Planet SolidWorks

May 29, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS PDM Automatic Notification Editor

A SOLIDWORKS PDM Notification can be added from the Local Vault, so that the logged in user will receive a message when a predefined event occurs to a file or folder. To set up these Notifications, right-click on the file or folder and select Notify.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Notify Options

SOLIDWORKS PDM Notify Options

Predefined Notifications

There are some predefined triggers, such as when the logged in user check’s file in or out. Notifications can also be triggered, when a file touches a predefined State.

Waiting for Approval

Waiting for Approval

Notify Me

Notify Me, offers the same options as other pull-down items but in in addition there are options to restrict Notifications, to the file creator or the user that changed State last time.

Select File Notification Type

Select File Notification Type

My Notifications

My Notifications, allows users to create, edit and control multiple Notifications. Individual Notifications are set up the same way as with Notify Me.

Notification Editor

Notification Editor

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS PDM

Attend the SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration course in a Canadian classroom near you or live online.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Automatic Notification Editor appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at May 29, 2017 12:00 PM

May 27, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Create Your Own Customized Color Swatch in SOLIDWORKS

When you add colors to your SOLIDWORKS files, you can select colors from a standard color palette like this one:

Color_swatch

But quite often users want to add their own custom colors. This could be company specific colors or colors based on the international color standard RAL. In the case of RAL it is quite easy to find RGB color codes, which can be entered in SOLIDWORKS to define the desired RAL color. As long as you do not create a custom color swatch it could be a time-consuming task to define your color each time. So, in this tech blog I want to show you how to create your own custom color swatch, which will save you a lot of time when adding color to your parts.

Step-by-step process

1. In the Color PropertyManager, select Create New Swatch Color swatch.

2. Enter a name for your custom color swatch and click Save.

Tip: you can change the file location for your color swatches in Tools-Options-File Locations.

3. Next you will see that the color swatch is added and that the swatch is empty.

color swatch

4. Now we can start to fill our color swatch. Just choose a color or enter a RGB code. After that you select Add Current Color to Swatch .

5. Repeat step 4 until your color swatch is complete. In case you want to remove a color from your swatch, just select Remove Selected Swatch Color .

Conclusion

Now you know how to create your own custom color swatches in SOLIDWORKS, you will be able to color your parts fast and in the right color. Also, the possibility to share one color swatch with all your colleagues is a big advantage to meet your company standards.

Written by Martijn Visser

Author information

CAD2M
CAD2M is certified reseller of SOLIDWORKS, SolidCAM, DriveWorks and our private label dddrop 3D printer. The CAD2M approach integrates this range of products into an all-in-one solution that covers the complete product development process. Take the full advantage of working in 3D with our advice, training and expertise. For more information, visit www.cad2m.nl.

The post Create Your Own Customized Color Swatch in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CAD2M at May 27, 2017 03:00 PM

May 26, 2017

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Coffee Chugger

danny-isles-art

As wide as four kegs strapped to the back of a molasses swamp hippopotamus, he trudged atop the thin film of earth wrinkling it between twelve toes at the end of a joint on a single leg. By size and agility, he was no match, but we knew his weakness–the excess intake of sun-scorched coffee beans, ground in these links.

Daniel Isles – Oh boy. The results of a 365 day sketch challenge with robots, cyborgs, androids, that serve as perfect models for his ultra-tech design style.

Google AutoML – Google’s AI is better than its own engineering team at creating networks for image and speech recognition tasks…

AI Paint – But maybe AI has a way to go if this experiment in AI created paint colors is any evidence, even though the paint names are fabulous.

Plants + Tech – Animator Sasha Katz created some lovely animated isometric illutration blending technology and plantlife, shared on here Instagram with other great illustrations.

Entomology – If you enjoy close-up, highly details photographs of exotic insects, you’ll enjoy Francesco Bagnato’s work.

Claybook – An incredible looking new physics-driven game from Second Order where each page is a new moldable, formable clay-like world.

Our Solar System – Beautiful poster series from Justin Van Genderen featuring the planets of our Solar System (except Pluto).

Pull the Trigger – Nifty new animated video from Flux Pavilion featuring vox from Cammie Robinson, directed by Popsicle Illusion.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/d86luPyzEUw?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The post Friday Smackdown: Coffee Chugger appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at May 26, 2017 11:10 PM

Affordable Clay 3D Printing with ClayXYZ

clayxyz-clay-3d-printer-00

A startup company has launched a 3D printer specifically designed for clay 3D printing. ClayXYZ, found currently on Kickstarter, has developed a simple and low cost 3D printer that prints just clay. But it’s not any clay, it’s the commonly available “air hardening clay” that doesn’t require firing in a furnace as most clay does.

This obviously simplifies the process: 3D print the clay object and then wait for it to cure naturally, usually within 24 hours. This clay can be re-used easily by simply soaking it in water again to produce a slurry suitable for extrusion. Of course, this won’t work if you’ve glazed the object.

The 3D printed clay objects can be finished in traditional ways, such as sanding and glazing.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86750" style="width: 800px;">Hand glazing a 3D print from the ClayXYZ desktop 3D clay printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Hand glazing a 3D print from the ClayXYZ desktop 3D clay printer</figcaption></figure>

That’s important because the resolution of this clay printer is not particularly fine; you can clearly see layer lines on all of the print samples.

But I think that is acceptable for this type of print: the texture may actually be an artistic feature in some cases. If not, it is easily dealt with by sanding and/or glazing.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Hy5HWHWUfe8?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

One very interesting capability of this device is that the prints could potentially be used in foodsafe environments, unlike virtually all of the plastic 3D prints you might find. With a glazed exterior surface, you could easily find yourself eating off a 3D printed clay plate.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86751" style="width: 800px;">The extrusion system on the ClayXYZ desktop 3D clay printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The extrusion system on the ClayXYZ desktop 3D clay printer</figcaption></figure>

The technology used here is based around an air compressor, which is used to “perfectly remove bubbles” from the wet clay. This obviously improves output quality. It also seems that their extrusion system could be mounted on other 3D printers.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86752" style="width: 1100px;">Some sample vase prints from the ClayXYZ 3D clay printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Some sample vase prints from the ClayXYZ 3D clay printer</figcaption></figure>

However, their own device offers a reasonable print volume of 210 x 200 x 180mm, and a 0.6mm nozzle for clay extrusion. This coarse printing will also speed up print times considerably.

The input material cylinder can hold about 15cc’s of clay, providing an upper limit to what you can print. Some will be “lost” in the plumbing, and not make it to the nozzle, so capacity will be somewhat less. However, it is unclear whether they offer a “restart” capability to reload and resume printing on larger objects.

The price of the ClayXYZ device is USD$749, which seems to me to be sufficient to feasibly run a business of this type, lowering the possibility of company failure, which we’ve seen all too often recently.

The ClayXYZ 3D printer could be a nice addition to a workshop, as it could produce different types of objects.

Read more at Fabbaloo!

The post Affordable Clay 3D Printing with ClayXYZ appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at May 26, 2017 10:12 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip: Compare Documents Command

Often times parts vary slightly in design, which can result in different geometry. The Compare Documents command is used to compare the document properties, the features used, the geometry itself, or a bill of materials between two documents in SOLIDWORKS. Because the documents can be so closely compared, it helps identify areas that may cause mechanical issues based on differences in the design geometry. This is an especially great tool for comparing imported geometry to a repaired or modified version of a design. Check out the video below to learn more!

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NmR6dYKQrcE?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

 

Want to see more SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips? Check out our playlist on YouTube to catch up on past videos or you can even jump ahead to the next video!

Do you have a suggestion for the next Tech Tip? Tell us in the comments; we’d love to hear your ideas!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip: Compare Documents Command appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at May 26, 2017 09:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Managing SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Search Favorites

In SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional, users can set up custom Search Favorites to dramatically speed up the process of finding relevant files.  This is great functionality that can be a huge time saver, however, sometimes things can get a little out of hand and Search Favorites can become too much of a good thing.

“They’re all my favorite”

Editing and Deleting SOLIDWORKS PDM Search Favorites

While creating Search Favorites is a pretty easy process, deleting, or editing the existing Search Favorites isn’t quite as clear.  In fact this cannot be done through the integrated Search within the vault view.  Search Favorites can only be managed through the standalone PDM Search Tool.

To launch the Search Tool, click the drop arrow beside the Search icon on the PDM toolbar in the vault view and select the “Search Tool …

Access the Search Tool

Access the Search Tool

In the standalone PDM Search Tool, it’s possible to right-click on each Search Favorite in the list and either edit Properties, or Delete the Search Favorite entirely.

Edit or Delete SOLIDWORKS PDM Search Favorites

Edit or Delete Search Favorite

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS PDM

Attend our Using SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Training Course either in a Canadian classroom near you or live online.

The post Managing SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Search Favorites appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at May 26, 2017 12:00 PM

May 25, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

“Fix” Your Fixtures

Since its infancy, CAD has been a tool for engineers and designers alike. Analogous to going to your tool box and getting something to remove a bolt, you will usually have several options to choose from. Will a ratchet be best for this situation? Maybe a pair of pliers? Each condition and the environment in which the bolt is in will determine the best solution… Sometimes, we just need to reach for the torch and sledge hammer!

This being the case, I thought I’d share a few methods I’ve uncovered over the past 25 years utilizing 3D parametric CAD, specifically to design jigs and fixtures.

Method 1- 3D Printed Parts

Most of us have access to either a 3D printer and/or a 2.5 axis CNC router. These machines are priceless when it comes to taking something that is virtual in SOLIDWORKS and making them in reality. This is by far the most common practice we see today to achieve this. In a few short hours, very precise and custom fixturing can be brought to life with a simple click of a print button. SOLIDWORKS has many features available to assist in creating these very important components. My personal favorites are listed below:

Creating Multibody Part in Preparation

Following the Combine Operation, Offset Surface can be used to adjust the fixture as necessary.

Method 2- Templates

Complex Bend-Steel Tubing

Route Check fixture on CNC.

MDF/Plywood usually works fine. I’ve even used high density foam, and HTPE. Basically, whatever you have available will suffice. Note: Be sure the surface won’t catch fire!!! Wood and red hot steel don’t work well together.

What about those insane junctions on welded frames? Fisheye cuts, not a problem!

Insane Junction

Individual tube derived to generate dxf or full scale drawing

Full Scale drawing

Simply cut this template out with scissors, and wrap around your tube. Trace curves with a Sharpe. Remove material with tool of your choosing. Repeat for back side of tube. Small hash marks can be embossed on the tube to aide in clocking angles in the event one side is rotated relative to the first cut.

Method 3- Purchased Fixturing Systems

My third method is a little heavier on the pocket books, but is a great solution for professional applications. I have firsthand experience using these systems. They can be used early on the design process to fabricate prototypes, and on the backside as a quality control check fixture. You can tear em down….and build them back the same way 2 years later. Think of the possibilities, not to mention the floor space you can save by getting rid of all those versions of fixture templates!

The concept is simple. Create a library of 3D components, that reflect what the shop has available. A precise 3D model of the fixturing table usually provides mounting holes, or a common coordinate system between a scanner, SOLIDWORKS, and the fixturing table in the shop will do the job as well.

You ultimately decide how to get the information from a virtual environment, to a real one. Traditional drawings can be used to locate the items. However, MBD remains top on my list of next generation graphical communication for engineering.

Bluco, the manufacturer of the system I used, is a common option when looking to purchase these types of items.

Bluco Fixturing system

And after all this… YOU STILL BETTER HAVE ONE HECK OF A WELDER!

For those of you readers that have additional ideas, I’d love for you to share them. I believe the more creative we think in these respects, the more powerful the technology we have access to will become.


By: Rob Stoklosa • SOLIDWORKS Application Engineer • TPM

Author information

TPM
TPM, Inc. is the Carolina’s largest 3D CAD provider and a leading technology company proud of its reputation of providing cutting-edge solutions to the engineering and design community for the past 40 years. Founded in 1973, TPM Inc. serves more than 3,000 customers across the Southeast each year. Inspired by our founder, Jerry Cooper, we are committed to offering our clients the best: 3D Design Software, 3D Printing and Scanning Options, Data and Document Management Solutions, Large-Format Graphics, Wide-Format Plotters and Office Equipment, and Reprographics.

The post “Fix” Your Fixtures appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by TPM at May 25, 2017 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS MBD How-To Video Series (Part 1)

Would you like to show off some 3D models with annotations to your friends who don’t have SOLIDWORKS installed? Check out several cool 3D PDF samples of a miter saw assembly and a housing assembly published by SOLIDWORKS Model-Based Definition. Your friends can just open them with Adobe Reader, click on “trust this document” to view the 3D content. For more detailed 3D PDF instructions, please watch this video. You are also welcome to join the discussions on the user forum.

The next natural question is how to publish these 3D PDF documents yourself. To answer this question, Chris Pagliarini recently shared his SOLIDWORKS MBD experiences in a four-video series: Define 3D annotations, Organize 3D annotations, Customize 3D PDF templates, and Publish 3D PDF.
This part 1 video shown below shares how to:

  • Set up SOLIDWORKS MBD for your specific workflows.
  • Define location dimensions, size dimensions, and geometric tolerances.
  • Specify continuous features, intersection geometries and patterns.
  • Edit call-out styles.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/S3N88IqPIaE?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

I hope you enjoyed this tutorial. Please share your feedback in the comment area below. To learn more about SOLIDWORKS MBD, please watch the 22-minute webcast below and visit its product page.

Author information

Oboe Wu
Oboe Wu
Product portfolio manager of SOLIDWORKS MBD, passionate about smart manufacturing opportunities, Keen listener to customer challenges, Sharp problem solver with 20 years of experiences in engineering, Sleepless father trying best to take care of a baby daughter.

The post SOLIDWORKS MBD How-To Video Series (Part 1) appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Oboe Wu at May 25, 2017 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS No Solve Move vs Detach Segment on Drag [VIDEO]

I’ve occasionally run into the issue where a user sketches a closed shape, such as a rectangle, only to find that when they drag an edge of the rectangle that the rectangle falls apart The top line appears to detach itself from the rest of the rectangle. This can be caused by one of two settings. Both can be found in the Tools > Sketch Settings menu.

SOLIDWORKS no solve move

Rectangle fallen apart after dragging a line

SOLIDWORKS No Solve Move

The first is called SOLIDWORKS no solve move. Although this technically does something different, if can manifest itself in this way. No Solve Move will allow you to move sketch entities in a sketch while ignoring their sketch relations. It prompts you to delete the sketch relations if you drag an entity. If you say no, you get a copy of the entity. I demonstrate this in the video. In the case of the rectangle, though, the corners don’t have sketch relations to delete. It allows the specific entity to move with adjusting the other entities since it isn’t solving the new lengths.

Detach Segment on Drag

The second method is the Detach Segment on Drag. With this method, it truly does what it says. When you move a sketch entity, it detaches its endpoints and moves independently of other sketch entities. I show this in the video as well. Unlike with No Solve Move, this method continues to respect the sketch relations.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MABbovngwwc?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

As you can see, both methods produce the same effect on the rectangle, so if you are seeing this on your sketch, it could be either setting. This is a system setting, so it will apply on other documents that you may be editing or new parts you create. It is, however, specific to the TYPE of file you are editing. For instance, if you change the setting while a part file is open, the setting will be unchanged in a drawing file.

The post SOLIDWORKS No Solve Move vs Detach Segment on Drag [VIDEO] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Jim Peltier, CSWE at May 25, 2017 12:00 PM

May 24, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Static electricity explained using EMS for SOLIDWORKS [VIDEO]

I am sure you have experienced a static electric shock especially on a dry winters day. You probably know this as static electricity. For some people this is extremely annoying but for some others it could be fun. Maybe you wondered why this happens. In this blog post, I will attempt to explain it using EMS, a multi-purpose simulation package for electro-mechanical applications.

Static Electricity Simulation

Static Electricity Simulation

The Static Electricity Phenomenon

You may be thinking that the shock occurs only if you touch a metallic surface like a door knob. Unfortunately, even if you go close enough you could experience a shock. Imagine your finger approaching a door knob, you have been walking on a carpeted surface with your rubber soled shoes. By the time you approach the knob, your body has enough charge generated from the constant rubbing of your shoes on the carpet. This charge distributes throughout your body especially at the sharp extremities like a finger tip. What happens when your finger is at a distance from the knob? And what happens as the distance keeps decreasing?

Simulating a Static Shock

We have created a demonstration video to explain what happens to the electric field in the air space between a finger and the metallic knob, this phenomenon is known as a static shock.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SIwRo2HOgAw?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

As your finger is moved closer to the knob, the charge in your finger creates an electric field. This by itself is no big deal if the strength of the electric field is less than the breakdown voltage of air which is about 3e6 V/m. In the region where the electric field exceeds this value, a breakdown occurs. This means that this region acts like a conductor (yes, air which is normally an insulator can be made a conductor if you produce an electric field greater than the breakdown). As the finger is moved closer to the knob, the breakdown region enlarges and at one point coincides with the conductor (metallic knob). When this happens, the charges from your finger happily moves to the knob creating a current. This leads to a static electric shock.

How EMS can help

EMS can help you predict breakdown in your electrical devices. This is highly beneficial for high voltage industry like manufacturers of high voltage insulators, transmission cables etc used in power transmission. By using EMS, you can drastically reduce the need for expensive field testing and there have been instances where customers have even eliminated field testing during product development phase.
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The post Static electricity explained using EMS for SOLIDWORKS [VIDEO] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Arvind Krishnan at May 24, 2017 08:42 PM

SolidSmack

6 Exploded Product Animation Examples (And Why We Love Them So Much)

3d-exploded-view-product-visuals-00

Don’t you hate how Kickstarter ruined the ukulele for all of us? I used to love that instrument. I never had an opinion about baby xylophones either but I do now–hate em. When I see b-roll of a busy bearded man, in a busy coffee shot, in a busy city accompanied by an upbeat ukulele, I see red. Red, because I eye-roll my corneas to the back of my head. Call me a hater but heck! Isn’t it a bit patronizing when a commercial tries to shoehorn you limp-wristed into the plot with bland visuals and the strum of four strings?

ryan-gosling-ukelele

Nice try, Mr. Gosling. Before implying the inextricable shame we’ll feel without their product, using a name that lost a vowel near the end, each of these commercials ironically asks us–what if things could be different? Well, we’re better than that. And if it’s a sign that companies are catching on, the product visuals we’re starting to see more of focus on the product, the detail and the passion that goes into the product development process.

Cue the music (sans ukulele)! Let’s take a look at some examples of high production product animations that look like intros to Netflix originals.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/TLLsTef0jzw?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ifZXp2geVKI?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2kahHl3gCDI?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WVPRkcczXCY?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/151504971" title="Duality - Razer Blade Stealth" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="500"></iframe>

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/168676100" title="Razer ManO'War" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="500"></iframe>

I love these kinds of commercials. Especially ones that have cool auto-focus exploded views of product internals and design details. Ahhhh. They get me excited, I love the details and the technical execution but as an industrial designer who now works in VFX, I’m biased and not necessarily the main target audience for these products so I spoke to the team at CUM creative agency to ask what goes in the recipe.

Cristian Spagnuolo is a VFX supervisor at Cum. m + d, a creative agency that works out of Singapore and Australia. He was part of the team that created the commercials for Razer linked above. Cristian says these commercials perfectly reflect the Razer target customer: hardcore gamers. They want to see something exciting, powerful, and dynamic. He credits their success by adding a touch of magic with a strong technical side.

People love seeing how things work, and through that, they see the value in what they are paying for… you’re reminding your audience that you aren’t buying a simple piece of plastic, but rather, something much more valuable.”

A strong technical side is a talking point in this. These commercials are a result of studying the target audience which describes a more technically affluent client base. Tan Wen Hao, co-founder of Cum. m + d explains precisely why it hits their demo and why we love them so much. “People love seeing how things work, and through that, they see the value in what they are paying for… you’re reminding your audience that you aren’t buying a simple piece of plastic, but rather, something much more valuable.”  It is interesting to the viewer and an opportunity for Razer to show off all the effort that went into their products.

Gennaro Esposito, lead 3D artist for Razer’s commercials linked above and founder of Digital Shark, points out that product commercials like these are highly accurate because they are the stars of the show. Faking any details would silly because users would know.

From a design and engineering standpoint, these commercials show the thought and detail put into a product and give the user an appreciation of the process. One reason why we love process videos showing how something is made, whether completely handcrafted or concept sketch to CAD to CNC. The products are more than pretty pictures that have been eye-humped to exhaustion, and companies realizing this see the value in providing more detail in their product visuals. And, ya know, it’s a little bit of a subtle shout-out to the designers and engineers behind the scenes that make it all happen.

Have any good examples you’ve seen? Tired of ukuleles too? Share in the comments!

The post 6 Exploded Product Animation Examples (And Why We Love Them So Much) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Lauren Thomas at May 24, 2017 08:37 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

WARNING: SOLIDWORKS Resources Running Low

Warning: SOLIDWORKS System Resources Running Low

This blog is for those unlucky individuals working in SOLIDWORKS are persistently annoyed by this message.

You check the Task Manager, only to find that there are still plenty of RAM left; not even at 50% capacity. Most of the time, you are likely to ignore or dismiss this message and just continue working. However, if this message turns into “Available system memory is Critically Low” then we are at a risk of the application crashing.

In this article, couple of suggestions will be made which will help prevent these messages from appearing, and hopefully avoid the inevitable crashes due to insufficient system memory. The resource monitor does not pin point what’s causing the lack of memory/resource. It could be any of or combination of GDI Objects, RAM and VRAM shortage.

WARNING: SOLIDWORKS Resources Running Low

1. GDI Objects Limit

GDI Objects (Graphics Device Interface) is a core windows component responsible for representing graphical objects and outputting them to devices such as printers or monitors.

For every window or application that is open, it uses up GDI Objects. The problem arises when there are too many objects are in use and causes unresponsive program behavior. This is also what may trigger the lack of system resources. For Windows 8 and later, the system wide GDI Objects are limited to max out at 65,536; and the maximum  single process is 16,384.

The default limit set by Windows for any single process is 10,000 GDI objects. If your application GDI Objects exceeds this amount, that process is likely to crash.

SOLIDWORKS should not require more than the default limit of 10,000.  If you observe over 10,000 GDI objects after following the below steps to monitor GDI usage, contact your local Value Added Reseller (VAR) for assistance troubleshooting this and reporting to SOLIDWORKS Support.

You can monitor this through the Task Manager.

  1. Open Task Manager (right click on start bar > Task Manager OR through CTRL+ALT+DEL)
  2. Click on ‘Details’ Tab
  3. Right click on one of the columns and click on ‘Select Columns’
  4. Tick the GDI objects

WARNING: SOLIDWORKS Resources Running Low
Suggested Solution:

This solution will involve editing the Windows Registry.

Disclaimer: Modifying the registry can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. We cannot guarantee that problems resulting from modifications to the registry can be solved. Use the information provided at your own risk.

As mentioned before, the windows by default sets the GDI Objects limit for a single process to be 10,000. However the maximum allowed is 16,384. By increasing this limit in the registry, it will give any given application more room to breathe.

  1. Open Regedit (via Run > type ‘regedit’)
  2. Locate to the key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Windows\GDIProcessHandleQuota
  3. Right click on the ‘GDIProcessHandleQuota’ and click ‘Edit’.
  4. Change the registry key to the maximum process limit 16,384; set the BASE to DECIMAL.

WARNING: SOLIDWORKS Resources Running Low
2. Virtual Memory

Another major cause for insufficient system memory could be due to virtual memory of Windows.

Virtual memory, also known as Page File is a memory combination of RAM and a portion of your hard drive disk. Whenever your system runs out of physical RAM, Windows will make use of the Page File to temporarily store files and swap back to the physical RAM when it is freed.

By default, your virtual memory (page file) managed by windows. Custom Size allows you to set the size of the page file. As a general guide, the maximum size of the paging file should be 2 times the amount of physical RAM installed on the machine.

How to set custom sized virtual memory:

WARNING: SOLIDWORKS Resources Running Low

  1. System > Advanced System Settings > Advanced (Tab) > Settings..
  2. Advanced (Tab) > Change..
  3. Untick ‘automatically manage paging file size for all drives
  4. Choose the Drive you would like to utilize Virtual Memory on. (eg. My workstation only had C:\ which is the SSD)
  5. Choose Custom size button
  6. Enter the Initial size value of 2 times the amount of physical RAM installed in your system (eg. If you have 16GB, type in 32000MB.)
  7. Enter Maximum size value same as the initial size.
  8. Press ‘Set’
  9. Restart your workstation.

WARNING: SOLIDWORKS Resources Running Low

Author information

NCCS Australia
N C CAD CAM SYSTEMS, Authorised SOLIDWORKS Reseller in Victoria, Australia. Over 20 years, we have offered CAD/CAM and manufacturing solutions to thousands of Australian and New Zealand companies.

The post WARNING: SOLIDWORKS Resources Running Low appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by NCCS Australia at May 24, 2017 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

How Swissomation Delivers Precision Manufacturing Using Fusion 360

swisomation-fusion-360-00

Sponsored by
Autodesk Fusion 360

I’m not sure what you think when you hear the term ‘precision manufacturing’ but when I saw the 7+ axis micro-machining capabilities of Swissomation, I was completely floored. They take precision to the ultimate level.

The company has over 70 years of experience working with some of the largest manufacturers in the U.S. They have locations in Texas and Virginia with machines that can take on the smallest parts and most intricate prototype, up to millions of units for a production run.

They used Fusion 360 for the modeling, but Fusion 360’s integrated CAM and collaboration capabilities have optimized their process and changed the way they’re able to interact with and get feedback from customers.

I talked with Swissomation President, Christian Welch, to find out more.

SolidSmack: What is at the core of what Swissomation is all about?
Christian Welch: So the mission for us is to make top quality parts for our customers. Not just as a supplier, but to really work with our customers. The ideal customer for us is one we can work with on a long-term basis. We’re not the kind of “get in, make money, get out” type of business. I really enjoy working with clients who need help with engineering, and the engineering side is my passion. Prototypes and production runs are our bread and butter, but helping people grow their business, helping people succeed, is one of my favorite parts of my job, and what I would say is at our core.

SS: What’s unique about the approach Swissomation takes to machining and prototyping?
CW: It’s really a commitment to customer service, as well as the quality in our abilities. We’ve got machines to cover a range of needs. You’ll see an image of a dime with dozens of parts on it. What sets us apart is the capabilities we have to make parts where you can put 10,000 in the palm of your hand all the way up 10 inches.

swisomation-fusion-360-01

There’s a wide range of sizes we can handle. The Texas facility specializes in tiny parts up to 1/2″. The Virginia shop specializes in parts from 1/4″ up to 1-5/8″. So we work together very closely to be specialists. Not a ‘jack of all trades’ for everybody but to really, truly be able to serve a wide variety of customers as specialists. When you make this small part–parts that are three-quarters the thickness of a sheet of paper–Now you’ve made it. How are you going to clean it? How are you going to count it? How are you going to handle it? That’s where we come in as specialists in the field.

SS: What 3D software is used at Swissomation?
CW: We switched from SOLIDWORKS to Fusion 360. With Fusion 360, the integrated CAM and collaboration tools are really important to us. We use the collaboration tools a lot, with smaller companies or even larger companies where we help on an engineering project.

SS: How are Fusion 360’s collaboration capabilities utilized?
CW: We’ll ‘live review’ a drawing and interact without having to buy software or services like GoToMeeting. I can show them everything with a browser link–no software to install at all. Whether it’s an engineer or someone in marketing, I can show them and say, “Hey, you see this circle right here, I need this to look like this.” I can explain it and they understand it.

In the old days of SOLIDWORKS they had to install eDrawings–they couldn’t install eDrawings or get it to read. Then I sent them a .exe, which the email service blocks. With Fusion 360, I can just send the link. If something changes I update and go. I don’t have to go through sending models back and forth. Fusion 360 just makes it very easy to collaborate with people on different designs.

swisomation-fusion-360-02

SS: How has Fusion 360 changed or improved your process?

CW: We also do design work. When we’re designing products for other people, the features that have improved our process is the integrated CAM, the collaboration and being able to do renderings. Within the eight-hour process for me to do it in SOLIDWORKS, I can hop into Fusion 360 and have something in two hours the first time. I can offload the renderings and simulations to the cloud instead of tying up my machine for three or four hours and have it back in 10 minutes. It frees me up to do something else.

SS: What advice do you have for others start-ups, inventors or those who need machining services?
CW: The best advice I can give to someone starting up is to learn Fusion 360. First and foremost learn Fusion 360. Watch some videos–it’s easy to pick up and go to work. And keep your cash flow going–that’s always a tough thing. With Fusion 360, it’s a no-brainer to me. It’s free for startups. I mean, how much better can you get your cash flow than ‘free for startups’. That’s a no-brainer. If you own a machine shop and you don’t have Fusion 360 and you know about it… you know there’s something wrong. I really say you should have your head examined but. (laughs) Here’s what I say, “If you are aware of Fusion 360 and the benefits of it and you’re not willing to pay $300 (per year) for it, you should have your head examined.”

swisomation-fusion-360-03

Your sales staff can have a copy to read drawings and talk to customers. Your engineers don’t have to have one copy of SOLIDWORKS in the back room that cost you $8,000 to buy and $2,000 a year, like I did, with one person knowing how to use it.

Teach your kids. Right now, I’m teaching my sons. One of my sons came to me when building a drone saying, “Hey dad. I lost this bushing.” I didn’t have to make them go through the process to create a bushing, bBut what they learned from going through that process is pretty cool. I love it and being able to spend time with the kids and to teach them, and ask, “How can you make this and 3D print it?” It’s just a great opportunity that we have to teach the younger ones. I could not afford to do that on SOLIDWORKS. When I had SOLIDWORKS, I couldn’t do it.

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The post How Swissomation Delivers Precision Manufacturing Using Fusion 360 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at May 24, 2017 02:14 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Valley Dairy Farm Automation Triples Production By Moving From 2D to SOLIDWORKS Solutions

Is 2D slowing you down and limiting your ability to create innovative designs? Do you find yourself spending too much time revising designs?  Kevin Bouwman, General Manager of Valley Dairy Farm Automation (VDFA), felt the same way and knew that in order to keep up with the growth of VDFA business, he needed a faster and more efficient way to create his designs with less mistakes.  Let’s take a look at their story.

Founded in 1982 as a dealer for Bou-Matic dairy equipment in northwest Iowa, southeast South Dakota, and southwest Minnesota, Valley Dairy Farm Automation has grown to become a leading manufacturer of customized, innovative dairy farm automation products.

According to Bouwman, “As business grew, designing and manufacturing in 2D became frustrating and limiting,” Bouwman recalls. “Whenever I needed to make a design change, I had to make the change to multiple drawing views, which wasted time. Roughly 40 percent of our products involve sheet metal, and because dairy applications require either stainless or hot-dip galvanized steel, design errors are costly. That’s why I investigated 3D design solutions.”

VDFA chose SOLIDWORKS solutions because of the expansive and supportive online community, short learning curve, and industry-leading sheet metal and weldment design tools. Today, VDFA relies on SOLIDWORKS Premium mechanical design and analysis software to develop its dairy automation systems and recently added SOLIDWORKS Electrical 3D to develop associated electrical systems for its products.

Since standardizing on SOLIDWORKS, VDFA has developed equipment designs that are more innovative, elaborate, and complete, with fewer mistakes and errors. As a result, the company has tripled the number of products that it develops annually. “The move to SOLIDWORKS has allowed us to go from designing a small number of products to support the equipment dealership to offering more than 100 different automation products,” Bouwman says. “With SOLIDWORKS, we can develop products more professionally in terms of fit and function than many global manufacturers, and every year, we add three times as many new products.”

To find out more about the Valley Dairy Farm Automation and how they tripled its production while minimizing design errors with SOLIDWORKS Premium and SOLIDWORKS Electrical 3D, Click Here. Then click the below banner to explore the role agricultural equipment plays in delivering your favorite beers from the farm to your glass.

Author information

Josie Morales
Josie Morales
Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post Valley Dairy Farm Automation Triples Production By Moving From 2D to SOLIDWORKS Solutions appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Josie Morales at May 24, 2017 01:04 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Solving the SOLIDWORKS Sheet Format could not be located error

You’ve taken the time to make a great drawing sheet format, and applied that format to a sheet in your drawing, and everything is great. Until you decide to double your drawing space by adding a second sheet, and are told that “The sheet format could not be located”.

Sheet Format Could Not Be Located

Sheet Format Could Not Be Located

This problem, while frustrating at first, is actually quite straight forward to solve! The issue here is that the drawing template used lacks the necessary reference to that great drawing sheet format you wish to replicate.

Solving the problem

To solve the problem, follow these steps:

 

  1. Open a blank drawing file using the drawing template in which you’d like to remedy the problem.
  2. Right-click anywhere in your drawing sheet. Expand the menu by hovering your mouse over the arrows at the bottom, and select Properties…
  3. The Sheet Properties Menu is now open (as shown here on the left). The outlined box contains the link where the sheet format is found. In this case, that link is likely wrong. Click Browse… and browse to the location where you’ve saved your drawing sheet format (*.slddrt).
  4. Select Apply Changes to close the Sheet Properties Menu.
  5. One more step! Make sure you save this new file as your new drawing template. Select File > Save As… and save as a Drawing Template (*.drwdot) in your templates folder. (SOLIDWORKS can be pointed to this location through Tools > Options > System Options > File Locations)
  6. You’re done! When creating a new drawing, make sure you select this new drawing template as your starting point.
Sheet Properties

Sheet Properties

Learn more about Drawings

Take our SOLIDWORKS Drawings course either live online or in a Canadian classroom near you.

The post Solving the SOLIDWORKS Sheet Format could not be located error appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Colin Murphy, CSWE at May 24, 2017 12:00 PM

The Top 20 SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips of all time posted on the Javelin blog

As part of our Javelin 20 Year Anniversary we want to share our top 20 SOLIDWORKS tech tips of all time featured in this blog. The tech tip posts range from dealing with pesky Windows issues to step-by step tutorials for completing tasks in SOLIDWORKS.

Javelin 20 Tips

The Javelin team have posted 2,000 SOLIDWORKS tech tips and provided millions of users with answers to their technical questions. Here is our top 20 list based on unique views by our readers:

RANK POST TOPIC
 1 Resolving the “File is open in another program” Windows Issue
Our number one ranked blog post describes a solution to a common windows issue that our readers have experienced. The Microsoft Process Explorer is featured as a tool to help resolve the issue
Windows
2 Is the latest version of SOLIDWORKS compatible with Windows 10?
This post was created in response to the popular question we received from customers when Windows 10 was released back in July 2015. This post is still popular with our readers
Windows
3 Step-by-Step Guide to Drawing Templates and Sheet Formats
This video post was created as a step-by-step guide to help customers create custom Drawing Templates and Sheet Formats in SOLIDWORKS.
Templates
4 How to export a model from SOLIDWORKS to Google SketchUp
If you have ever been asked by a customer or supplier to provide a Google Sketchup version of your SOLIDWORKS model then this post provides the answer you need.
Translation
5 SOLIDWORKS Database is Missing! Complete functionality will not be available?
Have you ever seen this error messages before when launching SOLIDWORKS? A lot of our readers had and this comes in at number five in our top 20 list.
Error
6 Creating a SOLIDWORKS Reference Plane at an Angle out in Space
How do you create a Reference Plane at a certain angle somewhere out in space? This was a common question for our blog readers and a solution using a sketch was described in this tech tip.
Sketching
7 Complete Uninstall of SOLIDWORKS
This was a procedure that we wanted to provide our customers and proved to be a popular blog post with the SOLIDWORKS community.
System
8 Blank SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager Problem Solved
This common problem turned out to be a firewall issue with Windows and we provide a couple of solutions to the problem.
Installation
9 Manually Updating SOLIDWORKS Toolbox
This tip on manually updating SOLIDWORKS Toolbox came from the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base. This is a question we receive on a regular enough basis that we felt that it would be worth posting on the Javelin blog.
System
10 Download SOLIDWORKS Weldment Profiles
When you have a new installation of SOLIDWORKS on your system you may notice that there are very few Weldment Profiles available when you select a Structural Member. This tech tip provided the steps for obtaining more profiles and setting them up in your system.
Weldments
11 Lost your SOLIDWORKS data in a crash? SOLIDWORKS Auto-recovery can help
This best practice tech tip provides the steps for restoring a SOLIDWORKS file from a crash with the auto-recovery tool, and more importantly how to set-up auto-recovery.
System
12 Increasing Your SOLIDWORKS Weldment Profile Library
Similar to our number 10 ranked post, this tech tip provides the steps for creating your own weldment profiles and adding them to the Profile Libraby.
Weldments
13 Selecting Base Scale for Exporting SOLIDWORKS Drawings to DXF/DWG
This procedure type post provides the steps for exporting SOLIDWORKS drawings to DXF/DWG format, and taking into account a scale factor to avoid incorrect dimensions and a potential loss of material.
Translation
14 SOLIDWORKS Default Template Location
A common question from our customers about template file locationswas the topic for our number 14 ranked tech tip
Templates
15 Why is SOLIDWORKS unable to locate my Assembly Components?
I’m sure you’ve seen this before. After opening a SOLIDWORKS assembly, there is a message that a file cannot be located and you must browse for it yourself or the component will be suppressed. Why does this happen and how to solve the issue were provided in this tech tip.
System
16 How to Rename or Move SOLIDWORKS Files Correctly
This procedure post proved popular with our readers and featured SOLIDWORKS Explorer as the tool of choice for renaming and moving SOLIDWORKS files correctly.
System
17 SOLIDWORKS has detected that your system resources are running low
Anyone who works with large SOLIDWORKS files has likely found this post while searching online as it descibes the issue and provides a solution.
System
18 SOLIDWORKS Electrical Cannot Connect to Database?!
An error that might occur when trying to launch SOLIDWORKS Electrical was described in this post along with a how-to guide for quickly and easily resolving the issue.
Electrical
19 One method of modeling a Chain in SOLIDWORKS
This tutorial tech tip provides the steps for creating a chain in SOLIDWORKS using a curve driven pattern feature.
Modeling
20 How to change the SOLIDWORKS Standard View Orientation
Finally tip # 20 provides the steps for changing the view orientation in a SOLIDWORKS part which is often required when using an imported model and the current orientation does not make sense.
Modeling

A big thank you to all the authors at Javelin and of course our readers for using the blog and giving us ideas for SOLIDWORKS tech tips and tutorials for the user community.

The post The Top 20 SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips of all time posted on the Javelin blog appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at May 24, 2017 04:10 AM

May 23, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Time-Lapse Tutorial: Useless Box

Looking for the perfect gift but don’t want to buy anything new? In this guide we will show you how we took an old useless box and use SOLIDWORKS and 3D printing and turned it into something new.

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Now this box isn’t all that useless, it serves a purpose. That purpose is to do nothing so, in turn, it is a useless box. Confusing right? We will give you a minute to process. So this is an old kit we got a little while back, but the acrylic and metal look got a little dull after some time so we decided to use SOLIDWORKS and 3D printing to bring it back to life.

Useless Box
The design process for this was simple; first replicate, then create. We started by reproducing a simple version of the PCB by just highlighting the important element. This saves time rather than recreating every element. Then, the original body was generated around the PCB which created a perfect skeleton to work from.

We then began create the new box around the old one. We used the old box as a reference for the scale and for the placement of splits, which are needed for the lids. We gave it a more shapely body with rounded edges, making it softer. Now, you could go ahead and add more details and extravagant markings but, we chose this shape to serve not as a final product but as an inspiration for your own projects.

Once all three parts were complete, we separated them and prepared them to print. We were lucky for this project as we didn’t run into any troubles with the printing process. With the design, we kept each overhang above 45 degrees to the bed. This allowed all parts printed with no support so they came off the bed clean and ready. This is the ideal scenario for any 3D printing project.

For assembly, we disassembled the old useless box, then put the battery box and PCB in place. We then glued the static lid in place and clipped on the moving lid. The hinge was a little stiff, so it was trimmed with a scalpel and used a lubricant to loosen it up. This made the hand press the switch and the lid went down went with it.

This project is great if you are bored with something and wish to change it up, or if you need a quick gift for someone and don’t have the time to go out and buy something. 3D printing is excellent for these any little project like this, and is an easy way to start your journey in the wonderful world of 3D printing. We hope you learned a lot from this tutorial and use this knowledge to brighten up your own home or someone’s day.

Check out our YouTube playlist for more SOLIDWORKS Time-Lapse tutorials!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Time-Lapse Tutorial: Useless Box appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at May 23, 2017 09:00 PM

SolidSmack

Coreform Uses Exact Geometry (Not A Mesh) to Bring You Next-Gen FEA

coreform-iga-fea-geometry-analysis-00

Remember when you had to create a mesh of your model to run any sort of simulation? If Coreform has their way, that question may not seem so strange in a future with the old ways of FEA archived alongside fidget spinners and smartphones. It’s a new take on geometry analysis and the team behind it makes the possibilities even more convincing.

In December 2016 we learned Autodesk was ending T-splines and that former T-Splines Founder/CEO and then Autodesk Product Manager, Matt Sederberg, had a startup in his back pocket, Isogeometrx (founded in 2014), a company “dedicated to revolutionizing design and engineering in the automotive, marine, and aerospace industries by providing tools and technologies for integrated design and analysis.”

We now have a clearer picture of what that is.

Isogeometrx is now Coreform with a goal of developing high-end simulation tools based on Isogeometric Analysis (IGA). Their team is a who’s who of IGA and 3D geometry experts and researchers who have developed a proprietary analysis-suitable CAD technology called “U-splines” (“Unstructured-splines”).

Through the U-spline technology, their tools will use IGA to run simulations on the exact CAD geometry without the need to defeature and generate a mesh prior to running a simulation. To get a better understanding of what IGA does, you’ll want to read over their one-page primer on the subject. To highlight:

Traditional FEA programs require a snapshot of the CAD, often simplifying the model by removing details like holes and fillets, and freezing the model resolution at a certain tolerance by converting it to a mesh.

Since the CAE model is disconnected from the original CAD model, transferring FEA results back onto the CAD model may take just as long, if not longer, than creating the original CAE model.

In contrast to the laborious and error prone process of translating CAD into CAE models, isogeometric analysis (IGA) performs the FEA simulation directly on smooth CAD geometry.

Here’s the infographic to help explain it:coreform-iga-01

Though the concept of IGA has been around since 2005, no companies have taken advantage of the process to develop 3D CAD tools. Coreform will be the first. So if you’re tired of generating mesh after mesh after mesh, they’re one to keep an eye on.

They’re coming out of stealth, slowly, but you can find out more about what they’re up to and sign up to be notified of products on their website.

The post Coreform Uses Exact Geometry (Not A Mesh) to Bring You Next-Gen FEA appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at May 23, 2017 07:56 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Drift Trike – Frame Design

In our latest SOLIDWORKS tutorial series, Cadtek Systems’ Stuart Wortley combines his passion for the outdoors to guide you through creating your very own Drift Trike. This latest gravity sport is rising in popularity both in the US and in the UK. It comprises of a single wheel at the front with two, often Nylon, wheels at the rear to allow “drift”. The 3D modelling techniques in this series cover a wide range of skills useful to any SOLIDWORKS user.

Frame Design

The first of a four part series Stuart will guide you through frame design in SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD. Not only is a frame the most important structural member it is also the biggest part and shapes the feel of the Trike. This video tutorial contains the step by step process for creating the frame and structure of the whole Trike. Using a layout sketch to drive all the features, your model will be smart in relation to other components. This makes it very easy to update and make changes if you need to in the future.

The topics covered in this part of the series include:

  • Introduction to the series
  • Layout Sketches
  • Multi Body Design
  • Lofts
  • Sweep Feature
  • Sheet Metal
  • Using End Conditions and References
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See Cadtek’s original article here. Look out for the second part in this series in the coming weeks covering fork design. This will go into Layout Sketches, Lofts, Sweeps and Complex features, other skills that every SOLIDWORKS user should have under their belt. For more hints, tips and content head over to our Twitter page or our YouTube channel.


Cadtek Designer Profile – Stuart Wortley

Cadtek Application Engineer

Stuart has been with Cadtek Systems for 18 years and is key part of our application team. His passion for the outdoors, his VW Camper-van and SolidWorks is clear. It has seen him produce some great, easy to follow SOLIDWORKS tutorials around Paddle Boarding, Cabinet Design and now Drift Trikes! This year saw Stuart achieve the accolade of Elite Application Engineer at SOLIDWORKS World 2017 in LA, the highest level achievable.

Author information

Cadtek Systems UK - Elite SOLIDWORKS Training & Support
Cadtek has been established for over 27 years. Based in the UK, we have unrivalled experience in providing design solutions for designers and engineers. We work across all disciplines and multiple industries. An award winning Elite Reseller we can help you understand and choose the right 3D CAD solution. Call 0800 804 7766 to speak to an account manager. For more information, visit cadtek.com.

The post SOLIDWORKS Drift Trike – Frame Design appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Cadtek Systems UK - Elite SOLIDWORKS Training &#38; Support at May 23, 2017 03:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Gain Productivity by using Sheet Metal in SOLIDWORKS

By using the SOLIDWORKS sheet metal tools your productivity can be dramatically increased as well as be a cost effective solution to producing sheet metal models!

With the sheet metal functionality you are able to:

  • Create Base, Edge, Swept and Miter Flanges
  • Take control of bend allowances/bend reductions by using bend tables
  • Generate a number of bends including loft bends, sketched bends and more
  • Flatten parts to quickly produce flat patterns with bend lines
  • Add weld definition on both model and drawing
  • Use forming tools to create rib, louvers as well as many other features

Another great benefit of SOLIDWORKS sheet metal tools is we are able to design within the assembly to take advantage of other part’s reference architecture!

Going from a STEP or IGES file to a sheet metal feature within SOLIDWORKS is a breeze through the convert to sheet metal command!

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When entering that command we have the flexibility of using gauge tables as well as updating the parameters:

SOLIDWORKS sheet metal tools

Use gauge tables

With sheet metal it is also easy to export as a DXF directly from model space saving lots of time in creating drawings manually!

Export to DXF

Export to DXF

From there it can be saved directly as a DXF file which then can be sent for production to the cutting machine, decreasing your time to market!

Discover SOLIDWORKS and take advantage of all the capabilities of sheet metal today!

The post Gain Productivity by using Sheet Metal in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sam Sharkawi at May 23, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | Flippin’ Flatpacks

feature

This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw, or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these fresh tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “The Web” from Kane Strang and work our way through tracks from Sunflower Bean, Slow Dakota, Tourist Dollars, Diners, and others before wrapping up with “We’ve Been Had” from The Walkmen.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

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The post SolidSmack Radio | Flippin’ Flatpacks appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at May 23, 2017 11:59 AM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids Make a Noise at Maker Faire

Apps-For-Kids-Maker-Faire-UK-3

Tiny children have the biggest ideas. A child’s mind is an astonishing hive of creativity. SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids harnesses that invention and turns it into reality and was abundantly demonstrated at Maker Faire 2017, little minds find SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids fun as well as easy to master.

Apps-For-Kids-Maker-Faire-UK-1
From potential to print

Last month SOLIDWORKS got to show exactly what SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids is all about at Maker Faire UK in Newcastle. Displaying 3D printed models straight from our app, they’re the physical fruits of fertile minds’ creative labour. The bright, eye-catching renderings captured attentions and enraptured imaginations, from the very young to those drawing a pension.


From app to actuality

At an exhibition with over 4,000 visitors that champions creativity, who could resist stopping by to investigate? Eliciting a flurry of activity on the exhibition floor, SOLIDWORKS found keen minds attracted to the possibilities on offer.

Pre-schoolers jostled with silver-haired hobbyists for a go on SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids. Children pestered their parents for a longer stay. Teachers made enquiries about making the app available for schools – and more than a few jaws dropped when they realised our versatile app is available for the glorious price of free.

Apps-For-Kids-Maker-Faire-UK-2

The approachable pick-up-and-build ethos fired the imaginations of all present, bridging the gap between creativity and accessible design.


Science, meet art

What became apparent over the two days was the app’s ability to blur the lines between art and science. In a good way. Viewed often as two distinct disciplines, SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids shows that this boundary is largely an imaginary construct.

We had children as young as three diving in, carving out their creativity in a world of design. It’s how Leonardo Da Vinci operated. He juggled both blueprints and brush strokes pretty successfully, don’t you think?

Children don’t delineate rigidly between art and science. Creating is creating, right? Science fiction drives scientific discovery – and that’s a scientific fact.

Apps-For-Kids-Maker-Faire-UK-3
Sign Up, create, make…

During the bustling invention of Maker Faire, we demonstrated that imagination is a rich seedbed for design and creation. With an average age range between six and 14 years old, eager young intellects ran with SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids’ opportunities and got visualising, designing and making.

See what SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids can do for your little ones’ attitude.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids Make a Noise at Maker Faire appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS UK at May 23, 2017 11:00 AM

May 22, 2017

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: 1932 Ford Hot Rod [Your New Project Car!]

3d-printed-rat-rod-body-instructable-00

Have a hot rod project car out in the garage? Yes? No? What’s that? It’s more a pile of hot rod parts you say? If you look at my garage in the dark and squint hard enough, all of those boxes look vaugly like a hot rod… kinda.

A hot rod is #3 on my project dream car list. But, like me, perhaps you want to start smaller, like with a RC hot rod car – just think of how many of those you could fit in your garage.

Jason Suter set out to design his own documenting the process along the way. He has provided the files and instructions, but also the thought behind the process to explain his appraoch and help you build your own RC car. Jason chose a ’32 Ford hot rod design – here’s his final result.

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Jason goes step by step through the complete process, beginning with the 3D modeling in Fusion 360 and designing for strength and 3D printing to painting, mods and assembly. This is a great model, both for its thoroughness and all the ways you can take it to make your own RC car build.

3d-printed-rat-rod-body-instructable-03

He designed the body originally for SLS printing, but has now provided a version that is FDM-Friendly, recommending to print it in ABS or PETG.

You can download the 32 For Hot Rod Body on MyMiniFactory and see the scratch build on Instructables to build it yourself!

3d-printed-rat-rod-body-instructable-01

3d-printed-rat-rod-body-instructable-02

The post Model of the Week: 1932 Ford Hot Rod [Your New Project Car!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at May 22, 2017 09:15 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Crafting a Career in Mechanical Design (and Brewing) with David Gilmour of Phillips Brewing

David Gilmour is a maintenance engineer at Phillips Brewing and Malting Co., a small-batch craft brewery in Victoria, British Columbia. Previously, Gilmour shared how Phillips uses engineering and technology to ensure its delicious brews get to the mouths of its loyal and thirsty customers. If you’re interested in beer and engineering, definitely give it a read. This post will cover Gilmour’s start in engineering, including a brewing project he completed while in school. Side note: I clearly went to the wrong school.

Like many engineers, Gilmour’s interest in building and inventing came at a young age. “As a kid I would spend hours building gizmos and gadgets out of Legos and Construx, as a teenager I built BMX bikes to ride and race, and while working as an arborist in my 20s, I would take apart and rebuild chainsaws and other power equipment,” Gilmore said. “I decided to capitalize on this interest and returned to school in my thirties, receiving a diploma in mechanical engineering technology two and a half years ago. Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine that my love for engineering design and tasty libations would be a possible career option!”

Gilmour was introduced to the basics of 2D and 3D modeling in CAD classes in tech school. After he graduated, he honed his SOLIDWORKS skills on a number of projects including a large project where he helped develop sport simulators for Olympic museums.

While Gilmour went back to school to pursue his mechanical engineering degree, Phillips actually sponsored his capstone project, which was designed entirely in SOLIDWORKS. “My classmates and I designed and built a Growler-filling vending machine dubbed the “Growlermatic.” Customers use a specially made tokens to have their growler filled by an automated machine that pressurizes the growler using CO2 before filling it with beer, which reduces the amount of O2 in the beer, lengthening shelf life and improving the flavor profile.” Now if I can just get one of these in the office…

Of course the next question has to be, which beer should we fill our growler with? “I find my tastes for different styles changes with the season, and right now I am enjoying Phillips Shortwave, a hoppy, west coast-style pale ale,” Gilmour stated. “One of my all-time favorites is our Electric Unicorn white IPA. I think a perfect beer is made with the best ingredients, a perfect blend of hops, precisely malted barley, fresh clean water, and perfectly cultivated yeast. Many beer styles have different elements that make them stand out, but these basic ingredients are required to make the perfect beer.”

Thanks to the work of smart engineers like David Gilmour, we can all enjoy our beer of choice and explore new offerings is easier than ever before! The next time you have a beer, be sure to raise a glass to the people behind the brews. Not all heroes wear capes! Check out Phillips Brewing cool beers and gear here. Read more about how Phillips Brewing engineers its equipment in CAD in this blog post.

Author information

Mike Fearon
Mike Fearon
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post Crafting a Career in Mechanical Design (and Brewing) with David Gilmour of Phillips Brewing appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mike Fearon at May 22, 2017 03:27 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Everyday Problems: Creating an Enclosure for Raspberry Pis

My name is Rob and as anyone that knows me well will tell you, I have a problem with Raspberry Pis. They are my uncontrollable addiction and I cannot get enough. I currently have six of them with plans for more in the near future; if I see a used one for sale, I have to have it. I use them for a variety of things such as, media centers, game emulators, home security systems, and various servers.

One of my latest projects was using an Arduino to control the temperature and water level in one of my saltwater fish tanks. The Arduino measures the water temperature and checks the water level via some external sensors. It then displays information about the tank to an LCD display, and sends serial data to a Raspberry Pi that stores the information in a database which can be queried and plotted through a web interface. Everything works flawlessly, but I didn’t have anywhere to put all of the components which would keep everything together and neatly organized. This is where SOLIDWORKS comes in.

I knew I wanted a simple enclosure to contain all of the components, but I didn’t know exactly what the enclosure would look like or how the components would be oriented. At this point, I went to the internet and found some CAD models for a Raspberry Pi, an Arduino, a breadboard, and an LCD display. With these 3D models now in a SOLIDWORKS assembly, I was able to align them how I wanted them to sit and use top down design methods to create an enclosure to house them.

Raspberry Pis

Using the “Insert New Part” function I was able to start creating a new part that would become the lower portion of the enclosure. This was done very simply by extruding the four sides and bottom, a small ledge for the Arduino to rest on, and then using cuts where things would get plugged into the Pi and Arduino. I threw in a few fillets, and the lower part of my enclosure was now exactly what I needed.

This ability to design around existing components is part of what makes top down design so powerful. I didn’t know exactly what the enclosure was going to look like and where holes would be located, but by putting the lower level parts into the assembly and then designing around them I was able to get exactly what I needed.

Now that I had the lower portion of the enclosure completed I needed to make a top to keep any water from getting splashed on the electronics. Again using top down methods I was able to insert a new part and create some very simple extrusions from a convert entity that was performed on the top edge of the lower enclosure. After this was extruded I capped off the top, inserted some fillets, and cut out the area where the display would be located.

Now that I had a model that looked like it would work with my components, I decided to head on over to the 3D Printer and create the enclosure. I came in the next morning to my printed components which neatly accommodated my electronics with the use of some double sided tape.

This small project really encompasses everything I love about SOLIDWORKS. I was able to download some files online and import them into SOLIDWORKS, then design around those parts, export STL files to use on the 3D printer, and then create those parts in a matter of hours. SOLIDWORKS provides the ability to solve extremely complex problems, but it can also be used for simple everyday issues that each of us may encounter even at home.

Author information

CADimensions
We are an authorized SOLIDWORKS and Stratasys reseller with certified training & support centers located in New York and Pennsylvania, USA. We are 100% focused on living a CADLIFE and have our vendor's unconditional endorsement in the sales and support of their products.

The post Everyday Problems: Creating an Enclosure for Raspberry Pis appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CADimensions at May 22, 2017 03:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to easily Identify Revised Dimensions in SOLIDWORKS [VIDEO]

Learn how to easily track revised SOLIDWORKS dimensions by enabling an option that highlights dimensions on a drawing that have changed since it was last saved.

  1. Have you ever been in a situation where a change has been made to one of your models (especially by someone else), but the drawing was not updated until the details of the change have been long since forgotten or have not been communicated?
  2. Has your design ever been revised but the drawing was forgotten?
  3. Have you ever wished that SOLIDWORKS could tell you that a dimension in your drawing had changed since the last time it was saved?

If you have ever wished for any of these things, then I have good news for you!

Revised SOLIDWORKS Dimensions shaded a different colour

The highlighted 100 dimension used to be something else

If you go to Tools > Options, then under the System Options tab, you select Colors from the list on the left, you will find an oft-overlooked check mark option called “Use specified color for changed drawing dimensions on open” or as it could be interpreted: If a dimension has changed on this drawing since the last time it was opened, make it ____ colour (the colour can be selected in the list as Drawings, Changed Dimensions).

Let’s see this function in action:

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As you can see, the dimension[s] that changed since the last save are highlighted. The colour is temporary, if you save the drawing, then close and reopen it, the colour will return to normal. Therefore, I would suggest making your revision while the dimension is indicated so you know what the change was. If you simply save and close the drawing without noting what the change was, then the record of what changed will be lost – unless you are using a revision control software, such as PDM.

The post How to easily Identify Revised Dimensions in SOLIDWORKS [VIDEO] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Jim Peltier, CSWE at May 22, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Monday List 21.17 | What We’re Reading This Week

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Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

What Animals Taught Me About Being Human
Surrounding myself with animals to feel less alone was a mistake: The greatest comfort is in knowing their lives are not about us at all.

01

Of Mice and Mindfulness
Mice do not, so far as we know, practice meditation.

02

Grizzly Bear Discuss Painted Ruins, Their First Album in Five Years
The indie-rock vets talk about streaming music’s stimulus overload, the radio’s disappointing lack of cool, weird guitar music, and their new record.

03

Nike’s 36-Year Quest for the Transparent Sole
The company has reimagined its signature air cushioning technology for the $190 VaporMax. Will going foam-free help it fend off Adidas?

04

In its nightmarish two-part return, Twin Peaks is pure Lynchian horror
“Let’s not overthink this opportunity”

05

In Defense of the Reality of Time
Physicists and philosophers seem to like nothing more than telling us that everything we thought about the world is wrong.

06

The post The Monday List 21.17 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at May 22, 2017 11:55 AM

May 21, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis Tutorial – Part 5

On May 20th and 21st, 1927 Charles Lindbergh, aka “Lucky Lindy”, made history by completing the first solo, nonstop, transatlantic flight; piloting his monoplane, the Spirit of St. Louis, from Long Island, New York to Paris, France. To celebrate the anniversary of Lindy’s achievement we’re showing SOLIDWORKS users how to model a 30” wingspan version of his iconic aircraft. Throughout this series, we’ll fly through lessons on how to work off imported images, and we’ll use a series of extrusions, lofts, and sweeps to model the Spirit of St. Louis.

Welcome to the final part of our 5 Part series where we are celebrating the anniversary of Charles Lindbergh’s historic feat by modeling his Spirit of St. Louis monoplane. We’ll pick up where we left off in part 4 with a nearly completed half of the aircraft and we’ll begin adding some of the aircraft’s details using some essential modeling techniques, as well as a few advanced techniques like the Circular Pattern command.  We will wrap up this part of the series by flying through how to add custom appearances and decals to your model.

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Whether you’re an aviation enthusiast or are just looking for a new SOLIDWORKS challenge, the Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis tutorial series is for you!

Can’t wait to watch the next video? View all of the tutorials on the playlist here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis Tutorial – Part 5 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at May 21, 2017 09:00 PM

May 19, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Stump the Chump: How Can I make My Cam Follower “Roll” on the Cam Surface?

This is the second installment of our new Stump the Chump blog series here at SOLIDWORKS. In this series we will delve into common SOLIDWORKS questions and/or problems that our users have on a day-by-day basis and will present various ways in which they can solve them. While we have a large team of seasoned CAD users at SOLIDWORKS available to answer user questions, we also have the most passionate and best CAD community in the world. So in this blog series, we are going to share advice, tips and suggestions from actual users.

We are scouring the SOLIDWORKS User Forums for questions and/or problems that we feel are probably pretty common among our users. If after reading this Stump the Chump post, you have an alternative answer or simply have an additional question, please feel free to add it to the comment section below.
So without further ado, here is the question:

Question: How can I make my cam follower “roll” on a cam surface?
User answer: I tried some things out, and I don’t think that it is possible using ONLY mates. I tried a combination of cam and RACK AND PINION mates, and it works, but only on the straight areas of the cam, if there are any.   But once the cam follower went around a corner, the rolling ceased and sliding started.

Stump the Chump

SOLIDWORKS Expert Weigh-in: Yes, it is possible to make the cam follower roll on the cam surface.  I created a video and attached the models showing two ways to approach this solution.

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There are two ways to accomplish this. If you want to make something that looks good in a design review or video, you can accomplish it with a Gear Mate, and set the ratio to be close to the average diameter of cam. This will make the follower appear to roll on the surface of the cam. This works well visually, but if you are looking for the angular velocity of the cam follower, you will need to use SOLIDWORKS Motion, and choose a Motion Analysis study as opposed to an Animation study.

Since the Cam Mate does not account for friction as does some of the basic mates, you will want to use curve contact to define the contact and set the coefficient of friction between the cam and follower to be 1, or very sticky. Apply a motor to the cam, and gravity so that the follower does not fly off the cam, and run the motion study. This will give you the precise angular velocity of the follower if that is the information that you are looking for.

 

Thank you to John Bryjak for the question and to Dan Pihlaja for providing solutions in the SOLIDWORKS User Forum. If you have a question that you would like to pose to the greater SOLIDWORKS user community or to provide tips and tricks to your peers, our User Forums are a great resource. Access the SOLIDWORKS User Forums here.

Author information

Barbara Schmitz
Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks
Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post Stump the Chump: How Can I make My Cam Follower “Roll” on the Cam Surface? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Barbara Schmitz at May 19, 2017 09:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Quick Tip: Prescribed Displacements

When setting up an analysis in SOLIDWORKS Simulation, we typically think of applying forces or other loads and calculating the resulting stresses and displacements as our outputs. However, in situations where the forces may not be known, an expected displacement can effectively be used as the “load” input to the analysis.

This is known as a Prescribed Displacement and is available under the External Loads drop-down.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Quick Tip: Prescribed Displacements - Part 1image001
Note that launching the Prescribed Displacement command actually brings the user to a type of advanced fixture, where a direction for the displacement must be specified. Then, the amount and direction of the prescribed translation or rotation are specified.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Quick Tip: Prescribed Displacements - Part 1image003
As a result, the force required to achieve the prescribed displacement can be backed out by using the option List Result Force and of course the resulting stresses can be calculated.

If it is ever necessary to apply both a translation and rotation, then an alternate method is to use the Remote Load/Mass feature under the External Loads pulldown. Within the Remote Load/Mass is the option to apply a Displacement.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Quick Tip: Prescribed Displacements - Part 2image001
This requires slightly more setup work since it is typically recommended to create a Coordinate System at the location where the displacement will be applied, as can be seen below. Once setup, however, it provides an easy way to prescribe both Translations and Rotations about this point in space.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Quick Tip: Prescribed Displacements - Part 2image003
It’s also worth noting that the Remote Load/Mass can effectively be used as a type of advanced fixture when used with this “Displacement” option. In fact, an important consideration whenever using a Prescribed Displacement is that it is placing additional constraints on the system.  If a displacement is applied, then that displacement will never be exceeded no matter how much force is applied elsewhere in the model.


For additional details on how this process can be performed, please check out our YouTube channel or contact Hawk Ridge Systems today. Thanks for reading!

Author information

Hawk Ridge Systems
From design to production, Hawk Ridge Systems delivers best-in-class solutions in 3D design, CAM software, and 3D printing.

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation Quick Tip: Prescribed Displacements appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Hawk Ridge Systems at May 19, 2017 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

You Won’t Want to Be on the Receiving End of This Lego Sniper Rail Gun

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We’ve said it time and time again, and we still mean it from the bottom of our hearts: if a zombie apocalypse ever breaks out, we want to be as close to ‘Slingshot Master’ Joerg Sprave as humanly possible.

While the German slingshot sensei has created everything from an Oreo Cookie Separation Pump Gun to the ultra-deadly Machete Slingshot, it is perhaps his latest that might deliver the most recognizable kind of pain…assuming you know what it feels like to step on a LEGO brick while barefoot.

According to Sprave, the LEGO brick has many desirable qualities for ammo: they’re cheap, hard, edgy, and indestructible. But they are also not without their flaws.

“(LEGO bricks) are also lightweight, plus their awkward shape makes it hard to shoot them straight,” explains Sprave. “Therefore we built a custom shooter for the tiny plastic toys and added some nails to see how much damage you can cause with these very basic elements!”

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Unsatisfied with the inability to penetrate a coconut (AKA Zombie Head) with his Brick Shooting Pistol, Sprave followed up his LEGO project with an even deadlier contraption: The LEGO Sniper Rail Gun.

“We made a LEGO brick shooting pistol not so long ago, and found the weapon to be extremely accurate and surprisingly powerful,” says Sprave. “But it did NOT penetrate a coconut, not even with a big fat nail inserted into the plastic bricks. That leaves something to be desired!”

Created with aluminum rails to add precision, the resulting toy brick launcher is something you won’t want to be on the receiving end of:

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Be sure to check out the rest of Sprave’s impressive slingshots and other projectile-launching contraptions over at The Slingshot Channel.

The post You Won’t Want to Be on the Receiving End of This Lego Sniper Rail Gun appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at May 19, 2017 12:05 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS Visualize User Spotlight: Peter Hildebrandt

The Visualize Featured User spotlight has now launched! Join us here for a Q&A highlighting how one of your peers uses SOLIDWORKS Visualize in their daily workflow. This month’s featured Visualize user is Peter Hildebrandt from Working Image, located in Germany.

What you are seeing are not photographs! They are images and animations created in SOLIDWORKS Visualize.

Q: Let’s start with the basics. Tell us a little about yourself and your background.
A: I’m Peter Hildebrandt and the owner of Working Image. I’m an advertising photographer and started my business in the “good old analog time” in 1989. I’ve always been impressed with the imagery produced from CGI. On my search for a software that is easy to use, shows results immediately and produces photographic renders, I found Bunkspeed in 2011, and used several Bunkspeed products. I’ve since transitioned to using SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional.

Q: Looking at your Visualize imagery, I can tell you’ve created some amazing photo-quality content for loads of clients in different industries. How is Visualize currently used in your workflow?
A: Visualize has changed my workflow. I don´t create models in CAD, however, I do use Visualize for creating photorealistic renderings for advertising use. Examples are for print, web and even exhibitions. I used to have to manually photograph products in photo studios, but now they are easily rendered in Visualize, saving loads of time. Using a combination of photography, CGI and post-production gives me an incredible power to create photo-quality pictures for my clients.

Q: Given your background in traditional photography, how has Visualize accelerated or improved your workflow?
A: Using the example of the car lifting platform in the image above, prepping these large objects to photograph in a traditional photography studio takes a lot of time, effort and money. You need a place large enough for the lift to fit, and lots of time and manpower to assemble it. Choosing Visualize to create the pictures made all this costly work obsolete. Also it was no problem to show the line-up of the platforms in two difference color schemes, which was a big benefit for my client. An easy way of reproducibility, organization and logistics is a decisive point of using Visualize/CGI for my presentations. Not to forget, for creative-minded people, there are almost endless possibilities to create pictures using Visualize.

Q: Why is SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional integral to your daily workflow, and a ‘must-have’ for your company to stay ahead of the competition?
A: Simply stated, SOLIDWORKS Visualize gives me the power to create stunning pictures and animations. I couldn’t achieve the same quality with traditional photography and especially not on budget.

Q: What features do you use the most in Visualize?
A: I like the possibility to customize the Appearance settings for my specific needs. Another is the Depth of Field option. I often use this feature to give my renderings a photorealistic touch. The possibility to render out different Render Passes makes compositing work in post-production much easier. Lastly, one thing I cannot live without is the integrated Render Queue in Visualize Professional. It´s a real time saver.

Q: Well it seems like you know exactly what you’re doing in Visualize. What is your favorite feature in Visualize?
A: My most favorite feature is the excellent connection to HDR Light Studio. It makes lighting very intuitive and super easy. You get to experiment with powerful features and fancy settings, because you can see the results immediately using the Visualize plug-in.

Q: What tip would you share with all the new Visualize users out there?
A: Play with the different settings and options for the Appearances. You´ll discover settings you never even thought of changing. Don´t make your renders perfectly clean; make sure to add little dust, textures, scratches and imperfections by using texture maps. At last, remember, there is only one sun outside. So when lighting a scene/object, only use one main light. This will help keep your scenes simple and produce great results. And keep your eyes open; watch how objects, materials and light interact in the real world.

Here are some more examples of Peter’s inspiring work. Thanks for sharing, Peter and happy Visualize-ing!

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If you have SOLIDWORKS CAD Professional or Premium and are on active Subscription, then you get SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard complimentary! And this free seat of Visualize Standard can be given to anyone in your company…even a different department! Visualize is a separate stand-alone product and does not occupy the SOLIDWORKS CAD license. Check out this blog post for download/install instructions and get started today!

Want to be spotlighted as a Visualize Featured User? Simply post your Visualize content to this Forum link for consideration.

Author information

Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner is the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager.

The post SOLIDWORKS Visualize User Spotlight: Peter Hildebrandt appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Brian Hillner at May 19, 2017 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Searching For a Configuration By Name in SOLIDWORKS PDM

In SOLIDWORKS PDM using the Complete Search Card you can search for a specific configuration by name.

Note: This option was added in Enterprise PDM 2011, if you don’t have the necessary check-boxes you may need to update your complete search card

Searching For a Configuration By Name

  • Open the Complete Search Card
Open the Complete Search Card

Open the Complete Search Card

  • Select the ‘History’ Tab
    • Insert the name of the desired configuration name
    • Ensure ‘Look in configuration/sheet names’ is checked
SOLIDWORKS PDM Search Configuration Name

Select the ‘History’ Tab

  • Hit ‘Enter’ to complete the SOLIDWORKS PDM Search Configuration Name
Completed search for a configuration by name

Completed search for a configuration by name

Need SOLIDWORKS PDM Training?

Contact us about our SOLIDWORKS PDM training courses for users and administrators.

The post Searching For a Configuration By Name in SOLIDWORKS PDM appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Williams at May 19, 2017 12:00 PM

May 18, 2017

SolidSmack

CANVAS Is Multi-Color, Multi-Material 3D Printing Software

canvas-3d-modeling-app-01

Mosaic Manufacturing announced a new cloud-based multi-material software tool for 3D printing, CANVAS.

The Canadian company has been busy building and marketing the Palette, which we’ve covered previously. This device is an ingenious 3D printer accessory which dynamically splices differently colored input filaments together in just the right sequence and lengths to enable printing of a multicolored (or indeed multimaterial) object.

But while this hardware is quite interesting, there is the matter of software to drive it. How can a print job know where to put which material?

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86663" style="width: 1100px;">Mosaic Manufacturing's new CANVAS cloud-based multi-material 3D tool<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Mosaic Manufacturing’s new CANVAS cloud-based multi-material 3D tool</figcaption></figure>

Most, if not all, commonly used desktop 3D printing software is focused on single-material (and color) objects. And in the few software systems that do accommodate multi-materials, it usually ends up that you can select a material for each independent 3D “shell” on the print plate.

That’s not very useful, particularly if you just want to place some text on the side of a 3D model, for example. With that paradigm you must literally use your CAD program to carve out the 3D representation of the digits and create a bunch of independent 3D shells. Not fun.

But CANVAS hopes to simplify all this, as the first release of CANVAS will permit easy assignment of color to 3D models.

The company is also integrating a series of customizable 3D models for tweaking – and coloring – before 3D printing. In their video, you can see how this can work:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/o8t1V672SRM?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

 

They say their customizer solution is easy to use, even for those without CAD experience. If so, this could open up many possibilities in the future.

The CANVAS software will be available (at least initially) at no charge, but will not be open sourced. The company does wish it to become a standard by integrating support for many other multimaterial 3D printers, such as the BCN3D Sigma and Ultimaker 3 machines, with others to follow.

Their intent is to eventually charge for the software based on premium features yet to be announced. However, it may be challenging for them to achieve their goal of using this software as an industry standard, as it is tied pretty tightly to their company.

But the good news is that there is movement on the seemingly intractable problem of easy 3D model coloring.

Read more at Fabbaloo!

The post CANVAS Is Multi-Color, Multi-Material 3D Printing Software appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at May 18, 2017 11:15 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Visit Javelin at CANSEC 2017 in Ottawa, ON

On Wednesday May 31st and Thursday June 1st Javelin is exhibiting at CANSEC 2017 at the EY Centre in Ottawa, Ontario. Visit booth #1927 to see the latest features in Aras PLM, SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD and Stratasys 3D Printing.

Javelin’s SOLIDWORKS, 3D Printing and Data Management experts will be onsite to perform live demonstrations and answer any questions you have about these technologies.

cansec

What is CANSEC?

“CANSEC is Canada’s Global Defence and Security Trade Show. CANSEC has been held annually in Ottawa since 1998 by the Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI). CANSEC 2017 will once again showcase leading-edge technology, products and services for land-based, naval, aerospace and joint forces military units. This two-day event is the largest and most important defence industry event in Canada. (https://www.defenceandsecurity.ca/CANSEC/)

Why you should attend CANSEC 2017

In 2016, CANSEC, Canada’s largest defence and security exhibition, welcomed over 11,000 attendees. The audience included top level national and international military staff, major procurement officials, and representation from the entire industry supply chain, from large prime contractors to supplying companies.

CANSEC 2017 will once again showcase leading-edge technology, products and services for land-based, naval, aerospace and joint forces military units. This two-day event is the largest and most important defence industry event in Canada.

cansec

Featured Products at Booth #1927

SOLIDWORKS 2017 
  • SOLIDWORKS is the ultimate tool to design, validate, communicate, and manage your 3D CAD models. With efficient part, assembly, and drawing capabilities, as well as available built-in simulation, routing, and image/animation creation tools.
  • Begin 3D designs quickly using imported images, simple sketches, or scanned 3D data. Share your designs, manage 3D files, and work closely with your team and other stakeholders. Create production drawings and lifelike renderings. Test the operation and performance while creating your design with fully integrated simulation and analysis tools.
Stratasys 3D Printers
  • 3D printing – particularly when done in-house – enables design teams to quickly produce a high-quality, realistic prototype with moving parts at relatively low cost when compared to other methods such as machining or outsourcing. This means teams can use prototyping on projects where it wasn’t feasible in the past due to time or cost considerations
  • When customized equipment is vital and deadlines are non-negotiable, 3D printing gives government, military and defense manufacturers the freedom to design a single end-use part, quickly create low-volume tooling, or build complex, precise prototypes.
PLM / Data Management
  • Aras PLM is a full-featured, business-ready product lifecycle management software solution built on top of SOLIDWORKS® Enterprise PDM that extends PDM and related engineering business processes and drives cross-functional collaboration enterprise-wide.
  • With Aras PLM companies improve product quality, accelerate time to market & streamline critical processes such as New Product Development & Introduction, Complex Configuration Management, Enterprise Change Management, Supplier Management, Outsourced Manufacturing & Quality Compliance.

cansec

Register for CANSEC 2017

DATE TIME LOCATION
Wednesday May 31 – Thursday, June 1 2017 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM EY Centre, Ottawa ON REGISTER

 

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by Sarah Pew at May 18, 2017 06:26 PM

Global Petroleum Show will welcome unique exhibitor and presenter Javelin Technologies, SOLIDWORKS 3D design and 3D printing specialists

Live demos of the entire suite of SOLIDWORKS® software. An operating 3D printer. Presentations by energy industry leaders. And the chance to view and interact with SOLIDWORKS designs in mixed reality using the Microsoft HoloLens.

This is the stuff Javelin Technologies is made of, and a few of the reasons that 50,000 energy professionals from 90 countries will have the chance to visit their booth in the exclusive Digital Oilfield Zone at the 49th Global Petroleum Show at Calgary’s Stampede Park, June 13 to 15, 2017.

SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD for oil and gas processing equipment

SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD for oil and gas processing equipment

“We definitely enjoy amazing people with our technology,” said John Creelman, Javelin’s Western Canada Sales Manager. “Our partners and products are exceptional and exciting. At the same time, the day-to-day, practical applications of all this cool tech is changing the way designers work and having a huge impact on overall productivity and the bottom line. We can point to lots of examples of this among our customers in the energy sector, where speed and efficiency are more important than ever before.”

Javelin is a popular Canadian reseller for SOLIDWORKS software and the full range of Stratasys 3D printers, and is a leading training provider. The company had its beginnings in Oakville, Ontario in 1997 and now has additional locations in Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Winnipeg, and Dartmouth. Celebrating 20 years in business in 2017, Javelin has supported more than 4,000 Canadian companies. In 2016, Canadian Business and PROFIT named Javelin as one of the Fastest-Growing Information Technology Companies on the PROFIT 500 list.

Javelin will be set up at the Global Petroleum Show in booth 2117. Regular demos will highlight the benefits of the most popular and robust SOLIDWORKS solutions, including 3D computer-aided design (CAD) software; Simulation; Electrical & PCB; Large Assembly Design; 3D Interconnect; and PDM (for data management). Javelin will also feature Aras PLM (for product lifecycle management).

Interact with designs in virtual reality

Javelin’s sister company, Cinema Suite, will demonstrate how the Microsoft HoloLens brings SOLIDWORKS models to life. It’s a head-mounted device that displays designs as holograms (about the size of a small car) that you can interact with using your hands.

Hololens with SOLIDWORKS model hologram

Hololens with SOLIDWORKS model hologram

“The team at Cinema Suite develops software for game designers and filmmakers, and specializes in 3D product animations and mixed reality,” Creelman said.

“We’re working together to help designers create holograms of their SOLIDWORKS assemblies for product development, design reviews, interactive hands-on training, and marketing. This is truly what we love to do – to change the game in 3D.”

3D printing demo and parts

Javelin representatives also expect a lot of interest in their live 3D printing demonstration, complete with an operating printer from the Stratasys F123 series. Using up to four different materials at once, the F170 can produce prototypes and strong, accurate parts, has a large print size, and is quiet and office-friendly.

Stratasys F123 Series

Stratasys F123 Series

Visitors to Javelin’s booth can see and touch 3D-printed parts used in the energy sector.

3D Printed Drill Bit

3D Printed Drill Bit

Seminar focuses on improving productivity

On June 14, Javelin’s Peter Kjellbotn will present “Productivity Gains with SOLIDWORKS for Oil & Gas,” part of the Digital Oilfield Knowledge Bar seminar series, which features experts in advanced information technology and engineering. Kjellbotn is Javelin’s Simulation Product Manager, and says top businesses are integrating SOLIDWORKS 3D design products and processes to streamline workflow and succeed in demanding and challenging markets.

“The work of the engineering team is connected to every other department – manufacturing, quality, marketing. Using design validation and analysis tools in SOLIDWORKS Simulation allows you to eliminate errors, cut development costs, improve product performance, and ensure that your equipment can withstand conditions on the oilfield.”

Javelin is online at javelin-tech.com and facebook.com/JavelinTech, and on Twitter and Instagram as @javelintech.

The post Global Petroleum Show will welcome unique exhibitor and presenter Javelin Technologies, SOLIDWORKS 3D design and 3D printing specialists appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Karen Majerly at May 18, 2017 05:45 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Engineering a Craft Beer Revolution with Phillips Brewing

Phillips Brewing and Malting Company is a small-batch craft brewery in Victoria, British Columbia producing amazing beers since 2001. Known for crafting a wide variety of brews to satisfy any palate, Phillips is a standout example of the global independent brewing revival. From the moment you check out its colorful website and peruse its unique offerings, such as Space Goat (dry-hopped oat pale ale) and Electric Unicorn (white IPA), you know this isn’t a 1990s craft beer.

While it’s clear Phillips conveys a fun attitude, the company is very serious about crafting quality beer. David Gilmour, maintenance engineer at Phillips, is part of the team responsible for ensuring that brewing equipment is performing properly and churning out a consistent, quality product. A lot of engineering work goes into keeping the taps flowing and customers satisfied; and SOLIDWORKS is among the tools used by Phillips to make its brewing magic happen.

Gilmour has been working in the maintenance department at Phillips for the past two years. He and his team perform routine upkeep and also design equipment related to all aspects of the beer-making process, from brewing to packaging. “Technology plays a large role in almost all aspects of the brewing process,” said Gilmour. “Many of the steps that are involved in the process are automated and require precise control, so being able to design equipment specific to our needs is very important.”

This automation process relies on a Swiss watch-level of precision, adding more weight to Gilmour and his team’s work on maintaining brewing technology. “We employ a fully automated brewhouse, so once a recipe is dialed in, the process can be completed using equipment and instrumentation, which allows for very precise brewing,” stated Gilmour. “In the brewhouse, automated systems communicate accurate temperatures and times to the brewers, thereby allowing for accurate control of each brew. The use of automation on the packaging line lets us track the number of bottles and cans that make it through our facility and helps us identify areas that can be made more efficient, increasing productivity on the line.”

Mash Filter in SOLIDWORKS

After that quick introduction to the Phillips brewery, it’s clear that no two brewers are the same. Craft brewers, like Phillips, have unique needs specific to their product that might not fit with other craft brewers – never mind macro brewers. Essentially, one size does not fit all in brewing. As Gilmour attests, the ability to quickly design custom parts is critical to maintaining old equipment and guaranteeing efficient brewing processes.

“Since we are a small brewery growing rapidly, we have multiple projects happening all the time,” Gilmour said. “We are in the final stages of installing a new brewhouse, and I utilized SOLIDWORKS in many ways through the installation process. A 3D model of the brewery was used to layout vessels, equipment and plumbing to ensure an efficient workspace. Our brewery uses new and old equipment and it can be difficult to find parts for some of the older equipment in use. I have utilized SOLIDWORKS to design smaller parts and pieces for this machinery to have it fabricated locally.”

While designing, Gilmour often takes advantage of assembly, sheet metal and weldment features, “one of the features of SOLIDWORKS that I think make it stand out from other CAD packages is the ability to efficiently create parts within an assembly,” said Gilmour. “This is a feature that I use to ensure the part I am designing is the perfect size and shape to avoid collision and keep costs down. I also use sheet metal and weldment features quite regularly to create parts with complex bends and welded joints. In previous projects I have used the extensive surfacing package in SOLIDWORKS to create molds for composite manufacturing as well.”

Mash Filter at the Brewery

In addition to designing smaller parts for older machinery, Gilmour is using 3D CAD on larger projects. “Right now I am in the testing phase of a large piece of equipment that I designed using SOLIDWORKS,” Gilmour said. “Once the malted barley is boiled to remove all of the sugars and enzymes used in brewing the spent grain must be removed from the wort, the sugary liquid that will eventually become beer.  To perform this task we use a mash filter, which is a series of filter plates and air bladders that remove as much of the wort out of the grain as possible. I designed a frame for the press that puts it at a height accessible to the brewers, about 12 feet off the ground, and a large drag conveyor to carry the grain to a pump. I used a 3D model of the brewery I created in SOLIDWORKS to lay out the piping system that carries the grain from the pump to a silo 200 feet away that holds the grain, which is then used by local farmers to feed their livestock.” It’s the brewing circle of life with engineering ingenuity and SOLIDWORKS.

While Gilmour understands that humans play the most important role in crafting a great beer, technology continues to facilitate better brewing processes. “I think that advances in engineering technology will allow for the increase of quality assurance and precise control over all aspects of the beer making process,” Gilmour said. “Advances in design technology are giving craft breweries like Phillips the ability to bring engineering design in house, which helps create specific equipment for the needs of the brewery.”

Author information

Mike Fearon
Mike Fearon
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post Engineering a Craft Beer Revolution with Phillips Brewing appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mike Fearon at May 18, 2017 12:30 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Why you should always choose the root folder for the local view in SOLIDWORKS PDM

When creating a SOLIDWORKS PDM local view for a PDM client, the first dialog we’re greeted with is: Select the folder you want to create the file vault view in

Local View Location

Local View Location

My recommendation is to select the root folder.

In some cases users want to store the local view in some sub-folders, for example;

C:\SOLIDWORKS PDM\Folder McFolderFace\Vault\PDM_STD

SOLIDWORKS PDM local view

Folder McFolderFace

Ok maybe that’s a bit dramatic but you get the point.  While there’s nothing wrong with this and you’ll be able to login and add files to your vault as expected, the problem is that this can limit us later on with file path length.

Due to SOLIDWORKS PDM being integrated in Windows Explorer, it is affected by the Windows limitation of file path maximum length being 260 characters.

With the example above we’re adding 41 unnecessary characters whereas if we chose the root folder we maximize the amount of sub folders and file name length we can create within the vault.

Need SOLIDWORKS PDM Training?

Contact us about our SOLIDWORKS PDM training courses for users and administrators.

The post Why you should always choose the root folder for the local view in SOLIDWORKS PDM appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Williams at May 18, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

This Modular Furniture System is a Nod to ‘The Universal Brick Making Machine’

feature

While not feasible for every product out there, ceramic materials are one of the few natural materials available to us that can be formed into just about anything. Best of all, it’s a sustainable and cheap material to work with.

But ceramic furniture?

Inspired by German machinery manufacturer Carl Schlickeysen, inventor of the first machine made to produce bricks by extrusion, Madrid-based ENORME Studio recently created a modular furniture system that makes perfect use of that ceramic good stuff.

ENORME-1

Consisting of a modular metal support bars, the SCHLICKEYSEN system makes use of curved ceramic bricks made through an extrusion-based process that can be used to create something as small as a bench, to picnic tables and even larger elevated seating systems.

ENORME-3

ENORME-4

ENORME-5

Perhaps best of all, the ceramic bricks could theoretical be manufactured anywhere—meaning, the creators could sell the system as a blueprint for creating the exact same system across a distributed manufacturing network without the need for shipping or storage costs.

The post This Modular Furniture System is a Nod to ‘The Universal Brick Making Machine’ appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at May 18, 2017 11:53 AM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Ideation with SOLIDWORKS and a MakerBot 3D Printer just makes sense!

Affordable, quick and easy-to-use 3D printers are changing the face of product design and development, bringing this additive fabrication technology in-house for many designers and manufacturers. Thanks to SOLIDWORKS software it can now be just a matter of minutes to create your design concept in 3D, and only a matter of hours to create a physical prototype model with a MakerBot 3D printer.

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MakerBot 3D printing offers many competitive advantages

Why should you be using a MakerBot 3D printer in your SOLIDWORKS design process? Here are a few good reasons:

Quicker Time to Market

The longer a product stays in the design cycle, the longer it’s time to market, meaning less profit for the company. Time-to-market considerations were identified as the most critical daily issue facing respondents of a Product Design and Development readership poll. In addition, this group said prototyping itself presented a time-to-market obstacle nearly 17 percent of the time.

Product Design Time to Market Graph

With increasing pressure to get products into the marketplace quickly, companies are compelled to make quick and accurate decisions during the conceptual stage of design. These decisions can affect almost 80 percent of the product’s total cost by establishing material selection, manufacturing techniques and longevity of the design. 3D printing optimizes profits by shortening design processes. With 3D printing, companies can now build parts within hours, not days or weeks.

In-House Convenience

3D printing technology can create multiple, ready-to-use models right from a desktop, making it especially convenient for companies needing a high number of models. The printers are versatile, yet easy to use and require no special training. Designers just load the printer software and start printing.

Increased Data Security

Everyone is concerned about security today, and while sending confidential STL files to an outside vendor is generally safe, having a 3D printer in-house removes any worry about risking intellectual property.

MakerBot Models

MakerBot Models

Cost Savings

The acquisition cost of a MakerBot 3D printer can be as little as $1,375 (USD), making them a good option for companies of all sizes. Annual operating costs are generally low too, as material and replacement parts are relatively cheap.

How does a MakerBot benefit the Design Process?

Today, MakerBot 3D printers are used by designers and engineers for concept development and product design. They help users and potential customers see and feel an actual part, rather than rely on their imagination to bring a picture or rendering to life. Models are also used as a visual aid to support tooling development.

Design Process

Design Process

Design iterations are created faster.

Each year, a considerable number of new product initiatives fail. In a business climate where many companies are asking employees to do more with less, CAD solid modeling and 3D printing capabilities are essential for efficient product design and development. With 3D printing, companies can experiment with new ideas and numerous design iterations, without extensive time or tooling expense, to determine whether product concepts are worthy of additional resources.

MakerBot 3D Printer in use

MakerBot 3D Printer in use

Early feedback identifies design flaws.

Successful product design requires review and input from many sources. With in-house 3D printers, design teams can review concepts earlier with others who may provide feedback. This real-time collaboration with engineering, marketing and quality assurance can lead to early quality suggestions, enabling designers to make adjustments throughout the design process and follow-up testing.

Early changes save money.

Changes cost more the later they occur in the design process. Early and frequent communication and collaboration can reduce these costs. The diagram on the next page illustrates how the cost of changing a product in the concept stage may cost only $1, but as the design progresses, so does the cost of making changes. By the time a product is in production, the change that would have cost $1 in the concept stage now costs $10,000.

3D Printing should be part of your process

3D printing provides a highly cost-efficient means of producing numerous design iterations and immediate feedback; throughout the critical beginning stages of the development process. The ability to refine form, fit and function quickly can significantly affect production costs and time to market. This can create a distinct competitive advantage for those companies who include 3D printing as an integral part of their design process.

Lower costs will continue to expand the 3D printing market, especially in schools and small to medium sized businesses. The speed, consistency, accuracy and low cost of these printers will help companies reduce time-to-market and maintain a competitive edge.

Get a SOLIDWORKS MakerBot 3D Bundle

A SOLIDWORKS MakerBot 3D bundle provides the tools you need to design your products and build a plastic prototype. We will provide you with the technical support to solve your tough design problems. Our bundles include:

  1. SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD Software
    • Choose from SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional or Premium software.
    • Includes 3D design tools and application specific add-ins.
  2. SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service
    • Technical support from Javelin’s SOLIDWORKS experts.
    • Software updates and new releases.
    • Access to MySolidWorks online training and resources.
  3. A MakerBot 3D Printer
    • Receive a MakerBot Replicator+ desktop 3D printer at a discounted price.
    • Includes Basic Starter Kit:
      • 1 spool of material
      • 6 month standard manufacturer’s warranty

Act Now. This special offer ends May 31, 2017.

CHOOSE A BUNDLE

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by Rod Mackay at May 18, 2017 10:30 AM

May 17, 2017

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Moving Additive Manufacturing from Concept to Production

Yesterday I had the pleasure of joining hundreds of additive manufacturing enthusiasts at the Dassault Systemes’ first-ever Additive Manufacturing Symposium in Chicago, which was part of the larger SCIENCE in the Age of Experience event being held May 15-18. The goal of the event was to bring the world’s leading experts and advocates of additive manufacturing (AM) together to share insights regarding the latest innovations, collaboratively address on-going industry challenges, and generate ideas to accelerate the widespread adoption and advancement of the technology.

The agenda was jam-packed with leaders from industry, government and academia. First up was Derek Luther, an engineer with Adidas, who discussed the role 3D printing played in the creation of the company’s first-ever 3D printed running shoe, the FutureCraft 4D, which features a highly complex lattice structure, shown in the video below here.

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The German company partnered with Carbon, a tech company that uses an additive manufacturing process known as Direct Light Synthesis. By moving to additive manufacturing, Luther says the engineers and designers have more design freedom, can iterate quicker due to faster part speeds and now have the ability to engineer every cell of the shoe’s lattice structure per individual customer. The company plans to ship 5,000 of the shoes by end of year with plans to ramp up in 2018.

Next up was John Vickers from NASA’s Marshall Flight Center who emphasized how critical AM is to NASA’s missions, especially the Mars mission. Making the point that’s it’s impossible to bring additional supplies and redundant parts with the astronomical (pun intended) pay load costs for space travel, the ability to create parts through on-board 3D printing is essential to the mission.

Troy Hartwig from the Kansas City National Security Campus (NSC) discussed how AM has greatly increased designers ability to innovate has changed what was possible in design, introducing novel forms and shapes that were never possible before due to the constraints of traditional manufacturing methods. “Breakthroughs come when you stop thinking about design constraints and you can add complexity to your designs without the additional costs normally associated with that.”

The NSC is using 3D printing for prototyping and material characterization, along with tooling and fixtures around different systems.

 

Jerry Feldmiller from Orbital ATK talked on the importance of industry participation in shaping future hardware, software and materials for AM. Feldmiller said his company has been very involved with AM, beta testing the company’s launch vehicle components using AM machines from Statasys, and believes that work has spawned many new areas of research at Orbital. He emphasizes the importance of internal user groups at companies to share important information on AM and to maximize machine use across teams and divisions. Feldmiller also believes that external user groups should be actively developing and sharing best practices for designing for 3D printing and that academia must play a role in STEM-related activities to address the growing skills gap, citing the 2 million jobs that will go unfulfilled over the next decade.

Metal 3D printing allows for complex geometries and assemblies that previously would have required multiple components, to be simplified into a single, cost-effective assembly, without compromising on strength or structure.

 

Tim Simpson, a professor at Penn State University, spoke about the challenges and research opportunities for AM. Simpson said that AM has drastically changed the way we approach design. By using AM engineers can design very lightweight components using internal lattice structures, something impossible by traditional manufacturing methods. He used the example of a Titanium 3D-printed hip implant, which can now go from concept to FDA approval in just 14 months. Another advantage is that through use of AM, these implants eventually will be fully customized to each patient’s body.

Jack Rome from The Aerospace Corporation discussed process simulation for developing AM parts for space applications. Most might think of simulation being used to analyze individual components or assemblies of components, however, to validate parts for space applications, the process of AM must also be validated. When designing for AM, material variability must be taken into consideration during the design process. He also emphasized the need for AM industry standards, in additional to the efforts of individual organizations, such as ASME.

Following up on the topic of standardization was Lyle Levine of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) who spoke on additive manufacturing of metals. One of the reasons Levine believes that metal AM isn’t more prevalent is its inherent complexities. The cooling rates of various alloys vary greatly, making the non-linear behavior of the material more unpredictable. To create metals parts with AM, users must use simulation to “bridge the gap.” His organization is working in a pillared approach to facilitate industry adoption; creating a “knowledge box” of tools to use for AM and an “engineering box” with standards, best practices, validation methods and benchmark tests.

Jack Beuth, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University, discussed the challenges of AM for industry. He said that while not many companies are using AM for production currently, the technology is still making a significant impact on product development. Often companies start with service bureaus and in-house tooling and prototyping as a first step into AM. He used GE as an example of a company spearheading the use of advanced digital manufacturing and AM, in particular. The company is currently using AM for producing many of the subsystems for jet engines. GE estimates that by using AM it can reduce part counts by 800 on its new jet engines and nearly 30 percent of the parts on its new gas turbine engine are being 3D printed.

Rather than cutting, milling and drilling engine components, GE is welding together thin layers of powdered metal with a 200-watt laser and build parts from the ground up.

 

For more information on how the different types of additive manufacturing work, interesting articles and on-demand webinars, check out the new section on the SOLIDWORKS website at http://www.solidworks.com/am.

 

Author information

Barbara Schmitz
Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks
Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post Moving Additive Manufacturing from Concept to Production appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Barbara Schmitz at May 17, 2017 09:16 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Creating an effective SOLIDWORKS PDM Workflow using Configuration Management Methodology

Your SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault is the heart of your business, and your PDM workflow are the essential arteries that directs the flow of information to personnel from project inception to completion. How your PDM workflow identifies, structures, links, and assigns ownership to your requirements and internal processes directly affects your ability to successfully and efficiently perform your business objectives.

PDM Workflow Plan

PDM Workflow

Common workflow issues

If your PDM workflow is ignored or done incorrectly, your business pays severe penalties in the form of intervention resource expenditure. Those expenditures are the unplanned time, money, and resources expended to compensate for revision, product quality and schedule problems.

When quality and schedule problems dominate the energy your organization expends on a daily basis, corrective action becomes the standard “way of working”. Changing that environment requires an understanding of how your current processes and the required workflow relate to best practices and the culture change that is needed to make the transition.

What should my workflow consist of? How do I actually go about designing a workflow for my business?

Configuration Management Training will help

Our new Configuration Management (CM) Training presents a structured and effective methodology for documenting, validating, releasing, and changing requirements. In addition the course provides methods for reducing intervention resource costs. It addresses the process enhancements that your organization must make in order to accommodate change and keep all requirements clear, concise, and valid.

The training is not about the picks and clicks of creating a PDM workflow, we can provide you with a SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration course for that; no, this training concentrates on how your process workflow should be structured and more importantly how your business should handle design and project change.

Planning a Configuration Management Process

Planning a Workflow Process

Who should attend the training?

Anyone in your business that needs to be involved or will contribute to your project workflow and change management requirements. Typical personnel involved are:

  • Project Managers, Project Leaders, Project Controllers, and Project Members.
  • Quality Assurance Managers, General Managers, Engineering Managers, and Process Implementation Team Members.
  • IT Managers, Software Controllers, Developers, and Testers.
  • Support Managers, Application Engineers, and Support Technicians.
  • Lab Managers and Lab Technicians.
  • Service Managers, Service Controllers, Service Technicians.
  • Configuration/Build Managers.

Take the next step

If your business workflow is not working effectively or you need to design a new workflow then talk to us about configuration management training for your business. We currently have configuration management courses scheduled in the next few months in Burlington, ON., and Ottawa, ON.

We can also provide private on-site training for 10 or more people. Allowing your team to learn about the methodology together, and determine how to design a workflow specifically for your business.

Visit our CM Training Website

The post Creating an effective SOLIDWORKS PDM Workflow using Configuration Management Methodology appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at May 17, 2017 01:49 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

22-Minute Webinar: How to Design Connected Devices

Increasingly customers now expect new products to be intelligent, and often connected to the internet through Bluetooth or wireless, from the Nest thermostat in the home to manufacturing facilities.  In fact, Gartner predicts that the total number of “things” or connected devices will reach 20.4 billion by 2020.

In response, companies are looking to be the first in their respective industries to have their product include intelligence and/or connectivity.  Society is also becoming more social and more connected…from smart products to smart cities, which has made designing products more complex than ever before.

As product design is evolving and business is transforming to accommodate the demands from customers, we have learned that adding intelligence to products adds several new challenges.

On May 23rd, we will be presenting a 22-Minute webinar: Design of Smart & Connected Things that  will explain how to simplify this process—and resolve these challenges—by using SOLIDWORKS® full ecosystem of innovative solutions.  We will focus on clarifying the changing role of “supplier of products” to “provider of intelligent products.”

Register for the 22-Minute Webinar for May 23rd (11AM and 2PM EST) here…

 

Author information

Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling is a Senior Marketing Manager at SolidWorks

The post 22-Minute Webinar: How to Design Connected Devices appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Cliff Medling at May 17, 2017 01:29 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS PCB Export Copper Traces

One of the many advantages of SOLIDWORKS PCB is its ability to export PCB copper and traces into your mechanical models.  This not only is a huge advantage for marketing and visual representation purposes but it can also be useful for simulations and heat flow analysis.  For example, we could apply our actual copper material to these traces and simulate standard voltage and current levels to give insight to heat flow within our electronics.

SOLIDWORKS PCB Export Copper Traces

Copper Export Options

To export the 3D CAD file including all copper traces we can simply go to the Outputs tab and select the Parasolid export option.  Within our Parasolid export option we will have a number of options of what exactly we would like to include in our export.  Here we can export all copper traces if we would like.

Once exported we can open within SOLIDWORKS and we will have our full PCB in 3D CAD format including all copper traces which can then be used for visualization, marketing, or heat flow simulation purposes as we may see fit.

SOLIDWORKS Assembly with Copper

SOLIDWORKS Assembly with Copper

For more information about SOLIDWORKS PCB

Read our recent blog post for a demo video, images, and detailed explanation to help potential users understand the benefits of SOLIDWORKS PCB. Or call 1-877-219-6757.

The post SOLIDWORKS PCB Export Copper Traces appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Flett at May 17, 2017 12:00 PM

May 16, 2017

SolidSmack

These Skateboarders Figured Out How to Ride Cobblestone Streets Via Tram Tracks

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What if you could surf on tram tracks?

Faced with rough cobblestone streets instead of smooth and paved roads, these creative skaters created a workaround by modding their boards to fit the tram tracks embedded within the cobblestone streets…effectively providing an ultimate smooth ride.

Featuring one wheel in the front center of the board and two wheels in the back, the resulting board design lets these shredders shred where no shredder has shredded so eloquently before in the streets of ancient Portugal and beyond:

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Helmets, anybody??

The post These Skateboarders Figured Out How to Ride Cobblestone Streets Via Tram Tracks appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at May 16, 2017 10:13 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

MySolidWorks Training

Have you seen MySolidWorks Training?

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Author information

Mike Fearon
Mike Fearon
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post MySolidWorks Training appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mike Fearon at May 16, 2017 04:55 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Adjusting Virtual Memory (Windows Pagefile) for increased SOLIDWORKS Performance

Author: Chris Briand, CSWE, Javelin Technologies

A kin to the article that our teammate, Josh Carrier, wrote back in 2010, I thought it high time we review the process of how to increase virtual memory on your workstation.

We use this procedure a great deal when attempting to enhance the performance of systems where SOLIDWORKS is having difficulty with importing or exporting geometry, or handling larger assemblies. What we are essentially doing is raising the ceiling and giving the operating system the extra room it needs to maneuver if it runs out of physical memory.

One of the tidbits we have discovered over the years is that SOLIDWORKS typically throws the demand for more page file at the Operating System so quickly that it takes time for the operating system to allocate the needed amount of virtual memory, further slowing operations.

SSD or NOT?

One item to highlight, having grown in prominence these last few years, is the effect of a page file being located on an SSD drive, which may be acting as the host drive for your Operating system and installation of SOLIDWORKS.

Before SSD technology was readily available you would have placed the page file on the Root of the main drive (C:\), without jeopardizing the long term safety of your HDD drive. The trade off here is that writing operations to a page file located on the HDD would have slowed performance slightly as the HDD was much slower than RAM. This is still true today with SSD drives however there is an added danger, as SSD’s have a limited lifespan and can only handle so many writing cycles – it may be a better choice to locate a larger page file on a secondary spinning disk.

How much RAM?

To properly adjust your virtual memory values, you will need to know how much physical memory, or RAM, is on the system.  You can find this by navigating to the System Information Dialog

The System Info Dialog can be found by typing “System Info” in windows 10 and opening the System Info dialog (or Start > All Apps > Windows Administrative Tools > System Information)

IMPORTANT: One question to research before attempting the following procedure is: Do I have sufficient Disk Space to make a change to the page file size?

With Physical Memory (RAM) amounts of 4GB to 24 GB we suggest having a page file minimum size set to 2 times the amount of Physical Memory (RAM) in the system.

If you are lucky enough that you have more than 16 GB of RAM in the system, we suggest that the page file minimum be set between 1 and 1.5 times the amount of RAM.

Changing the Virtual Memory Values

  1. Within the Windows 10 Search type “Performance”
  2. This should bring up an entry that states: “Adjust the appearance and performance of Windows” (This is the same dialog that you would have accessed if you had navigated via the control panel: Control Panel > System > Advanced System Settings > Advanced Tab > Settings)

Adjusting Virtual Memory for SOLIDWORKS Performance

Accessing Virtual Memory

  1. Once you have arrived within the performance options dialog choose the Advanced Tab > and select the “Change” button located within the in the Virtual Memory section of the dialog.
  2. Uncheck the “Automatically manage paging file size for all drives” Option
  3. Select the drive where you have room or deem it appropriate to place the page file.
  4. Choose the “Custom Size” Radio Button.
  5. Enter a MINIMUM value of 1 to 2 times the amount of physical RAM you have in the system. (16GB would appear as 16000MB)
  6. Enter a MAXIMUM value of 2GB more than the MINIMUM value specified in the step above. (This will ensure that windows reporting and other diagnostic reports are correct)
  7. Choose the “Set” button
  8. Restart the Workstation to realize the changes to Virtual Memory.

 

Author information

Javelin Technologies
Javelin Technologies is a provider of technology solutions since 1997. We are experts in 3D design and have helped thousands of companies with solutions for mechanical design, electrical design and 3D printing. Large or small, we have the skills, experience, and services to propel your organization to new heights so you can aim high.

The post Adjusting Virtual Memory (Windows Pagefile) for increased SOLIDWORKS Performance appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Javelin Technologies at May 16, 2017 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | Sideways Sketch Machine

feature

This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw, or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these fresh tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “Smoke Rings” from Modern Vices and work our way through tracks from Dog Bite, Video Age, Sweet Valley, Henry Hall, and others before wrapping up with “Future Primitive” from Paper Cuts.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

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The post SolidSmack Radio | Sideways Sketch Machine appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at May 16, 2017 01:11 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery: Starting our Mash

So we’re back it again and if you’ve been following along, we’ve managed to prepare our system and have progressed into the first real stage of making beer – the mashing process. This is where we slowly poured twelve pounds of grain into our mash kettle and patiently waited for the all the sugars to be extracted in order to create our wort. As this step is being carried out, the unforgettable aroma of steeped grains filled our nostrils. I for one enjoy this distinct smell. However, if you ask my wife, she doesn’t find it as pleasant as I do. More for me I guess…

This mashing phase can vary depending on the equipment and the recipe being used, but for our process, it took seventy-five minutes to be exact.  During that time, you could imagine five grown men standing around the kitchen waiting impatiently to start the next step. As we watched the wort swirl around the kettle, it needed to be maintained at a precise temperature. If the kettle became too hot, the grains would release tannins, which produce off-flavors or bitterness into our wort. If the temperature dropped too low, we’d be making a beer flavored porridge instead.

So with the electric brewing system we used, we were able to simply set the required temperature on our panel, which in turn monitored the temperature and controlled the heating element inside our kettle. This makes life a heck of a lot easier during the brew process because you’re not fumbling around with handheld thermometers or stovetop heating elements.

But before we can simply set the temperature on our control panel, we needed to build a schematic so we could better understand how all the components were required to be wired up. And before we wired anything up, one of the first steps we needed to take as we built our schematics – was making sure we created the appropriate symbols. In Episode 3, we discuss the basic topic of creating a new symbol for our temperature modules that are inside the electrical panel.

So be sure to check out Episode 3 in our “Brewing with Electricity” mini-series where we start the mashing phase to create our wort and discuss the various methods of symbol creation within SOLIDWORKS Electrical.

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If you are still looking for more great information on SOLIDWORKS Electrical including topics such as “How to create a template” or “Understanding Installations,” check out our videos on these more detailed topics at my.solidworks.com – simply search for Electric Brewery. You can also access past episodes by clicking on Episode 1 and Episode 2.

If you’re a fan of twitter, you can follow me @SWECAD.

Author information

JP Emanuele
JP Emanuele
JP is a Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, North America.

The post Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery: Starting our Mash appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by JP Emanuele at May 16, 2017 12:30 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to flip a SOLIDWORKS Section View Direction

As a designer or drafter we need to know the correct projection of the orthogonal views in drawings. There are two projection methods: First Angle and Third Angle. Depending on where on the globe we are living the projection direction will be different. For North American designers, the third angle projection is used, whereas, the first angle projection is mostly used in Europe and Asia. The following image shows the difference of the projections. For more information refer to this guide

Drawing Projection

Drawing Projection

To help readers of a drawing understand which projection method is used for each specific drawing, there is a common symbol  used in the drawing title block. The following image shows the two symbols used for the two projection method.

Symbols of the Projection Methods Used in Drawing Title Blocks to Guide Drawing Receivers.

Usually companies have their specific templates and the projection method is correctly assigned to them. Also, if you create your own template have this in mind. The following image demonstrates where you can set the projection method under Tools > Options.

Set the Correct Projection Method in Tools > Options

Correct Projection for the Section Views

This becomes more critical when section views are added. The assigned projection method for the drawing template defines the correct side to place the section view. If you are an experienced user, you would probably put the view on the correct side without thinking. However, this could be automated in SOLIDWORKS to work correctly for any users.

When the section view command is selected, there is an “Auto Flip” item available to be checked off. If this option is selected, SOLIDWORKS will correct the side of the arrow pointers showing on the section line itself and also the resulted drawing view.

SOLIDWORKS Section View Auto Flip

Auto Flip Options Corrects the Pointing Side of the Arrow and Also the Resulted Section View.

The following image demonstrates how Auto Flip helps in placing the section views on the correct side of the parent view. This example is done with Third Angle Projection. Note that the arrows direction and the resulted view change by placing the section view on different sides of the parent view.

Image on the Left Shows Placing Section View at the Bottom of the Parent View, whereas, Image on the Right Shows Placing the Same Section View on top of the Parent View.

Learn more about Drawings

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Drawings training course online or in a Canadian classroom near you.

The post How to flip a SOLIDWORKS Section View Direction appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWE at May 16, 2017 12:00 PM

May 15, 2017

SolidSmack

The Monday List 20.17 | What We’re Reading This Week

Feature

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Politics, It Seems, Has Jolted Even the Idiot Box Awake
The Idiot Box is wising up. But is it waking up?

01

Coke’s New CEO Must Win Over a New Generation That Shuns Sugar
James Quincey on energy drinks, stay-at-home consumers, and the eternal quest for a better sweetener.

02

Your Fidget Spinner is (Maybe) Making You Smarter
Why is fidgeting so hot? Because it’s an adaptation to deskbound lifestyles.

03

How to Calculate How Fast a Plane is Going—While You’re On It
You’ll want to request a window seat for your next flight.

04

Exactly What To Put In Your LinkedIn Profile To Get A Promotion
Looking to move up to a management role? Here’s how to showcase your potential in your LinkedIn profile and catch the eye of your boss or a recruiter.

05

How to Turn Boredom into a Performance Enhancer
An entire industry is trying to curb our boredom while running. But if you can harness that feeling of restlessness, you may find yourself stronger and faster than ever.

06

The post The Monday List 20.17 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at May 15, 2017 04:15 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Drawings – Automatically Create a Border

How to use the Automatic Border Feature

The Automatic Border Feature quickly allows you to create a border in your sheet format. You can control every aspect of the border, including grid size and layout. When using the tool border, zones automatically update. You can also add Margin Mask areas, where labels and dividers are not shown.

Let’s Get Started

To Start the Automatic Border Feature, go to – Open a drawing, then click the Sheet Format Tab. Select Edit Sheet and then Automatic Border.

Drawings
The first option you will see is the Delete list, you can select items that are already on your Sheet Format to be deleted. Select the arrow. You will want to delete any existing border, this prevents overlapping with the newly created border.

Drawings

Setting the Zone and More

The next step allows you to set the zone size, formatting, borders, and margins. You have two options for the zone formatting the “50mm from center” option creates zones every 50mm from the center or the “evenly sized” option creates rows and columns that are based on the paper size.

Drawings
The Margin options include left and right justifications, line size and adding a double border.

Drawings
If you want an odd number of rows and columns, the Center Zone Divider may overlap the center label.  If this is the case, you can specify the Outer Zone Divider Length to be zero.

Drawings

Margin Masks

The last step allows you to add margin masks.  Margin masks allow you to hide zone divider and labels in the margin. To create a margin mask, select plus button and position the rectangular mask over the area you want to hide. You can add multiple masks to the page.

Drawings
You have now created a parametrically linked border! Don’t forget to save it as a Sheet Format. To do so, save the sheet format, select File – Save As Sheet Format.

Drawings
And that’s a wrap on using the automatic border feature in SOLIDWORKS Drawings!


Author: Krystine Thoroughman
Krystine has been working with CAD for the past 10 years as a Designer and Technical Support Engineer. She became interested in the industry through working with her Dad, a machinist from Arizona. Krystine’s current focus is SOLIDWORKS PDM support and helping customers understand how different pieces of software can work together, to create a more efficient work environment!

Author information

GoEngineer
GoEngineer delivers software, technology and expertise that enable companies to unlock design innovation and deliver better products faster. With more than 30 years experience and thousands of customers in high tech, medical, machine design, energy and other industries, GoEngineer provides best-in-class design solutions from SOLIDWORKS, Stratasys, CAMWorks, Altium and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM). For more information, visit goengineer.com.

The post SOLIDWORKS Drawings – Automatically Create a Border appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GoEngineer at May 15, 2017 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

6 Ways to Reduce Development Costs with Industrial 3D Printing

Most product developers and engineers have gained a solid working knowledge of 3D printing over the years. Also known as additive manufacturing, the term covers a range of technologies, such as filament-based fused deposition modeling (FDM) that creates plastic prototypes, laser-curing processes that make parts from photopolymer resins, and powder-bed fusion machines that produce fully dense metal and plastic components.

A direct metal laser sintering machine fuses together powder to form each layer of a 3D printing design.

 

All offer great potential for cost reductions when prototyping. Two of these technologies—selective laser sintering (SLS) and direct metal laser sintering (DMLS)—can cut costs through accelerated production; reduced tooling costs and work-in-process; less waste; and parts that remain strong despite being lighter in weight. SLS and DMLS are especially important to those thousands of companies that are 3D printing end-use parts. Examples abound:

– Lockheed Martin’s Juno spacecraft, currently in orbit around Jupiter, carries a dozen 3D-printed waveguide support brackets.
– Activated Research Company used DMLS to develop a radical new design for its Polyarc gas chromatography catalytic microreactor, bringing it to market in just 15 months.
– Raytheon uses 3D printing for rocket engines, fins, and control system components for guided missiles, producing parts in hours rather than days.
– Boeing set a world record in 2016 by building the largest 3D-printed item ever made, a fixture used in the construction of its 777 airplane, reportedly cutting weeks off its manufacturing time.
– Brunswick Corporation used 3D printing for air conditioning grills on its Sea Ray yachts, eliminating the need for disposable tooling and speeding product development.

In these cases, results included greater functionality, lower weight, reduced manufacturing costs, and often times all three. Here are six design considerations that made these benefits possible:

1. Optimize the Design
Well-designed 3D printed parts follow many of the same rules as those made with injection molding. Use gradual transitions between adjoining surfaces. Eliminate large differences in cross section and part volume. Avoid sharp corners that often create residual stress in the finished workpiece. Watch that thin unsupported walls don’t grow too tall, or else buckling or warping may occur. Also, surfaces with shallow angles tend to leave ugly “stair-stepping” that makes them unsuitable for cosmetic features—flatten them out where possible.

2. Throw Out Tradition
The most dramatic 3D-printed part designs leverage 3D’s ability to create “organic” shapes, such as honeycombs and complex matrices. Don’t be afraid to use these shapes, provided doing so creates a lighter, stronger part. Nor should you fear placing holes—lots of them—into your part design. With traditional manufacturing, drilling holes in a solid block of material increases part cost and waste. Not so in the additive world, where more holes mean less powder and less processing time. Just remember, 3D printed holes don’t need to be round. Quite often, an elliptical, hexagonal, or free-form hole shape would better suit the part design and be easier to print.

3. Consider Next Steps in the Design Cycle
Just because you can print parts with lots of holes, however, doesn’t mean you should, especially if the plan is to make lots of such parts later on. Because 3D printing offers tremendous design flexibility, it’s easy to paint yourself into a corner by not considering how parts will be manufactured post-prototyping. Based on our examples at the start of this design tip, an increasing number of companies are finding 3D printing suitable for end-use parts, but many parts will transition from printing to machining, molding, or casting as production volumes grow. That’s why it’s important to perform a design for manufacturability analysis early on in the design cycle, assuring cost-effective production throughout the part’s life cycle.

4. Avoid Secondary Operations
Plastic parts produced via SLS need no support structures during the build process, so post-processing is usually limited to bead blasting, painting, reaming, and tapping of holes, and machining of critical part features. DMLS, on the other hand, often requires extensive scaffold-like structures to support and control movement of the metal workpiece—without them, surfaces may curl and warp. This is especially true with overhanging geometries—wide T-shapes, for example, which require build supports beneath the arms, and will have to be machined or ground away, thus increasing cost and lead time. The story is similar but less dramatic with SL, where cured resin supports are easily removed with a hand grinder and some sandpaper. Where possible, Proto Labs will work to orient parts in such a way to reduce these overhangs and other unfriendly features, but part designers can help by minimizing their use in the first place.

Some parts produced with DMLS require hand finishing, as seen here. Smarter part design can help minimize this extra post-production step that can add cost and time.

5. Watch the Tolerances
Designers and engineers should avoid “over-tolerancing” their parts—doing so may force them to be built using thinner layers (increasing build time and cost), and will in many cases call for secondary machining operations to meet overly zealous print dimensions. And because 3D printing offers so many opportunities for part count reduction, there’s less need for super accurate fits between mating surfaces anyway, just one more example of how this technology reduces manufacturing costs.

6. Look at the Big Picture
3D printed parts might cost more up front, but don’t let that scare you. With additive, you have tremendous possibility for part count reduction, reduced weight and greater structural integrity, lower assembly costs, internal passages for cooling or wiring, and other part features that are not possible with traditional part designs. Also, keep in mind that fixtures, molds, and other types of tooling are not needed with 3D printing, eliminating costs that might not be directly associated to the price of the individual piece part. Focusing on the part’s price tag, rather than product functionality and “the big picture,” may leave you designing the same parts you did yesterday, eliminating opportunities to reduce overall manufacturing costs.

Download our Industrial 3D Printing for Dummies book to learn more about designing for additive manufacturing processes and how it can be leveraged throughout product development.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author information

Eric Utley
Eric Utley
Eric is a 3D printing applications engineer at Proto Labs

The post 6 Ways to Reduce Development Costs with Industrial 3D Printing appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Eric Utley at May 15, 2017 02:43 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Dalhousie engineering students use SOLIDWORKS to redesign parathlete’s throwing chair

When an instructor at Nova Scotia’s Dalhousie University mentioned to the Javelin team that he was looking for real life design projects for his first-year engineering students, they had the perfect suggestion.

Pam LeJean, one of Javelin Technologies’ sponsored athletes, is among the best track and field parathletes in the world, but does long for a few improvements to the unique chair/cart she sits on when she trains and competes in shot put, javelin, and discus.

One of her wishes is to have a better storage system for the items she carries – one that will keep her towel dry in wet weather and keep her shots securely in place when in transport. The second problem Pam has identified is instability. She would like to reduce the rocking when she’s throwing.

Robert Warner is a senior instructor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Dalhousie. He says the redesign of Pam’s chair is part of an ongoing commitment to give students a chance to work for actual clients who have real criteria and constraints. In this case, Robert was able to borrow Pam’s throwing chair and bring it into the lab. The students measured, did hand sketches, and designed the existing chair in SOLIDWORKS®. Then they came up with ways to improve the design, without adding too much weight.

“It went really well,” Robert says. “The students enjoyed the project because they appreciated that there was a real problem to solve. That motivated them to do their best.”

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Javelin’s sponsored athlete Pam LeJean impressed by problem-solving designs

All first-year engineering students take the Design 1 course, developing skills in designing by hand and in computer aided design using SOLIDWORKS. They learn about the design process and how to use leading edge software as a design tool. Robert says it was valuable for them to have a realistic design project in which they could generate possible solutions and present their concepts.

Using PowerPoint presentations, each student group showed their SOLIDWORKS designs to their classmates and instructors. When Pam viewed some of the detailed assembly and part drawings of possible new storage and stability systems for her chair, she was impressed.

“It was surreal to see my throwing chair being analysed by so many super smart brains,” Pam says. “It was really flattering and unbelievable. To see everything broken down into such detail using SOLIDWORKS was awesome. I’d never seen anything like that before and I thought the ideas were great, especially considering these students aren’t even working in the field yet.”

Pam will continue using her existing chair for the 2017 competition season but is considering a redesign in the post-season. She says she’ll be looking at the students’ ideas for inspiration.

Dalhousie students use SOLIDWORKS to redesign parathlete’s wheelchair

Pam Lejean at Javelin

Industry standard

Dalhousie University is a long-time customer of Javelin Technologies, having purchased their first SOLIDWORKS research license in 2008. In 2012, they purchased 1,500 education licenses to use at Dalhousie and five feeder universities across Atlantic Canada. To learn more about Dalhousie’s Faculty of Engineering, visit www.dal.ca/faculty/engineering.html. Pam LeJean’s profile is online at paralympic.ca/pamela-lejean.

The post Dalhousie engineering students use SOLIDWORKS to redesign parathlete’s throwing chair appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Karen Majerly at May 15, 2017 01:22 PM

SOLIDWORKS PDM Cleaner Service

When files are DESTROYED (this is different to being deleted and likely only the admin has permission), they aren’t removed from the vault archive until the SOLIDWORKS PDM Cleaner Service has been run.

This can cause issues when your IT admin is frantically trying to clear space when the hard drives are close to being full on the archive server and not seeing results from all the file destruction.  In this situation a better option would be to spread the archive over multiple drives (see here), but if this isn’t an option you can change the time the cleaner service runs from the default 3 AM.

Changing the schedule for SOLIDWORKS PDM Cleaner Service

  • On the Archive Server open the Registry Editor
    • Start menu > Run > regedit
Run Regedit

Run Regedit

  • Navigate to the key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\SOLIDWORKS\Applications\PDMWorks Enterprise\ArchiveServer\Vaults\VAULTNAME\
Browse to the Vault

Browse to the Vault

  • Right-Click within > New > String Value > Named ‘CleanerSchedule’
Edit the CleanerSchedule entry

Edit the CleanerSchedule entry

  • For value data, enter the schedule string in format Minute Hour Weekday  (See below for more information)
    • In the below example it’s running every Monday at 1:00am
SOLIDWORKS PDM Cleaner Service time value

Enter time value

  • Restart the archive server service for the changes to be implemented
Restart the Server

Restart the Server

Schedule Format

Minute - Use numerals 0 through 59.
Hour - Use numerals 0 through 23, where 0 is midnight
Weekday - Use numerals 1 through 7, where 1 is Monday.
Examples

0 0 * Run every day at midnight.

0 2 1-5 Run every Monday through Friday at 2 a.m.

0 * * Run every hour on the hour every day.

0 6-18 1-5 Run every hour between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Need SOLIDWORKS PDM Training?

Contact us about our SOLIDWORKS PDM training courses for users and administrators.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Cleaner Service appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Williams at May 15, 2017 12:00 PM

May 12, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis Tutorial – Part 4

On May 20th and 21st, 1927 Charles Lindbergh, aka “Lucky Lindy”, made history by completing the first solo, nonstop, transatlantic flight; piloting his monoplane, the Spirit of St. Louis, from Long Island, New York to Paris, France. To celebrate the anniversary of Lindy’s achievement we’re showing SOLIDWORKS users how to model a 30” wingspan version of his iconic aircraft. Throughout this series, we’ll fly through lessons on how to work off imported images, and we’ll use a series of extrusions, lofts, and sweeps to model the Spirit of St. Louis.

Welcome to part 4 of our 5 -part series where we are modeling Lucky Lindy’s iconic Spirit of St. Louis monoplane. We have the basic components of the aircraft modeled and we are now ready to model in the unique landing gear and strut structures to the wing and tail. In this part of the series we will take a deep dive into the Sweep tool and we will touch on the Dome and Variable Size Fillet tools.

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Whether you’re an aviation enthusiast or are just looking for a new SOLIDWORKS challenge, the Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis tutorial series is for you!

Can’t wait to watch the next video? View all of the tutorials on the playlist here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis Tutorial – Part 4 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at May 12, 2017 09:00 PM

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Shave the Nail

Gao-Zhimin-art

The metal shavers strolled to and fro, peeling layers, shaving sheets and shifting the metal shells of the outer planets. Their arms, battered and scarred from eons of metals shavings flying against them made their skin more armor-like, unable to be penetrated by the sharp shackles of these links.

Gao Zhimin – Delightfully dramatic and surreal lanscapes of asian countrysides and seas with a print and embroidered feel to them.

Mumu – This wooden toy playset design from Dualai Studio is simple and just about the cutest little wooden toy playset ever.

Blade Runner 2049 – The Official teaser trailer for the new Blade Runner 2049 movie starring Harrison Ford (yes!) and Ryan Gosling (Hey girl).

Lion Sculpture – Carved from a single tree by famed sculptor Dengding Rui Yao and a team of 20 sculptors in Myanmar over a period of three years.

Real-life Hobbit House – I want to live in this, or build it and then live in it. Full interior, bathroom and upstairs area too!

El Raco – When I get old, I’m just going to buy a huge estate and turn every room into a different place to make stuff too. Just like Catalan ceramicist and Miró collaborator Joan Gardy-Artigas did.

CGI Podcast – A new podcast interviewing and going behind the scenes and into the workflow of the best CGI creators in the business, with your host Will Gibbons.

Amazon Spheres – Inside the amazing, new spherical orbs of the Amazon facility in Seattle. It will house 400-plus species of plants and Amazon employees of course.
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Shred – New video for Lektrique’s massive single. It has skateboarding.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6YNKolzfiro?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The post Friday Smackdown: Shave the Nail appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at May 12, 2017 08:04 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM Forms Series Part 2: Word Documents as Forms

SOLIDWORKS PDM Tech Tip

Written by: Bryce Hooper, Application Engineer, DASI Solutions

Continuing our series on automating forms inside of SOLIDWORKS PDM, we’ll move along with an example in Microsoft Word. (See Part 1 on Excel docs as forms here.)

Here is our example of an Engineering Change Notice form:Engineering Change Notice

Now, to map these properties to our file and our data card, we will need to start with the variable setup. For Microsoft Office documents, the setup is pretty simple. For each variable we are mapping we will want to use the attribute block CustomProperty. This should be familiar as it is the same that we would use for SOLIDWORKS documents and was also noted in our article about Excel forms.

Edit Variable

Set this to use the proper extensions that we are intending to use and the rest of the options can be set at your discretion.

It is then time to map the custom properties to those ranges. This is done by going to the file info inside of Word, then properties and Advanced properties.Microsoft Word Advanced Properties

In the dialog that shows we go to the Custom tab. Here we find a list of properties that are already defined. Any variables that have already been assigned a value inside of PDM will automatically be created. Any that haven’t we will create now. To do this, we give the property a name in the Name field and then give it a value in the Value field. A space will work for this value, but in the interest of seeing what we are setting up, it may be advantageous to give this a realistic value to get our formatting right.

Document Properties

Now that we’ve created the custom properties inside of Word, we can enter them into the body of our document. This is done by going to the Insert tab > Quick Parts > Field.

Insert Field - Microsoft Word

Do this with your cursor in the desired location, and the following dialog will help us add the right field.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Forms Series Part 2: Word Documents as Forms - Field Properties

To get to our custom properties, we need to scroll down to the Field Name “DocProperty”. This will give us the Field Property of our available custom properties (plus some file properties). Select the custom property that we need to enter and click “OK”. If we had filled in a value for the custom property, it will now show.

For Word, custom properties and the fields they are linked to do will not update automatically or open by themselves. We have two options in this case.

  1. Force an update each time we open by pressing Ctrl+A and then F9
  2. Add a macro to update the fields on each open

Here, I’ll give you the code to do number two on that list.

To start we’ll need to create a new macro in Word. To do this, we can press Alt+F8. We get the dialog shown below.

Create new macro in Microsoft Word

Click “Create” and paste in the following code snippet:

Sub AutoOpen()

    With Options

        .UpdateFieldsAtPrint = True

        .UpdateLinksAtPrint = True

    End With

    ActiveDocument.Fields.Update

End Sub

Save and close the VB editor. From now on, each time the file is opened the fields should update.

From here, we can make things even easier by creating a template to help us fill in values or serialize a naming convention. We can also create actions in our workflow transitions to automatically fill in names and dates for approvals.

There are, of course, some pros and cons to this technique. I’ll break them down a bit here. By no means is this an all-encompassing list.

Pros:

  • Your company’s forms are probably already in Word (or some other Office format), so the translation isn’t difficult.
  • If they aren’t already in Word, this is an easy program for anyone else to learn and create forms.
  • Setup for this is fairly simple and intuitive. The process works similarly for other office formats.

Cons:

  • The PDM Preview window does not update until the file has been checked out, opened, saved, and checked back in.
  • Requires Microsoft Office on any machine that would need to view/print it.
  • Does not handle changes down the line to the form/format with ease. I.E.: As your company uses the process and changes the formatting or logo, old forms will not update to the new format without manual updates.
  • As of this article, some variable types either don’t work (Yes/No) or don’t display correctly (Date)
  • Requires a macro to update correctly.

If you’re looking for other ways to create forms inside of PDM, you may also want to check out our blog on Microsoft Excel forms and watch for our upcoming third part in the series covering XML documents as forms in PDM.

Author information

DASI Solutions
DASI Solutions
DASI Solutions is dedicated to service and support. As one of a handful of original, charter value-added resellers (VAR) in the SolidWorks Community, DASI Solutions has built partnerships and success stories with many of our customers. We are very pleased to bring you SolidWorks 3D CAD design engineering software and 3D printing services.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Forms Series Part 2: Word Documents as Forms appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by DASI Solutions at May 12, 2017 03:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Using SOLIDWORKS for Plant Layout Design

SOLIDWORKS Plant Layout design is a breeze! Whether it’s a simple building layout or a more complex multi-building layout, SOLIDWORKS 2017 large assembly tools can help:

  • Easily organize equipment and space with new Magnetic Mates.
  • Publish parts and assemblies as assets with appropriate connection points for easy drag and drop mating.
  • Reposition models easily by un-snapping and re-snapping to new locations according to design needs.
  • Create super lightweight model version or Speedpak configuration, including published references.

Take a look at the SOLIDWORKS 2017 demonstration video below to learn more:

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Plant Design Layouts

Whether you need layouts for proposals, photo renderings or even just mapping, SOLIDWORKS is capable of doing all that and more, lets take a look at an example of a plant layout:

SOLIDWORKS Plant Layout

SOLIDWORKS Plant Layout

The details on this plant layout are crisp, clear and very nicely illustrated. An accurate representation of what is on site and how everything is connected.

SOLIDWORKS Routing

Also take a look at the routing from building to building. SOLIDWORKS Premium includes SOLIDWORKS Routing to help with the creation of piping systems as well as electrical wiring and harnesses.

SOLIDWORKS Plant 3D View

SOLIDWORKS Plant 3D View

After setting up a layout, SOLIDWORKS has a feature called 3D Walk Through / Fly Through. Create a camera and take a walk through the plant for a presentation or for inspection purposes. An example of a walk through from inside one of the buildings:

With the extensive list of SOLIDWORKS features and capabilities, plant layouts can be easily created by specifying the location of  machinery, buildings, and routed systems.

PlantWorks

Take designing and managing plant layouts a step further with PlantWorks from Javelin:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cg_VnqVcHW0?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Get PlantWorks

You can buy our PlantWorks SOLIDWORKS add-in software directly from our web store.

The post Using SOLIDWORKS for Plant Layout Design appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sam Sharkawi at May 12, 2017 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Schooled in SOLIDWORKS: Discover Handy Composer Features You Never Knew Existed

Ratchet-up your SOLIDWORKS skills as our inside experts reveal features you never knew existed. In this month’s webinar, find out how SOLIDWORKS Composer slashes the time you need to spend creating technical documentation, user guides, web content and more.

The best way to learn is to do. The second best? Beg, steal or borrow knowledge from people who are aces in their field. SOLIDWORKS is holding a series of webinars hosted by the crème de la crème in our company. It’s your chance to hear from the people who know SOLIDWORKS like the back of their hand… The next best thing to sitting in a room with them.

Each month an expert member of our team will share unmissable advice on how to get the most from SOLIDWORKS. You will learn to use our product not just as a design tool, but as a means to ease business challenges and ignite progress towards your goals. Sit back and power-up your knowledge of the world’s most advanced 3D design software. Ask questions at the end.
But hurry, you need to register your interest to benefit from the inside knowledge by 18th May.
This month we talk to Maykel van Oirschot, SOLIDWORKS Technical Manager for the Benelux region.

Here’s a Q&A to introduce his webinar…
>> Register your interest now

 

1. Please introduce yourself…

Hi, my name is Maykel van Oirschot and I’m 44 years old. My career in SOLIDWORKS began in 1997 while working as a reseller in the Netherlands. Then from 2000 to 2005 I worked as a mechanical engineer for a number of exciting companies. Yet I loved training others, so rejoined the SOLIDWORKS reseller in 2006. Since 2015 I have been working in my dream job at Dassault Systemes as a Territory Technical Manager. Essentially I am responsible for supporting all SOLIDWORKS resellers in the Benelux.

2. What is your webinar about, who is it for and why should I attend?

This webinar is about SOLIDWORKS Composer. I want to show how easily you can create documentation from your existing 3D data. It’s great for writing operation manuals, assembly instructions, web content and much more. SOLIDWORKS Composer has been designed especially for non-CAD users. Anyone who is responsible for writing documentation will discover the ease of creating content for their product.

3. What’s your best quick tip or trick for anyone considering using SOLIDWORKS Composer?

That’s an easy one. Without doubt I would recommend creating “company styles” that fit your product branding. In this way you won’t have to change the colours of arrows, line thicknesses, play buttons and so on, each time you use them. All it takes is a few clicks to create your styles.

4. What’s your favourite feature of SOLIDWORKS Composer?

That checkbox called “Views” on the “Multiple” tab. Small but immeasurably useful.

5. What makes this feature so good?

What happens if your product is tweaked after you have produced the documentation? Amending the images can take forever. Not so with the multiples feature. Instead of replacing each image manually, just update the images in SOLIDWORKS and they can be automatically replaced in your documentation. It slashes the time and effort associated with documentation production.

6. When does your webinar take place?

9.30-10am on 18th May. Can’t make it? No biggie! Register your interest anyway and you’ll be notified when the video of the webinar is available to stream.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Schooled in SOLIDWORKS: Discover Handy Composer Features You Never Knew Existed appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS UK at May 12, 2017 11:00 AM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

DraftSight Professional now only US$99 for 12 months

An Engineer using DraftSight Professional to edit a DWG

DraftSight Professional

Get DraftSight Professional for just US$99 for 12 months, you’ll get product upgrades, API access, and an abundance of productivity-boosting features like Toolbox, DGN, PDF and Excel file support, and much more.

About DraftSight Professional

DraftSight Professional is designed for small and medium-size companies that need a professional-grade CAD product with powerful, time-saving functionality. DraftSight Professional includes industry standard content that can be added to a document with ease and batch printing to print multiple files without opening them. Companies that have a need to customize their CAD system using LISP will find significant value in DraftSight Professional. Learn more about DraftSight Professional in the video below:

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What is the difference between the Professional and Free version?

Discover the difference between the free version of DraftSight and the new Professional package in the table below:

Features Pro Free
Toolbox for DraftSight: A standards-based mechanical symbol library and mechanical annotation add-on.
Design Library: The Design Library tab in DraftSight’s Task Pane provides a central location for user-defined reusable elements such as blocks.
Drawing Compare: DrawCompare is used to graphically compare entities between two drawing documents.
Macro Recording: The quickest and easiest way to start programming with the DraftSight API is to record a macro.
Batch Printing: Send a set of drawings and Sheets to printers in a batch job and save batch print jobs to Batch Print List (*bpl) files for subsequent use.
PDF Underlay: Attach pages of a PDF document to a drawing with the AttachPDF command.
DraftSight APIs (application programming interface) and API updates. APIs allow end users to customize and automate DraftSight.
Product upgrades, new releases and service packs that become available during your entitlement period.
Community Resources: Access to online community support and an abundance of learning resources, including a free “Getting Started Guide.”
Layer Preview: Quickly preview the content of layers one by one or by a set of specified layers.
Search in Options: Simply type your search in the box, and you will be provided with the path to the topic in the Options dialog.
Quick Group: Quickly create EntityGroups by using the right mouse button.
Standard Compliant Drawings: Use the VerifyStandards command to check that the current drawing conforms to industry, corporate, and custom standards.
iQuestions Integration: Log into the DraftSight online swYm community to search and ask questions in the iQuestions section.

What is the price of DraftSight Professional?

Visit the Dassault Systèmes DraftSight Store for the special price of US$99 for DraftSight Professional with New Term Licensing, a purchase includes a DraftSight Professional license plus a 12 month subscription for upgrades and service packs. Note that DraftSight Professional currently runs on Windows only.

Buy DraftSight Professional

The post DraftSight Professional now only US$99 for 12 months appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at May 12, 2017 10:50 AM

May 11, 2017

SolidSmack

AstroPrint Announces the AstroBox Touch (and Even More Interesting Stuff)

astrobox-touch-3d-printing-software-00

Previously the company marketed the AstroBox (no touch), which provided an easy means for you to connect an otherwise standalone desktop 3D printer to a powerful cloud environment, from which many interesting and useful functions became instantly possible.

And that’s really what Astroprint is all about: maintaining a huge cloud network of 3D printing participants and functionality. The set-top boxes are simply gateways to that cloud.

But the new version, the AstroBox Touch, is an extremely nice gateway. It’s designed to plug into your desktop 3D printer locally, but also connect to the Astroprint Cloud through your Internet connection wirelessly.

From there you can control your desktop 3D printer remotely, as was the case with the previous AstroBox, but the new version adds a rather nice touch screen. This addition seems to magically transform your poorly equipped 3D printer into something new, like many recent machines that come with a touch screen of their own.

The AstroBox Touch is specifically designed to be instantly usable, having no assembly required and only minor configuration required. You should be able to get it going in more-or-less plug and play mode. From there you will gain access to the extensive cloud services, and even be able to view 3D prints in progress if you add an optional webcam.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86612" style="width: 680px;">Astroprint's apps for controlling desktop 3D printers<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Astroprint’s apps for controlling desktop 3D printers</figcaption></figure>

The company is also releasing apps that will enable very easy remote use of the attached 3D printers. Of course, there aren’t any robot hands involved – yet – so there is only so much you can do remotely. But you can do all of that from these apps.

The cloud is indeed powerful and I encourage you to check out all the amazing things you can do with Astroprint’s environment.

This announcement is far more than just the availability of a new fancy set-top box, however.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86613" style="width: 1000px;">Astroprint's cloud-connected 3D printing environment<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Astroprint’s cloud-connected 3D printing environment</figcaption></figure>

The company also announced they’re developing an API for the AstroBox Touch. In other words, you – or any developer – will soon be able to build functionality right into the AstroBox Touch itself. Astroprint explains that such software will be easy to build:

Since we will be using this open source framework for the AstroBox Touch — it is very developer friendly.

Here’s why that’s important: You will be able to make 3D Printing related apps using just Javascript, CSS, HTML, and deploy it on our platform.

You’ll literally be able to make your app available to ALL of our users who own 3D Printers.

This is a very powerful capability, and I cannot imagine the types of applications that might appear in this environment. Some crazy ideas off the top of my head:

  • A kiosk mode where an organization could present a limited selection of items for printing, like in a museum, for example
  • Integration with external services for unusual 3D model processing: convert your 3D model to a large polygons, for example
  • Secure one-time 3D prints at lower cost than buying an entire model
  • Automated segmentation of a large 3D model and distribution of parts to a number of printers for collective production

You get the idea. This could be a very big deal. And Astroprint believes as one of the first to deploy such an environment, they will get an advantage over followers.

How can you get involved? You might start by hitting their Kickstarter page where you can order one of their new AstroBox Touches. The cost is USD$100 and up, depending on volume.

One thing to note: Astroprint offers subscription access to their 3D printing cloud environment, and Kickstarter backers will get a lifetime “Pro” subscription. This is normally a USD$10 per month value, so you could make your money back quickly.

The post AstroPrint Announces the AstroBox Touch (and Even More Interesting Stuff) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at May 11, 2017 10:07 PM

If You Want to Build a Hexapod, You’ll Want to Get a Stemi.

stemi-hexpod-robot-kit-education-diy-00

Remember Stemi? The six-legged, build-it-yourself robot removes the complexity of building such a machine, offering a building experience that requires no soldering and detailed videos that teach how to use each part.

Their Indiegogo campaign was a huge success, it’s been on multiple ‘Best Robot Kits for Kids’ lists and there’s been a waiting list… until NOW. Now the kit is available in their shop, where they’re offering free shipping and a 10% pre-order discount code (iwantmystemi).

It’s completely open-source and built on Arduino compatibility. The video tutorials covering everything from the 3D modeling and electronics to the math and mobile app programming. I’ve been waiting for the Stemi Hexapod to become available and I’m so glad it finally is.

The full price is $360, but the discount and free shipping will put the kit in your hands for $324. If you think this is expensive, take a look at some of the prices for similar bots on robotshop.com. You can get an overview of the build, features and capabilities on the Stemi website.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tV1zbBGHAAs?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The post If You Want to Build a Hexapod, You’ll Want to Get a Stemi. appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at May 11, 2017 09:26 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Engineering the Perfect Pint from Farm to Glass

For those who love beer, there’s not much in this world more enjoyable than cracking open a refreshing can of your favorite beverage on a warm day. The simplest joys in life are often the most satisfying.

While enjoying beer is easy, the journey that transforms hops, barley and water into the product you purchase at the store can be complex. It’s easy to forget, especially when you’re focused on savoring your drink of choice, that a lot of work goes into your favorite beer as it travels from the farm to your glass.

Although brewing itself hasn’t changed much over the centuries, technological advancements are responsible for streamlining the brewing process, making it more uniform and allowing beer lovers everywhere to sample everything from hometown craft brews to international favorites from around the world. It’s a great time to be alive.

Chances are you don’t think about it every time you open a bottle, but engineering and design play an immensely important role in the beer paradise in which we currently reside. For that reason, we wanted to highlight the contributions made to the brewing process that may not always be top of mind. Beer’s journey to your glass has many steps. From farming to brewing and packaging to transportation, SOLIDWORKS users are making major contributions to the brewing booms.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LfS_uEboShI?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

I invite you to grab your favorite beer and join us as we follow the brewing process from Farm to Glass. You’ll see interesting companies engineering amazing products across agriculture, industrial equipment, transportation, and consumer goods. It’s the brewing circle of life, and in addition to delivering us with delicious beer; these businesses have another commonalities: they bring their ideas to life with SOLIDWORKS.

Visit the SOLIDWORKS Farm to Glass website to explore how engineering and design software are making the modern brewing process possible. Through demo videos, white papers, feature articles, and customer testimonials, you’ll experience how great companies and SOLIDWORKS users are creating groundbreaking products – and in some cases, changing the way we enjoy our beverage of choice.

Author information

Mike Fearon
Mike Fearon
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post Engineering the Perfect Pint from Farm to Glass appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mike Fearon at May 11, 2017 12:30 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Installing The SQL Express Management Studio

The SQL Server Express Management Studio is a must for any SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard installation.  With this tool you can capture database backups, run queries and complete other vault maintenance.

The simplest way to install this is during install within the installation manger;

  • At SWPDM Server Options select ‘Install MS SQL Management Tools‘;
Install Via Installation Manager

Install Via Installation Manager

If you missed this during install do not fear as we can complete this later manually.

Manually Installing The SQL Server Express Management Studio

  • Browse to <Installation Media>\SQLMNGMNT\sqlmanagementstudio_x64_enu.exe and Run as administrator
  • Select New SQL Server stand-alone installation or add features to an existing installation
New SQL Server stand-alone installation or add features to an existing installation

New SQL Server stand-alone installation or add features to an existing installation

  • Check for and install any updates then click next.
  • For Installation Type select ‘Perform a new installation of SQL Server 2014‘ and click next;
Perform a new installation of SQL Server 2014

Perform a new installation of SQL Server 2014

  • Read and accept the license agreement then click next
  • For Feature Selection under ‘Shared Features‘ choose the following, then select next;
    • Client Tools Connectivity
    • Client Tools Backward Compatibility
    • Management Tools – Basic
    • Management Tools – Complete
Shared Features

Shared Features

  • Click Next and complete the install;
SQL Server Express Management Studio Installed

SQL Server Express Management Studio Installed

  • The management studio should now be available from;
    • Start > Programs > Microsoft SQL Server 2014 > SQL Server 2014 Management Studio

Need SOLIDWORKS PDM Training?

Contact us about our SOLIDWORKS PDM training courses for users and administrators.

The post Installing The SQL Express Management Studio appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Williams at May 11, 2017 12:00 PM

May 10, 2017

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: RepStroh Violin [Play That Fiddle!]

3d-printed-stroh-violin-instrument-repstroh-thingiverse-00

Ya know, there’s nothing that quite matches the craftsmanship of a traditional violin… except for a weird ass instrument that is 3D printed and sounds just like a traditional violin.

Thingiverse user Sun Gear (I only now a few people named Sun Gear–His father is a music teacher named Keith Engle, so we’ll call him Sun Gear Engle), Sung Gear Engle, created a 3D printed stringed instrument based on the design of a Stroh Violin.

What is a Stroh Violin? Quite simply, a violin-style instrument that replaces the violin body for a MASSIVE HORN. Picture a gramophone attached to a violin neck. They tend to be louder than wood violins and have most recently been made famous by music artists such as Tom Waits and Shakira. J.M.A. Stroh created Stroh violins, Stroh Cellos, Stroh Guitars and more. Don’t believe me?

stroh-catalogue

Just goes to show you, you can stick a horn on just about anything. Anything except watermelons. THAT is frowned upon in most countries – I blame it on modern agriculture practices. DOWN WITH PESTICIDES!

You can download the RepStroh on Thingiverse. (Bonus: You will look especially cool playing this if you wear Sun Gear Engle’s Rave Mask!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

The post Model of the Week: RepStroh Violin [Play That Fiddle!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at May 10, 2017 10:33 PM

Top 3 Onshape Updates: Composite Curve, 3D Fit Spline, DXF/DWG Import

onshape-whats-new-features-1705-00

Onshape snuck one in on us last Friday. By which I mean, we totally missed the 11 new updates/improvements released that make the previous curve-rich update even more convincing that surfacing is maybe, could be, definitely on it’s way to Onshape. Oh, glorious day that will be!

You can see the past update history and catch the latest on the Onshape What’s New page.

Here, we pick our ‘Top 3 Onshape Updates’ and provide a quick overview of each. To see our previous picks, visit our New Onshape Features page. Tell us which one you like the best, which need work, or if we picked the completely wrong features!

The Stats:
Total Updates: 11
Total Updates YTD: 64

Top 3 Onshape Updates (05.05.17)

Composite Curve – Crakalackin’ Curve Combo! Create a single curve comprised of sketch geometry, edges, curves, or any combination of these.

3D Fit Spline – Click, click curve! Create a 3D spline through selected points. Start and End direction vectors and magnitude allow you to control the spline’s shape.

Insert DXF/DWG in Onshape Drawing – Use your existing templates! You can now insert a DXF or DWG into an Onshape Drawing. (SUPER important for migrating to Onshape.)

Other updates

Sheet Metal Fillet/Chamfer – Break that edge! You can now fillet and chamfer the corners of sheet metal parts.

Export DXF/DWG from Flat View in Onshape – Do this quick without needing to create a throw-away drawing.

“List” Type Properties – Select lists, yeah! Company owners and admins can now create properties that allow the user to choose from a list.

Composite Geometric Tolerance – You can now create composite geometric tolerances.

Drawing View Improvements – Now when you move a drawing view with linked views, the annotations on those linked views move as well.

Derived Feature Improvements – Insert any curve with the Derived feature. (Limited to helices previously.)

Documents Page Improvements – Small improvements have been made to the Documents page, including a new Create button and the ability to collapse and expand teams and labels.

Import Improvements – Onshape now heals imported geometry with problem surfaces. Also added is the ability to import PTC Creo 4 files and CATIA V5-6R2017(R27).

You can see videos that breakdown each new features here. We’ll be keeping a closer eye on what Onshape is releasing with each update, so let us know what features you’re watching for or want to see the most!

Ask questions and talk about Onshape on SmackTalk!  Our new community site!

The post Top 3 Onshape Updates: Composite Curve, 3D Fit Spline, DXF/DWG Import appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at May 10, 2017 08:56 PM

SOLIDWORKS Blog | SOLIDWORKS Engineering & Design Blog

Symmetry Solutions Selected by HP to Sell and Support the World’s First Production-Ready 3D Printing System

Symmetry Solutions Is One of the First Partners Selected to Distribute the HP Jet Fusion 3D Printing Solution, Helping Customers Prototype and Produce Functional Parts Faster and More Economically

Minneapolis, Minn. – May 10, 2017 -- Symmetry Solutions, Inc., the leading provider of 3D engineering design software and 3D printing solutions in the Midwest, announced today that they are one of the first partners selected by HP Inc. to sell and support the HP Jet Fusion 3D Printing Solution--the world’s first production-ready 3D printing system.

The HP Jet Fusion 3D Printing Solution revolutionizes design, prototyping and manufacturing. It delivers superior quality physical parts up to 10 times faster and at half the cost of current 3D printing systems. Functional parts are printed at the individual voxel level (the 3D equivalent of a 2D pixel), allowing customers to deliver mass customization.

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Prospective customers of the HP Jet Fusion 3D Printing Solution are vast, and include general manufacturers, model shops and 3D print service bureaus. Benefits of the product include the following:

  • Simplified workflow and reduced cost for radical prototyping

  • Delivery of final parts manufacturing with breakthrough economics

  • Open materials platform that lowers barriers to adoption and enables new applications across industries

Symmetry Solutions will be supplying and supporting the Midwest with both the new HP 3D printers, designed for rapid prototyping and production.

  • The HP Jet Fusion 3D 3200 printer: provides improved productivity and the capacity to increase usage at a lower cost per part.

  • The HP Jet Fusion 3D 4200 printer: provides high productivity to meet same-day demands at the lowest cost per part.

“We are pleased to be selected by HP Inc. as one of the first resellers of this revolutionary 3D printer,” stated Paul Rudin, President, Symmetry Solutions. “Designed for real production parts and rapid prototyping, the HP Jet Fusion 3D Printing Solution completely transforms how manufacturers design and deliver solutions to their customers. This new technology is going to change our industry, and we are excited to be a part of it.”

Buy HP 3D Printer - Official Reseller

About Symmetry Solutions, Inc.

Symmetry Solutions, Inc. is the leading provider of 3D engineering design software and 3D printing solutions in the Midwest. From concept to production, our team of experts work with you to offer the best tools, training, support and experience available to meet your individual needs. Our goal is to streamline your engineering and design processes to increase productivity, speed time to market, and ensure you are successful with our solutions. Symmetry Solutions is your official SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD, HP 3D printing, and Markforged 3D printing provider for the Midwest. Symmetry Solutions is headquartered in Brooklyn Park, Minn. For more information, please visit www.symsolutions.com or call 1-800-975-0740.

Author

Nick Weirens, Marketing Manager

May 10, 2017 06:59 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Get Oriented – Tricks for Orienting Your 3D Model Views in SOLIDWORKS

It’s no secret that a 3D model makes conveying your concepts, ideas, or designs easier than ever but, navigating around the 3D space can sometimes prove tricky. It can even sometimes seem borderline impossible. So, here are a few tips that can help you orient your 3D models with ease. With these tricks you can save yourself from the tediousness of manipulating views and get back to conveying your concepts and designs.

Default hot keys 

Use the default hot keys for quick access to the standard views:

Get Oriented - Tricks for Orienting Your 3D Model Views in SOLIDWORKS

 

Normal to

  1. Press normal to a second time to flip the view 180 degrees
  2. Press normal to when not in a sketch and the view will orient to the closest orthogonal view
  3. Customize your “normal to” orientation by selecting a second face which will define the “up” direction
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Use the Triad

  1. Clicking the triad will orient the view normal to the axis you select
  2. Rotate about the axis 15 degrees or 90 degrees using the shift or alt keys
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Bonus

If you like a view, you can save it to your model or even “globally” to your SOLIDWORKS system

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="641" id="video-16733-3" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/saved-views.mp4?_=3" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/saved-views.mp4</video>

Author information

Stephen Petrock
Since 1998, TriMech has helped our clients design better products by partnering with them and offering, not only CAD, CAE, PDM, FEA, CAM software products, but also by engineering solutions involving full-time and temporary staffing, contract design, analysis and drafting services, rapid prototyping, custom programming and implementation services. TriMech is a value-added reseller of SOLIDWORKS and Stratasys 3D Printers in the Mid-Atlantic and South-East including New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana.

The post Get Oriented – Tricks for Orienting Your 3D Model Views in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Stephen Petrock at May 10, 2017 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

The Real Cost of Mismanaged Data

In case you missed it there was a great SOLIDWORKS 22-Minute webinar last month entitled The Real Cost of Mismanaged Data, which focused on how companies can improve their design and engineering efficiency by adopting SOLIDWORKS PDM. Now many of you may say that Product Data Management (PDM) software is too expensive, takes too much time to set up and your engineers and designers won’t use it because it will slow down their productivity. Let me try to convince you otherwise.

First of all many of you probably already own SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard, which has been included with SOLIDWORKS Professional and Premium licenses since the SOLIDWORKS 2016 release. Second, your SOLIDWORKS Value-Added Reseller can help you get it set up and working in just a few days. Third, your engineers and designers are probably spending more time manually managing and searching for files then they would using if you were using SOLIDWORKS PDM.

Here are the main advantages of SOLIDWORKS PDM that were highlighted in the webinar:

  •  Find it Fast (Searching): Many of us (yes I’m guilty too) are browsers when it comes to looking for files. We hunt and peck through folders looking for the right file. If we know the file name, we can use the search capabilities in Windows, which may be slow and will most likely return multiple files with the same or similar names because we saved different versions to different folders. Now how many of us browse the internet? Well no one because it really can’t be done; you need to run a search first, then you browse the results. This same workflow can be accomplished with SOLIDWORKS PDM. If you know something about the file, you can search on it, and when you get your results, you have more relevant data available to decide if it is in fact what you were looking for. This includes data like part numbers, descriptions, current release state and even dynamic previews.
  •  

  • Smart File Management (Moving and renaming): As a SOLIDWORKS user or as a user of any file-based system that has relationships between files knows that moving and renaming files can be tricky. The issue gets compounded when one file is referenced by several others. To start, how do you know where a file is used? That information may be in a separate system like ERP/MRP. With SOLIDWORKS PDM a file can be renamed and moved just like you would in Windows Explorer because it is Windows Explorer.
  •  

  • Keep Changes Easily (Versioning): How do you save versions? Many of you may answer we don’t; we just keep one version of a file. While this may be a clean and easy method, it was probably adopted because easily keeping past versions took too much time and resulted in lots of duplicate files. Others may need to keep older versions because products in the field still use them. So various methods are employed like using Pack and Go, creating folders and copying each version to them, or renaming files with the version information included (in case you forgot see point two above). SOLIDWORKS PDM automatically creates a new version each time a file is checked in and remembers which versions of parts, assemblies and drawings go together. In the 2017 release we introduce version overwrite so you don’t need to store a new version every time.
  •  

  •  A Full History (Time traveling): What good would previous versions be if you couldn’t easily access them and know who, why and when created them? SOLIDWORKS PDM makes this extremely easy. When working in SOLIDWOKS you can load previous versions into your session to see what a design looked like in the past and determine interchangeability of new versions of parts with older versions of an assembly. You can even use the compare functions in SOLIDWORKS Utilities with different version of the same file. This really useful for finding small changes in geometry, features and properties.

 

Still not convinced or you want to see SOLIDWORKS PDM in action? Then please visit our website where you can view a recording of the webinar and find out more information on SOLIDWORKS products. Here’s the link to our Data Management recorded webinars: http://www.solidworks.com/sw/resources/data-management-recorded-webinars.htm

Author information

Kurt Lundstedt
Kurt Lundstedt
Product Manager - PDM Solutions at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post The Real Cost of Mismanaged Data appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Kurt Lundstedt at May 10, 2017 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Reserving SOLIDWORKS PDM Licenses

Now that SOLIDWORKS PDM (both Professional and Standard) is using the SolidNetwork License Manager for distributing licenses to clients, reserving SOLIDWORKS PDM licenses for specific users or groups of users is now possible.  This is done through the SolidNetWork License (SNL) Manager Options File.

In other posts we’ve discussed how the Options File can be used to change the default timeout for PDM licenses, the default timeout for SOLIDWORKS licenses, how to block borrowing of SOLIDWORKS licenses and how to reserve just SOLIDWORKS licenses, now let’s look at reserving SOLIDWORKS PDM licenses for either PDM Professional or PDM Standard users.

How to create a Custom Options File

Step 1:  Launch the SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager program and click “Modify…” on the Server Administration tab.

SolidNetWork License Manager - Modify

SolidNetWork License Manager – Modify

Step 2:  Select the option to “Activate/Reactivate a software license” and then click “Next >”.

Activate/Reactivate a License

Activate/Reactivate a License

Step 3:  On the next screen check the box beside “Options File” and click “Edit”.

Edit Options File

Edit Options File

Step 4:  If you do not have an Options File created yet you will be presented with the option to create a new one in the default path.

Create Options File

Create Options File

Step 5:  Now we write our Options File.  First the groups will need to be defined.  These are not the groups already setup in SOLIDWORKS PDM.  The SNL Manager has no idea that those groups exist, so the groups for the purpose of reserving licenses MUST be explicitly defined in the Options File.

The correct syntax will be to have the Option Keyword, in this case GROUP, followed by the group name, then each user name that is a member of the group, each separated by a space.  This is the PDM username NOT the Window username, which would be the case if you have set up groups to reserve SOLIDWORKS licenses.  So if you have already defined groups of users in the Options File to reserve SOLIDWORKS licenses, you may need to create entirely new groups, with different usernames to reserve the PDM licenses.  So as an example, we can define two groups for whom we want to ensure there will always be a license available, the senior designers and the PDM administrators:

GROUP senior_design scott chris joe
GROUP administrators justin andrew

This is then followed by the actual reserve option definition.  The correct syntax will be to have the Option Keyword, in this case RESERVE, followed by the number of licenses to reserve, followed by GROUP and then the name of the group, each separated by a space.  So if we need to reserve three SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional CAD Editor licenses for the three senior designers, but just one PDM Professional Contributor license to be shared between the two administrators (who are not using SOLIDWORKS), we will add:

RESERVE 3 swepdm_cadeditorandweb GROUP senior_design
RESERVE 1 swepdm_contributorandweb GROUP administrators
Reserving SOLIDWORKS PDM Licenses

Reserving SOLIDWORKS PDM Licenses

The Feature Names of the SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional products are:
Product Name Feature Name
CAD Editor swepdm_cadeditorandweb
Contributor swepdm_contributorandweb
Viewer swepdm_viewer
PSL swepdm_processor

 

The Feature Names of the SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard products are:
Product Name Feature Name
CAD Editor swpdmstd_cadeditor
Contributor swpdmstd_contributor
Viewer swpdmstd_viewer

 

Step 6:  Once the Options File text is finished, save the sw_d.opt file and close it.

Save SolidNetwork License Manager Options File

Save SolidNetwork License Manager Options File

Step 7:  Ensure that all server information is correct and click Next to proceed to the next screen.

Check Server Information

Check Server Information

Step 8:  Click “Select All” to make sure all your SOLIDWORKS products are selected for reactivation, enter your contact email and click “Next>” to complete the reactivation process.

Activate License

Activate License

Activation/Reactivation Succeeded

Activation/Reactivation Succeeded

The post Reserving SOLIDWORKS PDM Licenses appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at May 10, 2017 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – May 2017

Hello to all,

Welcome to this new edition of the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News, coauthored by members of the SOLIDWORKS Technical Support teams worldwide.

NEW Functionality: Import SOLIDWORKS Bill of Materials into SOLIDWORKS Composer

By Jennifer Tashiro

With the latest version of SOLIDWORKS Composer, you can now import SOLIDWORKS Bill of Materials (BOM) directly into SOLIDWORKS Composer.  This means that you can repurpose even more of your 3D CAD data and save more time when creating technical communication content.

To use the new Import SOLIDWORKS BOM functionality:

  1. In the ‘FILE’ > ‘Open’ dialog, select a SOLIDWORKS part or assembly which includes a Bill of Materials.
  2. Select the ‘SOLIDWORKS’ options, then select the ‘Import SOLIDWORKS BOM’ checkbox.


After the import, you can see that a BOM is automatically generated in SOLIDWORKS Composer.  The Composer BOM contains the same data as the SOLIDWORKS BOM.

The Import SOLIDWORKS BOM functionality is available in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2017 SP3 and later versions.  Other enhancements in SP3 include automatic import of SOLIDWORKS appearances and textures.

Augmented Reality with eDrawings

By Sagar Gokulchand AGRAWAL

Some of you have already been explosed to the Augmented Reality (AR) of the eDrawings app or have enjoyed product design using AR. But for the rest of us, just know that SOLIDWORKS 2017 enables you to experience 3D CAD data in virtual reality using either the eDrawings iOS app or the Android app.

So what is Augmented Reality?

In simple terms, Augmented reality (AR) is a live direct or indirect view of a physical, real-world environment whose elements are augmented (or supplemented) by computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video or graphics data.

What do you need to experience Augmented Reality with eDrawings?

Short answer: Google Cardboard & a smartphone in which eDrawings app is installed

Google Cardboard is the least expensive way to dip your toe into virtual reality. And Cardboard viewers are designed to work with nearly any smartphone.

How does it work?

Similar to other Cardboard apps, the AR function of eDrawings mobile generates two images of the object being viewed, with a slight offset to account for stereo vision, making the object appear three-dimensional.

Convex lenses in the Cardboard headset resolve the two images into one and make it appear farther than a few inches in front of your eyes. The accelerometers in the phone also track movement, so the object moves and rotates, changing your perspective as you move your head.

What is the procedure to view eDrawings with AR?

  1. Open a model in eDrawings

Launch eDrawings app on your Smartphone > select a model

  1. Start a VR mode

Once the model loaded in eDrawings > Select VR button from left menu bar

 

  1. Keep your phone in Google cardboard or any other VR devices

 

  1. Wear you device and gets ready to experience your CAD data in AR.

As an eDrawings user, you can able to view the model 360º by simply moving your head around.  Although I would advise some caution if using in conjunction with a swivel office chair and doing full 360º rotation!  It can bring on a little motion sickness!  J

Conclusion

Viewing a model in eDrawings virtual reality allows you to add an extra layer of immersive realism to your design, using the movement of your head, rather than your finger, to manipulate the model.

It would be very impressive to demo 3D models of products to clients, where they can interact with them in VR space. VR is available only with the professional version of the eDrawings app, for both Android and iOS systems.

Some of the most remarkable fields where AR in eDrawings can be applied are architecture, construction and furniture. In these cases, CAD images of a structure can be superimposed into a real life local view before constructing the physical building.

AR is also very helpful in industrial design because it can help designers experience products’ designs and operations before completion.

Simulation Step-Up Series

Last month, Reza discussed the topic of FEA with an Engineering View. This month, Omar discusses the topic of basic failure analysis.

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Next month, Reza will come back and discuss the topic of Accuracy and Convergence.

Noteworthy Solutions from the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base

icon - SW Why is SOLIDWORKS graphical performance slow with Windows 10 after Windows Update?
Windows update might have automatically installed a new NVIDIA graphics driver on your Windows 10 system, the affected driver versions are 376.53 or 376.54.  Please verify the graphics driver version from System Information or Device Manager.
Until a fix is available from Windows/NVIDIA please roll back graphics driver then use this Microsoft tool to stop Windows from updating the driver: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us
From Solution Id: S-072912.

icon - SW General Hotfix for SOLIDWORKS® 2016 SP5 (SPR#1006822)
A hotfix is available for SOLIDWORKS® 2016 SP5 that addresses the following issue:
SPR#1006822 –  General Stability Hotfix to address crashes when CTRL+Q operation is performed on weldment assembly with weld beads.
The hotfix for this issue is included in the attachment of Solution Id: S-073024. This issue is addressed in SOLIDWORKS 2017 SP3.

icon - SW Is the SOLIDWORKS® software supported for use on Microsoft® Surface devices?
The SOLIDWORKS® software does not officially support the use of Microsoft® Surface devices because those devices do not include CAD system graphics.
However certification tests, showed the Surface Book run the SOLIDWORKS software capably.
For more detailed information, see Solution Id: S-072859.

Icon - EPDM In the SOLIDWORKS® PDM software, how do I control the number of pending tasks that a task host will process and place in ‘Starting up’ status?
By default, a SOLIDWORKS® PDM task host polls the file vault database every 30 seconds and starts processing all available tasks with the status ‘Waiting for host’.
In SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 , too learn how to control how many pending tasks a task host can queue up when polling the vault database, follow the steps in Solution Id: S-072642.

How do I manually calculate the ‘Acoustic Power’ and ‘Acoustic Power Level’ to validate the values given by SOLIDWORKS® Flow Simulation?
The foundation to such a hand calculation is to follow the explanation and equations given in the “Noise Prediction” topic of the Online Help.
Attachments to Solution Id: S-072876 provide:
•    A sample calculator in an Excel spreadsheet
•    A sample part model
•    A screen capture of ‘Acoustic Power’ and ‘Acoustic Power Level’ results

When I enter an evaluation (EVAL) serial number in the SOLIDWORKS® Installation Manager, why do I see the error ‘Your serial number does not entitle you to SOLIDWORKS Plastics…’?
This error message indicates that the evaluation (EVAL) serial number you are using was issued as a SOLIDWORKS® Premium CAD serial number, with SOLIDWORKS Plastics as an Add-In asset. This means that you do not enter this EVAL serial number in the ‘Simulation’ section of the Installation Manager because it is a CAD serial number. Instead, you must enter this EVAL serial number in the ‘3D Design’ section for the ‘SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional, Premium or SolidNetWork License’ option.
From Solution Id: S-072633.


That’s it for this month. Thanks for reading this edition of SOLIDWORKS Support News. If you need additional help with these issues or any others, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller.

Also, comments and suggestions are welcome. You can enter them below.

 

Author information

Julien Boissat
Sr. Technical Customer Support Engineer, SolidWorks, EMEA at DS SolidWorks Corp.
I have been a Tech Support engineer for Simulation products since 2002. I was previously a product manager at SRAC, the original makers of COSMOS for those who remember that time! ;-). I am currently in charge of the content of the certification exams for simulation products. I also initiated and still author the Simulation Knowledge Base and participate as much as possible in the expansion and evolution of the SolidWorks Knowledge Base. Finally, I handle the SolidWorks Support Monthly News blog.

The post SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – May 2017 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Julien Boissat at May 10, 2017 06:50 AM

May 09, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2017: Connection Dots

There’s no need to lament any further over missed connections thanks to the SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2017 Connection Dots feature.

Missed Connections – Somewhere on Craigslist Prior to September 2016

Missed SOLIDWORKS Electrical Connections - Somewhere on Craigslist prior to September 2016Have you ever read those “missed connection” posts on Craigslist? I learned of them from a radio morning show, where the on-air personalities would read these tragic (yet hilarious) tales of lost love and near misses. These posts always delivered the melodrama and were filled with regret. If only the individual had possessed the courage to make that connection, so their whole life could achieve its true meaning and purpose. Like I said, M-E-L-O-D-R-A-M-A-T-I-C. But, I digress.

So, How Do Missed Connections Tie into Electrical Design?

I was helping a new user who was experiencing the same regret… over missed connections of the electrical kind. He had created new symbols and built a schematic, but he had empty reports. At a glance, everything looked OK but zooming in very close revealed SNAP had been turned off when placing the symbols and wires on their schematics. That meant nothing was connected! Maybe not quite the melodramatics of a Craigslist missed connection, but frustrating nonetheless. Significant rework was needed to move and replace all of his symbol and wire work on the grid.

How do you know you’ve made a proper connection point, especially as a new user?

And, how do you spare yourself the regret of a missed connection? This may sound like a stretch (get it!?), but in SOLIDWORKS Electrical the connection is key. By missing the link between components, you miss out on the power of the automation and reports. With SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2017, we now have a great way to graphically verify if you’ve succeeded in making a proper connection. You are now guaranteed good results on all your reports!

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Missed Connection Example 1

You can always use the DRC for terminals not connected. Or, place connection labels.

But, how do you know on the fly if the new symbol you’ve created had the proper grid spacing for its connection points? And, how do you know if you had your SNAPS turned on and set properly when you drew in your wires? We have a new way of doing just that by using something that was already there!

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="855" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wrHR1VHx6fU?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

No More “Close, But No Cigar” or Guesswork and Rework!

In previous versions of SOLIDWORKS Electrical, connection dots were just a graphical indication of where a symbol’s connection points were lining up. The connection dots could be shown or hidden based on the symbol settings. That all still applies, but now any symbol with Connection Dots enabled, an intelligent feature can show or hide depending on if a connection has been properly aligned.

Solidworks Electrical Display Connection Points

Not to mention that in SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2017 getting close now actually DOES count to make a connection! New users will also appreciate that confidence boost in their initial designs and the new symbols that follow key spacing rules (.25 inches or 5 mm) for wires and connection dots.

So, make use of those new functions in 2017, and steer clear of missed connection regret.

Author information

GSC
GSC fuels customer success with 3D engineering solutions for design, simulation, data management, technical documentation, and 3D printing, as well as the most comprehensive consulting, technical support, and training in the industry. As a leading provider of SOLIDWORKS solutions and Stratasys 3D printing technologies, GSC’s world-class team of dedicated professionals have helped numerous companies innovate and increase productivity by leveraging advanced technologies to drive 3D business success. Founded in 1989, GSC is headquartered in Germantown, WI. For more information about GSC, please visit www.gsc-3d.com.

The post SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2017: Connection Dots appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GSC at May 09, 2017 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

LED iBond is Here to Brighten Your Future

LED iBond is here to brighten your future Feature

The internal combustion engine.

The jet engine.

The toasted sandwich maker.

Three of history’s greatest inventions. To that list, you can add Thomas Edison’s incandescent light bulb. Electric lighting paved the way for cheaper illumination, which has eventually developed beyond the energy-inefficient and cumbersome filament style bulbs to modern LEDs. Brighter, more efficient and far sleeker, LED lighting is the streamlined alternative to the unwieldy light bulb of yore. And LED iBond take LED lighting to its most futuristic.

LED iBond is here to brighten your future Light
Who is LED iBond?

Danish lighting company LED iBond has a simple USP: wringing every last strain of light from minimal space. With patented technology it’s spatially economic lighting is used in business and public areas, small and large. From shelf lighting to harbor bridges, it’s ultra-thin lighting brightens whatever project it’s briefed on.


Less is more: how SOLIDWORKS has helped LED iBond

As dedicated to saving seconds as it is space, LED iBond credit SOLIDWORKS with slashing both design and manufacture time. But how? Well with its calculations and blueprints loaded on to SOLIDWORKS, the team has been able to make decisions on materials far more swiftly than it was previously able. Of course navigating its fledgling products in 3D means the design team can exploit every millimeter of space available – championing minimalist style to maximum advantage.

LED iBond is here to brighten your future Light 2


Throwing the spotlight on new products

LED iBond has also incorporated SOLIDWORKS Composer into the design and marketing process of its business. Think of Composer as a visual communication tool that translates SOLIDWORKS CAD data into high-resolution photorealistic product images, with full 3D and zooms flexibility. That means the LED iBond team can share detailed images of its designs to both clients and manufacturers. In a nutshell: clients can see what they are getting; manufacturers can see how it’s built.


A no-brainer for new hires and subcontractors

SOLIDWORKS was a natural choice for LED iBond. Thanks to the software program’s popularity in the design field, new graduate engineers often come equipped with SOLIDWORKS knowledge having used it as part of their education and engineering training. In fact using SOLIDWORKS often means new hires can make a seamless transition from university and hit the ground running in their new job. SOLIDWORKS’ ubiquity also means LED iBond can share designs far more effectively with manufacturing subcontractors. This drastically reduces the likelihood of mistakes at the manufacturing end, saving time and money.


A bright future for LED iBond

LED iBond continue to invent and develop revolutionary ultra-efficient lighting.  We’re happy to be shining a light of our own on its design process.

 

LED iBOND 3DS Version from Martin J Pickering on Vimeo.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post LED iBond is Here to Brighten Your Future appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS UK at May 09, 2017 01:18 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Smart PDF

One of the many benefits of using SOLIDWORKS Electrical Schematic for your electrical design needs is the ability to output a SOLIDWORKS Electrical Smart PDF.

A SOLIDWORKS Electrical Smart PDF is a PDF file which holds additional information.  For example, all documents, locations, and components are bookmarked making it extremely simple to navigate to specific sheets or specific components within your projects.  The image below shows a smart PDF with all bookmarks generated.  Notice, this may even look very familiar and similar to how our documents manager and component manager looks in the SOLIDWORKS Electrical software, and we can navigate to sheets or components in a very similar manner!

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Smart PDF

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Smart PDF

There is even more smart functionality such as the ability to jump between origin/destination arrows or jump between associated components by simply clicking on the symbols in the PDF.

To export your electrical schematic project into a smart PDF we can just go to the Import/Export tab and select “Export PDF files” here we have a number of options and settings we can select but the “create bookmarks and hyperlinks” option should be checked off to ensure our smart PDF comes in with our specific bookmarks and hyperlinks to jump between components.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Electrical training course either in a Canadian classroom near you or live online. For more information about electrical software and training solutions call 1-877-219-6757.

The post SOLIDWORKS Electrical Smart PDF appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Flett at May 09, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | Mesh Bots from Mars

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This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw, or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these fresh tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “Maurine” from Say Hi and work our way through tracks from ARBES, The Rosebuds, BRONCHO, Mr Twin Sister, and others before wrapping up with “The Sound” from Human Highway.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:1OPQHjnDj5BeU0AudrK7n5" width="100%"></iframe>

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by SolidSmack at May 09, 2017 11:57 AM

Degoo Premium: Secure a Lifetime 2TB Cloud Storage Plan for $59.99

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These days, it’s nearly impossible to avoid having to use the cloud for at least some sort of file storage—even if it’s just a few photos off of your phone. And for more serious users, juggling huge amounts of important data can be cumbersome without a serious and dedicated Cloud storage account.

For those looking for some cloud storage breathing room Degoo Premium brings you 2TB of secured cloud storage accessible from all of your devices with high-speed transfers. That’s more than Dropbox, OneDrive, and Google Drive combined! And for a limited time, SolidSmack readers can grab a lifetime subscription to Degoo Premium for just $59.99—that’s 95% off!

Features:

  • Send files easily to friends via email or link
  • Store up to 2TB of data under ultra-secure 256-bit AES encryption
  • Replicate your backup as you perform it, giving you extra peace of mind
  • Perform backup to all of your devices
  • Get more storage space than Dropbox, OneDrive, & Google Drive combined
  • Keep your backup automatically up to date thanks to automatic file change detection

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

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Feature Image Courtesy of SolidWorks-Corsi

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by SolidSmack at May 09, 2017 11:53 AM

You Won’t Want to Get Your Finger Caught in This Giant Mouse Trap

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We’ve seen legions of YouTubers manifest chaos to bring us absurd contraptions with little purpose other than to document how capable they are of destruction. And with high-end slow-speed cameras more accessible now than ever, watching these homegrown science experiments has never been more entertaining…even, educational.

Among others leading the way is Kevin Kohler, aka ‘The Backyard Scientist’.

Part Bill Nye, part Johnny Knoxville, part Adam Savage, Kohler has amassed an impressive YouTube subscriber base pushing 3 million. On his channel, the Florida native has created videos documenting everything from a golf ball hitting a water balloon to melting an iPhoen in molten aluminum.

More recently, Kohler created what is quite possibly one of the deadliest contraptions in YouTube history in the form of the ‘Human-Sized Mousetrap.’

“I’ve got a bit of a Raccoon problem at my house,” explains Kohler.

“I built something to fix the problem. It breaks multiple local ordinances and a few international treaties, but I give you THE GIANT MOUSETRAP! It took over 3 weeks to build and cost around $360 to build, with the main expenses being the winch, and the multiple pipe fittings to adapt the springs to the bar.”

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You won’t want to get your finger stuck in this one. Be sure to check ou the rest of Kohler’s crazy experiments over at The Backyard Scientist.

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by Simon Martin at May 09, 2017 11:48 AM

Pay What You Want for This 2017 Coding 101 Bundle

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Code. You don’t have to be a computer science hotshot to take the deep dive—heck, some people are up and running with their first project in a matter of weeks. But knowing where and how to enter can be half of the battle.

The recently-launched Learn How to Code 2017 Bundle is the perfect entry point and includes over 156 Hours of premium coding instruction, from Python to Ruby & everything in between.

Consisting of ten courses in total, the ‘Pay What You Want’ bundle covers not just specific code languages, but also how and why you may decide to choose one over another depending on the project at hand.

Included Courses:

  • Learn How To Code: Google’s Go Programming Language ($249 Value)
  • The Complete Python Course: Beginner to Advanced! ($195 Value)
  • Learn By Example: Scala ($50 Value)
  • Projects in Programming Languages: Ruby, Python, Java ($150 Value)
  • Learn Angular 2 from Beginner to Advanced ($195 Value)
  • How to Make a Freaking iPhone App: iOS 10 and Swift 3 ($200 Value)
  • The Complete Web Developer Masterclass: Beginner To Advanced ($195 Value)
  • Git Complete Mastery With GitHub: 100% Hands-on Git Guide ($200 Value)
  • Professional Rails Code Along ($40 Value)
  • JavaScript Programming Complete ($99 Value)

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
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by SolidSmack at May 09, 2017 02:22 AM

May 08, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Making plans for digital transformation for Industry 4.0? Enterprise Configuration Management is the thread for success…

Most organizations struggle with the ability to manage information accurately for the enterprise or throughout the product/solution lifecycle. How to maintain the Digital Thread from the baseline to the planning bill, then from the planning bill to the order bill, and finally from the order bill to the actual as-built record is a major challenge. Knowing which requirements, at which revision level, to use at any point in time is another. This failure creates a high level of intervention resource expenditure and an inability to track fielded configurations. This drives significant warranty, recall, and concession costs that can have devastating impacts on the business.

Digital Thread

Digital Thread

The Digital Thread & Twin

To tap the power of the Digital Thread and to facilitate a true Digital Twin, all facets of the organization and all lifecycle phases are reliant upon the Enterprise Configuration Management (ECM) process. Activities driven through the Digital Thread impact the Digital Twin with a constant barrage of changes making the ability to manage the Digital Twin that much more complex. How an organization identifies, structures, links and assigns ownership to its requirements and internal processes directly affect its ability to successfully and efficiently perform the intended mission or achieve its business objectives.

If this activity is ignored or done incorrectly, an organization pays severe penalties in the form of intervention resource expenditure. Those expenditures are the unplanned time, money, and resources expended to compensate for quality and schedule problems. When quality and schedule problems dominate the energy an organization expends on a daily basis, corrective action becomes the standard “way of working”. Changing that environment requires an understanding of how current processes relate to best practices and the culture change that is needed to make the transition.

Requirements management is the foundation for the Digital Thread

A structured and effective methodology for documenting, validating, releasing, and changing requirements is paramount. Requirements management is the foundation for the Digital Thread. Organizations struggle with the ability to define and maintain the digital architecture needed to support Software, Hardware, Systems, Facilities and Infrastructure throughout the entire lifecycle. The inability to effectively manage the Digital Thread creates a high level of corrective action in every phase of the lifecycle. Configuration management is the major backbone of requirements management and requirements management is a major building block in the creation and management of the Digital Thread. Understanding that relationship is imperative when defining the future mode of operating.

Configuration Management facilitates a Digital Thread

CM2 establishes the roadmap that facilitates an organization’s ability to create a world-class enterprise Digital Thread. This is achieved through the application of a set of proven principles and techniques. When properly applied, this improved business model enhances the development, structuring, and managing of requirements throughout the enterprise. Organizations continually struggle to define a fast and efficient change management process. Many organizations have changed or replaced their change process multiple times without understanding the dynamics of change or the building blocks needed to facilitate change management. Struggles with item re-identification decisions and the required level of visibility of changes directly impact the ability to develop and maintain the Digital Twin. The management of change includes understanding it’s impact throughout the entire organization and the total product/solution lifecycle.

Enterprise Configuration Management

The inability of an organization to successfully manage the digital thread ties directly back to their inability to effectively manage change. Most organizations have subject matter experts (SMEs) identified for each key discipline, but rarely do organizations have a SME focused on the management of change. It is imperative that your organization address the importance of Enterprise Configuration Management and introduce the roles, responsibilities and workflows required for a world-class organization to efficiently manage change. Thereby ensuring that the digital thread remains intact throughout the entire lifecycle of the product/solution, and that your digital twin is accurate. Once the power and efficiency of the CM2 closed-loop and fast-track change methodology are implemented, an organization’s view and perspective of their change management process will shift from it being a “necessary evil” to it being a true competitive advantage.

“The foundational element of the 4th industrial revolution is a proper CM network leading to people, processes, data, and products that are integrated within a functional Internet of Things.”

Organizations continue to be disappointed with the results of efforts to implement improvements to legacy PDM, PLM, and/or ERP systems. Even when opportunities for specific improvements are identified, they struggle with the ability to achieve successful implementation. These improvement projects are oftentimes reduced in scope and still experience cost overruns and missed schedules.

The negative experiences described above are also realized when an organization launches a process reengineering project. These common failures are not the problem…they are simply symptoms of an underlying bigger issue. The number of organizations that have achieved integrated process excellence is smaller than it should be. This is because most organizations continue to use configuration management (CM) in a limited role, only applying it to design information. Those organizations process a high volume of deviations and waivers; use redlines and assume firefighting is normal business practice.

Achieving Integrated Process Excellence (IPE)

In order to achieve Integrated Process Excellence an organization must break the many paradigms generally associated with configuration management’s limited role. The phased transition from that limited approach to CM2 is a major culture change that must be carefully planned and managed. The foundation of that new culture is the ability to change faster and document better. The application of that ability is extended beyond design information to include all requirements for the enterprise, and the enterprise deliverables throughout all of the lifecycle phases. Keeping all of those requirements clear, concise, and valid at all times is the goal…a very achievable goal.

“IPE is achieved when all core business processes are fully integrated and automated and resources being spent on intervention to rescue quality and schedule are approaching zero.”

  1. What happens if your organization doesn’t take the time to address inefficient and possibly broken legacy processes?
  2. What happens if your organization doesn’t configure its respective Internet of Things (IoT) correctly?

The answers to the questions are simple…sunk cost!

Take the first step with Configuration Management Training

Javelin is now the official Canadian partner of the Institute of Configuration Management providing training, certification and services in Configuration Management to help companies achieve integrated process excellence. The CM2 Enterprise Configuration Management training will provide you and your team with best practices, roles, workflows and templates for out-of-the-box usage in any project.

Configuration Management Training Class

Configuration Management Training Class

Benefits of learning and using Configuration Management include:

  • Profit Increase thru Cost Avoidance. By reducing corrective action, unnecessary costs will be avoided leading to increased profit.
  • More room for creativity thru less rework. Most organizations spend more than 50% of resources on fixing problems. If corrective action declines creativity will increase.
  • Reduced lead time for changes. Lead time for changes will be reduced dramatically by using the unique “fast-track” capability of the Closed-Loop CM2 Configuration Management change process. More changes can be implemented in the same period than before.
  • Competitive advantage thru shorter development cycles. Products will be released into the market earlier by using CM2 Configuration Management principles in product development — with better quality and less failure than today.

Learn about CM Training

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by Joseph Anderson at May 08, 2017 05:58 PM

SolidSmack

The Monday List 19.17 | What We’re Reading This Week

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Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

The Superfood Gold Rush
What will become of Brazil’s new superfood?

01

Pitchfork Grows Up
Ryan Schreiber’s once-scrappy hipster music review site has made it to media’s main stage.

02

The Complete Works: Ranking All 374 Rolling Stones Songs
An honest look at the world’s greatest rock-and-roll band.

04

Can Wal-Mart’s Expensive New E-Commerce Operation Compete With Amazon?
A recent acquisition spree including Jet.com gives the retail giant much-needed digital chops.

06

The Online Marketplace That’s a Portal to the Future of Capitalism
ervices like Wish — through which American consumers can mainline goods directly from the manufacturing chaos of China — are harbingers of the end of retail as we know it.

05

What Happens When You Train Like Nike’s Two-Hour Marathon Runners
I DID IT.

03

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by SolidSmack at May 08, 2017 05:06 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Multiple processor cores and FEA: Good or bad?

There’s a lot of information scattered around the net regarding the usefulness of multiple core processors for Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in SOLIDWORKS Simulation.

So what exactly is the optimum number of cores for FEA?

Good question! There are some areas that do and do not benefit from utilizing multiple processor cores. Take a look at this table:

SolidWorks-Multi-Cores-FEA-Table

As you can see, not all areas of the software benefit from having multiple cores/processors. The areas that don’t benefit are linear processes only. There are some areas that do benefit, but there is a limit.

SolidWorks Simulation FEA Multi-core 1

Image 1 – Mutliple Cores/CPU’s vs. Solution time (numbers for illustration purposes only).

 

The graph above illustrates the convergence between the number of cores and the solution time of the study. This explains that, after a certain point, the number of cores has little or no significant impact on the solution time. This is due to the communication time between the individual cores; the more you have, the longer the time taken to communicate and therefore the longer the solution time. Please note that SOLIDWORKS Simulation doesn’t benefit from hyper-threading either.

In summary: For optimum hardware usage, limit the amount of processor cores to a maximum of 8.

Tip: A good rule of thumb when choosing hardware is to choose faster clock speed over quantity of cores!

Another technique you can use to utilize multi-core processors in SOLIDWORKS is to manually assign cores to the SOLIDWORKS process, as seen in the Image below. This can be done through the task manager, located on the ‘Details’ tab as seen in Image 2. Next, right-click on the SLDWRKS.exe and select ‘Set affinity’. This then presents you with a window where the number of cores required can be assigned to that process. After this has been done, ALL of the rest of the processes listed here need to be set accordingly to not use the cores that have been assigned to SOLIDWORKS. This then allows those cores to be solely used by SOLIDWORKS. By default each process will be assigned to all the available cores.

SolidWorks Simulation FEA Multi-Core 2

Image 2 – RMB>Set Affinity

 

SolidWorks Simulation FEA Multi-Core 3

Image 3 – Processor affinity window

We hope you found that useful.


Why not take a look at our blog archive where we have posted plenty of helpful tutorials and technical articles like this one. We also have a huge video library filled with easy-to-follow tutorial videos inspired by real customer enquiries. Don’t forget to follow Innova Systems on twitter for daily bite size SOLIDWORKS tips, tricks and videos!

Author information

Innova Systems Experts in SOLIDWORKS Training & Support
We specialise in the supply, consultancy and training of SOLIDWORKS software. Based in Cambridge we have a central location to service a UK wide customer base. We offer the skills and experience to help you develop new products using SOLIDWORKS - empowering smarter, faster and more cost effective design. We've been recognised by SOLIDWORKS Corporation for providing the highest rated customer support in Northern Europe in 2014, 2015 and 2016. Email: info@innova-systems.co.uk / Telephone: 01223 200690.

The post Multiple processor cores and FEA: Good or bad? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Innova Systems Experts in SOLIDWORKS Training &#38; Support at May 08, 2017 03:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Project Template

A SOLIDWORKS Electrical Project Template is used to create a new project with a number of specific settings and options. Project templates also hold any other additional information you would like to store in a template.

For example, when starting a new project, we have a number of SOLIDWORKS default templates we can choose from, such as ANSI or IEC.  If we choose the ANSI template for example, all settings and options will be set up appropriately for a ANSI project (grid spacing = 0.25 inch, snap spacing = 0.125 inch, default ANSI symbols to be use, for example).  The defaults also include 5 drawings already pre-created in the template including a cover page, drawing list, line diagram, and two schematic sheets.

The defaults provided are a great starting point, but we can utilize templates even further and create our own custom templates for our exact company or exact project needs.  Let’s say our company generally works of three unique types of projects: High Voltage, Low Voltage, and Communications.  Perhaps each of these projects have unique settings and documents required.  We can set up and create three unique completely custom templates for these types of projects.

If we know that our high voltage projects use specific high voltage wire styles, always will have at least 5-line diagram sheets and 5 schematic sheets, and a number of specific wire numbering and component numbering schemes we can set all of this up specifically for this particular template.

Once we are happy with all of our SOLIDWORKS Electrical Project Template settings and options we can save out as a template.  In our Projects Manager we have the option to “Save as template” as shown in the image below.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Project Template

Save as Template

We can save out our newly created template and give it whatever name we may like.  Now, when creating any new projects, we will have the option to use our newly create High Voltage Template.

Naming and Using Project Templates

Naming and Using Project Templates

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Electrical training course either in a Canadian classroom near you or live online. For more information about electrical software and training solution call 1-877-219-6757.

The post SOLIDWORKS Electrical Project Template appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Flett at May 08, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Google and Raspberry Pi Partner to Make it Easy to Create Your Own AI Interfaces

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There’s no denying that voice interfaces are the future of interaction design. Whether it’s through Apple’s Siri, Amazon’s Alexa, Google Home, or any number of chatbots and new AI technologies, ‘the invisible interface’ eschews screens in favor of speech to feed us information or take commands. Thankfully, affordable development boards like the Raspberry Pi have helped bring these AI technologies to a wide variety of digital tinkerers.

In the latest issue of The MagPi – The official Raspberry Pi magazine, tinkerers both young and old have the opportunity to make their very own hardware kit that enables voice interaction across a number of Raspberry Pi projects thanks to a partnership with Google to include a Google Voice Hardware Accessory on Top (HAT) accessory board, a stereo microphone Voice HAT board, a large arcade button, and a selection of wires with the purchase of each physical magazine (users can read the digital online version for free without the kit here).

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As long as you already have a Raspberry Pi 3, all that you’ll need to do is a quick software setup to have access to the Google Assistant SDK and Google Cloud Speech API. For the 3D modeling-savvy, you can even design your own hardware casing. Otherwise, an included cardboard enclosure is included.

57-AIY-Projects-feature

Additionally, the issue also includes a way to create your own custom Amazon Dash button, how to master the basics of Minecraft Pi, add an on/off switch to the Raspberry Pi, and more. Find out more over at MagPi Magazine.

The post Google and Raspberry Pi Partner to Make it Easy to Create Your Own AI Interfaces appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at May 08, 2017 11:37 AM

Kickstarter Expands Retail Network with New Museum Partnership

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Back in 2014, Kickstarter teamed up with the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) to sell some of the quirkiest and most successful products that come out of the crowdfunding platform through the museum’s lauded retail stores. The result was in many ways a glimpse into what a possible Kickstarter retail store would look like—a powerful notion considering that all of the products are created with grassroots funding and invited the public into the creative and manufacturing process versus traditional retail.

While you can still find a small collection of Kickstarter-backed products over at MoMA (and online), the popular crowdfunding network recently further expanded their retail network. This time, it’s through a new partnership with New York City’s New Museum.

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“We’re pleased to announce an ongoing collaboration with the New Museum in New York City, showcasing an array of inventive projects that got started on Kickstarter in their store,” explains Kickstarter’s Nick Yulman. “As a leading institution dedicated to boundary-pushing art and ideas, the New Museum is the perfect place to share this collection, which features adventurous takes on everyday objects, creative explorations of technology, and designs that are simultaneously playful and profound.”

10025937-IamElmental-Small-Figurines-Two-Examples-Front_2

10026146-nasa-graphics-manual-front

10025939-l3d-cube-lit-with-box

Among other products that the New Museum will begin selling immediately include the IAmElemental superhero action figures for young girls, the NYCTA and NASA Graphic Standards Manuals, the L3D interactive light visualization cube, the Analog Voltmeter Clock, and other quirky products to have come out of the crowdfunding platform within the past couple of years. If you missed these projects at first, head over to the New Museum’s online shop (or stop by in-person to see a kickass window display) to get a second chance.

The post Kickstarter Expands Retail Network with New Museum Partnership appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at May 08, 2017 09:55 AM

May 06, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Creating Linked Views in SOLIDWORKS Composer

SOLIDWORKS Composer can enable users to transform 3D CAD data into technical communications that helps customers understand and retain product information effectively. One of Composer’s powerful functions is to “breathe life” into conventional 2D documentation and 3D interactive outputs with dynamic hyperlinks and user-friendly navigation. By setting up a navigation structure ahead of time, the creation of the interactive content is reduced to a series of simple steps and the result is immediately apparent.

This example below shows the hierarchy of the parts catalog for a component. Each coloured box represents different areas which can be used for a website or an interactive document for example.

To create these links, both collaborative and geometric actor properties are configured to enable links to connect. There is a large variety of link types available in Composer and it is possible to hyperlink any actor to nearly any location, whether it be HTTP, FTP, a file on the network, or any point or portion of an animation in the Composer file.

This table has been compiled to list the available link types and their descriptions:

A common function is linking views throughout a document and this is demonstrated as follows:

Step 1: The relevant view is created (text box optional) and is pre-selected as the initial link

Step 2: In the Properties tab on the left-hand side, go to Event > Link > select the ‘…’ to open the URL options

Step 3: Under URL select view:// – From the drop down select the ‘View’ that is required to link and click OK.

Step 4: To validate the link – it is recommended to come out of the ‘design mode’ environment to simulate a user environment rather than editing the document. By clicking on the linked view, it should automatically switch to the designated view set earlier in steps 2 – 3.

Last step: Once all the links have been set up – an html file can be exported to publish to a website or alternatively, it can be used as an interactive assembly instruction guide in a workshop. The completed document can now be seamlessly navigated with ease.

Whether you’re new to SOLIDWORKS or a seasoned Composer user, I hope you’ve found this overview useful.


Andrew Tsim is an Applications Engineer at TMS CADCentre, a SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller in Scotland.  You can read more from Andrew on the TMS CADCentre blog

Author information

TMS CADCentre
TMS CADCentre - is a SOLIDWORKS Reseller based in Scotland providing 3D CAD Design Software, analysis software & product data management software. The company was formed in 1981 and now pleased to be celebrating 35 years in business. TMS CADCentre is the only UK SOLIDWORKS Reseller based and funded within Scotland and have been providing SOLIDWORKS software, training and support since 1996 when the product was first launched in the UK.

The post Creating Linked Views in SOLIDWORKS Composer appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by TMS CADCentre at May 06, 2017 03:00 PM

May 05, 2017

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Beasty Ogre Shrieks

Joao-Antunes-Jr-art

When you’re running you don’t expect the guttural sound of an ogre. You definitely don’t expect it to stop you in your tracks. I had been running through that park for years, hearing rumors of a horrible, skin-shedding shriek, but I dismissed it until I saw it, heard it, standing there, holding these links.

João Antunes Jr. – Bit o’ color here. Cyberpunk characters, worlds, robots and suits drenched in thick lines and color.

Liz Climo – Ah, the wonderful, little world of liz climo. Animals and cuteness and lots of animal cuteness.

Calligraphr – Make a font out of your own handwriting. Provides character randomization, ligatures, templates and more.

Wallflowers – Beautifully intricate flowerheads to hang on the wall, created by Vanessa Hogge from porcelain and black stoneware.

Axe cop – This amazing series came out in 2012. We missed it. Thank you, Jude Pullen, for bringing it to our attention!

Approaching Jupiter – Well, hello Jupiter.

200+ Art Books – View or download over 200 modern art books fron the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Filter by topic, publisher, language.

Escape – A new animation from Dolby Laboratories to follow their award-winning short, Silent.

Minecraft in Real Life – What if real animals were shaped like the animals in Minecraft? Aditya Aryanto imagines it. Or view on Instagram with more of his photo manipulations.

Brick Block – Oh man. Why, oh why, is this so much fun. A fun brick building game.

Helsreach – A unofficial, yet wonderfully animated Warhammer 40k fan story with voiceover from the audio book Helsreach.
<script type="text/javascript"> amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "solid0a-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Deals We're Watching"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B01MG9KY0E,B00JXQQNC6,B00VVOCQHE,B01GO1SP1E"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "120b5b23da089f81bcb52b08216f6933"; </script>
<script src="http://z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>

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by Josh Mings at May 05, 2017 11:12 PM

Bridgestone Goes Airless with Resin-based Bicycle Tires

bridgestone-airphobic-bike-tires

It looks like Bridgestone is flexing its biceps at Nexo by creating airless bicycle tires that won’t go flat, even when punctured. Unlike conventional tires with an inner tube filled with air to maintain rigidity, Bridgestone’s “Air-Free Concept” wheels feature thermoplastic resin spokes to maintain shape and support the weight.

The tires are stretched around the inner rim and made completely from recycled materials, giving a ‘lil bit o’ love back to Mother Earth. The concept was centered around the idea of rider safety by removing the need to pull-off on a road shoulder to change a flat as well as to reduce CO2 emissions from portable air pumps.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86519" style="width: 818px;">The uniquely designed resin spokes allow for uniformity and won’t deform while riding. (Image credit Bridgestone)<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The uniquely designed resin spokes allow for uniformity and won’t deform while riding. (Image credit Bridgestone)</figcaption></figure>

While Bridgestone doesn’t state how the tires are manufactured, my guess is they use a process much like Nexo employed using resin pellets (recycled of course), which are heated and injection molded into the desired shape. Not only is the process faster than producing a conventional tire (roughly 30-minutes), it’s more cost effective with the added benefit of being more eco-friendly.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86520" style="width: 1100px;">Bridgestone’s Air-Free Concept tires can be bolted to vehicles as well. (Image credit Bridgestone)<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Bridgestone’s Air-Free Concept tires can be bolted to vehicles as well. (Image credit Bridgestone)</figcaption></figure>

Bridgestone came up with the Air-Free Concept back in 2011 during their ‘post-modern’ artwork phase and have since looked at revising and adapting their air-free endeavor to “enable proposals of next generation bicycles which have never been seen before.” A bold claim for sure but the company states that their Air-Free Concept tires will be available in 2019, just in time for the Tokyo Olympics in 2020.

It will be interesting to see exactly what these tires can do, however judging from the photo releases, they don’t look like they could handle the stress and rigors of mountain biking and BMX is right out. They’re probably geared more for inner city travel, which is fun in its own right but only time will tell what they’re capable of handling.

The post Bridgestone Goes Airless with Resin-based Bicycle Tires appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at May 05, 2017 09:51 PM

Phrozen Make Resin 3D Printer Boasts 2K Resolution with LCD Lighting

phrozen-make-3dprinter

Hot off the trail of their One DLP 3D printer debuted last year, Taiwan-based Phrozen is back, this time with Make, “the world’s most compact, reliable, and precise LCD light-cured resin 3D printer.” If that sounds like a mouthful, you’re right, but over 240 backers have already put Phrozen over their Kickstarter campaign target goal of $30K with over $250K funded to bring the 3D printer to market.

The machine uses LCD lighting to cure Phrozen-spec or third-party resin at what they state is ten times faster than SLA-based printers and sports a resolution up to 2K and a 60% higher contrast ratio over traditional FDM boxes.

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Phrozen updated their features over the One 3D Printer with a larger build volume of 7.5 X 4.7 X 7.9-inches with a print speed of 40mm per hour- meaning you can churn-out fifteen 1.2 X 1.2 X 1.2-inch objects every 60-minutes.

The Make is outfitted with a Raspberry Pi SBC that controls the printer’s linear guide and gap-eliminator screw for precision movement along the Z-axis. Double cooling fans, front panel LED indicator (print monitoring) and Teflon-lined resin tank round-out the Make’s hardware features. On the software side, it uses a modified version of nanoDLP with wireless support for laptop and mobile devices.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86515" style="width: 1100px;">Phrozen’s Make comes in two sizes with the original and XL version, the only difference being size. (Image credit Phrozen)<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Phrozen’s Make comes in two sizes with the original and XL version, the only difference being size. (Image credit Phrozen)</figcaption></figure>

Phrozen’s Make 3D printer comes in two sizes with the original featuring the same hardware as the XL version but with a decreased build volume of 4.8 X 2.7 X 5.5-inches and lowered XY resolution of 47 microns VS. 75. The UV LED array is also smaller as well- 50W instead of the 100W array the XL packs.

Unfortunately, the early bird prices for both versions have sold out, but you can still grab one for a pledge of $939 (original) and $1,399 (XL) respectively, both with an expected delivery date in July with resin sold separately.

The post Phrozen Make Resin 3D Printer Boasts 2K Resolution with LCD Lighting appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at May 05, 2017 09:45 PM

Gravity Jack’s PoindextAR Provides Augmented Reality for Anything Anywhere

GJ_PoindextAR_Mock2

An AR platform so good even the military uses it? In this case, the platform in question is Gravity Jack’s PoindextAR– a system capable of detecting and augmenting any object without the need for markers and it can do so using any smart device with a camera. A bold claim would be an understatement, considering how tough it is to accomplish even with today’s devices (whatever happened to Google Glass?).

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Some of the more prominent AR applications such as ScanLife, Popcode or Google goggles rely on markers or tags as visual identifiers to superimpose virtual elements onto real objects. They can then be manipulated for various viewing angles, displayed with pertinent data relevant to what’s being displayed. PointextAR does away with the need to place identifying makers by tracking the position of the object- from screws to skyscrapers, regardless if the object is in motion.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86511" style="width: 1100px;">Seeing if your new appliances would look better in a different color or a different location is just one of the many applications that can be had with PointextAR. (Image credit Gravity Jack)<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Seeing if your new appliances would look better in a different color or a different location is just one of the many applications that can be had with PointextAR. (Image credit Gravity Jack)</figcaption></figure>

According to Gravity Jack, the platform can measure a 6-DOF pose for any object with just a single image or video frame down to just a fraction of an inch using mobile devices or HMDs (Head Mounted Displays). While the object in question is highlighted, you can select a component that needs to be replaced on the object, and it will overlay its location and tools needed to get the job done.

Convenient for sure, and it can be of value as a learning tool as well–imagine looking at an aircraft engine and having the relevant parts labeled and what their function is or being a med student practicing surgical techniques. Industry will undoubtedly benefit from the platform as Gravity Jack is focusing on the sector, with a possible consumer release to follow shortly after.

Of course, it’s not known exactly how PointextAR functions other than it doesn’t need any specialized hardware or lighting conditions other than an RGB camera, which can be found in nearly everything mobile. Perhaps they will enlighten us more when they present the technology at this year’s Augment World Expo held at the end of this month.

The post Gravity Jack’s PoindextAR Provides Augmented Reality for Anything Anywhere appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at May 05, 2017 09:35 PM