Planet SolidWorks

March 03, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Using the SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager Client

When you install a SOLIDWORKS Network license a SolidNetWork License Manager Client application is also installed allowing users to view available network licenses, change the server location, borrow licenses, or change the license check out order.

Activating the Client Manager

To activate the SolidNetWork License Manager on a Client go to Start > SOLIDWORKS Tools 20XX > SolidNetWork License Manager Client

SolidNetWork License Manager Client

SolidNetWork License Manager Client

The Client application will now start with the License Usage tab:

SolidNetWork Client License Usage

SolidNetWork Client License Usage

License Usage Tab

The License Usage tab provides information on the number of free and used licenses. A list of users will be provided to determine who is using a specific license.

The ‘Product’ dropdown provides information for each license such as SOLIDWORKS Standard or SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard.

NOTE: A SOLIDWORKS Standard license is required before using a Professional or Premium license. For example, if you have 2 Standard, 2 Professional, and 2 Premium licenses, you will see a total of 6 Standard licenses. All users initially obtain a Standard license until a Pro or Premium add-in is selected.

Server List Tab

The Server List tab lists all servers that the client is searching on the network for SOLIDWORKS licenses. You can add/remove servers from the list. If the SolidNetWork License Manager is moved to a new server, each Client’s License Manager must have the Server List updated with the new server name.

SolidNetWork Client Server List

SolidNetWork Client Server List

IMPORTANT: Log in as the Local Administrator on the machine if the server needs changing

License Borrowing Tab

The License Borrowing tab allows a user to temporarily lock a license to the local computer so SOLIDWORKS can be used when not connected to the network. For more information about the borrowing functionality, please refer to our SOLIDWORKS License Borrowing article.

SolidNetWork Client License Borrowing

SolidNetWork Client License Borrowing

The list of products that have an available license will be shown in the list.  Select the one required and specify the last day you will need the license.  Licenses are limited to a 30-day maximum borrow period.  This maximum period can be shortened using an Options file.

SOLIDWORKS will be available for use through to 11:59pm on the day specified.  At midnight of the following day, the license will expire on the client laptop and the license will be freed up on the server.  The license will need to be borrowed again after 30 days.

Once you have selected a product and the Borrow until date, then click Borrow.  This will move the license under the Borrowed Product Licenses window.  A Standard License will automatically be borrowed with any higher level license.

License Order Tab

The License Order tab allows you to modify which level of license to obtain when enabling additional add-ins. This is common in scenarios with multiple Simulation licenses. Read our related article to learn more.

SolidNetWork Client License Order

SolidNetWork Client License Order

The post Using the SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager Client appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at March 03, 2021 08:01 PM

Using the SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager Server

Here is an overview of the SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License (SNL) Manager Server application that is used to manage SOLIDWORKS network licenses.

After installing the SolidNetWork License Manager on your server machine you will then be able to manage the service.

Activating the License Manager Server

To start the SolidNetWork License Manager Server select Start > SOLIDWORKS Tools 20XX > SolidNetWork License Manager Server

SolidNetWork License Manager Start Menu

SolidNetWork License Manager Start Menu

The SolidNetWork License Server will now start on your machine:

SolidNetWork License Server Administration

SolidNetWork License Server Administration

Server Administration

The Server Administration tab provides the ability to Start and Stop the service. After installation and activation, the service is automatically started. Client machines ping the server every 30 minutes. If the service is stopped, users have 30 minutes until a message will be given that no licenses are available and will be forced to save their work and close the session of SOLIDWORKS.

  • View Log will provide a text file with logs of the license usage. A 3rd party FlexLM license usage monitor application would be required to process the logs into a report format.
  • Modify allows you to Reactivate or Deactivate the license, as well as see currently activated products.

License Usage

The License Usage tab provides information on the number of free and used licenses. A list of users will be provided to determine who is using a specific license. The ‘Product’ dropdown provides information for each license.

NOTE: A SOLIDWORKS Standard license is required for all Professional or Premium licenses. For example, if you have 2 Standard, 2 Professional, and 2 Premium licenses, you will see a total of 6 Standard licenses. All users initially obtain a Standard license until a Pro or Premium add-in is selected.

SolidNetWork License Usage

SolidNetWork License Usage

Other Tabs

The remaining three tabs (Server List, License Borrowing, License Order) are typically used on client machines.

Related Information

Here is a summary of upgrading, moving the server, and modifying serial numbers:

Upgrading SolidNetWork License Manager Server

The License Manager can be directly upgraded from a previous release. Use the newer Installation Manager to perform the installation using Server Products > Upgrade SolidNetWork License Manager.

You can upgrade the License Manager to a new version without requiring users to close SOLIDWORKS if you have the installation files ready. Client machines check the status of the License Manager service every 30 minutes, but the upgrade and reactivation can complete in less time. If the service is not restarted within this timeframe, users will be prompted to save their work and close SOLIDWORKS.

NOTE: The SolidNetwork License Manager must be the same major release (year) or newer than all SOLIDWORKS clients. The minor release (service pack) doesn’t apply. The License Manager can provide licenses for prior releases.

IMPORTANT: Once the new version is installed, it must be reactivated to obtain the new licenses, read our SNL upgrade article to learn more.

  1. Open the SolidNetWork License Manager Server on the hosted server.
  2. On the ‘Server Administration’ tab click ‘Modify’
  3. In the following dialogue window, select ‘Activate/Reactivate your product license(s)’
  4. Click ‘Next’ and then follow the rest of the on-screen instructions to complete the reactivation procedure

Moving the SolidNetWork License Manager to another Server

A SOLIDWORKS network serial number can only be activated on one server at a time. Therefore, the license must be deactivated from the old server before activating the new server.

For detailed instructions on moving the License Manager to a new server, please review our moving SNL article.

Modifying Serial Numbers in the SolidNetWork License Manager Server

To change a serial number in the SolidNetWork License Manager:

  1. Go into the Windows Control Panel > Programs and Features
  2. Right-click on ‘SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager’ and Change
  3. Choose to ‘Modify’ the install
  4. Add/change serial numbers (separated by commas)
  5. Reactivate the License Manager

The post Using the SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager Server appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at March 03, 2021 06:29 PM

How to Install SOLIDWORKS Network License

In this tech tip we provide an overview of how to install the SOLIDWORKS Network license desktop version, this process applies to SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional, or Premium software. You will first register your serial number, download the software, and install the SolidNetWork License Server and then a SOLIDWORKS Client.

Register your SOLIDWORKS serial number

Before you can download the software you need to register your serial number on the SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal. You will have likely received your SOLIDWORKS serial number from your Value Added Reseller (VAR) after making your purchase:

  1. Go to the SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal at http://customerportal.solidworks.com/
  2. You will be presented with the SOLIDWORKS One Account form in your browser as shown below
  3. Assuming you are a brand new customer you can pick the Create a SOLIDWORKS ID button to create a new account:
SOLIDWORKS ID One Account

SOLIDWORKS ID One Account

Create a SOLIDWORKS ID

You will need to enter your details to register the serial number with your email address.

  1. Enter your email address and serial number in the registration page and pick the Next > button
  2. On the next page you will be presented with your company information. Verify the information displayed is accurate, then click Yes to finish the process (if there are any errors or difficulties registering, contact your VAR for assistance).

Note: Use the navigation buttons in the pages. Do not use the standard browser navigation buttons.

Create SOLIDWORKS ID

Create SOLIDWORKS ID

Log into the Customer Portal

After registering your details you can then log into the customer portal with your credentials:

  1. Return to the Customer Portal and enter your email address and your password into One Account form
  2. Select the Log In button:
SOLIDWORKS ID One Account

SOLIDWORKS ID One Account

The SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal

Within the Customer Portal you can access a variety of resources under four sections, My Support, References, Download, and Community.

  1. In the Download section select the Downloads and Updates link

NOTE: If sections of the customer portal are locked use the Register My Products link as described in our unlocking the Customer Portal article

Download from Customer Portal

Download from Customer Portal

SOLIDWORKS Downloads

You will now be redirected out of the customer portal to the SOLIDWORKS website download page where you can select the product you need. The last four versions/releases of SOLIDWORKS are available to choose here, and you can select the Service Pack (SP) that you require:

  1. In Downloads page select the version you require from the dropdown menu
  2. Pick the SOLIDWORKS Products link adjacent to the service pack you require (pick the highest number SP if you are a new customer):
Download SOLIDWORKS Product

Select SOLIDWORKS Products in the Downloads page

  1. You then need to accept the license agreement to download the software by picking the Accept Agreement and Continue button at the foot of the page:
Accept SOLIDWORKS License Agreement

Accept SOLIDWORKS License Agreement

Run the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager

Now you can download the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager to get started with the installation process:

  1. Select the Download link in the page and a zip file will download from the SOLIDWORKS web site. This file is around 32MB and will manage the installation process for you without having to manually download files
  2. After the SolidWorksSeup.exe zip file has completed downloading run the SolidWorksSeup.exe file from your local machine
SOLIDWORKS Software Download

SOLIDWORKS Software Download

  1. You may be asked to authorize the app to make changes on your device, select Yes
Allow SOLIDWORKS Setup zip to run

Allow SOLIDWORKS Setup zip to make changes

  1. You can then Browse to the location where you want the files to unzip using the browse button on the WinZip dialog or use the default location

NOTE: not all the SOLIDWORKS installation files will download at this point, just the Installation Manager

  1. Select Unzip and the files will be extracted and the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager will load
Winzip Self Extractor

Winzip Self Extractor

  1. After the files have extracted select OK and the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager will start automatically
SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager Extracted

SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager Extracted

Using the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager

The SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager will now guide you through the rest of the installation process and provide you with options for installing your purchased SOLIDWORKS software and add-ins. Browse our library of posts on the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager for more information.

IMPORTANT NOTE: During installation the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager will determine the files you need based on the serial number you enter, this could by up to 16GB. So be prepared for a large download and ensure there is enough room on your machine to accommodate the download files and the installation itself.

  1. First step in the installation process is to select the type of install required from the four choices. For a network installation select Download and share all files. Create individual installs or administration images on multiple machines with a single download.
  2. With the option selected select Next >
SOLIDWORKS Install Download Files

SOLIDWORKS Install Download Files

Entering your Serial Number

At this point in the installation you will need to enter your serial number[s] for the SOLIDWORKS products you have purchased. At this stage you can install any of the 3D Design, Visualization, Simulation, CAM, Technical Communication, and Electrical Design licenses you have purchased:

  1. The next step is to enter your SOLIDWORKS Serial number[s] for the purchased product[s], you don’t have to install all products at once, you can modify the installation later if required

NOTE: You can populate the serial numbers automatically using the Log In button, but that process requires creating a SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal account. It is much easier just to enter the serial numbers into the boxes as you should have received the number already from your local reseller.

SOLIDWORKS Install Serial Numbers

SOLIDWORKS Install Serial Numbers

  1. Select Next to continue and SOLIDWORKS will connect to the online installation server and determine which products you have purchased based on the entered serial number.

NOTE: If an existing version of SOLIDWORKS is found on your machine the installation manager will give you the choice of upgrading your existing version or installing a new separate instance.

Download Options

The Installation Manager will now display a summary of your action along with download options for you to change the download location and an estimated download size

  1. The default options will save to Documents\SOLIDWORKS Downloads (in the screenshot below a custom directory is selected but you can choose any location you like). Click Change to modify the download folder.

 

SOLIDWORKS File Download Options

SOLIDWORKS File Download Options

  1. OPTIONAL: Pick Browse to choose the folder location required
  2. Enable the Use the background downloader option which can automatically notify and download newer service packs as they become available.
  3. Select < Back to Summary
SOLIDWORKS File Download Location

SOLIDWORKS File Download Location

Download SOLIDWORKS Software

The final step is to download and install onto your machine, you will notice the estimated installation file size is listed along with the download file size:

  1. Make sure you check the I accept the terms of the SOLIDWORKS license agreement option
  2. Select Download Now to obtain the installation files
SOLIDWORKS File Download Options

SOLIDWORKS File Download Options

  1. When the files have finished downloaded from the SOLIDWORKS web server the following Download Complete message will be displayed. Pick Close to finish.
SOLIDWORKS Download Complete

SOLIDWORKS Download Complete

SolidNetWork License Manager

The SolidNetWork License Manager hosts the SOLIDWORKS network licenses on a server to provide to client machines. This is a small application that runs a service in the background. The installation files for the SolidNetWork License Manager are included with the overall SOLIDWORKS download files the you obtained in the previous steps.

For a smaller download of only the License Manager files, use the Installation Manager obtained from the Customer Portal. Then run the Installation Manager on the server to only install the License Manager. This will download the required files for the installation (rather than Download and Share).

IMPORTANT: The SolidNetWork License Manager must be the same major release (year) or newer than all SOLIDWORKS clients. The minor release (service pack) doesn’t apply. The License Manager can provide licenses for prior releases.

Server – Installing SolidNetWork License Manager

Before client machines can launch SOLIDWORKS, the SolidNetWork License Manager must be installed and activated to provide licenses.

NOTE: The License Manager must be installed on a machine connected to the same network as all client machines.

  1. Locate the SOLIDWORKS Installation file set that you just downloaded and run Setup.exe
  2. Select Install Server Components and Install SolidNetWork License Manager then click Next
Install SOLIDWORKS Server Components

Install SOLIDWORKS Server Components

  1. You will then enter all SOLIDWORKS Network Serial Numbers. Multiple serial numbers can be separated by commas (,)
  2. Choose the default installation location C:\Program Files (x86)\SOLIDWORKS Corp\SolidNetWork License Manager , note this is still a 32-bit application. Pick Next
SolidNetWork License Manager Options

SolidNetWork License Manager Options

  1. Select I accept the terms of the SOLIDWORKS License Agreement and click Install Now to begin.
SolidNetWork License Manager Summary

SolidNetWork License Manager Summary

  1. When the installation is complete SOLIDWORKS has a few options you can choose for joining the SOLIDWORKS Customer Experience Improvement Program. Select the Yes, I want to join option as this will be very helpful for DS SolidWorks Corp. This is a confidential program and it will not effect your system performance. Read our SOLIDWORKS Customer Experience article to learn more.
  2. Then pick Finish and you’ll find the SolidNetWork License Manager under the Start menu.
SOLIDWORKS Installation Complete

SOLIDWORKS Installation Complete

  1. Launch the SolidNetWork License Manager application through the Start menu (Start > SOLIDWORKS Tools 20XX > SolidNetWork License Manager Server).

NOTE: If SOLIDWORKS is installed on the same machine, the Start menu will show two License Manager shortcuts. One is the Server Administrator version and the other is the Client version. The License Manager Server will have 5 tabs at the top, the first being ‘Server Administration.’ The License Manager Client will only have 4 tabs.

SolidNetWork License Manager Start Menu

SolidNetWork License Manager Start Menu

  1. If this is a new install of the License Manager, a dialog box will indicate that ‘No SolidNetWork license(s) exist, would you like to activate now?’ Select Yes.
New SolidNetWork License

New SolidNetWork License

  1. The License Server Information dialog allows you to customize which TCP ports for connectivity between client and server. The default port number is 25734. This can be modified if the port is already in use by another application. If firewalls are present, select ‘A firewall is in use on this server’. This will use port 25735 by default. Click Next.
SolidNetWorks License Server Information

SolidNetWork License Server Information

NOTE: The ports specified above will need to be opened through firewalls on both the server and client machines. Both ports 25734 and 25735 must be opened for incoming and outgoing traffic on your local network. For network connectivity tests, please review our SNL troubleshooting article.

IMPORTANT: When activating your License Manager, avoid using Remote Desktop Applications. The activation may be linked to the computer that was used to access the server, and not the server itself. If the server is then reactivated locally it will fail as the computer ID is different. It’s recommended to always activate on the physical machine. Review our avoiding SNL activation issues article.

  1. Select the licenses to activate and the activation method. If the server has an active internet connection, then you can select Automatically over the Internet and pick Next.
Activate SolidNetWork License Product

Activate SolidNetWork License Product

NOTE:  If the server does NOT have an internet connection, select Manually via email to save a file that can be transferred to another computer with internet access (i.e. via USB key). This file, called ‘SWActivateRequest’, can be emailed to activation@solidworks.com.

You will receive a reply email within a few minutes with a file called ‘SWActivateResponse’. Copy this file back to the server and return to the Manual activation process. Use ‘Open’ the SWActivateResponse file to complete the activation. If you do not receive a response, check your Junk/Spam email folders.

  1. After license activation a confirmation screen is displayed reporting that the activation has completed successfully. Select Finish. If you have difficulties activating, contact your SOLIDWORKS Reseller for technical support.
SolidNetWork License Activated

SolidNetWork License Activated

Clients – Installing SOLIDWORKS

The next step is to install SOLIDWORKS on client machines that will connect to the Server where the SolidNetWork License Manager has been installed.

If you specify a SolidNetWork License serial number when installing, SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager identifies that computer as a SolidNetWork license client. SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager prompts you for the SolidNetWork license manager computer name and port number to connect the client to the license manager.

When installing SOLIDWORKS, log in as the Local Administrator on the computer. This will ensure that you have full permissions on the entire machine. The Domain Administrator account may not provide enough permissions on the local machine. Read our related article for more information.

IMPORTANT: In general we recommend that you run the installation from locally downloaded installation files. Installing the program from a network drive can make the process longer.

  1. Begin the SOLIDWORKS installation by double-clicking on Setup.exe in the download folder.
  2. With the Install on this computer selected pick Next
Type of SOLIDWORKS Installation

Types of SOLIDWORKS Installation

Entering your Serial Number

At this point in the installation you will need to enter your serial number[s] for the SOLIDWORKS products you have purchased. At this stage you can install any of the 3D Design, Visualization, Simulation, CAM, Technical Communication, and Electrical Design licenses you have purchased:

  1. The next step is to enter your SOLIDWORKS Serial number[s] for the purchased product[s], you don’t have to install all products at once, you can modify the installation later if required

NOTE: You can populate the serial numbers automatically using the Log In button, but that process requires creating a SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal account. It is much easier just to enter the serial numbers into the boxes as you should have received the number already from your local reseller.

SOLIDWORKS Install Serial Numbers

SOLIDWORKS Install Serial Numbers

  1. Select Next to continue and SOLIDWORKS will connect to the online installation server and determine which products you have purchased based on the entered serial number.

NOTE: If an existing version of SOLIDWORKS is found on your machine the installation manager will give you the choice of upgrading your existing version or installing a new separate instance.

Optional: Change Products to Install

In this next step you can choose which products to install and more often than not you will keep the selection as the default as the license manager will have determined the products you are entitled to install based on your serial number:

  1. Use the default options for the installation unless there is a specific application you don’t want to install
  2. Select Change next to Products to view the applications that are going to be installed along with their file size, you should see all the products you have purchased listed, contact your VAR if you think you are missing any purchases (only English is installed, but other languages can be selected under Products)
  3. Select Back to Summary to go back
SOLIDWORKS Client Install Summary

SOLIDWORKS Client Install Summary

Optional: Download Options

In the download options you can specify details for completing the download operation, such as the location of the downloaded files, how to download the files, and whether to install the downloaded files.

  1. Select Change next to the Download Options
    • Download and install will download any additional missing files required to install
    • Download only will obtain the full installation file set that can be shared
    • Install only is used if you already have the full installation file set, which is the case in this example
  2. Select Back to Summary when you’ve reviewed or finished modifying the options
SOLIDWORKS Client Download Options

SOLIDWORKS Client Download Options

Optional: Installation Location

You can modify where SOLIDWORKS will be installed.

  1. Select Change next to Installation Location
  2. Enter a new location if required. By default, it will install to C:\Program Files\SOLIDWORKS Corp
  3. Select Back to Summary when you’ve reviewed or finished modifying the options
SOLIDWORKS Install Location

SOLIDWORKS Install Location

Optional: Toolbox/Hole Wizard Options

You can modify where the Toolbox/Hole Wizard library database will be installed:

NOTE: The SOLIDWORKS Hole Wizard is included with all versions of SOLIDWORKS, and SOLIDWORKS Toolbox is included with the Professional and Premium versions.

  1. Select Change next to Toolbox/Hole Wizard Options
  2. Enter a new location if required. By default, it will install to C:\SOLIDWORKS Data
  3. Select Back to Summary when you’ve reviewed or finished modifying the options
SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Install Options

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Install Options

NOTE: If you wanted to install multiple versions of SOLIDWORKS on your machine that is possible, our article  How to Install Multiple SOLIDWORKS Versions on your system provides the details along with some FAQs

  1. With all the options selected ensure the check box I accept the terms of the SOLIDWORKS License Agreement is checked and then pick Install Now to begin
SOLIDWORKS Client Install Summary

SOLIDWORKS Client Install Summary

  1. You’ll be asked to point to the server running the SolidNetWork License Manager. Enter the port@servername. The default port was 25734 so it would be 25734@yourservername. Select OK
SOLIDWORKS Client Server Port

SOLIDWORKS Client Server Port

The SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager will now install SOLIDWORKS on the machine:

SOLIDWORKS Installing

SOLIDWORKS Installing

  1. When the installation is complete SOLIDWORKS has a few options you can choose for joining the SOLIDWORKS Customer Experience Improvement Program. Select the Yes, I want to join option as this will be very helpful for DS SolidWorks Corp. This is a confidential program and it will not effect your system performance. Read our SOLIDWORKS Customer Experience article to learn more.
  2. Then pick Finish and you’ll find the SOLIDWORKS application icons on your desktop and under the Start menu.
SOLIDWORKS Installation Complete

SOLIDWORKS Installation Complete

Need help with your SOLIDWORKS Installation?

Javelin provides installation and upgrade services for SOLIDWORKS software. Visit our SOLIDWORKS services page to learn more.

The post How to Install SOLIDWORKS Network License appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at March 03, 2021 05:50 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

The Future of Design and Manufacturing

Powerful computers and fast communication networks are more affordable than ever. Cloud-connected tools, such as those offered on the 3DEXPERIENCE® platform, enable superior collaboration and the ability to keep everyone on the same page—all in a single environment. We have talked lots about how designers benefit from an integrated environment.

But what about manufacturing?

It is still fairly typical for most small- to mid-size manufacturers to rely on emails, faxes, and phone calls as the primary vehicles to communicate with customers. However, manufacturing can also work from this same common platform as designers do. One that is automatically in sync with product development, whether products are produced in-house or with outside suppliers.

Make Communication More Efficient

Design engineers and manufacturing have a history of poor or strained relationships. The lack of being on the same page can hurt productivity resulting in higher product costs. The 3DEXPERIENCE platform enables you to create project Communities where you can securely invite everyone on the product development project including customers and suppliers. Because you are working from the cloud, all information is shared in real-time—no more managing tons of project emails.

Disputes with designers or managers or clients are quickly resolved by reviewing communication threads within the Community. Follow-up meetings can be quickly organized using 3DLean on the platform, which guides and captures discussions in a natural environment leveraging a simple digital whiteboard, marker, and sticky notes. 3DLean makes Lean principles a natural outcome of team engagement, so improvement becomes second nature instead of a forced or awkward part of the process.

Get Involved Earlier on the Design

The 3D CAD review capabilities on the platform enable your entire team to review the product design without any requisite CAD knowledge.

From engineers to managers to manufacturing, all team members can participate in the design review process with full 3D digital renderings. Potential issues discovered earlier in the process are less costly to resolve.  Real-time design for manufacturing (DFM) advice from the shop floor or suppliers avoids (potentially expensive) downstream issues.

Making 3D reviews available to everyone is like sharing a common language; the entire team can participate in the design review process. Plus, all communication is captured on the platform, so traceability is built right into the process.

It becomes so much easier to communicate concerns, identify issues, and propose resolutions when everyone can see and review the 3D CAD model themselves. This enables internal stakeholders without CAD tools and outside suppliers to participate and get involved sooner in the development cycle.

Automatically in Synch

By now, you can probably easily see that when the entire team—designers and manufacturers—work from the same platform, making informed decisions is faster because everyone has access to real-time data, regardless of access to CAD tools. With all the data in the same place, everyone is up to date with access to a single source of truth. And because you are accessing “live” data, there is no risk of being out of sync on model revisions or assembly configurations.

With the ability of everyone to work from any location, traditional roadblocks to efficient deliveries and collaboration are eliminated. Manufacturers are no longer in the dark until the last minute. Relationships with designers and customers improve.

Manufacturing by its very nature is a collaborative effort. The advantages of a system that can embrace all of product development from concept through manufacturing should be obvious. Processes can be streamlined, productivity increased, delivery dates consistently met, and team communication maximized in a shared technology environment.

The 3DEXPERIENCE World presentation called The Future of Design and Manufacturing helps give you a visual, real-world scenario to imagine what this type of computing environment might do for your company.

If you have further questions, please contact your local reseller.

Author information

Michael Buchli
Michael Buchli has 20 years of design and manufacturing experience throughout the Midwest ranging from Aerospace to recycling systems. A number of those years were spent learning and understanding workflows and processes to improve efficiency and productivity. From running CNC equipment to welding and painting Michael has been hands-on in all aspects of bringing products to market. Michael is also certified in many areas of mfg and a CSWP. He has also written the CAMWorks Handbook.

The post The Future of Design and Manufacturing appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Michael Buchli at March 03, 2021 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

SmallAnt Chronicles His Journey To Beat World Pencil Sharpening Record

pencil sharpening speedrun

Quick! Off the top of your head, what do you think is the weirdest speed record out there?

Soda can opening? Pen clicking? Toenail clipping? All good answers with their respective record ranks. But for speedrunner and challenge taker SmallAnt, one of the strangest challenges he has ever undertaken has got to be pencil sharpening.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/oKEsSNJCVe8?feature=oembed" title="How I became the fastest pencil sharpener in the world" width="770"></iframe>

His video documents his entire journey from a pencil-sharpening novice to being a master human sharpener over the course of half a year. After seeing a bunch of weird speedruns in a YouTube video, he has taken note of the pencil-sharpening speedrun and has decided to look it up a month later.

Lo and behold, there are two types of records under pencil-sharpening: “drillless” and “drill.”

Drill speedruns allow the person to attach the pencils onto a drill and rotate them super fast, resulting in mostly hands-free, harmless pencil sharpening. Drillless speedruns will simply require you not to use a drill or any type of automated machine; everything else is fair game.

SmallAnt decided to take on the 10-pencil drillless speedrun, which at the time only had 7 speedrun attempts with the best time of 35 minutes and 35 seconds. And so begins this man’s decent down the pencil sharpening rabbit hole.

pencil sharpening speedrun

What started out as an idea for a dumb video quickly became SmallAnt’s obsession over the course of a few months. Using different pencils, sharpeners, and sharpening techniques, he experimented on what would be the fastest and easiest way to get 10 pencils down to nothing.

His first run was… not his best. Using two different gloves in one hand (one smooth one on his left to rotate the pencil and a rough grip glove to hold the sharpener), he quickly realized the added protection was just slowing him down. He removed the gloves to continue the run and while his sharpening time does increase, so do the blisters on his hands. At the end, he finished at 49 minutes and 18 seconds.

pencil sharpening speedrun

SmallAnt’s subsequent attempts at the pencil sharpening world record follow a pattern. He’ll take a break for a couple of weeks to recover from his blisters, only to see more people get added to the pencil-sharpening speedrun board. Never one to be disheartened, he found out that the more you sharpen the pencils the more the quality of the sharpeners tends to go down as you use them.

pencil sharpening speedrun

Things go this way for a while until a pair of pencil-sharpening madmen going by the names FootCream and bgrimm34 (obviously not their real names) found a way to sharpen 10 pencils in little less than 4 minutes. By holding a special pencil sharpener in between their feet and using both their hands to rotate the pencil, they destroyed the previous world record of 11 minutes like it was nothing.

After this display of sharpening prowess, SmallAnt was about to give up his attempt of breaking the world record, but not before FootCream and bgrimm34 messaged and decided to help him break their own records. They gave him a bunch of brand new sharpeners like the ones they used, along with tips on how to properly utilize their patented foot sharpening techniques for good.

pencil sharpening speedrun

Armed with the sharpeners and knowledge, SmallAnt tried to break the record once more… and failed. It was here where he found a better way to sharpen pencils without the use of your feet. Instead of bending over backward to reach your legs, SmallAnt found it was easier to put the pencils between your knees. By wearing a pair of shorts so the pencils make contact with your skin, you can keep the wood from moving while getting the most sharpening done with your upright posture.

pencil sharpening speedrun

With this final piece in his speed-running puzzle, SmallAnt was able to sharpen his way to the top with a time of 3 minutes and 38 seconds – 12 seconds faster than FootCream’s time. It may have seemed like a dumb record to break at the time, but thanks to his hard work, dedication, and some help from the previous world record holders, SmallAnt was able to achieve his dream of accomplishing one of the world’s weirdest records.

If you look at speedrun.com now, you’ll still find SmallAnt at the top of the boards. He even managed to get a better time, sharpening 10 pencils drillless in 2 minutes and 21 seconds. Not bad for someone who, just months ago, was but a young grasshopper in the world of pencil sharpening.

The post SmallAnt Chronicles His Journey To Beat World Pencil Sharpening Record appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 03, 2021 08:37 AM

Weaponsmith Tod Cutler Delves Into the Design of Medieval Swordbreaker

swordbreaker design

It’s always interesting to take a look at weapons from the past and see how they would have worked back in the day. While a lot of them fall under the categories of stabbing weapons, clubbed weapons, slashing weapons, and other weapons with macabre adjectives, quite a number have weird designs that aren’t so well-known to most of us.

Take for example the “swordbreaker” – a parrying dagger made during the late European Middle Ages to the early Renaissance. Its main purpose is to catch an opponent’s blades and prevent the person from properly using them.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jr8tSuMyGOI?feature=oembed" title="Sword "Breaker" or Sword "Catcher"?" width="770"></iframe>

Tod Cutler from Tod’s Workshop has crafted his own sword breaker and takes a look at what makes this dagger tick. From its overall design to practical use, he discovers why the swordbreaker was made – and why you ultimately don’t see it as often as other ancient weapons.

swordbreaker design

From the outset, Tod mentions the swordbreaker is meant to be held in your non-dominant hand. Seeing as most people are right-handed, this means the swordbreaker was usually forged to be a left-handed weapon.

What’s interesting about this is that when you fit your left thumb through the thumb ring of the weapon, the orientation of the sword breaker changes in such a way that the blade side is facing upwards, leaving the iconic tines facing down.

This means the swordbreaker was not meant to create direct damage, but rather to catch an opponent’s blade in between the tines. By holding the dagger with the blade facing your face, you can angle the tines towards an enemy’s sword strike, and catch their blade.

swordbreaker design

Once the blade is in the swordbreaker’s grasp, the wielder is free to control his opponent’s blade as he wishes. You can pull, twist, and even push the blade in whichever direction you want as long as the sword is stuck between the tines. The only way your opponent can free his weapon is if you allow him to pull the sword away from the swordbreaker at the same angle he would be attacking you in.

Despite its name, Tod mentions that the swordbreaker does not have much power when it comes to destroying swords. The metal in most swords is way thicker than the swordbreaker itself, and you would need to exert a lot of force to be able to bend, much less break, a well-forged sword.

swordbreaker design

This brings us to why you don’t see a lot of the swordbreaker nowadays. Apart from the misleading name, it must have been a nightmare to create these parrying daggers. Forging the tines is very difficult, as you have to make sure the space between them is enough to fit a typical sword while ensuring the grooves can keep the weapon in place once caught.

There are also different ways of forging a swordbreaker found throughout history. Back in those times, tines were filed, punched, and even fitted with pivots to allow the dagger to better hold a sword.

swordbreaker design

Lastly, the main reason the swordbreaker isn’t as commonplace as other ancient weapons is because it doesn’t work all the time. You have to be really accurate and really lucky to get this parrying dagger to work. Not only you have to angle the tines in the way of your opponent’s blade, but you also have to hope the blade falls into the small spaces between the swordbreaker and gets caught.

Those are a lot of elements you have to factor in for the swordbreaker to work; with the big downside being that if you miss, you’re a sitting duck. Without a second weapon to block your left side (you’re going to be instinctively using your sword to watch your right flank), you’re leaving yourself wide open for a counterattack. Needless to say, the idea of catching swords with daggers doesn’t really catch on as shields are proved more reliable in the long run.

Tod recreates a bunch of old school weapons and showcases them on his YouTube channel. If you’re feeling up for a duel, you can even find some of his works for sale on his website and Tod’s Workshop.

The post Weaponsmith Tod Cutler Delves Into the Design of Medieval Swordbreaker appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 03, 2021 08:30 AM

March 02, 2021

SolidSmack

Introducing the New Freelancing Platform for HW Engineers

OddEngineer.com + Free Giveaway with Consultation and Bose Noise Canceling Headphones!

While some got prison swole or Hot Cheetos swole in 2020, I got nerd entrepreneurship swole. I built a new thing for us freelance physical product engineers: OddEngineer.com. There, you can immediately book and pay for appointments with niche, hard-to-find engineering pros.

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-146327" class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_146327" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-146327">Do you get the graphic? It’s an…odd duck. I’ll see myself out.</figcaption></figure>

Got questions on things like thermal management, camera optics, illumination, electronics design for wearables, wireless power, IoT integration, plastics design for injection molding, medical device development, or the SBIR grant process? On Odd Engineer, there are engineers highly experienced in all those things and more, ready to speak to you personally. Plus, there’s no obligation of a longer contract. You don’t even have to create an account!

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-146330" class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_146330" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-146330">All the nerds available in this experimental pilot on OddEngineer.com!</figcaption></figure>

Check out the video explanation for Odd Engineer below, or scroll to the bottom to find out about the Fabulous Prize Giveaway and how you can register for a chance to win 1 free appointment with any Odd Engineer, nerd swag, and Bose noise-canceling headphones (or similar depending on your country’s availability):

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gSw8APSQd_g?feature=oembed" title="New Freelancing Platform for Hardware Engineers: Odd Engineer + Free Prizes - Bose Headphones" width="770"></iframe>

Why Build a Totally New Freelancing Platform?

Last year, normal operations for my optical engineering consultancy, SpireStarter.com, went full SNAFU. Once lockdowns began, it was tough to bring in new clients. Normally, I travel full-time to meet my fellow nerds who need help with optics. I rub shoulders with them at conferences, clink beers with them at MeetUps, and most importantly, I examine their problems in-person in their labs and factories.

The in-person bit is essential because the components involved in my engineering work – lenses, LEDs, reflectors, IR sensors, etc. – are real-life things! Those of us who design parts where millimeters matter, know how true this is. When a physical system has a problem, there’s no true substitute for seeing it in person. Moreover, meeting people in-person expedites the building of trust between us. That, in turn, helps push along the signing of contracts.

So, between lockdowns and some other problems that happened last year, I decided I needed to do business in a totally new way.

Alternative Freelancing Sites for HW Engineers

It had been many years since I perused a freelancing website (think: UpWork or Freelancer.com), so I checked out what they look like today. To my dismay, they still didn’t look to be structured in a way that would make it easier for me to strike up new engineering contracts fast. In fact, it looked like they made it a lot harder.

After polling a bunch of other hardware engineers, I concluded that there were no good platforms out there for us. There are good platforms in existence! But they are good for the clients. That’s how these platforms need to be built to have the highest chance of viability. Almost all “open talent” platforms cater first to the client-side (“demand-side”).  I wondered if, instead, there was a way to build a platform in a new way that did put our interests first.

We’re…Different

Also, I wanted to build something that catered specifically to hardware (physical product) engineers. Many engineers I polled gave me the same feedback about how tricky hardware engineering contracts are to structure and work through, especially on these platforms.

For one thing, clients usually don’t know what they need. They can’t create a sensible SoW (statement of work). Instead, that should always come from the freelance engineer. Yet, platforms often put it on the client to first state what they need and how much they should pay. Then, an engineer might have to agree to those baseless terms before finding out what’s actually needed!

Second, our costs to do business – our tools, software, even business insurance, are way higher than for other types of engineers. For these, and many other reasons, us HW engineers have a more complicated time of getting these platforms to work for us.

I knew figuring out a new platform idea capable of avoiding these landmines would require dedication and concentration.

Going Full Recluse Mode to Design the Thing

For several months, I shut down engineering work for my business. Instead, I focused on studying platforms and interviewing people. I learned about what other physical product development freelancers need. I also joined an amazing group of leaders creating these open talent platforms, called Open Assembly. The members were incredibly kind and generous in sharing what tactics and structures worked for their platforms, and which didn’t.

As a result, once I came up with a platform MVP (minimum viable product) to experiment with, it was at least 3 iterations beyond what I would have otherwise tried first. That experiment is OddEngineer.com. The offering is simplistic. It’s held together with WordPress duct tape and chewing gum. Yet, it’s somehow doing a great job as a temporary prototype to test with!

Also, as with all prototypes, it’s not meant to last forever. This experiment runs for 4 months: through May 26th, 2021. If it proves successful, meaning if it connects the engineers with new, paying clients, then I’ll build a new, bigger and better platform immediately afterward.

Finding Your Engineering Superpower – Specialization FTW

On the site, you can find profiles for me plus 12 other niche physical product development pros. Instead of an hourly rate in gigantic font, printed bigger than their names, you’ll see a “superpower” engineering expertise. I tried to pull out of each one of us the thing we are “the guy” for.

So, for example, if someone who was the same discipline of engineer as you, referred a client to you because of some particular experience you have, what would it be?

Many of these engineers I featured wanted to push back with, “but I have broad experience.” To which I replied, “yeah, we all do, but what is your thing?”

Why Superhero Powers are Important in Branding

If you think of your engineering superpower as a superhero power, it becomes a little clearer why I did this. For example, imagine you were getting jumped in an alley and needed someone’s help to fistfight your attackers. Which X-Men character would you choose?

Well, Storm is capable of hand-to-hand combat.

Sure, but is she really your first choice when you’re getting sucker-punched by a very large, muscular person? Probably not.

Now, let’s say you were entrenched in some other disaster. Maybe it’s something that full command of the forces of nature could remedy. Pretend, instead, that the town you’re in is about to be plastered with molten lava. Now who would you call?

Oh, now, NOW you’ll take Storm. I see how it is.

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-146322" class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_146322" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-146322">Ok, so, clearly Photoshop is not one of my superpower skills.</figcaption></figure>

All the X-Men can throw down. Any of them would be better to have watch your back if a fight was erupting than your typical passerby. But they each have unique gifts that make them the perfect person to help you in certain situations. That thing, your superpower, is what you need to figure out if you’re going to communicate your value to a client.

Think about if your little nephew were asking you why a certain X-Men character was your favorite. Would you say for any of them, “well, he/she has good general hand-to-hand combat abilities”? Yawn. Are you trying to bore your young relative to death? Of course, you wouldn’t say that!

You would say,

Wolverine because he has freaking KNIVES in his FREAKING hands that shoot out of his FISTS.”

And that’s how we need to highlight our engineering skills!

Easiest Access Out There to HW Engineering Guidance

Another big difference between this platform and others is — you can only get 1 hour with these engineers. Each nerd’s profile comes with a button to book a 1-hour appointment with them. You don’t need their permission. You don’t need to ask their availability, either. Just – book!

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-146324" class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_146324" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-146324">Example calendar you see with an engineer’s availability when you directly book appointments on Odd Engineer.</figcaption></figure>

This part is so simple it actually perplexes some clients. I get emails asking if a client can book with me or another engineer. “No, it’s cool, you don’t need to ask, just book it. Really.”

Why don’t I involve larger contract work on the platform? Well, I’d like to! It’s just that it was way too complicated to include for this simple, short-term pilot experiment. If this Odd Engineer prototype succeeds, I may build a bigger platform that does include larger contracts. However, in the meantime, the simplicity of the site makes transactions less painful for all parties involved — not just me!

What Types of People Might Need to Book with an Odd Engineer?

Odd Engineer primarily brings guidance to those trying to figure out a part of physical product development that they’re not familiar with. However, there are other possible uses…

Physical Product Development Teams Missing Key Talent

This might be a hardware startup founder with some or no engineering knowledge. Or, it might be a full engineering team that’s stuck on how some piece of their system needs to work because they don’t have the right specialist on staff. Many hardware specialists, like those featured on Odd Engineer, are too scarce for every company to hire all of those they need full-time.

Packages Worth Multiple Appointments Available

If teams need more than an hour’s worth of help or help from several engineers, they can purchase a package. Packages have a value worth multiple appointments and the associated code can be used for any engineer. So, an engineering manager could make a one-time purchase to provide help for their engineers whenever they need it!

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-146325" class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_146325" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-146325">Packages available worth several appointments on Odd Engineer, for giving your engineering team “set it and forget it” assistance.</figcaption></figure>

Peer Troubleshooting for Those in the Same Engineering Niche

There are other ways you can use this site, too! Even if you already “know the thing” it helps when you hit a wall to be able to talk through technical problems with other specialists in your field. So, if you’re another illumination designer, for example, and you don’t have any other optical engineers to talk to where you work, you can book an appointment with me. Then, we can talk through things like: different design possibilities or testing methods or troubleshoot what went wrong in the manufacturing of your optical system. Or, if that’s not your niche, you can book with whoever does speak your dialect of nerd.

Students and Junior Engineers

We’re also available to speak with university classes/groups/students or junior engineers interested in jumping into a track of engineering or industry. Want to learn what it’s like to design sexy race car bodies? They can have a Zoom call with Adam Kenney. Or do they want to know about developing instruments for NASA to send into outer space? They could schedule a Zoom call with Pablo Sobron. Do they want to learn about developing medical devices? In that case, Randal Chinnock is the guy to talk to.

Engineers Interested in Escaping their Cubicle and Going Freelance

Want to learn about what it took for some of the other successful business owner enginerds on Odd Engineer to get where they are? It’s not easy! But the thing that can help most is learning from those who’ve already done it. On Odd Engineer, there are all sizes of companies represented – from individual freelancers to those who built large R&D companies from zero with dozens of employees. Check out each engineers’ profile to see which is capable of giving you the guidance you’re looking for.

Guidebook for Freelancers and Students – How to Attract Paying Clients to You by Building Brand

Another offering for my fellow freelancers or aspiring engineers is this eBook, “Freelancer’s Framework, Guidebook 1: Building Brand.”

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-146326" class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_146326" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-146326">Guidebook for physical product engineers on branding available at several online stores. See: https://www.oddengineer.com/freelancers-framework-building-brand/</figcaption></figure>

The most important step of surviving as a freelancer is figuring out how to find paying clients. This book goes over in detail the most efficient ways to instead, attract them to you – by building a name for yourself. The coolest part is: you can start doing these things before you start freelancing. You can even start to do them before you graduate from college!

Other freelancers of other disciplines can get something out of this book, too, but it’s filled with specific examples related to hardware engineering services.

Giveaway

Enter the giveaway on https://www.oddengineer.com/giveaway-for-companies/ for your chance to win 1 free appointment with any listed engineer, Nerd Swag, plus one Grand Prize Winner will receive 1 pair of Bose noise-canceling headphones (or similar depending on your country’s availability)!

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-146328" class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_146328" style="width: 1078px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-146328">Grand prize drawing for: 1 free appointment with any engineer, nerd swag, freelancing guidebook on branding, and a pair of Bose noise-canceling headphones (or similar depending on availability in your country). See giveaway page for details.</figcaption></figure>

Submit your entry before March 23, 2021. See giveaway registration for more details.

Join the Waitlist!                  

Want to become an Odd Engineer and have a profile featured? Join the waiting list here, and remember to pick a super-specialized niche when you do. Pro tip: check out the existing profiles to make sure you’re not duplicating a skill already on there.

Add Your Input on What You Want to See in V2

Got a freelancing platform wish list? Tell us what you want most from a service like this with the survey here. Help us make this thing meant just for us physical product engineers even better!

The post Introducing the New Freelancing Platform for HW Engineers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at March 02, 2021 09:31 PM

The Javelin Blog

The Javelin Automotive Virtual Tech Conference begins Today!

Calling all designers and manufacturers of automotive parts, heavy equipment and transportation machinery across all industries attend our virtual tech conference today at 11:00AM ET!

The theme of the Automotive Virtual Tech Conference is geared toward the automotive and transportation industries, but if you aren’t working in the automotive or transportation industry – not to worry! This event is packed full of tips, tricks and 3D technology and manufacturing solutions that can easily be translated to your specific business needs.

Register for the conference NOW

Four reasons to attend the conference

  1. Complimentary: During this complimentary event, you will learn about the industry leading 3D solutions that will enable you to accelerate product innovation, manage product development, and simplify production – allowing you to get your products on the road faster.
  2. Customizable: Pressed for time? We understand. This event is designed in a way that allows you to build your own schedule, attend only the sessions that are of interest to you, spend time networking with industry experts, and check out the 3D solution partner booths in the virtual trade show. Registration is necessary so that you can access the on-demand content for 30 days following the event.
  3. Networking: The event agenda has been organized so that there is plenty of time for networking with industry experts and fellow attendees. There are also other meet up spots; such as, the virtual trade show featuring the following exhibitors: 3D CAD (SOLIDWORKS)3DEXPERIENCEDesktop MetalStratasys, and Artec 3D.
  4. Prizes: Of course, it wouldn’t be a Javelin event without prizes! Your participation in a quick post-event survey will enter you in a draw for the chance to win 1 of 3 prizes; $200 Canadian Tire gift card3DConnexion Wireless Space Mouse, and a 55″ LG 4K Smart TV!

Virtual Tech Conference Sessions

Here is a list of the Virtual Tech Conference sessions:

Register and select your sessions

Register now to learn more about the free event. Once you have completed your registration, you will have access to the full agenda. Here is a quick guideline to sign up for different sessions and customize your event.

We look forward to meeting you at the Automotive Virtual Tech Conference!

The post The Javelin Automotive Virtual Tech Conference begins Today!  appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at March 02, 2021 01:52 PM

SolidSmack

JLaservideo Shows How You Can Create Your Own Colored Mario and Luigi Fireballs

irl mario fireballs

Anyone who has a passing interest in Nintendo’s Mario will know that eating a red mushroom will make the little Italian plumber grow. But it’s surprising that not many people know Mario can also eat a fire flower, allowing him to throw great balls of flame.

While not as famous as his older brother, Luigi can also shoot fireballs from his hands (although his are green). Inspired by this classic power-up, Jake from JLaservideo has decided to put his real-life take on Mario and Luigi’s fireballs.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/C_8JdVuTtjw?feature=oembed" title="Make Mario and Luigi Fireballs! - Cheap and Simple" width="770"></iframe>

To give the fire its color, Jake employs the use of some anti-freeze mixed with different chemicals. Creating Luigi’s fireballs is easy enough. By mixing boric acid (which can be found in most roach killers) with anti-freeze and igniting it, he can turn a clear blue flame into an evil-looking green.

irl mario fireballs

Despite being closer to the natural color of flame, Mario’s red fireballs are a little harder to replicate. Jake takes apart an everyday battery to get the lithium inside, which he then mixes with some anti-freeze (you should wear gloves if you plan on doing this yourself because the chemicals inside can be dangerous when they make skin contact). Once mixed, the ignited flame burns a nice, bright red.

irl mario fireballs

With the mixtures in the bag, Jake can focus on creating a glove that can ignite the balls with a push of a button. This is done by taking apart an arc lighter and modifying it so it can fit onto a glove. Jake places the switch onto the index finger so he can easily reach it with his thumb, while the igniter is lengthened using some wires and placed right in the middle of the palm.

irl mario fireballs

All he needs now are balls – tennis balls, that is. After dunking these bad boys in his mixtures, he pops them out of his makeshift ball holder and lights them up with his glove. Bam! Instant fireballs!

What’s great about the tennis balls is that the felt they are covered in is super absorbent, making it easy for them to soak up the lithium-anti-freeze and boric acid-anti-freeze mixtures. All Jake has to do is roll the balls in his mixtures for a few seconds and then light them up for a very satisfying light show.

irl mario fireballs

He should really be wearing more protective gear when playing with these things. Juggling fireballs is best left to the professionals, as a stray ball in the middle of a hot day could lead to an uncontrolled fire. Thankfully, Jake is playing with his fireballs at night. The dark also adds an effect to the fireballs’ illumination, making it a remarkable sight.

You can find more of Jake’s weird inventions on his YouTube channel, JLaservideo.

The post JLaservideo Shows How You Can Create Your Own Colored Mario and Luigi Fireballs appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 02, 2021 08:36 AM

March 01, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Microsoft SQL Licensing for SOLIDWORKS PDM FAQs

SOLIDWORKS PDM, SOLIDWORKS Manage and SOLIDWORKS Electrical software all rely on databases hosted by Microsoft SQL Server software to operate.

The Microsoft SQL Server software is licensed separately from your SOLIDWORKS software, so it is your responsibility to ensure that you have the correct licensing for both the Release and Edition of Microsoft SQL Server which you have installed.

NOTE: The information in this guide is intended to provide an overview the MS-SQL licensing requirements as they relate to SOLIDWORKS products.  Your Microsoft Software Reseller will be able to help you with more specifics concerning these licensing options.

Do I need to purchase Microsoft SQL Server licensing for SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard?

No. SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard is only compatible with Microsoft SQL Server Express, the PDM Standard database cannot be hosted on any other edition of Microsoft SQL ServerMicrosoft SQL Server Express is free for commercial use so no additional licensing needs to be purchased.  Express Edition is an entry level database server which is limited to being able to use only 4 processor cores and 1 GB of memory per instance.  The database file itself is limited to a maximum size of 10 GB.

What Edition of Microsoft SQL Server should I use to host my SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional databases?

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional is compatible with Microsoft SQL Server Express, Microsoft SQL Server Standard, and Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Editions.

For most situations, Microsoft SQL Server Standard should be used for hosting the vault databases.  Microsoft SQL Server Standard Edition is able to use up to 24 processor cores and up to 128GB of memory per instance.  These limits are more than sufficient for most SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional vaults.

For some exceptionally large vaults or for replicated PDM environments, there may be benefit in the additional functionality available with Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise, such as database replication and higher resource utilization limits. However typically there are other less expensive steps that can be taken to optimize performance of the vault.  If you feel your performance is being limited by using Microsoft SQL Server Standard Edition to host the databases, speak with your SOLIDWORKS PDM Value Added Reseller first to examine if the Enterprise Edition would provide substantial gains for your specific vault.

Microsoft SQL Server Express can be used for sandbox or training vaults, however it should never be used to host a SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional or SOLIDWORKS Manage production vault due to the resource limits of this edition mentioned earlier.

How does Microsoft SQL Server Standard Edition licensing work?

There are two licensing models for Microsoft SQL Server Standard, Server + CAL and Core-Based licensing. More information about these licensing models can be found in the SQL Server 2019 Licensing Datasheet and the SQL Server 2019 Licensing Guide.

The licensing model that is best for you will depend on several factors, including how many users will be accessing your SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault, and what Microsoft SQL licensing you may already own.  It is best to consult with your Microsoft Software Reseller to determine which one you should choose for your specific situation.

If you own no other Microsoft SQL licensing at this time, or if you must keep the licensing separate, typically the Core-Based licensing model becomes the more economical option once there are 25-30 individual users who must access the vault.

Did my SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional software purchase include Microsoft SQL Standard Licensing?

Possibly, it depends on when you purchased your SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional software.

  • If you purchased PDM Professional CAD Editor, Contributor or Viewer licenses prior to October 8, 2019, then your purchase would have included 1 run-time restricted Microsoft SQL Server Standard 2014 Server License as part of the initial order, as well as one run-time restricted Microsoft SQL Server Standard 2014 Client Access License for each user license purchased.
  • After October 2019, these licenses were no longer bundled automatically with the SOLIDWORKS PDM software, though they could be purchased separately through your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller by request up until October 1, 2020.  Since then these run-time restricted licenses have not been available for purchase.
  • If you purchased SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Universal License packs (formerly called PSL licenses) before April 1, 2020, then Microsoft SQL Server Standard 2014 Core Licenses (4 Cores) were included with the purchase.

If you have purchased SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional after these dates, then you will need to purchase the required MS-SQL licensing separately through your Microsoft Software Reseller.

What does it mean that the SQL licenses previously bundled with SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional were run-time restricted?

The Microsoft SQL Server Standard Server + CAL licenses that were previously bundled with SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional were not full, unrestricted licenses, meaning that they can only be used for SOLIDWORKS software (i.e.: SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional, SOLIDWORKS Manage or SOLIDWORKS Electrical).  No other applications can be hosted on the Server license and these run-time restricted CALs cannot be used to authorize the client to connect to a SQL server hosting another application.

The Microsoft SQL Server Standard Core licenses however did not have this restriction. (Though for performance reasons we strongly recommend against hosting other databases on the same SQL server that the SOLIDWORKS PDM databases are hosted)

Are there any other limitations with the Microsoft SQL Server licenses that came with my SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional software?

Yes, these limited licenses did not include Microsoft Software Assurance so that means that they cannot be upgraded to newer releases of Microsoft SQL.  Microsoft Software Assurance cannot be purchased separately for these licenses.  Additionally, these licenses cannot be used for public cloud servers.

How long will I be able to keep using the Microsoft SQL 2014 licenses that came with my SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional software?

The Microsoft SQL Server Standard 2014 licenses that were bundled with SOLIDWORKS PDM are perpetual licenses so you can continue to use them for as long as you wish.

However, SOLIDWORKS PDM 2021 SP5 will be the last release of PDM that will be compatible with Microsoft SQL Server 2014.  SOLIDWORKS PDM 2022, and all future releases, will be blocked from running on Microsoft SQL Server 2014.  New licenses for MS-SQL will need to be used and the server software upgraded to a release compatible with SOLIDWORKS PDM 2022 (Microsoft SQL Server 2016 or newer).

If I am using the Client Access Licenses that came bundled with my SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional CAD Editor/Contributor/Viewer licenses, do I need to purchase any additional SQL licensing now?

That depends on how many individual people are accessing the vault.

It is very important to understand that Microsoft SQL Client Access Licenses are not “floating” or “concurrent” licenses, the way that SOLIDWORKS PDM user licenses are. PDM user licenses are intended to be shared between users, so once one user is done with the license they can log out the vault, then that license can be returned to the pool and a different user can then take that license.

Microsoft SQL CALs are different, each individual user that accesses the vault would need their own SQL User CAL (the exception would be if multiple users are sharing a single device, and these people only ever access the vault from that device, then one Device CAL could be used instead).

When SQL CALs were previously bundled with PDM Professional User licenses, only one CAL was included per PDM license.  If those SOLIDWORKS PDM licenses are being shared by multiple people, then additional CALs are required.

However, before purchasing any additional Microsoft SQL Client Access Licenses you should first determine if you already own any that are being used for other software, such as an ERP program.  If so, determine whether the CALs are unrestricted and can be used any software or if they are run-time restricted to only be used for that other program.  If they are unrestricted, and if some of the PDM users are already covered by those CALs, then you may not need to purchase additional licensing (once a person is covered by a Client Access License, they can use that license to connect to any SQL Server).

If additional CALs are required, your Microsoft Software Reseller will be able to supply them for you.  Microsoft SQL Client Access Licenses are backwards compatible, so a 2019 SQL CAL can be used to access a 2014 SQL Server.

If I am using the Core-Based Licensing that came with my SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Universal (PSL) licenses, do I need to purchase any additional SQL licensing now?

That depends on how many cores are currently accessible by your Microsoft SQL Server software.  Each SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Universal (formerly PSL) license included SLQ Core-Based licensing for 4 processor cores and additional core licenses could be purchased through your SOLIDWORKS Reseller as needed up until April 2020.  If you require additional SQL Core Licenses, these can be purchased through your Microsoft Software Reseller.

Can I use a cloud hosted Microsoft SQL Server for SOLIDWORKS PDM?

Yes, as long as your Microsoft SQL licensing includes Microsoft Software Assurance it can be used on a public cloud server.  Additionally, some Amazon AWS and Microsoft Azure cloud offerings bundle Microsoft SQL licensing into the cost of the instance, effectively reducing the upfront cost of the licensing.

NOTE: though that the Microsoft SQL Server Standard licenses that came bundled with SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional cannot be used on a public cloud server.

The post Microsoft SQL Licensing for SOLIDWORKS PDM FAQs appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at March 01, 2021 02:47 PM

February 28, 2021

SolidSmack

Watch A Classic Sonic Clay Figurine Get Sculpted and Formed From Scratch

clay sonic

Only second to Nintendo’s Italian plumber, Sonic the Hedgehog is probably the most recognizable video game character out there. Blue fur, red shoes, and a too-cool-for-school attitude, Sonic looks and acts nothing like his real-life counterpart.

If you don’t believe me, check out this Sonic clay figurine, created from scratch by Kia from kiArt:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5RcP3YvjUhc?feature=oembed" title="Create Classic Sonic the hedgehog with Clay / Sonic Mania [kiArt]" width="770"></iframe>

Using a method used in a lot of claymation movies, Kia creates a metal wire skeleton which allows him to freely mold the figurine. After taping two wires which serve as the arms and legs, he can fill out the skeleton with clay and sculpt it to his heart’s content.

clay sonic

Creating the original Sonic’s chunky body is easy enough as it’s technically just a big circle. The arms and legs are just as easy, as they are just fleshy cylinders that connect to Sonic’s body.

The figurine starts to take on Sonic’s iconic shape once Kia sets in the two spines on his back. Add in the tail and you’ve got the makings of an anatomically incorrect cartoon mammal.

clay sonic

You can’t make a Sonic figurine without his red shoes, which is what Kia gets to working on next. The socks are made by pressing a piece of clay into a wide cylinder, which is then placed on top of the triangular shoes. Create a couple of small clay squares for the buckles (why do his shoes have buckles?), sculpt in some details, and you have yourself a pair of sneakers!

clay sonic

How Kia makes Sonic’s hands is quite interesting – he takes four long pieces of rolled-up clay and bunches them up together. Then, with a large lump of clay on one side coupled with Sonic’s thumb, he connects them together at the palm.

He repeats the same process for Sonic’s other hand, only this time he forms Sonic’s fingers into a fist. This hand will later be placed near his waist, so the blue blur can rest his gigantic hand on the side of his disproportionately smaller body. Pop on the glove collars and his hands are as good as finished.

clay sonic

The hardest part of Sonic to sculpt is without a doubt his head. Not only does Kia have to sculpt in the various spikes on its back, but he has to add extra clay around Sonic’s one eye (where both his pupils are found) to give the impression of eyebrows without making actual eyebrows.

Kia also gives Sonic his pointy ears, smooth mouth, and sculpts in his iconic grin before making his pointy nose. Once finished, he adds metal wire to the bottom of the head so it can connect with the rest of Sonic’s body.

clay sonic

He pops everything in a kiln at 130°C for 30 minutes so all the parts can harden. Afterwards, all he has to do is paint everything in their traditional colors before assembling all the parts together.

clay sonic

Kia hasn’t just worked on this Sonic figurine. He’s actually made figures of all the classic characters in the series, along with a bunch of other icons from different games, movies, and shows. You can find them all on his YouTube channel, kiArt.

The post Watch A Classic Sonic Clay Figurine Get Sculpted and Formed From Scratch appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 28, 2021 11:09 AM

Forging An Old Metal Spring Into A Kunai Is Just As Hard As You Think It Is

rusty spring kunai

You’ve probably seen a Japanese kunai in a movie or anime before. Initially built as a gardening tool, these forged metal pieces can become deadly in the right hands.

Due to their multi-purpose nature, kunai were made from sturdy yet simple metals. But I’m pretty sure no one in Japan traditionally made kunai from rusty coil springs; probably because there were no cars back in the day.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_yrMB-Pzzp8?feature=oembed" title="Rusty Coil Spring FORGED into a KUNAI" width="770"></iframe>

Using a piece of 1.2-inch thick metal cut from a car coil spring, metalworker and restorer Random Hands creates a traditional Japanese kunai using unconventional methods.

Folding the Metal

rusty spring kunai

The first order of business is to fold the coil piece into a flat metal strip. Seeing as he doesn’t have a power hammer, it took Random Hands hours of work to forge this old car part into a workable material with a hand hammer.

Once the piece is flat, he spray paints a stencil of a kunai onto the surface and cuts it into shape.

Cutting the Kunai Shape

rusty spring kunai

Cutting the metal is easier said than done, since it is extremely thick. To do this, he uses an angle grinder with a metal cutting disk. Creating the straight lines of the tip is easy enough but to make the slim handle, Random Hands has to make various cuts. This allows him to create chunks of excess metal which he can hammer out later to shape the rest of the kunai.

Sanding and Filing the Edges

rusty spring kunai

The metal could use a bit more work to look like a kunai, so he takes it to a belt sander to smoothen it out. Random Hands flattens the tip of the kunai while filing down those unsightly grooves at the handle. This is also a perfect time to drill the ring at the kunai’s pommel. With the general shape of the kunai finished, he sands down the sides of the metal to reveal the shine within.

Lathing the Handle

rusty spring kunai

Though the metal now has a distinct kunai aesthetic, it’s still very thick and flat. He takes it to a lathe to make the round handle, which isn’t easy considering the metal around the middle is very flat. With enough time and some sanding afterwards, Random Hands turns what was once a grove-filled metal piece into a smooth handle.

The only parts left to complete now are the pommel and the blade.

Shaping the Edges of the Blade

rusty spring kunai

Making the business end of the kunai looks a lot easier than making the round handle. By marking the edges of the blade and using an angle grinder, Random Hands can easily flatten the blade into the shape that he wants. To make the blade look cleaner, he files it down after grinding.

Drilling the Pommel

rusty spring kunai

The final part left to shape is the pommel, which is done by using a drill bit to create a curved ring for ropes and fingers to slip into.

Tempering the Kunai

rusty spring kunai

Now that the kunai is shaped, it’s time to temper the piece to make it hard and sturdy. Random Hands first places the kunai in a furnace. Once ready, he removes it from the heat and immediately cools it down.

Putting the Finishing Touches

rusty spring kunai

With the hardened metal now tempered, he can use a grindstone to sharpen the blade into a working (and very deadly) tool. After some hand sanding, he sandblasts the kunai to give it a matte finish before painting it with super blue to give it a darker look and prevent the metal from rusting again.

rusty spring kunai

Finally, he wraps the handle in white cloth to create a nice grip before promptly throwing the kunai into a piece of wood. It sticks to the surface like a good kunai should, and Random Hands proceeds to throw his new toy at other innocent inanimate objects.

Random Hands makes more than just weapons. His YouTube channel also has a lot of content where he restores rusty and neglected items back to their former glory. Be sure to check them out if you ever want to see nostalgic items brought back to life.

The post Forging An Old Metal Spring Into A Kunai Is Just As Hard As You Think It Is appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 28, 2021 10:58 AM

February 26, 2021

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Rocket Ship Lamp Tutorial

I LOVE astronomy and everything outer space, so, naturally, that had to be the theme of my daughter’s room. We even had a good friend (thank you @JenHeartsArt) come over and paint her ceiling to look like space.

Yes, the ceiling glows in the dark at night. It’s incredible.

Anyway, the one thing we are still missing from this room is a lamp, so of course I decided to design one using SOLIDWORKS and make it using a laser cutter. I started with a simple sketch. To be clear, I’m not an artist, but it doesn’t actually matter as you’ll see later.

A simple sketch like the one above is literally all you need to get started designing in SOLIDWORKS. To be clear, you don’t actually *need* a sketch, but I find it helpful and you will see why in a minute.

Let’s get started! The first thing we want to do is open a sketch on the Front plane and insert our beautiful “napkin sketch” from Tools > Sketch Tools > Sketch Picture. From here, we can scale our picture in Properties. I decided to give the lamp a height of 15 inches before centering it approximately on the origin and setting the Y insertion to 0.

Awesome! We now have the shape we need and we can simply trace it. I like to do this in a new “Layout” sketch to keep everything neat and tidy.

Note: Initially I decided to sketch this using a mix of splines, arcs, and lines, but later I went back and removed most splines, replacing them with arcs and lines because I feel like this (1) gives me more control and (2) allows me to offset, trim, etc. with more precision.

From here, we can start by extruding the primary shape that will make our rocket ship come to life. I extruded this to a depth of ¼” since the goal is to laser cut this out of ¼” wood. I also made sure to hollow out the top using an offset to make room for a light bulb!

The next step is a trick I like to use when I’m working in a multibody part (and therefore I *don’t* want new Extrude/Revolve features to Merge with other bodies by default). I inserted the Weldment feature to keep bodies separate by default.

This feature appears in our tree and it also creates a Cut List for us with identical bodies grouped together – PERFECT for this application!

Now we can continue by extruding the wing (and adding some stars for decoration) to the same thickness. I also used Split to section off the top of the rocket ship that will act as a lid so that we can insert the light bulb.

The next part is to add supports and support cuts so that the rocket can piece together like a puzzle when we assemble it. This is actually a tiny bit trickier that I originally assumed because all cuts need to be normal cuts so that this can actually be manufactured. The first time I did this, I used Revolve and Intersect to create the geometry but then I realized that I had created curved faces where there should be flat ones, so I tried again. Luckily, it didn’t take too long to realize my mistake and I was able to quickly correct it.

Support cuts were added using a simple Cut Extrude before the corresponding supports were created using Revolve and then normal cuts were made to each support (and patterned using a Circular Pattern) to create the interlocking piece.

Finally, we can use two circular patterns to create the rest of our primary geometry before using Combine to merge the wings with the main extrudes at four points. I also added a window and cut corresponding pieces out so that it fit into the puzzle at this point.

Now we’re REALLY getting somewhere!

It looks amazing, but we still need to add the light itself. I opted to purchase an incredibly simple lamp off of Amazon and finish the design around this. As soon as the lamp arrived, I removed the shade, took a few measurements using a digital caliper, and reverse engineered it into SOLIDWORKS for design reference.

(Left is the manufacturer’s picture, Right is my quick reverse engineer of it in SOLIDWORKS)

I also quickly modeled a light bulb and the ring that was used to secure the lamp shade and I threw everything together in an assembly. In the assembly, I selected Section View from the Heads-Up Toolbar and right-clicked the Rocket Lamp part > Edit Part to edit it in context. This allowed me to modify the position of supports and create cuts as needed so that the lamp shade would be able to accommodate the lamp itself.

We’re done, right? Almost. We still need to create a dxf to give to the manufacturer, but luckily SOLIDWORKS makes this a piece of cake.

From the lamp part, all we need to do is right-click the Cut List and select Save Bodies…

From here, we can create an assembly (as shown above). After opening the assembly, we notice that all of the parts are fixed in place. To change this, we simply select all of the parts in the tree to Right-click > Float. This allows us to move our parts around and mate them to the Top Plane so that we can get a nice layout for our dxf. The last step before exporting is to quickly go to File > Make Drawing from Part and select a sheet scale of 1:1. This ensures that our parts will print at the correct size.

To export, all we need to do now is go to File > Save As… and select dxf.

 

Ready for manufacturing!

Just for fun, I decided to make an exploded view that shows how everything fits together…

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… and paint everything before quickly rendering in SOLIDWORKS Visualize.

Now we’re really ready to blast off!

Thank you so much for following along. I can’t wait to get these parts cut and put this in my daughter’s room. Such fun!

Here’s hoping 2021 is out of this world.

Author information

Loretta Stiurca
Loretta Stiurca
Loretta is a mom, a wife, and an engineer. She is a CSWE and has been using SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS Electrical for more than 6 years. In her free time, she enjoys hiking with the puppy, playing Dungeons and Dragons, thinking up crazy inventions, learning magic tricks, juggling, making her baby girl laugh, and going on adventures.

The post Rocket Ship Lamp Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Loretta Stiurca at February 26, 2021 04:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to hide and show a BOM in SOLIDWORKS Composer Animations

SOLIDWORKS Composer geometric actors or collaborative actors such as a BOM can be shown or hidden in an animation.

If once the actor is hidden it will remain hidden throughout the animation and if we try to show the actor, it will be visible throughout the animation. Hence, hide or show is not the right tool/property to be used in this case. The control of actor display can be achieved by changing the opacity property of the actor.

Steps to hide/show BOM

Follow the steps below to first show the BOM, then hide it and then show it back without using the hide/show property:

  1. Place the time-bar at a specific time frame, lets say 1 second.
  2. Either drag and drop the view from the Views Tab that has a BOM within it or Click generate BOM Ids and Show/hide the BOM table using the BOM workshop pane.
  3. Now click on the BOM in the viewport and observe the opacity property is set to the maximum which is 255 in a Composer property manager.
Maximum opacity-BOM shown

Maximum opacity-BOM shown

  1. To hide the BOM at 3 seconds place the time-bar at the 3 second mark > Click on the BOM > Change opacity property to zero.
Zero Opacity-BOM hidden

Zero Opacity-BOM hidden

  1. Now the BOM will be completely hidden at the 3 second mark and it starts getting lighter from 1 to 3 seconds and will have completely disappeared at 3 seconds.
  2. However, if you would like to hide the BOM at 2.9 seconds, place the time-bar at 2.9 seconds and now set opacity property to the maximum. This will make the BOM disappear quickly at 2.9-3 seconds while still showing it between 1-2.9 seconds.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer

To learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer attend our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training course live online.

The post How to hide and show a BOM in SOLIDWORKS Composer Animations appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at February 26, 2021 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Affordable Product Development Services for Inventors

Way ahead of the current “maker” and tech incubator trends, MAKO Design + Invent hit the ground running back in 1999 with the mission to enable inventors, startups, and small businesses to take their ideas from concept to store shelves.

In addition to more than a dozen awards, MAKO recently won the 2020 Red Dot Award, recognition by an eminent panel of judges for distinguished product design, for the design of the ROVER Packhopper, an innovative tool for tennis players.

CEO Kevin Mako was still in high school in 1999 when he founded his company that has flourished and grown—without financing or debt—since its inception. The company started in Toronto, but today has U.S. offices in Austin, Miami, and San Francisco.

Quality Design Modest Price

MAKO must leverage operational efficiencies to a larger degree than most design consultancies to keep its services affordable for its clients. The company offers in-house industrial design, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, patent referral, prototyping, and manufacturing including strategic marketing, sales, and distribution services.

Kevin Mako attributes his company’s success and growth to its philosophy of leveraging technology in the most efficient ways possible. “I knew that if we leveraged integrated software tools that are either networked across our offices or based in the cloud, our top talent could achieve the operational and product development efficiencies that would make our services significantly less expensive than conventional design firms and more attractive and affordable to our targeted portion of the market.”

Seamless Collaboration

To perfect the mechanics from a napkin-sketch concept in a high-quality, cost-effective, and timely manner, MAKO implements the integrated SOLIDWORKS® 3D product development and 3DEXPERIENCE® Works tools.

According to Mako, “The fact that SOLIDWORKS solutions are integrated and work seamlessly with each other is very valuable to us, because it enables us to consistently deliver quality, innovative products faster and at lower cost than previously possible,” stresses Mako.

Saving Time, Money, and Rework by 50 Percent

With integrated SOLIDWORKS solutions, MAKO is able to cut both time to market and development costs by 50 percent. Helping clients launch quality products in half the time is critical to nabbing market share and becoming an attractive target for acquisition by large, international manufacturers.

Quality, however, is not sacrificed as time and money are saved: MAKO has improved quality while reducing prototyping requirements. Since designers can reduce the number of prototypes with digital validation in SOLIDWORKS, prototypes have been reduced from five or six rounds to two or three rounds.

More recently, SOLIDWORKS Simulation tools have enabled MAKO to improve quality across the board by cutting the incidence of defects and related rework by 50 percent.

To read the complete case study, click here. If you have more questions or would like to see a live demonstration, please contact your local reseller for more information.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Affordable Product Development Services for Inventors appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 26, 2021 01:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Why Javelin Authorized SOLIDWORKS Training is the best option

Where should you go for the best SOLIDWORKS training, a College, University, or an Authorized SOLIDWORKS Training Centre?

So you realize that training is a vital aspect for growth and increased productivity at your company, but where should you go for the best training? The choices are broad and varied, from college and university courses to books and videos to training consultants and more. You might start looking for the cheapest option but a poor training experience can cause more frustration and time lost. Javelin Technologies’ high quality training services will quickly increase the efficiency of any designer by teaching the full potential of SolidWorks and its products.

You might start looking for the cheapest option but a poor training experience can cause more frustration and time lost

Through my university experience obtaining a B.Eng. in Mechanical Engineering I took two CAD courses in 3D Design. I had assumed that spending a full semester in each course would turn me into a parametric modeling guru. In the end less time was spent actually learning the software and more used for teaching the theory. Don’t get me wrong, as engineers this is crucial to validate the output, but now you must learn the software yourself. College and university courses teach the fundamentals, develop your problem solving skills, and open your mind to learn so much more. Yet now you’re in the workforce and want to use this specific software to the utmost potential. Post-secondary courses can only lay the ground work and inspire you to grow.

SOLIDWORKS Training

SOLIDWORKS Training

What is the most effective method for learning SOLIDWORKS?

If we know the basics and the theory, what is the most effective method for learning SOLIDWORKS? Books and videos are an invaluable source of knowledge. Enormous volumes of step-by-step instructions and video lessons have been compiled over the years. These sources are useful for learning the tools and commands, however there are significant limitations. It’s rare to find someone who enjoys sitting down alone with an exorbitantly thick manual to start. Motivation levels can drop quickly when you realize that you need to read, then understand, and finally remember this information. Where do you turn if you don’t understand something? You end up rereading the pages many times until something clicks or you give up.

Books and videos are an invaluable source of knowledge but where do you turn if you don’t understand something?

These resources are great for reference but they will always contain generic examples that may not fully apply to you. Until artificial intelligence is born, these methods cannot answer the questions that haven’t been pre-programmed.

Go beyond the standard commands and learn best practices

Among the options, only Javelin’s instructor-led courses provide the best environment to learn the products and immediately take this knowledge and confidence to your workplace. Our certified instructors provide the reassuring voice to answer any questions. We bring enthusiasm to the classes as we know the software can help your company in countless ways. Through years of experience, we go beyond the standard commands to show best practices. As our instructors rotate between teaching and providing technical support, we remain current with the latest developments and enhancements. This also allows us to form ongoing relationships with our user base so no one is left in the dark.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FneImWkobn8?feature=oembed" title="SOLIDWORKS Essentials: What every user needs to know!" width="500"></iframe>

Location does not have to be a barrier

Recently, Javelin has relocated to a new head office in Oakville, Ontario to provide the best facilities to students with a professional training environment and the ability to experience the latest technologies with our Additive Manufacturing Centre. With training facilities across Canada, along with laptops for our Mobile Training Centre, and LIVE Online Courses — location does not have to be a barrier. Javelin’s training expertise will equip you with the skills and insight to use SOLIDWORKS with confidence.

Learn more about Javelin Training and download a price list, and view our upcoming training schedule.

The post Why Javelin Authorized SOLIDWORKS Training is the best option appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at February 26, 2021 01:00 PM

February 25, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Push your SOLIDWORKS design envelope with SIMULIA Structural Mechanics Engineer

To have a competitive advantage, we see that more businesses are investing in solutions which can help achieve reduced time-to-market, be cost-effective, sustainable, and have an optimal design with better performance.

As a result, it is important to have a solution which encourages collaboration on the design and engineering front, validates them by enabling users to run simulations of high fidelity and keep the concept of simulations accessible to a large audience. This is achieved by the Structural Mechanics Engineer (SME) role on the 3DEXPERIENCE Works platform.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/v3TNr7hcJiA?feature=oembed" title="First Look - SIMULIAworks Structural Mechanics Engineer" width="500"></iframe>

With an overview of what the 3DEXPERIENCE® Platform and the Structural Mechanics Role is about, let us dive into the benefits.

  1. Collaboration and Connectivity – Platform adoption
  2. Solution Scalability
  3. Simulation Democratization

SIMULIA Benefit #1 – Collaboration and Connectivity

With companies adopting different products, maintaining the integrity of the workflow becomes difficult. Users now have to figure out “ways” (or what I like to call – workarounds) to transfer data (whether it is CAD models, simulation data or drawings) between products. This also impacts the user’s ability to work productively and efficiently, thus adding time and effort to achieve nothing but a mundane process.

At the heart of Dassault Systèmes products lies an integrated and connected environment (a platform) which the Structural Mechanics Engineer (SME) role works on. SOLIDWORKS users can quickly extend and accelerate their design development by adopting a connector that ties the platform to it, thus making design data readily available, securely accessible and up-to-date on a cloud-based environment. Leveraging what each is best at (SOLIDWORKS for CAD and SME for simulation modeling) makes the workflow easy-to-use and enables accelerated product development.

An example workflow has been shown in terms of how design development can be benefited from a connected platform solution.

SOLIDWORKS and platform connection

Connected Workflow – SOLIDWORKS and SME

SIMULIA Benefit #2 – Solution Scalability

Abaqus solvers – Reliable, Accurate, Industry-proven

With the SME role, it accelerates the initial design concept by subtracting prototyping and testing costs. A key differentiator to this role is the adoption of Abaqus solvers for running challenging simulations such as non-linear material, geometry and contact modeling conditions. It also comes with both the Implicit and Explicit solvers that help model events that are simple as well as those that happen in the blink of an eye ! – crash, drop and impact tests. This helps address the needs of a variety of users – from designers to analysts ! High speed dynamic events, thermal analysis, non-linear static and dynamic problems are simulated with ease using the SME role, to name a few.

SME role for designers and engineers

Simulation users and skills

Material Calibration – Predict the right behavior

SME provides the end-user with material calibration applications which come with a large number of material models that make it easy to import, analyze and calibrate complex material behaviors (Hyper-elastic, plastic etc.). This provides the end-user with the benefit of being a step closer to reality, reducing the dependence on physical tests.

Computational Power – Faster results

As with SOLIDWORKS Simulation, with the SME role, jobs can be run using local cores (up to 4). In addition to that, the role enables you to run up to 32 cores on the platform, without having to invest in core-intensive hardware! Lighter on the wallet, faster with the simulation times.

SIMULIA Benefit #3 – Simulation Democratization

Gone are the days when simulations are kept in closed shells with a group of analysts ! When innovation is tasked, we need both designers and engineers. With this role, simulation engineers are able to develop, modify and capture their simulation workflows to keep it accessible to the designer or design engineer. This helps to quickly evaluate product concepts even before the simulation analyst begins working with it, thereby enabling an efficient design development and going to market with the product faster.

The 3DEXEPERIENCE Works Simulation SIMULIA Structural Mechanics Engineer role, enhances and accelerates the development of designs while reducing the need for prototyping and testing. SOLIDWORKS can easily be linked on the platform with connector applications to harness the power of a cloud-based solution. This empowers users to collaborate and share up-to-date data with ease, without the need of being locally tied to their machines. Finally, with evolved solvers driving simulations, users are confident in the results they get and can model challenging simulations such as high-speed dynamic events.

Learn more about the Structural Mechanics Engineer role

Contact a Javelin Simulation Expert today and get your simulation questions answered.

The post Push your SOLIDWORKS design envelope with SIMULIA Structural Mechanics Engineer appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vishnu Chandrasekaran at February 25, 2021 01:00 PM

February 24, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Transforming a high-detail Artec 3D Scan with SOLIDWORKS Mesh Decimation tool

When using SOLIDWORKS to create CAD models of complex, high-detail meshes, you need to start with a first-rate 3D scan of the model, such as this example from an Artec Space Spider 3D scanner. Then use the SOLIDWORKS Mesh Decimation tool to simplify the geometry.

Using an Artec Scanner you are guaranteed detailed scanned models every time. Watch the video to learn more:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZjwVoS2v0-I?feature=oembed" title="Transforming a high-detail Artec Space Spider scan with SOLIDWORKS 2020's Mesh Decimation tool" width="500"></iframe>

As seen in the video, after running the Mesh Decimation tool to simplify your model, you can generate a solid model and then use the Body Compare tool to compare it with the initial mesh data for identifying (via a visual heat map) any inaccuracies or features that weren’t modeled at all.

About the Artec Space Spider 3D Scanner

Artec Space Spider is a handheld 3D scanner designed specifically for SOLIDWORKS CAD users and perfect for reverse engineering, product design, quality control and mass production. Together with Artec Studio software, it is a powerful, desktop tool for designers, engineers and inventors of every kind.

Artec Space Spider 3D Scan for SOLIDWORKS Mesh Decimation tool

Artec Space Spider 3D Scan

How does it work?

Space Spider is a high-resolution 3D scanner based on blue light technology. It is perfect for capturing small objects or intricate details of large industrial objects in high resolution, with steadfast accuracy and brilliant colour.

The scanner’s ability to render complex geometry, sharp edges and thin ribs sets the technology apart. It is an ideal industrial 3D scanner for high resolution capturing of objects such as molding parts, PCBs, keys, coins or even a human ear, followed by the export of the final 3D model to SOLIDWORKS software.

Artec Space Spider in Use

Artec Space Spider in Use

Why choose an Artec Space Spider?

Designed with engineers and CAD specialists in mind, Artec Space Spider is used by thousands of professionals in a myriad of fields including metrology, reverse engineering, quality control, healthcare, research, VR, AR, and many others:

  • SUPREME ACCURACY AND RESOLUTION: Create highly accurate 3D models of small industrial objects or sections of larger objects in fine detail with up to 0.05 mm accuracy and an impressive 0.1 mm resolution. You also have the option of exporting directly to SOLIDWORKS or Geomagic Design X.
  • SAVES YOU TIME: Thanks to smart temperature stabilization, Space Spider maintains precision in a wide range of temperatures, and adjusts to any conditions in only 3 minutes, saving you precious time.
  • TARGET-FREE SCANNING: Space Spider uses hybrid geometry and color tracking technologies for the best possible data capturing and faster processing. This means no targets are required to achieve accurate results.
  • EASY TO USE: Just plug the scanner in and point it at and around the item, as you would with a video camera. It’s that simple.
  • PORTABILITY: Lightweight and compact, Space Spider was designed for a comfortable and flawless 3D scanning experience across all environments. Even in remote locations or without a power supply, you can simply connect it to the Artec battery pack for up to six hours of scanning.
  • GREAT FOR BLACK & SHINY SURFACES: A nightmare for many scanners, reflective and dark surfaces can be digitized in full color and with great resolution, like any other “easy to capture” surface.
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by Rod Mackay at February 24, 2021 04:49 PM

Dynamic FEA Using SOLIDWORKS Simulation & 3DEXPERIENCE Works

This on-demand webinar covers the simulation of vibration and dynamics using SOLIDWORKS FEA tools.

DS discuss some basic concepts in natural and forced vibration, explaining a few different types of linear dynamic analysis types, plus a review of the SOLIDWORKS Simulation linear dynamics study setup, and transition to the benefits of using Structural Mechanics Engineer from the 3DEXPERIENCE Works portfolio.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9hVTMoZSNLo?feature=oembed" title="Simulation FEA Dynamics with SIMULIAworks Webinar" width="500"></iframe>

Learn about the different types of Vibration Simulation

Designers and engineers who want to learn about the significance and the different types of vibration simulation and anybody who wants to get familiar with our simulation capabilities in this area may benefit from attending this webinar.

The following features are presented in the on-demand webinar:

  • Vibration concepts and analysis types
  • Linear Dynamics with SOLIDWORKS Simulation: Interface, setup, capabilities
  • Nonlinear Dynamics with Structural Mechanics Engineer

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Simulation

Javelin provides comprehensive SOLIDWORKS Simulation instructor led training courses including FlowMotion, and Plastics. All the courses are hands-on and will allow you to learn by carrying out different tasks outlined in the training.

The post Dynamic FEA Using SOLIDWORKS Simulation & 3DEXPERIENCE Works appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at February 24, 2021 03:29 PM

SolidSmack

This Knife’s Edge Is Made Using Replaceable Utility Blades

utility blade knife

By now, a lot of people credit Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates. As the saying goes, the best person for the job is a lazy person, because he’ll find the easiest way to do it.

Now I’m not saying the founder of Experimental Fun is lazy, but he does come up with interesting ways to reduce the amount of work he has to do in the future.

Take for example this customized kitchen knife, which is made to hold three utility blades on its cutting edge. By swapping out the cheap blades once they get dull, you never have to sharpen the knife itself.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5ZchgU9KLOc?feature=oembed" title="World's Sharpest Kitchen Knife! - (Razor Sharp!)" width="770"></iframe>

Let’s take a look at Experimental Fun’s custom knife, shall we?

Making The Blade

utility blade knife

The main attraction of the knife is the blade shape that is drawn onto a piece of metal before being cut out.

Once the metal is cut, three indents are carved into the cutting edge using a drill bit. These indents will keep the utility blades safe and snug while you slice away using the handle.

Threading the Screws

utility blade knife

To keep the utility blades from falling off, you’d want to add some connectors. After drilling two small holes per utility knife indent, Experimental Fun uses a tap wrench to create the screw threads. These will allow you to remove the blades once they become dull and replace them with fresh ones.

The Handle

utility blade knife

You can only do so much with a handleless knife, so make sure to cut and carve out a wooden piece to fit around the tang of the blade. Using a variety of saws, drill bits, and even the exact same utility knives at the end of the knife he’s making, Experimental Fun makes himself a handle fit for a knife-wielding expert.

While most knives use rivets to connect the knife blade and the handle, he instead opts to use screws and nuts. By cutting off the excess metal and filing it down, he creates custom-made connectors specific to the knife.

Putting on the Finishing Touches

utility blade knife

Both the metal and the wood get a good amount of sanding and polish to make them more presentable. With that finished, the only thing left to do now is fit in the utility knives and cut some stuff up!

Though Experimental Fun made this knife specifically to save time sharpening blades, he has still mentioned that the carbon blades corrode quite easily, requiring them to be swapped out often. It also goes without saying the multiple parts of the knife make it harder to clean than a single blade knife.

This doesn’t change the fact this knife looks downright awesome. Experimental Fun has always wanted to make something like this and hopes to eventually sell these knives to other like-minded lazy knife users. To see when they will be available, check out his YouTube channel. Oh, and you can also find more of his other experimental projects there, as well!

The post This Knife’s Edge Is Made Using Replaceable Utility Blades appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 24, 2021 02:33 PM

Watching A Native American Chainsaw Carving Being Made Is Both Relaxing And A Learning Experience

Native American carving

We’ve covered wood carvings before here on SolidSmack, but it’s not often we see them made out of a single piece of wood… nor this big.

Vlad Carving is a YouTube channel dedicated to the art of making giant wood carvings. In one of his videos, he carves a giant bust of a Native American, along with two wolf heads to keep it company:

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Going into details about the carving defeats the purpose of the entire video, which is to relax and watch as one man creates a masterpiece from scratch. But look closely and you will get to learn more about his creative process when it comes to making these giant works of wooden art.

Native American carving

For example, you’ll notice how he starts off with a rough sketch before drawing the base features onto the wood. Once the head of the Native American and the wolves are in place, he starts chipping away at the giant tree trunk.

Before the woodwork even begins, you’ll see that our man uses at least three different kinds of chainsaws. Swapping between these not only saves him from refuelling each chainsaw, but the different lengths and widths of guide bars allow him to cut the features of his Native American carving.

Native American carving

This brings me to another revelation: there is a surprising amount of chainsaw work involved in this particular piece. Now you would think that making such a fine piece of wood art would require more precise tools (it does), but the ratio of chainsaw work to chisel work seems to be about 1:1.

Features like the Native American’s furrowed brow, chin, and the wolves’ fur are all carved into the wood using different chainsaws. There is a bit of sketch work involved in order to provide a guide, but the actual cutting is done using only these man-made machines.

Native American carving

As the carving starts to reveal itself, more intricate details require more precise tools. Our man busts out the hammer and chisel and gets to working on the wolves’ teeth, and the Native American’s face and headdress.

Native American carving

It takes quite a bit of time and effort but once it’s finished, he lightly sands the carving before putting on some wood paint and finish.

My description of the video does not do it justice. It’s easier to get immersed in Vlad Carving’s… err, carving process if you watch it for yourself (preferably on a Sunday morning with a nice cup of hot chocolate). You can find more of his work on his YouTube channel.

The post Watching A Native American Chainsaw Carving Being Made Is Both Relaxing And A Learning Experience appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 24, 2021 02:13 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Breaking the Barriers of Simulation for All

Simulation can be a key differentiator for companies who develop innovative products. Unfortunately, many finite element analysis (FEA) software products are too difficult to use, unless you are a highly trained expert. Plus, limitations in functionality and computing power have also crippled FEA adoption into mainstream design and engineering departments.

A survey done by Tech Clarity (see chart above) demonstrated that top performing companies place nearly equal importance on product quality, reliability, and performance.

It is easy to see why.

Simulation can directly impact product quality as you can identify and avoid possible failures early in the design process. Reliability is improved as you can make sure that your product will behave as designed before you commit to physical tests and production. And product performance can be tested digitally so you can maximize the strength and stiffness of your designs while minimizing the weight and the material used in your product.

The goal of SOLIDWORKS® is to deliver a scalable simulation portfolio that is accessible to everyone including students, designers, engineers, and high-level FEA specialists. The platform paves the way with the 3DEXPERIENCE® Works simulation product portfolio.

Simulation-driven Design

Simulation takes much of the guesswork out of design; it provides data-driven design answers that provide reliable guidance starting early in the product development process. Simulation will effectively discover and address multiple questions about your product design even before physical prototypes and testing occurs including:

  •         Will it work?
  •         Can it be assembled?
  •         What if it drops?
  •         Is it strong enough?
  •         Will it last?
  •         Will it overheat?
  •         Can it be manufactured?
  •         And so on…

Let’s take a look at how simulation can help answer some of these questions.

Drone assembly in 3DEXPERIENCE showing the von Mises stress results with deformations, highlighting the snap fit event of the cover sub-assembly (in blue).

Will It Work?

Like in this drone example, snap fit between two different plastic parts is very important for a product to function correctly. A designer needs to know the force required to correctly snap and unsnap two components together.

Von Mises stress results with deformation in 3DEXPERIENCE showing the snap fit event of the drone cover.

In terms of physics, a snap fit event is actually quite complex. It is a typical non-linear problem as it involves large displacement and sliding contact interactions.

By leveraging the Abaqus technology on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, solving this type of problem is very easy. General contact takes care of the set-up automatically and the algorithm is very robust during the solve.

What If It Drops?

Dropping a device is actually very common; however, a physical drop test is very costly and time consuming. Drop test and impact are rapid events (less than 1 second) and are very difficult to simulate with most software packages as it is a highly nonlinear dynamic with a lot of contacts.

Von Mises stress results with deformation of a camera drop test on the ground.

With Abaqus Explicit technology on the platform, you can get accurate answers quickly so that you can predict where it will fail depending on the impact event.

Is It Strong Enough?

In the high-tech industry 3-point bending is a standard test. It is also time-consuming and costly. Also, in a physical test you get a limited view of the results with the number of sensors installed on the prototype. With simulation you get so much more information about your entire product.

Von Mises stress results with deformation of a 3-point bending test of a speaker structure.

This 3-point bending test is also highly nonlinear because of the sliding contacts, large deformation, and material plasticity. The Abaqus technology has been proven to be the best in the industry to solve these types of nonlinear problems.

Learn More

This is only a small sample of what the simulation tools on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform can do for you. If you’d like to see the entire presentation on this topic given at 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021, click here (log-in required).

Simulation discovers potential issues earlier in the process, so they are less costly to resolve. The platform provides the technology infrastructure to manage the people, data, and documents among your entire team, including partners, customers, suppliers, and manufacturers.

Plus, you can securely manage and share CAD data and access it from any location with an internet connection.

If you have any questions regarding the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, please contact your local reseller.

Stay alert for part 2 of this blog article where we will address the remaining questions asked in this blog: Can it be assembled? Will it last? Will it overheat? Can it be manufactured?

Author information

Nicolas Tillet
Nicolas Tillet
Product Portfolio Manager at DS SOLIDWORKS Corp.
Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS Simulation

The post Breaking the Barriers of Simulation for All appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Nicolas Tillet at February 24, 2021 01:00 PM

February 22, 2021

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

22 Years of Model Mania®

Every year SOLIDWORKS hosts one of the largest engineering conferences in the world. Since SOLIDWORKS World 2000, Model Mania® has been an attraction for many engineers wanting to show off their SOLIDWORKS skills. Model Mania, for those not familiar, is a design challenge where you are measured on both time and accuracy.

First, you are first given a 2D drawing of a part. Your goal is to create that part in SOLIDWORKS as quickly and as accurately as possible. Seems simple, right? Well the second “Phase” is when things get really interesting. For Phase 2, you are given a modified version of that drawing; you can consider it an engineering change if you like. Your goal now, similar to before, is to make the design change as quickly and as accurately as possible and run a simulation to determine the factor of safety.

At SOLIDWORKS World, all of the entries are judged on accuracy first, and time second, because in the real world, it doesn’t matter how fast you get something done if it’s not right.

Over the years, many people have asked for access to the Model Mania drawings so we are happy to make them available to you.  Below you will find links to the Phase 1 and 2 drawings and a video solution to each year’s Model Mania Challenge.  Feel free to use these for your user group meetings, internal company training and we hear that many schools use them for their exercises.

The models, drawings, and other materials created for the Model Mania® Challenge and distributed by Dassault Systemes SolidWorks Corporation (DS SolidWorks) are intended for the sole use of DS SolidWorks, its partners, and customers, and may not be used for commercial purposes except by DS SolidWorks partners without written consent from DS SolidWorks

Model Mania 2000
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2001
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2002
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2003
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2004
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2005
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2006
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2007
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2008
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2009
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2010
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2011
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2012
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2013
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2014
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2015
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2016
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2017
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
 

 

Model Mania 2018
  Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
Model Mania 2019
Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution video
Model Mania 2020
Phase 1 drawing
Phase 2 drawing
Solution Video

 

Model Mania 2021

Phase 1 drawing
Solution Video

 

Author information

Mark Schneider
Mark Schneider
Mark Schneider (CSWE) has been with SolidWorks since 1996, and creates technical content for all sorts of product demos, What’s New videos and more. He has also run the Model Mania® contest at SOLIDWORKS World since 2002.

The post 22 Years of Model Mania® appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Mark Schneider at February 22, 2021 07:00 PM

Six SOLIDWORKS Solutions – BOM and Balloons

When working with SOLIDWORKS support, I receive questions multiple times, and most of the time the answer is the same.

So in this and some of my other blog posts, I will be giving some examples of questions I receive when working in support, as well as offer solutions for them.

In this blog post the focus will be on BOM and Balloons, as that can also prove to be quite a handful on occasions.

All of the solutions offered here can be done by most users

BOM reference

Sometimes it can be useful to have multiple views and BOM in a drawing due to different configurations.

However, if you delete one of the BOMs your Balloon on the referring to view with the deleted Table does not match the remaining BOM.

Reinserting the Balloon does not help.

To solve this you have two options:

  1. Insert a new view.
  2. Make sure the existing view refers to the correct BOM

 

I will not go over option 1, but instead focus on option 2.

Right click on the view and press “Properties”

Properties

Under balloons, set a checkmark on “Link Balloon text to specified table” and select the table you want to link to.

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BOM Order

Sometimes it can be useful to have the same assembly in different configurations on the same drawing.

And even if possible, make sure that the BOM numbers match in the view.

Wrong BOM number

It is possible to rearrange the numbers manually, but doing this is a time consuming task and errors can occur.

I recommend rearranging the parts and subassemblies with the suppressed models in the bottom as shown in the below video.

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This way the BOM will always update and if a new configuration is inserted, it is automatically sorted in the right order.

You only need to make sure that “Follow assembly order” is checked, and your BOM should match up nicely.

follow assembly order

Bill of material options

When working with subassemblies on BOMs 
you can sometimes experience one the 
 following issues.

1) Your parts does not appear on the BOM, only the subassembly.

BOM options

2) Or the subassembly it self does not appear on the BOM.

In most cases this is due to a setting in the configuration in the affected subassembly. To resolve it, open the assembly and go to configurations, right click on the active configuration and press “Properties.”

Subassembly options

Find “Bill of Materials Options”, and the section “Child component display when used as subassembly.”

Bill of matiarial options

Here you have 3 different options on how to show the assembly when it is used as a subassembly in another assembly AND when the BOM is set as “Indented”;

Show:

This shows the entire assembly with both assembly name and parts.

Show

Hide:

This hides the parts completely in the BOM, and only the Subassembly is visible

Hide

Promote:
When this radio button is marked, only the parts of the assembly is shown and not the assembly itself

Promote

 

All of these have different uses, depending on what you want to show in your BOM.

 

Size of balloons

In SOLIDWORKS you have many options on how to customize your drawings.

One of these is the size of the balloons.

On the below image you can see an example of to large Balloons.

Balloon size

This is set within the document properties and saved in the template.

Go to Tools->Options->document properties->Annotations->Balloons

Balloon size

You have the option to modify the size and shape of the balloons for both single balloons and stacked balloons.

Once you have found the size and shape you want, press ok and save the template.

However the existing balloons you need to change them manually.

Click on the individual balloon or select multiple balloons and change them in settings.

Manually change balloon size

 

An Asterisk (*) Instead of a number, 

When placing a placing a balloon on a drawing it can sometimes occur that instead of a number you get an asterisk (*)

Asteriks in Baloon

If you have inserted a BOM Referring to a configuration where the particular part is missing, you can get this error:

BOM configuration

In the below example I have created a configuration with “The train” Missing, the result is an asterisk in the balloon.

Asteriks in balloon

This being a simple assembly it is relatively easy to locate the error.

Another reason for the asterisk, could be if the part (or subassembly) has “Exclude from BOM” option checked.

To find out if this is the issue, go to your assembly, left click on the part or the subassembly and press properties.

part options

Here you have the option to “exclude from the bill of materials”,

Exclude from BOM

If this is checked, you will see an asterisk as well as the part or subassembly will be missing from the Bill of Materials.

 

Balloons do not snap to the parts

Balloon snap

This is a problem that occurs if you have created your own view in perspective mode and used it in a drawing.

perspective

Create a new view where perspective mode is turned off to solve this.

To achieve this easily, select your customized view and make sure that the perspective mode is NOT active.

perspective unselected

Now save the view as a new view, by pressing space and selecting the New view icon.

new view

Now select the new view in the drawing orientation.

select view

 

And your balloons should snap to the parts just fine.

Author information

Lennart Tinndahl
I started working with CAD systems in 2003, and have since 2012 worked solely with SOLIDWORKS. I am a certified Technical support specialist as well as a SOLIDWORKS Certified Expert. Since 2016 I have helped PLM Group customers to work smarter, not harder. The inspiration for most of my posts comes from the support cases i work on. When writing blogpost I try to focus on the everyday use of SOLIDWORKS.

The post Six SOLIDWORKS Solutions – BOM and Balloons appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Lennart Tinndahl at February 22, 2021 04:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Drawings Best Practice Tutorial

Got drawing issues? One of the biggest issues that our customers face is a disconnect between the design and manufacturing departments. Javelin’s SOLIDWORKS Drawings Service is customized to solve your unique drawing production and manufacturing issues.

In this on-demand webinar, Javelin’s certified SOLIDWORKS Expert and Training Process Consultant; Jamie Hill, will demonstrate what Javelin’s Drawing Service can do for you!

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fzv_8x7Hmzw?feature=oembed" title="SOLIDWORKS Drawings Best Practice Tutorial" width="500"></iframe>

Key topics in the SOLIDWORKS Drawings tutorial

During this 45 minute on-demand webinar, we look at:

  • Custom property propagation
  • Advanced select tools
  • Predefined tolerancing
  • Automatic note block generation
  • Predefined GD&T
  • Predefined Drawing Views
  • Quickset print options
  • And more!

The SOLIDWORKS Drawings Service will help

  1. Optimize your process: Learn a process that better connects your engineering/design team with manufacturing.
  2. Save costs: Reduce the number of drawing revisions by ensuring the use of standards and tolerances.
  3. Save time: Reduce the amount of time spent creating, revising, and annotating production drawings.

The post SOLIDWORKS Drawings Best Practice Tutorial appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at February 22, 2021 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Accurate Flow Simulation Helps Automaker Get Better Results While Increasing Creativity

Palatov Motorsport designs and manufactures high-performance, super lightweight automobiles built in Portland, Oregon. Primarily targeted at recreational track day use, the company’s mission is to create and build designs with outstanding performance that provide unmatched value.

Palatov’s workflow primarily uses SOLIDWORKS® software, which enables the company to create components and fit them together into a car design, and then use SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation CFD software to test the airflow, mechanical, and thermal performance. This will be fed back into further design updates.

With a single car comprising 750 to 1,000 individual components, this places a huge load on processor and graphics subsystems. The CFD simulation will be an equally massive processing job. This means that every part of a workstation needs to provide the best possible performance.

The Need for Speed – Off the Track

Palatov was experiencing workflow interruptions at two points in the production cycle. “If I’m spending a lot of time just twiddling my thumbs waiting for the model to reorient itself or to zoom in and out, that slows down the process a lot,” explains Dennis Palatov, Owner of Palatov Motorsport, LLC.

The second interruption was when it came to testing the designs with SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation. “CFD is very incremental. You change one little thing and you rerun it. Normally it takes 12 hours. So I used to set it up last thing at night, let it run overnight, come in, get the results and then go on with the rest of the day.”

The company had been using workstation technology based on the Intel Core i7 processor with AMD Radeon™ Pro WX 7100 graphics. This provided an adequate modelling experience, but when a simulation was running it was a different story. “CFD used to be an overnight project,” says Palatov. “The key thing is to visualize and evolve the design in real time and see where everything fits. So the tools really have to move at the speed of my thought. If I have to wait, then it’s very disruptive, and it really negatively impacts productivity.” To resolve the issue, Palatov implemented AMD CPUs and GPUs (AMD Ryzen 3950X processor and AMD Radeon Pro W5500) with impressive results. “I found that I can run a CFD simulation and still have full usability of SOLIDWORKS on the same computer,” said Palatov.

With the power of the 16 cores of the AMD Ryzen 3950X, it meant that staff could use 8 to 10 of these for flow simulation and still have some leftover for modelling. Palatov Motorsport has a specific example with one of its car design simulations. “The old system took seven hours and 24 minutes to finish it,” says Palatov. “The new system took six hours and 22 minutes, but I was also using SOLIDWORKS in the foreground simultaneously. The old system was basically running only CFD and was completely useless for anything else at the same time.”

According to Palatov: “The productivity is the payoff. The value proposition is very easy. You save a significant amount of time and do a lot more with every day, so you look at your personnel costs and opportunity costs versus equipment costs, and it becomes very compelling. It makes me enjoy the work a lot more, and it makes me more excited and motivated. It’s not just work; it’s actually fun when the tools get out of your way and just let you be creative.”

By relying on SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation for CFD, combined with proper supporting hardware, Palatov Motorsports can accurately produce modelling experiences resulting in critical data to create and build outstanding track-ready automobiles.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Accurate Flow Simulation Helps Automaker Get Better Results While Increasing Creativity appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 22, 2021 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Chill Your Soda In Record Time With A Powerade Bottle And An Electric Drill

chill soda machine

The best part about having a chilled soda is drinking one after a hard, hot day’s work. The worst part? Waiting for it to get cold.

While you could wait 20 minutes by storing your beverage in a cooler or fridge, Chris Notap has found a much faster way to chill a soda: through an empty Powerade bottle and an electric drill:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/50VyUdewAj4?start=20&amp;feature=oembed" title="Fastest Way to ● Chill A Beverage ( this actually works ! )" width="770"></iframe>

The reason Chris uses a Powerade bottle isn’t because of some sponsorship deal (though they really should reach out to him). It’s because the bottle’s unique design allows for sodas to fit exactly the way he wants them to.

The Powerade bottle in question has three grooves on the side for a handgrip, a measurement of 7 and 3/4ths of an inch in height, and a flat cover.

chill soda machine

Start by drilling a ¼-inch hole into the center of the bottle cap. Then, fit a ¼-inch bolt (roughly 1/2-inch long), along with a washer on either side and a nut through the bottom of the cap. The end of the bolt should protrude from the top of the bottle cap, along with the nut.

chill soda machine

Next, you’ll want to cut the top half of the Powerade bottle in between the embossed letters “D” and “E”. Once done, you have the option of drilling two holes on either side of the remaining bottle to help your soda cool faster.

chill soda machine

Lastly, fit the bolt to your drill, set it to low speed, and fit your soda into the Powerade top with the bottom side facing the drill.

Dip the beverage into your cooler and rev it up at full speed on low for about a minute and a half. The rotations will chill your soda at a breakneck pace which, thankfully, Chris mentions doesn’t affect the amount of fizz. If all goes well, you should have a soda with a temperature that sits nicely around the 4°C mark (or 40°F).

chill soda machine

It may have taken 90 seconds to cool the beverage with the drill, but it could take you an extra 5 minutes to make this modified cooling apparatus. Still, 6 and a half minutes feels like a short time compared to the 20 grueling minutes you have to wait by storing your soda in a cooler the old-fashioned way.

Chris has more DIY creations, inventions, and hacks on his YouTube channel, Chris Notap.

The post Chill Your Soda In Record Time With A Powerade Bottle And An Electric Drill appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 22, 2021 09:22 AM

February 21, 2021

SolidSmack

Someone Actually Turned Adam Savage’s Book Into A Working Hammer

book hammer

Back in 2019, MythBusters host, special effects designer, and all-around crazy creator Adam Savage released a book titled Every Tool’s a Hammer. Chronicling his career as a creator, it takes a deep dive into Savage’s creative process and how he approaches crafting… well, I mean anything.

While I’m sure creators will get a kick out of reading the book, Peter Brown thought it would be fun to take the book’s title literally and turn Savage’s biography into an actual hammer:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_HFx13eoGjo?feature=oembed" title="Can You Make a Book Into a Hammer?" width="770"></iframe>

Using everyone’s favorite hardening material, art resin, Brown slathers the stuff through 310 pages of soft, pliable paper.

I actually thought he would use the hard book covers as a way to help make the hammer sturdier but no: Brown insists on doing this the old-fashioned way. He cuts out the book covers as well as the first page of the book before taking his brush and laying art resin on each and every one of the 310 pages.

book hammer

This is probably the longest, most grueling way you could cover anything in resin but according to Brown, it is also the surest way to get the entire book completely rock solid. You can see his mental state start to deteriorate throughout the process. What starts as a per-page brushing becomes a per 2-3 page brushing, with Brown hoping the resin seeps through the pages as he goes along.

book hammer

He runs out of resin at around the 183-page mark, so he mixes another batch and decides to change his plan of attack. Brown abandons the brushes and instead resorts to pouring the resin between a few pages and spreading it using his gloved hands. This is nowhere close to his original idea of painting resin on each and every page, but the casting process is starting to give him carpal tunnel syndrome (so he has to contend with this alternative method).

Eventually, he finishes casting the whole thing in resin and leaves the book to dry before cutting it into the shape of a hammer.

book hammer

Once the resin dries, he stumbles into a new obstacle: the book is now way too hard for some of his tools to cut through it. His CNC machine fails him, so Brown has to cast a whole ‘nother Adam Savage book in art resin before he can attempt to make a new hammer.

book hammer

This time, he takes his scroll saw to the resin book and cuts out a hammer pattern. Unlike his CNC machine, Brown’s scroll saw relies heavily on his hand-eye coordination to cut out the pattern. It’s also slow, time-consuming, and just by looking at it, is also very rickety.

After cutting out the hammer, he takes it to the sander and router table to smoothen out the edges and make it look just a tiny bit more professional. Elsewhere, he epoxies the excess parts of the book back into the covers to make a nice little storage container for his new hammer.

book hammer

Et voilà, a book hammer made using Adam Savage’s Every Tool’s a Hammer. This thing is way harder and heavier than it was before, making it ideal for pounding nails and other objects into place. It would have been cool if Brown fleshed out the claw portion of the hammer so you could remove nails with it but making a hammer out of paper is tough enough as it is.

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It’s nice to know even Adam Savage himself was proud that someone took his book title so literally. It just goes to show that madness always appreciates madness!

The post Someone Actually Turned Adam Savage’s Book Into A Working Hammer appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 21, 2021 11:26 AM

Make Your Own Retractable Wolverine Claws With Popsicle Sticks and Pressurized Syringes

wooden Wolverine claws

Tons of creative X-Men fans have made Wolverine claws that can cut through pretty much anything. Nonetheless, only a few of those folks can brag a pair that actually draws and retracts. Just as a refresher, in addition to Wolverine’s advanced healing factor (his actual mutant power), he has a solid adamantium skeleton complete with three retractable claws on each hand.

Makers worldwide have put their own spin on creating these indestructible claws, but Brian from Brains techKnowlogy is one of the few I’ve seen who has made a retractable version of the same claws on a budget:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LSiyyxohsXk?feature=oembed" title="X-MEN WOLVERINE Claws fully automatic DIY tutorial - Popsicle sticks" width="770"></iframe>

Using popsicle sticks, metal wire, syringes, and some tubing, his claws can be made just by anyone. The reason? No metalworking required.

The Wooden Claws

wooden Wolverine claws

While not as indestructible as metal claws, these wooden claws serve as perfect alternatives. They’re lighter, more malleable, and can still cut through a water balloon or two.

Brian glues several sticks around the single, protruding claw. To get the claws to draw, he makes two wooden housings: a bigger one housing another per claw. On the other hand, a few wooden stoppers glued on top of the housings will keep the claws in a prime cutting position.

Finally, he adds a couple of small hooks fitted with twine so the claws can retract once the syringe is depressurized.

Prepping the Syringes

wooden Wolverine claws

Getting the claws to draw and retract requires the aid of a few syringes. Each claw has a syringe placed under it, so when Brian puts pressure on them, they push the claws forward.

wooden Wolverine claws

Each syringe will be connected to another syringe located just underneath Brian’s hand. He adds some metal wire rings to the tips of the plungers so when he pulls on them, they will draw the claws on the other side of his hand.

Does Wolverine Have Green Blood?

wooden Wolverine claws

Connecting the underhand syringes to the claws are plastic tubes. Before fitting the tubes, Brian first fills the syringes with green, red, and clear colored water (at least I hope it’s water) to get the pressure flowing. He does this since the air pressure inside the tubes might not be enough to push the claws forward.

Once filled, he fits in the tubes and prepares to get his sknit on. (That’s the sound Wolverine’s claws make in the comics, in case you didn’t know!)

Fitting On The Claws

wooden Wolverine claws

Each of the overhand syringes is glued onto a couple of giant popsicle sticks and fitted with Velcro, so Brian can fit them onto his hand. Likewise, the underhand syringes are also glued to a single giant popsicle stick and fitted with a couple of hooks that latch onto the Velcro strap I mentioned. It’s a simple arrangement, but you have to admit it all fits very nicely together.

wooden Wolverine claws

It won’t cut through everything, but the way these claws draw and retract are just so cool. Brian pops a couple of water balloons with no problem and adds some kickass sound effects to make the claws sound like the real deal.

You can check out more of Brian’s creations and experiments on his YouTube channel, Brains tehKnowlogy.

The post Make Your Own Retractable Wolverine Claws With Popsicle Sticks and Pressurized Syringes appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 21, 2021 11:19 AM

February 19, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Stratasys adds carbon fiber on the F123 series printers with ABS-CF10

Can you 3D print carbon fiber? Stratasys F123 series printers including the F170, F270, and F370 are now capable of printing stronger, stiffer, and lighter-weight parts with the addition of a carbon fiber material – ABS-CF10.

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ABS-CF10 is an ABS-based material with 10% chopped carbon fiber, making it 15% stronger and 50% stiffer than ABS. The combination of ABS and carbon fiber offers more desirable mechanical properties for tooling applications than ABS. It is the first fiber reinforced material on the Stratasys F123 series printers.

Below you can see the difference in stiffness and strength compared to other materials available on the F123 series printers.

ABS-CF10 compared to other F123 materials

This new material allows the F123 series printers to print parts with enough strength to replace metal components in functional prototyping, tooling applications, and production parts. The new carbon fiber material is ideal for automotive, industrial, recreational, and aerospace manufacturing.

Easiest way to print carbon fiber

Printing with carbon fiber is simple on the F123 printers. Drop a canister of FDM ABS-CF10 in the printer and you are ready to print! Get strong, stiff, light-weight parts in a matter of hours.

Current owners of the F123 series printers can run ABS-CF10 with a hardware head upgrade. A dedicated head is required due to the abrasiveness of the material; however, it can be changed easily with no service visit required. The new material does not require different trays or support, you can use the standard build trays and QSR soluble support.

Below are two example parts printed with ABS-CF10 material on the F123 series printer.

ABS-CF10 Fuel Pipe Fixture Carbon fiber pipe weld fixture

Stratasys F123 series machines

With the addition of the carbon fiber material, the F123 series printers can now print up to 8 different FDM materials including PLA, ABS-ESD7, ABS-M30, ASA, PC-ABS, TPU 92A and Diran. The printers allow you to produce fast, effective prototypes for concept development, as well as highly accurate and robust parts for design validation and functional performance.

Key features and benefits of the F123 printers:

  • Large build size – print large, dense parts successfully with large build size options (up to 14 x 10 x 14 in)
  • Easy installation and operation – simple plug and play operation. Fast, easy material change-out, plus auto-calibration means less time troubleshooting.
  • Office friendly – Ultra low noise level during building and fully enclosed system with auto-locking door.

Sign up for a webinar

Register for the upcoming webinar “ABS-Carbon Fiber: Expanding Additive Applications & Enhancing Manufacturing Efficiency” on Thursday, March 18 to learn more about this new carbon fiber material.

Register

The post Stratasys adds carbon fiber on the F123 series printers with ABS-CF10 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Kelly Clancy at February 19, 2021 06:32 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Car Racer Track Tutorial

I have seen many variations of these car racers recently, and even bought one for family. I find them quite interesting to watch the little car go down the tracks flipping over as it goes. I’m not sure how long they would’ve entertained me as a child, but I think they are a novelty toy all the same. To follow this tutorial you will need to download this file here. Within this file you will find the DXF file needed for the front panels. The DXF file was created in a vector program called CorelDraw to map out where the screw holes would go for the car ramps. There is the screw part which is inserted into Car Racer Track front panels to hold the ramps in place. This is just as an example for the construction of the toy, there would be more screws needed to construct this design. Then there is the four colored cars parts, and a set of wheels that are all assembled together at the end of the tutorial. Finally there are two decals which you can add to the car racer if you wish to, I added these to the front and back panels, and the base panel. 

The DXF file I imported for the front panels already had the screw holes added to it, however sometimes you will find when you export a circular profile from a vector program your circular profiles come in without a center point to use as a guide. Because of this, I had to convert all the circles in the sketch for construction and draw new circles in SOLIDWORKS and manually move it into place with move entities. The circles where then used with hole wizard to create custom countersink holes for the screws to be added later on.

For this tutorial the most useful tool was the offset entities sketch tool. it was used in several steps of the tutorial. I used it to create the ramp sides by sketching out a spline, and offsetting it bi-directional (both ways) but also capping the ends to close off the offset into a profile. Here you can choose to cap the ends with either an arc or line. For this shape I chose line, and then added a small fillet to the corners afterwards. The offset entities was also used to create the ramp itself, by offsetting the side profiles and then offsetting that entity in one direction and capping off the ends with lines. The sketch could then be extruded to create the ramp.

Mirror Bodies came in handy too for this design, it was used to mirror over the front panels, but also to mirror over the ramp sides. I always like to start my models center to the parts axis so that you have the front and right plane center to the model. In this case I started the base of the model from the center of the axis on the top plane. This meant that i could use the mirror bodies feature straight off the front plane without the need for a new plane. The feature was also used for mirroring over all the screw parts from the front side to the back panels too. This tool always saves me so much time.

The screws are added using insert part, they are then mated into place using move/copy bodies. There is a constraints option within here that allows you to mate the parts into place like you would in an assembly. The only differences are that the part you bring in cant move around by dragging it, and you have to mate each part individually.

Once you have completed the cars racing track part, you will start creating an assembly, the race track goes in first, then you can bring in the individual car parts into the assembly dropping them near the tracks. For this tutorial I have only showcased one car going down the track, but you could line them up on the starting ramp to see how they all fall during the motion analysis. The wheels are mated onto each car with concentric and coincident mates, and the car that is on the ramp has additional tangent mates attaching it to the ramp floor. I also added a parallel mate to the side of the car to the ramp sides for positioning the car in place. Both the tangent mates and the parallel mate were suppressed for the analysis. Gravity, and contacts were added to the analysis before it was run, this finished rendered result can be seen at the end of the tutorial.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ii8ruTT_iaw" width="560"></iframe> 

Author information

Jade Crompton
I am a 3D Designer and Solidworks Blog Contributor from the UK. I am a self taught Solidworks user, and have been using it to inform and create my designs since 2012. I specialise in the design of Ceramics, Home Accessories and Wooden Toy Design.

The post Car Racer Track Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Jade Crompton at February 19, 2021 04:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Mate Property Manager Interface Change in SOLIDWORKS 2021

The Standard, Advanced, and Mechanical mate categories found in the Mate Property Manager have now moved into tabs at the top of the Property Manager in SOLIDWORKS 2021!

SOLIDWORKS 2021 Property Manager:

SOLIDWORKS 2021 User Interface has the Mate type categories as tabs and the appropriate mates are shown under the “Mate Type” group box.

SOLIDWORKS 2021 Mate Property Manager

SOLIDWORKS 2021

SOLIDWORKS 2020 and older:

The older User Interface had the Mate type categories as separate group boxes in the property manager.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 and Older Mate Property Manager

SOLIDWORKS 2020 and Older

If you found this interesting, please take a look at a few other SOLIDWORKS 2021 User Interface updates.

The post Mate Property Manager Interface Change in SOLIDWORKS 2021 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Prasadh Annalingam, CSWE at February 19, 2021 02:54 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Technology Preview: 3DEXPERIENCE Works and SOLIDWORKS 2022

The beloved tradition of the TECHNOLOGY PREVIEW continues at 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021 in the form of Don’t Miss This Demo. Released in three episodes, Don’t Miss This Demo shows off the latest, greatest and what’s next for the 3DEXPERIENCE Works portfolio, including a sneak peak at the upcoming release of SOLIDWORKS 2022.

EPISODE ONE: Kevin makes his coworkers disappear!?

We open with the intern, Kevin, giving a demonstration of 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS to his manager and coworkers. “It’s the SOLIDWORKS we all know and love, but connected to cloud.” While his demo skills can be improved, the software looks good to the team as it improves their level of data management, collaboration, design re-use and more. Kevin even shows off how it can use models made in the browser-based, Sub-D modeling app xShape.

However, the coworkers continue to torment Kevin. His patience has expired. He wishes they would all disappear and he retreats to the shop to 3D print one of his new designs. Waiting for the print to finish, he dozes off. Meanwhile, the rest of the company receives an immediate work-from-home order.

When Kevin wakes up, he think his wish came true! Now he has the run of the entire office without fear of his coworkers. Does this story sound familiar? It should.

While taking a break from his antics, Kevin is alerted by two CAD bandits who plan to break in and steal the company’s hardware and designs. However, the building still looks occupied. They return to their van to hack into the company’s servers.

Before the bandits gain access, Kevin migrates the company’s designs to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform using the automated tools included with 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS.

Empty handed, the CAD Bandits will not give up. They will return tomorrow to break into the building and steal everything. Surely, everyone will be working from home by then.

Watch Episode One On Demand at the virtual 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021 (log-in required)

EPISODE TWO: The CAD Bandits are coming back!

Kevin needs a plan…a project plan…to make the office look busy and drive off the bandits when they return. Using the breadth and depth of the 3DEXPERIENCE Works portfolio and reconnecting with his team, Kevin succeeds…

Lean Team Player to quickly lay out his battle plan. Project Planner to prioritize his tasks. Product Release Engineer to build his shopping list.

Kevin combines the power of 3D Creator, 3D SheetMetal Creator, 3D Structure CreatorNC Shop Floor Programmer, and Collaborative Business Innovator to video call his manager, design and build the rest of the robots.

When the bandits arrive, it looks to them as a fully functioning office. They watch and list in on a design review meeting showing 3D Mold Creator, 3D Structure Creator, 3D SheetMetal Creator, 3D Sculptor, 3D Creator, 3D Render, and Product Communicator…all in the web browser, touch-enabled and built on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

Continuing their scan of the building, the bandits see how the company validates their designs using Structural Performance Engineer, Electromagnetics Engineer, Fluid Dynamics Engineer, and Plastic Injection Engineer, all of which are associated with the SOLIDWORKS designs with no data import or export.

Upon closer inspection, the bandits realize that they’ve been deceived. The office is empty except for the intern. Confident they can suppress the intern, they plan to return the next day. When they do, Kevin will be ready with SOLIDWORKS 2022.

Watch Episode Two On Demand at the virtual 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021 (log-in required)

EPISODE THREE: This is Kevin’s Office. He had to defend it!

With the power of SOLIDWORKS 2022, Kevin designs traps for the bandits as they try to break in. But first, he uses 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight to predict where the bandits will start their attack.

Kevin designs a gantry system with the new connection elements in Structure System to crush the bandits when they arrive.

A secret shredder with sheet metal mounts will be sure to take out the bandits. With the new predefined flat pattern views, Kevin finishes his drawing faster than ever before.

Next, the barista barrage will be sure to blast them away. With the new ability to create coordinate systems from absolute coordinates and enhanced Quick Mates, Kevin rapidly assembles his components.

But the CAD Bandits keep coming and finally reach Kevin. At the climax of our story, the CAD Cops return from SOLIDWORKS World 2011 and save the day. Armed with their donut blaster, they take out the CAD Bandits for good. They even show a bit of how their blaster was designed and validated using the new linkage rods and more flexible mesh controls in SOLIDWORKS Simulation.

To see what else was shown in the technology preview and find out how the story concludes, watch the entire episode:

Watch Episode Three On Demand at the virtual 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021 (log-in required)

As always, please remember, this is a TECHNOLOGY PREVIEW regarding SOLIDWORKS 2022. Feature and functionality are always changing until fully vetted and not guaranteed to be in the next release of the software.

Author information

Michael STEEVES
Ever since he was first able to crawl, Michael has been pushing buttons to figure out how things work and sharing his experiences to empower others. From pool trick shots to technology previews while wearing leopard print suits, Michael lives the question of “how can I do that in SOLIDWORKS?”

The post Technology Preview: 3DEXPERIENCE Works and SOLIDWORKS 2022 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Michael STEEVES at February 19, 2021 01:00 PM

February 17, 2021

The Javelin Blog

How to create Multiple Animations from a SOLIDWORKS Composer Assembly

SOLIDWORKS Composer is used to create the technical documentation or animations referring to the various processes such as assembling components.

There is always a need to create multiple animations from the same composer assembly such as one animation could show the exploded position of the parts and then slowly assembling one part at a time whereas another animation could just show the assembled model from different angles or camera orientations.

NOTE: You do not have to delete the existing animation and create the new one OR you don’t have to reimport the SOLIDWORKS model in SOLIDWORKS Composer to create another animation for the same model. We can save multiple animations from the same assembly and load whichever animation we would like at any time.

How to save multiple animations:

  1. Create the first animation in the animation key track.
  2. Now save this animation  as a Scenario .smgSce through Animate Tab > “Save Root”
  3. Give the File name to the Scenario file (.smgSce) and Click Save.

    Save Root

    Save Root

  4. Now the keys on the key track can be deleted and create the second animation and the second animation can be saved as a Scenario file (.smgSce) file as well.
  5. Whenever you want to modify the first animation it can be loaded back using “Load Root” from Animate Tab.
  6. Once you click Load Root browse to the first scenario file and Open > Now the animation can be modified and exported as a video through Workshops > Video > “Save video as” .MP4 or .AVI
Load Root

Load Root

NOTE: The current animation doesn’t have to be deleted when loading another animation through Load root, it automatically replaces the current animation.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer

To learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer attend our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training course live online.

The post How to create Multiple Animations from a SOLIDWORKS Composer Assembly appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at February 17, 2021 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

What’s New in 3DEXPERIENCE Design Roles 2021

The browser-based design and engineering capabilities on the 3DEXPERIENCE® platform have been recently updated with the R2021x FD04 release on January 23, 2021. You may not have noticed it, because all updates to our cloud-based portfolio of products happen automatically. The power and flexibility these applications are worth considering as part of your product development toolbelt.

Let’s take a closer look at what is new in the January 2021 update.

Faster Creation and Updates to Assemblies

The Feature Driven Component Pattern leverages feature patterns in parts to drive component patterns in assemblies. If the number of instances in the feature pattern updates, so does the component pattern in the assembly. This enables fast updates to assemblies (without all the rework) because you can automatically link feature and component patterns or holes for more robust parametric models.

Re-import Newer 3D CAD Files

If you have newer versions of previously imported SOLIDWORKS, CATIA, Solid Edge, and Inventor files, you can reimport them—both part and assembly files. Any downstream features or mates applied to the imported model are maintained. Now you can work with suppliers or with imported parts from other CAD systems without waiting for the latest version, safe in the knowledge that any previous work can be easily updated.

Quickly Access & Change your Mates

Mates applied to components can now be viewed and accessed via Breadcrumbs, along with the ability to view mate status. This creates a more productive environment for making changes to component mates in an assembly and less time spent navigating the assembly structure.

Minimize Search Time

The new app landing pages now show your most recently accessed content, and it can be opened with a single tap. Increase productivity and reduce time searching for your data by quickly accessing all your latest designs directly from the landing page. Content can also be dragged from the landing page into other apps to complete your projects quickly and efficiently.

Improved Zoom Levels

When using standard views, zoom to fit, or the view cube, there is now a more efficient use of screen space, which makes it easier to work with your design to get your job done faster.

Drag and Drop Content from 3DDrive

Now it is easier than ever to get started with a whole range of 3D file formats with fewer steps. You can drag and drop files into the xDesign app in 3D Creator, the xShape app in 3D Sculptor, the xSheetMetal app in 3D SheetMetal Creator, and the xFrame app in 3D Structure Creator to import them. Even non-native content in 3DDrive can be imported with drag and drop. Or you can simply use the “Open With” selection to trigger the import.

Blend Between Disconnected Edges

Create a blended surface between edges of a continuous but open contour. The new blend option allows you to close and blend rather than simply extend the edge of the surface. The new surface extrusion options allow you to quickly fill gaps and create surfaces that are smooth and natural as if the gap never existed.

Drag and Drop Components from Design to Other 3DEXPERIENCE apps

Drag and drop designs into 3DPlay, Bookmark Editor, Collaborative Lifecycle, and other apps directly from your design environment, which automatically opens them in the app, saving time and effort.

Drag and Drop Component Structure Changes

Structure your assemblies on the fly with drag and drop restructuring and hierarchy changes. Restructure assemblies by dragging and dropping components from one assembly to another, top level to sub assembly, and vice versa. Components can be easily arranged to create new top level and sub level structures.

Additional Sketch Snaps and Behavior Enhancements

Now it is faster and easier to sketch the appropriate forms with the right design intent the first time, which means you spend less time adding relations separately. Here are the additional options for snapping and automatic relations in sketching:

  • Line tangent or coincident to arc centers
  • Line parallel and perpendicular to other lines

Chain Select and Box Select Dimensions

Faster and more intelligent selections of multiple items are now possible when: 1) selecting a chain of sketch entities and 2) selecting multiple dimensions at the same time.

New View Filter for Sketch Constraints

When working with complex sketches it is often useful to see all relations at the same time. Previously you had to select sketch entities to see the relations. Now you can quickly show and hide all sketch constraints as needed.

Common xApp Preferences

It is easier to maintain consistency and preserve your favorite settings across all your SOLIDWORKS web-based apps with the new centralized common xApp preferences.

Design Assistant – Mate Helper

New machine learning capabilities enable you to automatically insert additional instances of duplicate components. Maximize your efficiency and reduce redundant time spent installing duplicate components, such as fasteners. The new Design Assistant Mate Helper automatically inserts multiple instances of components into your assembly. The Mate Helper automatically recognizes and suggests locations to replicate components.

Parametric Primitives

Now 3D primitive shapes can be snapped together and edited with downstream features updating as expected. This streamlines the modeling of prismatic parts, which is ideal for concept design, setting up a Design Study for Design Guidance, and more.

Create a Blended Surface Between Edges of a Continuous but Open Contour

New surface extrusion options allow you to quickly fill gaps and create surfaces that are smooth and natural as if the gap never existed. Now you can close and blend rather than simply extend the edge of the surface.

Undo Available Outside Sub-D Environment

Undo now works even after confirming and exiting the subdivision modeling environment, which provides more flexibility and increased confidence in knowing that you can Undo any action, even after leaving the subdivision environment.

Always Connected

The pressure is always on to deliver faster and at a lower cost. With product development teams spread out geographically now more than ever, companies need additional tools to bring products to market faster and more efficiently.

The 3DEXPERIENCE platform makes it easy to work with people inside and outside your company, including customers, suppliers, and manufacturers. You can simplify your communication workflow and improve productivity since everyone works from a common platform.

And because data management is built-in, you not only have design data audit trails but also communication audit trails all in one, easy to access location.

If you have more questions about this release, please contact your local reseller.

Author information

Mark Rushton
Mark Rushton
Mark Rushton is a Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS and has been involved with 3D CAD and 3D Printing for over 15 years in several capacities from research to consulting for the likes of Rolls Royce, GE, JCB and Dyson. When not playing with 3D printers or other tech, he is most likely out snowboarding, wake boarding or mountain biking.

The post What’s New in 3DEXPERIENCE Design Roles 2021 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mark Rushton at February 17, 2021 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Feel The Nostalgia With This Pokémon Papercraft Diorama

pokemon papercraft

It doesn’t matter if you were a kid in the early 2000s: you couldn’t go a day without hearing about Pokémon during those years. What spawned into the now gargantuan media franchise started as a pair of video games for the Nintendo Game Boy. Pokémon Red and Blue that were both released in 1996 have established their special spots not just in video game history, but so as in the childhoods of countless individuals (mine included).

GUMY Art’s creator is yet another individual whose life has been affected by the cute and powerful creatures. His YouTube channel is dedicated to creating art based on video games, anime, and other forms of pop culture. He’s recently been focusing on creating 3D papercraft dioramas of iconic 2D scenes, and what better scene is there than the beginning of Pokémon:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7Q5Jkt2BNmU?feature=oembed" title="Turning a 2D Pokemon Famous Paper Scene into a beautiful 3D Diorama Cube Papercraft Fanart" width="770"></iframe>

This latest diorama of his is based on Pokémon Leaf Green and Fire Red. These games are actually remakes of the original Red and Blue, but it still captures the feel of those titles, just with updated gameplay and graphics.

But enough about the game, let’s take a look at the diorama:

The Pokémon Lab

pokemon papercraft

The backdrop is fairly simple to make. By printing a pre-set background and using the help of a needle to get the folds just right, you can recreate a 3D version of Professor Oak’s Pokémon lab.

pokemon papercraft

GUMY Art uses some clear tape to stick the frames of the three starting Pokémon onto the background. This allows them to protrude a bit and gives the illusion that they are hanging from the wall.

pokemon papercraft

Finally, he glues the backdrop onto a makeshift cardboard stage. This serves as the base of the whole diorama and will support all the props and pieces he’ll add.

Which brings us to…

The Props

This part is much more difficult and time-consuming. While GUMY Art still has to print out the different pieces of the diorama, most of these are way smaller and require delicate hands to place and assemble them in place.

pokemon papercraft

First, he has to carefully cut out each of the props by hand. Take note that some of the props – such as the furniture and tables – have foldable pieces that allow them to lean onto the background of the lab. GUMY Art cuts out all these tiny pieces and uses a needle to make the foldable parts easier to work with.

pokemon papercraft

Next comes the glue. He has to make sure he uses just the right amount of adhesive: too much amount and the glue will seep into the paper and make it look soggy; too little and the pieces won’t stick. I’d actually recommend using some tweezers if you plan on attempting this yourself, as the process looks really impossible with nothing to use but just your bare hands. (Especially so if you have gigantic fingers as I do!)

With enough persistence and a lot more patience, you should be able to glue every little thing in Professor Oak’s lab; the professor and the main protagonist included!

pokemon papercraft

You wouldn’t want the pieces to fly everywhere so to make things more permanent, wait for the glue to dry before placing the diorama in a glass case. GUMY Art has posted links to everything you need to make your own diorama in the video description: from the glue and paper he uses, all the way to the prints you need for the Pokémon lab and props.

Be sure to check out his YouTube channel as well. He does a lot of easy-to-make projects which you can do at home without too many complex materials!

The post Feel The Nostalgia With This Pokémon Papercraft Diorama appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 17, 2021 08:52 AM

February 16, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Why is my SOLIDWORKS Sketch Text Upside Down?

Have you noticed that sometimes your SOLIDWORKS Sketch Text is upright going left to right but sometimes the text is upside down and is reversed right to left?

SOLIDWORKS Sketch Text Orientation

SOLIDWORKS Sketch Text Orientation

This is not a bug or a mistake in the program but rather an intended behaviour. The cause of the upside text is actually quite straightforward but almost always missed. The text orientation is dependent on the way you create the curve (line) the text is referenced on. If you create a line from left to right then the text will be upright and if you create it from right to left, then it will be upside down as see above.

Upside Down Sketch Text Prevention:

Make sure you create the line in the direction you want the text to be oriented.

Fix for existing upside down text:

Recreate the line in the direction you want the text to be oriented. That being said, if you have already created a line and do not wish to recreate the line then there is another simple option to fix the orientation. See below to use the flip options in the property manager.

SOLIDWORKS Sketch Text Flip Vertical

Sketch Text Flip Vertical

Text Flipped Horizontally

Sketch Text Flip Horizontal

SOLIDWORKS Sketch Text Flipped

Sketch Text Flipped

Sketch Text with Arcs:

The same behaviour is noted when using arcs instead of lines. An arc created clockwise will give you text that is upright while an arc created counter-clockwise will result in upside down text.

SOLIDWORKS Sketch Text Orientation- Arc

Sketch Text Orientation for Arcs

Did you know you can link a SOLIDWORKS Custom Property to Sketch Text? Take a look at other SOLIDWORKS Sketch Text articles below.

The post Why is my SOLIDWORKS Sketch Text Upside Down? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Prasadh Annalingam, CSWE at February 16, 2021 01:53 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

500,000 Certified Users: A Program That Has Changed the Lives of Many

I’m very proud to announce that on February 8th, 2021, we achieved the milestone of 500,000 Certified Users.

A number of this magnitude certainly provide the opportunity to extract all sorts of fun and interesting numbers, and I’ve run some reports in order to provide some of those below.  But throughout the life of the SOLIDWORKS Certification Program we have always focused on the value that the certifications hold for the users who have earned them.

Something that you may not expect to hear is that no one on my team is actually given a numerical goal in regards to how many certifications we issue in a year.  We do, of course, have an idea of what kind of numbers to expect each year, but that’s mainly so we can plan what we’ll need for technology needs behind the scenes.

One of the best parts of our job is getting emails from people letting us know how having one of our certifications helped them.  Emails from students telling us that they were able to get an interview that led to a job offer because they had a CSWP, as well as emails from out of work engineers telling us that the certification, they have helped them in the same way.  And of course, we also get emails from engineering managers and employees letting us know how earning certifications have helped them improve productivity.  So, to the 500,000 of you, thank you for being part of our not-so-little family!

I’d also like to say a huge thank you to the people that have been integral to reaching this milestone.  To my predecessors Mark D, Dave P, and Jeremy L, thanks for building such a strong foundation for us to continue build on.  To Mie and Mattias from our technology vendor Tangix, your creativity and desire to provide us the most efficient tools possible not only changed the way we delivered our exams, it’s also what we’re able to use to keep expanding.

To the internal team at SOLIDWORKS, from marketing, to the subscription team, the events team for letting us participate in the World Conference every year, and the executive team, thank you for being a part of this achievement.  To my boss Ian, thanks for your continued support and guidance and always focusing on the continued success of the program.  Finally, to my team who are without a doubt the key component of our success, a big thanks as well.  Avelino, Daniel, Yannick, and Junko; it’s a pleasure getting to work with you every day.

Note: When composing this post, the more I listed out the key events I wanted to cover, the longer the post got!  So, if you’d like to read a bit about the things that got us to 500,000, then continue reading below!

A look back

In 1998 when the SOLIDWORKS Training Program was expanding along with the rapid adoption of SOLIDWORKS Desktop software, a need arose to validate that people taking the training were actually learning something.  In late 1998, the very first  certified SOLIDWORKS Professional (CSWP) Certification was issued.

For the next eight years CSWP would grow to become something of a brand name in the SOLIDWORKS Community.  It was an exclusive group to be in, and if you attended SOLIDWORKS World, you even got to attend a private event open only to other CSWPs in attendance at the conference.

In 2006 we were seeing the impact that earning a CSWP Certification had on the careers of those that had earned it.  We quickly understood that providing a similar certification to students around the world could help them greatly once they finished their degree, and began to pursue a career in industry.  Out of this, the Certified SOLIDWORKS Associate (CSWA) certification was launched.

At the that time, the CSWP exam was very costly, and you had to schedule a time and day to take it at one of our reseller offices.  You also had to wait a day for the results to arrive.  If we were going to introduce a certification meant for anyone, anywhere in the world, then accessibility to our program would need to be truly global.  So, we launched our online certification program.

Accessibility not only included access to exams 24 hours a day, every day of the year, we also needed to lower the cost of taking exams.  In addition to reducing the price of the CSWP exam by 80%, we launched an education provider program that allowed schools on subscription to be the delivery method and proctor for exams at their school.  We now had the foundation to grow as much as we wanted.

2007 through 2010 saw the addition of our first “Advanced Topic” exams where we offered exams focused on specific parts of the software.  In this case, it was the Sheet Metal exam.  The list of Advanced Topic exams continued to expand to include the five different exams available today.

In 2010 we added a new level of certification called Expert.  The CSWE, as it came to be known, was different from other exams in a few new ways.  It was the first exam to have prerequisites in order to be able to even take it.  It also took a different approach to modeling challenges in that the exam focused on using a variety of tools and features to solve a question, instead of questions focused on different features.

In 2019 we introduced the second Expert-level exam focused on Simulation.  In 2014 we said goodbye to the CSWP Event at SOLIDWORKS World, and introduced the CSWE Event, which remains as the exclusive annual event at 3DEXPERIENCE World each year.

As we move on from half a million certified users, we’ll continue to focus on offering the best-in-class certification program in the CAD industry.  We’ve already passed 5,000 certifications for the 3DEXPERIENCE Works Portfolio Roles that we have created and released exams for, and the growth rate for these exams are outpacing the growth of our legacy desktop exams back when they were new.

Onward to 1 Million!

Some fun stats:

  •        Our database contains nearly 2.6 million unique session records
  •        The first certification to ever be issued was CSWP on October 22, 1998
  •        The day with the highest number of sessions launched ever occurred on October 31, 2019
  •        On October 31, 2019 2,744 exam sessions were launched. Note: On that day an exam was launched somewhere in the world just about every 30 seconds!
  •        The SOLIDWORKS Certification program currently offers 19 different exams
  •        We currently offer 7 exams that cover Roles from the 3DEXPERIENCE Works Portfolio
  •        Our Partner Certification Program includes nearly 30 different exams, many which require annual recertification
  •        We have an exam based on internally developed training on how to compose content for our Knowledge Base that must be passed before someone from our technical support staff can begin adding content to it
  •        The exam with the greatest number of certifications issued is the CSWA exam with just over 325,000 certifications
  •        The person on the certification team with the longest tenure at SOLIDWORKS is Yannick with 20 years total
  •        The person on the certification team with the longest tenure on the team itself is Avelino with just over 12 years
  •        It took 18 years to get to 250,000 Certified Users
  •        It took just over 4 years to double that number and reach the 500,000 Certified Users mark

You can learn more about how you can particpate in the SOLIDWORKS Certification program by reading this blog or by visiting the SOLIDWORKS Certification Center by clicking here.

Author information

Mike Puckett
Mike Puckett
Senior Manager, Worldwide Certification Program, SOLIDWORKS

The post 500,000 Certified Users: A Program That Has Changed the Lives of Many appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mike Puckett at February 16, 2021 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Check Out This Wood-turned Eyeball, Complete With Matching Eye Socket Holder

wood turned eye

Woodturning can be used to make tons of useful things but sometimes, you just want to make something that looks extremely cool but serves zero purposes.

Andy Phillip, woodturner and resin aficionado, loves using different combinations of wood and resins to different effects. In one of his recent projects, he mixes a number of resins to create a giant eyeball:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VXLlMNuzbks?feature=oembed" title="Woodturning - An Eyeball !!" width="770"></iframe>

The resin contains a mix of polyurethane and mica powders, which give the resin its unique colors.

The Sclera

wood turned eye

Undoubtedly the centerpiece of this project, the eyeball is made out of different layers of colored resin. The largest layer – the sclera of the eye – consists of white resin mixed with a dash of red at the bottom.

Once the resin is cured, Phillip sticks it onto his lathe and drills a hole in the middle for the iris.

The Iris

wood turned eye

No, I’m not talking about the Goo Goo Dolls song – this is a fake iris which represents a real iris of an eye.

Phillip makes this part of the eye by pouring the hole in the center of the sclera with blue resin. When the hole is almost full, he mixes in some yellow resin before slightly overflowing the iris just a tad above the sclera layer with blue resin (this is to elevate the iris above the rest of the eyeball – just like a real eye).

He cures the resin once more before drilling yet another hole in the center of the iris. This time, however, the hole is for the pupil.

The Pupil

wood turned eye

This pupil is made from solid black resin and is poured into the dead center of the eyeball. Just like the iris before it, Phillip slightly overflows the resin above the previous layer to elevate it.

It’s Turning Time!

wood turned eye

Once all the pieces are in place, Phillip cures the resin one last time and begins chipping the resin into an eyeball shape.

You know how it goes: strings of resin fly everywhere with the help of some woodturning tools. He turns the cylindrical piece of resin into a sphere, making sure to put emphasis on one side of the eyeball so the different layers can be seen properly.

wood turned eye

To give the eyeball some more detail, he paints some red blood vessels on the back of the sclera. Just like with a real eye, this gives the wood-turned eyeball some life. Add this to the protruding iris and pupil, and you have yourself an eerie-looking eyeball that looks right back at you.

Don’t Forget the Eye Socket!

wood turned eye

To hold the eyeball in place, Phillip makes a wooden stand. The stand, made from spalted beech wood, is turned and cut until it very much resembles an eye socket. He glues the stand onto a flat piece of wood before getting ready to place the main attraction: the eyeball.

wood turned eye

The eyeball has undergone some sanding and polishing to make it smooth and shiny like the real thing. It’s nice that Phillip didn’t glue the eyeball to the eye socket, so you can pick up the eye and reposition it to make an illusion that it follows your visitors’ movements.

Andy Phillip has tons of woodturning videos on his YouTube channel, but he also has his own webpage, Instagram account, Pinterest, and Etsy shop if you want to purchase some of his works.

The post Check Out This Wood-turned Eyeball, Complete With Matching Eye Socket Holder appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 16, 2021 08:31 AM

The King Of Random Finds Out If Candy Rope Can Hold Your Weight

candy rope

Candy may not have a lot of useful benefits (it causes diabetes, toothache, and high blood pressure just to name a few), but many people still love it. It’s sweet, it makes for a great Valentine’s Day gift, and (shockingly) you can string a bunch of it to hold your weight.

Nate and Cali at The King of Random love candy rope so much that they decided to put its name to the test. Using 12 pounds of the red licorice, they see if a thick rope of sugar can hold the weight of a grown person.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PQ8Kg3Uisr0?feature=oembed" title="Can You Swing From a Candy Rope?" width="770"></iframe>

They start by using a fish scale to test the weight limit of a single knotted piece of licorice. After discovering it can hold about 2.5 pounds (1.13kg), they test it again with 8 strands of licorice – 4 of which are joined into one giant strand, and another 4 which are braided together.

candy rope

Turns out, it doesn’t really matter whether or not the candy rope is braided. Since 4 strands can hold a weight of about 7 pounds (3.18kg), they upscale the number of strands to 100 and see if it can carry and hold a human being for more than a few seconds.

candy rope

Using a pair of larger hooks drilled into the ceiling, Cali takes her pair of hundred licorice ropes and hangs on it as she put their theory to the test.

candy rope

Despite its oily feature which makes it a challenge to hold on to, the licorice actually CAN hold you mid-air for a good number of seconds before breaking. Nate and Cali decide to use paper towels to mitigate the slipperiness of the candy ropes with much success.

They try the same experiment again, this time with a much taller Nate using paper towel handholds from the get-go:

candy rope

This time, Nate is able to swing from the licorice rope for a few seconds… right before his sweet tooth gets the better of him and he starts eating away at the candy ropes! You can see the licorice ropes on Nate’s right start to snap even prior to his attack on the other side, so while licorice can hold a human, you will definitely need to add more ropes depending on your body weight and appetite.

candy rope

Nate and Cali try making another pair of licorice ropes, this time using braided licorice instead of bunched up strands. After discovering a single, long piece of braided licorice starts to break at the knots, they have decided to make a hundred of these time-consuming licorice ropes.

The King of Random is dedicated to all things random. They explore life hacks, answer scientific questions with facts, and much, much more on their YouTube channel.

The post The King Of Random Finds Out If Candy Rope Can Hold Your Weight appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 16, 2021 08:10 AM

180 Flashcards to Pass CSWP with 100%

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zJXQxtx5e4s?feature=oembed" title="How to Pass CSWP with 100% on all 3 Segments - Flashcards" width="770"></iframe>

 

The best way to learn something is by a technique called spaced repetition,  flashcards.
I’ve made 180 flashcards so that you can pass the Solidworks CSWP with a 100% score like I did. I utilized the following resources to compose the flashcards:

Gabriel Corbett’s Linkedin Learning CSWP course
*BONUS: Did you know that you can use your library card to get Linkedin Learning for free? This saves you $30/mo. You’re welcome. 🙂
MySolidWorks CSWP Exam Prep Course
Model Mania
CSWP Sample Exercises
-Nearly a hundred YouTube videos

👉FREE FLASHCARDS HERE: https://tinyurl.com/yac2vzbc

____________________________________

Sample flashcard #95
Answer:

____________________________________

Sample Flashcard #111: The CSWP is about speed. I’ve included huge time-saving tips as part of the flashcards.

Answer:

____________________________________

Sample Flashcard #157

Answer:

____________________________________

Sample Flashcard #180: You should definitely study Model Mania 2009 part. Trust me. This is not giving you too much information, it’s all fair game. ____________________________________

The SolidWorks CSWP is an industry-standard certification. If you’re going to get one SolidWorks certification, my recommendation is that you get this one.  If you’ve found this content of value, please “share” this article on social media. I want to hear from you, let me know if you were able to get 100% on your CSWP, I’m “Rafael Testai” on Linkeidn.

BONUS: For my loyal readers who have read this article in its entirety, contact me on Linkedin and I’ll award you 3 CSWP segment codes so you can take the CSWP for free. That’s a $99 value. First come, first serve. All that I ask is that you A) send me a screenshot of you sharing this article on social media, and B) show proof that you already have your CSWA and are ready to take the CSWP.

The post 180 Flashcards to Pass CSWP with 100% appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Rafael Testai at February 16, 2021 01:52 AM

February 12, 2021

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Valentines Day Card – Tutorial

The first part of this tutorial involves creating an assembly with these parts here. There are a range of different ways illustrated in the tutorial in which you can assemble the parts to create different card layouts seen below. Feel free to follow the tutorial or tweak the outcome to create your own design using the parts available.

There are three different sized heart beads, the decal/photo frame and the ‘LOVE’ lettering to assemble, the assembly I created in the tutorial is for a portrait card, but you can layout the design to be horizontal too. The heart beads are mated using a combination coincident mates using sketches, and coincident mates using two planes. The beads could then be dragged along the outer ring of the frame for placement.

The decal/photo was applied to the frame by opening the part itself and applying the decal to the center face. If you want to follow the tutorial you will need a photograph to apply as a decal. Base appearances have already been added to the parts in preparation for rendering, you can apply all the appearances in visualize, but by doing this you can quickly edit the current appearances in visualize as the appearances are already grouped by parts or faces.

Once the assembly is finished, I can export the model directly into SOLIDWORKS Visualize. For this model I needed to use export advanced. This then exports the assembly with all the parts visible in the model tree in Visualize. If I had used export simple, it would export as one whole part, which makes it very difficult to change individual appearances. It also makes it easier to move individual parts within Visualize without the need to amend the assembly.

The tutorial demonstrates how to change the rendered image aspect ratio, which allowed me to create a photo sized rendering. I also demonstrate how to edit the render background, for studio changes, background color and floor effects. For this project I decided to use the blurred studio because the light reflections are blurred and softened on very reflective appearances such as metal which was perfect for the meatal appearances I applied.

The appearances of the parts are edited within Visualize by changing the color, material roughness, and also adding texture. The below screenshot shows added bump texture which I applied with an increased depth of 200, and a tile size of 5 by 5, I wanted to create a jeweled like finish to some of the hearts. All the appearances I used were metal apart from the white plastic on the lettering and frame. I managed to create a rose gold effect using the metal appearance, zero roughness and inputting precise color values into the color swatch of the appearance.

I uploaded the final rendered image to a create your own card website to have printed just in time for Valentine’s Day. Its very simple to do, but if you’re low on time you could always email it with a note, after all handmade is always best!

 

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xjfk2EDrDRk" width="560"></iframe>

Author information

Jade Crompton
I am a 3D Designer and Solidworks Blog Contributor from the UK. I am a self taught Solidworks user, and have been using it to inform and create my designs since 2012. I specialise in the design of Ceramics, Home Accessories and Wooden Toy Design.

The post Valentines Day Card – Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Jade Crompton at February 12, 2021 02:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Advanced Width Mate – Taking It One Step Further!

SOLIDWORKS Advanced Width Mate is very useful in centering one component (identified as tab) between two planar faces.

If you are new to Advanced Width Mates, please take a look at SOLIDWORKS Width Mates and Constraints in the Width Mate.

Taking it one step further!

We can take this mate to a whole other level by using it for more than just centering two components. See below of an example where two components (red slotted plates) are spaced with either side of a third component (green frame). They will maintain an equal relation on distance on both sides. This will be very similar to a Mirror Components Pattern but is not limited to a straight path as can be seen in the example below.

Plates to be Advanced Mated

Plates to be Advanced Mated

Click on the Mates command, choose the Advanced Mate category and then choose the Width Mate.

Choose Advanced Width Mate

Choose Advanced Width Mate

Choose the two inner green walls for the Width Selections and the respective sides of either red slotted plates for the Tab Selections.

Select the Width and Tab Selections

Select the Width and Tab Selections

Below is the end result with the red slotted plates equally distanced from either inner wall.

End Result: Equal Gap on Either Side

End Result: Equal Gap on Either Side

 

The post SOLIDWORKS Advanced Width Mate – Taking It One Step Further! appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Prasadh Annalingam, CSWE at February 12, 2021 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

A DIY Enthusiast Shows An Easy Way To Completely Hide Wooden Screws

hiding wooden screws

For some reason, no one ever thought of making surface-colored screws. Think about it: if you could produce screws that would blend well with the color and texture of the surface they would be put in, you would make millions of projects and builds look way cleaner. Most of all, you would also make a killing by selling them on the market.

However, until some smart entrepreneur reads this, we have to contend with the use of those unsightly metal screws or using different, more visually appealing alternatives like welding or gluing.

Korean DIY enthusiast 검은별 공작소 DIY CRAFTS may be of assistance when it comes to hiding screws on wooden surfaces. Using a chisel, some wood glue, and a clamp, he shows an easy way to make it, so that no one (including yourself) ever finds the screws on your projects:

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After showcasing a couple of conventional methods of connecting pieces of wood (such as hiding them under wooden pegs and outright using pegs as connectors), he gives us a step-by-step tutorial on his own method.

hiding wooden screws

Start by taking a chisel and chipping a layer of wood off the top of the area where you plan to put your screw. This is the hardest part, as you have to make sure the layer doesn’t detach from the rest of the wood. You don’t have to worry about the peel being uniform, but you do need to take care as to not accidentally peel off any of the wood hiding the layer underneath it.

hiding wooden screws

Once the layer is peeled, you can drill your screw onto the bulk of the wood. You can do this manually with a hand screwdriver or you can follow the tutorial and use a mechanical screwdriver to save on time.

hiding wooden screws

With the screw in place, all you need to do now is apply some wood glue and clamp that peeled layer tight onto the wood. Clean the surface after it dries and – Bam! Not even you can find where you put your screws.

hiding wooden screws

Of course, not being able to find the screws make it a pain to disassemble or repair, so you might want to put a light pencil mark in case you have to come back to them. Peeling the layer above the screw is also a problem, as it will most likely chip off and break due to the wood glue keeping it in place.

But if you’re making something to last, you won’t have to worry about these problems. You might even completely forget that your project has screws in it!

The post A DIY Enthusiast Shows An Easy Way To Completely Hide Wooden Screws appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 12, 2021 08:23 AM

February 11, 2021

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Day Three at 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021 Recap

The last day of general sessions was dedicated to the hard work of our wonderful, passionate user community. The world’s coolest new products get their start in SOLIDWORKS and today we saw many of the innovative thinkers behind those products.

Suchit Jain, Vice President, Strategy, Community & Business Development for Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS, kicked off today’s general session entitled, “Connections to Relationships.” Suchit confirmed what many already know: that SOLIDWORKS is still everywhere.

More than six million designers, engineers, students, entrepreneurs, makers and innovators are designing and creating many of the things we see around us every day, and many of those users rose to the occasion during the COVID-19 pandemic to retool factories to manufacture medical supplies or create better designs to rapidly 3D print personal protection equipment (PPE).

Matt Carney and Tej Matel are two customers who shared their stories. Matt leveraged the 3DEXPERIENCE platform to connect hundreds of engineers to iterate and develop open-source face mask designs that everyone can help improve. Tej addressed the need for better information sharing with all the various tests being used to diagnose COVID-19.

Marie Planchard, Director of Education and Early Engagement, was up next, speaking with two well-known SOLIDWORKS engineers who took very different paths on their engineering journeys and who are both paying it forward to the workforce of the future. Eric Beatty teaches other users as a SWUGN leader and through SLUGME, the world’s largest user group meeting. Paul Ventimiglia, when he’s not working in his day job, is a fixture on the BattleBots TV show and mentors one of the competing robotics teams.

Today’s keynote was a panel consisting of Brent Bushnell, co-founder and chairman of Two Bit Circus, Nolan Bushnell, founder and CEO of Atari, Inc. and Chuck E. Cheese, and Grant Delgatty, Chair of Innovation, USC Iovine and Young Academy. Nolan shared the story behind the creation of Atari and Brent explained how he expanded on those lessons learned to develop Two Bit Circus. One thing they all agreed on is that failure is an essential part of the innovation process.

If you missed general sessions, or any of the meetups, you can catch up by going to agenda tab on the virtual event platform and watching the session replays. Also be sure to check out the session with Jim Capobianco, the Academy Award-nominated writer of Pixar hit Ratatouille, about his new stop-motion movie, The Inventor. Sharing your models of Leonardo Da Vinci’s designs can help the animators better understand how the mechanisms moved and help bring Leo’s ideas into reality.

With over 130 tech sessions, we hope that you all were able to find the classes you needed to take your skills to the next level. The best news? These tech sessions will be available for the next month or so through the 3DEXPERIENCE virtual event platform so be sure to take advantage of the replays—don’t miss out!

Miss the action? No worries. Watch the video below to get an overview of the day and remember you can watch replays of any of the sessions on the virtual event portal. Thanks for virtually joining us for 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021 and we can’t wait to see you all in person for 3DEXPERIENCE World 2022 in Atlanta!

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AfwrNgpHN-M?feature=oembed" title="Highlights of Day 3 - 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021" width="1140"></iframe>

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Day Three at 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021 Recap appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 11, 2021 11:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to Remove a Replicated SOLIDWORKS PDM Archive Server

When retiring a replicated archive server within SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional it’s important to use the recommended steps to ensure all replication information in the database for the server will be removed, along with any archives.

CRITICAL: This operation is destructive.  It is imperative that good vault backups are captured ahead of completing any of the steps within this article.

How to remove a replicated archive server

  • Open the Administration Tool
    • Locate the server to remove from replication
      • RMB > Remove

Remove Replicated Archive - RMB Remove

NOTE: In this scenario, the server being retired is WIN-8P6OOFC3A8K and the replicated vault is named JavVault

  • Confirm the vault is being removed from the appropriate server then enter the SQL credentials and accept that this operation is destructive and confirm that good backups have been captured and hit Yes
Remove Replicated Archive - SQL Credentials

Remove Replicated Archive – SQL Credentials

ENSURE: you are removing the replicated vault and not the ‘primary’ vault, we can confirm this if the dialog lists ‘…this vault is part of replicated network of vaults, only the local copy of these files will be deleted’ as above.

  • Click Yes to confirm the removal and affected database connections
Remove Replicated Archive - Confirm DB Connections

Remove Replicated Archive – Confirm DB Connections

then…

Remove Replicated Archive - Removing

Remove Replicated Archive – Removing

and the result;

Remove Replicated Archive - Removed

Remove Replicated Archive – Removed

If any client’s local views are still attached to this server, they will need to be repointed to an existing archive.  This can be completed by removing and re-adding the local view.

Why is it important to remove it ahead of retiring the server?

In a replicated environment, there are values within the ‘ArchiveServerNeighbour’, ‘ArchiveServers’ and ‘ArchiveServerStored’ tables in SQL for the corresponding replicated archive.  Removing the vault using this method will ensure there are no orphaned files, and the archive servers are removed and no longer listed within the replication schema and settings.  If there are any files that have not been replicated ahead of removing the replicated archive the following error will be thrown;

SOLIDWORKS PDM Warning

SOLIDWORKS PDM Warning

These files will need to be replicated before the vault can be removed.

The post How to Remove a Replicated SOLIDWORKS PDM Archive Server appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at February 11, 2021 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Watching A Stainless Steel And Brass 8 Ball Get Made Is Quite Relaxing

lathed 8 ball

And now for your daily dose of ASMR:

Metalworker and restorer my mechanics is best known for bringing rusty old machinery back to life. His YouTube channel is chock-full of restoration projects, but once in a blue moon, he decides to make something different.

Armed with the newfound knowledge of creating balls using a lathe and milling machine, he decides to take a break from restorations and makes an 8 ball out of stainless steel and brass:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/KKiHgBhW8UQ?feature=oembed" title="I make an ''8 Ball'' out of solid Stainless Steel and Brass" width="770"></iframe>

The project consists of six pieces: two brass tubes form the inner circles of the “8” symbol, two stainless steel tubes to hold the brass tubes, a brass piece serving as the light circle in which “8” resides, and a stainless steel ball.

Making A Basis for 8 Ball Body

lathed 8 ball

To start things off, my mechanics takes a good chunk of solid stainless steel and drills a hole in it with his lathe. This will house the rest of the 8 ball’s parts and will help him determine their measurements.

Crafting “8”

lathed 8 ball

This is where the meat of the project takes place. My mechanics lathes two tubes of stainless steel: one for the upper circle and one for the lower circle of the “8”. These steel tubes are fitted with two cylindrical pieces of brass.

To get the metal pieces to fit in with as little space between them as possible, my mechanics makes the shafts 0.03 mm bigger than the holes they are supposed to fit in. He heats up the tubes using a blow dryer before taking the pieces to a hydraulic press and fitting them in.

Fitting “8” Into the Light Ball Circle

lathed 8 ball

With the “8” complete, he can now fit it into a light brass piece. He starts by drilling a hole for the larger part of the “8” to fit in before hitting it with some heat to make the pressing process easier. Then, slowly but surely, he fits the bottom part of the “8” into the brass.

lathed 8 ball

He didn’t just make two holes for both pieces to fit in so he can cut off a layer of brass and steel to make the overall piece look more cohesive. Once he removes the top layer, he begins drilling a new hole on top and repeats the same fitting process for the rest of the symbol.

lathed 8 ball

He shaves another layer off the top before cutting the brass piece into its final shape.

Turning the Ball Shape

lathed 8 ball

After pressing the brass into the stainless steel body, my mechanics ore-turns the piece into a ball shape. This cuts a number of circles onto the body which gives it a rough, spherical appearance.

He takes this ball to his milling machine and sets it at an angle where it can start shaving off metal from a different position. The various cuts help bring out the smoothness in the ball, which is only emphasized once my mechanics sands it with a 120-grit, a 240-grit, and finally some 400-grit sandpaper.

Cutting and Polishing

lathed 8 ball

He gives the 8 Ball a pass with some Scotch Brite before cutting it off from the excess steel. The flat nub is then uniformly lathed, filed, and sanded to match the rest of the eight ball body.

To finish the whole thing off, the 8 ball is taken to a buffer where it can get a mirror polish and be ready to serve its duty as a glorified paperweight.

lathed 8 ball

To be honest, you can’t really use this 8 ball in a game of billiards. Apart from being too heavy, its sheen can confuse players and throw them off with the glare. If my mechanics decides to use this ball in an actual game, he would definitely have to make the rest of the balls in the set out of the same material (and maybe wear some shades, too).

It took him four days and roughly $25 to make this 8 ball, so here’s to hoping he makes the rest of the set!

The post Watching A Stainless Steel And Brass 8 Ball Get Made Is Quite Relaxing appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 11, 2021 08:50 AM

The Metalist Creates A Literal Hand Axe

literal hand axe

Quite possibly the oldest tool in known history that has taken on many forms is the hand axe. You’ve got your various one-sided axes and your double-sided axes (used in Medieval ages and cosplays), but rarely you have seen a hand axe live up to its namesake.

The Metalist is a metalworker whose latest work is a literal hand axe – and by this, I mean it’s an axe with a blade exactly shaped like a human hand. Using his own hand as a basis for the blade, this man cuts and welds a piece of metal until it can deliver karate chops the likes of which anyone without any martial arts expertise has ever known.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sJf_8X3qLc0?feature=oembed" title="Axe Build - shaped like a human Hand" width="770"></iframe>

Most of the item’s creation is centered on cutting and welding the interesting axe blade. Using a stencil of his hand to cut out the initial shape, the Metalist cuts out a slot in the “palm” of the axe. This will hold another important piece: a metal tube that will allow the blade to slot into the wooden handle.

literal hand axe

After welding the two pieces together, the real work begins. The Metalist uses a wide number of cutting apparatus, including various saws and rotary tools, to carve the flat chunk of metal into a hand-shaped axe blade. He leaves the pinky end of the hand axe flat for a while, as this will be turned into an actual blade later.

literal hand axe

As the fingers start to take their initial form, he begins adding more details. Sections where the joints can be found are given shallow cuts, while more pronounced areas like the knuckles are heated and curved to make them stand out.

literal hand axe

Tiny details such as wrinkles and fingernails are next on the agenda. These features don’t do much for the axe’s chopping capabilities, but they definitely add a lot of life to the hand aspect of it.

literal hand axe

To make the axe sharper, the Metalist welds a special metal (I really wish he put some indication as to what it is) onto the pinky end of the axe. He makes a few passes with his saw before giving the whole thing a good polish.

literal hand axe

All that’s left to do now is make a handle for this baby. The metalist drills a small hole on the side of the palm for a screw before jamming his custom-made handle into the axe. Finally, he drills enough space into the handle before screwing the two pieces tightly together.

literal hand axe

The Metalist sprays his axe black and polishes it before taking it out for a test run. As you would expect, this axe works exactly as intended. Most of all, it looks way cooler karate chopping a piece of wood than simply cutting it with a conventional axe.

The Metalist posts new metalworking videos on his YouTube channel monthly, so check him out every now and then if you want to see more of his quirky but totally viable projects!

The post The Metalist Creates A Literal Hand Axe appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 11, 2021 08:35 AM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – February 2021

Hello to all,

Welcome to the new edition of the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News!  This monthly news blog is co-authored by members of the SOLIDWORKS Technical Support teams worldwide.

 

SOLIDWORKS Detailing Mode

By Bishwaraj Roy

SOLIDWORKS Detailing mode helps to enhance productivity by letting users to open complex drawings consisting of large assemblies, many views with lots of sheets and annotations very quickly, which are otherwise very much resource consuming.

Detailing Mode allows a user to load a drawing without having to load the referenced components. The model does not get loaded but the drawing views are intact, so there is no loss of detail.

How to open a drawing in “Detailing mode”?

Drawings can be opened in Detailing mode from the “File” menu and navigating to “Open” and then when selecting the drawing, “Detailing” mode is available.

After selecting open, SOLIDWORKS shows what operations can be done in Detailing mode:

When a drawing is opened in detailing mode, you can see the note “detailing mode” appear next to the drawing and sheet name like below:

How is “Detailing” mode different from “Detached drawings”?

  • Detailing mode is similar to detached drawings, but different because a drawing does not need to be first saved in detailing mode like detached drawing.
  • Detailing mode has the advantage that when any referenced components have changed, and while opening the drawing, a dialog box will pop up which warns user that the drawing needs to be updated and user can continue opening in detailing mode or resolve all the model data and update the drawing.

What are the capabilities which we can do in Detailing mode?

Some of the capabilities of working on drawings with “Detailing” mode are:

  • Notes, including notes with leaders
  • Weld callouts
  • Linear and circular note patterns
  • Geometric tolerances
  • Surface finish symbols
  • Datum feature symbols
  • Datum target symbols
  • Revision symbols
  • Revision clouds
  • Radial and linear dimensions, including use of the Smart Dimension tool
  • Locations labels
  • Balloons
  • Ordinate dimensions
  • Magnetic lines
  • Angular running dimensions
  • Change the position, rotation, and labels of drawing views.
  • Copy or cut drawing views and paste them onto the same or other sheets within the same drawing.
  • Within annotations, add links to the displayed values of dimensions and other linkable annotations.
  • Insert sketch blocks.
  • Add general and revision tables.
  • Save the file as a PDF/DXF file, or print as a PDF.

With SOLIDWORKS 2021, some major enhancements in detailing mode are:

  • We can create Break, crop and Detail views (It is necessary to first save the drawing in SOLIDWORKS 2021)
  • Add hole callouts: In Detailing Mode, we can add and edit hole callouts for holes that use Hole Wizard, Advanced Hole, Hole, Extruded Cut, Swept Cut, and Revolved Cut features.
  • Editing Existing Dimensions and Annotations in Detailing Mode: In Detailing Mode, for existing dimensions and annotations created in resolved mode, we can edit additional characteristics. It is possible to do the following:
    • Edit dimension tolerance values
    • Edit dimension characteristics such as line type and arrow type
    • Add and remove dimensions in sets of chain and baseline dimensions
    • Edit annotation note characteristics and content

Here is a short video showing some of the functionalities in Detailing mode in SOLIDWORKS:

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="641" id="video-27949-4" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Whats-New-in-SOLIDWORKS-2020-Detailing-Mode_HD.mp4?_=4" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Whats-New-in-SOLIDWORKS-2020-Detailing-Mode_HD.mp4</video>

Terminology changes in SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2021

By Julien Boissat and Jay Seaglar

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2021 introduces a broad range of changes in terminology for contacts and component interaction.

The goal of these changes is to improve clarity and better align the terminology in SOLIDWORKS Simulation with industry standards.

The implementation of the terminology changes will take place gradually over the course of the Beta phase of SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2021 and may benefit from adjustments when necessary.

1. Contact ==> Interaction

One of the benefits of the new terminology is to reserve the term Contact (if you’re confused, don’t worry – read on). The new general term for how bodies behave with each other is Interaction. So out goes the expression Bonded contact (an oxymoron), replaced with the clearer Bonded interaction.

This change allows getting rid of the former No Penetration type of Interaction, and simply calling it Contact. Similarly, Free is the new name for Allow Penetration.

A downstream effect of these changes is the new term Interaction Viewer to replace Contact Visualization Plot.

2. Compatible / Incompatible bonding

The concept of Compatible and Incompatible bonding has been well established in SOLIDWORKS Simulation. It appeared in version 2006, which introduced Global bonding with incompatible mesh for assemblies. Although the terms Compatible and Incompatible were effective in distinguishing between the methods, the words did not describe well the underlying technology. Eventually, these terms remained unique to SOLIDWORKS Simulation, and the rest of the industry did not adopt them.

Furthermore, the trend in the industry has favored Incompatible bonding over Compatible. Reasons for this trend include:

  • New technological developments in constraint equations made Incompatible bonding more accurate.
  • Meshing coincident bodies to enforce common nodes between touching boundaries (Compatible bonding) is a common cause of mesh failure
  • Meshing bodies independently (Incompatible bonding) produces better quality elements.

After 13 years of having Compatible bonding as the default, version 2020 already made the switch to having Incompatible bonding as the default.

Version 2021 completes the transformation started in version 2020. SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2021 seamlessly achieves Bonded interactions after meshing bodies independently using a Bonding formulation of either Surface to surface or Node to surface constraint equations.

Users can still opt for the alternative and choose to boundaries when meshing using the Standard or Curvature Based meshers.

3. Gap (Clearance) ==> Contact Offset

The Gap (Clearance) option takes on the new name Contact Offset in Contact Interactions. This terminology change combines two benefits:

  1. It is consistent with the terminology in place in SIMULIA.
  2. It is coherent with the name of the new Contact Stabilization option.

Always ignore clearance takes the new name Unlimited gap distance. With this option, the program enforces the Contact offset irrespective of the gap between the selected entities.

Ignore clearance if gap is less than is shortened to If gap is less than.

4. Other miscellaneous changes

Here is a list of some other changes.

The Show advanced options for contact set definitions (no penetration and shrink fit only) option is ON by default. Therefore, the option to show these settings is now obsolete and has been removed from

The Simplified and More Accurate bonding formulations take more explicit names, respectively . The Bonding formulation and Contact formulation now use consistent terminology.

5. Summary and chart

Refer to the following charts for a color-coded, side-by-side comparison of the terminology.

 

Noteworthy Solutions from the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base

icon - SW When installing the SOLIDWORKS® 2021 SP1 or earlier software, what can cause the error ‘A newer version of this application is already installed’ and how do I resolve this issue?
This error appears because of a change in the Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) version 7.1, introduced in the SOLIDWORKS® 2021 SP2 software.. To get more information, see Solution Id: S-078838

icon - SW When opening a drawing file in the SOLIDWORKS® 2021 application, why are shaded drawing views missing or distorted?
There is an issue with some AMD video cards where the new graphics functionality in SOLIDWORKS® affects the display of shaded drawing views in SOLIDWORKS 2021. To get more information, see Solution Id: S-078884

Icon - EPDM When using SOLIDWORKS® Manage in a high latency environment, are there any recommendations to help improve performance?
In general, a network response of over 200 milliseconds leads to performance issues within the SOLIDWORKS® Manage software. To get more information, see Solution Id: S-078834

How does the ‘List Heat Power’ tool work and what are the limitations?
The ‘List Heat Power’ and ‘List Heat Energy’ tools first became available with the release of SOLIDWORKS® Simulation 2011. These tools make it possible to determine the heat power generated or dissipated through selected entities accurately for steady state and transient thermal studies.. Please see solution Id: S-078712 for more details.

That’s it for this month. Thanks for reading this edition of SOLIDWORKS Support News. If you need additional help with these issues or any others, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller.

 

Comments and suggestions are always welcome. You can enter them below.

Author information

Bishwaraj Roy
Bishwaraj Roy
Mechanical Engineer with overall 8 years of experience in consultation and Technical Support of Computer Aided Design and PLM Products, 5+ Years experience in Supporting SOLIDWORKS suite of products. Certifications: 3DEXPERIENCE® Collaborative Industry Innovator, 3DEXPERIENCE® Industry Innovator, 3DEXPERIENCE® 3D Creator

The post SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – February 2021 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Bishwaraj Roy at February 11, 2021 06:33 AM

February 10, 2021

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Day Two at 3DEXPERIENCE World Recap

Today during general session we learned a lot about the transformation from product to experiences. The general sessions as well as the deep-dive domain sessions afterwards provided many more examples of how the 3DEXPERIENCE Works portfolio allows you to connect the people, apps and real-time data from every aspect of your business to increase productivity, facilitate collaboration and accelerate innovation.

Members of the R&D team provided some cool examples and compelling testimonials from companies of all sizes that are now harnessing the power of 3DEXPERIENCE Works tools to turn their dreams into reality. One such company, startup Skinny Guy Campers, is using 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS to meet their needs for today as well as scale up as they grow their business.

The next company, Square Robot, explained how they have been able to sharpen their competitive edge by pushing the boundaries of design, engineering and collaboration by using tools in the 3DEXPERIENCE Works portfolio. Next up was Seed Terminator, a company that is using the 3DEXPERIENCE Works portfolio to adapt its products to various harvesters and weed seeds to allow for rapid mass customization of its products.

Today’s keynote from Frank Stephenson, a designer who earned acclaim as lead designer and design director at major carmakers such as McLaren, Ferrari, Maserati, Fiat and MINI, was perhaps fittingly all about speed. He discussed how to reduce development cycles; how he uses new and evolving design tools; and the need to maintain the “human link” when designing products.

Want to see a race on the moon or take a ride in a flying taxi? He showed examples of some of his current projects and yes, you could say they were out of this world! Watch his full presentation in the replay on the virtual event platform under the agenda tab.

Take a deep dive

After the general session, there was the opportunity to take deeper dives into specific product areas. “Product Excellence through Simulation” shared why it’s important to assess your product’s performance earlier and better using a simulation-driven design process. Demos revealed the scalable, connected and powerful SIMULIA solutions you can add to your SOLIDWORKS.

A session on “Hassle-Free Data Management” featured interviews with three different customers who are tapping the power of the cloud to store their data without the traditional “hassles” of managing it locally. They also explained why effective data management is critical to product development success.

In the “Future of Design and Manufacturing,” the Titans of CNC joined the Product Introduction team to share a story about a company that was able to complete a project under an extremely demanding deadline with a safe and secure collaboration using SOLIDWORKS and the powerful 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

Another great session featured Jason Pohl, the recognized industrial designer who made a name for himself on the long-running TV series American Chopper. Attendees were treated to a glimpse at some of the amazing designs Jason is currently working on.

The “Passport for Startup Ecosystems” sessions for North America, Europe, Asia, and the South Pacific covered the challenges and opportunities facing startup founders who are launching new products, along with all the exciting changes that come along with entrepreneurship. The participating companies shared insights such as what investors are looking for, current design trends, and how startups are going from idea to manufacturing.

We covered a lot in day two of 3DEXPERIENCE World. We learned about transforming products into experiences. Join us tomorrow for day three as we take a deep dive into the connections and relationships—even when we are far away from each other—that come into play.

This blog obviously just scratches the surface of everything that happened today so please watch the video below for more highlights from day two. See you tomorrow!

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eOoCOK7_C28?feature=oembed" title="Highlights of Day 2 - 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021" width="1140"></iframe>

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Day Two at 3DEXPERIENCE World Recap appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 10, 2021 11:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

FREE Automotive Supplier Virtual Tech Conference

Fasten your seat belts! On March 2 & 3, Javelin’s tech experts and 3D solution partners are coming together to host an Automotive Virtual Tech Conference with sessions geared towards auto suppliers.

Now hold on a minute, if you aren’t working in the automotive or transportation industry — not to worry! This event is packed full of tips, tricks and 3D technology solutions that can easily be translated to your specific business needs.

Why attend the Virtual Tech Conference?

During the event, you will learn about the industry leading 3D solutions that will enable you to accelerate product innovation, manage product development, and simplify production – getting your products on the road faster.

Build your own schedule

Your time is valuable and two-day events can seem like a big commitment. This event is designed in a way that allows you to build your own schedule, attend only the sessions that are of interest to you, spend time networking with industry experts, and check out the 3D solution partner booths.

On-demand content is available after the event

If the date and time of the Virtual Tech Conference does not fit your schedule and the topics are of interest to you — we recommend that you register so that you can access the on-demand content for 30 days following the event.

Take a look under the hood

Here is a list of the Virtual Tech Conference sessions:

Register and select your sessions

Register now to learn more about the free event. Once you have completed your registration, you will have access to the full agenda. Here is a quick guideline to sign up for different sessions and customize your event.

We look forward to meeting you at the 2021 Virtual Tech Conference!

The post FREE Automotive Supplier Virtual Tech Conference appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at February 10, 2021 01:50 PM

Live Tutorial: SOLIDWORKS Drawings

Got SOLIDWORKS drawing issues? One of the biggest issues that our customers face is a disconnect between the design and manufacturing departments. Javelin’s SOLIDWORKS Drawings Service is customized to solve your unique drawing production and manufacturing issues.

Attend a free tutorial on Thursday February 18 at 11:00 AM EST to learn Drawing best practices and discover what Javelin’s Drawing Service can do for you!

Why attend the SOLIDWORKS Drawings tutorial?

  1. Optimize your process: Learn a process that better connects your engineering/design team with manufacturing.
  2. Save costs: Reduce the number of drawing revisions by ensuring the use of standards and tolerances.
  3. Save time: Reduce the amount of time spent creating, revising, and annotating production drawings.

Key topics in the SOLIDWORKS Drawings tutorial

During this 45 minute webinar, we’ll look at:

  • Custom property propagation
  • Advanced select tools
  • Predefined tolerancing
  • Automatic note block generation
  • Predefined GD&T
  • Predefined Drawing Views
  • Quickset print options
  • And more!

Bring your questions! We will answer them at the end of the webinar.

Meet the SOLIDWORKS Drawings expert

Certified SOLIDWORKS InstructorJamie Hill – Training Process Consultant at Javelin

Jamie is a Certified SOLIDWORKS Expert with over a decade of professional experience and education in mechanical engineering, manufacturing and design.

The post Live Tutorial: SOLIDWORKS Drawings appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at February 10, 2021 01:21 PM

How to Speed Up a SOLIDWORKS Composer Animation Export

SOLIDWORKS Composer can often take an extended amount of time to export animations as MP4. The main cause for the slow processing is due to the number of animation keys within the animation key track.

There could be a lot of extra unwanted keys in an animation which do not serve any purpose in the key track, these additional keys can be deleted.

Animation keys can get added when you drag and drop views to create animations that duplicate the keys of each actor over and over again. Another cause can be transforming parts one by one rather than using assembly mode.

Delete unused animation keys

To solve this issue you can simply delete the additional unused keys:

  1. Go to Animate Tab > Click on Delete unused keys.
  2. The confirmation window pops up.
  3. Click OK on the confirmation.

The animation still remains the same just the extra keys are deleted which reduces the file-size and improves the export processing time.

Delete unused keys in SOLIDWORKS Composer animation

Delete unused keys in animation

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer

To learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer attend our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training course either in a classroom near you or live online.

The post How to Speed Up a SOLIDWORKS Composer Animation Export appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at February 10, 2021 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Collaboration Made Easy on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform

It can seem like an endless struggle to keep everyone involved on a project on the same page, especially in product development, where approvals from critical stakeholders quickly become bottlenecks that impede fast and efficient delivery.

Consider the engineering department alone: Constant challenges include knowing who is working on what project, when each project is due, why delays occur, and how to resolve problems. On top of this are the needs for effective communication within and among the engineering, management, marketing, and manufacturing teams.

Also, keeping an audit trail of all communications, not to mention the design data generated during a project, can feel overwhelming and practically impossible.

The 3DEXPERIENCE® platform provides a cloud-based product development environment for efficiently working with people inside and outside your company, including customers, suppliers, and manufacturers. Based on permissions, users from any location with an internet connection can access live product content via collaborative apps from a single framework.

Let’s take a closer look at some of the functionality on the platform that can benefit your organization.

Dismantle Communication Barriers

Stakeholders outside of engineering often do not have access to CAD or PLM systems. Even if they do, the complex nature of engineering tools often prohibits collaboration. Therefore, in-person or online meetings, data extractions, screen captures, emails, phone calls, spreadsheets, and more rule the day.

Companies can eliminate communication silos by enabling all stakeholders secure access to product and related data via collaborative apps on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. Communities on the platform enable you to make posts, discuss projects, create tasks, and more. Customized dashboard views enable you to display only the information you need to get your job done.

Design reviews also become super easy on the platform. No need to install additional plugins to review and discuss SOLIDWORKS® models and even non-CAD users can participate. Decisions tend to be made more quickly when all stakeholders—especially non-engineers—can easily view, interrogate, and comment on the 3D models.

Simplify Data Management

In today’s business environment, companies must continuously innovate regardless of where their employees and suppliers are located geographically. Work is conducted from homes, offices, and on the road. Managing the influx of files and storing them in a single location is only the beginning of the challenges. Duplicate files are often saved in multiple locations in the same database; released files get reworked without permission; and changes made in one location are not updated in all locations. What’s more, file naming conventions are often obscure and confusing to everyone in the organization. Technology that captures and shares maturity states and controls file access, permissions, and privileges is no longer optional.

The 3DEXPERIENCE platform provides built-in data management and a host of apps that help you methodically and efficiently manage product life cycles from creation to obsolescence. The platform dramatically simplifies the process of defining and conducting project tasks. With all the data in the same place, everyone is up to date with access to a single source of truth. And because you always access live data, there is no risk of being out of sync on model revisions or assembly configurations. Version-management capabilities should include automatic detection of out-of-date assembly components, enabling accurate and fast updates.

Conquer Product Change

Every person in development knows that product changes will happen and are necessary, whether they like it or not. In fact, the process of innovation is often about managing changes from the earliest stages of design through delivery. Before any work is done, all stakeholders need to sign off. During the heat of design and development, products may change on a day-to-day basis. Changes must not only be captured but recorded and stored for easy access in the future. Proposed changes also need to be reviewed by all key stakeholders to assess the value and benefits to the organization.

The tools on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform make it easier to track and manage product changes. Tools provide a controlled, clearly defined process to manage products and production during the development process. Creating, assigning, and managing change actions for all project stakeholders is simple, including for employees working remotely, vendors, and suppliers. Attaining peer validation and approval, updating changes of scope, and tracking proposed or completed work is all contained within a framework where everyone on the team has visibility into the change status and the actions assigned to them.

Envision Something Better

The 3DEXPERIENCE platform makes it easy to work with all stakeholders. There is no software to install or download, updates happen automatically, and IT management is streamlined.

Think of an environment where it is easy to communicate concerns, identify issues, and propose resolutions. Promoting product ideas becomes a snap because all team members, from engineers to managers to executives, can participate in the design review process. Potential issues are discovered earlier in the process, so they are less costly to resolve. Designers have instant access to updates made by other contributors. This enables real-time concurrent design, enhanced decision-making, and faster design maturity.

The platform provides the technology infrastructure to manage the people, data, and documents among your entire team, including partners, customers, suppliers, and manufacturers. As designs change, the shared common data updates automatically, so everyone stays in sync. Plus, you can securely manage and share CAD data and access it from any location with an internet connection. And, all stakeholders can see the latest status at their convenience.

If you have any questions regarding the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, please contact your local reseller.

Author information

Salih Alani
Salih Alani
Graduate of the University of Technology , Iraq - Baghdad with BS in Mechanical Engineering , graduate of Northeastern University with a Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering, specializing in mechanics and design - 6+ Years in SOLIDWORKS ®Technical Support team - Focused on core SOLIDWORKS , DraftSight , licensing (Online Licensing), Lead Technical Support of 3D CONTENTCENTRAL® , Technical Support Account Manager for Enterprise Subscription Services (ESS) customer account and lead organizer for VAR Performance Tuning Workshop in Dassault Systemes Waltham - Certifications: - 3DEXPERIENCE® Platform Explorer – Associate - CSWA, CSWP, CSWP-Drawing Tools, CSWP-Weldment, CSWP-Sheet Metal

The post Collaboration Made Easy on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Salih Alani at February 10, 2021 01:00 PM

February 09, 2021

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Day One of 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021: Find Out What you Missed

Today we kicked off the first day of general sessions for the all-virtual 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021. While it was certainly different than our in-person event, we covered a lot of ground and heard some really exciting announcements. Here are some highlights.

Get certified. Many attendees took advantage of the free certification exams this year. Attendees were able to get up to 17 different certifications for SOLIDWORKS and five for the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform. These certifications are the best way for our users to prove their respective competencies, increase their skill sets and make themselves more marketable in their industries. Congrats to everyone who earned their certifications yesterday!

In other certification news, we announced yesterday an important milestone: over a half million certifications! Keep an eye out for Mike Puckett’s blog about this exciting news next week.

In the general session, we heard from Bernard Charles, vice chairman and CEO of Dassault Systemes, as he provided examples of real-world customers who are creating sustainable innovations and helping to solve big problems.

We also heard from SOLIDWORKS CEO Gian Paolo Bassi, who shared the stories of four different SOLIDWORKS customers who are using the 3DEXPERIENCE Works portfolio of tools to increase their organizations’ ability to collaborate more efficiently. We also heard about the newly announced 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS for Makers program.

If you have a passion for making products, there are SOLIDWORKS design tools and a global community of creative makers for you. The best news is there will be sharply discounted prices, starting at $99 US/year. Click here to learn more about this program, which will kick off later this year.

With the 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Offer for Makers you’ll get:

  • Intuitive and easy-to-use cloud-based 3D design tools including 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Professional, 3D Creator, and 3D Sculptor.
  • An invitation to join an online community of makers filled with “Champion” makers, influencers, and innovators to inspire and help you with your projects.
  • Access to new ways to collaborate and share designs.

The morning wrapped up with Duncan Wardle, former head of Innovation and Creativity at Disney. He and his team helped Imagineering, LucasFilm, Marvel, Pixar, and Disney Parks to innovate, creating magical new storylines and experiences for consumers around the globe. Wardle’s unique Design Thinking process helps companies embed a culture of innovation into everyone’s DNA. It was inspiring to hear his perspective on how to “swim out of your river of thinking” to develop your best ideas.

The morning’s general session ended with the “What’s New” demo skit, a cherished element of this event over the years during which some of our technical experts—and a few surprise guests—provide a fun teaser of  upcoming new functionality in 3DEXPERIENCE Works portfolio, both on the desktop and in the cloud. This year’s skit, “Work from Home Alone,” didn’t disappoint. Don’t miss tomorrow’s episode to find out if Kevin, the intern, can save the company from the CAD bandits by using the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

The 3DEXPERIENCE Playground

This year’s 3DEXPERIENCE Playground features several zones. The EDU Zone will show how high school and university engineering students are using SOLIDWORKS and the 3DEXPERIENCE platform to build the products of the future. The 3DEXPERIENCE Lab zone highlights how our open innovation lab is nurturing disruptive projects that will have a positive impact on society and create a better, more sustainable world. At the Sponsor Hubs you can learn about the innovative partner products and services that cater to SOLIDWORKS users.

Everyone’s favorite playground feature, Model Mania, is back again this year! Test your modeling skills out in this fun, but intense battle. Learn more about this year’s Model Mania here.

Another super cool area is the Shop Floor. This year we are sharing great stories from a number of companies that are keeping manufacturing alive in the heart of the U.S. and teaching those skills to new audiences. Don’t miss hearing about these ground-breaking companies pushing the boundaries of manufacturing technology, such as Motorway Sports. This company uses automation to create and have parts on a truck within four hours of your order. Be sure to tune into these compelling stories. Other companies featured include TMCO, MetalQuest Industries, and Titans of CNC.

Miss something today? No worries. Replays will be available on the virtual event platform. Just head to the agenda tab on the top of the navigation on the event site. Once you are there, you can explore the virtual event platform where you can see your digital badges, which you can earn for participating in sessions, visiting sponsors, scheduling one-on-one meetings, and filling out surveys. Badges and points will be displayed on your personal dashboard. Compete with colleagues and other attendees for badge bragging rights!

Watch the video below to get a full recap of all the action from day one. There’s still time to register to watch the rest of 3DEXPERIENCE World so get going and we’ll see you tomorrow!

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vLfENFpWWeM?feature=oembed" title="Highlights of Day 1 - 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021" width="1140"></iframe>

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Day One of 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021: Find Out What you Missed appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 09, 2021 11:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to Activate a SOLIDWORKS Standalone License

After you have installed SOLIDWORKS software you must activate the license for that computer before you can use it.

If you disable a computer or move SOLIDWORKS software from one computer to another, you must deactivate the license to the license key server at Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corporation. Then, you reactivate the license on the other computer. For details about deactivating, and reactivating SOLIDWORKS licenses, see SOLIDWORKS Standalone License Deactivation and Activation.

To activate SOLIDWORKS

  1. Run SOLIDWORKS software from the Start menu on your machine. You may need to accept the license agreement if you are running the software for the first time
  2. Select the Help icon in the top-right of the SOLIDWORKS interface and select Licenses > Activate (in SOLIDWORKS releases prior to 2020 this would be found under the Help menu)
Activate SOLIDWORKS License

Activate SOLIDWORKS License

  1. In the SOLIDWORKS Product Activation dialog pick Select All for the licenses to be activated
Activate SOLIDWORKS

Activate SOLIDWORKS

  1. Pick Next and the Activation Manager should activate your product
  2. To verify your product is activated select Help icon > Licenses > Show…
Show SOLIDWORKS License

Show SOLIDWORKS License

Note: For the ‘Manually via e-mail’ method, you will be prompted to save a Request file. Attach the file to an email addressed to activation@solidworks.com.  Within 10 minutes, you should receive an email back with a Response file from the Dassault Systemes automated system.

The post How to Activate a SOLIDWORKS Standalone License appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at February 09, 2021 07:52 PM

SOLIDWORKS PDM Error: “Could not copy the file. Cause: The file could not be found.”

This article is part of a series for troubleshooting common, and perhaps not so common, SOLIDWORKS PDM error messages. The error message “Could not copy the file. Cause: The file could not be found.”, can occur when a user launches a SOLIDWORKS PDM Template that generates a file.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Error "Could not copy the file. Cause: The file could not be found."

Template Fails to Create New File

When a PDM Template generates a file, it uses a corresponding document template.

Defining Document Template for PDM Template

Defining Document Template for PDM Template

For example, if the PDM Template generates a SOLIDWORKS part file, the PDM Template would use an existing SOLIDWORKS part, as a template. The user of the PDM Template will need at least read permissions to the template document.

Resolving the PDM Issue

To resolve this issue, make sure that users have at minimum the permission, Read file contents, for both the folder and state that document templates reside in.

Minimum State Permissions to Use Document Template

Minimum State Permissions to Use Document Template

Alternatively, editing the PDM Template and specifying a user with sufficient permissions, will temporarily elevate the current user’s permissions. This is useful when you want to elevate a users permission, only when they use the PDM Template.

Elevating User Permissions When Running Template

Elevating User Permissions When Running Template

Error could also be from Invalid Characters

This error message as well as the error message “Could not create folder. Cause: The file/key name was invalid,” can also be the result of an invalid character being specified for the file name, by the PDM Template. Below is a list of invalid characters, for file names:

" (Double quote)
/ \ (Forward / Back slash)
: (Colon)
? (Question mark)
* (Asterisk)
< > (Smaller / Bigger than)
| (Pipe)
Any character created using the CTRL key
An empty filename

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Error: “Could not copy the file. Cause: The file could not be found.” appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at February 09, 2021 01:25 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

The SOLIDWORKS Grand Challenge: Everyone is a Creator

As the COVID-19 pandemic raged on during 2020, SOLIDWORKS employees, like most office workers, worked remotely. Faced with an inability to see one another and a dearth of creative outlets, company executives tried to think of a way for employees to connect and build something together. A collaborative project that the entire company could have a hand in and could take ownership of, all while using tools in 3DEXPERIENCE Works portfolio. Thus, The Grand Challenge was born.

In just eight weeks over the summer, over 500 SOLIDWORKS employees around the world joined together on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform to create a digital space station. Pushing 3DEXPERIENCE Works design tools to the limit, teams of eight each created a different module to be housed on the station.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HEDSZJ58BtA?feature=oembed" title="The SOLIDWORKS Grand Challenge | Everyone is a Creator" width="1140"></iframe>

The station itself is 2.2 kilometers in length and 800 meters in diameter, giving each team a 100mx72mx68m module to create whatever they wanted. Over 50 teams worked together to build more than 10,000 unique parts with 3D Creator and 3D Sculptor: life support systems, recreational arenas, food support systems, waste processing plants, and beyond.

Not all SOLIDWORKS employees are designers, of course. This project included many non-CAD users as well from departments such as legal, human resources, finance, marketing, IT, and more. As a result, the Grand Architects of the challenge created different roles to help make people with different skill sets comfortable. Each team had a Mission Director to lead the design, a Mission Specialist to lead the way with 3D design and modeling, and a Creative Collaborator to help keep tasks organized. Teams also had a Storyteller to keep track of the team’s progress and share updates with the Grand Challenge 3DSwym community, and a Chief Dreamer to visualize the theme for the module and keep the team organized. Regardless of skillset, everyone had a role in The Grand Challenge.

The Grand Architects organized inter-company “Mission Readiness” webinars to teach participants how to use 3DEXPERIENCE Works tools, such as the parametric design tools in 3D Creator and the Sub-D modeling tools in 3D Sculptor. People learning how to use CAD for the first time felt empowered and included, with one person in the finance department saying, “I am from a computer background, but I did not know anything about 3D modeling before [the Grand Challenge]. This is the first time I tried to model, and I really enjoyed it. I learned a lot and I will not stop modeling!”

Now that The Grand Challenge has ended, what will become of this digital, grand model? It will be built, of course. SOLIDWORKS turned to Dimensional Innovations, a longtime customer, to create a scale model of the space station. Dimensional Innovations is an experienced design, build, and tech firm known for creating immersive experiences for clients like Disney, Google, Home Depot, Audi, the Minnesota Vikings, and much more. SOLIDWORKS provided Dimensional Innovations with the full-sized space station model, and they scaled it down to 2 meters so they could start building.

“We’ve used SOLIDWORKS for years. Working with a company that you’ve known for so long and seeing their side of things was a cool experience,” said Jason Cornett, Engineering Manager for Dimensional Innovations. “Getting involved with the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, seeing how it works, was really cool.” He went on to say, “It used to be like this: I would be working on something in SOLIDWORKS, save it out, send it to somebody, and then they could work on it. Now anybody with an internet connection can work together, and share thoughts  and make design adjustments in real time.”

Fabricating the model is a complex endeavor. Dimensional Innovations has turned to SOLIDWORKS CAD to help with hardware and production drawings, using the full suite of SOLIDWORKS and 3DEXPERIENCE Works tools to bring the space station to life. The digitally designed details The Grand Challenge participants worked on will not be sacrificed with the scaled down model.

The model is a showpiece that will be displayed in the Dassault Systèmes U.S. headquarters in Waltham, MA. “We had to make sure the space station could work with Earth’s gravity in a scaled-down size in the orientation we want to display it in, make sure structurally it will survive the assembly, transportation, and the display process,” said Jared Nelson, Lead Engineer of the project at Dimensional Innovations. The finished model will hang and slowly spin on an axis to give it an extra dynamic aspect. The team at Dimensional Innovations had a lot of fun figuring out the mechanism to make the space station rotate on Earth. They created a flexible round belt that could flex in two dimensions: flexing around pulleys as it transfers power, and also flexes through the curved legs holding up the model.

Dimensional Innovations is using many different techniques to create the real-world model, such as metal working, CNC cutting, high-end 3D printing, electronics, lighting, special paints and graphics, and more. A lot of effort and expertise is going into it, and both SOLIDWORKS and Dimensional Innovations are excited to see the final product.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uv3SA0Qa4u0?feature=oembed" title="The SOLIDWORKS Grand Challenge | Build Time Lapse" width="1140"></iframe>

Grand Architect and SOLIDWORKS Digital Community Manager Ryan Priddy concurred. “It was exciting to see how passionate our employees were when they came together around a common theme, and jumped into creating CAD parts,” he said. The Grand Challenge provided SOLIDWORKS employees with a way to meet new people they probably would not have interacted with otherwise, all while working together to build something creative, inspiring, and new. And now they can look forward to coming together again and seeing the real-world expression of their collaborative efforts, knowing for sure that The Grand Challenge slogan is true: Everyone is a Creator.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post The SOLIDWORKS Grand Challenge: Everyone is a Creator appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 09, 2021 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Make A Miniature Japanese Tanto Using A File

miniature japanese tanto

Weapons are cool but do you know what’s even cooler? Making your own weapons!

The YouTube channel known only as Koss is dedicated to making all types of handmade weaponry which includes swords, hammers, hatchets, and knives (which are basically smaller swords), just to name a few.

In this particular case, the weaponsmith takes an everyday file and turns it into a miniature Japanese tanto:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Cq0phQ91r5I?feature=oembed" title="Making Little Tanto out from Little File" width="770"></iframe>

Shaping Metal File

miniature japanese tanto

First things first: you have to turn a blunt file into an imposing small blade. To do this, the weaponsmith cuts an outline of the tanto onto the file and begins whittling down the metal on a belt grinder.

Since files are made to be thick, he has to shave it down so the metal can be sharpened into a cutting tool. Using a marker as a guide, he also starts angling the grinder to create the sharp edge of the blade.

miniature japanese tanto

Once the grinding is done, he hand files the metal of the tanto handle before popping the entire thing inside a kiln. He then cools it off before sanding it down and filing a couple of indents for the blade collar.

Crafting Blade Collar and Spacer

miniature japanese tanto

Nested between the tanto blade and handle is the collar and spacer, a metal combination that protects your hands and strengthens the hold between the metal and wood.

For this tiny tanto, a brass collar and spacer (which are called a “habaki” and a “seppa” respectively) are used. By measuring the indents made on the file blade, the weaponsmith cuts out a piece of brass and hammers it to fit the shape of the tanto. This piece is then heated and sanded before being fitted onto the blade.

miniature japanese tanto

Making the spacer is a little different, as it has to be crafted in tandem with the blade handle. For now, it is just a square piece of brass with a sawn hole that will house the tanto.

Making The Handle

miniature japanese tanto

Wielding any blade requires you to craft a handle, and this particular tanto uses hornbeam wood for both its handle and sheath. The weaponsmith fits the blade into a piece of wood using a drill and uses an adhesive (possibly wood glue) to keep it from wobbling around. Once the adhesive has dried, he cuts an outline of the handle using a table saw.

miniature japanese tanto

With the handle shape roughly completed, he can now finish the blade spacer. Using the dimensions of the handle as a guide, he cuts off the excess brass so the spacer shares the same measurements as the wooden handle. He takes the spacer and the handle to the grinder before sanding them down.

Making The Sheath

miniature japanese tanto

Crafting the other end of the tanto requires the weaponsmith to measure out the blade and carve it onto two similar pieces of wood. These pieces are then glued together and cut to create the sheath. The sheath is set to the grinder before being sanded down to the same dimensions as the handle.

Putting On The Finishing Touches

miniature japanese tanto

Now that the tanto is almost finished, the only thing left to do is give it a final sanding, as well as some paint and polish and – Bam! You now have yourself an awesome-looking letter opener!

As mentioned before, if you want to see more DIY weapon making and restoration, the Koss YouTube channel is where it’s at.

The post Make A Miniature Japanese Tanto Using A File appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 09, 2021 09:22 AM

February 08, 2021

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

All-Virtual 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021 Starts Today! Here’s What to Expect

We are delighted to welcome a record number of attendees, over 35,000, to this year’s all-virtual 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021, which kicks off today! All you need to do is register, if you haven’t yet, and watch all your favorite parts of the event from the comfort of your home or office.

Sign up for tech sessions today!

There’s still time to sign up! The slate of over 130 amazing tech classes is posted up on the 3DEXPERIENCE World site.  Here you will find those super helpful SOLIDWORKS sessions with plenty of tips from seasoned users and SOLIDWORKS technical experts as well as how-to’s on all the products in the 3DEXPERIENCE Works portfolio.  Learn more about our stacked tech session agenda in this blog from Lynn Allen.

This Year’s Speakers

Our General Sessions begin tomorrow, February 9th, at 10:00AM ET. This year’s speakers represent nearly every industry so you are sure to find inspiration. Here are some of this year’s speakers:

Frank Stephenson is now applying his design expertise to a wide range of projects that move beyond the realms of automotive design. That industry is where he earned acclaim as lead designer and design director at major carmakers such as McLaren, Ferrari, Maserati, Fiat and MINI.

Titan Gilroy, CEO of TITANS of CNC, founder and star of the TITANS of CNC television show on MAVTV, and creator of the TITANS of CNC: Academy and Aerospace Academy is partnering with SOLIDWORKS to share his opinion as to why the 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS portfolio is essential for teaching design to manufacturing at the academy. You can read more about this exciting partnership here.

Brent Bushnell, CEO & Co-Founder of Two Bit Circus, a LA-based experiential entertainment company, will share how he uses technology, design and engineering to inspire inventors. Brent is an engineer and entrepreneur passionate about STEM, and previously created STEAM Carnival, a traveling event to inspire kids about science, technology, engineering, art and math.

Matt Carney, who you may remember from the main stage at 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020 and our SOLIDWORKS Live interview thereafter, has pivoted during the pandemic into manufacturing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). He’ll give you a glimpse into what it’s like to crowdsource ideas, and collaborate with engineers worldwide to design a protective respirator.

Jason Pohl, best known for his long career at Orange County Choppers, is now an independent designer at Jason Pohl LLC. Jason’s enthusiasm for design, innovation, problem solving, and creativity is bound to inspire you to look outside the box next time you start a new project. We also did a recent Born to Design Podcast with Jason. If you missed it, you can check it out here.

Virtual Shop Floor

Take a virtual tour of three design and manufacturing customers who are innovating and pushing the boundaries of automation and technology. Our customers will include Speedway Motors, TMCO, and MetalQuest Industries, along with Titans of CNC—all pushing the boundaries of meeting today’s demands future manufacturing challenges.

From design to simulation and manufacturing, attendees will get a chance to learn and ask questions about how they can benefit from automation and new paradigms in the manufacturing process.

 

MeetUps

Are you interested in meeting new people, your peers who work in your same field, while hearing their stories and learning how they solved similar challenges? Do you have questions about SOLIDWORKS/3DEXPERIENCE solutions and don’t know who to ask? If you answered “yes,” then join us at one of the 35+ MeetUp sessions taking place during the event. You can learn more about these amazing opportunities to network and share tips and tricks in this blog.

Model Mania returns

Model Mania® returns to the all-digital 3DEXPERIENCE® World 2021 and next year, this annual competition will be divided into three different challenges: The SOLIDWORKS Challenge, the 3DEXPERIENCE Challenge, and the Student 3DEXPERIENCE Challenge. Learn more about how you can test your skills in this battle of modeling excellence in this blog.

The 3DEXPERIENCE Playground

The 3DEXPERIENCE Playground is the hub of the event, where you can interact with our partners and learn how to extend your investment in SOLIDWORKS and 3DEXPERIENCE solutions. You will be able to interact with student design teams and be inspired by makers, entrepreneurs, and manufacturing facilities to help empower your freedom to create.

3DEXPERIENCE Lab 

3DEXPERIENCE Lab, part of the 3DEXPERIENCE Playground, is Dassault Systèmes’s open innovation laboratory, focused on empowering makers, innovators and startups. The lab nurtures disruptive projects that aim to create a better, sustainable world and have a positive impact on society.

During the event, be sure to check out the 21 videos that tell the stories about makers, innovators, startups and fab labs. Other sessions not to be missed include: Using Collective Intelligence and Collaboration to Make Impact; Expanding the Dimensions of Making; Shifting the Scales of Innovation; How to Make ‘Almost’ Anything in the 3DEXPERIENCE Lab; and Inspiring New Labs and Extending the Ecosystem.

Click the banner below to register now to take advantage of all this all-virtual event has to offer you…from the comfort of your own home or office!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author information

Barbara Schmitz
Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks
Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and new tech.

The post All-Virtual 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021 Starts Today! Here’s What to Expect appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Barbara Schmitz at February 08, 2021 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Leah Bolden Shows The Beauty of The Carpenter Pencil’s Design

carpenter pencil design

Have you ever wondered why carpenter pencils are shaped the way they are?

It wasn’t a design error or some environment-conscious carpenter trying to reuse rejected pencils from the production line. There really are a number of things a good, old construction pencil can do which a #1, #2, or even the fabled #3 pencils cannot – most of which involve, you guessed it, construction and designing tasks.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GAsSOnU0jqk?feature=oembed" title="Why is a Carpenter's Pencil Flat? And Other Stuff" width="770"></iframe>

Leah Bolden is a journeyman and a building trades instructor whose YouTube channel is aimed at helping experts and DIY enthusiasts by giving them helpful hints and tips on home improvement. In one of her older videos, she gives a breakdown as to why block-shaped carpenter’s pencils are preferred by a lot of creators and designers, even though you can’t just jam them into any old pencil sharpener.

You can probably tell just by its appearance that the block design of the carpenter’s pencil is to prevent it from rolling down inclines. Well, there’s more to it than that!

carpenter pencil design

For instance, did you know that a carpenter’s pencil measures a half-inch across and a quarter of an inch thick? Leah sure did! This uniform measurement allows carpenters and other designers to use the pencil as a measuring tool or spacer on the fly.

Say, for instance, you’re in the middle of placing some planks to make a wooden table. By slotting the pencil in between the planks, you can evenly space out the wood without having to pick up a ruler or measuring tape. All you have to do is reach for your trusty carpenter’s pencil from behind your ear and – BAM! You got yourself instant inch increments.

carpenter pencil design

Another nifty design choice of the carpenter’s pencil is its ability to be cut and be shaped into a wide array of marking tools. As I mentioned earlier, you can’t just take a block-shaped pencil to a round pencil sharpener. You have to manually cut the wood with a knife in order to get to the marking lead at the pencil’s center.

Now while this may seem like a chore to many, cutting the wood yourself lets you shape the carpenter’s pencil just the way you want it. While round pencils can only be sharpened towards a center, carpenter’s pencil can be sharpened at a number of angles. You can cut them to form a point like with a #2 pencil, or you can angle it to expose more lead and make a great marker.

carpenter pencil design

The cool thing about carving your carpenter’s pencil is you can sharpen both ends differently. You can customize one end specifically for fine lines and the other for thick lines. Of course, there are tons of ways you can sharpen your carpenter’s pencils, but it all depends on what you plan on using them for.

The whole video is definitely worth watching, as Leah delves deep into the many features of this seemingly simple, but very useful writing material. Leah Bolden has a ton of other helpful DIY videos and hacks on her channel, seejanedrill.

The post Leah Bolden Shows The Beauty of The Carpenter Pencil’s Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 08, 2021 10:29 AM

February 07, 2021

The Javelin Blog

How to Install SOLIDWORKS software

In this tech tip we provide an overview of how to install the SOLIDWORKS standalone desktop version, this process applies to SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional, or Premium software.

There are many different types of SOLIDWORKS license available…network, online licensing etc., which we cover in other SOLIDWORKS installation posts, but here are the steps for a quick installation of a brand new SOLIDWORKS perpetual or term license. If you are installing the latest version of SOLIDWORKS on a machine with an existing older version you can review how to run a SOLIDWORKS upgrade installation.

Register your SOLIDWORKS serial number

Before you can download the software you need to register your serial number on the SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal. You will have likely received your SOLIDWORKS serial number from your Value Added Reseller (VAR) after making your purchase:

  1. Go to the SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal at http://customerportal.solidworks.com/
  2. You will be presented with the SOLIDWORKS One account form in your browser as shown below
  3. Assuming you are a brand new customer you can pick the Create a SOLIDWORKS ID button to create a new account:
SOLIDWORKS ID One Account

SOLIDWORKS ID One Account

Create a SOLIDWORKS ID

You will need to enter your details to register the serial number with your email address.

  1. Enter your email address and serial number in the registration page and pick the Next > button
  2. On the next page you will be presented with your company information. Verify the information displayed is accurate, then click Yes to finish the process.

Note: Use the navigation buttons in the pages. Do not use the standard browser navigation buttons.

Create SOLIDWORKS ID

Create SOLIDWORKS ID

Log into the Customer Portal

After registering your details you can then log into the customer portal with your credentials:

  1. Return to the Customer Portal and enter your email address and your password into One Account form
  2. Select the Log In button:
SOLIDWORKS ID One Account

SOLIDWORKS ID One Account

The SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal

Within the Customer Portal you can access a variety of resources under four sections, My Support, References, Download, and Community.

  1. In the Download section select the Downloads and Updates link
Download from Customer Portal

Download from Customer Portal

SOLIDWORKS Downloads

You will now be redirected out of the customer portal to the SOLIDWORKS website download page where you can select the product you need. The last four versions/releases of SOLIDWORKS are available to choose here, and you can select the Service Pack (SP) that you require:

  1. In Downloads page select the version you require from the dropdown menu
  2. Pick the SOLIDWORKS Products link adjacent to the service pack you require (pick the highest number SP if you are a new customer):
Download SOLIDWORKS Product

Select SOLIDWORKS Products in the Downloads page

  1. You then need to accept the license agreement to download the software by picking the Accept Agreement and Continue button at the foot of the page:
Accept SOLIDWORKS License Agreement

Accept SOLIDWORKS License Agreement

Run the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager

Now you can download the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager to get started with the installation process:

  1. Select the Download link in the page and a zip file will download from the SOLIDWORKS web site. This file is around 32MB and will manage the installation process for you without having to manually download files
  2. After the SolidWorksSeup.exe zip file has completed downloading run the SolidWorksSeup.exe file from your local machine
SOLIDWORKS Software Download

SOLIDWORKS Software Download

  1. You may be asked to authorize the app to make changes on your device, select Yes
Allow SOLIDWORKS Setup zip to run

Allow SOLIDWORKS Setup zip to make changes

  1. You can then Browse to the location where you want the files to unzip using the browse button on the WinZip dialog or use the default location

NOTE: not all the SOLIDWORKS installation files will download at this point, just the Installation Manager

  1. Select Unzip and the files will be extracted and the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager will load
Winzip Self Extractor

Winzip Self Extractor

  1. After the files have extracted select OK and the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager will start automatically
SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager Extracted

SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager Extracted

Using the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager

The SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager will now guide you through the rest of the installation process and provide you with options for installing your purchased SOLIDWORKS software and add-ins. Browse our library of posts on the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager for more information.

IMPORTANT NOTE: During installation the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager will determine the files you need based on the serial number you enter, this could range from 6GB – 20GB. So be prepared for a large download and ensure there is enough room on your machine to accommodate the download files and the installation itself.

  1. First step in the installation process is to select the type of install required from the four choices. In this example we will use the popular choice which is Install on this computer. Other choices include:
    • Administrative image for downloading a set of installation files for deploying to multiple machines
    • Server components for network licensing installations
    • Download and share all files allows you to download all installation files for a later deployment
  2. With the Install on this computer selected pick Next
Type of SOLIDWORKS Installation

Types of SOLIDWORKS Installation

Entering your Serial Number

At this point in the installation you will need to enter your serial number[s] for the SOLIDWORKS products you have purchased. At this stage you can install any of the 3D Design, Visualization, Simulation, CAM, Technical Communication, and Electrical Design licenses you have purchased:

  1. The next step is to enter your SOLIDWORKS Serial number[s] for the purchased product[s], you don’t have to install all products at once, you can modify the installation later, but you will need to install the SOLIDWORKS 3D Design in order to install other products

NOTE: You can populate the serial numbers automatically using the Log In button, but that process requires matching your credentials to your account. It is much easier just to enter the serial numbers into the boxes as you should have received the number already from your local reseller.

SOLIDWORKS Install Serial Numbers

SOLIDWORKS Install Serial Numbers

  1. Select Next to continue and SOLIDWORKS will connect to the online installation server and determine which products you have purchased based on the entered serial number.

NOTE: If an existing version of SOLIDWORKS is found on your machine the installation manager will give you the choice of upgrading your existing version or installing a new separate instance.

Optional: Change Products to Install

In this next step you can choose which products to install and more often than not you will keep the selection at the default as the license manager will have determined the products you are entitled to install based on your serial number:

  1. Use the default options for the installation unless there is a specific application you don’t want to install
  2. Select Change next to Products to view the applications that are going to be installed along with their file size, you should see all the products you have purchased listed, contact your VAR if you think you are missing any purchases
  3. Select Back to Summary to go back
Download and Install

Download and Install

Optional: Download Options

In the download options you can specify details for completing the download operation, such as the location of the downloaded files, how to download the files, and whether to install the downloaded files.

  1. Select Change next to the Download Options
    • Optionally choose the download file location required, I’d recommend the default if you have the space on your machine
    • Optionally you can specify a different location on your machine to install the files
    • There are additional download options, such as using the background downloader and a manual download option if you have trouble with the download process
  2. Select Back to Summary when you’ve reviewed or finished modifying the options
SOLIDWORKS download options

SOLIDWORKS download options

NOTE: the other panel in the window is for SOLIDWORKS Toolbox installation, you can typically leave that as the default, but if you are installing SOLIDWORKS on your machine and Toolbox is already installed on another machine you can review our post on installing SOLIDWORKS without the Toolbox data.

Download and Install

The final installation step is to download and install onto your machine, you will notice the estimated installation file size is listed along with the download file size:

  1. Make sure you check the I accept the terms of the SOLIDWORKS license agreement option
  2. Select the Download and Install option to run the installation
Download and Install

Download and Install

The SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager will now download the files and then install SOLIDWORKS on your machine, this may take some time depending on your internet speed:

SOLIDWORKS Installing

SOLIDWORKS Installing

  1. When the installation is complete SOLIDWORKS has a few options you can choose for joining the SOLIDWORKS Customer Experience Improvement Program. Select the option that suits you.
  2. Then pick Finish and you’ll find the SOLIDWORKS application icons on your desktop and under the Start menu.
SOLIDWORKS Installation Complete

SOLIDWORKS Installation Complete

Need help with your SOLIDWORKS Installation?

Javelin provides installation and upgrade services for SOLIDWORKS software. Visit our SOLIDWORKS services page to learn more.

The post How to Install SOLIDWORKS software appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at February 07, 2021 12:55 AM

February 05, 2021

The Javelin Blog

What is the difference between DraftSight and AutoCAD?

DraftSight gives you the 2D tools you need with the software license flexibility you want. But what are the main differences between DraftSight and AutoCAD 2D CAD software?

Not all design tasks require the power and functionality of SOLIDWORKS, sometimes a 2D CAD solution is required.  Whether you are student, professor, small business owner, machinist on the shop floor or a designer in a huge engineering firm; having an easy to use design tool with a familiar interface and an intuitive workflow is needed now more than ever. Take a look at DraftSight 2D CAD software in the video below:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/e4h5ehFJDuk?feature=oembed" title="An overview of DraftSight 2D CAD software" width="500"></iframe>

Advantages of DraftSight vs AutoCAD

Many of you will be familiar with AutoCAD and AutoCAD LT, listed below are the main advantages of DraftSight over the AutoCAD 2D solutions:

  • Pricing: DraftSight comes at a much lower price point, starting at US$99 a year for the Standard version.
  • File types: DraftSight runs natively with the DWG and DXF format, and supports the latest 2018 format, all the way back to R12.
  • Familiar Interface: Transitioning from AutoCAD is a breeze. The interface is very similar to AutoCAD, so it won’t take long to get acquainted with a few new icons.
  • Shared Commands: Although some commands are different, DraftSight made the aliases match the AutoCAD commands. For example E or Erase will start the Delete command…PU or Purge will start the Clean command, Osnap will start the Esnap command.
  • Customizable UI: The DraftSight user interface can be streamlined to how you like to work. There’s the more modern ribbon interface — but for the traditionalist switch to the classic toolbar and pull down menus.
  • Flexible Licensing: To start there are 6 versions to choose from which I’ll cover further down. The world is quickly changing to a SaaS (software as a service) for software. However, Dassault Systems still provides you with choices:
    • Subscription based versions are available
    • Enterprise version of DraftSight provides a choice of:
      • Perpetual licenses which you own with optional subscription renewal.
      • Network licenses to allow sharing licenses with multiple users.
  • Latest Technology: Because DraftSight isn’t pushing 40 years old like other 2D CAD software. DraftSight has been built with the latest technology and the underlying code is much lighter, and more nimble.
  • Operating System: DraftSight supports Windows and Mac operating systems.

DraftSight Versions

DraftSight is available as a Standard, Professional, Premium, Enterprise, Enterprise Plus and the latest 3DEXPERIENCE cloud-connected version. I’ll briefly outline the different versions below:

DraftSight Standard

DraftSight Standard is the entry level. Great for students and Hobbyists.  Providing all the 2D drawing, annotating and modification tools one could ever need. A couple of unique tools are Dynamic blocks and PDF underlay. Dynamic blocks… think configurable or adjustable blocks that fit different situations and mitigates the need for huge libraries. PDF Underlay enables industry standard format PDFs, and use them as a reference or to trace in your designs. US$99/yearBuy DraftSight Standard Now »

DraftSight Professional

DraftSight Professional is where the fun begins and is typically used for Companies and Individuals needing more than just the basics. Adding to then functionality in standard, professional has Toolbox… with its automation of intelligent, standard based fasteners and holes. Batch printing, Drawing Compare, CNC G-Code Generator, Image Tracer, and a Power Trim function. This version also provides the API to allow custom applications to be written. This is also the minimum level requires for proper SOLIDWORKS PDM Integration. US$199/yearBuy DraftSight Professional Now »

DraftSight Premium

DraftSight Premium takes all that great functionality of professional and adds 2D constraints to your linework. This is very similar to the parametric behavior many are used to from SOLIDWORKS sketches. This version also adds 3D capabilities. More traditional but still provides Primitives and Boolean operations. US$499/yearBuy DraftSight Premium Now »

DraftSight Standard, Professional, and Premium is purchased online from the DS web store. These licenses are supported through the DraftSight community only, learn more about the community support.

DraftSight Enterprise and Enterprise Plus

Moving on to Enterprise and Enterprise Plus. These two versions are for larger organizations with many users or multiple locations. Enterprise has the same a functionality as Professional while Enterprise Plus has the same functionality as Premium.  However, both versions get network licensing allowing for convenient license sharing. A deployment tool helps IT teams install on multiple systems more easily. And the biggest value up is full technical support through Javelin. These licenses must be purchased through Javelin with a minimum quantity of two:

3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight

Finally, 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight brings you all the functionality of DraftSight Premium but adds the technical support through Javelin and best of all it adds the connectivity to the 3DEXPERIENCE cloud platform. This means unparalleled team collaboration, data management and project planning which are all interconnected to your traditional DWG format data. Watch a demonstration below on the latest version of DraftSight:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/aJWJE5uOq3w?feature=oembed" title="Introduction to 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight" width="500"></iframe>

Next Steps

As you can see there is a lot of functionality available in DraftSight and many advantages over AutoCAD. The flexibility in license type and user experience ensures you can get what works best for you. For more information please reach out to us or download a trial version of DraftSight Premium below:

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The post What is the difference between DraftSight and AutoCAD? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Lidgey at February 05, 2021 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Here’s What Happens When You Pit 10 Gun Safes Against A World War II Tank

tank vs safe

Safes are some of the most secure places in the world to store your belongings. I mean, it’s why they’re called “safes” in the first place. A lot of them are meant to withstand the harshest of situations, so you won’t be surprised to find fireproof, bulletproof, and even idiotproof variants that keep you from locking yourself out of your precious safe.

But what if you pit not one, not two, but ten safes against a tank?

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/iqC2kJNdJjE?feature=oembed" title="TANK vs GUN SAFES!!!" width="770"></iframe>

This is what explosives and gun enthusiast channel DemolitionRanch aims to find out. They have propped 10 Liberty gun safes in a row on an isolated plot of land and aim to shoot at them with a 1944 World War 2 M4 Sherman Tank. Will a 17-pound shell make it through all the safes? Let’s find out.

The hardest part about this experiment is making sure the tank round actually hits all of the safes dead-center. It’s really easy for any projectile (bullets and tank rounds included) to veer off-course due to gravity, air pressure, or any other incalculable and unforeseen elements. The shell could just ricochet off of the first safe and land somewhere nearby, so it’s a good thing they’re doing this as far away as possible in an unpopulated area.

tank vs safe

With a couple of GoPros in place and a ripcord to fire the loaded Sherman tank, the first 76 mm solid steel shell is launched towards the safes!

tank vs safe

The tank shell has actually hit the safes quite high for the initial shot, hitting the top of the first safe and smashing the second into bits. The third safe was damaged a bit but this is where the shell starts to deviate from its intended trajectory and veers off course. While destroying two gun safes is cool, it isn’t quite the amount of destruction you would expect from a tank.

The team remove the first two destroyed safes and get ready to shoot a second round into the remaining eight safes.

tank vs safe

This time, the round hits pretty close to the center of the safes. After busting through the first safe, the round actually turns sideways and continues through. You can see the indent of the tank round as it rotates through each safe, making its way through a total of five safes before denting the sixth safe’s door and landing on the ground nearby.

Upon closer inspection, they discover the round broke the bars which allow you to open the safes. This means that if you were ever to rob one of these babies with a tank (though I’m can’t imagine where you’ll manage to get yourself a tank), the contents and the safe would be beyond recovery. This is good publicity for Liberty safes, however. If you really, REALLY want to keep your stuff safe, just place it behind a wall of their safes and not even a tank can get to it.

The DemolitionRanch YouTube channel is full of videos with things that go boom, all for the sake of experimentation, evaluation, and the sheer sight of seeing things explode.

The post Here’s What Happens When You Pit 10 Gun Safes Against A World War II Tank appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 05, 2021 09:00 AM

February 04, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Accelerate SOLIDWORKS Simulation with SIMULIA Cloud-based Software

Learn how SIMULIA, built on industry-leading Abaqus technology, will accelerate your product design by solving tough engineering challenges faster. SIMULIA is a portfolio of connected, powerful and collaborative simulation solutions for SOLIDWORKS on the cloud-based 3DEXPERIENCE® Works Platform.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Lo905XT_4zM?feature=oembed" title="How do Professional Engineers use SIMULIA for validation?" width="500"></iframe>

Product design challenges

Consumer product design has been undergoing a surge with products getting smaller while their requirements grow. If we look at projectors, we’ve seen them move from standard definition to high definition and now even 4K; we’ve also seen the integration of technology like Bluetooth speakers and Wi-Fi.  In conjunction with this the desire to miniaturize these devices continues, meaning internal components face new challenges.

In the video demonstration we’re going to look at a conceptual design for an internal bracket that stabilizes the lens in a new portable projector. A typical scenario for the bracket design is a three-point bending test to evaluate its feasibility and usage.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation can provide us with an initial solution for the three point bending test but can be time consuming and takes over 20 minutes. We have design alternatives and multiple load cases to process, this could take hours of solve time to obtain the results.

Adding Performance to SOLIDWORKS Simulation

We need to leverage some new tools available in SIMULIA Structural Engineer or SSE on the 3DEXPERIENCE Works Platform to speed up our solve time. We’ve already gotten the model in SSE using the one click connector. Let’s first review how SSE handles contact because this is a game changer. Gone are the days of having to manually define contact pairs instead of assuming that all touching faces are bonded SSE makes the assumption that all faces touching or not are no penetration which allows them to slide separate or collide and develop contact pressure.

With animated results we can see the model going through a full range of motion and we can highlight where plastic defamation has occurred while the requirement was only for 20 millimeters of defamation, we expected a worst case scenario of deflection of 80 millimeters. And within 10 minutes we were able to get results in SSE because of high strain localized buckling and complex contact. This worst-case scenario was beyond the scope of what could be solved in SOLIDWORKS Simulation.

SIMULIA high performance computing

SIMULIA high performance computing

Working between SOLIDWORKS and SIMULIA Structural Engineer

The beauty of working between SOLIDWORKS and SIMULIA Structural Engineer on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform is now when we make changes in SOLIDWORKS they can immediately be reflected in SSE and we can re-evaluate our designs quickly without redundant stats with a five minute runtime I now feel confident that I can evaluate multiple designs and multiple load cases fast.

With SIMULIA we are able to leverage an existing SOLIDWORKS Simulation setup and use the powerful Abaqus solver to get through tough FEA problems whether it’s reducing run times or solving problems that previously were outside the scope of SOLIDWORKS. SIMULIA on the 3DEXERIENCE Works Platform is the pathway for existing SOLIDWORKS Simulation users to the next generation of simulation tools.

The post Accelerate SOLIDWORKS Simulation with SIMULIA Cloud-based Software appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Claudia Mak at February 04, 2021 05:51 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Create Your Own Flexible Component (Part 2) : Basic Flexible Component

[A New Balloon Air Pump Design]

Welcome! Here we are again! This is Part2 of Flexible component, for those who seeing this blog for the first time, you can go to the “Introduction of Flexible Component – Part1”  for better understanding.

To be continuous, I will demonstrate how to create the spring sketch for the flexible components feature in details.

 

Step 1 For Flexible Spring (Sketch)

First, we must create the reference top plane (Ref TOP P) to control the spring boundary sketch and for external reference in assembly. (you can think it as the spring top plane)

Then create the spring boundary sketch that coincident with the reference top plane.

Step 2 For Flexible Spring (Sketch)

       We are going to create 3 individual sketches for the spring structure, the reason is to fully define bottom and top sketch, and leave the middle sketch become a “Driven Value” while the Ref TOP P being shift in assembly.

 

Step 3 For Flexible Spring (Part Feature)

       Nothing special in this step, we are going to use swept boss feature to create spring body by using the 3 individual sketches, you may combine it together result as one solid body.

 Then cut the extra spring body to make it flat on top and bottom just like below picture.

Step 4 For Flexible Spring (Part Feature)

       This step will show you how to create the external reference for the Ref TOP P. First of all, create the assembly file and add mate relation to place the spring in right position.

Then go to the feature manager to choose the spring part and edit the Ref TOP P, you need to delete all origin references first, then select the handlebar bottom face as external reference and click OK. So that now the spring length is “driven by” handlebar position.


Step 5 For Flexible Spring (Assembly)

       Finally, you can apply “Make Part Flexible” feature into your spring part. The feature you can find in Customize > Commands tap > Assembly categories. Or you can direct use the search commands function to find it.

       

After enter the make part flexible feature, select the handlebar bottom face as the flexible references. And you should able to make the spring become flexible.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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In addition, there will be one last chapter in this topic as “Part3 – Advance Flexible Component”. In coming chapter, we will create more complicated sketch for the flexible balloon.


Written by Roy Fu, Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.

Author information

Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.
Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.
Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.

The post Create Your Own Flexible Component (Part 2) : Basic Flexible Component appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd. at February 04, 2021 04:00 PM

SolidSmack

Mark Rober Fills A Pool Full of Actual Gelatin

jell-o pool

For some weird, unspoken reason, it bet you have dreamt of swimming in a pool of Jell-O before. Perhaps, triggered by subliminal product placement? Or maybe it’s just because swimming in a sea of sweetened gelatin is just something every child (and child at heart) with a sweet tooth would want.

Just so you know, there have been tons (and I mean TONS) of attempts at making Jell-O-filled pools that have been done before. (Well, this is certainly a dream-come-true for those people!) And while the process of making each attempt or experiment is different, most have one thing in common: they don’t look like Jell-O. It could be the way they fill the pool or the product they use.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DPZzrlFCD_I?feature=oembed" title="World's Largest Jello Pool- Can you swim in Jello?" width="770"></iframe>

Here enters Mark Rober – a mechanical engineer and former NASA and Apple employee. Nowadays he puts his engineering skills in use to flaunt his acts on YouTube and like the rest of us, he has the same dream of making an authentic pool of Jell-O.

According to Mark, the reason most Jell-O pools don’t work is because of the small scale production of the material, causing it to be smushed when thrown into the pool in small batches.

jell-o pool

In order to recreate this on a large scale, Mark first does a ton of experiments with different amounts of Jell-O to find out the perfect temperatures needed to both heat and cool large amounts of gelatin.

jell-o pool

Once he realized any Jell-O mixture should be heated to at least 71°C for the hardening reaction to occur, he and his brother dug up a pool-sized hole and used six 55 gallon drums to hold their Jell-O. These drums are fitted with custom propane burners beneath them to heat the Jell-O at the desired temperature. Also, they have propped the tanks over the pool, so they can easily pour the Jell-O into it using spigots and tubes.

That’s the heating problem taken care of, but what about the cooling?

jell-o pool

Instead of creating a massive, energy-consuming refrigerator, Mark instead opts to use the weather to his advantage. Using weather forecasts and a good old thermometer he has placed in his brother’s backyard, Mark has managed to determine a three-week period near the end of April and the start of May in which the nightly temperature would be sufficient enough to cool the pool of Jell-O.

jell-o pool

With a plan in mind, he and his family get to work. Seven days before a planned Jell-O pool party, they begin filling the pool with 10 barrels (roughly 550 gallons) of gelatin mix per day. Every night, the cold air cools the poured mixture, giving each section ample time to solidify before the next day’s pouring.

jell-o pool

Slowly but surely, the pool starts to fill up with gelatin. To help the heated gelatin mix cool faster, Mark and his family are lucky enough to have a neighbor who has a spare evaporative cooler. This, coupled with the night air, has allowed for more convection cooling which will replace the escaping heat from the Jell-O with colder air above it.

So after seven days of long, arduous work, is it worth it?

jell-o pool

You bet your money: it is a success! Seeing the first-ever belly flop into a real pool of gelatin is only made more awesome when you capture it in slow motion. Once they have realized they are successful in their efforts, all the adults in the vicinity promptly revert back to their 10-year-old selves and take a dip in the pool.

jell-o pool

Of course, Jell-O only remains solid for as long as you don’t touch it, and constant swimming (coupled with the heat from the sun) will slowly liquefy the gelatin. Mark admits that if he were to do this again, he would install a pipe cooling system that would help chill the lower layers of Jell-O.

jell-o pool

Still, both the kids and the kids at heart make the most of the gelatin pool when they can. They dive into it, search for toys at the bottom of the pool, and when it starts to liquefy, they throw some of the gelatin onto a slip and slide!

I’m glad Mark Rober has made the jump to YouTube, because now he can use all his NASA and mechanical engineering expertise to make fun stuff like this for all of us to enjoy!

The post Mark Rober Fills A Pool Full of Actual Gelatin appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 04, 2021 08:51 AM

February 03, 2021

SolidSmack

What Happens When You Cast A McDonald’s Cheeseburger and Fries in Resin?

pouring resin on mcdonalds

Whenever you hear the word “resin casting,” your mind usually gravitates to objects you would normally dunk in a vat of resin. Things like wood, metal, or even mosquitoes cased in amber like in Jurassic Park. Rarely, if ever, you think of food.

YouTuber jedrek29t must have been thinking on an empty stomach a few months ago as he has decided to cast a McDonald’s cheeseburger and fries in resin to see if he could preserve this classic meal for future paleontologists to find:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ThL4m7EU4hU?feature=oembed" title="BURGER 🍔 and FRENCH FRIES after 60 days in Epoxy Resin / What Happened??? / RESIN ART" width="770"></iframe>

All resin projects start with the creation of a mold, and these particular molds are made using 1 mm plexiglass. After pouring the first layers of resin and letting them dry (this is to keep the food suspended in the resin), jedrek29t carefully places the burger and the fries into their respective containers.

pouring resin on mcdonalds

Here comes the part you’ve all been waiting for. To be honest, the resin looks more like a clear syrup when poured onto perfectly palatable food, but you still shouldn’t eat it. Since McDonald’s burgers usually look like they’re made of plastic, the resin covers this cheeseburger quite nicely.

pouring resin on mcdonalds

The fries are a different story. Since potatoes absorb liquids, the resin turns these already soggy fries into shriveled, brown shadows of their former crispy selves. He uses a couple of fries to fit the plexiglass mold before filling the entire container with clear resin.

Now you would think this is where the project ends, but jedrek29t does us kindness and shows us just how permanent these molds are. He leaves his molds out for 60 days and documents the change in the appearance of the foods inside.

pouring resin on mcdonalds

Since the resin prevents air from making contact with the food, the burger and fries remain mostly untouched by mold or insects. The top of the burger bun does shrink a little due to lack of air.

pouring resin on mcdonalds

Curious to see if the food still smells good, he cuts open the molds and inspects his burger and fries. While the fries have long since lost their odor, jedrek29t swears he can smell the cheeseburger emanating once he cuts the mold.

Eager to see what will happen if he leaves these out for another 60 days, he then covers one side of the opened burger and fries in resin and hardens them with a UV light. The other halves of the foods, on the other hand, are left uncovered and open to the elements.

pouring resin on mcdonalds

As you would expect, the resin-covered exhibits (the ones on top) have remained unchanged and the open ones have started to fill up with… well, mold.

What’s interesting to see is that the fries haven’t actually changed that much, whether or not they are covered with resin. This is most likely due to the potatoes absorbing the resin during the initial pour. The same can’t be said about the burger though, as you see the presence of the white mold mound on top of the burger bun.

This is by no means a good way to preserve your McDonald’s meals. While it looks visually interesting, the fact that you just dunked your food into toxic resin makes it completely inedible. So, I suggest just get yourself a good refrigerator.

Jedrek29t casts tons of things in resin on his YouTube channel, most of which look way more visually appealing than an expired McDonald’s combo meal.

The post What Happens When You Cast A McDonald’s Cheeseburger and Fries in Resin? appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 03, 2021 02:51 PM

The Javelin Blog

Why did my SOLIDWORKS PDM Task Fail?

A SOLIDWORKS PDM Task automates the conversion of SOLIDWORKS files to other file formats, such as PDFs. A PDM Task opens a SOLIDWORKS file, in SOLIDWORKS, and then performs a Save As operation. Occasionally a SOLIDWORKS PDM Task can fail!

SOLIDWORKS PDM Task Properties

SOLIDWORKS PDM Task Properties

Reasons for a SOLIDWORKS PDM Tasks Failure

Typical reasons for a task to fail are slow network connections (if the PDM Task is being sent across a network), as well as insufficient resources on the Task Host (the computer where the task is being executed), can lead to crashing. In some situations, a previous SOLIDWORKS crash, can cause a PDM Task to fail.

When SOLIDWORKS crashes, sometimes the SOLIDWORKS executable remains running. You may have experienced this when you launch SOLIDWORKS and get the message shown below.

Journal File Warning

SOLIDWORKS Journal File Issue

SOLIDWORKS creates a Journal file whenever SOLIDWORKS is launched, There can only be one Journal file active, at any time for each major version of SOLIDWORKS installed (i.e. one for SOLIDWORKS 2020, one for 2021 etc.); if after a crash occurs the SOLIDWORKS executable continues to run. A new Journal file cannot be created when SOLIDWORKS is relaunched. This Journal file warning is what can prevent the PDM Task from running. This is because the Journal file warning must be manually dismissed, before a new session SOLIDWORKS can be launched.

To resolve this issue, start the Windows Task Manager and look for the Process called SLDWORKS.exe. Then right-click on the executable and select End Task. Do this for all SLDWORKS.exe you find. If you have any open files, you should save them first, before ending the SLDWORKS.exe Processes.

Ending SLDWORKS.exe Process

The post Why did my SOLIDWORKS PDM Task Fail? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at February 03, 2021 02:36 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Social Business Explorer: An Easier Way to Make Data-Driven Decisions

The Social Business Analyst role on the 3DEXPERIENCE® platform enables you to make insight-driven business decisions through trends gathering, market listening, and competitive intelligence. You can choose the sources you want to monitor, visualize data with customized charts, and drive intelligent decision-making faster by automating actions triggered by events and data insights.

We introduced Social Business Analyst last year, and executives quickly learned its value in monitoring industry trends and developing competitive and economic insights. Also, product managers can better understand what customers are saying about their products, and marketing managers benefit by efficiently segmenting their customer base, as well as monitoring what competitors are doing from brand awareness and promotional perspectives.

Social Business Explorer

The newly released Social Business Explorer role is a complementary product that enables you to consume, view, and drill down into the content inside a dashboard created by Social Business Analyst. You can leverage unstructured web and social data to get a real-time understanding of market trends and opportunities to identify how and when to develop the most promising products. You can learn customer likes and dislikes to make intelligent product development choices that help beat the competition.

Working in Tandem

Let’s say your company has a team that gathers content and builds advanced queries to produce dashboards in Social Business Analyst. When a dashboard is ready for analysis it can be shared with Social Business Explorer users who can drill down into the charts, add commentary, and much more.

As shown in the chart below, the business intelligence process typically starts with content creators who collect content and build a dashboard. Reviewers conduct a primary analysis of the content. Consolidators do a secondary analysis to ensure the content’s accuracy, and then decision-makers use the data to make informed decisions and take action.

Beating the Competition

It can be nearly impossible to stay on top of industry-specific trends and news about your clients, suppliers, partners, and competitors. Information keeps coming at us fast and furious. We must have efficient ways to collect and leverage the data so stakeholders can make the best data-driven decisions.

The Social Business Analyst can perform automated web crawls across social, news, image, video, and forums and save the content to customized libraries. With the Social Business Explorer, you will be able to drill down, review, and consolidate data shared with key decision-makers in secure 3DEXPERIENCE communities. Or, you can generate push emails that automatically share relevant content with team members.

The Social Business roles on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform will enable you to better understand market opportunities and help enable your company to develop the most profitable products by leveraging real-time consumer feedback and market intelligence to optimize each stage of product development. Contact your local reseller for more information regarding the Social Business Explorer if you have more questions or if you would like to see a demo.

Author information

Salih Alani
Salih Alani
Graduate of the University of Technology , Iraq - Baghdad with BS in Mechanical Engineering , graduate of Northeastern University with a Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering, specializing in mechanics and design - 6+ Years in SOLIDWORKS ®Technical Support team - Focused on core SOLIDWORKS , DraftSight , licensing (Online Licensing), Lead Technical Support of 3D CONTENTCENTRAL® , Technical Support Account Manager for Enterprise Subscription Services (ESS) customer account and lead organizer for VAR Performance Tuning Workshop in Dassault Systemes Waltham - Certifications: - 3DEXPERIENCE® Platform Explorer – Associate - CSWA, CSWP, CSWP-Drawing Tools, CSWP-Weldment, CSWP-Sheet Metal

The post Social Business Explorer: An Easier Way to Make Data-Driven Decisions appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Salih Alani at February 03, 2021 01:00 PM

February 02, 2021

SolidSmack

Engrave Everything With The Extremely Portable LaserPecker 2

laserpecker 2

When I was younger, I always wanted to label everything. My younger brother and I would constantly fight over things, and the only way I could stake my claim on something could only be possible if I put my name on it. Doing this was easy enough on books and toys (thanks for the tip, Toy Story), but for objects with more permanence like my Game Boy, I would have my mom use her handheld engraver to put my name on them.

Technology has changed a lot since then, and while people still use pen engravers by hand, most modern engravers these days use automated laser etching.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qJXG51Upgpw?feature=oembed" title="LaserPecker 2-Super Fast Handheld Laser Engraver &amp; Cutter" width="770"></iframe>

The LaserPecker 2 (trying hard not to laugh at the name right now), is an updated version of the company’s flagship laser engraver. Featuring faster engraving speeds, a more powerful laser, and the ability to increase your printing area, this beast of a machine can engrave any surface while still being extremely portable.

Increased Engraving Speed and Resolution Options

laserpecker 2

Everyone wants a job well done in the shortest time possible, and that goes double for machines. The LaserPecker 2 not only ups the engraving speed to 600 mm/s, but it’s 5W semiconductor laser also provides three different resolution options. You can choose from the 1,000-pixel resolution for fragile surfaces like wood, leather, or thin glass; the 1,300-pixel resolution for painted surfaces; or the 2,000-pixel for those really durable metal faces.

Rotating Cylinders Allow For Curved Engraving

laserpecker 2

You wouldn’t call it a good laser engraver if you had to keep readjusting the material you want to be engraved. Luckily, the LaserPecker 2 has a variety of ways you can set up your stuff for engraving.

You can always do things old school and lay your objects flat on the printing surface for simple engraves. As for objects with curved or uneven surfaces, the two cylinders on the LaserPecker 2’s printing surface will allow the machine to rotate your stuff for hands-free engraving.

An Auxiliary Booster Provides A Larger Printing Space

laserpecker 2

Larger surfaces don’t seem to be a problem in this tool. If you cannot move the object with the cylinders, the LaserPecker 2 will move for you! Using the Auxiliary Booster attachment, you can effectively increase the printing area from 100*100 mm to 100*2000 mm – twenty times its normal printing area.

When attached, the LaserPecker 2 cruises along the surface, engraving as it goes. All you have to do is set it and watch as the machine unquestioningly etches your name on your belongings for the hundredth time.

It’s Portable, too!

laserpecker 2

On the other side of the printing area spectrum, you can take the LaserPecker 2 around and use it to engrave those 100*100 mm surfaces. Due to its small size and the addition of a portable power bank, you can engrave stuff around the house for a good 200 minutes without having to bring everything to the garage.

Multi-Platform Capabilities

laserpecker 2

Thanks to its cross-platform abilities on both mobile apps and desktops, setting up and transferring your files on the LaserPecker 2 is seamless and easy to do. It also supports a wide variety of formats, such as JPEGs, PNGs, and your ever-reliable Adobe Illustrator files. That is why you don’t have to keep switching programs just to get the engraver to recognize your designs.

laserpecker 2

There are currently three versions of the upcoming LaserPecker 2: the base version, the Pro, and the Delux. All three have the same features, with the only differences being the dimensions, weight, and engraving size.

The Laser Pecker 2 is currently on Kickstarter and Indiegogo where it has managed to raise HK $45,971,347 and HK $46,552,876, respectively. You can find out more on this portable powerhouse of an engraver on either of the two crowdfunding sites.

The post Engrave Everything With The Extremely Portable LaserPecker 2 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 02, 2021 01:01 PM

The Javelin Blog

Copying or Moving animation keys in SOLIDWORKS Composer

While working with a SOLIDWORKS Composer animation, there could be cases when we have to copy or move the animation keys from one time-frame to another.

Maybe there is a need to copy the location, opacity, material or event of an actor.

By selecting a specific geometric or collaborative actor > Toggling ON “show keys for selected actor only” – Filter keys > holding the Ctrl key and dragging and dropping key from one time-frame to another, copies the key.

However, not holding the Ctrl key would simply move the key from one time-frame to another. Similarly, properties of viewport, camera and digger tool can be copied or moved.

Now when we copy/move the keys, by default it also copies the markers which could be misleading.

SOLIDWORKS Composer markers refer to:

  • Either the view name in the view-Tab which gets created automatically when the view is dragged and dropped in the animation key track
  • OR a manually created marker to give a better definition of events in the animation.

To avoid copying markers follow the steps below:

  1. Go to Animate Tab
  2. Click on Time Settings
  3. Time Settings dialogue box opens up
  4. Uncheck “Update markers when moving the keys”
  5. Doing so, the markers won’t be copied when we move or copy the keys in the animation track.
SOLIDWORKS Composer Animation Copy

Uncheck Update markers

Learn more about Composer

To learn more attend one of our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training courses live online.

The post Copying or Moving animation keys in SOLIDWORKS Composer appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at February 02, 2021 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Slow Mo Guys Take A Closer Look At What Happens When You Shoot A Tranquilizer Dart

slow mo tranq dart

Thanks to movies like The Matrix, a good portion of the general populace knows how a lot of things can look way cooler in slow motion. Shooting a gun? Cooler in slow-mo. Riding a bike? Cooler in slow-mo. Pouring yourself a glass of water? Yup! Even cooler in slow-mo.

Since 2010, Gav and Dan of The Slow Mo Guys have made it their mission to take everything and anything under the shutters of a variety of slow-motion cameras. While you can always expect the results to be visually appealing, sometimes you can learn something new by looking at everyday objects through a very fast and very powerful camera lens.

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Case in point: a tranquilizer dart. You know that when one of these babies hits you, you will be sent to Dreamland in a couple of minutes.

But did you know that the hole which injects the sleeping agent isn’t found at the tip of the hypodermic needle? Upon inspecting the dart for the first time, the duo has noticed a second hole on the side of the needle which is covered by a rubber stopper. When the needle punctures an animal (or a person), the stopper gets pushed back by the target’s skin, allowing the sleeping agent to enter their bloodstream.

There’s a lot more to it than that, so The Slow Mo Guys shoot a couple of darts filled with food coloring at a piece of faux leather. They then capture the footage with their Phantom Flex 4K slow-motion camera; first at 1,000 fps, then at 3,000 fps.

slow mo tranq dart

After loading and shooting the first dart, you can see just how strong and quick the food coloring spurts out of the hole. The sheer force of the impact makes it possible, allowing the pressurized air in the dart to inject the drug at a rapid pace inside the target. Couple this with the long needle, and you can be sure the dart will pierce deep and won’t fall out until it has done its job.

slow mo tranq dart

Next, they do another shot at 3,000 fps from a couple of different angles. While the result is unsurprisingly the same, Gav notices something he has missed at a lower framerate: the rubber stopper doesn’t actually get pushed all the way back once the dart hits its mark. Instead, it bounces backward before being forcefully pushed into the faux leather by the rest of the dart.

slow mo tranq dart

Gav and Dan conduct one final experiment, this time with a water balloon on the exit point of the faux leather to mimic the blood inside a living animal. They should have really gone with a more organic container, as the balloon pops before we can properly see the food coloring mix with the water. But thanks to the power of slow motion, we can catch a small section of water near the dart’s entry point which turns a lighter shade of blue before it pours down to a container below.

So – yes – you can learn a thing or two by watching things in slow motion. The footage is awesome and all, but things you can only read about are further emphasized when you can see them in action. For more slow-motion goodness, check out Gav and Dan on The Slow Mo Guys.

The post The Slow Mo Guys Take A Closer Look At What Happens When You Shoot A Tranquilizer Dart appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 02, 2021 12:53 PM

February 01, 2021

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Top 5 New Features in SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2021

SOLIDWORKS and 3DEXPERIENCE rolled out a little differently this year. If you treated yourself to one of GSC’s virtual 2021 What’s New Recaps, you saw our 25-year veteran Jeff Setzer unveil myriad new features in 2021 through the eyes of Square Robot’s AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle).  And just as in years past, this 3 hour ‘deep dive’ proved to be only the tip of the iceberg!

Just like an iceberg, most of the mass is below the surface, so let’s take an ‘in depth’ look at a few of our favorite SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2021 enhancements and how you can put these to work right away once you make the switch!

(Need a refresher? View our SOLIDWORKS Electrical page)

Below is a list and brief description of several new features where I show you my top 5. But don’t take my word for it, read over the notes and see how 2021 can benefit you!

5. Use Splines & Arcs to Define Your Routing Path (EW_Path)

Check out this video displaying new possibilities in 3D Routing, also embedded below this text. Where our routes always resulted in lines and splines for our routes, we now can use splines, along with lines and arcs to guide our routes.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5SXQMwOCCUk" width="560"></iframe>

The ability to use this extra sketch type gives us more control over the route’s path to ensure clearance in geometrically complex mechanical frameworks, and also can help avoid some of the common “bend radius” warnings that appear during routing by giving our EW_PATH splines to smooth out tight corners.

4. SOLIDWORKS Electrical Viewer

With the addition of the Electrical Viewer (present on anyone’s machine at time of install of 2021), users can now review and even export or print drawings without using a license of SOLIDWORKS Electrical. If your team is hard at work and no licenses are in the pool and you just need to get in and review portions of the design, this is a great tool to have. It’s simple to pull up, and can avoid interruptions to your team that is hard at work and focused on laying out your next big thing.

 

 

3. Exclude From Bill of Materials (BOM)

While SOLIDWORKS teams have had a convenient way to hide items from their BOM, Electrical users had to develop their own methods, typically via USER DATA and Filtering. Now Electrical users can join the party, getting their own “Exclude from BOM” function.

This is handy for when you want to use the convenience of a part’s data (attributes, footprint, symbols etc.), but it’s project inclusion may be assumed (and ignored) or accounted for by the mechanical team. Now adding that extra documentation is cleaner and easier. If a part NEVER belongs on your BOMs, you can check the box in your Library. If it is a case-by-case exclusion, you can address it on the part properties, and update only that component.

Now run your reports with the Exclude FILTER or hard code into your custom query via a “WHERE” statement (i.e. WHERE “exclude from BOM” == 0) and those parts will dissolve from your reports!

Also check out this bonus feature for your BOMs…what can this do for your Electro-Mechanical Collaboration? It’s good to have options!

2. Wire Options

It took me a minute to fully understand the impact of this one, but trust me, this is BIG. I recently worked with users sharing several ideas they had to build into SOLIDWORKS Electrical. They described how each time symbols on a node changed, the wire flow also changed automatically. However, their intent was typically to remote a component and replace it with something else, preferably leaving the wiring as it was. Now in our Project configuration, we can solve exactly this!

You’ll notice when you fire up your projects, 3 new boxes that will be checked by default to maintain legacy behavior. However, changing these settings unlocks some serious time savings!

Unchecking the first 2 boxes now allows wiring to maintain its state by keeping the nodal indicator and setting a “PENDING” state on the open end of the wire, meaning that wire exists in the database as a flying lead, and also stays in place when another component comes into play.

So no more wiring order changes, once it’s set, it sticks. I get the feeling this will be one you’ll set and never want to go back.

And finally…

1. Scheduled Archiving

This one almost made it into 2020, and has been requested in virtually EVERY training class I’ve ever run. Happy to say it’s here! We now have the ability to create our environmental archives automatically. This past year I helped with a higher than usual number of cases with unexpected Electrical data loss…and having the Environmental Archive capture regularly makes these situations SO MUCH easier to recover from. Previously this had to be scheduled and maintained by your team. Now we can now use Windows Task Scheduler to set and run the archive in the background at a convenient time without interruption! Set it for 3 a.m. on Saturdays and you’ll never have to send out those email blasts to everyone over lunch.

Here’s how it works. By visiting your SOLIDWORKS Electrical folder in Program Files, we have a ewenvironmentarchiver icon, open this to set your options. You can choose to create a TOTAL or PARTIAL backup depending on your preferences, along with the path for where to place the final file.

Now we turn to the Windows Task Scheduler, and in your task list you can verify the path to the target the .exe file along with defining it’s time and frequency via “properties.”

Schedule a test run to make sure everything is set properly. It will create a uniquely named archive file in the output folder at the scheduled time. A report can be generated showing if the archive finished cleanly or had trouble with anything along the way. And enjoy the peace of mind knowing your Electrical data is getting backed up routinely and will be easily recovered.

 

Related Video: Prevent Data Loss with SOLIDWORKS Electrical’s Archive Environment

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ciYdtC9s9SA" width="560"></iframe>

 

I hope you found this informative and helpful! Enjoy getting the most out of your SOLIDWORKS Electrical Experience (see what I did there?)


Contact Us

Did you like this list? There’s more where this comes from. Find other blogs covering SOLIDWORKS Electrical by Evan or more on our YouTube Tech Tip videos.

Have a question? We’re always available to talk over the phone, for you to leave a message, or for you to submit a request – just contact us.

About the Author

GSC’s Evan Stanek has over 10 years of experience as an Electrical Applications Engineer. Prior to GSC, he worked as an engineer in the broadcasting field designing panel layouts and schematics/installations for transmitter control systems, as well as network and control layouts for radio studios. Evan is a certified SOLIDWORKS Electrical Trainer and Electrical Applications Engineer (CSWE).

 

 

 

Author information

GSC
GSC fuels customer success with 3D engineering solutions for design, simulation, data management, electrical schematics, PCB, technical documentation, and 3D printing, as well as the most comprehensive consulting, technical support, and training in the industry. As a leading provider of SOLIDWORKS solutions, HP, and Markforged 3D printing technologies, GSC’s world-class team of dedicated professionals have helped numerous companies innovate and increase productivity by leveraging advanced technologies to drive 3D business success. Founded in 1989, GSC is headquartered in Germantown, WI. For more information about GSC, please visit www.gsc-3d.com.

The post Top 5 New Features in SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2021 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GSC at February 01, 2021 04:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Sketch Text Convert Entities in SOLIDWORKS Workaround

If you are reading this article then you have most likely tried to use Convert Entities on SOLIDWORKS  Sketch text and was not able to?!

Although we cannot use Convert Entities on Sketch text (at least for now…SPR shown at end of article) we can use a clever workaround.

Do not use Dissolve Sketch Text

We will not be using the “Dissolve Sketch Text” to convert the Sketch Text into sketch geometry (lines, arcs and splines). This will indeed allow you to convert the Sketch Text but you will lose all links to the original Sketch Text and won’t be able to make simple changes like changing the font size.

If you are interested in seeing a Dissolve Sketch Text example, please take a look at this article: Magic 8 ball blog article using Dissolve Sketch Entities

Project Curve Solution / Workaround

What we will doing is actually creating a Projected Curve feature that will capture the Sketch Text outline first and then we will use Convert Entities on the Curve. See below for the steps!

Start with a Sketch with Sketch Text:

Sketch Text

Sketch Text

Next preselect the Sketch and the Plane to which it should be Projected on, then select the Project Curve command.

Sketch Text - Preselect and Choose Project Curve

Preselect and Choose Project Curve

With “Sketch on faces” selected, click the green checkmark to confirm.

Sketch Text Confirm

Confirm “Sketch on Faces” is selected and Click Ok

Create a new Sketch on the same plane where the Sketch Text was created. Select the Convert Entities command and then choose any edge of the Curve that was created.

HELPFUL NOTE: Hiding the sketch with the Sketch Text will allow you to choose the curve entities easily. You can also use select other.

Sketch Text > Create New Sketch > Convert Entities

Create New Sketch > Convert Entities > Select Edge on Curve Created

NOTE: Make sure to start the Convert Entities command first before selecting the edge of the Curve.

Make any changes to sketch geometry, if required.

Make any required changes to the text

Make any required changes to the text

 

Use the sketch where desired, such as a wrap feature.

Sketch with Converted Entities used for Wrap Feature

Sketch with Converted Entities used for Wrap Feature

NEXT let’s make a small change to the original Sketch Text like changing the width factor of the font from 100% to 80%:

Sketch Text changed to 80% Font Width Factor

Sketch Text changed to 80% Font Width Factor

Warning: Changing the original Sketch Text that results in Geometry change, other than size, may not be captured completely (such as changing the font style). If you do then you will have to delete the converted sketch entities and reuse the convert entities on the updated Curve.

Below we see the updated model after the 80% change to the Font Width Factor where the Sketch Text updated the Curve which updated the Converted Entities in the new sketch being used for the wrap feature.

Model at 80% Font Width Factor

Model at 80% Font Width Factor

The solution found in this article is a workaround for not being able to directly convert Sketch Text. That being said, there is a reported enhancement request (shown below) in which you can go vote for a future update.

SPR 828902: Ability to convert sketch text lines to sketch entities without first dissolving sketch text.

The post Sketch Text Convert Entities in SOLIDWORKS Workaround appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Prasadh Annalingam, CSWE at February 01, 2021 03:36 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Learn How to Make Magic with Epic Inclusion at 3DEXPERIENCE World

You can make the argument that scientists and engineers have removed magic from our lives by explaining everything with science and hard facts, but Magic Wheelchair proves that there is still an abundance of wonder in this world.

For the past three years, SOLIDWORKS has supported Magic Wheelchair, empowering them to create epic costumes for amazing kiddos in wheelchairs and giving these special children their own day to be superstars. Accelerated by the 3DEXPERIENCE Lab and proudly supported by La Fondation Dassault Systèmes, Magic Wheelchair is a nonprofit organization that builds larger-than-life costumes for kiddos in wheelchairs — at no cost to families. The organization’s programs promote the inclusion and self-expression of children with disabilities by transforming their wheelchairs into fantastical creations from their imaginations and brought to life by our hands.

The SOLIDWORKS Magic Wheelchair Build Team and their first build

 

Many of you may remember the incredible costume reveals from 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020, where international build teams came together and made two costumes for local Nashville children, one based on Star Wars and the other on Beauty and the Beast. The Magic Wheelchair booth was one of the most popular at the 3DEXPERIENCE Playground, raising awareness and money for the program. And, although we cannot physically be together in 2021, SOLIDWORKS is still hoping to virtually bring magic to your day by sharing stories of inclusion and of Magic Wheelchair’s super heroes.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LeQVMV943uk?feature=oembed" title="Magic Wheelchair Reveal at 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020" width="1140"></iframe>

 

This year at 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021, you can get in on the magic too.  Annie Cheung, Product Definition Senior Manager of Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS, and Christine Getman, Executive Director of Magic Wheelchair, will talk about the journey of balancing the momentum from 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020 going into the pandemic; how Magic Wheelchair builders pivoted; what virtual and socially distanced magic making looks like; and highlights from Halloween 2020. They will also showcase the Magic Wheelchair build process from within the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, which removes the barriers to collaboration and allows the community of passionate builders to reach new heights and create what can only be described as magical.

Ben, the recipient of the second SOLIDWORKS Magic Wheelchair build, enjoying his custom motorcycle

 

“One of the greatest honors of my life has been supporting Magic Wheelchair and its goal of inclusion,” says Annie, who is also the Project Manager of the SOLIDWORKS Magic Wheelchair Team. “There is no greater feeling than to bring some light and love to a person’s life.  It’s our hope to help Magic Wheelchair bring inclusion to the lives of every kiddo in a wheelchair.”

One of the ways Magic Wheelchair is trying to spread its message is with its Inclusion Quest. The goal is to reach 10,000 followers on Instagram so account features can be unlocked to help them reach more people and engage with the larger builder community. More eyes on these important projects means more builders building, which means more happy children and their families.

Christine Getman, left, and Annie Cheung, right

 

Want to learn more and get involved? Be sure to register for 3DEXPERIENCE World so you can attend this breakout session. You can also check out the Magic Wheelchair community on 3DSwym, where you can learn about projects that SOLIDWORKS and the 3DEXPERIENCE Lab have worked on or supported. You’ll see firsthand that there is definitely still magic left in this world: the magic we create together.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Learn How to Make Magic with Epic Inclusion at 3DEXPERIENCE World appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 01, 2021 01:00 PM

January 30, 2021

SolidSmack

What I Learned From Interviewing 50 Senior Engineers

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It can be inspiring to listen to smart people talk about what motivates them and learn what habits have enabled their success. I co-host “Being an Engineer,” a podcast centered around engineers and what makes them tick. As my co-host Aaron Moncur and I have shared the privilege of interviewing over 50 engineers and other creative people, we constantly gather useful advice and are reminded of important values that can take our skills to the next level. While nobody’s lifelong wisdom can be reduced to one sentence, this list is some of my quick takeaways from the podcast. Anyone else who listens to these interviews will likely have a different interpretation of each episode, but these are mine:

Episode 54: Dan Slaski

My takeaway: Don’t just download the McMaster hardware you need. Take a few extra moments to explore the section of the hardware you need so that you build a mental library of the off the shelf hardware that’s available. This will help you in future designs. 

The importance of having various prototypes and educating the customer on the design process. 

Serendipity, and how to gain a 6th sense in design. 

Episode 52: Martha Ganesh

My takeaway: Strive to have a company culture in which transparency is the norm. Achieve this by making it clear that when one gives constructive criticism, it’s focused on the project and not the person.

Episode 49: Jeff Christian

My takeaway: This is a recurring theme: Understanding and being able to manufacture prototypes with your own hands by operating various methods like machining, laserjet, etc, makes you a valuable designer. You want your designs to be optimized for manufacturing. 

Germany has a great mechanical engineering program. 

This statement has been incredibly helpful when proposing ideas during brainstorming, “What would happen if ________.” 

Episode 46: Mauricio Romero 

My takeaway: Making the end user–in many cases, the operator–part of your design team is crucial for two reasons: A) The end-user can give you insights on the real problems they’re facing, B) The end-user will take ownership for the solution you develop and actually use it. They become your advocate in promoting your solution to other operators. Conclusion: Always make the end-user part of your design team and touch base with them regularly to ensure the idea being developed aligns with their needs. You’ve succeeded if the operator feels ownership of the solution you’ve developed.  

Episode 45: Les Voss

In my own words: Read “Exact Constraint: Machine Design Using Kinematic Processing” by Douglass L. Blanding to become a better mechanical designer. 

Immediately after graduating, continue reviewing your college notes so that you keep the equations fresh in your memory. 

Episode 44: Astrid McNellis

My takeaway: Develop processes that foster clear communication between the team. 

Episode 42: Rob Maldonado, Mr. #CADModelOfTheDay

My takeaway: Dedicate one hour a day to improving your craft. Pay keen attention to how you communicate. Aim to project the most confident version of yourself. Be wary of “imposter syndrome,” you probably already have what it takes. 

Episode 35: Tim Rempfer

My takeaway: Have “rubber band focus.”  Rubber band meaning develops the habit of looking at the fine details of a project as well as the high-level overview. When looking at a problem, you may get into the intricate details and lose track of overall projects. When solving a complex system, every now it’s useful to take a step back to ensure what one is trying to accomplish is aligned with the goals as a whole

Episode 31: Kirsty Crofton

My takeaway: Similar concept to episode 46. Visit the manufacturing floor/assembly line and develop a relationship with the operators. Kirsty tells a story of how engineers may overcomplicate a solution that sometimes an operator can solve in an instant if you simply ask them. Her toothpaste box story is an eye-opening example, you have to listen to it. 

Episode 29: Rob Donley

My takeaway: Manufacturing companies are moving from Asia to Latin America. Reason: The workers in Latin America seem to be a better alternative because of what seems to be higher-level high school education. This makes Latin American operators more apt at assembling. Thus, being a bilingual engineer who speaks Spanish could make you invaluable to the company that you work for if you can communicate directly with the manufacturing facilities in Mexico. This results in getting paid handsomely. This advice made me very optimistic because I’m Argentinean and I’m 100% bilingual. 

Episode 27: Reade Harpham

My takeaway: Advice on how to communicate with engineers (hint: use numbers). This skill has allowed him to earn the respect of engineering teams owing to his ability to communicate in a way that allows engineering teams to fully understand and appreciate the value his human factors team brings to the table. He has also helped develop and foster an incredible work environment at Priority Designs (check out their website – it’s an impressive firm) where a flat organizational structure has led to supreme efficiency and empowering team members to get stuff done without the bureaucracy of traditional organizations.

Episode 16: Robert Whirley

My takeaway: Understand the problem really well before you start designing a solution. 

Episode 8: Aaron Moncur

My takeaway: How to start a company after getting laid off from your mechanical engineering job. The importance of soft skills, or what Aaron calls “kindergarten skills.” Aaron is the host of the “Being an Engineer” podcast and founder of Pipeline Design & Engineering. His company specializes in medical device test fixtures. 

Episode 5: Rafael Testai

My takeaway: This is my episode. I talk about how I went from graduating with a degree in Genetics with honors at 23, selling my software company at 26, and starting my mechanical design engineering career at 27. I’m almost 30 years old now and I will be writing articles on SolidSmack about what it’s like to break into the world of mechanical design. 

Episode 1: Michael Hadley

My takeaway: Michael graduated with a degree in mechanical engineering from an Ivy League school and didn’t actually “use it” until 20 years after graduating. I asked him how he was able to remember the concepts he learned 20 years ago, and the key was to internalize the information learned. As long as you understand the main principles, like the laws of physics, everything should come back to you. This has positively affected my study habits and improved my retention.

Conclusion

My goal is to be direct, succinct, and to provide value in my articles. I know that by you reading this list, you are now equipped with at least one golden nugget of wisdom that you may have not known before. If you’ve found this content of value, please consider “sharing” on social media so your astute followers can benefit from these golden nuggets. Thanks for reading.

The post What I Learned From Interviewing 50 Senior Engineers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Rafael Testai at January 30, 2021 11:38 PM

January 29, 2021

SolidSmack

Watch Two Guys Make An Underground Hideout And Swimming Pool With Nothing But Their Own Two Hands

manmade underground hideout and pool

Building an underground hideout and pool with nothing but bare hands. Well, that’s not entirely true – they actually employ the use of some handy machete-like tools, as well. Nevertheless, these three men from the YouTube channel The Survival get their kicks from building astounding structures using nothing but the environment, their creativity, and their own two hands.

For this particular project, they dig themselves their own underground hideaway – complete with underground slide and pool:

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It All Starts With A Hole…

manmade underground hideout and pool

As with most of their underground builds, these men start by digging a giant hole in the middle of nowhere. As the duo reach their intended depth, they begin to carve out the different features of the hideout.

It’s amazing how they manage to carve out the two benches, a round table, and an entrance to the pool area without any measuring tools (at least, none that we can see). They most likely make blueprints for what they have in mind prior to the building process but if the video is to be believed, they eyeball everything in their minds and make markings with their tools as they dig along.

Carving Out The Swimming Pool

manmade underground hideout and pool

Once the initial hole and features are done, they begin to carve into the hard rock and ground to create a swimming pool. Using the entrance they have made as a point of reference, they painstakingly dig out a hole big enough for two as well as some extra swimming space.

Making The Pool Slide

manmade underground hideout and pool

When the enclosure is big enough, one guy continues work on the pool area while the other goes above ground. What they do next is something straight out of Minecraft: using nothing but their eyes, they estimate the topography of the land and dig a hole leading directly downwards to the pool. They make it look easy, but this involves a lot of guesswork without the proper tools or measuring equipment. With enough digging, the two ends meet, and the duo resume carving the finer details of their hideout.

Clay It Up

manmade underground hideout and pool

Making clay by mixing some ground they have found nearby and some water, they line the walls of the pool and the slide to make them smooth and easier on the skin (no one likes to slide down a rough slide, after all). They use a different kind of clay to line the benches and candle crevices they have made to give them a bit of color before moving on to one of the most important parts of the project…

Filling The Pool With Water

manmade underground hideout and pool

Seeing as they want to keep things as natural as possible, the duo can’t just grab a hose and fill their pool from a nearby home or fire truck. Instead, they opt to use Mother Nature’s natural moving bodies of water to do the job for them.

By connecting a string of hollow bamboo poles and dipping one end into a nearby stream, they funnel natural running water into their manmade pool. Filling any pool takes a lot of time but since they can’t control the flow of water, the two take a short break before continuing with their work.

Carving The Main Entrance

manmade underground hideout and pool

Until now, the duo could only get into the underground hideout by entering the first hole they have made. In order to make access easier and well-hidden, they have carved out a staircase leading to the rest area using their trademark tools. They then line the entrance with some candle crevices and fill those with clay to make finding the entrance much easier.

Covering The Top

manmade underground hideout and pool

The two make their hideout really hidden by adding a roof to their rest area. Using long wooden sticks and hay as a base, they cover the roof with the ground they have dug up and then harden it with another type of clay. Finally, the whole thing is covered in another layer of ground and leaves to make it blend with the environment.

Time To Relax and Enjoy Your Work

manmade underground hideout and pool

Light up some bamboo candles, place them on the crevices, and you have yourself a hideout which looks more like a spa than an underground cave. Then, you can take the slide down into the pool or take a break on one of the benches once you’ve had a nice dip.

manmade underground hideout and pool

Thanks to the hardened clay, sliding into the pool doesn’t seem as rough on the skin as sliding down a rocky surface. The whole hideout definitely has a relaxing vibe, and you wouldn’t mind taking a weekend off to take a retreat here, would you?

The Survival YouTube channel is full of manmade structures built using nothing but human hands and a couple of simple tools. Be sure to check it out for more natural architecture!

The post Watch Two Guys Make An Underground Hideout And Swimming Pool With Nothing But Their Own Two Hands appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 29, 2021 04:21 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

An Exclusive Preview of 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021 with SOLIDWORKS Live

3DEXPERIENCE World 2021 is just around the corner and we cannot wait to see you all there! Last year, we had an opportunity to bring you a ton of unique content via SOLIDWORKS Live – from Certifications, to Magic Wheelchair reveal, to general sessions, exclusive interviews with speakers, most interesting technical breakout sessions, overview of the technology on the 3DEXPERIENCE Playground and so much more! This year, the conference is 100% virtual and free to attend to everyone. All you need to do is register, if you haven’t yet, and watch all your favorite parts of the event from the comfort of your home or office. Nevertheless, we want to give you a taste of what to expect during February 8-11!

We’ll be coming to you live at 11am ET on February 4 with our SOLIDWORKS Live broadcast, giving you an exclusive sneak peek into what will be happening at 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021. You’ll have a chance to be greeted by our CEO Gian Paolo Bassi and hear about what he’s most looking forward to.

You’ll also have a chance to meet and hear from a great line up of speakers. Titan Gilroy, CEO of Titans of CNC, who went from boxing and then prison to a successful business owner, will share his story of perseverance and success. His passion for CNC machining and manufacturing is infectious!

Brent Bushnell, CEO & Co-Founder of Two Bit Circus, a Los-Angeles-based experiential entertainment company, will share how he uses technology, design and engineering to inspire inventors. Brent is an engineer and entrepreneur passionate about STEM, and previously created STEAM Carnival, a traveling event to inspire kids about science, technology, engineering, art and math.

Matt Carney, who you may remember from the main stage at 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020 and our SOLIDWORKS Live interview thereafter, has pivoted during the pandemic into manufacturing PPE (Personal Protective Equipment). He’ll give you a glimpse into what it’s like to crowdsource ideas, and collaborate with engineers worldwide to design a protective respirator.

You’ll also have a chance to hear from Jason Pohl, best known for his long career at Orange County Choppers, who is now an independent designer at Jason Pohl LLC. Jason’s enthusiasm for design, innovation, problem solving, and creativity is bound to inspire you to look outside the box next time you start a new project.

Of course, we can’t leave out our users favorite – Model Mania! This 21-year old design competition has grown into THREE different challenges this year. Be sure to tune in to learn about each one, and how you can participate.

The cherry on the cake, we have prepared something special for all those tuning into our live stream – you don’t want to miss it! Join us at 11am Eastern Time on February 4 on your favorite social media platform. We’ll be going live on YouTubeFacebookLinkedIn and Instagram. See you then!

Author information

Olga Bai
Olga Bai
Olga Bai is a Digital Marketing Manager at SOLIDWORKS in charge of the brand’s social media channels and other digital initiatives.

The post An Exclusive Preview of 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021 with SOLIDWORKS Live appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Olga Bai at January 29, 2021 03:49 PM

The Javelin Blog

Redo Support for Part Features in SOLIDWORKS 2021

For anyone who has used the Redo ability in SOLIDWORKS prior to 2021 and loved it…one thing may have come to mind…UPGRADE, UPGRADE, UPGRADE! For everyone that loved the ability (including myself), we wanted more!

In SOLIDWORKS 2021, yes you guessed it, the command has been upgraded!

Redo allows you to undo…your undo

With redo in SOLIDWORKS you can reverse a recent undo that was performed. Up until SOLIDWORKS 2020, it has been limited to use within sketches only.

  • Undo: File Menu: Edit > Undo or Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl + Z
  • Redo: File Menu: Edit > Redo or Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl + Y

The example below shows a sketch that is trimmed, an undo is performed and then a redo is used to reverse that undo. This is a great ability to have for designers that like to go back and forth between steps (…like myself).

SOLIDWORKS Sketch Undo Redo

Sketch going through Trim, Undo and Redo

You can make changes within a sketch, undo and redo all day long!

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2021?

This is a great ability to have but a common request for this command was to be able to Redo not only in the sketch level but also at the part level. Well, SOLIDWORKS has heard you and delivered! The Redo ability has been upgraded in SOLIDWORKS 2021 and now includes more than 60 part features and commands that it can be used for.

Redo for Part Features Example:

This is best seen with your own eyes! Create a simple part like the one seen below

SOLIDWORKS Create Simple Part

Create Simple Part

Use the Undo button (or Ctrl + Z) to go back to the very beginning and then

SOLIDWORKS Undo Back to Sketch

Undo Back to Sketch

Use the Redo button (or Ctrl + Y) to get back to the finished part

Back to Simple Part

Redo to Simple Part

SOLIDWORKS Redo Limitations

With this update to the Redo functionality for part commands, there are still a few limitations in SOLIDWORKS 2021 where it is not supported. Please see below for a list of known exceptions. This just means it isn’t possible just yet. We can only wait and see what joins the list of items that is supported with Redo.

  • Annotations
  • Hole Features
  • Instant 3D Modifications
  • Mold Tools
  • Sheet Metal
  • Weldments

Something you may notice in SOLIDWORKS 2021 is the Redo button is available on the Quick Access Toolbar.

SOLIDWORKS Redo Quick Button

SOLIDWORKS 2021 Redo Quick Button

The redo button is still available in previous versions of SOLIDWORKS but will have to be added as a shortcut wherever desired. Learn how to search for commands easier in SOLIDWORKS 2021 and a workaround for earlier versions.

Other SOLIDWORKS 2021 User Interface Updates

If you found this interesting, please take a look at a few other SOLIDWORKS 2021 User Interface updates:

The post Redo Support for Part Features in SOLIDWORKS 2021 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Prasadh Annalingam, CSWE at January 29, 2021 01:33 PM

January 28, 2021

SolidSmack

Tour: Inside R&D Startup and NASA Contractor – Impossible Sensing

Pablo Sobron, PhD gave us a tour of the R&D company, Impossible Sensing, which he founded in St. Louis, Missouri. See the video below for a look inside their lab:

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Most of the systems Impossible Sensing builds are to be used in aerospace by NASA. Others are for deep ocean and oil & gas applications.

While Impossible Sensing’s branding refers to their instruments as sensing technology, most of what they do could be more precisely labeled spectroscopy. They’re not making position detectors, or occupancy sensing devices, or temperature and humidity sensors; they detect specific elements and molecules.

Why St. Louis?

Land is cheap in St. Louis, compared to, say, Silicon Valley, so it’s also cheaper to make mistakes there. Impossible Sensing may be an R&D lab, and even develops much of its technology according to hyper-practical NASA methodologies, but it’s also a startup. The day-to-day operations still need to be lean and adaptable as it figures itself out. Sobron also has some academic roots there with Washington University down the street. Plus, he’s just really fond of the city.

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-144431" class="wp-caption alignnone" id="attachment_144431" style="width: 633px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-144431">Inside Impossible Sensing’s basement lab – which is not at all creepy like I expected.</figcaption></figure>

What the Heck Are Spectrometers?

There are many types of spectrometers, but the basic concept is the same for all. In a spectrometer, you shoot up some material with light, the two interact, and then you detect which wavelengths (think: colors) of light you get coming off it. If your spectrometer is tuned correctly for the gunk you’re inspecting, there should be a difference between the wavelengths of light going in versus coming out. That difference is like a fingerprint. It can tell you what molecules or elements the sample of gunk is made of.

How Many States of Matter Does Impossible Sensing Work With?

All of them! They work with solid, liquid, gas, and even plasma.

What are the Devices Used for?

Many instruments Impossible Sensing develops detect the types of materials you’d expect to see where life is present. But why would anyone care to dump millions of dollars into making instruments to detect life?

Now is probably a good time to mention that Sobron is also a SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) nerd.

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-144436" class="wp-caption alignnone" id="attachment_144436" style="width: 452px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-144436">Pablo Sobron is affiliated with SETI, but if you aren’t familiar with that org, to be clear: it’s a legit scientific effort.</figcaption></figure>

Impossible Sensing’s grander vision is to build instruments that will detect evidence of life on Mars and beyond. Projects for monitoring life on the ocean floor are great starter endeavors.

InVADER

One such project is InVADER (In-situ Vent Analysis Divebot for Exobiology Research). Side note: oh, nice work with that acronym.

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-144453" class="wp-caption alignnone" id="attachment_144453" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-144453">Sobron showed off a poster of InVADER because the real deal is en route to the ocean.</figcaption></figure>

It’s set to launch (er, dive?) July 2021. InVADER will monitor life and rock interactions on seafloor hydrothermal vents throughout its year-long mission. With this project, they’ll prove they can detect and monitor life long-term in a place where life is already proven to exist. Additionally, they’ll prove they can make widgets that can withstand really harsh environments — as with a mission to Mars or one of Jupiter’s moons.

No matter what the application, Impossible Sensing’s instruments offer the advantage of quick and easy on-site measurements compared to alternatives of shipping (or shuttling) samples back to a big lab. This, in turn, can speed up timelines of larger projects that need these sensors.

SpectroGRID

One of their first devices, SpectroGRID shoots a sample with a laser that creates plasma. It focuses a pulsed laser to a very small (~20-50 microns) spot on the sample and hits it with a lot of power. That’s actually not the (extra) cool part. That part of the tech is already-existing LIBS (laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy).

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-144457" class="wp-caption alignnone" id="attachment_144457" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-144457">SpectroGRID machine, making plasma and 2D-chemical maps, as it does.</figcaption></figure>

The cool part is it can scan a sample to determine its chemical makeup over the entire surface of one side without any moving parts. That means there’s no prone-to-breakage mechanical stage involved. Instead, light is guided with liquid lenses and MEMS devices to create all the “pixels” needed for a “2D chemical map”.

Again, with SpectroGRID, as with InVADER, you get detailed, on-site answers about what materials you’re looking at quickly.

Other Cool Details About the Space:

The lab is in a basement of a former church, which I personally find a little…disturbing. In between being a church and Impossible Sensing’s lair, it morphed into an event space. Interesting remnants of that middle state still exist, too!

Artsy Stuff

When you first walk down into the dungeon/lab, an artistic diorama greets you. It’s a model of the vents on the ocean floor which one of Impossible Sensing’s instruments will be monitoring in the future, and it looks astoundingly like the real thing.

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-144438" class="wp-caption alignnone" id="attachment_144438" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-144438">Top: real ocean floor; bottom: diorama version at Impossible Sensing. Ok, I’ll admit it; that’s honestly impressive.</figcaption></figure>

Historical Stuff

Compton’s chairs are there! (A la the Compton Effect.) And his blackboard, too!

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-144439" class="wp-caption alignnone" id="attachment_144439" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-144439">Part museum, some of physicist Arthur Holly Compton’s stuff hangs out at this facility.</figcaption></figure>

Stage Suitable for White Paper Talks or Wild Parties

Space even came with a performance stage complete with a sound system and fog machine. It’s all they need to make those scientific presentations “extra”.

Glamor Shot Studio Booth

There’s even a large photo booth for widget Glamor Shots.

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-144440" class="wp-caption alignnone" id="attachment_144440" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-144440">Ensuring Impossible Sensing’s primary objective: making stuff look really cool. Whether it works is secondary. It will work. But that’s secondary.</figcaption></figure>

The Holy Grail of Office Details: Shuffleboard

Shuffleboard is tiled into the floor for Take Your Grandparent to Work Day.

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-144443" class="wp-caption alignnone" id="attachment_144443" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-144443">Can your swanky startup office beat this? Shuffleboard floor!</figcaption></figure>

The Toys (Equipment):

Impossible Sensing has most capabilities on-site for developing a product from concept to prototype to its final form. An exception is the custom PCB’s they send out to be made, but even those are finished and assembled in-house.

3D Printers and (Soon) a CNC

3D printers get a workout there testing out all sorts of designs from handles to lens mounts to faceplates before going to a machined part. It’s an inexpensive way to perfect form and part fit quickly. Sometimes, when the printed part is good enough, it may even get included in the final version of the system.

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-144446" class="wp-caption alignnone" id="attachment_144446" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-144446">Pile of 3D printed part carcasses.</figcaption></figure>

Electronics Bench

They’ve got enough electronics equipment to get the job done.

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-144447" class="wp-caption alignnone" id="attachment_144447" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-144447">Electronics workstation in Impossible Sensing’s lab.</figcaption></figure> <figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-144448" class="wp-caption alignnone" id="attachment_144448" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-144448">Reflow oven where Sobron showed off a custom PCB complete with the all-important Impossible Sensing logo.</figcaption></figure>

Dirty Lab for When They Get Serious About Making a Mess

One room is reserved as a “wet/dirty lab” for chemistry experiment type work. It used to be the kitchen of the former event space. There, they make test samples to replicate things like a soil sample from Mars or an oil sample for their oil & gas industry clients.

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-144451" class="wp-caption alignnone" id="attachment_144451" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-144451">Custom soil sample made on-site from mixing particular grains together and pressing them into a pellet.</figcaption></figure>

So Much Room!

Plus, there are optical benches and a lot of workspace to piece all those instruments together.

How is Making Stuff for Space Different Than for on Earth?

Sobron told us that for the most part, NASA only lets you use technology that’s already proven for space. This is true even if other, newer tech sounds like a way better idea.

Anything we fly to Mars today is obsolete. – Sobron

For example, with the case of liquid lenses, as used in SpectroGRID, those would be theoretically great to use instead of prone-to-breakage mechanical stages! Mechanical actuators are vulnerable components on Earth, let alone when going through a bit of rocket-grade turbulence. However, liquid lenses have never flown on a space mission, so they’re a much harder sell.

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-144433" class="wp-caption alignnone" id="attachment_144433" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-144433">Pablo Sobron, caught it the act balancing heritage and innovation.</figcaption></figure>

There’s a combination of heritage and innovation. NASA is cautious about innovation because in space there are no re-dos; your gizmo has to work right off the bat. – Pablo Sobron, PhD

When you build stuff for NASA, there’s a heritage chart you need to refer to. That shows NASA how much of your system you built from components that have flown on missions before (and survived) and how much of your sprocket is new innovation. Sobron tells us, “NASA is cautious about innovation because in space there are no re-dos; your gizmo has to work right off the bat.”

When the space agency does need to move up to a new grade of technology, they’ll order, say, 20 of something and test them all. The one that works the best after being mauled and abused in testing is the one that flies. The 2nd best working one is your backup, and the rest are toast.

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-144434" class="wp-caption alignnone" id="attachment_144434" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-144434">One of the devices in a midway stage of development at Impossible Sensing.</figcaption></figure>

The Technology Readiness Scale (TRL)

Of course, United States government agencies do leave room for more regular innovation! Projects moving through this graduation process are rated by a Technology Readiness Scale (TRL) that goes from 1-9. A project that’s at stage 1 is still in an early development phase. At 9, you’re ready to fly in a mission – whether combat or to Mars.

During the tour of Impossible Sensing, Sobron showed us some projects at “TRL 4” that they’re working on. These were pretty close to what they expect the final form factor to be, but they haven’t gone through rigorous environmental tests yet.

Tips from Sobron on Winning Government Contracts

When you submit a contracting bid, Sobron tells us you need to first ensure you don’t bore the person reading it to death. He takes care of this by investing a lot of brainpower into cool acronyms. The US government loves those things.

It also helps that Impossible Sensing employs a fulltime graphic designer to take care of all aspects of a bot’s image. From illustrations for proposals, to creative and unique housing designs to those glamor shots for the finished device, they got it all covered in-house. Oh, and also “Major Tom”. He’s the space suit Sobron had custom-designed to demonstrate the small scale of their instruments compared to people. That’s also important.

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-144435" class="wp-caption alignnone" id="attachment_144435" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-144435">Actual photograph of an Impossible Sensing device being used on Mars. Just kidding. Check out “Major Tom” doing his thing, though!</figcaption></figure>

In all seriousness, Sobron credits attention to these details to be one of the keys to getting noticed and winning contracts!

Would You Like Guidance from Pablo Sobron, PhD?

If you’re building an instrument that uses material sensing or other robotics sensing, or you’re applying for a government grant and want some tips from Pablo, you can book a 1-on-1 appointment with him for a limited time.

<figure aria-describedby="caption-attachment-144430" class="wp-caption alignnone" id="attachment_144430" style="width: 532px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" id="caption-attachment-144430">OddEngineer.com (which I’m to blame for creating) is a totally separate thing from Impossible Sensing. You can find expert guides (including Pablo Sobron) for many product development niches there.</figcaption></figure>

To do that, go to OddEngineer.com and look for him under the “Optical Engineering” category. Then, book and pay for your appointment. Easy peasy!

The post Tour: Inside R&D Startup and NASA Contractor – Impossible Sensing appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at January 28, 2021 06:36 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Six SOLIDWORKS Solutions- Startup

Six SOLIDWORKS solutions is a blog series which focuses on some of the typical problems I come across when working in support in PLMGroup

In this post I will focus on some of the errors you receive when you startup SOLIDWORKS.

These errors can easily fixed by yourself however some of them require the help of a person that is used to look in to the computer registry

Journal file could not be created.

This error message can occur when SOLIDWORKS is starting. it is not a serious problem but an annoying one. You press OK and can start to work but you have to do this EVERY single time

Journal file could not be created

Sometimes the issue can be that you are trying to start another instance of SOLIDWORKS and this is an unfortunate outcome of two running sessions.

If, however you have just started up your machine you know that this it the first SOLIDWORKS session you are running.

Then the issue is most likely one of the following issues:

  1. You do not have access or write permissions to the folder that SOLIDWORKS uses to record the session
  2. The session files in folder is damaged

Then my advice is to look closer into windows registry.

BE AWARE THAT DELETING OR EDITING THE WRONG REGISSTRY KEYS CAN CAUSE SERIOUS DAMAGE TO YOUR SYSTEM.

If you do not have experience with this, make sure that you speak to a person with some degree of experience with editing the registry

First you need to find the path of the session file.

To do this, press your windows button and type “regedit”, right click on the icon and press “run as administrator”

Find the path “HKEY_CURRENT_USER > software > SolidWorks > SolidWorks 20xx > ExtReferences” and locate the “SOLIDWORKS Journal folders” key. Double click on the “SOLIDWORKS Journal folders” key to determine the path to the journal folder.

For the sake of simplicity, I have name mine ”C:\SOLIDWORKSJOURNAL\SOLUTIONS”.

SOLIDWORKS SOLUTONS

After the path has been located it is quite simple to determine the cause:

No rights to write to the folder

In windows explorer, find the folder that is referred to, in the example ”C:\SOLIDWORKSJOURNAL\SOLUTION”, and right click on the folder to see if you have the needed rights to write to the folder. In this case it would be the “SOLUTION” folder

No access to the folder.

The issue can also occur if you do not have access to the folder. For the most parts, this occur if you have restored the settings from another user and the Journal file is located in a user folder for instance

C:\Users\<Username>\AppData\Roaming\SolidWorks\SOLIDWORKS 20XX (XX again being the version.

In this case you can either delete the ExtReferences path in the registry editor, or rename the key to a folder location you know you have access to.

Damaged Journal file

A damaged Journal file can occur if SOLIDWORKS has not shutdown properly,

This can be resolve by locating the folder that was given in the registry, find the file called “swxJRNL.swj” and delete it, this should resolve the issue

If not contact your VAR, as this could require further investigation

 

CAM error

When you star up SOLIDWORKS you get an error stating “Could not obtain license for SOLIDWORKS CAM. Invalid (Inconsistent) License Key”

Could not obtain CAM license

CAM standard is a Free add in for subscription users, which means that the actvation only applies for the duration of your subscription period.

After a renewal of your subcrtiption, the CAM license should be reactivated, and then the error message should not appear.

If you for some reason do not wish to renew your subscription, you can disable the add in by removing the checkmark under “add ins”

Disable CAM Add-inn

 

 

Stops at “splash screen”

This error is fairly new.
When starting SOLIDWORKS, you can see the splash screen and then it shuts down with no error message at all.

splash screen

If you experience this, please consider the following before contacting your local support department.

  1. are you using a laptop in a docking station?
  2. Are you using extended display

If the answer is yes to both of these questions, try one of the following:

  1. Disconnect from your docking station, start SOLIDWORKS and reconnect to your docking station
  2. Make sure that your external monitor is set to duplicated, and start SOLIDWORKS

If you are able to start SOLIDWORKS using one of these methods, the SPR 1195846 is the culprit.

For now the only workarounds are the ones given above.

If this does not help, contact your local support representative, as this might need further investigation.

Failed to initialize Visual basic

When starting SOLIDWORKS you might get the above message.

There are a few possibilities for this error, and I will go through the 3 most common solutions

The windows update

The most common is the windows update KB4048955, that has enabled the the combability mode for SOLIDWORKS.

To ensure that this is the issue, do the following:
1. Right click on your SOLIDWORKS icon, press Properties.

2. Find the “Compatibility” tab

3 Make sure that the “Run this program in Compatibility mode” is NOT checked

Combability mode

Next find the default installation folder (default is: “C:\Program Files\SOLIDWORKS Corp\SOLIDWORKS”)

FInd the “sldworks.exe” file, and make sure that this file does not run in Compatibility mode, as described above

Missing Temp Directory

This error can also appear if a temp directory is missing

To ensure that the temp directory is correct, find the “DiagnosticsReport.xml’ file in the RX package and locate the “TempDirectory” Element.

After the file path there is a “DriveType”, if this number is 3, then the system can find the folder.

see temp file
If it is 1, the folder cannot be found

To change this, you need to change the windows environment variable.
This is something your IT department should be able to help you with.

Insufficient rights or access

The last possibility I will look into her is insufficent permissions to write to “HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\SolidWorks”  (another registry key).

Please, with the assistance of your IT Department, ensure that you have write access to the above registry key.

And furthermore make sure that you have read access to “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\SolidWorks” as this is used to write to many of the keys in the “HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\SolidWorks” key

 

If the above suggestions does not help, please contact your local VAR for further trouble shooting

Could not obtain License for SOLIDWORKS

When you start SOLIDWORKS, you get the following error message:

could not obtain license for SOLIDWORKS standard

This error message is for the most part related to SOLIDWORKS Network License(SNL), and usually means that it is not possible to get a license from the license server.

This can happen to a number of reasons, most of them which I covered in this blogpost.

 

SOLIDWORKS is not enabled for your SOLIDWORKS ID

This error only applies if you are using an online license (for further information on Online license read here)

For the most part the online License runs smoothly, you can however come across these error message:

SOLIDWORKS is not enabled for yout SOLIDWORKS ID

For the most part, this can be resolved by doing the following:

  1. Browse to ‘C:\Users\<USER NAME>\AppData\Local\SolidWorks\Credentials
  2. find the ud.xml file
  3. delete it

location of udxml

 

If this does not resolve the issue, contact your VAR as further investigation is needed

 

Author information

Lennart Tinndahl
I started working with CAD systems in 2003, and have since 2012 worked solely with SOLIDWORKS. I am a certified Technical support specialist as well as a SOLIDWORKS Certified Expert. Since 2016 I have helped PLM Group customers to work smarter, not harder. The inspiration for most of my posts comes from the support cases i work on. When writing blogpost I try to focus on the everyday use of SOLIDWORKS.

The post Six SOLIDWORKS Solutions- Startup appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Lennart Tinndahl at January 28, 2021 04:00 PM

SolidSmack

Watch As This Artist Fills Broken Wall Structures With A 3D Filament Pen

3d filament building restoration

One of the biggest strengths of an artist is being able to see the world in a different light and to bring their vision into reality. Painters do it with brushes and a canvas. Musicians do it with instruments. But for a special artist in Korea, his medium of art comes in the form of a 3D filament pen.

Known only by his YouTube channel 3D SANAGO, this artist expresses his art using 3D filament pens. While most of his project are done in the comfort of his own home, he sometimes goes outside to fill out dilapidated public spaces with his art.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Qi_m0NXrccY?feature=oembed" title="90년된 건물 수리하기" width="770"></iframe>

Recently, our artist was commissioned by the city of Daejeon to work his 3D filament magic on a couple of broken segments in an old provincial office. And when I say “old”, I really mean OLD. This building was built back sometime during the Japanese occupation of Korea from 1910-1945. Armed with his iconic orange suitcase filled with his pen, filaments, and… a stuffed giraffe, he gets to work on adding some modern flavor to this ancient building.

3d filament building restoration

The two main segments he works on in this video are a couple of broken bricks located just a few feet above a normal human’s reach. He employs the use of a ladder to get to them and we soon see the use of the stuffed giraffe- it’s for keeping his bottom comfy while he works on the building!

3d filament building restoration

As soon as he’s nice and comfortable, our artist starts filling in the missing segments with his 3D filament pen. Just like his other public “restoration” projects, he traces the outline of the broken segments first. This not only provides a solid base for him to work on, but it allows the filament to stick to the building while it’s still hot (plus, y’ know… adding filament to a flat surface is way easier than suspending it over open-air).

3d filament building restoration

Upon finishing his first attempts at filling out the two spaces, he notices that he really doesn’t like the red color or the way they turned out. He removes these initial fillings and starts anew with some blue filament.

3d filament building restoration

Once the base is complete, he then starts working on adding the suspended lines to his art. As I mentioned earlier, adding filament to open-air is way harder than doing it on a surface since you have to take into consideration some factors like wind and gravity. Thankfully, he has a lot of experience working with 3D filaments and creates a single, crisscrossing line to fill out the open space left by the missing brick.

3d filament building restoration

The second segment is harder as there aren’t any edges on the bottom to work with. To remedy this, our artist employs the aid of a ruler as temporary support. He mentions that filaments also shrink as they cool down, so you have to carefully estimate how much of the material you want to use. To make the filaments stick in the air, he creates a number of bridges that helps support each other and prevent the whole thing from falling out.

3d filament building restoration

He doesn’t really “fix” the broken segments of the building, as a good storm could most likely wash his art away. But the whole point of this project isn’t to repair the building, it’s to showcase how the old and new can coexist harmoniously. With this goal in mind, I’d say he accomplished exactly what he set out to do.

There’s still a lot of work to be done on the building. Hopefully, he comes back to fill out the other broken parts of this old Daejeon provincial office.

The post Watch As This Artist Fills Broken Wall Structures With A 3D Filament Pen appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 28, 2021 09:44 AM

LEGO Vidiyo Lets You Become The Director of Your Very Own Music Videos

LEGO Vidiyo

Have you ever seen Michael Jackson’s iconic Thriller music video and said, “Hey! I can do that!” Well, with the advances in cinematography, special effects, and costume design since the video first came out in 1983, I’m pretty sure you can. But while a working adult such as yourself has access to the know-how and resources to make a music video (not to mention an actual budget), kids don’t have such luxury without the help of their parents.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FuLKhyzj8HI?feature=oembed" title="LEGO VIDIYO I NEW MUSIC VIDEO MAKER EXPERIENCE" width="770"></iframe>

Here enters LEGO Vidiyo – a music video-making experience that makes use of augmented reality and LEGO bricks to help kids slide into the crazy world of the music industry.

LEGO Vidiyo

It all starts with you (or more accurately, your kids) downloading the LEGO Vidiyo app onto your smart device. Once installed, you select one of many family-friendly songs from a variety of artists under the partnered Universal Music Group (such as Imagine Dragons and Marshmello) and begin your music video-making journey.

LEGO Vidiyo

Now, this is where it gets interesting. Using the same aforementioned app, you then scan a LEGO mini-figure to star in your music video followed by what LEGO calls “BeatBits”. These 2×2 bricks correspond to the different AR elements you want in your video. And if you want a specific filter or visual effect, simply scan a BeatBit. How about a new dance move for your minifig? There’s a BeatBit for that, too!

LEGO Vidiyo

Once you’ve scanned the BeatBits you want to use for your music video, you can now set the elements to the backdrop of your kitchen, backyard, or garage and have your kids dance away with a life-size replica of the minifig. You don’t really need to dance along with the music, as the LEGO minifig busts a move just fine, but it’s nice to give them some company. Edit the video afterward and voila! You’ve just become a music video director!

What’s even cooler about this is that while your kids can enjoy the edited videos locally, you can take a shot at fame and upload your music vids to the Vidiyo app and have complete strangers watch and rate them. And since this is a LEGO app, videos will have to first pass a strict moderation test before being uploaded. That means no privacy-breaching information or risqué business allowed! Sweet!

LEGO promises more information on their new music directing experience this coming March 1. We’ll be sure to post a follow-up once more details have been announced.

The post LEGO Vidiyo Lets You Become The Director of Your Very Own Music Videos appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 28, 2021 09:37 AM

January 27, 2021

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Results on Specific Assembly Components

Using assemblies in SOLIDWORKS Simulation can make things more difficult to view the results of the various plots.  Perhaps you only want to see results for specific components in your assembly.  There are techniques to view the results on selected components.

Here is a simple assembly with stress results.  We are most interested with the stress in the link.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Assembly Study

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Assembly Study

Show Plot Only on Selected Entities

One option is to create a new stress plot with the option to plot only on selected entities.  Here we choose the Body option and select the component.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Plot Only On Selected Entities

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Plot Only On Selected Entities

We can also change the Chart Options to update the Min/Max range of the colour chart to be the actual stress on the visible components.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Colour Chart Min/Max Range on Shown Parts Only

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Colour Chart Min/Max Range on Shown Parts Only

The disadvantage with this method is the need to create or edit plots for other components.  There would also need to be separate plots for Displacement, Factor of Safety, etc.

Perhaps you want to quickly review the existing plots for specific components.  With the ‘Show Min/Max Range’ option enabled, you can hide/show components within SOLIDWORKS and the existing plots will show results according to the graphical state of the model.  Just be aware that if a plot is currently being shown, hiding and showing components won’t automatically update in the plot.  You can regenerate the plot by hiding and showing the plot again, or activate another plot.

Isolate

Using the Isolate command is a quick way to hide all other components.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Isolate

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Isolate

You have the option to Exit Isolate mode from the pop-up dialog.

Exit SOLIDWORKS Isolate

Exit SOLIDWORKS Isolate

Display States

Using Display States is even better as it will give you quick access to switch between the hide/show states of all components.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Display States

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Display States

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation Results on Specific Assembly Components appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at January 27, 2021 04:39 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Manage CAD Data from Multiple Systems in a Single Product Development Environment

Most companies struggle to keep everyone on the same page—especially in product development. Sharing data across departments while simultaneously keeping it in sync is difficult and expensive in a singular CAD environment. Sharing data is even more complex in a company that has multiple CAD systems, which is becoming more and more common.

The Collaborative Designer roles on the 3DEXPERIENCE® platform enable you to manage product design data and documents in a cloud environment. Designs can be stored online, easily reused, and securely managed. Data cannot be lost or deleted by accident.

The 3DEXPERIENCE platform not only accommodates your internal team’s project work but also allows key customers, suppliers, and managers secure access to the data they need. The Collaborative Designer enables users of multiple CAD applications to contribute directly to a single product structure, eliminating the need to independently manage and combine separate, partial product structures.

Working under a change action with Creo Parametric data.

 

New Collaborative Designer Roles

There are new roles that connect even more CAD users to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. Companies that use Creo Parametric from PTC®, Inventor from Autodesk®, or Solid Edge from Siemens® can now manage and share their CAD data on the 3DEXPERIENCE cloud platform. These are in addition to the existing Collaborative Designer roles for SOLIDWORKS®, CATIA® V5, AutoCAD®, and DraftSight®.

The new Collaborative Designer roles provide direct integration from inside the CAD application, providing a seamless connection to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. All 3DEXPERIENCE solutions for design, simulation, manufacturing, and governance can leverage the data once it is on the platform. The role enables you to:

  •         Collaborate with all team members regardless of location
  •         Share designs and drawings via a browser-based application
  •         Work in the full 3D context of a multi-CAD product definition

Now you can maintain efficiencies even when product development resources reside in various locations.

People and Data in Sync

Using these new Collaborative Designer roles, design data becomes part of a full, model-based product definition, further enhancing designs using the multi-discipline portfolio of applications on the platform. This means one complete, holistic model serves all product development disciplines. These roles also support a rich set of 3DEXPERIENCE platform apps that maximize collaboration.

By connecting to the platform, designers can continue to work in their current CAD system while their design data becomes part of a unified product definition. The result is faster, more accurate product development. As designs change, the shared common data automatically updates so everyone across the enterprise remains in sync.

One Place for All

Collaboration is easier when the entire extended team is connected in a single environment. The platform enables spur-of-the-moment reviews of 3D models from any device, which helps speed turnaround times. Communications among team members are automatically tracked, so problems can be solved quickly.

Designs can be cleanly and efficiently handed off to colleagues or critical suppliers via the platform’s virtual product development environment.

Single Source of Truth

Advanced data management capabilities such as revision control, product maturity, permission management, and more are automatically enabled when you make design changes on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. The platform provides the technology infrastructure to manage product design data and documents.

With all the data in the same place, everyone is up to date with access to a single source of truth. This helps teams avoid the risk of being out of sync on model revisions or assembly configurations.

Collaborative Designer enables you to securely manage and share CAD data and access it from any location with an internet connection. All stakeholders are instantaneously up to date and can see the latest status at any time and at their convenience.

Learn More

Are you ready tosimplify your communication workflow and improve productivity? All the platform apps needed for design and collaboration are available within your own CAD environment. This enables diverse computing environments, so multiple teams can work on a singular product definition in a concurrent, safe, and real-time computing ecosystem.

For more information on these new roles and the other CAD Collaborative Designer roles for SOLIDWORKS, CATIA, DraftSight, and AutoCAD, click here. If you have more questions about the 3DEXPERIENCE platform or Collaborative Designer roles and would like to see a demo, please contact your local reseller.

Author information

Kurt Lundstedt
Kurt Lundstedt
Kurt is a Product Portfolio Manager for PDM Solutions at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS.

The post Manage CAD Data from Multiple Systems in a Single Product Development Environment appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Kurt Lundstedt at January 27, 2021 01:00 PM

January 26, 2021

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM Error: “Could not create folder. Cause: The file/key name was invalid.”

This article is part of a series for troubleshooting common, and perhaps not so common, SOLIDWORKS PDM error messages.

SOLIDWORKS PDM ERROR: “Could not create folder. Cause: The file/key name was invalid.”

This reported error can occur when executing a SOLIDWORKS PDM Template. The error is caused when a folder/file name being defined in the SOLIDWORKS PDM Template contains an invalid character. Later versions of SOLIDWORKS PDM will capture the invalid character, and prevent it from being used in the folder/file name

SOLIDWORKS PDM Invalid Character

Invalid Character

If the Template was created in an earlier version of SOLIDWORKS PDM, an invalid character may exist in the folder/file name defined in the PDM Template. In this situation, a user will receive the message “Could not create folder. Cause: The file/key name was invalid.”  when executing the PDM Template. Editing the PDM Template and removing the invalid character will resolve this issue.

Invalid characters for folder/file names include:

" (Double quote)
/ \ (Forward / Back slash)
: (Colon)
? (Question mark)
* (Asterisk)
< > (Smaller / Bigger than)
| (Pipe)
and any character created when pressing the CTRL key

This error message can also occur if the folder/file name is empty.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Error: “Could not create folder. Cause: The file/key name was invalid.” appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at January 26, 2021 01:58 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS Top Ten 3DEXPERIENCE World Voting Now Open

3DEXPERIENCE World 2021 is quickly approaching. This year’s all-virtual event will take place February 8-12, 2021.  As a result, the voting period for your favorite SOLIDWOKRS Top Ten ideas will end soon on February 1, 2021.  There are many Top Ten ideas that need your vote!  In fact, many ideas are only separated by one or two votes. That means, your vote may make a difference by helping your favorite idea reach Top Ten status!  That is important because historically, Top Ten ideas have a very high rate of implementation within SOLIDOWORKS products.

The 3DSwym Platform

The SOLIDWORKS Top Ten 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021 Community is hosted on the 3DSwym Platform! To participate, navigate to the SOLIDWORKS Top Ten 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021 Community.

Instructions to Login or Register

If you already have a 3DEXPERIENCE ID, you will need to use it to login.  Alternatively, you can use your customer portal login to access the SOLIDWORKS Top Ten 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021 Community.

If you don’t have either of these, you will need to click “Create your 3DEXPERIENCE ID” and provide the necessary information to register. Please be on the lookout for an email sent after registering that will ask you to validate your new 3DEXPERIENCE account.

How to vote

Learn how to vote on ideas by viewing the video in the How to Vote! Community article.

Important Dates

Idea Submission Open: November 10, 2020 – January 4, 2021

Voting Open: January 4 – February 1, 2021

3DEXPERIENCE World: February 8-12, 2021

Commenting

If you don’t like an idea—or even if you do, but have something to say about it—please comment on that idea’s post.  This helps our SOLIDWORKS team understand different points of view when reviewing submissions for further consideration.

Some of the ideas

Here’s just a few ideas for which you may wish to vote or comment:

Enhance Functionality of Selection Sets

Copy of a BOM with linked Item Number

Option to maintain Draft angle within Mid-Plane Extrusion

Combine Chamfer and Fillet into a single feature

Enable Layer Functionality in parts and assemblies

We look forward to see which of your ideas make it into the final SOLIDWORKS Top Ten at 3DEXPERIENCE World 2021.

 

Author information

Matt Lorono
Product Definition Manager at SolidWorks Dassault Systemes
Applying two decades of engineering field experience to improve and create new SOLIDWORKS products

The post SOLIDWORKS Top Ten 3DEXPERIENCE World Voting Now Open appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Matt Lorono at January 26, 2021 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Watching A 100-Ton Hydraulic Press Crush Objects Is Oddly Satisfying

hydraulic presss ASMR

Though its main purpose is to flatten things to make them easier to work with, hydraulic presses have a secondary function where it serves as a very entertaining piece of machinery.

I doubt anyone ever grows out of watching things get crushed under excessive amounts of force, and while this isn’t quite the same as using your ten-speed bike to run over soda cans, the premise is still very much the same.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kgwUh8wnTbo?feature=oembed" title="100 TON HIDRAULIC PRESS VS VARIOUS ITEMS" width="770"></iframe>

Crazy Hidraulic Press is a YouTube channel solely dedicated to crushing things with a 100-ton hydraulic press. Using a variety of different tool attachments, you can see how different materials react when they come into contact with too much force.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FDvCYUKSfhk?feature=oembed" title="100 TONS PRESS VS 1000 SHEETS OF PAPER" width="770"></iframe>

Objects made from wood and paper are a no-brainer. The hydraulic press doesn’t have to exert too much effort for them to rip apart and send splinters and bits of paper flying everywhere.

hydraulic presss ASMR

Playing cards deserve a special mention, as pressing a stack of them with a guillotine attachment results in a neat V-shaped card valley. If you make the guillotine thinner, you can fill the whole room with flying cards!

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ii6jguvaFP0?feature=oembed" title="HIDRAULIC PRESS VS STEEL BALL" width="770"></iframe>

When you put something with a higher density against a hydraulic press, the results become way more interesting.

Just see what happens when you press a 100% steel ball. You wouldn’t expect such an object to bend or crumble so easily due to its material and geometry, but the hydraulic press doesn’t seem to care – it just keeps doing its job and flattens this bad boy into a pancake.

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Pressing a bulletproof ceramic plate comes with different results. The hydraulic press can definitely flatten out the curves in the vest which makes it wearable, but you can already hear the ceramic start to creak under the pressure.

Things get more dangerous once you slap on a smaller circular press attachment and increase the pressure. While the ceramic plate was made to withstand bullet shots, anything packing more force than a standard handgun bullet (i.e. a 100-ton hydraulic press) just shatters the plate and sends shards flying everywhere.

The Crazy Hidraulic Press YouTube channel has been up since March of last year, which falls just about the same time the world started going into quarantine. I guess crushing objects with a hydraulic press is one way to cure boredom; plus it makes for some great ASMR!

The post Watching A 100-Ton Hydraulic Press Crush Objects Is Oddly Satisfying appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 26, 2021 09:03 AM

Will SawStop Table Saws Protect Your Hotdogs From Workshop Accidents?

SawStop hotdog test

You can never go wrong with workshop safety. When you’re working with heavy-duty machinery and sharp objects, it’s always best to think of your wellbeing.

SawStop is a table saw manufacturer that cares about the safety of people. It has been making table saws safe since 2000. Hidden inside these seemingly common-looking table saws is an automatic brake system that activates whenever your skin comes into contact with the blade. Thanks to the current which passes through the blade, any contact with a conductive surface (i.e. your skin) triggers an aluminum brake to halt the blade and stop the motor.

But just how safe is a SawStop table saw? To find it out, woodworker and inventor Jonathan Katz-Moses takes a bunch of Nathan’s hotdogs and drives them through a SawStop. With the aid of some high definition, slow motion cameras, we can see just how a SawStop works and if it really is as safe as they say it is.

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For this experiment, Jonathan does nine SawStop activations: six with a 10-inch blade and three with an eight-inch dado blade (which, as he mentions, is illegal in the UK since you need to remove the guard and riving knife in order to use them). He also uses a 5-horsepower table saw, which is one of the more powerful saws SawStop has.

Start With The 10-inch Blade

SawStop hotdog test

Before he can get to the illegal blade, Jonathan wants to first test out the 10-inch blade. By propping a hotdog on a piece of wood and carefully passing it through the table saw, you can see how the SawStop tech works.

As soon as the hotdog interrupts the 3-volt current passing through the blade, the computer within sends electricity through a fuse wire which activates the roughly 2-pound aluminum brake inside the table saw. At the same time, the motor powering the sawmill stops and the blade is retracted into the table saw to prevent further injury. Take note that all this happens in a fraction of a second, and without the slow-motion camera, you wouldn’t be able to see any of this at all.

So How’s The Damage?

SawStop hotdog test

But seeing the SawStop in action isn’t all we’re here for. What we want to see is if the hotdog suffered any damage.

Apart from a small nick where the blade made contact, the hotdog doesn’t seem any worse for wear. You might get a small cut if this was your finger instead of a ballpark snack, but you’ll live to point at things another day.

But What If You’re Moving At A Faster Pace?

SawStop hotdog test

Not content with the results, Jonathan wants to see what would happen if he would push a hotdog at full force towards the saw blade.

The blade cuts deep this time, cutting off a good 1/8th of an inch. While Jonathan mentions that he was giving the push all he had, this would still be a painful experience if it was your finger that was cut. Sure you might recover after a few stitches, but you could still suffer permanent nerve damage from such a cut.

Now For The Illegal Blade

SawStop hotdog test

Happy that he has managed to slice some hotdogs with the 10-inch blade, Jonathan can now move to the eight-inch dado blade. For this particular experiment, he uses a bigger aluminum brake to compensate for the more powerful blade. He props a hotdog against a piece of wood, runs it towards the sawblade and…

SawStop hotdog test

Wow! The larger brake was so powerful it even broke parts of the dado blade it didn’t come into contact with. This is due to the g-forces the brake had to immediately grind to a halt. You definitely won’t be working with this blade once the aluminum brake is done with it, but you’ll be happy you still have working fingers on your hand.

It’s a shame the dado blade broke, as Jonathan wasn’t able to do a second test in which he rams a hotdog at the blade at full force. Still, it’s nice to know the SawStop safety features work! Just make sure you aren’t running full speed around the workshop when your table saw is turned on.

The post Will SawStop Table Saws Protect Your Hotdogs From Workshop Accidents? appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 26, 2021 08:55 AM