Planet SolidWorks

January 21, 2020

SolidSmack

Must-See TV: David Jason’s Great British Inventions – Airs TONIGHT

Our favorite celebrity maker, design shaker is at it again. Since ‘The Big Life Fix’, Jude Pullen has been up to all sorts of shenanigans on his site and Instructables, including the prep of his super-human, inventive, problem-solving capabilities for a new show on UK’s Channel 4 – David Jason’s Great British Inventions.

Here’s a look at the trailer:

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In case you didn’t catch it, David Jason is the older gentleman that is “on a journey of discovery’, out and about experiencing all of the great inventions that shaped products over time, Jude is the one that David apparently has fastened up in the shed creating all sorts incredible gadgets to help explain what’s behind the design.

As Jude explained to me, David goes off and learns about people who invented things and Jude comes in showing how to make it from scratch or illustrate the concept behind the invention, keeping the build to ones and tens of dollars/pounds so others can realistically make it too, completing the picture for the viewer.

What do we have to look forward to? Well, if the trailer is any evidence, there will be bicycles, automobiles, jet packs, hoverboats, airplanes, tanks and, I imagine, much more.

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Yes, yes you will, Jude, and we can’t wait to see you.

The show airs TONIGHT, January 21st at 9:00 PM on Channel 4. ” If only it were available in the US!” I know, I know, we need MORE SHOWS LIKE THIS everywhere BUT you should (we hope) be able to catch the episodes online at the show’s homepage. Be sure to follow Jude on Twitter and tell him what you think too!

Oh, and if you were not around seven years ago (!), we interviewed Jude on Engineer vs Designer. He’s done quite a bit since but hearing the chap describe his experience always brings a smile to the face. Listen here.

The post Must-See TV: David Jason’s Great British Inventions – Airs TONIGHT appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 21, 2020 05:47 PM

The Javelin Blog

Methods for screen capturing SOLIDWORKS errors for Support

It’s great that people are taking advantage of Javelin’s support service to make their SOLIDWORKS experience a more pleasant one. Providing a good explanation of the problem with accompanying documentation helps to expedite the process. Once in a while, however well-intentioned, we come across a screen capture that is taken hastily with a camera phone as seen in the image below.

Hurried Problem Capture

Hurried Problem Capture

The photo may have looked fine over a one glance review, but the distortions from the monitor along with a misplaced focus can make the messages difficult to recognize, causing unnecessary emails or calls back and forth trying to figure out what was in the picture. In this article, we will go over methods for screen capturing errors for support effectively every time and in a timely manner, sometimes faster than if you took a picture with your phone.

Creating an Rx Report

Ideally, If a client has an issue that is easily repeatable, the first thought would be to create a SOLIDWORKS Rx report. This feature comes standard with all SOLIDWORKS installations. An Rx report provides background information and the option to capture the error in addition to the steps leading up to it through a video recording. A guide on how to do this can be found here: How to use SOLIDWORKS Rx to diagnose your system and capture problems.

Methods for Screen Capture

If the problem happens intermittently, a good way to capture the error is by capturing an image of the problem. There are several ways to do this and we will go over them in detail. Using the following methods in tandem with publishing software such as Adobe Indesign or Microsoft Word to provide a description can also be helpful.

Using the Snipping Tool

The Windows 10 Snipping Tool is a great way to capture images. It is native to Windows so most users will have access to it. Snipping Tool allows users to select the desired area to be copied. The user can then edit the images using editing tools in the image editor.

Snipping Tool in Windows

Snipping Tool in Windows

Using the PrtScn Button

Pressing the PrtScn button on the keyboard is another great way of capturing the contents of the screen, When opening a program such as Microsoft Paint or Adobe Photoshop, You can simply press Ctrl + V to paste the image into the editing software.

Pressing Windows + PrtScn automatically saves an image file in the folder C:\Users\<your name>\Pictures\Screenshots. If you do not have time to edit the photo or open a program, simply drag and drop the screenshot into an email.

These are only a few of the methods for screen capturing errors for support. We are sure there are many others, and if you have one, please feel free to mention it to the support staff, it would be great to discover more ways to get a good screencap!

The post Methods for screen capturing SOLIDWORKS errors for Support appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at January 21, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Monday List 04.20 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

The Wonderful World of Chinese Hi-Fi

The best pair of $20 earbuds you’ll ever buy.

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How to Scale a Chain-Link Fence

Prepare for ripped clothing. 

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The Unbearable Softness of Engineered Fabrics

The human senses never cease detecting things the brain finds a way to dread.

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Secretive Startup Promises Satellite Internet for the Masses

Skylo’s $100 “hub” antennas can divvy up satellite signals among a bunch of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connections.

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The Secret History of Facial Recognition

Sixty years ago, a sharecropper’s son invented a technology to identify faces. Then the record of his role all but vanished. Who was Woody Bledsoe, and who was he working for?

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7 Things You Didn’t Know About Plastic (and Recycling)

Recycling is a complicated system dictated by market demand, price determinations, local regulations, the success of which is contingent upon everyone, from the product-designer, to the trash-thrower, to the waste collector, to the recycling factory worker.

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The post The SolidSmack Monday List 04.20 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 21, 2020 12:28 PM

January 20, 2020

SolidSmack

Going to 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020? Here’s What You Don’t Want to Miss.

3DEXPERIENCE World Platform SolidWorks World 2020

Well, well, well. What’s this? We’ve left the previous two decades behind and with it the conference that defined the era for a generation of designers and engineers. SOLIDWORKS World is no longer, but that’s OK, because now we have 3DEXPERIENCE World to take us into the next decade with all the experiential experiencing we can experience.

While we may not be entirely sure what the new conference name means for the user experience as a whole, we know the agenda is set, the parties are planned and the show must go on. Here’s what you need to know and where you need to be for 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020.

Changes to Note:

  • Monday and Wednesday have an 8:30 ‘General Session’. Tuesday has changed to an 8:30 ‘Keynote: Innovate with 3DEXPERIENCE® WORKS’ with a simultaneous ‘Innovation Keynote: DELMIAWORKS’.
  • The Partner Pavilion is now 3DEXPERIENCE Playground.

SOLIDWORKS Top Ten

The Top Ten SOLIDWORKS enhancement requests voting has changed a little this year. 1) It’s hosted on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform and 2) ‘Likes’ are counted as votes. Submissions are closed but there’s still time to vote!

Vote Here

(Login with your SOLIDWORKS forum login or create a new 3DPassport login)

Location – Music City Center

The 3DEXPERIENCE World conference is taking place in downtown Nashville at Music City Center. It’s approximately 16 minutes from Nashville International Airport (BNA) to Music City Center.

Music City Center Website
Floorplans
Wayfinding App – iOS | Android

Directions (from airport)

3DEXPERIENCE World Overview & Agenda

Free Certification Exams

On Sunday, from 10-2 and 3-7, you have the opportunity to take a certification exam for free (included with each full conference pass). NEW for 2020 are TWO new 3DEXPERIENCE platform certifications to get your foot in the door on 3DXP.

Party, Party, Party

There’s no lack of off-site parties, after-parties, customer appreciation events, and more. Register at these links to join in.

General Session Live Stream (?)

If you’re not able to attend 3DEXPERIENCE World, the livestream is the next best thing. Catch the keynotes and announcements via these links.

Links coming soon!

SOLIDWORKS typically provides a livestream of the General Sessions. If made available, we’ll post them here.

Special Event – Bash on Broadway

This year’s speical event is a hop, skip, and a jump from Music City Hall. SolidWorks users will take over a city block of Nashville bars and eateries with live music and entertainment scattered throughout. Don’t miss it Tuesday night at 7-10 PM.

3DX Playground

The Partner Pavilion is now 3DEXPERIENCE Playground. It’s split up into four sections (Design, Simulate, Manufacture, Plan) with the Dassault Systemes booth slap dab in the middle.

Overview
Details
Exhibitor Directory

See ‘Location’ above for floorplan and conference center app.

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Get Ribboned

You might have a ribbon or ten on your badge, but make note of these fun subgroups not officially endorsed by SOLIDWORKS, but totally legit. It’s easy to join up too.

SLUGME
CAD Monkey

Previous years – awaiting confirmation
Bacon Brotherhood
Beerme

#Hashtag #atcha

If you want to stay in the loop on the socials, follow the hashtags. The official 3DEXPERIENCE World hashtag is #3DXW20. Use it wisely or don’t.

Things To Do in Nashville?

There are loads of things to do in and around Nashville! Here are a few references and some of my own recommendations. Enjoy.

Things To Do Before/After 3DXW – Matt Lorono shares his yearly things to do before and after the conference.

And my picks…
Smokey Mountain National Park – Just a 3.5-hour jaunt east from Nashville.
Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge – Where is all started for Willie Nelson.
Listening Room Cafe – Great venue to eat and hear up and coming artists.
Johnny Cash Museum – Get to know The Man in Black a little better.
Madam Tussaud’s – Creepy wax people? Yes, please.
RCA Studio B – Into the oldies? Take a tour where it all started.
The Hermitage – Andrew Jackson’s home away from DC.
Grand Ole Opry Calendar – Plenty of shows weekend before and after.
Adventure Science Center – Good day activity for the whole family.
Hattie B’s Hot Chicken – Best Peach Cobbler. Chicken ain’t half-bad either.
Bajo Sexto – Some proper Mexican food in the heart of country.

Breweries? Yes.

Yazoo, Fat Bottom, Little Harpeth, Tailgate, Smith & Lintz, Black Abbey, Blackstone, Jackalope, Tennessee Brew Works, Bearded Iris, Southern Grist, New Heights.

Oh. And, Speakeasies.

Old Glory, Attaboy, Fox Bar, Patterson House, Skull’s, Rudy’s.

Other Links

Here are just a few other links and resources to have on hand at the conference this year.

3DXW Registration (until Feb 12)
SWW Survival Guide (Old but valid!)
Feb Nashville Weather (50s/20s)

Must-Have Things to Bring

  • A mobile charger (Anker PowerCore HIGHLY recommended.)
  • Snacks (granola bars, jerky, trail mix, etc.)
  • Water bottle
  • Notepad/pens
  • Business cards
  • Scan app – Handy (Evernote or Dropbox)
  • Winter clothing (it can get cold/below freezing)

Going to 3DEXPERIENCE World? I would love to meet you. Follow @solidsmack on Twitter for 3DXW coverage and you can get a hold of me @joshmings or over on LinkedIn.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">3DEXPERIENCE World Platform SolidWorks World 2020</figure>

The post Going to 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020? Here’s What You Don’t Want to Miss. appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 20, 2020 08:20 PM

Highlights from the 2nd Annual Hardware Summit

The second installment of Hardware Massive‘s Hardware Summit took place in San Francisco, at Mind the Bridge, on November 6, 2019. In spite of fires raging around the Bay Area complete with power outages, around 200 hardware nerds came out to connect and learn. There were three talks with experts in the physical product space who have seen things. These were interlaced with networking sessions and time to chat with hardware startups and service providers at booths encircling the space.

For highlights from each talk, you can watch the video below:

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RSYao3ED84A?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
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The Strategy Panel

This talk’s aim was to give guidance on the high-level plans for a HW startup’s development and business model. Its full title was, “The Strategy – Building the Right Team, the Road Map, and Critical Considerations”. Panelists included: Alex Witkowski, founder at Witkowski Law; Alec Rivers, co-founder of ShaperTools; Kelly Coyne, managing partner/co-founder of Grit Ventures; and Anne Cocquyt, founder and CEO of The GUILD. The moderator was HW product entrepreneur, Seth Heltsley.

<figure class="wp-block-image">The Strategy Panel at the 2nd Annual Hardware Summit. From left to right: Alex Witkowski, Alec Rivers, Kelly Coyne, Anne Cocquyt, and Seth Heltsley.<figcaption>The Strategy Panel at the 2nd Annual Hardware Summit. From left to right: Alex Witkowski, Alec Rivers, Kelly Coyne, Anne Cocquyt, and Seth Heltsley.</figcaption></figure>

Kelly Coyne

Coyne shared a story about being an early user of Amazon’s Alexa and needing her husband to turn the lights on and off because Alexa ignored her. Apparently, the male-dominated engineering team behind this product hadn’t done user testing with women. So, it took a while for them to learn that Alexa didn’t respond to the higher pitches of women’s voices. Coyne’s message to startups is that diverse teams aren’t just a feel-good thing that helps with a company’s PR; the range of perspectives within these teams actually help to build a better product.

Alec Rivers

Rivers shared the story behind the birth of Shaper Tools in the midst of him getting a PhD at MIT. He’d developed the idea for the machine vision-based freehand cutting tool outside of MIT. However, he had the option of working with the university to develop the technology into a business. He got some insider advice letting him know that if he joined up with MIT, it could take away the rights to the company at any time if they thought Rivers wasn’t commercializing the tech fast enough. Rivers decided against the partnership, and his advice to startups is to thoroughly research the organizations your business considers getting entangled with. That goes for accelerators/partnerships, lawyers, or any company that would have significant influence over the progress of your baby.

Anne Cocquyt

The advice from Cocquyt echoed the sentiments of Rivers and Coyne. Diverse teams are important, and surrounding yourself with people you can trust is important, too, especially at the beginning of a startup’s journey. However, the people you know and trust going into a startup are more likely to be not diverse. So, when a new business is at the point to bring in new hires, it’s key to build “a team that represents that consumer group that you want to serve.”

Alex Witkowski

Witkowski warned against the desire for startups to get a patent just for the sake of getting a patent. On their own, patents don’t necessarily bring value. “It depends on what’s in the patent application, and what it covers and how enforceable, and how easy it is to design around…”

He also warned, “you can patent something that no one wants to buy.” He’s seen inventors spending years working on a product that doesn’t have a market. Don’t be that guy. Do market testing!

The Operations Panel

I was the moderator of this panel, subtitled, “How to Design for Growth and Avoid the Killer Pitfalls. During our time, I asked the experts if they’ve seen the same weird things in hardware startup land as I have. If you’re thinking I abused my position in order to get public validation of my viewpoints, you’re 100% correct.

<figure class="wp-block-image">The Operations Panel from left to right: Darragh Hudson, Chrissy Meyer, Dana Madlem, and, uh, me - Erin McDermott.<figcaption>The Operations Panel from left to right: Darragh Hudson, Chrissy Meyer, Dana Madlem, and, um, me – Erin McDermott.</figcaption></figure>

Joining uh, me, Erin McDermott, Director of Optical Engineering at Spire Starter, (woah, this is so meta) were these awesome panelists: Darragh Hudson, founder of Kaizen Dynamic; Chrissy Meyer partner at Root Ventures, and Dana Madlem, VP of Services at Rush Order.

What Shouldn’t HW Startups Try to “Wing”?

Dana Madlem sees a lot of people mistake shipping product as a simple task because it seems commoditized and commonplace. He equated this phenomenon to the idea of having kids.

Billions of people before me have had kids and therefore it should be easy, but it’s NOT at all.

– Dana Madlem on how HW startups think about shipping product

Unfortunately, things that seem simple can, for example, result in extra unnecessary dollars in shipping — which can kill your margins entirely. Madlem warned startups not to overlook the parts of your business that seem easy. That would be a sad way to sink!

HW Startup Founders in the Bay Treat HW Development like SW Development

I’ve traveled around the world meeting hardware startups, and more than anywhere else, the ones coming from the San Francisco Bay Area tend to try to build hardware like software. This is in large part because there are a lot of software engineers jumping into hardware development for the first time there. Plus, many of those moving into the wide, grenade-laden world of HW don’t understand how it’s different from building code. But don’t just take it from me! Here’s what the other pros say about this phenomenon and how HW and SW dev differ.

Chrissy Meyer

Yeah, 100%.

– Chrissy Meyer, Partner at Root Ventures

Well, there you have it.

She told us she hears sentiments of this in an innumerable amount of startup pitches. Meyer added: “There are very good reasons why hardware should not move at the speed of software…Once you cut a tool, I’m sorry, there’s no going back.” After a certain point, making changes is extremely expensive, and there’s a limit to how much you can fix with over-the-air software updates after you ship.

Meyer also mentioned most VC’s are afraid of HW startups. Many VC’s don’t understand how to measure the costs and risks associated with HW startups so they play it safe and stay away. Root Ventures is one of only a few firms that focus on hardware because they understand it.

Darragh Hudson

‘Yeah, hardware typically takes a long time, but we’re gonna do things differently.’ FAMOUS LAST WORDS.

– Hudson on seeing startups treat HW like SW development

Hudson pointed out that there are parts of hardware production that can’t be sped up or skipped. And a lot of those steps are very, very costly and time-consuming. Things like opening tooling, kicking off PCBA fabrication or certification each cost thousands of dollars and costs usually cannot be recovered if you need to make changes. So, take the time to plan them well to begin with; it’s worth it!

Where Are Opportunities Missed for Cost or Time Savings in HW Development?

We all had some items that topped our cringe-inducing list of missed opportunities we see with HW startups.

  • Virtual Prototyping – there’s a lot of development that can be done before you hold any physical parts in-hand. This can be CAD to test mechanical fit, optical simulation software to see if your lighting is pretty or if your camera gives a nice image, thermal simulation SW to prevent your widget from melting, etc. This one makes me shudder when I see it skipped because it means unnecessary extra time and cost for development.
  • Reliability Testing – Chrissy Meyer told us a horror story about not doing this enough for a certain project and then discovering a catastrophic failure rate (80%) at the moment they began to ship. Never again. Now she pushes the HW startups she works with to put in the effort for frequent and thorough reliability testing.
  • Using the Tried and True Path – Darragh Hudson explained he sees startups trying to take risks and shortcuts to ship product cheaper and faster, but it never works out well. The experience of those who have done it before is incredibly valuable! And there’s a reason why HW development methodologies exist: they work. Listen to that expert guidance so you don’t get tripped up by details.
  • Building a Flexible Supply Chain – relying on over-the-air updates can only get you so far. Dana Madlem guaranteed us he had more experience flashing firmware than any of us. It’s common for a change at this level to be needed once you’ve already got product waiting to ship! Make sure your supply chain can help out if/when you need this level of tweaking.

Fireside Chat – Trade Policies, IP, and the Future of the Hardware Supply Chain

This talk was a very timely discussion on the state of tariffs and trade with China. Greg Fisher, CEO of Berkeley Sourcing Group, moderated this one. The expert panelists were: Mark Cohen, Director and Distinguished Senior Fellow at UC Berkeley; and Philip Rogers, Ph.D. candidate at UC Berkeley.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">The 2nd Annual Hardware Summit's closing "Fireside Chat" talk from left to right: Philip Rogers, Mark Cohen, and Greg Fisher.<figcaption>The closing “Fireside Chat” talk from left to right: Philip Rogers, Mark Cohen, and Greg Fisher.</figcaption></figure>

Expert Opinion on Trade War with China

Cohen told us that things aren’t actually as bad as the media is portraying. In terms of what the United States asked for from the Chinese government, there’s been compliance on most items. These include China’s laws on technology transfer, foreign investment, and trade secrets. He believes much of the fuss we’re seeing around tariffs is happening more for domestic political maneuvering than in regard to international trade policy.

Key Advice to Hardware Startups

Get Yourself a Chinese Patent

Mark Cohen told us they really like to litigate in China. They do it even more than Americans, and if you’re not protected, your hardware company is at risk.

“If you took all the patent offices in the world, except for China, and put them together, the number of patents would be less than those filed in China.

– Mark Cohen, Director and Distinguished Senior Fellow at UC Berkeley

China has inexpensive rights, too. A simple utility model might only cost you around $500-$1,000, and within a matter of weeks, you have some protection with high litigation value. Without basic protections, it’s highly likely that your Chinese manufacturer will file for rights on your invention in China, as if they were the original creator!

Tips for Mitigating Supply Chain Stress in the Current Trade Climate

Philip Roger’s advice to hardware startups was to always carefully evaluate your own specific situation. Not all industries are being affected equally by the current political disruptions. With some products, it may make sense to move manufacturing to another country, for others, it might not. Also, even if you decide to switch up your supply chain to avoid China, it may not be 100% possible if some key components can only be sourced from there. What’s more, instability can and does happen everywhere! The place you move production to may prove even more disruptive. Lastly, don’t believe everything you see on the news. A lot of what you’re hearing is likely overdramatized, and you should keep yourself educated with your own real research to keep straight what are valid conclusions versus hysteria.

Miss the 1st Annual Hardware Summit (2018)?

If you missed the previous year’s Hardware Summit and want to glean some gems of wisdom from those talks: not to worry. We covered highlights from that event here.

Link to the Full Version Videos

Want the longer version? Hardware Massive’s Matthew Hall put together a more detailed summary of the 2nd summit along with the full-length videos for each talk here.

The post Highlights from the 2nd Annual Hardware Summit appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at January 20, 2020 04:23 PM

This Soapbottle Holds Liquids and Dissolves Over Time

soapbottle

How many soap bottles do you throw out each year? Yeah, enough for the eco-terrorist elite and Leonardo DiCaprio to make you feel guilty for a few seconds while you mock their hypocrisy. All the while, despite our best efforts to rid ourselves of evil plastics, we still produce tons of waste which takes ages to decompose. But what if there were a zero-waste bottle option that dissolved (before?) by the time you were done with the contents?

Jonna Breaitenhuber, a Berlin-based product and process designer, has come up with one such option. Her Soapbottle project (which features bottles which look less like containers and more like bars of soap) holds a variety of liquids and dissolves as the contents are being used:

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Created by pouring soap mixtures into molds, the base Soapbottle features a hole for a hanging string to fit in and is filled with either a shampoo, conditioner, or shower gel. To get to the contents, you have to cut out the small indent on the upper-right edge of the “bottle”. This allows the liquid to be poured out and the bottle to be sealed using a small metal cover.

<figure class="wp-block-image">soapbottle</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">soapbottle</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">soapbottle</figure>

You wouldn’t want to fill these bottles with drinks, because Soapbottles are best used in the shower. As their namesake implies, the bottles are made of soap which dissolves as the liquid inside continuously pours out and the Soapbottle is exposed to water in the environment.

Once the soap has outlived its usefulness, you can grate it down and mix it with some natron and baking soda to make your own washing detergent. Or you could just use the whole thing up until there’s nothing left but disgusting leftover soap chips.

<figure class="aligncenter size-full">soapbottle</figure>
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Jonna went through various types of soap fats, bottle types, and molds before ending up with the Soapbottle’s bar-like design. Though it looks to hold little more soap than a week’s worth of suds, the end result is a simple concept (a bottle made of dissolvable soap! ) in a simple design and completely zero waste.

Me? I’m holding out for the 32 oz version but have some ideas to make my own. Let’s hope P&G and other body care product-producing companies pick up on the idea. You can find more on the variations and design process at Jonna Breitenhuber’s webpage. For more photos of the Soapbottle, her Instagram page is the place to be.

The post This Soapbottle Holds Liquids and Dissolves Over Time appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 20, 2020 04:15 PM

The Javelin Blog

Setting the path for eDrawings in SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration

SOLIDWORKS PDM can work with different viewers to preview files within a vault. For SOLIDWORKS files, eDrawings is the default viewer. During the Installation of SOLIDWORKS PDM or SOLIDWORKS, eDrawings can be installed at the same time.

During the installation of SOLIDWORKS PDM, the default location for the eDrawings viewer is noted within the PDM environment. Typically the default edrawings path is:

 C:\Program Files\SOLIDWORKS Corp\eDrawings\EModelViewer.exe

This path can vary between implementations, and in some cases updates can cause the defined path to become invalid.

Assigning the eDrawings PDM Viewer Path

The eDrawings viewer path can easily be fixed though. In the PDM Admin, if you right click on a User, User node or Group, you can access the Settings for that selection.

Accessing PDM User Settings

Accessing PDM User Settings

In the Admin settings under the Viewers options, along the left side of the Settings window, the location of an eDrawings installation can be specified.

Viewers Settings

Viewers Settings

By default, there are two Installed Viewers. One is a SOLIDWORKS File Viewer and the other is the eDrawings EModelViewer. The latter being the default eDrawings viewer.

Adding or removing PDM File Viewers

Additional viewers can be added, and existing ones removed. The first step to add an additional viewer is to first install it. These additional viewers would be for other file types, that are stored in a PDM vault and are not supported by the EModelViewer.

Selecting an Installed Viewer will display the files extensions associated with the viewer. Additional extensions can be added, but the Selected Viewer needs to support those file types.

As noted earlier, a viewer should first be installed before defining it in SOLIDWORKS PDM Settings. The path can be entered manually, or it can be selected by using the Browse button.

Note the syntax “%1%”. It is important to have this syntax at the end of the viewer path, for the default viewers and may also be required for other viewers.

For more information on defining viewers, please refer to “Adding a Viewer for the View File Command”, in the SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration guide, available from the Help pull-down menu in the PDM Admin.

The post Setting the path for eDrawings in SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at January 20, 2020 01:00 PM

January 17, 2020

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Frog Chirples

Frogs chirped amidst the flooded bank of a moon-drenched pond. Little was known about when they arrived or whence they came. One thing was certain though, they seemed to grow louder with closer proximity to these links.

Gernot Buder – Incredible work all around but the clean lines and contrast in his concept work (especially the mechs) is what really stands out.

Paris Musees Collection – Over 150,000 new artworks digitized and online for you browse and enjoy.

Ocean Art – The winners of the 2019 Underwater Photo Comp feature a Crab-eater Seal, Sweetlips, Anemone City, and so much more.

Wave Dabs – Speaking of the ocean, the Instagram follow of the week, Golsa Golchini, puts an ocean scene in a dab of paint, from surfers to swimmers, skiers and more.

The Apple Archive – Unofficial (yet thorough) collection of Apple since the beginning, from ads and keynotes, to design and odd music videos.

Octopussi – Drum ring? How about three drum RINGS. Greenbeats percussion ensemble shows you there’s no limit to the number of drummers you can have.

LIVEN 8bit Warps – If you’re into creating electronic music and looking for the latest all-in-one synth, this new one from Sonicware may interest you.

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Take the ‘A’ Train – The classic, unlike you’ve ever heard it before. Arranged and played by ‘The Mad Arranger’, Jacob Koller.

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</figure>

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by Josh Mings at January 17, 2020 06:35 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Assembly Mates Shortcuts

SOLIDWORKS 2020 has many big enhancements that improve performance, stability and usability. Sometimes it’s the small things that matter most. The littlest things that improve our CAD life.

As an instructor who teaches SOLIDWORKS I really try to promote a two hand design theory. What I mean by that is keeping one hand on the mouse and the other on the keyboard, as much as you can. Any time your cursor has to travel to the other side of the screen or you have to look down to find a key on the keyboard you lose time. Now some of that may not sound like a big deal but when you are under crunch time and must make hundreds of parts or a massive assembly – shortcut keys, tips and tricks mean everything.

In the Assembly Tab – third icon in is the Mate command

When in the assembly mode hitting “s” on the keyboard will bring up this menu which can be customized

By holding ctrl key and selecting the entities you want mated this list will appear

There are many ways in an assembly to get to the precious mate command. Mates are the relations of sketches. How I tell most people to add a sketch relations from one line to another is hold the Ctrl key and click both lines. When adding mates in an assembly you can do the same thing. Click on the two entities you want mated and a small list appears in the pop out box. The list of the mates has been expanded.

This new list can contain mates such as: Limit Distance, Limit Angle, Slot, Width, Flip Alignment and Lock Rotation. In my example I am using the assembly found in the SOLIDWORKS Essentials Class. If you are interested in taking the Essentials class with Javelin please check our schedule for upcoming live online classes and in-class sessions.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Assembly Mates Shortcuts appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at January 17, 2020 01:00 PM

January 16, 2020

SolidSmack

A New STEM Site for 3D Print Construction Set Projects

STEM 3D Printed Construction Set Projects

I spoke with Paulo Kiefe, the founder of STEMFIE, a new site dedicated to providing 3D printable construction set components.

The site, as you might gather from its name, is focused on providing an ability for students to learn principles of construction. STEMFIE provides an “open educational construction set” for making new designs. 

Aside: It turns out that Kiefe was one of the designers who produced the original #3DBenchy 3D model back in 2015, which is perhaps now the most-3D printed object in the universe. See a 3D Studio for 3DBenchy here.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption> Paulo Kiefe, founder of STEMFIE [Source: Twitter] </figcaption></figure>

Fabbaloo: What is the STEMFIE project?

Paulo Kiefe: The STEMFIE project attempts to create a new application for 3D printers in schools and homes. The technology and price level of machines and material has become so accessible, that making things on demand, is no longer something that only companies can do.

With that in consideration, STEMFIE was designed as an ecosystem of parts in a coherent construction set toy — which 3D-prints easily on most consumer-level machines.

The system resembles the good old Meccano construction set, which has been around since the late 1800s.

STEMFIE also aims to create a new kind of toy which is downloadable by the end-user. In this way, when kids need more parts for a project, they only need to turn on the 3D printer and make as many as they want.

Fabbaloo: Who started STEMFIE, and when did that happen?

Paulo Kiefe: I am the creator of STEMFIE. Having used 3D printers for 20 years – and now seeing the ease-of-use and affordability of desktop machines – the thought of designing parts that can be useful and have a long-term use at home, was always on my mind. I realised the potential in spreading designs online when I, back in 2015, co-designed 3DBenchy together with my colleague and friend Daniel Norée.

I love construction set toys and especially, building mechanical things with beams, rods, cogwheels, etc. When I was a child, I use to love when my father taught me how to play with these and make my inventions.

I, therefore, decided, roughly two years ago, to start designing and prototyping a set of components that would be small enough to print quickly and easily, but still maintain enough detail and dimensional accuracy.

After many attempts and iterations, I finalised the construction standard for STEMFIE, meaning that all parts attach proportionally and coherently.

Fabbaloo: Who’s funding STEMFIE?

Paulo Kiefe: I developed STEMFIE on my own. I spent time, lots of filament and, sometimes, a bit of sweat and tears. 

Fabbaloo: Are you the only person on the STEMFIE project? Is anyone else involved?

Paulo Kiefe: Apart from myself, I have had excellent help from my friend and inventor Sven Hellestam. He also uses 3D printers and has been very good at helping me see the design from a different perspective.

I have also had great support from my friend Thomas Lindgren, who, apart from also being a maker and 3D print user, printed STEMFIE parts at home and played with his kids, which gave me excellent user feedback.

Fabbaloo: Where is STEMFIE based?

Paulo Kiefe: STEMFIE was born in Sweden.

Fabbaloo: Is there an intention to add additional projects?

Paulo Kiefe: Yes, there is an intention, and ongoing work behind the scenes, to release all the part files for the STEMFIE standard – the fasteners, beams, etc., all in the different sizes.  In that way, anyone will be able to make their STEMFIE projects.

I will also release new projects regularly. There are already a bunch assemblies designed, which I need to do more testing before I release them, and there will be many more in the future built on ideas.

I will also prepare a specific Blender scene file, in which anyone more efficiently will be able to create their projects and modify any part they desire. In other words, I want this to be a community project an let people know that STEMFIE is a toy designed for everyone to use and play with!

Fabbaloo: Do you have any idea what these additional projects might be?

Paulo Kiefe: The list is long! All projects till be released under stemfie.org/projects. I already have plans for making different kinds of projects, suitable for doing experiments in schools and being an educational tool. I also wish to receive community feedback. It is more fun to design a STEMFIE project, knowing that people want to 3D print that and play with it.

I can already mention, as a teaser, that the next project will use a ping-pong ball.

Fabbaloo: Are any formal educators involved in the development of projects?

Paulo Kiefe: I have talked to a few schools in Sweden that have shown interest in using STEMFIE as an educational tool. But as far as the project has progressed now, I am the only person deeply involved developing STEMFIE, and naturally also with the excellent help and feedback from my friends.

Fabbaloo: How are projects produced? Are they made in-house or can anyone submit a design?

Paulo Kiefe: The projects produced now, which I will regularly be releasing in the future, are all created by me.

Nevertheless, I sincerely wish that other users of STEMFIE will make their designs and submit them to the project. I will gladly publish them also on stemfie.org, and naturally, with attributions.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post A New STEM Site for 3D Print Construction Set Projects appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at January 16, 2020 11:27 PM

Japanese Artist Recreates Vintage Machines Using Old Newspapers

newspaper art

While most of us reuse old newspaper to wrap breakables, hold fish and chips, or create paper-mache sculptures of our pets, Atsushi Adachi has a much more creative use for them. A Japanese visual artist, Adachi takes old newspapers and uses them to create replicas of machines FROM THE PAST.

<figure class="wp-block-image">newspaper art</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">newspaper art</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">newspaper art</figure>

If you’ve ever been to Japan, you may notice their newspapers are a lot thinner and harder to work with than newspapers from other countries. Apart from locally sourced papers, he also tries to find newspapers from other parts of the globe. No matter what country it comes from, however, Adachi uses newspapers from the same time period as the item he is re-creating, making them even more brittle and prone to flaking than today’s papers.

According to him, working with newspapers dated to the specific build helps him get a better understanding of what the designers had in mind when making the real deal. As an added bonus, many times the newspaper articles reflect the media and public opinion of these creations at the time. You’ll never be able to view them all, but bits and pieces can be seen on certain parts of Adachi’s work (provided you can read Japanese, German, or whatever language the papers are in).

<figure class="wp-block-image">newspaper art</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter">newspaper art</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter">newspaper art</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter">newspaper art</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter">newspaper art</figure>

He’s already re-created an army of battleships, Neil Armstong’s astronaut suit (made from the pages of a novel), a crashed fighter plane, and an old Bugatti T35 among others. To see more of Atsushi Adachi’s work, you can follow him on Instagram. If you aren’t the social media type, then his webpage will keep you occupied.

The post Japanese Artist Recreates Vintage Machines Using Old Newspapers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 16, 2020 11:14 PM

The Javelin Blog

Creating Primary Members based on Points in SOLIDWORKS 2020 Weldments

SOLIDWORKS 2020 provides you with additional tools and control options for creating primary members in weldment structures. In this article, we are going to review these new options in SOLIDWORKS 2020 for primary members based on “point and length”, members “between points”, members using “up to point” end conditions and members based on “direction”.

When specifying Point and Length, you can set a direction for a primary member by selecting a reference which is a sketch entity. The member extrudes in its direction and you can also reverse the direction of extrusion. As an example, consider the part below which is made of a few sketches for the reference geometries.

Starting sketch for primary members

Starting sketch for primary members

To start the primary member command, click on Insert > Structure System > Structure System to get into the structure system mode.

Starting the structure system mode

Starting the structure system mode

Once you are in this mode, you need to click on Insert > Structure System > Primary Member to start adding primary members to your weldment part. It’s a good practice to Pin the property manager of primary member command to be able to add multiple primary members.

Creating the first primary member

Creating the first primary member

Now, you can select the desired profile from the profile tab in the property manager and then switch to the member tab:

Specifying the profile for the primary member

Specifying the profile for the primary member

For our first member type, point-length member is selected:

Creating a point-length member

Creating a point-length member

We select the 4 points from our sketch and specify the length of the members and click OK to confirm.

First set of members using the length end condition

First set of members using the length end condition

For the next members, we change the end condition of the members from length to point and select the start and end points of the new structural members. SOLIDWORKS will create members between the selected points.

Creating members between two points

Creating members between two points

The next end condition to explore is “up to point”. Using this end condition we are creating 3 additional members up to a specific point.

Creating a members using the up to point end condition

Creating a members using the up to point end condition

And the last end condition is to create an structural member based on direction. In the member tab, under end condition we select length and click in the box for member direction. For the direction of the member, a sketch line is selected. The length of the member, also needs to be specified.

Creating a member using the length end condition and choosing a specific direction

Creating a member using the length end condition and choosing a specific direction

Want to learn more about Weldments?

Attend our SOLIDWORKS Weldments training course either live online or in a Canadian city near you.

The post Creating Primary Members based on Points in SOLIDWORKS 2020 Weldments appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at January 16, 2020 01:00 PM

January 15, 2020

SolidSmack

Open: The SolidSmack 2020 Reader Survey (Win a $250 Gift Card)

Greetings, SolidSmack Reader! Welcome to 2020. By now you’ve composed yourself, returned to a normal schedule, and adjusted to all that’s new and amazing about living in a new decade and leaving a previous one behind. Ahhhh.

There’s just one thing you haven’t done yet – take the 2020 SolidSmack Reader Survey! It’s that time of year, and one of our favorites, where we get to know you a letter better and you let us know what interests you, what you’d like to see, and how we’re doing. Be honest!

When you enter the survey, you’ll have the option to enter to win a $250 Gift Card (from Amazon, Home Depot, or iTunes – your choice!), so take a few minutes and let us know what’s on your mind. And, as always, thank you for being a faithful SolidSmack Reader!

The survey will be open until January 31st. The winner of the gift card will be announced here and via email shortly after. Thank you!

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by SolidSmack at January 15, 2020 02:37 PM

CES 2020 Highlights: Trends, Highlights, Hardware, and More

What are the tech trends for 2020 and the decade to come? Read on and watch the video for all the gadget goodness that catches a HW engineers’ eyes at CES 2020! This year’s show in Las Vegas expected over 170,000 attendees and took up literally millions of square feet of exhibit space. That’s a lot of ground for one enginerd to cover. Luckily, I was able to pull in more vantage points from some other hardware pros.

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Trends

The Talk: 2020 Tech Trends to Watch

AR and VR

In this talk before the show, it was mentioned that AR is expected to overtake VR in quantity of useful applications. AR hardware is also trending toward more sleek, streamlined form factors.

Robotics

In terms of viable products, social robots are dying out and robots built to fulfill specific tasks are seeing an uptick. Consumers aren’t buying bots just because they’re novel anymore. Robots are practically commonplace! Today, they need to do a thing today to earn their keep.

Television Screens

Yes, 8K was all the rage this year at CES. However, in this talk, the more notable trend was in screen size, not resolution. In U.S. households, consumer demand is continually driving screen size up larger and larger.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Note the ever-steady rise of television screen size in relation to U.S. consumer demand.<figcaption>Note the ever-steady rise of television screen size in relation to U.S. consumer demand.</figcaption></figure>

For those of us creating games, that could mean that offline multiplayer games can expect a growing platform in American homes. Screens keep getting bigger, and that makes entertaining a group on a home display ever easier.

From an electro-optical standpoint, that also means expensive, high energy-consuming screen formats are not the most sensible platform for display technology. It will be more difficult for a panel of electrified semiconductors to grow with this super-sizing trend, than, say laser projection technology. Plus, projectors like the Hisense L5 Laser TV (shown off at CES 2020) have the added benefit of not frying users with as much radiation, because they use reflective systems. Typically, these types of optics can more easily achieve high viewing angles with less energy.

This is just my view as an optical engineer, but electronic tech is a wild animal, and you never know what “impossible” advances are just around the corner.

Trends on the Show Floor

Endless Rows of Smart Home Devices

If there is a thing in your house that could be made connected, it was probably in one of the many smart home booths at CES. There were so many things that this may actually be a coup instead of a trend.

<figure class="wp-block-image">As far as you can see, the virtual eyes and ears waiting to be implanted in all your home things.<figcaption>As far as you can see, the virtual eyes and ears waiting to be implanted in all your home things.</figcaption></figure>

Holographic Everything

Holographic-type displays for advertising, decoration and game graphics were everywhere. However, most of them appeared to be more like 2D floating graphics, not a fully 3D hologram. Below is another example — the virtual companion (read: imaginary friend) hologram from Gatebox.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Gatebox.ai's holographic imaginary friend was one of the many holograms I ran into at CES 2020.<figcaption>Gatebox.ai’s holographic imaginary friend was one of the many holograms I ran into at CES 2020.</figcaption></figure>

Drink-Making Contraptions

If you’re thinking of getting into a hardware startup that is building a beverage-making machine, you should probably just quit now. I think I’ve seen them all after going to CES 2020.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Is there room for your babybrezza baby formula maker next to your matcha, coffee, and cocktail maker?<figcaption>Is there room for your babybrezza baby formula maker next to your matcha, coffee, and cocktail makers?</figcaption></figure>

On display was the Drinkworks cocktail maker by Keurig, a matcha mixer from Cuzen Matcha and smart baby formula formulators by Baby Brezza.

AMD vs. Intel

During AMD’s keynote, the press was wowed again and again with each new standards-changing product reveal. Their 4000 series mobile processors promised to dramatically boost laptop performance and efficiency. And of course, the thing we all needed but didn’t know yet was unwrapped: the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ 3990X 64 CORE processor. Ok then.

<figure class="wp-block-image">AMD showing off its new 7nm mobile processor with 8 cores and 16 threads for ultrathin laptops.<figcaption>AMD showing off its new 7nm mobile processor with 8 cores and 16 threads for ultrathin laptops.</figcaption></figure>

Intel’s keynote immediately followed AMD’s. It notably lacked major announcements of products with cold, hard specs. There was mention of a focus on AI going forward and a peek at a laptop prototype with a flexible display…

When deciding whether to bother going across the hall to attend Intel’s keynote, I checked out Twitter for spectator feedback. Those had me too busy laugh-crying to make the trek.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Thank you, James Newburrie, @DifficultNerd<figcaption>Thank you, James Newburrie, @DifficultNerd</figcaption></figure>

The winner of this round: AMD. Was there any question?

CES Unveiled

Core – Wellness Device for Meditation Training

I was happily surprised to see the familiar faces of some of Core’s team at the unveiling. Core makes a “meditation trainer” device, and we’ll be publishing a Behind the Design piece on the engineering of this thing later this month. (There were a lot of hardware engineering challenges in designing this wellness product which contains dry electrodes and natural wood.)

<figure class="wp-block-image">CEO, Sarah McDevitt, looks on Core like a proud Momma. As she should!<figcaption>CEO, Sarah McDevitt, looks on Core like a proud Momma. As she should!</figcaption></figure>

Their gizmo also made it to the CES 2020 Innovation Awards Showcase. Congrats, Core!

Hap2U – Haptic Feedback for Touch Displays

This super-thin haptic technology was able to move a demo display screen, just where my fingers were. Unlike other haptics, Hap4U‘s tech doesn’t move the entire phone — just where your fingers are.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Hap4U's haptic feedback makes it possible to feel each scale of this virtual fish as your fingers run over the screen.<figcaption>Hap4U’s haptic feedback makes it possible to feel each scale of this virtual fish as your fingers run over the screen.</figcaption></figure>

“Multi haptics” are also possible where you have one sensation for one finger on one part of the screen, while another part of the screen delivers a different sensation to another finger simultaneously. This is the kind of thing the next generation will one day think we’re silly for thinking is amazing. But it is!

Cosmo Connected – IoT Helmets

This company develops a few different technologies for safer bicycle and motorcycle riding. Their connected helmets and displays have lit emergency, brake, and turn signals; they can detect if you crash and call an emergency contact; and you can also share your ride with another person so they can watch out for you.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Cosmo Connected's helmet gives cyclists hazard lights among many other things.<figcaption>Cosmo Connected’s helmet gives cyclists hazard lights among many other things.</figcaption></figure>

Right now, Cosmo Connected is working on new heads up display/smart glasses, but those aren’t ready for prime time yet.

LiBEST – Flexible Batteries

LiBEST showed off their flexible batteries which promised to be able to power things like iPhones and wireless headphones.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Flexing a LiBEST battery.<figcaption>Flexing a LiBEST battery.</figcaption></figure>

They only flex in one direction, but that still opens up quite a bit of design freedom for hardware engineers – especially in the wearable space.

Automotive Overview

Anthony Swartz, who has an electrical engineering background, was on assignment from Murata to soak up the automotive vibes at the show. He was kind enough to share some of his vehicle takeaways with us, too.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Anthony Swartz, our unofficial CES vehicle tech correspondent.<figcaption>Anthony Swartz, our unofficial CES vehicle tech correspondent…er…interviewee.</figcaption></figure>

Ford

Ford is using the Mustang name to help them jump into the electric vehicle market with the Mach-E. To Swartz, however, the EV version’s look doesn’t meet his Mustang expectations.

<figure class="wp-block-image">The all-electric Ford "Mustang" Mach-E.<figcaption>The all-electric Ford “Mustang” Mach-E.</figcaption></figure>

Jeep

It was interesting to see brands like Jeep, which conjure images of muddy off-roading, also showcase electric versions of their vehicles. If there was any doubt, I’d say this proves electric R&D is becoming mainstream.

<figure class="wp-block-image">We've all been waiting for the electric Jeep and now it's finally here! Wait, were we though?<figcaption>We’ve all been waiting for the electric Jeep and now it’s finally here! Wait, were we though?</figcaption></figure>

Rivian

Rivian has a fully electric truck and SUV and they’re partnering with Amazon to stick Alexa in their vehicles. So now she can both order your toilet paper at home and open the tailgate on your electric vehicle.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Rivian let Amazon's Alexa inside and now there's nowhere we're safe from her.<figcaption>Rivian let Amazon’s Alexa inside and now there’s nowhere we’re safe from her.</figcaption></figure>

Byton

Chinese manufacturers are getting in on the electric vehicle trend and Byton is one of the bigger names in this club. The insides of Byton‘s M-Byte are covered in screens and that’s part of the angle they’re taking to make their EV stand out. Driving is boring, so it’s important to have lots of things to distract you from the road.

Byton expects to start selling in the US next year. Watch out, Elon.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Chinese manufacturer Byton's M-Byte.<figcaption>Chinese manufacturer Byton’s M-Byte.</figcaption></figure>

Sony

And then SONY was like, “well, I guess everyone is doing it now. Let’s make a car.” This vehicle, the “Vision S“, was a surprise appearance at CES.

<figure class="wp-block-image">SONY is now a...car manufacturer?<figcaption>SONY is now a…car manufacturer?</figcaption></figure>

Nissan

Nissan showed off its autonomous driving tech with this golfing demo.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Nissan's self-sinking golf ball as an analogy to autonomous driving tech. I just hope it doesn't get confused and land a car in a hole one day.<figcaption>Nissan’s self-sinking golf ball as an analogy to autonomous driving tech. I just hope it doesn’t get confused and land a car in a hole one day.</figcaption></figure>

Putt it to get it going, and somehow that little ball would make it to its mark, with a bit of flair at the end. According to this article, the functionality requires an overhead camera, so the ball is not a self-contained system, but we get the picture.

John Deere

It was also surprising to see John Deere‘s giant AI-based tractor at CES!

<figure class="wp-block-image">John Deere competing for the Biggest Booth Prop Award for CES 2020.<figcaption>John Deere competing for the Biggest Booth Prop Award for CES 2020.</figcaption></figure>

Swartz said the idea behind this tech was to make farming more efficient. That includes the ability to keep track of which parts of a field were, say, already sprayed with seed, and then turning on and off sprayers accordingly as the tractor travels.

Uber’s Drone “Master Plan”

Swartz explained that eventually, Uber would like users to be able to order their full journeys from their phone – from an Uber car ride to that Bell Nexus drone sky taxi we’re always using. So in the future, Uber may have fleets of these scary things flying around, too.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Uber's Intimidatingly Skynet-feel Sky Taxi.<figcaption>Uber’s/Bell’s Intimidatingly Skynet-feel Sky Taxi.</figcaption></figure>

A Look at Audio

For even more perspectives on CES, I suffered through dinner with Anthony Mattana, CEO of Hooke Audio (previously featured here), and the delightful Philipp Sonnleitner, CEO of MIKME. Here’s what the show looked like through an audiophile lens.

Philipp Sonnleitner:


I have not seen anything interesting for audio.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Philipp Sonnleitner, CEO of MIKEME, audio tech news resource.<figcaption>Philipp Sonnleitner, CEO of MIKEME, audio tech news resource.</figcaption></figure>

Great, Philipp, thanks so much for that.

Audio aside, he did mention that the Neon reveal of their virtual human project was pretty weird.

These video-like avatars generated a lot of buzz before spectators saw them, but then afterward, many visitors were left underwhelmed. It’s still not clear if the demonstrations were simply videos of normal human-type people with canned responses to predetermined questions. They did come with disclaimers, however: “For demonstration purpose only. Not final product.”

<figure class="wp-block-image">Neon's "Virtual Humans" on display at CES but for "demonstration purposes only". HMMMM.<figcaption>Neon’s “Virtual Humans” on display at CES but for “demonstration purposes only”. HMMMM.</figcaption></figure>

Anthony Mattana had some more time to scour the audio tech at CES and so he had real sound bites.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Anthony Mattana, CEO of Hooke Audio, other audio tech news resource.<figcaption>Anthony Mattana, CEO of Hooke Audio, other audio tech news resource.</figcaption></figure>

Things Mattana found of note included a new trend with audio HW factories to advertise themselves as authorities in making true wireless technology. That’s weird because it’s a relatively new thing…but if nothing else, it’s proof true wireless audio is becoming mainstream.

Mattana found Shure’s true wireless earphones to be well-designed. He thought they seemed sturdily built and he liked that they are IPX certified. They weren’t new, astonishing tech; they were simply true wireless made well according to more traditional standards.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Shure's true wireless earphones managed to impress Anthony Mattana of Hooke Audio.<figcaption>Shure’s true wireless earphones managed to impress Anthony Mattana of Hooke Audio.</figcaption></figure>

Over at Logitech’s booth, we could see very clearly what Mattana explained as Logitech’s interesting jump into streaming technologies. He mentioned they recently purchased Streamlabs and it was clear from the booth art they are taking aim at the vlogging generation.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Logitech is going all in on streaming audio and they weren't hiding it at CES.<figcaption>Logitech is going all in on streaming audio and they weren’t hiding it at CES.</figcaption></figure>

Weird And/Or Neat Things to Catch My Eye

Hyperfine – Portable MRI Machine

Hyperfine is bringing MRI technology to places it’s never been before by making it both cheaper and portable. Wow!

<figure class="wp-block-image">Hyperfine's portable, less expensive MRI machine has the potential to bring impactful changes to the medical industry.<figcaption>Hyperfine’s portable, less expensive MRI machine has the potential to bring impactful changes to the medical industry.</figcaption></figure>

A lot of this new tech revolves around a permanent magnet they developed themselves. This machine already being used in studies like with daily monitoring of infants to see if there’s any value to derive. A use case like this would ordinarily be cost-prohibitive, but now that it’s not, MRI can be used in so many more ways!

Toyoda Gosei – E-Rubber

This super-thin, flexible material from Toyoda Gosei can be used to create actuators or sensors in a variety of ways. The primary application right now is in creating virtual beating hearts for aspiring heart surgeons to practice on. Before this booth, I’d never thought about how hard it must be to perform delicate operations on something that’s MOVING. It must be like trying to dress a toddler, except someone might die if you mess up.

<figure class="wp-block-image">This e-Rubber demo blew my mind transferring the sensation of a shaken, water-filled balloon from someone else's fingers to mine.<figcaption>This e-Rubber demo blew my mind transferring the sensation of a shaken, water-filled balloon from someone else’s fingers to mine.</figcaption></figure>

Another freaky demo used both the sensor and actuator capabilities together to transfer the feeling of shaking a water-filled balloon from one person’s fingers to my fingers. It was SO WEIRD. I can only imagine what Solid Smack readers would use this for.

Stoll

On the expo floor was a knitting machine capable of embedding hard components into textiles at the same time as the fabric is being woven.

<figure class="wp-block-image">The part of Stoll's knitting machine being pointed to here is where you'd fit a hard component to be woven into your finished IoT pants, or whatever wearable you're making.<figcaption>The part of Stoll’s knitting machine being pointed to here is where you’d fit a hard component to be woven into your finished IoT pants, or whatever wearable you’re making.</figcaption></figure>

Stoll’s booth also showed applications for this tech – mostly in wearable sensor technologies. I really loved how they took an old-school machine and made it a valuable tool for new tech development with 1 addition. Stoll calls this technology “Technical Textiles“.

BrainCo

BrainCo had a lively demo with attendees driving race cares solely through their power of concentration. They slapped on a headband and then concentrated…on something, on anything. It didn’t matter what they concentrated on, they just needed to concentrate fast. Or deeply. Or…I’m not really sure, but the more they concentrated, the faster their car went.

<figure class="wp-block-image">BrainCo's concentration-powered race car track at CES.<figcaption>BrainCo’s concentration-powered race car track at CES.</figcaption></figure>

Lovot – Realistically Useless, Just Like a Cat

It’s not Lovot’s first time at the CES rodeo, but it is the first time for its latest, most improved version of this companion bot. My first thought was, “hey little guy, aren’t you supposed to be dead?”

<figure class="wp-block-image">Lovot so far survives the dire survival rate of social robots and returned to CES 2020.<figcaption>Lovot so far survives the dire survival rate of social robots and returned to CES 2020.</figcaption></figure>

After the media days talk on trends where the press was told these robots that don’t perform meaningful tasks are going under, it was shocking that this big-eyed thing would still be rolling around. Way to go, you little weirdo.

CocaCola’s New Energy Drink Served By Alexa

To sneak into an expo about tech, CocaCola partnered up with Amazon’s Alexa to show off their new energy drink at CES. Clever. Attendees said some magic words to Alexa and a door opened revealing the drink.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Coke Energy inside an Alexa Trojan Horse.<figcaption>Coke Energy inside an Alexa Trojan Horse.</figcaption></figure>

But what did it taste like? Imagine watered-down Coke and watered down Red Bull. Now mix them together. It’s like that. Actually not as bad as it sounds, though.

Startups Climbing Up From the Basement of CES

Muto Labs – Glass 3D Printer

This Korean startup is creating a soon-to-be Kickstarted glass 3D printer.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Muto Labs showing their glass filament and examples of their 3D printed fake glass teeth (right) compared to traditional implants.<figcaption>Muto Labs showing their glass filament and examples of their 3D printed fake glass teeth (right) compared to traditional implants.</figcaption></figure>

The sensible use case they’re using to promote it first is with making much more realistic-looking and cheaper replacement teeth. (I imagine it would be mostly for crowns?) You can find out more at Muto Labs.

Plasmics – Multiple Material 3D Printer with Machine Learning

This startup is making a 3D printer that builds designs incorporating multiple materials without requiring the user to physically mess with changing print heads.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Plasmics is soon to bring us their multiple material 3D printer without the fuss of having to manually change out print heads.<figcaption>Plasmics is soon to bring us their multiple material 3D printer without the fuss of having to manually change out print heads.</figcaption></figure>

Print heads are automatically changed out to switch to different colors or materials. There’s also some machine learning in there to ensure better quality control as the print is happening.

Iron Bull

This company exists because of the unfulfilled need in all of us to operate a miniature, armed, remote-controlled tank.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Iron Bull's toy tanks can be used to take your aggression out safely instead of going to a real war. Or so I'm told.<figcaption>Iron Bull’s toy tanks can be used to take your aggression out safely instead of going to a real war. Or so I’m told.</figcaption></figure>

The idea is to not sell these tanks individually, but as a game system like laser tag, because battling is only fun when there are other people playing, whose tanks you can pepper with tiny, plastic “bullets”. You can find out more on Iron Bull’s website or their Insta.

Miomove – IoT Pressure Sensors for Shoe Insoles

I’ve seen this Czech startup virtually everywhere I go in the world, starting well over a year ago. Back then, their prototype was at a stage where you still needed to use your powers of imagination to visualize how their IoT pressure sensor show insoles would ultimately look. They’ve come a long way!

<figure class="wp-block-image">Miomove's latest prototype version is looking fully legit.<figcaption>Miomove’s latest prototype version is looking fully legit.</figcaption></figure>

Today, it looks like a real product, and it’s as impressive as my imagination originally hoped. Way to go, Miomove!

Sunflower Labs

These guys are taking pre-orders right now for their wild drone security system. Garden lights create an invisible fence that when tripped tell a flying, camera-laden drone to wake up and patrol your property, sending you video footage.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Release the HOUNDS! I mean, the camera-equipped drone security system from Sunflower Labs.<figcaption>Release the HOUNDS! I mean, the camera-equipped drone security system from Sunflower Labs.</figcaption></figure>

Well.

You don’t need to be Barbara Walters to say to yourself, “THIS is 2020.”

What Piqued Your Interest?

If you attended CES or played along at home, what caught your eye? There was surely more going on that I couldn’t fit here. Please comment below!

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The post CES 2020 Highlights: Trends, Highlights, Hardware, and More appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at January 15, 2020 01:57 PM

The Javelin Blog

Organizing the Annotation Folder in SOLIDWORKS MBD

SOLIDWORKS MBD (model-based design/definition) has some new Annotation organizational features for the 2020 release. When viewing annotations, they can now be displayed per the annotation view. This will help you to identify PMI (Product & Manufacturing Data) for a specific view.

SOLIDWORKS MBD Annotations

SOLIDWORKS MBD Annotation

SOLIDWORKS strives best with bi-lateral communication between the graphics area and the design tree information. For example, when I click on a dimension in the tree, it will highlight where that is in the graphics area.

Annotation Folder

Sort by Annotation Type

The benefits of organizing the SOLIDWORKS MBD Annotation Folder are two-fold. Particular dimensions need to be on specific view captures as you see in the picture. If you like the older view of seeing your dimensions as one block, you can right click on the Annotations folder and select Sort Annotations By Type. For more MBD tips and trick check out our recent SOLIDWORKS MBD Sheet Metal and SOLIDWORKS MBD Security Check articles.

The post Organizing the Annotation Folder in SOLIDWORKS MBD appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at January 15, 2020 01:00 PM

January 14, 2020

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Open & Save As Dialog Improvements for File Types

A simple but very welcome improvement that has been made in SOLIDWORKS 2020 is the file type list in the Open and Save As dialog boxes.

In previous releases, if you needed to open a non-SOLIDWORKS file, when opening the file type drop list, you were presented with a very large list of options, too many to even fit in the window, as shown in the example below:

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Open dialog

Now in SOLIDWORKS 2020, that list has been consolidated and reorganized.  Files are grouped logically by software, and best of all, after the SOLIDWORKS file types, the other file types are listed alphabetically.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Open dialog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Open dialog

The same is true with the Save As dialog. This simple change makes very common actions faster and easier.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Open & Save As Dialog Improvements for File Types appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at January 14, 2020 01:00 PM

January 13, 2020

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Animated Command Tooltips

A great addition to the user interface in SOLIDWORKS 2020 is the new animated tooltips that appear when you hover your cursor over some tools.  This new functionality provides a quick overview of how a command works for new users, or if it’s one that you don’t use very often.

SOLIDWORKS Animated Tooltip

SOLIDWORKS Animated Tooltip

However, for some users, it’s quite possible that they wouldn’t want the very large, animated tooltip popping over their toolbar.  In which case, the tooltip options can be controlled by going to Tools > Customize.  There are 3 tooltip options, Large tooltips with images (new for 2020), Large tooltips without images (the default in previous versions) and Small tooltips.  If you want to completely disable the tooltips, uncheck Show tooltips.

SOLIDWORKS Tooltip display options

SOLIDWORKS Tooltip display options

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Animated Command Tooltips appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at January 13, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Watch a Fabricator Create a Sideways-Folding Metal Door From Scratch

While there’s nothing particularly wrong with traditional horizontal doors, diagonally-opening “sideways-folding” metal doors look way cooler when you open them.

Case in point, YouTuber Phil Vandelay’s folding metal door for his new workshop:

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</figure>

Despite its daunting appearance, all it takes to make this futuristic door are a few sheets of metal, some metal frames, and a couple of hinges.

Sounds familiar? That’s because these materials are almost exactly the same ones you need to make a normal door; the only difference being this door frame is a little more complicated.

<figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure>

Instead of making a large rectangular door frame around a rectangular door, Phil makes a series of smaller triangular frames that combine to form the door’s shape. Using a design he mocked up in CAD, he then measures and cuts several metal bars before welding them together to form the triangles.

<figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure>

Phil crafts some custom nuts and drills out a couple of the corners of the metal frames to fit them on. He then welds these nuts into the door itself.

<figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure>

To get the door to actually open, he fits custom made bolts into the nuts on the door and hinges on the sides to support the other parts. This allows the metal parts to rotate in place, giving the door its futuristic opening mechanism.

<figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure>

After adding all the nuts, bolts, and hinges in place, the frame can finally be fitted on a wall to see if it actually fits. It takes a bit of effort to install, what with all the folding parts, but Phil manages to get the entrance to his shop up and running without a hitch.

<figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure>

The only thing left to do is add the rest of the metal sheets which make up the body of the door. Compared to making the frame, cutting and bolting the metal onto the existing frame seems a lot easier but is nevertheless an important part to make sure unwanted guests are kept out of Phil’s shop.

<figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure>

Finally, the door of the future can be opened! Though relatively simple to build, watching the door magically fold diagonally to switch orientations never gets boring to look at.

If you want to make your own folding door, Phil Vandelay made the plans available for purchase on his Etsy page. To see more of Phil, you can check out his YouTube channel.

The post Watch a Fabricator Create a Sideways-Folding Metal Door From Scratch appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 13, 2020 12:36 PM

The SolidSmack Monday List 03.20 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Is the Viral Non-Ad Ad the Future of Advertising?

A remarkable aspect of so many viral ads today is how brazenly they defer, as long and as fully as possible, the realization that you’re watching an ad at all.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Is It O.K. to Buy a TV From a Pawnshop?

For environmental reasons, the habit of frugality is indeed a virtue worth cultivating. 

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Stock Market Record

Asset bubbles and the desperate search for profits amid negative rates aren’t laughing matters. Be afraid.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The Hidden Dangers of the Great Index Fund Takeover

The Big Three—BlackRock, Vanguard, and State Street—are the most important players in corporate America. Whether they like it or not.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Computers Are Learning to See in Higher Dimensions

New artificial intelligence techniques can spot patterns not only in 2D images but on spheres and other curved surfaces, lifting AI out of “flatland.”

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Awake in Dreams

The science and practice of lucid dreaming

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 03.20 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 13, 2020 12:28 PM

January 11, 2020

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Paper Cunckles

Kez-Laczin-art

The crack and split of the paper cunkles ended as quickly as it started. Stacks upon stacks lined the warehouse with only the edges charred, but their fleshy interiors were still roomy enough to move around in plus forage enough to keep from freezing after the sun set and all was frosted with the icy sweat from the pores of these links.

Kez Laczin – Weird? Odd? Enjoyably so. You will lack no curiosity with the work of this Texas-based artist and you’ll leave wanting to see more.

Nicolacaredda – Instagram follow of the week. This painter from Milan has a way with color. A mix of surreal and dream-infused realities.

Dante’s Inferno Violins – 33 violins and one Cello to be exact. Artist Leanardo Frigo hand-paints each to illustrate the story. Amazing.

Patterns 2019 – More color. But in patterns by Juan Díaz-Faes. I’d not wear any of these, but it’s captivating to think on how these patterns tile.

CY-BO – A packaging concept that combines pieces of something rather than cutting and shaping from a larger piece of something.

Cool Vintage – Love Land Rovers? You will love what Cool Vintage does to give them new life. Loads of inspiration for your own project car in their gallery.

Drone Magic – Marco Tempest has a way with technology. Is it all programmed? Or is it all actually responding to him?

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When I Grow Up – Yup. It’s rap. But not like the rest – It’s NF. Other Rappers: flexing with cars and girls. NF: Garbage truck and shopping carts.

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</figure>

The post Friday Smackdown: Paper Cunckles appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 11, 2020 12:10 AM

January 10, 2020

SolidSmack

Launching New Products Has Never Been Easier, Thanks To 3D Printing

I’m looking at an interesting project undertaken by Protolabs, the well-known manufacturing service. 

The project in question is the curiously-named “Wayzn Slide”, a smart robotic door opening system designed for pet access. It’s a mechanism that attaches to a standard sliding door and can open and close the door automatically. It does this through a set of sensors or via remote command through a smartphone. This gives your pet a “Wayzn”. Protolabs explains how it works: 

Wayzn Slide is a low-profile, powered opener that can be placed just above the track of a sliding door and attaches to both the door and jamb. The high-tech device connects securely to the internet via WiFi. If a dog wants to go in or out, the owner is alerted and can simply push a button on a smartphone, which sends a signal to the device’s motor. The motor pulls the door open just enough to let the pet in or out, then closes it.”

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</figure>

The project was considered sufficiently interesting and valuable to garner not only Protolabs “Cool Idea” award, but also a CES 2020 Innovation Award. It looks to be a system that could easily work in almost every home with a patio door and can be self-installed as well.

For a venture like this to succeed in such a way demands some investigation into how they achieved their goals. 

Like many product ventures these days, the Wayzn folks are not manufacturers; they are product designers and marketers. They had to rely on outside expertise to help with the physical build of the product. In this case, they turned to Protolabs for that help. 

According to Protolabs:

Protolabs made it possible for Wayzn to rapidly prototype enclosures and mechanical components using 3D printing stereolithography technology. 

Protolabs printed the various components under normal resolution in an ABS-like material, Accuar Xtreme White. Additional custom finishing was completed by sanding and painting key components to have the appearance of end-use injection molded components.”

Protolabs apparently managed to 3D print 156 copies of 13 different parts in eight days of iterative work with Wayzn. During this iteration, they helped Wayzn refine the design of the parts to ensure they were mass-manufacturable at reasonable costs.

This work enabled Wayzn to very quickly develop their product and it seems that effort paid off. With the award at CES, they are set to sell a great many units to the public. And that’s within a market of tens of millions of homes that own pets. 

The amazing part to me is that services like Protolabs’ are at the ready to assist startup companies in developing radically new products and ensure they are positioned for the next steps in their corporate journey. 

Years ago this entire sequence of events — and particularly the speed in which it was done — would have been a complete fantasy. Now, it’s a routine event. 

I expect that in years to come those of us from today will be similarly astonished at what manufacturing services will be able to achieve given the likely advances in 3D printing processes and technologies. 

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Launching New Products Has Never Been Easier, Thanks To 3D Printing appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at January 10, 2020 04:49 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Feature Tree Name Translation

More and more commonly, teams spread out across the globe are collaborating together on designs.  SOLIDWORKS Data Management tools make it easy for designers to work together and share files, even if they are located on different continents.

One side effect of this global collaboration though can be multi-lingual Feature Manager Design Trees.

Now in SOLIDWORKS 2020 though, designers can enable a new Tooltip which will translate Feature Names into any language they select when they hover over the Feature.

Translated Tooltip

Translated Tooltip

To enable this new tool, right-click on the top-level file name in the FeatureManager Design Tree and go to Tree Display then Show Translated Feature Name in Tooltip and select the language that you would like the tooltip to be displayed in.

To disable the functionality, just select Hide Tooltip.

Show translated feature name in Tooltip

Show translated feature name in Tooltip

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Feature Tree Name Translation appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at January 10, 2020 01:00 PM

January 09, 2020

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Command Manager and Toolbar controls

A change has been made in SOLIDWORKS 2020 that simplifies the process for controlling both the Command Manager and Toolbars.

In previous releases, to enable additional tabs for the Command Manager, you had to right-click directly on an existing tab to access a specific menu that listed all of the available tabs for that file environment.

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Tab Menu

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Tab Menu

If you right-clicked anywhere else on the Command Manager or any other toolbar area, you got a different right-click menu that just showed the available toolbars that could be enabled.

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Toolbar Menu

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Toolbar Menu

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Enhancement

Now in SOLIDWORKS 2020, those two menus have been consolidated in a single right-click menu with logical flyouts:

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Menu Flyout

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Menu Flyout

This menu can be accessed easily by right-clicking on any toolbar or anywhere on the Command Manager.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Toolbars Menu

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Toolbars Menu

This small change in behavior makes customizing the SOLIDWORKS interface even easier and more intuitive than before.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Command Manager and Toolbar controls appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at January 09, 2020 01:00 PM

January 08, 2020

SolidSmack

Varna Tech Upgrades the Mason Jar – Debuts HALO+ Smart Storage Design

Do you know what a smart lid looks like? Well, you’re about to and it’s likely to blow all your preconceived notions about smart lids out of your pantry drawer.

Varna Tech, a Sprout Labs Company by Boston-based design firm, Sprout Studios, is debuting their answer to your safe storage woes with a simple product that converts the classic and beloved Mason Jar into a VAULT OF GLASS.

The Halo and Halo+ smart lid fit over a standard and wide-mouth Mason Jars to 1) lock 2) protect and 3) provide Bluetooth connectivity for remote locking/unlocking, access permission, content logging, usage history, proximity alerts (and more) for all your valuables/stash/candy/medicine/nuts & bolts.

Halo+ comes with the Halo+ app that allows the Bluetooth connectivity to help you keep track of all your Mason Jar business and the more analog Halo lid has the option to add an accessory loop to add the Halo+ functions if desired.

We created Varna Tech and the Halo line of products to allow users peace of mind when storing their belongings. Whether our users are keeping edible cannabis products out of the hands of their children, monitoring their parents’ and grandparents’ medication intake, or keeping family heirlooms safe our Halo products can help.”

Jordan Nollman, Founder of Sprout Studios

Now, I know what you’re thinking, “Grandpa Joe’s gonna just bust open that glass with his dentures!” Ah, not if his dentures are IN THE MASON JAR. But really, if anyone cracks the glass, you’re gonna know, if not by the sound of breaking glass, by Halo’s mobile app alert system. Yep, you’ll know. Grandpa Joe will have a glass cut and the shame of knowing he’s been found out. Put your teeth in, Grandpa. *Womp womp*

Sprout Studios is debuting the Halo and Halo+ out at CES this week (Booth #51334, Eureka Park, Sands Expo Center) with the official product launch coming in Spring 2020 with a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo.

Oh, and if Sprout Studios sounds familiar, you may remember their successful Pakt One travel bag campaign on Indiegogo. The crowdfunding netted nearly $2.1 Million from nearly 7,000 backers.

But that’s not all Sprout Studios does. They work with some of the coolest companies taking on everything from product and branding to digital and strategy. Check them out at sprout.cc and gather up those loose Mason Jars for their upcoming product launch.

The post Varna Tech Upgrades the Mason Jar – Debuts HALO+ Smart Storage Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 08, 2020 11:08 PM

SkillCoach Tutorial | Using Product Underlays As A Guide To Create New Sketch Concepts

With 2020 now in full swing, the creativity train is loaded to full capacity. All along the line, creative folks of every ilk are hopping off at their respective stops. Skills in tow most are ready to get back at it! For some “it” is to dream up new ideas. While for others the “it” is to implement with the greatest degree of technical savvy. Well, todays post is mostly for the dreamers, the visionaries on the front end of this thing called product development.

This post is a reminder of the need to stay sharp and on-point with your skills of rapid visualization. By design, the content is meant to be a jump starter and a high-level overview. It’s a rare chance to look over SkillCoach’s shoulder as he throws down some lines! It’s an opportunity to snag a tip or two on the creative power of using product underlays to guide and facilitate rapid idea development. Finally, if you are observant you will glean a few nuggets with regard to tools-of-the-trade.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jUAleLO4tvE?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The Sketch Theme Backstory

If you’ve already cued up the video then you may be wondering a little about the back story. You might have a question such as “Why an RFID scanner?” or “Why use a powered screwdriver as the underlying reference product?” Well, here’s the scoop!

I’m gearing up for another advanced surface modeling exercise in collaboration with the folks at Onshape. My prior post, Onshape Enhanced Surface Modeling Tools Make The Grade! described my first foray into using Onshape for advanced “organic” surface geometry creation. A parallel blog post I authored over at Onshape provided a high-level overview of the modeling process. The first step was to prepare reference art. Given that I did not elaborate on the workflow I used to prepare the art at that time, I thought this go around I would.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Example of product underlay used to guide creation of background art to be used in CAD app. The contour lines that define the form and component parts were carefully selected.</figcaption></figure>

Choosing Product Reference

During the initial concept sketch phase there’s usually a fair amount of latitude when it comes to tools used, format and reference material selection. So in this exercise although there were gobs of barcode and RFID scanner reference material out there to chose from, I decided to go with the Milwaukee Fuel Screwdriver for several reasons:

  • Quality photos of the product were readily available. I especially looked for side, front, and top view images that had minimal distortion and that were close to true 2D orthographic projection.
  • The product architecture was similar to that of the RFID scanner segment.
  • I had the opportunity to hold one during one of my trips to Home Depot and the feel of the grip was quite nice.
  • Finally, the product looked cool! The TPE grip regions and the textures handle well. Thus, taking a little inspiration from its DNA surely could be a good thing.
<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Contour line drawing created from product photo underlay. Sketch captures the overall structure and device posture. The essential details such as handle grip profile, trigger placement, and battery access are all useful for guiding idea creation. </figcaption></figure>

Concept Sketch Iteterations

Given I chose to use the screwdriver architecture, the first adjustment was to create a base RFID concept by shifting the upper mass of the housing a little forward. A few product features were roughed in as placeholders. With this guide underlay complete, I was off to the races! I found it relatively easy to generate alternative concepts.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Sketch concept variation</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>refined sketch overlays</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>marker sketch from overlay</figcaption></figure>

I hope you are inspired to grab some tools of your choice and get to sketching. Stay tuned for the video of laying down the marker!

Until next time, keep learning!
SkillCoach

The post SkillCoach Tutorial | Using Product Underlays As A Guide To Create New Sketch Concepts appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at January 08, 2020 10:39 PM

Autodesk Fusion 360 (Sub) Now Includes EAGLE PCB Design

Seems those New Year’s Eve champagne corks over at Autodesk had an electrical surprise attached to them. The January Fusion 360 product update isn’t out yet but notifications are going out about new subscription benefits.

If you’re a user of Fusion 360, your subscription now includes access to Autodesk EAGLE, the electronic design automation software to aid schematic layout or determine PCB routing and component placement. EAGLE users will also now get Fusion 360.

From Autodesk, Fusion 360 Director and Chief Product Strategist, Kevin Schneider, on Twitter:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-twitter aligncenter wp-block-embed is-type-rich is-provider-twitter">
<script async="async" charset="utf-8" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js"></script>
</figure>

In @adskFusion360 news, starting today Fusion 360 now includes @ADSKEAGLE. As an Eagle user you also get Fusion 360! We are on the cusp of releasing game changing convergence of ECAD & MCAD. So proud of @technolomaniac & team breaking down boudries and reimagining design.”

Depending on if you already have a Fusion 360 subscription or were only paying for Autodesk EAGLE, your feeling about this may be different. They have an Autodesk Eagle knowledge base article to address questions and clear up the muddiness you might have around subscription, pricing, and credits.

Next step? PCB design inside Fusion 360?

The post Autodesk Fusion 360 (Sub) Now Includes EAGLE PCB Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 08, 2020 08:02 PM

The Javelin Blog

3D Printing with PANTONE® Colours

Stratasys J835™ and J850™ 3D printers are PANTONE Validated™. This is the first additive manufacturing technology that offers professional design realism. Pantone, a leading global authority on professional colour standards in multiple vertical industries helps designers, modelers, and manufacturers all over the world accurately define, communicate, and consistently reproduce colours. Using a simple workflow, Stratasys CMYK colours can be matched to 1,970 printable Pantone Colours, Solid Coated and SkinTones™. 3D printing with Pantone reduces time and costs significantly and ensures superior colour fidelity.

This article describes recommendations and tips for best colour results when printing 3D parts with Pantone Colours on Stratasys 3D printers:

  1. Supported Printers, Materials, and Modes
  2. Preparing for 3D Printing
  3. Printing Parts with Pantone Colours

Learn about the process in the videos below:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLI35xrqqQVUvz4qRfinqmJmPxRlOXga0f" title="Pantone Colour 3D Printing" width="500"></iframe>

Supported Printers, Materials and Modes

Create prototypes that look, feel and function like the finished product. The Stratasys J850 can produce more than 500,000 colour combinations, print seven resins simultaneously and provide multi-material capabilities that bring even the most imaginative ideas to life — allowing you to make more accurate design decisions earlier in the process.

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3D Printers Stratasys J850 (software version 85.1.0.25247 D97.1 and above), Stratasys J835 (software version
83.1.0.25248 D98.1 and above)
Printing Modes High Mix, High Quality (High Speed is not supported.)
Model Materials
  • VeroVivid™ materials: Vivid Cyan – VeroCyanV™, Vivid Magenta – VeroMagentaV™, Vivid Yellow – VeroYellowV™
  • Vero PureWhite™
  • VeroBlackPlus™
Support Materials SUP705™, SUP706B™
File Type STLs (colour per shell)
GrabCAD Print GrabCAD Print™ version 1.28 and above (Note: The advanced slicer must be enabled.)

 

Preparing for Printing

Proper file preparation, printing material usage, and colour selection and assignment are required for best results when printing Pantone colours.

  • Pantone colours have been tested and validated for parts printed as follows:
    • a flat and glossy surface.
    • a 1-mm thick colour coating over a 4-mm thick core made of Vero PureWhite.
  • Other geometries and thickness might result in colour differences.
  • It is recommended to use the Pantone PMS Colour Guides for Solid Coated and SkinTone™ to identify the colour you wish to 3D print.

Tip: Make sure that the guides are current and in good condition. Pantone recommends purchasing new guides annually, because the colours change over time.

  • Use STL files. VRML files are not supported.
  • In GrabCAD Print, the advanced slicer must be enabled to use the Pantone Colours.
  • Pantone Colours are not suitable for printing on walls that are less than 3-mm thick.
  • These five materials must be loaded in the material cabinet (see Figure 3):
    • Vero PureWhite
    • VeroBlackPlus
    • VeroCyanV
    • VeroMagentaV
    • VeroYellowV
  • The sixth material can be any material you choose (for example, VeroClear™, Agilus30™ White).
Loaded materials for printing with pantone

Loaded materials for printing

  • When printing the Pantone Colours, the VeroVivid materials are opaque, due to the Vero PureWhite core. Transparency is not supported.
  • Avoid switching materials to prevent colour contamination that might adversely affect colour accuracy. If you switched materials, perform two material replacement cycles to flush the system thoroughly and achieve the intended colour accuracy.
  • Printed colours may vary from the Pantone Colours due to several factors, such as temperature, materials, printer maintenance and calibration. The degree of colour matching between the Pantone Colour and the printed colour is indicated in GrabCAD Print next to the Pantone Colour.

Tip: With Pantone Colours, the colour of the model on the build tray in GrabCAD Print will be the actual colour of the printed model.

Indicator Meaning
pantone accurate match Accurate match. Differences are generally minor and acceptable.
pantone minor difference Minor visible differences might be seen between the printed colour and Pantone swatch. Acceptability will vary by job.
pantone visible difference Visible differences might be seen between the printed colour and Pantone swatch. Acceptability will vary by job.
pantone major difference Major visible difference might be seen between printed colour and Pantone swatch. Acceptability will vary by job.

Printing Parts with Pantone Colours

  1. Load the Model printing materials listed above.
  2. In the Preferences dialog box, click PolyJet™ and make sure that the Enable advanced slicer checkbox is selected.
Enabling the advanced slicer

Enabling the advanced slicer

  1. Insert your part into GrabCAD Print.
  2. Display the Print Settings dialog box and select PANTONE®.

Tip: If the Pantone button is disabled, you need to enable the advanced slicer as described in step 2.

Select Pantone Colours

Select Pantone Book

  1. From the Book drop-down list, select the Pantone Solid Coated or SkinTone™ guide.
Selecting Pantone guide

Selecting Pantone guide

  1. In the search box, enter the Pantone Colour value you wish to print. Alternatively, you can select from the
    list of colours or enter the equivalent Hex or RGB values for the colour you wish to print.

Tip: When entering an RGB value, write it inside parenthesis. For example (68, 161, 210).

Search box for entering a color value

Search box for entering a colour value

A range of Pantone Colours appear.

Pantone Colours

Pantone Colours

  1. Assign the selected Pantone Colours to the part and print.

Interested in a Pantone Colour 3D Printer?

Contact us about the Stratasys J835™ and J850™ 3D printers to build your models and prototypes in Pantone Colours.

The post 3D Printing with PANTONE® Colours appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Stratasys Ltd. at January 08, 2020 06:52 PM

Why upgrade to the Stratasys J850 3D printer?

You should upgrade to a Stratasys J850, for the new standard in design and ultra-realistic simulation, The J850 delivers vibrant colour fidelity for your prototypes with PANTONE® and multi-material 3D printing capabilities.

Learn more about the product design workflow with the Stratasys J850 and how professional designers prototype with a colour 3D printer:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UsAuIOir6fk?feature=oembed" title="Product Design Workflow with the Stratasys J850" width="500"></iframe>

With the Stratasys J850™ 3D printer, you gain:

  • Two new materials exclusive to the J850
    • Produce concept models fast with DraftGrey™ and reduce your material cost by as much as 71% (actual savings range is 57-71%).
    • VeroUltraClear™ for high clarity with outstanding transparency. Light transmittance of 86% in comparison to glass — similar to polycarbonate (PC).
Stratasys J850 materials

Prototypes printed with the Stratasys J850, featuring DraftGrey [left] and VeroUltraClear [center] material

  • Additional material capacity
    • Print 7 materials simultaneously with the additional model channel – enabling printing of full colour, flexible, and transparent parts at the same time.
    • Limit downtime with the new, more efficient 4kg cartridge.
  • Accelerate your workflow
    • Print up to two times faster than the current Stratasys J750 High Speed Mode*.
  • Even more user friendly
    • Features an easy-to-use touch screen—no keyboard or mouse is required (Windows 10 compatible).

* Part geometry and tray pack dependent. Increase in speed is achieved with the J850’s Super High Speed Mode and 54μm layer resolution.

Learn more

The post Why upgrade to the Stratasys J850 3D printer? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at January 08, 2020 02:30 PM

SOLIDWORKS MBD 2020 Compound Hole Callouts

A long awaited feature we desperately needed was a fix on the hole callouts in SOLIDWORKS MBD (model based definition). New for SOLIDWORKS MBD 2020 are hole callouts and not only that but compound hole callouts.

SOLIDWORKS MBD Hole Callout

SOLIDWORKS MBD Hole Callout

I have tested this on many types of holes as seen in the pictures here. As you can see, I have made my countersink hole as complex as I could and MBD picked up all the dimensions, like: size of hole, depth of hole, size of countersink, angle of countersink and all with a tolerance on them. Same goes for those pesky pipe threads; the callout worked flawlessly. Probably one of the most common holes is a counter-bore and that worked just fine too, even with a pattern associated to it.

SOLIDWORKS Hole Pattern

SOLIDWORKS Hole Pattern

So, I’m pleased to announce that SOLIDWORKS added improved hole callouts to MBD, for everything else MBD or SOLIDWORKS, please check out our related model based definition guide and articles here and how to avoid costly errors with SOLIDWORKS MBD.

The post SOLIDWORKS MBD 2020 Compound Hole Callouts appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at January 08, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Wacom Starts Off 2020 With A $400 Drawing Tablet

wacom one

It’s barely been a week into the new year and Wacom has already kicked things off with a new, more affordable tablet for digital creators.

Announced at CES 2020, the Wacom One has a 13.3-inch screen, a 1920 x 1080 HD display, weighs 2.2 pounds (1kg), and covers all the basics of a drawing tablet:

In terms of hardware, the screen has surface friction which gives it a “paper-like” feel when drawing. The stylus works just like any stylus – with the ability to be used as a variety of digital pens and brushes using your favorite drawing apps.

<figure class="wp-block-image">wacom one</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">wacom one</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">wacom one</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">wacom one</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">wacom one</figure>

In case you want to try something new, the Wacom One also comes with software packs which include apps like Bamboo Paper (which turns your display screen into a sketchpad). They aren’t groundbreaking per se, but if you don’t have the time or patience to download something better, then these built-in programs should more than suffice.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">wacom one</figure>

While its ability to connect to Macs and PCs is a no-brainer, what’s interesting is the Wacom One can also be connected to a select few Android tablets and smartphones. This feature could definitely come in handy for a digital creator looking to move their work to and from their phones or secondary tablets to the Wacom One.

It’s pretty obvious the Wacom One caters to beginning digital content creators, as it doesn’t have many unique features. Still, a $399.95 drawing tablet is nothing to scoff at. If you’re just starting out in the world of digital artistry, then it does not seem like a bad choice for a beginning tablet.

You can find all of the Wacom One specifications (and maybe even make your first big new year’s purchase) on the Wacom webpage.

The post Wacom Starts Off 2020 With A $400 Drawing Tablet appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 08, 2020 12:26 PM

SolidSmack Radio | The Brutalist Breakdown (Powered by Spotify)

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe allow="encrypted-media" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="795" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/playlist/5IsKfUoncL4KuBiJtIZLvh" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Brutalist Breakdown (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 08, 2020 12:23 PM

January 07, 2020

The Javelin Blog

Why is my JPEG file not being displayed in SOLIDWORKS Composer?

When working in SOLIDWORKS Composer, it is not uncommon to use other media such as pictures to add a personal touch to the project for branding or actor texture purposes. Once in a while, you may run into a situation where your JPEG files are not displaying in SOLIDWORKS Composer. Hours have been spent wondering if there was something wrong with Composer, or the file itself, which simply leads to doubt and frustration. In this article, you will learn how to identify an unruly JPEG file, and how to correct it.

Symptoms your JPEG is not working

Jpeg images can be added to backgrounds, ground textures, and 2D image actors. You will notice that for ground textures & 2D image actors, a file path for the desired image will be in the Texture > Map Path (called Ground Texture for Ground images), but no image will display. For the background, when trying to select a file path, no path is added after selecting the image as seen below. If this is the case, what do we do next?

Properties for Image Actors, Backgrounds, & Ground Textures respectively

Checking Image Properties

After the symptoms above have been identified, it is a good idea to take a look at the properties of JPEG files themselves. This can be done by opening the file location in the Windows explorer. From there, right-click the JPEG file and select properties from the dropdown menu. Under the details tab in the image section, there is a property called bit depth as seen in the image below.

For SOLIDWORKS Composer, JPEG images must have a Bit depth of 24 or below. Anything higher will not work!

JPEG Properties: Bit depth

Formatting JPEG Images

There are several ways to change the bit depth of a JPEG image, but a solution that will work for most users will be to use Microsoft Paint, as it comes standard for all Windows users. Simply open the JPEG image and save a copy of it. By default, Microsoft Paint will save the JPEG with a Bit Depth of 24. From there, all images will work in Composer as seen below.

Custom JPEG added to Background & Ground surface

Customization is key when it comes to marketing. When JPEG files are not working in SOLIDWORKS Composer, value is potentially lost, but as long as you remember to check the Bit Depth, this problem can easily be resolved.

The post Why is my JPEG file not being displayed in SOLIDWORKS Composer? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at January 07, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

An Engineer Just Built a Real, Burning Star Wars Lightsaber

The weapons of the titular Star Wars Jedi, lightsabers are nothing short of freaking cool. Fictionally powered by kyber crystals, these glowing portable beams have unique colors, handles, and best of all, can cut through pretty much anything. Countless replicas have been made since the original movie’s 1977 release, but seeing as kyber crystals aren’t a thing in the real world, none feature the lightsabers’ cutting potential.

That is… until now.

Product developer-turned-YouTuber The Hacksmith recently turned his engineering expertise towards creating “the world’s first” protosaber – a fictional predecessor to the lightsaber with an external power supply box powering the saber to actually cut through objects.

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</figure>

To start things off, he creates some Star Wars-inspired CAD models for the protosaber and battery pack. He then uses a plasma cutter to manufacture the parts before welding the battery pack into its intended housing.

<figure class="wp-block-image">protosaber</figure>

Within the battery pack housing lies a number of energist lithium ion cells that provide a total of 1,600 amperes to power the protosaber. It also isn’t the lightest thing to carry, weighing in at around 34.5 lbs.

<figure class="wp-block-image">protosaber</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">protosaber</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">protosaber</figure>

Now armed with enough power to operate the protosaber—as well as an average household—one of the big problems he runs into is controlling it; that can’t be easy turning 1,600 amps on and off. Ultimately, he tests several switches before settling on a giant contactor. Combining the contactor, batteries, wires, and other materials inside the battery pack makes the entire unit weigh in at 41.5 lbs.

All that’s left for the battery pack is a little bit of surface finishing to give it that worn-in Star Wars appearance.

<figure class="wp-block-image">protosaber</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">protosaber</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">protosaber</figure>

Using a mixture of copper acetate and some copper pot scrubbers, he attaches the scrubbers to the positive side of the power supply and the battery pack parts to the negative side of the power supply. He then soaks the battery pack in the mixture for about a day—effectively allowing the electricity to transfer from the copper scrubbers to the components he wants to paint.

<figure class="wp-block-image">protosaber</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">protosaber</figure>

He then reinstalls the parts of the battery pack and does a quick test to make sure everything works before adding in the amp meter, volt meter, and power setting lights.

<figure class="wp-block-image">protosaber</figure>

It wouldn’t be a protosaber build without the actual blade, so he takes an old lightsaber build and updates it with a thicker tungsten piece and larger titanium blade.

<figure class="wp-block-image">protosaber</figure>

After the initial flame at the tip of the blade, the whole thing soon heats up and ignites to a bright orange hue. Due to the energy passing through the saber, the air around it gets really hot and makes this thing a glorified deadly weapon.

<figure class="wp-block-image">protosaber</figure>

Just to prove it actually works, the Hackmaster uses the protosaber to chop through an innocent mannequin’s head. Needless to say, the severed head never stood a chance.

Check out more of the Hacksmith over on his YouTube channel.

The post An Engineer Just Built a Real, Burning Star Wars Lightsaber appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 07, 2020 12:46 PM

January 06, 2020

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: 3D Printed Rubix Cube Solving Robot CASE [SOLVED!]

otvinta-3d-printed-briefcase-00

You’re trundling through the train station with your Rubix Cube solving robot, huddled protectively around it like a badger on a worm-covered pinecone. SNAP, that guy with the umbrella and snake cage just broke the foot. THAT’S IT. You need a case.

But not just any case – a 3D printed Rubix Cube Solving Robot Case. Fortunately, NYC-based Otvinta has a simply ingenious solution for that puzzle breaking bot (you can also build!) or anything else you might like to store in a 3D printed carry case. And they printed it in the most glorious green and yellow (sorry, Bears and Cowboys fans).

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Along with storing and protecting the robot, Otvinta brings a little more curiosity to its reveal with the 3D printed carrying case.

This carrying case was designed specifically with the robot’s dimensions in mind. The robot will fit in it perfectly with plenty of room for accessories. By no means a small project, the case requires a printer with a large print platform, such as Creality CR-10, as some of its parts are outright massive.

Altogether, there are 44 parts held together by no less than 133 Phillips-head countersunk M3x12 screws. That’s a bit of a build but the look is just all kinds of mysterical cool.

You can snag the .stl file downloads on Thingiverse or at the Otvinta website where assembly instructions and more images are included. (Bonus! The Rubix Cube Solving Robot (RCR3D) has its own website where you can download the parts, order hardware, or install the software. Find it at http://www.rcr3d.com!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Model of the Week: 3D Printed Rubix Cube Solving Robot CASE [SOLVED!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 06, 2020 06:21 PM

The Javelin Blog

eDrawings 2020 Performance Improvements

SOLIDWORKS eDrawings has been used for many years as a part, assembly and drawing viewer. This can be used on computers without SOLIDWORKS installed. Maybe not as well-known but still hitting the cool factor, in my opinion, is eDrawings can be purchased and installed on mobile devices like Androids or Apple products.

There have been many improvements in this development year. Some are really subtle and some were desperately needed, so here’s a list:

What used to happen is when zooming the text would adjusts its size to suit how zoomed in/out the file was. The would cause problems with graphics and sometimes the text would be larger than the part. Now we zoom in, zoom out, rotate and the text will maintain its original size.

Text retains original size upon zooming in and out

Text retains original size upon zooming in and out

The Bill of Material would travel around when rotating the file, also there was an unwanted shadow. Now the BOM stays in place to the assigned view and the shadow graphics have been removed.

BOM stays in place without a shadow

BOM stays in place without a shadow

Geometric Tolerances used to be blurry, position could have been off, boxes might not have aligned up and fonts could have been missing or misaligned too. I happy to report that this has been fixed.

Surface finish was and sometimes still is a frustrating annotation. Sometimes it will appear rotated or upside down. This would cause confusing when trying to read a drawing or look at an eDrawing. Surface Finishes now appear correctly in the upside right configuration.

Annotations appear correctly in view

Annotations appear correctly in view

Text and notes would always have the correct font, angle, position and mirrored notes were even worse. This all has been fixed. Notes appear how they should as if you were using SOLIDWORKS.

There are many other tweaks and fixes. Just know that 2020 eDrawings has been vastly improved to suit our needs of viewing assemblies, parts and drawings for the paperless manufacturing. Download eDrawings 2020 now.

The post eDrawings 2020 Performance Improvements appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at January 06, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Behold The World’s First Universal LEGO Sorting Machine

LEGO Sorting Machine

While there’s nothing quite as bad as stepping on a stray LEGO block, a close second is having to sort out the mess of bricks once you (or your kids) are done using them. It’s bad enough finding all of the little buggers, but when you’re a LEGO aficionado who plans on using specific parts for future builds, categorizing LEGOs can be an even bigger pain.

LEGO mastermind Daniel West has gotten tired of sorting LEGOs the old fashioned way. Determined to make manual brick sorting a thing of the past, he recently used his love for toy bricks and artificial intelligence to make his own universal LEGO sorting machine — capable of sorting “every LEGO brick that’s ever been in production”:

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</figure>

West’s Universal LEGO Sorting Machine is itself made up of over 10,000 LEGO blocks, 6 LEGO motors, and 9 servo motors that allow it to segregate the heaps of LEGOs you’ll feed it after a long playtime. You’ll still have to separate each LEGO brick from one another before putting it in the machine, but once you do, Daniel’s invention will sort the LEGO parts into 18 different LEGO containers at a rate of 1 piece per every 2 seconds.

The machine is composed of three main parts:

<figure class="wp-block-image">universal LEGO sorting machine</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">universal LEGO sorting machine</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">universal LEGO sorting machine</figure>

First, you have the input bucket which consists of two conveyor belts and a vibration feeder. The first two belts slowly push the stack of parts you unceremoniously dumped into the machine so the vibration feeder can release them one brick at a time into the 3D scanner.

<figure class="wp-block-image">universal LEGO sorting machine</figure>

Once they get to the scanner, 3D images of the parts are taken and sent to an onboard Raspberry Pi computer. These images are then sent via Wi-Fi to Daniel’s laptop which classifies the LEGO parts and sends the data back to the sorting machine.

<figure class="wp-block-image">universal LEGO sorting machine</figure>

Armed with the new information, the universal sorting machine can now drop the part down a series of LEGO gates where it is sorted accordingly. Daniel has created 18 buckets that categorize them according to their part class. Bent connectors can be found in one bucket, straight connectors in another, and so on.

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</figure>

According to Daniel, the machine’s A.I. takes 3D images of the parts it sorts and uses them to classify each particular piece into its own category. The convolutional neural network in the A.I. allows it to learn and store new pieces in its database, including LEGO pieces which were made after the A.I.’s creation.

If you want to learn more about Daniel’s universal LEGO sorting machine, he has made two articles that go more in-depth on the technology he used to create his brick-biased behemoth. For his other LEGO creations (such as a LEGO bolt action rifle with a grenade launcher), be sure to check out his YouTube channel.

The post Behold The World’s First Universal LEGO Sorting Machine appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 06, 2020 12:19 PM

The SolidSmack Monday List 02.20 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

A $1 Billion Solar Plant Was Obsolete Before It Ever Went Online

SolarReserve’s Crescent Dunes received backing from Citigroup and the Obama Energy Department but couldn’t keep pace with technological advances.

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Letter of Recommendation: Dumb Robot Vacuums

Perhaps I see some of myself in it: poorly constructed, easily confused, constantly emitting a low whining noise.

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What I Learned in Avalanche School

I wanted to be prepared for the worst nature could throw at me. But the real threat turned out to be human.

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Everything You Thought You Knew About Inbox Zero Is Wrong

Merlin Mann says people took his idea far too literally. 

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Patagonia Is Refusing To Sell Its Iconic Power Vests To Some Financial Firms

Sorry, Wall Street. The vest purveyor of choice for tech and finance bros now is prioritizing bulk orders of corporate swag to mission-driven companies.

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How to Build a Low-tech Website?

…a website redesign was long overdue — and because we try to practice what we preach — we decided to build a low-tech, self-hosted, and solar-powered version of Low-tech Magazine.

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The post The SolidSmack Monday List 02.20 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 06, 2020 12:07 PM

January 03, 2020

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2020 PDM Menu Integration

A great addition in SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2020 is the new SOLIDWORKS PDM menu.  This menu provides better integration between Visualize and your data management tools.

The menu will become active when a file stored in a SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional vault is opened in Visualize (this functionality is not currently available for SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard).

SOLIDWORKS PDM Menu

SOLIDWORKS PDM Menu

Now, directly through the Visualize interface, users can manage files in PDM.  Actions such as Get Version, Check In, Check Out and Change State can be performed through the drop menu.

Version and Transition Comments can be entered directly through the interface without leaving the program.

Version and Transition Comments

Version and Transition Comments

Specific file information including, Local Version, Local Revision, Checked Out By, Checked Out In and the current Workflow State are all listed at the bottom of the menu.

Additionally, you can open the file’s Data Card, and view or edit it inside the SOLIDWORKS Visualize program.

Specific file information

Specific file information

The post SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2020 PDM Menu Integration appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at January 03, 2020 01:00 PM

January 02, 2020

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Transition Notification Warning

New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020, for transitions that include dynamic notifications, you receive a warning if you have not selected a user or group to receive a notification.

Previously in SOLIDWORKS PDM, if you submit a file through a transition with dynamic notification and if a user/group was not selected to receive the notification, there was no warning that notification will not be sent out. In SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 a warning is displayed if you move a file from one state to another using transition with dynamic notifications.

Transition Notification Warning

Transition Notification Warning

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Transition Notification Warning appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at January 02, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

SkillCoach | Product Sketching Teaser

Now that 2020 is upon us its time to get busy flexing our creative muscles anew! So what did ole-Skillcoach go and do? He busted out his markers and set to sketching and videoed it to-boot! Here’s a little teaser of the tasty sketching tidbits coming down the pike throughout the year. First, up “Building Quick & Proportionally Accurate Concept Underlays.”

Enjoy!

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tfLs4Jp8pEM?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Stay Tuned!

The post SkillCoach | Product Sketching Teaser appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at January 02, 2020 04:57 AM

January 01, 2020

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 SQL Server Requirements

Starting with SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020, the SQL Server running the vault database will need to be upgraded to at least SQL Server 2014 SP3.

This applies to both SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional (running SQL Standard) and SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard (running SQL Express).

You can check which service pack of SQL Server is currently installed by launching the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio and looking at the Version number that is displayed in brackets next to the server/instance name.

Check Service Pack

Check Service Pack

The Version build numbers align with Service Pack releases as follows:

  • 12.0.2000.0 – SQL 2014 RTM (Release To Manufacture – April 2014)
  • 12.0.4100.1 – SQL 2014 SP1 (May 2015)
  • 12.0.5000.0 – SQL 2014 SP2 (July 2016)
  • 12.0.6024.0 – SQL 2014 SP3 (October 2018)

If the Version build number is lower than 12.0.6024.0, then you will need to update SQL before installing SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020.

The Service Pack updated is available for free and can be downloaded directly from here: Microsoft® SQL Server® 2014 Service Pack 3 (SP3).

SOLIDWORKS strongly recommends always keeping the SQL Server software up to date with the latest service pack.

The SQL update can be done at any time (any older versions of PDM that are compatible with SQL 2014 are supported on SQL 2014 SP3) however it is always best to make sure you have performed a backup of any PDM databases before running the installer.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 SQL Server Requirements appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at January 01, 2020 01:00 PM

December 31, 2019

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Composer Callout Exponent Shape Option

In the past, SOLIDWORKS Composer has offered the option to call out quantity as an exponent on an annotation.  Now, in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020, that exponent can be set to utilize a new clarity-enhancing callout option.  It’s controlled by a property called Exponent shape.

In the picture below, the lower callout has its Exponent shape property enabled, while the upper callout does not.

Exponent shape disabled for upper callout, and enabled for lower callout

To show the exponent shape, simply select any Callouts and check their collective box for the Exponent shape property.   Set their Quantity exponent (shown below) property to some value other than None, otherwise the exponent will not be shown.

Setting options to show the exponent shape

Note that for geometry actors with quantities of 1, their exponents will be hidden by default, but they can be shown if desired by checking the box for File > Properties > Document Properties > Advanced > General > ShowCalloutExponentX1

Learn more SOLIDWORKS Composer tips, tricks, and methods in our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training class.

The post SOLIDWORKS Composer Callout Exponent Shape Option appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at December 31, 2019 01:00 PM

December 30, 2019

New Models Added to Surfacing Site

I’ve added a few new models to the surfacing site, which is coming along nicely. The end of the year push to get this thing up and running is coming…

by matt at December 30, 2019 01:58 PM

The Javelin Blog

Create SOLIDWORKS Reference Sketches from 2D DXF/DWG Files

Being able to work with different file types is crucial to working with other clients using other programs. There are a large number of companies who use DWG & DXF files for creating CNC files of documentation. These files can be great for SOLIDWORKS users to use a reference when trying to design parts in SOLIDWORKS.  With this in mind, we can now create reference sketches from 2D DXF/DWG files in SOLIDWORKS 2020. Let’s take a closer look to see how it works.

Importing DXF/DWG File

When opening a DXF or DWG file, the Import Dialog Box opens providing the user with options deciding on the format of the file. Inder the 2D sketch option, there is a setting that allows the sketch to be imported as a reference as seen below.

Import as reference Option

Reference sketches are locked an cannot be edited. The pencil superimposed with a black no sign indicates that the sketch is for reference as seen below.

Reference Sketch as indicated by the Pencil Icon

A sketch can be toggled back into a regular sketch by right-clicking the sketch and selecting “Make Edit Sketch” from the drop down menu. It should be noted that creating a reference sketch is not limited to DXF/DWG files. Right-clicking a sketch made in SOLIDWORKS and selecting “Make Reference Sketch” will change the sketch type.

Toggle Between Reference & Edit Sketch

Using the reference sketch geometry to define the position, offset & convert entities will work, but mirroring items must use a drawing in the construction line. I found that creating the dimensions for a barrel bridge of a watch was easy using a reference drawing as seen in the images below.

Referenced Positions in Sketch

Reference Sketch application

I found the Reference Sketch useful for designing parts that are interconnected. Having the ability to create Reference Sketches from 2D DXF/DWG files in SOLIDWORKS 2020 is a welcome addition to SOLIDWORKS and I am excited to see how this feature will be applied in the future!

The post Create SOLIDWORKS Reference Sketches from 2D DXF/DWG Files appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at December 30, 2019 01:00 PM

December 28, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Simplified Open Options in SOLIDWORKS 2020

Choosing the correct way to open files can be difficult, especially when it comes to opening those bigger assemblies. In SOLIDWORKS 2020, the Open options dialog box has been reorganized to make selecting the way you open files more intuitive and easy to understand. With the simplified open options in SOLIDWORKS 2020, choosing the way you open documents has become a lot clearer.

Changes in the Open Dialog Box

There have been a few changes to how the open options are organized. You will notice that items categorized under the Mode section to differentiate between option pertaining to computer resource usage and model properties as seen in the image below.

New Intuitive Open Options

In the mode section, we can see that options pertaining to performance have been consolidated. A graduated slide used for selecting the mode has been added with a gradient to represent the number of resources used as well as features;e.g. mates. This visual queue provides the user with an idea of what mode they would need for their purposes.

Choosing the way you open files can be a huge time saver, especially if you are working with large assemblies and complex parts. Being able to review models on the fly can help provide visual aid when presenting to others. With the consolidation of the open options, as well as the visual queues, you no longer need to give a second thought when deciding how you would like to open your files.

For a more in-depth look at the ways to open files, please check out the following articles:

The post Simplified Open Options in SOLIDWORKS 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at December 28, 2019 01:00 PM

December 27, 2019

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Cinnamon Core Slaps (Best Links of the Week!)

A thick fog enveloped the lake and most of the bank where we stood. Outside of the haze, the dark purple lights of their eyes flickered, trying to adjust, trying to make out our forms shielded by the thin, misty veil; a veil that would hide us as long as the unrelenting fragrance persisted from the cinnamon-infused core of these links.

The Friday Smackdown is a collection of the best links in art, design, music, and photography we’ve come across over the week. Have one to add? Share it here!

Calder Moore – A pleasant array of style and expansive environment art from this Vancouver-based Surface Artist.

Post Malone Custom Spectre – This case! A thing of BEAUTY. Custom Spectre Case build from Singularity Computers, designed by James Passmore. Thanks, James!

Tank Turn – Can an electric truck zero-turn like a tank? The new Rivian EAV can. Donuts and u-turns will never be the same.

Earthworks – Sand dunes at work amongst the walls of humanity. The photography of Helene Schmitz. See her other works as well.

Under Over the Moon – Instagram follow of the week. Artist Nancy Liang creates earthy, simple and quite charming gifs.

The Deep Sea – An interactive scroll adventure from sea level to 10924 meters below, with illustrations of the creatures and explorers along the way.

All I Font For Christmas – 30 days of fonts. Even though it’s the final days of December, you can ‘unwrap’ them all and save a couple for next week.

Best of the Internet 2019 – Daily Dose of Internet brings you a small taste of the best, oddest, and most amazing on the internet over the past year.

Artemis – NASA is going back to the moon. This is their plan for making it happen to lay the foundation for the next voyage, Mars.

<script type="text/javascript"> amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "solid0a-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Year-end Deals We're Watching"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "a2b6835cacd4761b3276002c5d8e4ec4"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B0756CYWWD,B01C3LEBW6,B07DHGPHBN,B0786BN4WY"; </script> <script src="http://z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>

Christmas in Bed – A perfect mix from Solumun to wrap up the holidays, ring in the new year, and get you gently back into the work-work-work mode afterward.

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<iframe frameborder="no" height="300" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?visual=true&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F733060573&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;maxwidth=770&amp;maxheight=300&amp;dnt=1" title="Christmas In Bed 2019 by solomun" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The post Friday Smackdown: Cinnamon Core Slaps (Best Links of the Week!) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at December 27, 2019 08:13 PM

Five (Endless) Myths About 3D Printing

After reading yet another mainstream publication talk about “3D printed human organs” I thought it wise to share my thoughts about the five most frequently heard myths of 3D printing. 

These myths have been around since I started in this business over 12 years ago, and for some unexplainable reason, they have not gone away. Perhaps it was because of the initial excitement over the technology and the corresponding lack of true, depth understanding of what it could do and not do. 

Now, years later when we should all be more knowledgable about 3D printing, some of these myths are even now stronger than ever. 

But they’re still myths. 

3D Printers Are Only For Prototyping

This was a true statement years ago because the initial materials available in early 3D printers were really designed to make it easy for the printer to print, and the thought of using parts produced into those materials for a real-life application wasn’t truly possible. 

Thus initial uses of 3D printers were for prototyping shapes and sizes of parts, and not so much for testing heat or mechanical resistance. 

That has changed with the introduction of many new materials of engineering quality, particularly those in the high-temperature ranges. PEEK, ULTEM, PEKK, Carbon Fiber-Reinforced and many other materials are now routinely used with the right equipment. 

On the metal side, metal prints have now been certified as having sufficient quality and consistency to be used in real-life applications, and in particular in the aerospace industry. Production parts made through additive manufacturing are now normal. 

Sure, 3D printing is still used for prototyping, and always will be. But production parts are the future. 

3D Printed Human Organs

Twelve years later, there are no 3D printed organs. 

What there has been a steady progress of innovations towards the idea of 3D printed organs, which could theoretically replace the need for donations and transplants. However, that’s a very, very long way off yet. 

The problem is that human organs are highly complex bio-machines made from many different components, all “grown” over several years. To replace that requires an incredibly detailed understanding of what’s happening in the organs to an almost molecular degree. We’re nowhere near any of that. 

Yes, you can 3D print very simple organs, such as “skin”, but a new heart? Stomach? It’s going to be quite a while yet. 

3D Printed Houses

I seem to be writing about this one every week, but let’s do it again briefly. 

There are monthly press releases from one unscrupulous company or another boasting of 3D printed homes being produced in only 24 hours! This is patently false, as the homes are actually entirely built with conventional methods, except that a portion of the concrete work was done using a computer-controlled concrete extrusion system. 

If someone said, “Concrete Foundation 3D Printed In 24 Hours!” I would be happy. 

But no one says that. Ever.

3D Printed Dinner

One of the first questions I am always asked about the technology is whether dinner can be 3D printed. I have no idea why there is this fascination about 3D printed food, other than perhaps people are inherently lazy and are hoping for a Star Trek-like steak dinner to magically appear. 

The biggest issue is that 3D printing is slow, and you’d likely starve before dinner could be prepared. This alone has relegated the notion of 3D printed food to pre-made items, like cake toppers.

Foods are being 3D printed, but there are enormous constraints on the type of food material, as it usually must be reduced to an extrudable paste. Long ago 3D Systems announced sugar and chocolate 3D printers targeted at chefs, but they didn’t seem to have any legs and were swiftly discontinued. 

Once again the issue comes down to materials: many foods are complex compositions of multiple ingredients combined in a specific sequence using particular mixing techniques. These are not processes found on typical 3D printers, which usually employ a single making process to build an object in a single material. 

I think a different kind of 3D printing technology is ultimately required for true “dinner printing”. 

3D Printers “Bring Back Manufacturing”

The loss of manufacturing jobs in the West has been quite problematic for many families, and anything to restore those jobs would seem quite desirable. Those jobs went to two places: Asian countries where the worker wages were a lot lower, and to robotic automation. In fact, I’m told the automation effect was actually far greater than the low wage effect. 

Nevertheless, could “jobs come back”? I’m afraid I don’t think so. Should a manufacturer set up a new factory, it’s almost certain the factory would make extensive use of robotic automation, and in particular 3D printers, leaving only a few supervisory, machine operations and design jobs available. It’s actually likely that as the cost of automation drops, even the low-wage earning Asian workers themselves could find themselves being automated out of work. Everyone can use the same 3D printers regardless of location, after all. 

Perhaps “manufacturing” can be brought back to the West, but there won’t be many jobs coming with it. 

Those are my five biggest myths of 3D printing. Do you have some of your own?

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Five (Endless) Myths About 3D Printing appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at December 27, 2019 06:41 PM

The Javelin Blog

New basic attach type for Annotations in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020

New in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020, is a basic attach type for labels.  It is simpler than some of the other attach types, for example, it has no Properties > Label (even though it is a label).  True to its name, it is rather basic.  There is a certain beauty in simplicity!

Labels using the ‘basic’ attach type

To set the labels to basic attach type, select the labels and choose Properties > Attach > Type > Basic

Setting the Basic attach type

Learn more tips and tricks in our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials class!

The post New basic attach type for Annotations in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at December 27, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

SkillCoach | Tutorial: Model A 3D Printable Cookie Cutter Using Onshape 3D CAD

The season of festive celebration is upon us! With the semester of teaching ID at Virginia Tech behind me, I’m thoroughly enjoying my extended moments of family, fellowship, and food! So when my daughter Phoebe got inspired to make a batch of cookies the other day, I was all in! Being the creative type that we are, I knew we’d never settle for the basic run of the mill round-n-rise (I made that up by the way) variety of cookie! Nope, rather we set our sights on cookies that would be playful and festive in form. When Phoebe declared that a cute little deer fawn was to grace our festive ensemble, the hunt was on. Our quick trip to our local Hobby Lobby was to no avail, no fawn. What to do?

Ahh, SkillCoach to the rescue! Armed with Onshape for my 3D CAD modeler and a Creality Ender3 3D printer, I set to save the day and set to work making our very own custom on-demand cookie cutter. In the end, we “Got-R-Done!” The remainder of this post is a snapshot of the creative flurry that ensued and the tasty treats that followed.

Onshape 3D CAD Modeling of Cookie Cutter

As mentioned I used the cloud-based 3D CAD software to model our cookie cutter. The actual model build time was approximately one hour. The video below has been edited to 14 minutes. My goal at the time was to keep the process moving and get cookies in the oven! Hence, during the model build, I employed a little improvisation. I mixed and matched various tools and techniques as I constructed the geometry. I may post the unedited version to my Vince Haley_SkillCoach Youtube channel at a later date.

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</figure>

All I Want Is Some Treats

Now if pushing pixels, modeling splines or 3D printing plastic is not your idea of creative festivities, but making and munching on some fresh baked cookies is, not to worry. I’ve included the recipe Phoebe used and a few in-process pics.

<figure class="wp-block-image is-resized"><figcaption>Almond cookie recipe and custom cutter used to make of festive fawn deer cookies!</figcaption></figure>

Art to Part Workflow

Step 1 – Prepare Reference Art

<figure class="alignleft is-resized"><figcaption>Reference image for tracing.</figcaption></figure>

First up, prepare the artwork for importing into the Onshape CAD modeling environment. I chose to use Adobe Photoshop and push a few pixels around in this example. An alternative would be to prepare vector art in .DXF or .DWG format using Adobe Illustrator or freeware such as Inkscape. The beauty of vector over pixels is that when imported into Onshape vector art is ready to go, the step of manually tracing around background art to create the 2D sketch is not required. Both workflows have their pros and cons.

Sketch and scan, or download your reference art, whichever works for you. The key is to have enough contrast between the subject (fawn in my example) and the background. The enhanced edge detail will make the Onshape CAD tracing process somewhat easier. Additionally, trim the boundary of the image close to the subject on all sides and adjust the image size to have a vertical or horizontal dimension that is close to the size you desire your cutter to be. My target was a four-inch-tall cookie. Finally, save the image out in either .PNG or a .JPEG format and you’re ready to move on to the next step.

Step 2 – 3D CAD Model Construction

Reference the video at the head of this post for step-by-step model geometry build.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Twin fawns!</figcaption></figure>

Step 3 – Prepare CAD for 3D Printing

After completing the construction of the model in Onshape, I exported the file out in the .STL format. Using Simplify3D a 3D print slicing program, I prepared the cookie-cutter geometry for 3D printing. The software slices the model in layers and produces the gcode needed by the 3D printer. Given we were chomping at the bit to try out our custom cutter, I decided to use what’s known as “Vase Mode” which is one of the fastest ways to produce prints. Vase mode prints the outer boundary of an object in a continual spiraling motion.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Simplify3D Software</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Model imported and positioned on the virtual printer bed</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Model after processing. Shown is the build-up of print layers. The file gets copied to an SD Card</figcaption></figure>

Step 4 – 3D Printing

The fun part was firing up the 3D printer! Over the summer I purchased two Creality Ender3 3D printers and I’ve been putting them to good use. Although this model is an entry-level product, it’s a pretty good price to performance ratio. I’ve upgraded mine by adding an OEM Creality glass bed, TL Smoothers stepper motor electronics, and a SeeMeCNC EZR Struder™ filament extruder. By printing in vase mode we had our first print in just shy of one hour!

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Once Phoebe was set for baking, I went back into Simplify3D and scale up the cookie by 125% and resliced the model. Our new-build time was a little over 5 hours owning to using more infill, more layers. Yet, overall it yielded a bigger and stronger cutting utensil.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Tasty Treats!</figcaption></figure>

Well, there’s a peek at our creativity flurry! I’ve enjoyed sharing a little of the processes, tools, and CAD modeling techniques. I trust you’ve been able to glean a morsel or two to help you in your creative pursuits.

Until next time, keep learning!

The post SkillCoach | Tutorial: Model A 3D Printable Cookie Cutter Using Onshape 3D CAD appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at December 27, 2019 12:22 AM

December 26, 2019

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Certified Graphics Card Drivers Branch Family Support

SOLIDWORKS requires a certified graphics card and driver for optimal performance and stability.  Our SOLIDWORKS Certified Graphics Drivers blog post provides detailed information on how to locate the proper driver.

There have been recent changes to the driver results as the SOLIDWORKS developers are working with video card partner companies in different aspects.  One item you may have noticed are the results of DCHU drivers.  This is explained in our DCHU Graphics Card Driver Information blog post.

SOLIDWORKS is also transitioning to support “Branch Family” of drivers to make it easier to stay certified.  Traditionally SOLIDWORKS supported very specific drivers, for example 430.64.  A new approach is now being used where a family of drivers are now supported (i.e. Branch).  For example driver 430.64 is part of the family R430.  The graphics card vendor may add additional point updates for the R430 driver with security fixes and optimizations, creating a new driver 430.XX.  These don’t really have an impact in terms of SOLIDWORKS functionality so the entire family of drivers will now be supported.

SOLIDWORKS Certified Graphics Driver - Branch Family

SOLIDWORKS Certified Graphics Driver – Branch Family

If you see results for both a point release (i.e. 430.64) and the overall branch family (i.e. R430), this is due to the current transition period.  You can use either driver, but the branch drivers will be used going forward.

In the case where only a point release is available (no branch driver is listed), the specific point release driver should be used.

The post SOLIDWORKS Certified Graphics Card Drivers Branch Family Support appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at December 26, 2019 01:00 PM

December 25, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Importing Exploded Views into SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020

SOLIDWORKS Composer is a great way to create documentation based on SOLIDWORKS models. However, a major sticking point for Composer users was that they needed to create exploded views from scratch. This is no longer the case, as importing exploded views in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020 is now possible! Let’s take a closer look at how importing exploded views work and the considerations that need to be made.

Toggling the Options in the Open Dialog Box

When opening a new project, a couple of options have been added to the SOLIDWORKS subsection of the open options as seen below. These options are checked by default. Let’s go over these two options that are new to SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020 in more detail.

Import Options when Opening a SOLIDWORKS Model

The “Import SOLIDWORKS Explode Views and Saved Views” option will create camera views based on the exploded views and custom views that have been saved under the configuration selected. One thing to note is that only exploded views that have been saved under the selected configuration will be used.

The “Import SOLIDWORKS appearance” is also new to Composer 2020. In previous versions, model appearances were automatically imported when opening, but the option to not include the appearance data is available.

Model Output in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020

Initially, if the exploded views of your SOLIDWORKS model have multiple steps, a camera view will be made for each one as seen in the image below. The views that are not needed can be deleted, but keep in mind that once a camera view has been deleted, it will not be replaced when the model is being updated.

Initial Camera Views derived from Exploded & Saved Views

When working with an ever changing model, there are always revisions to be had. When it comes to exploded and saved views, there are a few behaviors that the person on the SOLIDWORKS end needs to be aware of so that updating in Composer runs smoothly.

Behaviors to Consider for Updating Composer Views

  • Only Exploded Views that are derived from the selected configuration will be imported into the Composer file.
  • Initially, all steps used to create the Exploded View will have their own Camera View in Composer. The excess views that are not needed can be deleted, but cannot be readded when updating the Composer file.
  • New Exploded views that were made in Solidworks will add new Camera Views in Composer.
  • Deleting an Exploded View in Solidworks will cause the behavior of the associated Camera Views in Composer to behave incorrectly if the file is updated.

It is important that both SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS Composer teams understand the behaviors listed above so that errors occurring due to a deletion or addition of an exploded view are managed. Overall, Importing exploded Views in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020 is a welcome addition and will save a lot of time.

The post Importing Exploded Views into SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at December 25, 2019 01:00 PM

December 24, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Upload STL files to 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace with eDrawings 2020

In a previous article, we demonstrated how to access the 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace from within SOLIDWORKS in order to get parts quoted for manufacture.  We can now use eDrawings Professional to get parts quoted using *.stl files.  STL (stereolithography) format is one of the most common and universal file formats for 3D printing.

  1. Load the *.stl model in eDrawings and click on the icon shown below.  If the button is available in a native eDrawings format file, it likely means that the STL information was included.  In that case, simply save as *.stl and open in eDrawings.

    Select button for Manufacture this model on 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace | Make

  2. You will be asked to log in to the 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace using your 3DEXPERIENCE ID.  That will spawn this window:
  3. Choose Get a quote.  Please note that decals or visible cosmetic thread appearances can prevent this from working.  Try hiding them in the source model, or review SPR-567023 in the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base for other options.
  4. Go through the guided steps to select part properties, manufacturing specifications, quantity and delivery, service provider
  5. Submit the request

Manufacture with Javelin

Did you know that Javelin provides manufacturing services? We offer a variety of custom-tailored 3D printing services, including the creation of your high-performance prototypestooling and manufacturing aids, end-use parts, and low-volume production runsSimply upload your part and get a quote.

Our Manufacturing Services Include:

The post Upload STL files to 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace with eDrawings 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at December 24, 2019 01:00 PM

December 23, 2019

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Monday List 52.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Apple, Mercedes, and Others Complain Patent Disputes Are Delaying Connected Cars

Is red tape going to delay connected-car networks because it delays the necessary communication infrastructure for them? Maybe, and there’s one company being blamed.

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Vanillanomics

Watching global market forces at work in the far reaches of Madagascar.

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The Hacker Who Took Down a Country

Daniel Kaye, also known as Spdrman, found regular jobs tough but corporate espionage easy. He’s about to get out of prison.

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Is Screen Time Really Bad for Kids?

‘The part that people don’t appreciate is that digital technology also has significant benefits.’

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

How to Spot a Counterfeit Watch

“Is the second hand ticking in a herky-jerky-type motion?”

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How Hong Kong’s Protests Turned Into a Mad Max Tableau

The demonstrations are fueled by technology high and low, from encrypted messaging apps and laser pointers to bows and arrows and Molotov cocktails.

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The post The SolidSmack Monday List 52.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at December 23, 2019 01:58 PM

The Javelin Blog

Faster ways of Opening Recent Files in SOLIDWORKS 2020

We are always looking for more ways to improve our productivity, where it’s trying to save a few seconds in an assembly line process, or a few clicks of the mouse when working on a model. The single act alone may not seem like much but over time, the accumulation of all those improvements adds up. One method that has been integrated into SOLIDWORKS is how we can access recent files. Let’s go over the faster ways of opening recent files in SOLIDWORKS 2020.

Accessing the Recent Files List

As SOLIDWORKS is a Microsoft Windows-based application, there are a few ways to access the recent files list through familiar windows buttons and features. The images below provide an illustrated guide on how to show the lists.

The Windows Start Menu

If you have added a quick launch button to your Windows start menu, right-clicking the icon will give you a list of recent documents as seen in the image below.

Access from Start Menu

The Task Bar Icon

If the SOLIDWORKS App has been pinned to the Windows taskbar, or SOLIDWORKS is already opened, right-clicking the icon will generate the list is illustrated below.

Access from Task Bar

The Windows Search

You can also access the recent files list by searching for “SOLIDWORKS 2020”.

Windows Search for “Solidworks 2020”

Enabling the Recent Files List

In order to have access to the Recent Files functionality, a Windows Start setting must be turned on. In order to do this:

  1. Click the Start Menu and select Settings > Personalization > Start.
  2. Verify that Show app list in Start menu and Show recently opened items in
    Jump Lists on Start or the taskbar are On as seen in the image below.

Start Settings

Every step towards efficiency helps out overall workflow and productivity. With faster ways of Opening Recent Files in SOLIDWORKS 2020, though it may be a small step, we can open our files a little bit faster.

The post Faster ways of Opening Recent Files in SOLIDWORKS 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at December 23, 2019 01:00 PM

December 20, 2019

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Cup of Happy Slaps (Best Links of the Week)

Vincent Lefevre

The Friday Smackdown is a collection of the best links in art, design, music, and photography we’ve come across over the week. Have one to add? Share it here!

The snow fell against the limbs where we sat; Nothing but the occasional whirring of one of our sentinel’s lens defoggers breaking the crisp air. Though it would be warmer in the suits, we had a better vantage point from the treetops and knew, if the attack did come again, they would come from the porous lip skin of these links.

Vincent Lefevre – Immense and magnificent mix of mechs and melancholic creatures with incredible detail and little surprises in each work.

Centro Verso – Instagram follow of the week. Tom Blachford captures architecture like no one else. Latest shots of Melbourne at night. More on his website.

Paul’s Boutique Sample-fest – Every sample from the infamous Paul’s Boutique by The Beastie Boys. Plus some License to Ill crossover.

Bird friends – Lisa Lloyd constructs intricately detailed bird sculptures entirely from paper. Robins, woodpeckers, and more.

a-l-o-n-e – So calm. These stark, icy shots capture a single object in their cold, misty, or icy environment that just pulls you in.

Deck Skulls – Broken skateboard decks turned into skulls by Roberto Janz.

Deskspace – From the solar system to a solar sun, these handcrafted semi-precious gem recreations of our galaxy’s planets is captivating.

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Winter 2019 Mixtape – We’ll close out 2019 with the smooth synths and solid beat mix, 2 hours worth, from Lane 8.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-soundcloud wp-block-embed is-type-rich is-provider-soundcloud wp-embed-aspect-18-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe frameborder="no" height="300" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?visual=true&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F729456562&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;maxwidth=770&amp;maxheight=300&amp;dnt=1" title="Lane 8 Winter 2019 Mixtape by Lane 8" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Friday Smackdown: Cup of Happy Slaps (Best Links of the Week) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at December 20, 2019 11:22 PM

The Best Design and Engineering Stories This Week (12/20)

Huddle around the computer a little bit, your digital detox is a farce! How can you stay away from great stuff that you can read and chew on … mentally that is! We got you covered, while you were away, busy with your digital detox diet. Don’t be shy, take a look at the week that was, right here on SolidSmack.

Cause we are ROCKIN!

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Watch an Insanely-Detailed CNC-Machined Recreation of Mt. Saint Helens

Most craftsmen think of CNC machining as a means to an end, but for the filmmaker and digital artist Dom Riccobene, it’s the best way to make miniature landscapes of both real-world and fictional locales.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

MIT Engineer Builds Bionic Leg That Feels Sensation

As we inch closer to the future promised by the late 20th century (still waiting on you, flying cars), the technology we thought to be impossible is now starting to become reality.

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SkillCoach | Onshape CAD Improvements Mega Resource Pack Collection!

Contained in this post is my curated list of must-know Onshape features and enhancements. When I started digging around I decided I’d go back and grab the goodies from 2018 and mid-2017 as well. Hence the megapack!

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React Robotics: Kicks Future into High Gear, Provides Access to AI and Robot Tech

We’ve all seen the intensely cool robot development coming out of Boston Dynamics. The latest videos from the company show a level of untethered quadrupedal and bipedal agility only previously imagined in movies. It’s a level of tech that seems inaccessible outside of a well-funded company or government research facility, but one company is breaking down the barrier to research and development in advanced robotic systems.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Frank Howarth Immortalizes A Family Vacation In A Wood-Turned Resin Sphere

While the best (and easiest) ways to keep memories are through writings, photos, and videos, they aren’t quite as creative as what woodworker and filmmaker Frank Howarth has come up with.

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Weekend Builds: How to Make a Pocket Hacksaw

Instead of lugging around a traditional hacksaw, YouTuber Cemal Açarshows how you can create your own portable version that fits neatly inside of a pen-like case.

The post The Best Design and Engineering Stories This Week (12/20) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at December 20, 2019 01:19 PM

The Javelin Blog

Callout-driven BOM ID visibility is new in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020

A handy feature new to SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020 is the ability to filter the BOM table to show only the components which have visible callouts.  The setting is a checkbox found in BOM Properties > Filter > Visible Callouts

Here are the results of checking versus clearing that checkbox:

The checkbox is cleared and the BOM table shows all actors which have a BOM ID assigned

With the box checked, the BOM is filtered for only the actors which have a callout

For more tips and tricks on how to use SOLIDWORKS Composer, enroll in our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials class!

The post Callout-driven BOM ID visibility is new in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at December 20, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Learn Raspberry Pi in a Weekend with This $34 Mastery Bundle

Raspberry Pi

We’ve said it time and time again, but the Raspberry Pi is just so dang cool and we believe all designers and engineers should have one in their toolkit—if not on their desktop. While there is a bit of a slight learning curve, it’s nothing that today’s designers and engineers can’t handle on a leisurely Saturday.

So why not start now?

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle includes 8 courses to get started creating your very own Amazon Echo or even a KUKA-like robotic arm for your desktop (how’s that for office bragging rights). Throw in any of your own 3D printed housing designs, and the opportunities are limitless!

For a limited time, The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle is 96% off of the $865 retail price and can be purchased right here for a mere $34.

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The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle — $865 $34

Courses included:

  • Automation with Raspberry Pi Zero
  • Introduction to Raspberry Pi
  • Hardware Projects Using Raspberry Pi
  • Bitcoin Mining Using Raspberry Pi
  • Raspberry Pi Robotics
  • Internet of Things Automation Using Raspberry Pi 2
  • Home Automation in 48 Hours Without Coding
  • Build Your Own ArmBot Step By Step Using Raspberry Pi Zero

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links that help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
StackSocial Amazon

The post Learn Raspberry Pi in a Weekend with This $34 Mastery Bundle appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at December 20, 2019 11:35 AM

And the Protolabs Cool Idea Design Award Goes To…

Coool Idea Award

Protolabs has selected two innovative designs as their Cool Idea Award: Healthcare Grant

Protolabs is a well-known 3D print and manufacturing service based in Minnesota, and they’ve been operating an awards program they call the “Cool Idea Award” since 2011. Since inception, the program has awarded projects some $1.5MM USD in services to aid in the development of products. The services awarded could be any of Protolabs’ extensive manufacturing services, including CNC milling, sheet metal work, injection molding and, of course, 3D printing. 

Cleveland Clinic Healthcare Alliance Partnership

For this particular award, Protolabs has partnered with the Cleveland Clinic Healthcare Alliance, a group working together to generate and eventually commercialize healthcare innovations. A panel of judges from the Alliance and Protolabs chooses an award winner from worthy candidates twice a year. 

Selected in this iteration for the award were two joint winners:

MedStar Health Syringe Holder

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption> 3D printed newborn syringe holder [Source: MedStar] </figcaption></figure>

MedStar Health’s innovation is a “gravity feed syringe holder”. It seems that newborns who spend their first days in hospital incubators require very special care, including feeding of liquids from syringes. Normally, this is done manually by a nurse, who must hold the syringe for hours per day as the child slowly consumes the liquid. 

The innovation is a specialized syringe holder that mounts on either an IV pole or the incubator itself. Four different syringe sizes can be accommodated as well. 

The syringe holder, while a simple object, can free up the nurse’s hands to perform other nearby duties while still allowing supervision of the newborn. This is could be a huge productivity gain, and is clearly worthy of an award. 

Protolab’s award was used by MedStar Health to make use of HP MJF 3D printing services to produce prototypes of the syringe holder. 

Cleveland Clinic Innovations’ Leak Stopper

The second awardee is Cleveland Clinic Innovations, which is developing a “leak stopper”. The device is targeted at bedridden patients who depend on feeding tubes normally inserted through the skin into the gut. 

These “stoma” are prone to infection for obvious reasons and can cause particularly difficult situations for patients, who must undergo antibiotic treatments regularly. 

The leak stopper is a seal around the stoma that provides a friction barrier between the skin and the inserted tubes. Normally these tubes would aggressively rub against body tissues when the patient moves, generating leakage. The leak stopper forms a proper seal and allows some freedom of movement for the tubes. This concept should reduce the possibility of infection greatly. 

Cleveland Clinic Innovations made use of Protolabs’ injection molding service to complete prototypes of the leak stopper, a rendering of which is shown at top. 

<figure class="aligncenter"><figcaption>The percutaneous tube leak stopper design. [Source: Protolabs]</figcaption></figure>

3D Print Services Supporting Innovation

Two highly deserving projects received a boost thanks to Protolabs’ award program, and hopefully, these innovations will make their way forward into the medical universe and make life better for patients. Award programs such as Protolabs’ are of significant value to any organization developing new and innovative products. I’m pleased to see their results in this iteration. 

But at the same time, I wonder why other 3D print services do not always offer similar programs. Do we not all want to help make the world a little bit better? 

The post And the Protolabs Cool Idea Design Award Goes To… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at December 20, 2019 12:56 AM

December 19, 2019

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Torsion Continuity Relation (G3)

SOLIDWORKS 2020 adds an additional sketch relation to provide torsion continuity (G3) between splines and any other sketch entity in a 2D Sketch.  The torsion relation applies to splines and one of these sketch entities:

  • Spline
  • Arc
  • Conic or elliptical arc
  • Model edges that are linear, circular, conic, parabolic, elliptical or spline-based

The continuity of a surface is described by the term ‘G’ which stands for Geometry, relating to how surface faces meet and transition.

In this example we have a sketch with two arcs on the sides and a spline connecting them at the top.  Curvature combs will be added to help visualize how the transition takes place.

SOLIDWORKS Sketch Entities

G0 – Continuity

This represents geometry connected with a coincident relation, but there can be a sharp edge.

SOLIDWORKS Sketch with Coincident Relation

SOLIDWORKS Sketch with Coincident Relation

G1 – Continuity + Tangency

This represents connected geometry and adds a tangent relation.  It may appear to be a smooth transition between the sketch entities, but the curvature combs show a different story.  The curvature values at the connection point don’t match up.  If we extrude a surface and turn on zebra strips, the faces coming together no longer look smooth.  You would also see this in real life with a polished surface under lights.

SOLIDWORKS Sketch with Tangent Relation

SOLIDWORKS Sketch with Tangent Relation

SOLIDWORKS Zebra Stripes for Tangent Relation

G2 – Continuity + Tangency + Curvature

Adding an additional relation ‘Equal Curvature’ improves the transition by having the curvature values match at the point of contact.  The zebra stripes show a much cleaner surface.  Yet you can still make out the location of where the faces meet.  In this case we have arcs which have the same curvature throughout and then it needs to transition fairly quickly to the higher curvature of the spline.

SOLIDWORKS Sketch with Equal Curvature Relation

SOLIDWORKS Sketch with Equal Curvature Relation

SOLIDWORKS Zebra Stripes for Equal Curvature Relation

NEW! G3 – Continuity + Tangency + Curvature + Torsional

SOLIDWORKS 2020 adds a new Torsion Continuity sketch relation which provides G3 continuity between geometry.  It essentially helps with the rate of change of curvature to balance the transition and generate an even smoother surface.

SOLIDWORKS Torsion Continuity Relation

SOLIDWORKS Torsion Continuity Relation

SOLIDWORKS Sketch with Torsion Continuity Relation

SOLIDWORKS Sketch with Torsion Continuity Relation

SOLIDWORKS Zebra Stripes for Torsion Continuity Relation

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Torsion Continuity Relation (G3) appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at December 19, 2019 01:00 PM

December 18, 2019

SolidSmack

MIT Engineer Builds Bionic Leg That Feels Sensation

bionic leg

As we inch closer to the future promised by the late 20th century (still waiting on you, flying cars), technology we thought to be impossible is now starting to become reality.

Just take a look at Everett Lawson, a research assistant at MIT’s Media Lab. Born with congenital clubbed-foot, his left leg was weaker and prone to breaking easily. After undergoing reconstructive surgery, which resulted in the complete deterioration of his leg, the decision was made to amputate the leg.

As an RA at MIT, Lawson did the only logical thing: make a leg of his own.

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</figure>

Unlike a normal amputation, he underwent an “Ewing amputation” – a procedure where most of the musculature and tendons are preserved near the cut off portion. This allowed Everett to create a link between his brain and the bionic limb attached to his leg.

<figure class="wp-block-image">bionic leg<figcaption>image source: Bloomberg</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">bionic leg<figcaption>image source: Bloomberg</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">bionic leg<figcaption>image source: Bloomberg</figcaption></figure>

By attaching sensors to the muscles near his amputated appendage, he can control the mechanical leg just by thinking about it.

<figure class="wp-block-image">bionic leg<figcaption>image source: Bloomberg</figcaption></figure>

But Everett wasn’t content with just moving a bionic leg; he wanted to feel with it as well. After working with the biomechatronics group at MIT to get his leg up and running, he took things into his own hands and added a whole heap of sensors to the bionic leg.

<figure class="wp-block-image">bionic leg<figcaption>image source: Bloomberg</figcaption></figure>

These sensors work completely opposite to the sensors in his flesh-and-blood upper appendage. Instead of acting on what the upper leg tells it to do, the sensors in the bionic leg send signals up to Everett’s brain, giving sensations of touch that he would feel in his original leg.

<figure class="wp-block-image">bionic leg<figcaption>image source: Bloomberg</figcaption></figure>

He can feel individual stimuli on his ‘toes’ and the bottom of his foot, allowing him to know there is something acting on the leg. Thanks to his son, he even discovered he could be tickled through the sensors.

Everett hopes the technology could help his son one day should he ever need it. As it turns out, he has bilateral clubbed feet, which means he has his father’s same condition only on both of his legs. With the advances in technology, both Everett and the biomechatronics group at MIT hope to remove the notion that the loss of a limb isn’t a handicap but rather an opportunity to make your body even better.

The post MIT Engineer Builds Bionic Leg That Feels Sensation appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at December 18, 2019 09:09 PM

React Robotics: Kicks Future into High Gear, Provides Access to AI and Robot Tech

React Robotics DogBot Lenovo

We’ve all seen the intensely cool robot development coming out of Boston Dynamics. The latest videos from the company show a level of untethered quadrupedal and bipedal agility only previously imagined in movies. It’s a level of tech that seems inaccessible outside of a well-funded company or government research facility, but one company is breaking down the barrier to research and development in advanced robotic systems.

React Robotics

React Robotics has a goal to create an open robotics platform for anyone to create robots that can go anywhere and do anything. The Guildford, Surrey-based company is a team steeped in artificial intelligence, robotics, machine learning, and industrial design. Their first proof-of-concept, and product, is a untethered quadrupedal robot capable of suburban navigation. DogBot is a 800mm (31 inches) tall, sleek, four-legged bot weighing in at 20kg (40 lbs)with 34kW of high-torque brushless motors and an open-source controller.

If DogBot sounds familiar, you may recall React Robotics Co-founder, Dr. Charles Galambos, sharing his work and vision on the concept just over two years ago. Dogbot won the 2017 Hackaday Prize with the demonstration of building “a walking robot that can work in human scale world for $1000.” You can get a sense of all the work put into the vision in the project logs, why a quadruped design was chosen, the initial prototype development, and the turning point in April of 2019 with a new robot design – a new robot design that, most recently, Charles shared Fusion 360 files (A360) for.

Talking with Gregory Epps, CEO at React Robotics, he explains that, “compared to the previous robot, this robot was designed to be way, way stiffer. We now have this monocoque construction which takes the load much, much better, with legs that are a much larger diameter carbon fiber (solid 12mm rod) pushing the stresses much further out where the loads actually occur, while retaining the shock absorption to take the jarring nature out so it isn’t transferred to the gearbox.”

The stiffer robot makes it easier for them to transfer their predictions from the simulation. This, in turn, allows them to put the robot into real-world scenarios, where machine learning takes over, providing more data and a better understanding of how the robot really operates, to make more improvements.

While Fusion 360 is used on the software side, React is partnering with Lenovo on the hardware side, using the ThinkStation P920 for data simulation and compilation, with ThinkPad P1 mobile workstations used for on-site, field-testing. In the field, React’s robot is proving to be the perfect application for the construction-industry where a Faro scanner can be mounted to the DogBot to capture data for the build-site.

<figure class="wp-block-video"><video controls="controls" src="https://www.solidsmack.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/Lenovo-Workstation-Customer-React-Robotics.mp4"></video></figure>

You would think the field of robotics is saturated and everything that can be done with robotics is already being done, but React is filling a large void between low-end consumer robot kits and high-end, AI-powered automatons. Though DogBot has been developed over the past few years, they’re just getting started and opening the field of robotics up to a larger audience with open-source software on an affordable platform.

The DogBot package will include:

  • Robot: quadruped chassis with built-in locomotion
  • Power Supply: Run the robot on treadmills without using up battery supply
  • Spare Batteries: So you can charge while you use
    And you get:
  • Manual: Thoroughly documented
  • Example Files: Walking code that works already
    Software:
  • ROS stack with Python API
  • Open-Source low-level control software with C++ API
  • Gazebo simulation and URDF
    Options include:
  • Flight Case: Transport DogBot to remote locations
  • Stand with hanging straps: Start by walking in the air!
  • Linear Overhead Rail: suspend DogBat while you are teaching it
  • Configuration: custom perception and compute packages

The CAD files are available on A360. The DogBot software is already available on GitHub along with DogBot simulation files. You can find more information and sign-up on their website to be notified of updates and when pre-orders are available. Follow them on Twitter @reactrobotics for the latest and view videos of their progress on YouTube.

The post React Robotics: Kicks Future into High Gear, Provides Access to AI and Robot Tech appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at December 18, 2019 06:11 PM

The Javelin Blog

A new method for applying Callouts to External Cosmetic Threads in SOLIDWORKS 2020

In prior years of SOLIDWORKS, cosmetic thread callouts were added into drawings either automatically on view creation, or manually this way.  Now in SOLIDWORKS 2020, the cosmetic thread callouts can be shown like dimensions, but the prior method is still available.  The new functionality in 2020 works like this:

  1. Here is a sample part with cosmetic thread using these settings (Insert > Annotations > Cosmetic Thread)

    Example - cosmetic thread settings

    Example – cosmetic thread settings

  2. Insert view into drawing and add a Smart Dimension, selecting the silhouette edge(s) such that the pointer changes to this when hovering over the edge(s):Example - cosmetic thread settings
  3. Place the Smart Dimension:

    Pick these silhouette edges and place the callout

    Pick this silhouette edge and place the callout

     

Learn more detailing tips and tricks in our SOLIDWORKS Drawings course!

The post A new method for applying Callouts to External Cosmetic Threads in SOLIDWORKS 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at December 18, 2019 01:00 PM

December 17, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Simplify Cosmetic Thread Callouts with SOLIDWORKS 2020

New in SOLIDWORKS 2020 are simplified callouts to cosmetic threads.  In prior years, the callout would automatically include the type of thread.

With checkbox enabled, thread type is shown

Thread type display is now optional in the callout, thanks to a control checkbox that is available from the Cosmetic Thread Property Manager:

With checkbox cleared, callout does not include thread type

This is but one of many updates and improvements in SOLIDWORKS 2020.  Stay current with some of the more impactful updates to SOLIDWORKS in our Advanced Update Training Class!

The post Simplify Cosmetic Thread Callouts with SOLIDWORKS 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at December 17, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Watch an Insanely-Detailed CNC-Machined Recreation of Mt. Saint Helens

Most craftsmen think of CNC machining as a means to an end, but for the filmmaker and digital artist Dom Riccobene, it’s the best way to make miniature landscapes of both real-world and fictional locales.

We’ve already seen his AR map of Game of Thrones’ Westeros, but this time around, he’s gone back to the real world to create a giant data sculpture of Washington’s Mount St. Helens:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-4-3 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gU27mPlDXcY?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Using a model of the volcano from Google Earth VR, Dom completes two test carves on some high-density urethane (HDU) to see what ball end he will use for his final result.

<figure class="wp-block-image">mt. saint helens cnc machined</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">mt. saint helens cnc machined</figure>

After deciding on sixteen-inch tooling, he sets the CNC machine to go at a half-inch flat-end mill at 800 inches per minute with a 1/8 inch down for the rough pass. While he could go a half-inch step down to make the process faster, he keeps it so for recording purposes. Thanks to this, you can slowly see the volcano emerge from the urethane as the machine works downwards.

<figure class="wp-block-image">mt. saint helens cnc machined</figure>

As the carving continues, more of the surrounding topography begins to emerge. What was once only the tip of the crater now has ridges and layers surrounding it.

<figure class="wp-block-image">mt. saint helens cnc machined</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">mt. saint helens cnc machined</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Satisfied with the roughing pass, Dom then completes a finishing pass to fine-tune the carving. In total, it takes 1,800,000 lines of G-code to produce this miniature recreation of Mt. Saint Helens, making the finished product incredibly dense and detailed as a result. Eventually, the various ridges which signify the different layers of the volcano are cut to reveal the many rivers, cracks, and crevices dotting the landscape.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Thirteen and a half hours later and Dom has himself the most detailed CNC machine landscape he has ever made. While he could have gone for a more detailed representation, the amount of time it would take to craft using a tool thinner than a human hair would be a lot longer than your average weekend.

You can find more of Dom Riccobene’s CNC creations on his YouTube channel, Instagram page, and website.

The post Watch an Insanely-Detailed CNC-Machined Recreation of Mt. Saint Helens appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at December 17, 2019 12:36 PM

SolidSmack Radio | T-Splines from Paradise – Winter Edition (Powered by Spotify)

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<figure><iframe allow="encrypted-media" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/playlist/3FmRI7gE2P0cttEHlx9xZk" width="100%"></iframe></figure>

The post SolidSmack Radio | T-Splines from Paradise – Winter Edition (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at December 17, 2019 12:25 PM

This Giant Matchstick Makes an Obnoxiously, Massive Flame

huge matchstick

We’ve seen matchstick art before, but most of the time it usually involves a stupid amount of tiny, normal-sized matches. What Eduard Krawchenko from Our Vidos TV (OVT EN) wants to do instead is make one large match. It’s OBNOXIOUSLY large, ugly and has us laughing at the result. It’s just something you have to see (and put on the list to make over the holidays):

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ObPaJuTMG9I?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

If you’ve made smoke bombs before, you know the process, but instead of putting your potassium nitrate mixture inside a small egg carton, you get a MASSIVE post and coat the end until you have (what looks like) a match head. Let’s break it down.

<figure class="wp-block-image">huge matchstick</figure>

To create the matchstick head, create a mixture of 60% potassium nitrate and 40% sugar. Stir together in a pan over a low flame. Next, add enough water to the mixture until you get a mushy paste consistency. Finally, add red food dye to give the matchstick its unmistakable red color.

<figure class="wp-block-image">huge matchstick</figure>

With the flammable mixture complete, start heaping and slathering it over the edge of a giant piece of wood. As each layer dries, add more of the mix to the tip of the giant matchstick. It’s now worthy of being lit.

<figure class="wp-block-image">huge matchstick</figure>

Once the layers of mixture on the matchstick have dried, it’s time to light it up! Eduard ignites the matchstick at the base, where the flame slowly burns away the wood. A few minutes later and BAM, the rest of the red matchstick head catches on flame and quickly burns through the rest of the wood.

<figure class="wp-block-image">huge matchstick</figure>

The force of the matchstick head suddenly going all aflame is enough to launch it from its standing position and onto the rocks below. It sends a huge plume of smoke into the air and if it wasn’t for the fact that they filmed this near a stream, then you might start to worry. Thankfully the matchstick soon dies out, leaving nothing but a scorched stump and the smell of burning wood in the air.

You can see more of Eduard’s crazy projects and life hacks on his YouTube channel, along with another video of an even larger matchstick, at OVT EN.

The post This Giant Matchstick Makes an Obnoxiously, Massive Flame appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at December 17, 2019 12:03 PM

SolidWorks Legion

My Instagram Videos from SOLIDWORKS 2019

Here's my videos from Instagram from SOLIDWORKS World 2019. Nothing new to add, other than bringing them over for posterity. The post My Instagram Videos from SOLIDWORKS 2019 appeared first on...

by fcsuper at December 17, 2019 10:32 AM

December 16, 2019

SolidSmack

Nokia 3310 Mobile Phone Gets Turned Into A Working Hammer

Nokia 3310 hammer

19 years after it was first released, the Nokia 3310 has been known to be THE phone when it comes to durability. It’s been dropped from high altitudes, run over by all types of vehicles, and even shot with firearms. And most of these times, the phone has lived to play mobile Snake another day.

So, it’s only inevitable that history’s strongest phone gets turned into a hard-hitting construction tool. Using some crude and quick methods, YouTuber Blintom Man takes a Nokia 3310 and turns it into the head of a hammer:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-4-3 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/J2-1eltVI_o?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
<figcaption>Some simple welding and BAM.</figcaption></figure>

So, yeah, it’s more of a Nokia 3310 inlay within the solid steel frame of a hammerhead, but still, kinda cool. How did he do it?

<figure class="wp-block-image">Nokia 3310 hammer</figure>

After measuring the length and curve of the phone, he takes a few metal rods and bends them with the aid of a vice. These will house the phone and connect it to the rest of hammer. He nails the curve of the rod the first time.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Nokia 3310 hammer</figure>

For the actual impact area, Blintom Man uses thick tiles of steel to beat things into submission and protect the Nokia while it does its job.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Nokia 3310 hammer</figure>

He welds these pieces together to form the housing of the phone while constantly using the Nokia 3310 as a reference point to make sure it fits.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Nokia 3310 hammer</figure>

With the initial housing finished, he cuts off the excess rod length and bends a small nut which serves as the connector between the phone and the wood handle. He welds these two pieces together before finally adding the steel endcap which will turn a humble Nokia phone into a tool of creation (or destruction, depending on what the hammer is bashed against).

<figure class="wp-block-image">Nokia 3310 hammer</figure>

Smooth the edges, squeeze the phone in, add the wooden handle, and you’re ready to go! Does the video show him using it? Well, yes, to hammer, but doesn’t go on to say if he can use it afterward to call his mama.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Nokia 3310 hammer</figure>

Though the metal frame takes the brunt of the impact, the 3310 is a nice, dramatic touch. It can hammer nails into wood pretty easily, but I can imagine the phone flying out after you use it a bit. Nevertheless, this is yet another instance that showcases the apparent indestructibility of Nokia’s infamous phone.

The post Nokia 3310 Mobile Phone Gets Turned Into A Working Hammer appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at December 16, 2019 09:45 PM

Model of the Week: 3D Printed 2020 Glasses [Pixel in the New Year!]

The END IS NIEGH… The end of 2019. You’ve been taking half days at work to plan shenanigans to ring in the new year, but have hit a roadblock on one critical item: 2020 NEW YEAR’S EVE GLASSES. How can you be seen in public without a ridiculous set of year-shaped spectacles?! You can’t!

And for a year such as 2020, it’s got to be good. I mean, how may other 2020s are you going to have? (Answer: NONE.) So, let’s make it count… or at the very least, help close out that icky 2019 with a bunch of high-fives and, “Hey dude! Sweet specs!”

Kalle-Iivari Mononen, aka, superbeasti, has just what you need to get prepped for every 2020 New Year party you hit. The ultimate PIXEL-IZED 2020 New Year Party glasses. They’re almost a party in themselves. In fact, who knows WHAT will happen when you put them on.

<figure class="wp-block-image">3D Printed 2020 New Year's Eve Glasses</figure>

This is an EASY print, with lots of options to size and customize, so don’t be afraid to print out a miniature set for your monkey and that bag of chips you’ll be celebrating the last hours of the 10th and last year of the decade. Did I say chips? I meant FRIENDS – that bag of friends.

KM doesn’t provide much tech info, but the print is pretty straightforward, with five parts all together or a single print version if you’d like to print it all in one go. If you’re using a Prusa 3D Printer or other PETG compatible printer (like the FlashForge Creator Pro), I recommend the Prusa Orange and Prusa Red filament.

You can put your cape on and download the model on MyMiniFactory. (Bonus! Check out the Amethyst Ice Latern Mold by Kalle-livari for some sweet New Year Party ice decor here!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Model of the Week: 3D Printed 2020 Glasses [Pixel in the New Year!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at December 16, 2019 09:30 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to Work Offline with SOLIDWORKS PDM

Working with SOLIDWORKS PDM, there will be times where connectivity to the server is unavailable. This could happen while working remotely for example, or while the vault is undergoing maintenance such as an upgrade, a server move, or a migration.

To prepare your SOLIDWORKS PDM vault for working offline:

  1. Check in active files to ensure you have the most recent copies of them in your vault. Then Check those files out to obtain write access.
  2. Then proceed to work offline.

These instructions are assuming the vault view will not need to be recreated. If the vault view is to be recreated, please follow instructions in this article here.

Step 1: Check in and check out all active files

The first step is to ensure you have checked in all your active files, and then check them out again. This can be done by selecting the “Keep Checked Out” option from the check in dialog:

SOLIDWORKS PDM Check In dialog

SOLIDWORKS PDM Check In dialog

This accomplishes two things. One, it gives the user write access to those files, and two, it caches those files locally making them available to you in offline mode.

Step 2: Switch to working Offline

The next step is to switch to working offline via Tools > Work Off-line.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Work Off-line

SOLIDWORKS PDM Work Offline

When working offline, folders will appear blue in colour which indicates that the vault is now in offline mode, as shown in the image below:

Blue folders for off-line mode

Blue folders for off-line mode

In offline mode, users will have access to all files they have in their local cache. Any files that were checked out before switching to offline mode will also be writeable (i.e. users will have write access to them). Files can then be opened, modified, etc., just as normal.

Once connection to the server is restored, users can switch back to on-line mode using Tools > Work On-line.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Work On-line

SOLIDWORKS PDM Work On-line

Once back online, all files that were checked out will need to be checked back in for changes to be written to the server.

The post How to Work Offline with SOLIDWORKS PDM appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ish at December 16, 2019 09:02 PM

SOLIDWORKS Christmas Tree Topper

December is here, which means the holiday season is upon us and Michael Bublé is singing festive songs. Every year when putting up my tree, I have the same Christmas tree topper. It is an ugly angel that my mother insists on keeping and displaying at the top of the tree. This year I wanted to give the old angel a refresh, so I got to work in SOLIDWORKS to come up with something that is let’s say… nicer on the eyes. Drawing inspiration from the stars, I modeled a tree topper that is much more contemporary.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/35DtXBZYBX8?feature=oembed" title="SOLIDWORKS Christmas Tree Topper. Can You Create This?" width="500"></iframe>

The video shows how this SOLIDWORKS Christmas Tree Topper was made, using advanced part modeling tools, such as Combine and Swept Boss/Base. These tools are useful for creating more complex geometry and you can learn more about them in our Advanced Part Modeling course.

The post SOLIDWORKS Christmas Tree Topper appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Claudia Mak at December 16, 2019 02:33 PM

Using Markup in SOLIDWORKS 2020

SOLIDWORKS Markup is a great way to communicate ideas between teams, allowing users to propose changes without having to edit the geometry of a part. With SOLIDWORKS 2020, there is now a dedicated Command Manager for the Markup features and functionality for users with no touch screen or stylus capabilities.  Let’s take a closer look and see how using Markup in SOLIDWORKS 2020 works with the new features.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Lla__GHyxwM?feature=oembed" title="What's New in SOLIDWORKS 2020 - Markup" width="500"></iframe>

The Command Manager

In SOLIDWORKS 2020, a dedicated command manager has been added for Markups for easy access. Below we can see that several options have been added to be inclusive to all users, from those using a stylus to a mouse. Let go over the different options available.

Markup Command Manager

  1. The first feature allows the user to toggle markup colour & line thickness. This can be great for differentiating contributors or creating emphasis, among other things. One thing to note is that when using the stylus, the line weight is captured when writing.
  2. The second set of features is used for creating and editing your markups. The Draw features allow the user to add written notes, while Erase is used to remove unwanted markups. The Select feature allows the user to select a group of markups to move, remove or change Color & Line properties.
  3. The Touch feature is used when a user has access to either a mouse or a touchscreen. If a stylus is being used, then Touch will be toggled off.
  4. The Note feature allows users to type any comments. This is great for people who are using a mouse or touch screen since writing with these tools can be difficult.

The markup tooltip also has some useful features that enable easy collaboration with those who may not have SOLIDWORKS readily available to view any of the comments. The edit, suppress & hide options that are available on all features are available as well as a couple of tools that are specific to Markups.

Markup Tool Tip

  1. The first one is the “Orient” button, which as the name implies orients the view of the model to align with the original markup view. This is great if you need to use the second option on the tooltip.
  2. The second option allows the user to export a view of the selected Markup to PDF. This is great for sharing comments or providing in quick instructions to those how do not have access to the model

Markup in the Feature Manager Tree

Each markup is captured as a separate entity in the feature manager tree, as seen in the image below, and is organized in its own folder the same way equations or solid bodies are. Markup features can be edited or deleted by either right-clicking the element on the feature tree or double-clicking the feature in the model space.

Markups Folder

Markup in the 3D Space

An issue that tends to happen when there are several authors making notes on a drawing is the amount of clutter and confusion that can accumulate on the initial model. As mentioned earlier, using options to suppress, naming markup features, and using colors can be used to alleviate this. Still, SOLIDWORKS has integrated markups in a way that keeps them out of the user’s way, as seen in the image below.

Viewing Markup while Panning

The markups are not visible unless the model is set to that specific orientation. As the user rotates the model, a transparent preview of all the Markups appears, as seen on the left side of the image above. A markup will only be fully visible when the model has been rotated into the orientation it was originally created in and will be isolated when the mouse button has been let go as seen on the right side of the image above.

The Markup tool is a great way for teams to communicate effectively with each other. With the addition of mouse functionality, the command manager and model integration, Markups provide a way to document the design process on the fly, while still being unintrusive to those working on the model. If you would like to find out more ways to share SOLIDWORKS files more effectively, please check out the following articles:

The post Using Markup in SOLIDWORKS 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at December 16, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Monday List 51.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Cord Cutters Love to Watch, Until the Free Trials Expire

Streaming giants are struggling with a big churn conundrum: Only a third of users stick around.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

A Big Law Firm Aims to (Partly) Automate Big Law

Wilson Sonsini’s year-old subsidiary says its AI can save clients 80% to 90% on California’s sweeping data privacy legislation.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

His Novels of Planetary Devastation Will Make You Want to Survive

Jeff VanderMeer, the author of “Annihilation,” brings us fresh horrors with each new book. So why does he remain an optimist?

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Letter of Recommendation: 3D Without Glasses

Free viewing, when it works, works much better than any other method. The images snap together, unimpeded by imperfect guidance mechanisms, and you are able to inspect the images in a way that you can’t by any other means.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Tweak These Google Chrome Settings to Level Up Your Browsing

Get the most out of Google’s Chrome browser with these tips and tricks.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Every Startup Needs to Prepare for Its Downfall

Silicon Valley lives in denial, so nobody plans for the inevitable.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 51.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at December 16, 2019 12:40 PM

Weekend Builds: How to Make a Pocket Hacksaw

saw pen

Ever find yourself in a situation where you wish you had a hacksaw on hand?

Instead of lugging around a traditional hacksaw, YouTuber Cemal Açar shows how you can create your own portable version that fits neatly inside of a pen-like case:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/W-G0dg6-yOs?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">saw pen</figure>

Taking a saw blade from an electric hacksaw, Cemal first sharpens the blade before wrapping it in two individual sheets of plastic to measure its dimensions. These pieces of plastic will serve as the housing for some resin casts which will hold the blade in place.

<figure class="wp-block-image">saw pen</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">saw pen</figure>

He then creates his own resin mixture and pours it into the plastic. Using a couple of wooden slabs and some pliers, he dips the hacksaw blade into one of the resin casts and leaves it suspended so the resin can harden around it.

<figure class="wp-block-image">saw pen</figure>

15 hours later, the resin has stiffened and is ready for carving. Cemal cuts some small indents onto the blade.

<figure class="wp-block-image">saw pen</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">saw pen</figure>

The blade cover, on the other hand, needs some more work. He first cuts into the resin using a small blade before drilling a hole large enough for the pen saw to fit in.

<figure class="wp-block-image">saw pen</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">saw pen</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">saw pen</figure>

He files and sands down the outer sides of both halves before drilling a small hole for a pen hook to fit through. Cemal finishes the pen hacksaw by gluing the pen hook onto the saw and laying on some varnish to make the whole thing shine.

<figure class="wp-block-image">saw pen</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">saw pen</figure>

You would expect the hacksaw pen to cut through wood pretty easily, but what you’d be surprised to know is it can also cut through a 1.5mm steel pipe.

<figure class="wp-block-image">saw pen</figure>

Cemal Açar makes tons more DIY videos, all of which you can find on his YouTube channel.

The post Weekend Builds: How to Make a Pocket Hacksaw appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at December 16, 2019 12:23 PM

SolidWorks Legion

Blast from the Past at SOLIDWORKS World 2016 (video snippets from Instagram)

I'm manually adding my SOLIDWORKS World 2016 Instagram videos here for posterity. The post Blast from the Past at SOLIDWORKS World 2016 (video snippets from Instagram) appeared first on SolidWorks...

by fcsuper at December 16, 2019 10:00 AM

December 13, 2019

SolidSmack

How to Repurpose An Old Gas Can Into The Ultimate Toolbox

gasoline tank toolbox

Has there ever been a time when you looked at your tool box/bin/pile and thought, “I wish I had more space”? Creator and craftsman, Hassan Abu-Izmero, has. Funny enough, he looked at an empty gasoline can and thought it was the perfect size for his most used tools. Let’s see how he made it:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/c-FH2xge9qg?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">gasoline tank toolbox</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">gasoline tank toolbox</figure>

After cutting ¼ way through the empty (and hopefully clean) gas can, Hassan starts crafting multiple wooden compartments for his various tools. The base of the gas can holds all the tools with the sharp edges of the gas can deburred and covered with rubber edge trim to prevent injury.

<figure class="wp-block-image">gasoline tank toolbox</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Hassan constructs a removable wooden tool holder with slots, grooves and drawers for all of his tools. Screwdrivers, pencils, and even pliers get their own spot, while large tools, like hammers and clamps, get their own strategically located spot.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">gasoline tank toolbox</figure>

Tools that come in handy during the construction include a drill, angle grinder, finish nailer, sanding block, wood glue, and clamps. He also makes good use of a table saw and a band saw for the inner box construction.

<figure class="wp-block-image">gasoline tank toolbox</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

It wouldn’t be a proper toolbox if it didn’t have drawers, so Hassan creates a number of dividers for three small drawers. He makes the process look simple, constructing a basic box and thin, plastic strips to space the drawers and dividers evenly. They all get spray painted to match the gas can.

<figure class="wp-block-image">gasoline tank toolbox</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">gasoline tank toolbox</figure>

While waiting for the paint to dry, he adds a few slots to the outside of the inner tool holder to hold his clamps, along with a substantial shoulder eye bolt positioned top-center to allow easy removal of the tools from the gas can enclosure.

<figure class="wp-block-image">gasoline tank toolbox</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">gasoline tank toolbox</figure>

Speaking of the gas tank, Hassan connects the top and bottom using a simple, custom-made hinge mechanism and quick-release toggle clamp for easy access inside the toolbox.

<figure class="wp-block-image">gasoline tank toolbox</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">gasoline tank toolbox</figure>

A little sanding and it’s ready to go! Just as advertised, Hassan’s gas tank toolbox has room for practically everything he would ever need. While it may seem a bit heavy and cumbersome, you’re sure to get some looks from those wondering why you’re carrying a gas container into a woodshop.

The whole video is definitely worth a watch. You can catch more of Hassan’s silent DIY videos on his YouTube channel and Instagram page.

The post How to Repurpose An Old Gas Can Into The Ultimate Toolbox appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at December 13, 2019 06:05 PM

The Javelin Blog

Use keyboard shortcuts to access searches in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020

There have been lots of enhancements added to the search function within SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020, like the new Quick Search and the ability to search multiple variables.  Another enhancement I’m a big fan of, are the keyboard shortcuts we can use to access the search functionality quickly while within explorer;

Last Used Integrated Search Card

From within explorer; CTRL & SHIFT & F takes us directly to our last used search card within the integrated search.

CTRL & SHIFT & F

CTRL & SHIFT & F

Quick Search

From within explorer; CTRL & F takes us directly to the Quick Search box.

CTRL & F

CTRL & F

Wrap Up…

Both of these keyboard shortcuts, provide users a quick and easy and way to access the powerful search functionality within SOLIDWORKS PDM.  Learn more about SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 enhancements and new search tools.

Next Steps

Now we know how to access the search card quickly, it’s a great chance to talk about how custom search cards can help us with our day to day searching.  Within our Administering SOLIDWORKS PDM course, we cover in detail how to create a search card from scratch, allowing administrators to create a custom card to suit their company’s needs.  During our training course, we discuss limiting search cards to only the values that pertain to the users and creating separate cards for each department paired with custom columns displaying only the results the users require making searching within the vault easy and efficient for users.

The post Use keyboard shortcuts to access searches in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at December 13, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Frank Howarth Immortalizes A Family Vacation In A Wood-Turned Resin Sphere

While the best (and easiest) ways to keep memories are through writings, photos, and videos, they aren’t quite as creative as what woodworker and filmmaker Frank Howarth has come up with.

Taking an ordinary wooden sphere, he engraves a terrain map of Newberry Crater —located in Central Oregon’s Deschutes Forest — onto the wood before encasing the whole thing in resin:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6sAY9WkOFoU?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Wooden Resin Sphere</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Wooden Resin Sphere</figure>

Howarth first imports a 3D model of the location into Fusion 360, where he fits the model into a 3.5-diameter sphere and sets the cam paths. Once finished, he uses a tapered bit with a small point to intricately cut the model into the wood.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Wooden Resin Sphere</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Wooden Resin Sphere</figure>

After making a small enclosure on top for the resin, he can finally start pouring. A small problem rears its ugly head during the pouting process: the grooves on the inner part of the enclosure cause the resin to leak out. To remedy this, Howarth pops the whole thing into a pressure pod to stop as much resin from leaking out as possible. Once finished, he adds more resin to offset the leaks.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Wooden Resin Sphere</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Wooden Resin Sphere</figure>

He takes the wood out of the pod and leaves it for an entire month before getting back to it. When he does, he cuts off the excess resin, pops the wood on a lathe, and starts cutting out the sphere.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Wooden Resin Sphere</figure>

With the wood half-finished, he changes the jaws of his lathe and starts cutting the resin.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Wooden Resin Sphere</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Wooden Resin Sphere</figure>

Now that both sides are cut down to size, he can finally start rounding out the actual sphere. He keeps the carving blade almost horizontal when cutting the resin but angles it a bit lower when working on the wood.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Wooden Resin Sphere</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Howarth takes the almost completely round sphere to a saw where he cuts of the bottom portion. He then takes it back to the lathe where he turns both wood and resin at the same time.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Wooden Resin Sphere</figure>

With the sphere complete, he takes his sander and starts sanding the sphere with 220-grit sandpaper before making his way to 600-grit sandpaper.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Wooden Resin Sphere</figure>

To cap things off, he adds some Yorkshire grit which polishes the sphere as well as adds a bit of finish to it.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Wooden Resin Sphere</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Wooden Resin Sphere</figure>

There are a few bubbles in the resin which result from not drying the wood enough before casting, but for the most part, the sphere looks pretty cool. Apart from fixing the resin container and drying the wood more thoroughly, Howarth exclaims he would try a more prominent landmark like a mountain next time, as casting a crater doesn’t leave a whole lot of distinguishable features in the wood.

To see more of Frank Howarth’s awesome video editing skills and woodworking prowess, check out his YouTube channel as well as his webpage, Frank makes.

The post Frank Howarth Immortalizes A Family Vacation In A Wood-Turned Resin Sphere appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at December 13, 2019 12:49 PM

December 12, 2019

SolidSmack

Multistable + Prismatic: Researchers Explore New Metamaterial Design

Researchers have been exploring new concepts for developing metamaterials.

Metamaterials are small mechanical structures made from one or more basic materials, but the motions possible in the structure exhibit more complex behaviors. A very simple example might be to 3D print a spiral structure – but at the same time creating a “springy” material. The researchers define metamaterials as:

“Metamaterials are artificial materials that derive their unusual properties from their periodic architecture. Some metamaterials can deform their internal structure to switch between different properties.”

Multi-Property Metamaterials

The research, performed at AMOLF in Amsterdam, examined how to control such microstructures in a more precise manner. In particular, they wished to determine if it was possible to create a metamaterial that can exhibit more than a single property.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption> Example metamaterials offering more than one stable state [Source: Nature] </figcaption></figure>

Their approach was to leverage existing knowledge of origami, the ancient Japanese method of folding paper into complex structures. The researchers used advanced mathematical techniques to study “prismatic multistable 3D building blocks” and developed a method of identifying the multiple stable states of a particular configuration. They explain:

“While a complete description of all possible deformations and stable states is not possible due to the large number of degrees of freedom arising from the elastic description, our method was designed to closely mimic possible experimental implementations of locally actuated metamaterials previously studied for only one prismatic structure. As a result, we are able to shine light on the highly multistable behavior that most of these building blocks exhibit.”

3D Printing Metamaterials

How does this research relate to 3D printing? It’s my belief that metamaterials could be a large portion of 3D printed items in the distant future, simply because it is the only manufacturing technology currently able to do so.

We haven’t seen this happen yet because metamaterials are a relatively new concept and are radically different from traditional materials. So far there have been a number of experiments and research projects such as this one, but few, if any, have made their way yet into actual commercial products.

But they will.

Metamaterial Enabled Products

It’s going to take perhaps a generation for scientists to refine our understandings of metamaterials, engineers to develop products that leverage their properties and entrepreneurs to commercialize those inventions.

For now, few designers know how to make products that make good use of metamaterials, and many will have never even heard of them.

But when that transformation happens, we will see a flood of astonishing new products that were unimaginable in the past.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Multistable + Prismatic: Researchers Explore New Metamaterial Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at December 12, 2019 09:45 PM

The Javelin Blog

New PDM Options for processes in SOLIDWORKS Manage 2020

In SOLIDWORKS Manage 2020, we have more options for PDM outputs from a process;

  • Process Configuration Wizard > Workflow Properties
    • Outputs
Process Configuration Wizard > Workflow Properties > Outputs

Process Configuration Wizard

Do not increment version of PDM files

With this enabled, a new version won’t be created as part of the process output.  This is similar to the option within PDM Overwrite latest version.

A few notes about this option;

  • This setting only applies to the SOLIDWORKS Manage output.
  • May take some time if there are a large number of items linked to this

We can use the Overwrite Latest Version option on the PDM workflow to prevent extra versions being created in PDM if;

  • Manage changes the state of the PDM workflow
  • The PDM transition updates a variable.

Permissions: Use permissions from the logged-in user

This will use the permissions of the logged-in user to complete the process output.

Permissions: Use permissions from the following user

Similar to the functionality within tasks in PDM, we have the ability to assign a user account for the Output Process to use while completing.  This allows users to inherit or limit permissions they wouldn’t normally have for purposes of completing the output.

The post New PDM Options for processes in SOLIDWORKS Manage 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at December 12, 2019 01:00 PM

December 11, 2019

The Javelin Blog

The SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault Structure and Backup best practices

If you are an IT professional who supports a SOLIDWORKS PDM installation, you already know that it has many features that enable the Engineering department to design their products faster and better; but from a purely IT perspective, it is a specialized file repository – a vault. This article will help you understand its structure, and how you can make sure your SOLIDWORKS PDM vault is properly backed up.

If all you want is straight-forward instructions on how to create a SOLIDWORKS PDM backup, please see this article.

The Vault Structure

A PDM vault has two main components: a SQL Server database, that holds metadata, such as data card values, folder structures, users, groups, etc and the Archive Server, that contains all file contents. Note that the SOLIDWORKS PDM SQL Server database DOES NOT store any files at all, even though Microsoft SQL Server has the ability to store files. This is by design. We will discuss the implications from a backup point of view later on this article.

The diagram below shows a hypothetical conversation between a workstation with a PDM client installed, SQL Server and the Archive Server.

A conversation between a PDM client, SQL Server and the Archive Server

What really would be happening here is this:

  1. User browses to a file in the vault. So far, only SQL Server is involved. The folder structures, permissions, data card information, etc is all stored in the vault database. That includes the file entry, with the complete file information.
  2. Once a file is selected, one of the attributes that are returned by SQL Server is the file internal ID. The user will never see that, but that ID is what the PDM client software will use in the next step.
  3. If the user opens the file or simply goes to the Preview tab, the PDM client will make a request over TCP Port 3030 to the Archive Server. It will tell the Archive Server what file ID it needs and what version (typically, the latest).
  4. The Archive Server will return the file contents and the PDM client will store it in the local cache folder so the user can open or view that file.

So, here are a few conclusions that we can draw from this:

  • Each file in a SOLIDWORKS PDM vault is made of SQL data and file system data.
  • Each version of a file in the vault is stored by the Archive Server as a separate file. In the example above, if the user had requested version 4 of that file instead of 5, the file transmitted by the Archive Server on step 4 would be different – it would be a different file, but that is transparent to the user.

How to create good backups

So, what does this all mean from a backup standpoint?

  • A good PDM backup is made of the SQL Server database backup and the corresponding archives.
  • Both must be synchronized, i.e. taken at the same time or at least within a short time interval.

Let’s consider a few scenarios where you need to restore a full back due to hardware failure.

If you take the SQL backups in the morning and the Archive backup at night, the SQL database will not know about the newer files and versions that the users added during the day. So when users browse the vault, they will not even see those newer files or versions, even though the Archive has them. Those archives will be orphaned. For all practical matters, the vault state is exactly what it was in the morning, when the SQL backup was taken.

And, if we had the opposite scenario, where the Archives are backed up in the morning and the SQL database at night? As you can probably guess at this point, PDM would show the latest data (all files that have been added during the day and latest versions too), but those newer versions would simply not exist in the Archive. So when a user tried to obtain them, he or she would get an error message at step 4.

NOTE: the database backup and the archive backup must be synchronized.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Backup Best Practices

So here are some good backup practices for your PDM vault.

The first advice is… hope for the best, but plan for the worst. If you do this, you can rest assured you will be able to restore your vault, even in catastrophic scenarios:

  1. Make daily backups.
  2. Make sure the SQL backup and the archive backup are synchronized.
  3. Test your backups periodically (e.g. monthly) to make sure your backups are good. You can use a test environment to do a full restore.
  4. Make sure your backups are stored in a different system than the production server. This could be a different server on your network or a backup device such as a tape drive, for instance.
  5. At least weekly, move a backup set physically to another building. No one wants a disaster to happen, but fires, flooding, etc can happen.

The post The SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault Structure and Backup best practices appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Samir Lohmann at December 11, 2019 01:00 PM

December 10, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Adding/Analyzing/Modifying SOLIDWORKS Center of Mass Part 2

Have you ever had an old fan with the metal cage still run like a champ but found that a newer plastic fan seems to die within a year or two of usage? Ever been on the freeway and saw someone’s hub cap wobbling and then suddenly fly off? Did you know the earth isn’t a perfect sphere and it’s actually more plump in the middle?

Rotational Mass and Center of Mass play off each other. If the Center of Mass is not perfect on a fan blade or a hub cap it will wiggle itself loose and potentially fail. A lot of design and machining goes into items that spin.

Taking a look back at our Crankshaft example featured in part 1; but this time it’s in an assembly and we can see the COM came in. This COM has a colour change and has the part icon below it. That mean this is the part level COM not the assembly COM. What I recommend is suppressing the COM on the part side so it doesn’t interfere with the assembly COM.

Center of Mass feature

Center of Mass feature

I have these special brass blocks in my assembly. I want to do the Center of Mass, but I don’t want to include these. In order to do this you must bring up the right click menu and select Properties. While the Component Properties is open, on the right side near the bottom, you will see an Envelope check box. Checking this will exclude this part from the COM. This must be done per part and even for any pattern parts.

Component Properties

Component Properties

Any part that’s enveloped will have an icon change in the Design Tree and will change colour in the graphics area. If the colour is interfering with your assembly the envelope colour can be changed in the options.

Enveloped Parts

Enveloped Parts

With the envelope parts out of the way this allows you to add the Center of Mass and do any studies you’d like, such as Motion Study, Design Study or Simulations.

Envelopes removed

Envelopes removed

The post Adding/Analyzing/Modifying SOLIDWORKS Center of Mass Part 2 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at December 10, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

SkillCoach | Onshape CAD Improvements Mega Resource Pack Collection!

Well, the end of the year is rapidly approaching! And if you are an aspiring Onshape CAD user I’ve got an early Christmas present for you! I’ve compiled my SkillCoach Onshape CAD Improvements Mega Resource Pack! Yep, I scoured the Onshape website for every CAD improvement they posted pertaining to modeling tools and techniques that are of interest to folks who develop consumer products, especially us Industrial design types. Contained in this post is my curated list of must-know Onshape features and enhancements. When I started digging around I decided I’d go back and grab the goodies from 2018 and mid-2017 as well. Hence the megapack!

Over the course of this year 2019, I’ve invested a good chunk of time in cultivating my Onshape CAD skills especially pertaining to surface modeling. In early June I authored a post entitled “Onshape Enhanced Surface Modeling Tools Make The Grade!” That post was my report back to the Solidsmack community of my findings after completing a pretty extensive CAD surfacing tool evaluation I undertook in collaboration with the folks over at Onshape. Being quite pleased with the outcome I was motivated to keep learning Onshape!

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The monthly CAD improvements section on the Onshape forum and the “What’s New” webinars were my source for compiling the mega improvements pack.

Note: Onshape is the source of all material contained in this post both video, image and text descriptions. I’ve copied the material verbatim.

Live links have been maintained to each original post as there are many other feature enhancements pertaining to other Onshape functionality that may be of interest to you. It may be necessary to reset to the first page in the forum post to view content properly.

<figure class="wp-block-image is-resized"><figcaption>It may be necessary to reset to page one to view the beginning of the post.</figcaption></figure>

These resources proved invaluable in helping me stay abreast of the advancement in the software and I trust they will do the same for you. Go ahead peruse and enjoy!


Improvements to Onshape – December 3rd, 2019 — Onshape

MERGE SURFACES

You can now merge surfaces using the Boolean feature. In the past, the Boolean feature was limited to merging solid parts, and the only options to merge surfaces were within individual features.

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Improvements to Onshape – November 12th, 2019 — Onshape

IMPORT IMPROVEMENTS

You can now choose the option to “Orient imported models with the Y Axis Up” when importing into multiple Documents. In the past, this option was limited to importing to a single Document.

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BOOLEAN IMPROVEMENTS

You can now subtract solids from surfaces using the Boolean feature in Onshape.

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Improvements to Onshape – October 17th, 2019 — Onshape

DIALOG IMPROVEMENTS

Dialogs will now automatically advance to the next input in cases where only a single item can be selected.

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Improvements to Onshape – September 11th, 2019 — Onshape

CHANGE UNITS OF MESH DATA

You can now dynamically change the units of imported Mesh data. The changes automatically update, resizing the mesh in the Part Studio where it was imported.

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August 20th, 2019 — Onshape Improvements

HIGHLIGHT BOUNDARY EDGES

A new view tool is now available to toggle highlighting boundary (or laminar) surface edges. This will aid in identifying areas of an imported model which need repair and assist with surfacing workflows. See our help documentation for more on repairing imported models.

<figure class="wp-block-image is-resized"><figcaption>HIGHLIGHT BOUNDARY EDGES
A new view tool is now available to toggle highlighting boundary (or laminar) surface edges. This will aid in identifying areas of an imported model which need repair and assist with surfacing workflows. See our help documentation for more on repairing imported models.</figcaption></figure>

CYLINDRICAL WRAP

You can now wrap sketch or surface entities around a cylinder.

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Improvements to Onshape – July 8th, 2019 — Onshape

MOVE BOUNDARY

Move Boundary can take surfaces and extend them outwards, cut a surface back, or un-trim a surface with the use of various end conditions. You can also extend and cut back a surface simultaneously depending on the end conditions and selections made.

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CURVATURE VISUALIZATION IMPROVEMENTS

The Show Curvature dialog now gives you the options to display curvature combs, the minimum radius of an edge, curve or sketch entity, and inflection points along 2D splines in a sketch.

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Improvements to Onshape – June 18th, 2019 — Onshape

CURVATURE CONSTRAINT

You will find a new “Curvature” sketch constraint that makes it easy to create curvature continuous transitions between sketch splines (and conics) and surrounding geometry.

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Improvements to Onshape – April 15th, 2019 — Onshape

REPLACE IMPORTED GEOMETRY

You can now directly replace imported geometry within Onshape. You can update the file by right-clicking on the import feature or by selecting the “Update” button on the tab in the new CAD Imports folder.

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CURVATURE COMBS ON CURVE CREATION

You now have a new option to view the curvature combs of previewed edges while creating features such as Bridging curve, 3D fit spline, and loft. These curvature combs update dynamically as you modify the curves.

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Improvements to Onshape – March 22nd, 2019 — Onshape

DYNAMIC CURVATURE COMBS ON SKETCH DRAG

Where previously you have had the ability to display the curvature of sketch entities statically, with this release the curvature-comb display is now dynamic and updates in realtime on drag. This is especially useful when manipulating spline points.

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PARTIAL BOUNDARIES FOR SURFACE LOFT, FILL FEATURES

If the profiles or guide curves extend further than necessary, we can now select to trim them directly in the Loft feature (Surface). The Fill feature can similarly handle a partial boundary, trimming all excess automatically.

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Improvements to Onshape – March 1st, 2019 — Onshape

RE-ORDER OF SELECTIONS IN LOFT, FILL, AND OTHER FEATURES

Rather than having to delete and re-select the items, you can now re-order selections in many order-dependent features.

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Improvements to Onshape – December 4th, 2018 — Onshape

FEATURE LIST FOLDERS

You can now create folders in the Feature list. 

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Improvements to Onshape – March 2nd, 2018 — Onshape

SPLIT FACE WITH FACE OR SKETCH REGION

In the last update, we introduced the option to split a part using a face from a solid or a sketch region. This capability has now been extended to the Split Face feature. This gives you more flexibility; you no longer have to create a plane, a surface or a sketch perpendicular to the face you want to split.

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Improvements to Onshape – February 13th, 2018 — Onshape

SPLIT PART IMPROVEMENTS

You can now use a sketch region or a face from a solid or surface body to split a Part. A new option, “Trim to face boundaries”, determines whether these new selection types are extended to the boundaries of the Part or not. This enables you to split individual areas of your design without affecting the rest of the Part.

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NON-UNIFORM SCALING

The Transform feature can now be used to apply non-uniform scaling. Choosing a mate connector as the reference entity will scale about the mate connector center and use the mate connector coordinate system.

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Improvements to Onshape – November 9th, 2017 — Onshape

MATCH CURVATURE IN BRIDGING CURVE AND 3D FIT SPLINE

You now have options in both the bridging curve command and the 3D Fit Spline command to match the curvature, giving you curvature continuous transitions between your selections and the curves you are creating.

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3D FIT SPLINE IMPROVEMENTS

You can now reference a plane or planar face when specifying direction in the 3D Fit Spline command.

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Improvements to Onshape – July 6th, 2017 — Onshape

FILL

You can now create a surface defined by a boundary of edges or curves.

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GUIDES AND END CONDITIONS IN LOFT

You can now use a combination of guides and end conditions in the Loft command.  In the past, you had to choose one or the other.

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ENCLOSE

Create a solid part from an enclosed selection of surfaces or planes.

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Improvements to Onshape – October 19th, 2017 — Onshape

FILL SURFACE GUIDES

Fill surface can now use curves as well as vertices to control the shape of the surface.

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Improvements to Onshape – August 16th, 2017 — Onshape

MERGE SCOPE FOR SURFACES

When creating surfaces using Onshape’s advanced modeling tools, you can now specify a merge scope and choose which surfaces to merge them with.

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The post SkillCoach | Onshape CAD Improvements Mega Resource Pack Collection! appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at December 10, 2019 01:54 AM

December 09, 2019

If SolidWorks is disappearing, why am I writing new material?

You see rumors and conjecture a lot. And obviously, everything you read on the internet is true, especially the SolidWorks forum ;o) But regardless of the rumors, SolidWorks as a…

by matt at December 09, 2019 07:12 PM

The Javelin Blog

Adding/Analyzing/Modifying SOLIDWORKS Center of Mass Part 1

In my opinion, the SOLIDWORKS Center of Mass is an underrated reference dimension. Many designers use it to see where the bulk of the weight is. This can determine if weight needs to be added, subtract weight or reorganize items to get the desired balance. This can be used to design a part’s shipping cradle to help balance a load. It can also be used to increase the performance of a race car keeping its weight lower and central makes it easier to control the G-forces.

Example Assembly

Example Crankshaft Part

Taking a look at this Crankshaft, it’s important to have a Center of Mass in the center of the part. This can be difficult to achieve with so many bosses, cuts, holes, etc. Most cranks have balancing weights on the ends or have minor cuts to achieve equilibrium. If the crank wasn’t balanced this would lead to a catastrophic failure in the engine. With this in mind, knowing Center of Mass is critical.

Weight removed from the bottom creates an unbalanced part.

Weight removed from the bottom creates an unbalanced part.

There are a few ways we can add a SOLIDWORKS Center of Mass mark on the part side.

With that feature removed the part is balanced.

With that feature removed the part is balanced.

Add Center of Mass Method 1:

In the Feature tab, on the far right is the Reference drop down arrow and here is Center of Mass.

Via reference menu

Via reference menu

Add Center of Mass Method 2:

In the Evaluate tab, click on Mass Properties. This brings up a new dialog box. If you haven’t used this feature before it’s great to see the over mass, surface area and Center of Mass. There is a check box near the top Crete Center of Mass feature. You can check that and exit the Mass Properties.

Mass Properties

Mass Properties

NOTE: Another trick to this is overriding the existing mass or Center of Mass. Right under the body selection is an Override Mass Properties button, clicking on that will bring up a near dialog box. Learn more about the SOLIDWORKS Center of Mass feature.

The post Adding/Analyzing/Modifying SOLIDWORKS Center of Mass Part 1 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at December 09, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Monday List 50.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

How Chinese Sci-Fi Conquered America

The translator Ken Liu has done more than anyone to bridge the gap between Chinese science fiction and American readers.

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Letter of Recommendation: Badly Dubbed Movies

“Cinema” has become a loaded term, but if you’re a fan of it, you most likely came of age with an acceptance of at least one uncontested truth: To view a film in a language other than your own requires reading

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The Bloomberg 50 (2019 Edition)

From finance to fashion and technology to trade, these are the people who defined 2019.

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The 2019 Outsiders of the Year

The athletes, activists, makers, movers, hustlers, and rule breakers who shaped our world this year

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Is Amazon Unstoppable?

Bezos, reportedly worth a hundred and fourteen billion dollars, has donated less than three per cent of his wealth to charity.

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The post The SolidSmack Monday List 50.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at December 09, 2019 12:43 PM

December 06, 2019

SolidSmack

Xometry Acquires Shift, Prepares to Body Slam Europe with On-Demand Manufacturing Bliss

Xomety just keeps on slamming out the hits. Early this week, the US (Maryland) based company, founded in 2013, acquired Germany ( Ottobrunn) based Shift to cement its plan of “growth initiatives, product development and global expansion” with its $50MM in equity funding early in May of 2019.

As you (should) know, Xometry has established itself in the US with a slew of on-demand manufacturing capabilities from CNC Machining, Milling, and Turning to Sheet Metal Fab, 3D Printing, and Injection Molding, along with services for finishing and design. Over the years, they built support for and integrations with SOLIDWORKS, CATIA, NX, Inventor, and PTC Creo. They have supply partnerships for raw material, tools, and components and an Instant Quote system faster than Marg in procurement can spit at you for getting the RFQ wrong again.

It’s all worked together to break down a huge mind/workplace barrier around the idea of high-quality, affordable on-demand manufacturing. So, outside of global DOMINATION, why expand to Europe? Xometry CEO, Randy Altschuler, breaks it down:

Many of our customers, like BMW and Bosch, have a global presence and we can serve more of their needs with a global network. Our AI-driven algorithms and intelligent sourcing platform give us a competitive advantage as we expand across new geographies and manufacturing technologies.” 

If you’re not familiar with Shift, they’ve got a smaller set of capabilities, but central to the European market and a strong supply chain. It’s a combination that is perfectly situated for Xometry to set-up its technology–its instant quote capabilities, AI-driven algorithms, and intelligent sourcing platform–to make the on-demand dream even more real for European firms and manufacturers.

Altogether, over the past six years, Xometry has grown to a company that employs over 300 people while doubling revenue at the same time it’s making acquisitions and expanding its service and manufacturing portfolio.

In the words of the Beastie Boys, Xometry is, “rolling down the hill snowballing getting bigger.”

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The post Xometry Acquires Shift, Prepares to Body Slam Europe with On-Demand Manufacturing Bliss appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at December 06, 2019 07:59 PM

Siemens Scoops Up Atlas 3D

atlas3d-siemens-plm-simulation-software-acquisition

Industrial giant Siemens acquired Atlas 3D to add to their growing additive manufacturing portfolio. Somehow I missed this in the Formnext Frenzy, but on 12 November Siemens and Atlas 3D announced the Indiana-based startup was to be entirely acquired by Siemens.

Sunata Features

We’ve followed 3D Atlas for a few years now and were impressed with their Sunata product. Sunata can perform a sophisticated simulation of a metal 3D print in order to understand the thermal distortions while 3D printing a specific geometry. Then, it can re-engineer the design slightly to account for the thermal stresses to ensure that the part is geometrically correct when printed.

In other words, if a warp is predicted, it will adjust the model to use the warp to bring the geometry in line. Such a tool is indispensable in the expensive world of metal 3D printing, where print failures – often due to thermal warping – are common.

Recently the company added GPU support to Sunata, greatly speeding up the simulation process. This effect is particularly noticeable on high-resolution analyses, where we saw one Sunata benchmark show a 21X speed improvement.

Siemens says:

“Siemens announced today that it has signed an agreement to acquire Atlas 3D, Inc., a Plymouth, Indiana-based developer of software that works with direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) printers to automatically provide design engineers with the optimal print orientation and requisite support structures for additive parts in near real-time. Atlas 3D will join Siemens Digital Industries Software, where its solutions will expand additive manufacturing capabilities in the Xcelerator portfolio of software.”

And:

”Atlas 3D’s Sunata software solves this problem by giving front-end designers a quick, easy and automated way to get much closer to a “right first time” build. Sunata is a GPU-accelerated high-performance computing additive manufacturing software solution that can deliver results up to one hundred times faster than other build simulation solutions on the market.

GPU-accelerated computing is the employment of a graphics processing unit (GPU) along with a computer processing unit (CPU) to facilitate processing-intensive operations such as deep learning, analytics and engineering applications.”

Siemens – Atlas 3D Outcome

This is good news for Siemens, as it will add a very powerful capability to its broad suite of industrial software dedicated to 3D printing production environments. In particular, the cost savings incurred by Sunata will surely be most welcome by clients.

For Atlas 3D, a recent startup company, this could have been their exit strategy all along: build up a product and market, and then sell to a larger player. If that was their strategy, it is now complete, and the investors in Atlas3D are likely pretty happy right now.

For the small staff of Atlas 3D, it’s our understanding that many will continue to work with Siemens to develop the product. With Siemens’ huge customer reach they should be able to place the Sunata in far more installations than ever before.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Siemens Scoops Up Atlas 3D appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at December 06, 2019 06:31 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Offset Surface now much easier to use!

Remember that time you tried to offset faces as new surfaces, only to receive an error message that it failed?  This can be frustrating, especially when many faces are involved and it is unclear which ones are the culprit.  Troubleshooting can become time-consuming as you try different subsets of the faces, hoping for partial success.

In year versions prior to 2020, there is a method using Shell that may help you to find the culprits.

Now, voted a Top Enhancement in SOLIDWORKS 2020, there is an easy way to get Offset Surface to succeed as much as possible!  Offset Surfaces will now let you know which faces failed to offset, if any, and give you a chance to delete them in order to ensure that the feature succeeds.

Failed offset surface faces clearly indicated

Failed offset faces clearly indicated

Better yet, you can now strike all failing faces from the list with a single click on the new button: “Remove All Failing Faces”.  This button will appear if there are any failing faces.

Failed faces removed

Failed faces removed

…and just like that, your Offset Surface is good to go.

Explore this and other surfacing tools in our instructor-led Surfacing course!

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Offset Surface now much easier to use! appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at December 06, 2019 01:00 PM