Planet SolidWorks

February 25, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Photo Light Ring Tutorial

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Photo Light Ring: This assembly was designed help provide uniform lighting for photographic purposes. The main plank part has examples of global variables and equations. It is also has an example of an “in context” cut. There is an example of a Circular Component Pattern in the assembly. There is one picture of the finished assembly included with this model in the “Design Journal” document located in the “Design Binder” folder in the assembly and the plank part. Download this part to see the assembly created in SOLIDWORKS and then see the finished product.  

Download: Photo Light Ring
Complexity: Basic
Parts used: Base Extrude, Mirror, Split Line Curve, Circular Component Pattern

View all the Part Reviewer Tutorials here.

DraftSight Download: In conjunction with DraftSight, Dassault Systèmes’ 2D CAD product, the 2D drawing(.dwg) file of the Photo Light Ring tutorial is now available for download here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Photo Light Ring Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 25, 2017 10:00 PM

Automate your file exports with SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler

A common process is the export of your drawings to PDF files, so you can communicate these with non-CAD users. This can be a very time-consuming and boring task. SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional offers automated tasks to do this job for you, but non-PDM users will not benefit from this. So, in this tech blog I want to introduce the SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler. This tool helps you with automating many different tasks, but in this blog I want to focus on the exporting capabilities.

SW Task Scheduler: Where to find it?

You do not need to search in your SOLIDWORKS window. The SW Task Scheduler is a standalone application and must be opened from the Windows Start menu. Go to All Programs > SOLIDWORKS <version> > SOLIDWORKS Tools > SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler.

SW Task Scheduler: What can it do?

The SW Task Scheduler lets you set up tasks to perform at a future time. You can use it with any SOLIDWORKS license to convert documents to the latest SOLIDWORKS version. To schedule other tasks, you must have a SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium license.

The following list shows some of the capabilities of the SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler:

Task Scheduler functions overview

As mentioned before I want to focus on the Export Files task. All the other tasks work basically the same way, so explaining one task will be sufficient.

Export Files Task: How does it work?

1. First of all, you need to select the Export Files task on the sidebar. The following dialog box appears:
Export Files Dialog Box

2. Under Task title you can type a new title for the task or leave the default.

3. Select the desired file type under Export file type. The following file formats are available:

  • Dxf (*.dxf)
  • Dwg (*.dwg)
  • IGES (*.igs)
  • Adobe Portable Document Format (*.pdf)
  • STEP AP203 (*.step)
  • STEP AP214 (*.step)
  • JPEG (*.jpg)

4. Select the files or folders you want to export:

  • To select files:
    1. Under Task files or folders, click Add File.
    2. Select the types of files to export in Files of type.
      Available selections for DXF, DWG and PDF files:
      – Drawings (*.drw, *.slddrw)
      Available selections for IGES and STEP:
      – Parts (*.prt, *.sldprt)
      – Assemblies (*.asm, *.sldasm)
    3. Browse to the file you want to export, then click Open.
    4. Repeat steps 1, 2, and 3 to select additional files.
  • To select folders:
    1. Under Task files or folders, click Add Folder.
    2. Browse to the folder that contains the files to export, then click Select
      Folder
      .
    3. Under File Name or Type, click in the row that contains the folder you just
      added, then select the type of file to export.
    4. Repeat steps 1, 2, and 3 to select additional folders.
    5. If you do not want to include subfolders, clear Include subfolders.

5.  Under Task output folder:

  • Select Same as original file, to save the exported files at the same location as the original files.
  • Or select This folder, to select a folder location where you want to save the exported files.

6. Under Task schedule, you can specify how often the task should run (Once, Daily, Weekly, or Monthly). Use Start time and Start date to define the start of the defined task.

7. Click Options to set export options. Note that these options are different for each selected Export file type.

8. Click Advanced if you want to change task options such as the Task working folder and time-out duration.

9. If everything is defined as desired, you can click Finish.

The task and its title, scheduled time, scheduled date, and status appear in the Tasks panel. The status of the task is Scheduled.

Tasks panel

To run a scheduled task, your computer must be on at the scheduled start time. The SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler window does not need to be open. If your computer is off at the scheduled start time, the task runs when you turn your computer on. At the scheduled start time, the task is initiated. If the task acts on more than one file, a sub-task is generated for each file. When the task completes, the status changes to Completed.

Conclusion

We have seen how SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler can make life easier by automating boring export tasks.  In this tech blog I only explained the export file task, but I also want to encourage you to look at the other available tasks!

Thanks for reading this tech blog!

 

Written by Martijn Visser

Author information

CAD2M
CAD2M is certified reseller of SOLIDWORKS, SolidCAM, DriveWorks and our private label dddrop 3D printer. The CAD2M approach integrates this range of products into an all-in-one solution that covers the complete product development process. Take the full advantage of working in 3D with our advice, training and expertise. For more information, visit www.cad2m.nl.

The post Automate your file exports with SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CAD2M at February 25, 2017 04:00 PM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 08.16

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Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top ten stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

Amazon Launches Virtual STEM Club Subscription Featuring Monthly Projects Handpicked by Experts

Every once in a while, a new business model comes along that totally disrupts the status quo and changes the way we buy and become introduced to new products. Among others, the subscription service business model is just one of them.

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Vention.io is a Web-based Machine Builder Platform & Social Marketplace

A Montreal-based startup is about to shake the world of design automation. Vention, a new browser-based machine builder platform, launched in beta today. They provide a social marketplace of industrial equipment for purchase and a 3D machine builder with library of components to construct your own equipment.

vention.io-3d-web-machine-builder-platform-01-1100x818

Model of the Week: 3D Printed Quadruped Robot [Four Times the Awesome!]

Glory be! I’ve always said I wanted a baby quadruped of my very own. Those gang members with knives laughed, but I still kept saying it. After I got them all shirts with a cute baby quadruped graphic on it, they stopped trying to cut me. Just goes to show you Huey Lewis & the News, that’s The Power of (Quadruped) Love.

3D-Printed-Quadruped-Robot-01

IKEA is Finally Set to Launch Their Own Furniture Hacking Ecosystem

From converting a cheap wood dining room table into the ultimate productivity station to repurposing lamp components into clever light fixtures, there are very few things that cannot be done with IKEA’s expansive product line and a creative mind. Despite a growing community of IKEA Hackers, however, the company has never formally encouraged these hacks—as a matter of fact, they even sent a cease and desist letter to one of the more popular IKEA hacking community sites.

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This $400 Robotic Arm is the Desktop Peripheral You Didn’t Know You’ve Been Missing

Robots. They’re set to (maybe) take over the world. But first, they’re going to take over our…desks?

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The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 08.16 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 25, 2017 09:00 AM

February 24, 2017

SolidSmack

New 3D Print Materials Now Possible: 3D4Makers Develops Air-Cooled Filament Production System

3d4makers-3d-printer-filament-00

Netherlands-based 3D4Makers seems to have broken through a major barrier to producing unusual 3D print filaments in engineering materials with a new production system.

The secret to their venture is a new filament extrusion system that differs significantly from typical filament production operations.

But let’s see how most filament production is done.

Most filament production is accomplished by precisely melting high-grade plastic pellets and pushing the soft plastic through a precision nozzle. But the two most important aspects of the production occur after this relatively easy stage.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85202" style="width: 1100px;">Fresh 3D printer filament emerging from the extruder and entering the cooling water trough.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Fresh 3D printer filament emerging from the extruder and entering the cooling water trough.</figcaption></figure>

To achieve a consistently shaped and constant diameter filament, the production system must carefully adjust both the speed of the plastic flow and the temperatures.

If the speed is too high, the filament becomes thin; too slow and it’s fat. Varying speed results in varying diameter.

This happens because the filament is soft as it emerges from the extrusion nozzle because it’s still hot. The idea is to very precisely cool the plastic after it emerges to maintain shape and diameter.

Typically this cooling is accomplished with a rather large water trough through which the filament passes. The water is kept at very precise temperatures that ensures success.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85203" style="width: 1100px;">A typical water cooling trough used to produce 3D printer filament.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">A typical water cooling trough used to produce 3D printer filament.</figcaption></figure>

But therein lies the problem: the completed filament must pass through water, and many 3D printable plastics tend to absorb water. For typical non-3D print applications, this is entirely suitable. But 3D printing is different, because the plastic must be re-softened during printing.

When re-heated, the absorbed water will boil and corrupt the printing process, leading to lousy surface finish, poor bonding, or even jammed extruders.

To avoid this scenario, all typical filament manufacturers must bake the newly completed filament for many hours to extract the absorbed moisture, or at least most of it.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85207" style="width: 700px;">3d4makers-3d-printer-filament-05<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The best look we have on the secretive air-cooled 3D4Makers filament extruder.</figcaption></figure>

But now 3D4Makers has turned this process sideways by developing a new type of filament extruder that does not require water cooling! Instead the new device uses carefully positioned high-pressure air-jets to solidify the softened plastic in a way that ensures very precise shape and diameter, without any absorbed moisture. At no stage in production does water come in contact with the plastic, allowing an operator to merely bake the input pellets once to permanently eliminate all absorbed water.

3D4Makers says that the process results in filament with superior 3D printing characteristics:

We found that in layer adhesion of 3D printed parts is improved because of our production process. This means that you will get better and stronger 3D printed parts with 3D4Makers filament as compared to any other filament supplier. The same grade of PLA from the same plastics vendor will print into stronger 3D prints if we turn it into filament. Parts 3D printed with our materials also exhibit higher impact resistance than parts made from other filaments.

There are other benefits to this process:

Due to our unique production process, and extensive polymer knowledge we can also make 100% materials. 100% materials are filaments that 3D print but have no additives in the material. No plasticizers for example. Our materials are also ionised and many have food contact approval and are biocompatible or biodegradable.

But what’s really interesting about this extrusion system is that it will permit the production of filament made from materials that would otherwise be impossible or challenging with water-based systems.

To that end, 3D4Makers has begun producing a series of unusual materials that should significantly widen the types of materials available to designers.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85205" style="width: 480px;">A spool of PPSU 3D printer filament from 3D4Makers.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">A spool of PPSU 3D printer filament from 3D4Makers.</figcaption></figure>

One of their new materials is PCL (polycaprolactone), which I speculated last year someone might attempt to make. They’ve also developed filaments in PPSU, PEI, PEEK and others, and I expect them to produce many more. In addition to these, the company also markets PLA, ABS, ASA, PLLA, PET-G and Hemp filaments.

These materials have engineering properties far different from the typical ABS and PLA used on most filament-based 3D printers. Recently I’ve seen a new wave of machines that have the ability to deal with more unusual materials, many of which require far higher extrusion temperatures. Now those machines could have many new materials to explore.

Will other filament producers shift to air-cooled production systems? I think that could be problematic, because 3D4Makers doesn’t appear to be remarketing their device to other firms, at least not at this time. This leaves the other producers with the prospect of developing their own air-cooled equipment, or repurposing other manufacturing equipment.

For the moment, 3D4Makers may have a significant advantage in filament production.

Lead image: A PLLA test print made on an Ultimaker 3D printer. 3D4Makers PLLA is usually used as a scaffold material for bioprints.

Read more at Fabbaloo

The post New 3D Print Materials Now Possible: 3D4Makers Develops Air-Cooled Filament Production System appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at February 24, 2017 10:12 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Gear Heart Tutorial – Part 2

Many of us SOLIDWORKS users would be considered “gear heads”, or high-tech enthusiasts, but some of us take our “gear headed-ness” to such a high level that our enthusiasm for all things mechanical just pours from our heart. This tutorial series is for you, the SOLIDWORKS user that says “Nay, I am not just a gear head, I’m a gear heart!” In this four-part series we’ll be building a functional geared heart pendant using mostly essential SOLIDWORKS features, with a few unique part and assembly features sprinkled in.

In part 2 of our 4-part series for those who are in love with the mechanical world, or “gear hearts” as I’ve come to call them, we will start adding some patterned detail to this design using the curve driven pattern feature and we’ll dive into several of the available options in the extruded boss and extruded cut features to help expose the design’s inner workings.

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Whether you’re interested in all things mechanical or want to exercise your artistic side, the Gear Heart Tutorial Series will help you better understand and expand your Gearing and Mechanical Mate skills in SOLIDWORKS! Can’t wait for the next video? View all of the tutorials on the playlist here.

Download the full Gear Heart SOLIDWORKS assembly here.

Are you a gear head? Share your creations with us in the comments below! As always, thanks for watching!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Gear Heart Tutorial – Part 2 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 24, 2017 10:00 PM

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Crush-Bunny Fun-Punches

Gregory-Euclide-art

They fought off the abundance of nibbles. From left and right they came, wearing their customized little hats. Should you try to grab one and put it on your head, your fate was sealed. You would be punished unless, by chance, you were able to make your way through them to what they swore to protect, all the way, to take these links.

Gregory Euclide – Wonderfully amazing reliefs that mix together an array of materials from foam and moss to acrylic and seeds. A handful of surreal installations as well.

Fabric and Skin – translated into a digital mesh. A fashion visual experiment by Tobias Gremmler for Osage Gallery during HK|Runway.

Hidden Folks – Can you find them? A beautifully done hand-drawn, interactive game of hide and seek among the miniature landscapes by game designer Adriaan de Jongh. Available on everything.

Slow Mo Battery Explosion – What happens when you heat a battery. Gav and Dan, the Slow Mo guys, find out in their latest experiment.

Straw Camera – An experimental analog camera, made from… you guessed it, straws. 32,000 straws. Many photos, with more on the process here.

Admantium Crush – What happens when you try to crush adamantium (you know, Logan’s claws) with a hydraulic press? You won’t believe it. Bit of language here.

Pixelated – The sculptures of artist Hsu Tung Han are wooden people and busts pixel-glitching, carved from teak, walnut or African wax wood.

Smash the Window – The Tossers new one from the title album on Victory Records.

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The post Friday Smackdown: Crush-Bunny Fun-Punches appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 24, 2017 06:58 PM

The Milanote Infinite Workspace Note-Taking App is the Evernote for Creatives

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While smartphones and the Cloud have made note taking and inspiration gathering easier than ever, effectively organizing all of that new incoming information has been lackluster at best.

Although robust note-taking apps like Evernote and even native note apps on iOS and Android perform all of the basic functions, making logical sense of it all has largely involved jumbling everything together into even more notes or lists—thus, repeating the process.

Such is the premise behind the recently-launched Milanote app for design professionals.

laptop-iphone

Billed as “the Evernote for creatives,” the freemium app allows users to organize various notes and multimedia snaps into cohesive information trees on a virtually infinite workspace; so while you may be grabbing notes in a meeting, you can just as easily upload screenshots and snaps you took at the latest motorcycle show onto one expansive whiteboard versus individual note files.

Once the whiteboard is filled, users can gradually ‘connect the dots’ once patterns and connections reveal themselves through an integrated structuring system.

board-inspiration

Currently, Milanote is free for individuals (up to 100 notes) on desktop with iOS and Android apps on the way. Unlimited storage for professionals and teams starts at $12/month.

The post The Milanote Infinite Workspace Note-Taking App is the Evernote for Creatives appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 24, 2017 06:10 PM

The Hoverbike Scorpion-3 is a Mashup Between a Quadcopter Drone and a Motorcycle

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From mechanical wings to jet packs, man’s desire to fly stretches back centuries. But, like flying cars and teleportation, it’s a concept that’s still just beyond our grasp.

But for the particularly gutsy extreme sports enthusiast, Hoversurf’s Scorpion 3 Hoverbike just might carry over any fleeting flying desires in the meantime.

Built as a combination between a motorcycle and a quadcopter drone, the 265-pound electric-powered vehicle is capable of reaching heights of 33 feet at a top speed of 30 MPH. And while it may be stable enough to stay in the air (indoors at least) thanks to a custom-built software to limit its range and velocity, there’s no saying what might happen if your leg happens to come a little too close to one of those blades:

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Hoversurf is currently crowdfunding the Hoverbike with a retail price of $150,000. But seriously—for that much, can’t they at least include a protective cage over each of the blades?

Stay updated on the project over at Hoversurf.

The post The Hoverbike Scorpion-3 is a Mashup Between a Quadcopter Drone and a Motorcycle appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 24, 2017 05:57 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Light up your Products with SOLIDWORKS Visualize

For this blog, we wanted to create an animation of a model surrounded by lighting rigs so that we could lights on and off at different intervals to show off different features of a product. We have used 2 really useful tools that come with SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional, the Formation Tool and Model Sets.

The Formation Tool

The formation tool within Visualize Professional takes advantage of designs that need patterns of models. Rather than having to align models linearly by eye, Visualize has this tool that will do this for you.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Formation

The formation tool can be activated by selecting multiple model with either Ctrl or box selection. Then within the Models toolbar,  ‘Formation’ box will show, here we have a number of selections we can make from the ‘Type’ dropdown – for example: Line, Vee, Circle & Semi Circle.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Formation

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Formation

Once selected, spacing and orientation can be edited to the desired design.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Formation

Model Sets

Next, we’re going to look at Model Sets. Model sets within SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional gives you the flexibility to manage not just one set of files but multiple in the same Visualize project.

Multiple model sets are available only in SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional. These can contain identical geometry or unique geometry.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Formation

Some geometric operations you perform on a model that is present; in identical model sets apply to all instances of that model across all model sets in which it is used. This includes part splitting, animation, grouping of parts, and decals.

In this case we decided to work on the model of the car and the lighting rig separately. We did this so it would be easy to edit and manage the car model without the lighting rigs getting in the way.

In the animation video below you can see that we have used the formation tool (as well as model sets whilst we were creating it) to form a lighting rig around the model of a car then using the animation tools to show off different aspects – much like they do on Top Gear when showing off the car central to an episode.

*For the full experience please turn on your speakers!*

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Once created, we then pulled this into some video editing software to finish off the final tweaks and add the audio.

For more information SOLIDWORKS Visualize information including the Why Go Pro blogs please follow our Blog or MySolidSolutions.

 

By Olly Smith

Elite SOLIDWORKS Applications Engineer

Author information

Solid Solutions Technical Team
Solid Solutions commenced business as a SolidWorks Training and SolidWorks Support provider in 1998 and has consistently achieved strong growth year-on-year to become the UK’s leading SolidWorks 3D CAD reseller. Growth has been completely organic and has been consistently driven by a focus on recruiting the best from academia and industry and by delivering high quality services to more than 4,000 customers. Our customers range widely in size and are drawn from a broad spectrum of industry sectors. SolidWorks software is used by over 2 million engineers and designers across the world. As a company we are dedicated and focused at providing first class training and support to help you realise the best return on your investment.

The post Light up your Products with SOLIDWORKS Visualize appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Solid Solutions Technical Team at February 24, 2017 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Blog | SOLIDWORKS Engineering & Design Blog

Symmetry Solutions Named Top Reseller in North America for Subscription Support Services by SOLIDWORKS

Symmetry Solutions wins the prestigious award for the third time in 9 years, demonstrating the company’s commitment to outstanding customer service and support
Minneapolis, Minn. – February 24, 2017 -- Symmetry Solutions, Inc., a leading provider of 3D engineering design software and 3D printing solutions, has been named the top SOLIDWORKS reseller in North America for the third time in nine years. The award, #1 in North America for Subscription Support Services, was presented to Symmetry Solutions at the SOLIDWORKS World 2017 conference held February 5-8 in Los Angeles, California.

To receive the top award, Symmetry Solutions outperformed approximately 31 other SOLIDWORKS Resellers in North America who provide SOLIDWORKS Subscription Services.

“We are thrilled to receive this award again – for the third time in only nine years!” explained Paul Rudin, President of Symmetry Solutions. “We work hard to ensure our customers are successful. This unwavering commitment to our customers’ training, technical support and guidance is why they continue to put their trust in us.”

Symmetry Solutions Named Top Reseller in North America for Subscription Support Services by SOLIDWORKS

SOLIDWORKS presents the Top Reseller in North America for Subscription Service award yearly to honor companies who consistently demonstrate excellence in service. Subscription Service represents the areas where SOLIDWORKS end users depend on Value Added Resellers (VARs) the most: technical support, guidance in software upgrades and enhancements, and expert problem-solving advice.

“From the very first day Symmetry Solutions opened its doors, we have stayed true to our core values--supporting every company like they are our biggest, best, and only customer,” concluded Rudin. “By instilling those values into every team member at Symmetry Solutions, we are able to achieve extraordinary results.”

SOLIDWORKS products are used by over 3.1 million engineers and designers at more than 265,000 companies worldwide. To learn from Symmetry Solutions how the SOLIDWORKS 3D design product portfolio can quickly and easily transform ideas into great products, visit www.symsolutions.com/SOLIDWORKS-products.

About Symmetry Solutions, Inc.

Symmetry Solutions, Inc. is the leading provider of 3D engineering design software and 3D printing solutions in the Midwest. From concept to production, our team of experts work with you to offer the best tools, training, support and experience available to meet your individual needs. Our goal is to streamline your engineering and design processes to increase productivity, speed time to market, and ensure you are successful with our solutions. Symmetry Solutions is your official SOLIDWORKS, HP and Markforged provider for the Midwest. Symmetry Solutions is headquartered in Brooklyn Park, Minn. For more information, please visit www.symsolutions.com or call 1-800-975-0740.

Author

Nick Weirens, Marketing Manager

February 24, 2017 03:39 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Adding Mesh Controls to Beam Elements in SOLIDWORKS Simulation

Beam elements in SOLIDWORKS Simulation are simplified elements that don’t require any size settings when meshing.  The SOLIDWORKS Simulation Beam Elements are meshed with a default size that’s required for the calculations.

However in situations where you have bonded contacts between a solid or shell and the beam somewhere along its length, the default element size may not be sufficient.  The contacts may not hold if the beam elements are too large over the contacting area.  The solution is to add Mesh Controls to the beams of importance to refine their mesh.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Beam Elements

Mixed Mesh with Solids and Beams – Beam elements not refined

In the example above, you’ll notice we have a small contacting region between the solid and beam.  The beam doesn’t even have a full element over this contact area which may cause the contact to fail and make the model unstable.  Simply add a Mesh Control to these two beams with an element size that will reduce it enough to have several elements over the contacting region.

Add Mesh Controls to Beam Elements

Add Mesh Controls to Beam Elements

Beam Elements have been Refined

Beam Elements have been Refined

Be sure to add Local Bonded Contact Sets where you have a mixed mesh interface to ensure the contact is defined properly.

Local Bonded Contact Set - Define one for each beam

Local Bonded Contact Set – Define one for each beam

The refined mesh and local bonded contacts ensure a strong bond and the components remain locked together through the deformation.

Displacement Results

Displacement Results

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Simulation

Take one our SOLIDWORKS Simulation training courses either live online or in a SOLIDWORKS classroom near you.

The post Adding Mesh Controls to Beam Elements in SOLIDWORKS Simulation appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at February 24, 2017 01:00 PM

February 23, 2017

SolidSmack

The Stress Block is the Ultimate Desktop Fidget Toy (37% Off)

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We get it – patience doesn’t always come easy. Whether you’re waiting for a comp to finish rendering or are just nervously waiting to hear back from a client, it’s normal to fidget with the first thing you can get your hands on.

But instead of stressing everybody else out with your excessive nail biting and desk drumming, consider grabbing a Stress Block at the first sign of feeling like you’re about to go crazy.

With six different sides featuring six different ways of fidgeting, you’ll never lose your mind while waiting for those assemblies to rebuild themselves ever again. And for a limited time, SolidSmack readers can get a Stress Block for just $14.99 – that’s 37% off the retail price of $24.00.

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When you were a kid, there was Silly Putty. Today, we’re smarter, more accomplished, and definitely in need of greater focus, which is what makes Stress Blocks such a revelation. This addicting desk toy is designed to help you focus, offering six sides with a unique game to play on each, helping you to burn off that excess energy in a healthy way.

Features:

  • Play w/ six different sides to expel energy
  • Increase focus by occupying your hands while you zero in on what’s in front of you
  • Take Stress Blocks anywhere – they easily fit in your pocket

BUY HERE

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by SolidSmack at February 23, 2017 07:20 PM

Watch Mythbusters’ Adam Savage Modify a Nerf Blaster Into a Foam Dart Sniper Rifle

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No stranger to modding things to his liking, ex-Mythbusters host Adam Savage has documented the process of created everything from custom tool storage in his incredible workshop to even a working replica of the Star Trek Captain’s Chair. Not surprisingly, the results are always entertaining. For his latest, Savage is sure to make Nerf fans drool with a Sniper mod for the popular foam dart blaster.

Starting with a generic store-bought blaster, Savage documents the process of taking the Nerf toy apart and putting it back together with his functional and aesthetic improvements.

If one thing’s for certain, you might want to bring extra protection and more than a few extra darts if you end up in a Nerf battle with this guy.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cwOXSXkW-uE?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

For those interest in learning more about Nerf Mods, there’s an entire community centered around them.

The post Watch Mythbusters’ Adam Savage Modify a Nerf Blaster Into a Foam Dart Sniper Rifle appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 23, 2017 04:29 PM

These Apple Car Concepts Are Inspired by Apple’s Most Iconic Products

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Whether or not Apple actually makes a self-driving car for the masses or not, perhaps just as interesting is what the company would envision a car in 2020 to actually look like—you know, considering that it would be chiseled away by a team of the world’s most elite industrial designers.

To give them a boost, ClickMechanic—a sort of AirBnB for auto mechanics and garages in the UK—crowdsourced some rather interesting concepts inspired by some of Apple’s most iconic products over the past few decades.

“Apple has led the technology industry since the 1980s and has become the definition of cutting edge,” says the company. “With rumours surrounding the company producing the first car, we have created five concept cars based on some of Apple’s most iconic products.”

1-APPLE-CAR-1-Macintosh-128K
iCar Macintosh
The iCar Macintosh is based on the original Apple Macintosh 128k, released in 1984. We’ve incorporated the beige, plastic like feel of the computer as well as its big, square, and angular features to create a true retro automobile.

4-APPLE-CAR-3-Power-Mac-G5
iCar Power
The iCar Power draws inspiration from the early noughties era when the PowerBook G4 was released. It lends the same anodised aluminium alloy and delivers a powerful, sturdy, and industrial looking vehicle. Ideal for transporting heavy loads.

6-APPLE-CAR-5-iphone-7
iCar 7
The iCar 7 comes in a glossy, jet black shell. Powered by electricity, its battery will last hundreds of miles. The smooth finish, slightly rectangular shape, and rounded edges makes the car look every bit as powerful as it is.

Check out the rest over at ClickMechanic.

The post These Apple Car Concepts Are Inspired by Apple’s Most Iconic Products appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 23, 2017 04:14 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Make it Move with SOLIDWORKS – Part 2

Have you ever wanted to make your model move but were not sure how to do it?

This is part two of our three part series about how to do just that in SOLIDWORKS. SOLIDWORKS has many built in design tools that capture or use motion to create technical design data for documentation purposes and so you can share your findings as a proof of concept.

While the first installment covered the Mate Controller, the second installment shows the Animation tools under the motion study tab for a more refined and detailed way to create motion in your assemblies.  At first the Animation tools may seem harder to use but I go over a few tips and tricks to make sure your animations look fluid and complete.

solidworks animation tools

Check out the part two video of the Make it Move with SOLIDWORKS series below and keep an eye out for our final installment in the coming weeks which will cover Motion Simulations!

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ShW_ixlmdD4?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

My example for the Make it Move series is a model from FIRST Robotics Team 3506 YETI.  This robot was designed and built in 6 weeks by a team of high school students using SOLIDWORKS.  Black Ice was designed to shoot foam balls, cross rough terrain, and climb a six foot castle wall.


By: Robbie Hoyler • SOLIDWORKS Application Engineer • TPM

Author information

TPM
TPM, Inc. is the Carolina’s largest 3D CAD provider and a leading technology company proud of its reputation of providing cutting-edge solutions to the engineering and design community for the past 40 years. Founded in 1973, TPM Inc. serves more than 3,000 customers across the Southeast each year. Inspired by our founder, Jerry Cooper, we are committed to offering our clients the best: 3D Design Software, 3D Printing and Scanning Options, Data and Document Management Solutions, Large-Format Graphics, Wide-Format Plotters and Office Equipment, and Reprographics.

The post Make it Move with SOLIDWORKS – Part 2 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by TPM at February 23, 2017 04:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS Visualize: Fast Mode Just Got Faster

So you’ve heard only bug fixing happens during Service Packs? Not with the Visualize R&D team. We’ve got some surprises in store to brighten up your day…scratch that, speed up your day. Update now to SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2017 SP2 to take advantage of our crazy fast speed improvements!

Here’s a breakdown of the awesome speed improvements you’ll now enjoy with 2017 SP2 (Visualize Standard & Professional):

  • Improved Viewport interactivity in Fast and Accurate render modes
  • Added new Fast Rendering mode switch for even faster Fast mode
  • BONUS: extended the ‘Monitor File’ across Visualize sessions

Improved Viewport interactivity in Fast and Accurate render modes

Want to interact with your model faster when in Fast and Accurate modes? Well your wait is over. You’ve specifically asked us to improve the Viewport interactivity when rotating the camera around your model, and we’ve delivered with 2017 SP2. You’ll notice this improvement immediately; night and day over previous versions. No settings or switch to fiddle with; it just plain works…faster.

Added new Fast Rendering mode switch for even faster Fast mode

The Visualize R&D team developed a new, faster setting specifically for Fast mode. You now have the option to make Fast mode even faster, by choosing ‘Speed’ in this Fast mode setting. Easily accessible in the ‘Tools > Options > 3D Viewport’ tab, you can choose between two new Fast modes:

  • Speed: recommended for fastest interactivity in the Viewport.
    o This new Fast render setting will complete renders almost 2X faster than in previous versions, by removing self-shadowing and time-consuming reflections.
    o Ideal for projects without glass, clear plastics or transparent objects.
  • Quality: recommended for final renders…but you be the judge!
    o This new Fast render mode is actually more realistic and advanced than our previous Fast render mode! Now you can enjoy the more photorealistic Accurate mode with the blazing speeds of Fast mode. The best of both worlds.
    o If you haven’t tried Fast mode yet for your Visualize projects, then now’s definitely the time. You might be wasting loads of render time using Accurate mode, when this new Fast: Quality mode gives nearly identical results in a fraction of the time. Update to 2017 SP2 and give it a try today.

Model credit: Myomo

 

BONUS: extended the ‘Monitor File’ feature across Visualize sessions

Are you taking advantage of the powerful ‘Monitor File’ feature to CAD Live-Update your model in Visualize as design and engineering changes are made? Well, we’ve got a bonus for you in 2017 SP2. If ‘Monitor File’ is selected upon first import, Visualize will now continuously monitor your CAD file, even while Visualize is closed. As soon as you launch Visualize again, it will search for any newer version of your CAD file and immediately show a pop-up asking if you want to import the newer CAD file. This is a huge added bonus, allowing you to have a seamless workflow between your CAD tool and Visualize.

All these improvements and loads of stability enhancements are just a click away for customers on active Subscription. Click ‘Start’ and type ‘Check for Updates’ and then launch the SOLIDWORKS Check for Updates tool. You’ll be cruising with 2017 SP2 in no time and creating Visualize content faster than ever before.

Don’t forget to follow SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager @bhillner on twitter for product news and updates, and share your SOLIDWORKS Visualize creations on social media with #swvisualize and #gettinvizzy!

More Resources to get started with SOLIDWORKS Visualize:

WATCH A BRIEF WEBINAR OVERVIEW of SOLIDWORKS Visualize and its benefits by SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager Brian Hillner.

WATCH THE TUTORIALS to master SOLIDWORKS Visualize in no time and impress your boss with photo-quality content.

UPGRADE TO SOLIDWORKS VISUALIZE PROFESSIONAL for an enhanced 3D visualization experience. Contact your Reseller now!

 

Author information

Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner is the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager.

The post SOLIDWORKS Visualize: Fast Mode Just Got Faster appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Brian Hillner at February 23, 2017 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Inserting a 3D Cross-Break in SOLIDWORKS

A question we sometimes get in the SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal course is how to insert a 3D cross-break. The functionality seems to be there in the SOLIDWORKS Cross-Break command on the Sheet Metal toolbar, but upon inspection, the cross break it inserts is merely cosmetic. In most applications, this will be sufficient, since the distortion on the actual component will be minimal.

Indeed, by SOLIDWORKS doing it this way keeps the geometry simple (lending itself to faster system performance) while not sacrificing too much in terms of functionality. After all, the cross break is still shown on the drawing in the bend notes, so the shop floor will still get it done.

Cross-Break command and result

SOLIDWORKS Cross-Break command and result

However, this does not dissect the top face and does not give me the slight pyramid shape that I would expect to see in the real world. Let’s say that was important to my design intent and I needed to show it. How can I go about doing this? I can’t use Sketched Bends for this, nor can I use an Edge Flange. This is due to the fact that I have two bend lines that cross each other. Well, luckily there is a way to do this without using bends or flanges.

What I need to do is use a Forming Tool to achieve what I’m try to do. I take a quick measurement of the rectangle I’m trying to cross-break (in this example, 150mm x 195mm). Then I create a new part and sketch the rectangle, 150 x 195, as shown below:

Cross Break Sketch

Cross Break Sketch

If this was a square, then I could just do a Boss-Extrude with the Draft option selected, but if I try this with my rectangle, I will not get all the faces converging on a single point. I could do a simple Boss-Extrude, then apply draft afterwards using the Draft command, but I’d have to use trigonometry to get the desired angle, and if my rectangle size changed, then I’d have to revisit all my math. Instead, I’m going to use the Lofted Boss/Base command. Of course, you’re wondering how I can do this, since I need two sketches. Well, I’m transition this rectangular profile into a single point, so I’m going to make a second sketch (on an offset plane, of course), that contains a single point. Behold:

Sketch point of second sketch indicated. It is on Plane1

Sketch point of second sketch indicated. It is on Plane1, and centred on the origin

Now I have two profile sketches (even though one of them is just a single point). Now I can crease my loft feature using the Lofted Boss/Base command. This gives me my very flat pyramid, which I will use as a forming tool to give me my 3D Cross-Break. If you’re not familiar with the process of creating a forming tool, please refer to this forming tool blog article which explains the steps well.

Please note: that the Forming Tool Stopping Face will be the flat base of the pyramid and there should be nothing selected for Faces to Remove.

Once you have your forming tool, you can switch back to your sheet metal part and use it. Be careful to locate the forming tool using the Position tab, as shown below:

I like to reposition the insertion point so I can select it (middle of image)

I like to reposition the insertion point so I can select it (middle of image)

Then, I apply Horizontal and Vertical sketch relations to the midpoints of the edges:

Right-click, Select Midpoint

Right-click, Select Midpoint

Once completed, the end result is shown below.

SOLIDWORKS Cross-Break applied

Measure angle between faces

If you’ve done this correctly, the faces should be split and you should be able to measure an angle between the faces.

The post Inserting a 3D Cross-Break in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Jim Peltier, CSWE at February 23, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidWorks Legion

AngelSix releases many of their SOLIDWORKS API Macros and Books for free

An older resource for many things related to SOLIDWORKS API is AngelSix.  Luke Malpass, founder of AngelSix, has written many SOLDWORKS macros.  He has also written a couple of macros books. As of...

by fcsuper at February 23, 2017 10:31 AM

February 22, 2017

SolidSmack

The Vaquform is the World’s First Digital Desktop Vacuum Former

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Unlike desktop 3D printers, which have only grown more connected and technologically advanced over the past few years, vacuum forming has remained somewhat Lo-Fi—oftentimes consisting of a homemade jig hooked up to a shop vac. But what if desktop vacuum forming finally got smart? It would probably look a whole lot like the Vaquform, which bills itself as “The World’s First Digital Desktop Vaccum Former”.

But what exactly makes a vacuum former “digital”? According to Vaquform, Inc., the digital integrations go far beyond the machine’s LCD interface.

db58a19e9eabe30a61a9e8f8e08f2a55_original

The Vaquform is the first thermoformer that has preset heating profiles and an IR probe to monitor different types and thicknesses of plastic materials including specific temperatures so as to not waste material. Once a material has hit its ideal temperature, the machine alerts the user and automatically turns on the vacuum to begin the forming process.

7462710ad7d3d05e61aee2af997b520d_original

Using a hybrid vacuum system, the Vaquform first uses a low-pressure, high-speed vacuum to rapidly suck out the majority of the air, followed by a slower but more powerful vacuum to help mold the plastic more closely against tight details.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/vaquform/vaquform-the-worlds-first-digital-desktop-vacuum-f/widget/video.html" width="800"> </iframe>

Having raised nearly $200K with an original goal of $60K, it’s clear that the Vaquform team just might be on to something here. While the Early Bird Kickstarter specials have already sold out at a price of $539, those who manage to get in before the campaign ends on March 13th can still swipe one for $645.

Find out more over at Kickstarter.

The post The Vaquform is the World’s First Digital Desktop Vacuum Former appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 22, 2017 10:17 PM

WorldViz Solves the Secret of How Business Will Use VR

worldviz-vr-system-skofield-01

WorldViz is a developer of virtual reality software, but they’re approaching it differently than most. The team, led by Matthias Pusch, Peter Schlueer & Andrew Beall, Ph.D have been developing VR tech since the 90s (no, not the Virtual Boy). They started out in academia, at MIT and the University of California, creating methodological tools for studying human cognition and visual perception leveraged by the unique abilities of VR to address scientific questions.

What sets WorldViz apart from other VR software developers? Well, for one, they aren’t making video games; they aren’t making consumer products at all, and it’s working out for them. While the rest of VR world focuses on who will light the VR consumer market fire, WorldViz has their sights set on enterprise and academia. Industrial use, not consumer use, is what they believe will ultimately drive VR adoption in 2018 and, after examining some of their case studies and impressive client list, you quickly start to see why.

Here’s the rub. Consumer VR applications require inherently expensive hardware and software to participate. Furthermore, experiences are isolating, and resolutions are lower than what we would expect. Essentially, you’re asking people to pay a lot for an (arguably) ‘meh’ experience. On the other hand, WorldViz wants their customers to save by investing in their VR experience packages, and if you can save a business money, you’re in business!

worldviz-vr-system-01

Let’s take a look at what they’re selling and who’s buying.

WorldViz has a focus on academic, architectural, engineering and construction (AEC), healthcare, defense, and manufacturing industries. They offer two practical solutions, VR development services and a VR product line, aimed at making it simple to develop and experience VR environments. “Practical solutions” and “VR” wouldn’t normally belong in the same sentence with each other but, in this case, they do—the solutions they provide for those interested in VR truly are practical.

For example, their software is created to be simple to use and deployed anywhere, communicating complex ideas to remote decision makers to save both time and travel expense. And these savings are bigger than you might think. Companies spend $1.25 trillion globally on business travel to get around these limitations. Architectural and construction companies are using WorldViz VR  products to displace physical mock-ups with virtual ones with full-scale BIM and CAD file import and collaboration capabilities.

Their VizMove VR System combines everything needed to design and experience projection, standing, walking or seated VR environments. Each is a complete preconfigured system running on a Lenovo ThinkStation and using their Vizard VR software for rapid application development.

The Projection VR system demonstrates this best in a system offering simultaneous viewing of the same virtual space projected onto two walls. This solution is distinct because it breaks through the inherently isolating design of full VR headsets and all users can interact with elements within the shared environment.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/136564371" title="VizMove Projection VR" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="500"></iframe>

Late last year, they introduced project ‘Skofield’, a cloud-based system to quickly build VR presentations through a drag-and-drop WYSIWYG editor. Here’s how they describe the experience:

Once they’ve created a presentation, the presenter can then invite attendees to join a session immediately or at a later date via email or text. Attendees can then view, experience, and interact with the VR presentation or 3D designs without ever having to travel. A set of tools will give attendees the ability to interact with the presentation in different ways, such as move around the virtual space, zoom in on or interact with objects, annotate on objects, measure distances, or even use a virtual laser pointer. Skofield also provides telephony for voice as well as gaze tracking, and can even record meetings for later reference.

These are just two examples of how WorldViz is taking aim at the barrier to VR and, we believe, may very well have solved the secret, the question many are asking, of how a business will use VR. With a turnkey approach, businesses are starting to see the ‘practical solutions’ of VR and if they’re making VR development so simple, it’s going to be very interesting to see how they move to develop and integrate with other 3D software and VR tech.

worldviz-vr-system-02

The post WorldViz Solves the Secret of How Business Will Use VR appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Lauren Thomas at February 22, 2017 08:55 PM

Disney Acquires 3D Printed Toy Startup MakieLab

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While 3D printing failed to live up to its hype as a viable form of manufacturing—at least, in a way that makes sense—there were a few bespoke product companies that managed to pave their way through the noise and found success using more advanced additive manufacturing technologies to produce their one-off wares.

Among others was MakieLab, a startup that made bespoke 3D printed dolls tailored to the very specific request of customers. Unlike mass manufactured Barbie or American Girl dolls, MakieLab was able to create dolls tailored to very specific requests from a customer before fabricating with SLS 3D printers and processing to a finished product quality.

toymaker-jan4th2016-homepage

This morning, the company announced quietly on Facebook that they have been acquired by Disney and company founder Alice Taylor will now serve as the Director of the StudioLab at The Walt Disney Studios.

“We’d like to send enormous thanks to all of our customers, our supporters and our suppliers around the world for helping us to launch the world’s first 3D printed toy,” said the company in the post. “Makies were just a little ahead of their time. They’re going back to the future, which is where they came from in the first place, of course…”

While nothing has been said about what Disney has planned for their new custom toy platform, it’s safe to say that they’ll be leveraging it to do something similar on a much larger scale.

The post Disney Acquires 3D Printed Toy Startup MakieLab appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 22, 2017 08:55 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017 – Costing

Hi, everybody! Every year, SOLIDWORKS rolls out a new version with many great enhancements, and this year is no different. In this article, I’m going to show you some of the top enhancements to the costing module in SOLIDWORKS 2017. In case you aren’t familiar with Costing, it’s a tool to get accurate manufacturing costs of your part and assemblies available in SOLIDWORKS Professional and Premium, respectively. Let’s take a look at some of this year’s improvements. I’ll show them using this Torso Frame. When costing an assembly, you now have the option to do a Flat Tree or Nested Tree. The Flat Tree will cost all of the parts individually, while the Nested Tree will allow you to cost the subassemblies as one entity. Here are is the assembly tree, and the flat tree and nested option. You can see the difference in the costing trees:

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017 - Costingimage001Assembly assemblies and parts
What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017 - Costingimage002Flat Tree costing
What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017 - Costingimage003Nested Tree costing

 

Rules based costing was introduced in SOLIDWORKS 2016 for machined parts. Now in 2017, this can be applied to sheet metal parts as well. I’ll take the side of this support frame I’m working on. I’m using a custom template from VF Metal Cutters.

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017 - Costingimage004Sheet metal piece

 

Launching the Template Editor lets me add rules or view them. I created a rule that adds the custom operation of Anodize if 6061 Alloy is chosen for the material.

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017 - Costingimage005Custom operation rule

 

Since I had the material set to Steel, there’s no Anodize in the cost. But if I change it to 6061 Alloy, it’s added.

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017 - Costingimage006 What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017 - Costingimage007

Cost with steel as the material

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017 - Costingimage008 image009

Cost with aluminum as the material

Now that I’ve costed this part, it’s time to generate the report. The next enhancement that I want to highlight is that now you can show up to 5 alternate quantities on your reports to easily see how lot size affects the price. I’ll use 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250. Once I generate the report, there is a section where it shows the different quantities.

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017 - Costingimage010

Alternate quantities for reporting

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017 - Costingimage011

Alternate quantities section

 

Going back to templates, the last enhancement that I want to point out is you now have the option of going to MySolidWorks for custom templates provided by suppliers. This is set to be available in Service Pack 2, so keep an eye out for that, but promises to be a way to get supplier information for pricing your designs.

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017 - Costingimage012MySOLIDWORKS template integration

 

In this article, I went over some key enhancements for Costing in SOLIDWORKS 2017. For more information, check out our YouTube channel or contact us at Hawk Ridge Systems today. Thanks for reading!

Author information

Hawk Ridge Systems
From design to production, Hawk Ridge Systems delivers best-in-class solutions in 3D design, CAM software, and 3D printing.

The post What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017 – Costing appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Hawk Ridge Systems at February 22, 2017 04:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

ZAMAK Develops Innovative Concepts Faster with SOLIDWORKS Visualize

Did you click on this blog because you could see yourself lounging in that room by the ocean?  So relaxing and serene.  After the cold of winter, that’s where I want to be – in a hotel by the beach.  What if I told you that image is not an actual photo, but instead a photorealistic rendering created with SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional, one of the  newest products in the SOLIDWORKS ecosystem?

ZAMAK design® is a leading French industrial design studio with an extensive portfolio that includes everything from kitchen appliances to hoverboards. ZAMAK works with clients, then develops concept art with SOLIDWORKS Visualize to show how these concepts can translate to the physical world.

Nicolas Michel-Imbert, former Hardware/Software Manager, explains, “For all of our projects, we need to show design concepts as realistically as possible, going beyond sketches and 3D mock-ups, to provide clients with high-quality, photorealistic renderings, so they can thoroughly visualize and understand exactly what we are proposing as quickly and cost-effectively as possible.”

For ZAMAK, it was an easy choice to standardize on SOLIDWORKS Visualize.  “SOLIDWORKS Visualize is the perfect balance of quality, speed, and ease,” says Michel-Imbert. Some renderers are fast but output low-quality images. Some produce great quality but take six months to learn. Others are easy to use, but take four hours to render an image. SOLIDWORKS Visualize provides the right combination of quality, speed, and ease of use, and is the best renderer for supporting our business.”

Read the entire story on ZAMAK Design  to find out how SOLIDWORKS Visualize allowed them to realize hundreds of hours in time savings annually and cut tens of thousands of euros in costs each year.

Don’t forget, if you own SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium and are on active Subscription Support, you receive a complimentary license of SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard.  If you have any questions on how to install or where to retrieve your license, contact your reseller today!

Author information

Josie Morales
Josie Morales
Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post ZAMAK Develops Innovative Concepts Faster with SOLIDWORKS Visualize appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Josie Morales at February 22, 2017 01:30 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

What is the difference between As-Built and Latest in a SOLIDWORKS PDM BOM?

The dividing factor between SOLIDWORKS PDM As-Built vs Latest in a Bill of Materials is a Check-in of the selected assembly.

As-Built vs Latest

As-Built vs Latest

The As Built option will show the BOM for a referenced file at the time that the assembly is checked in whereas the Latest option shows the BOM for a referenced assembly, which reflects the latest versions of all referenced files.

If you check out an assembly, make a change, and then check the assembly back into the vault — PDM will update the referenced BOM to reflect the latest changes.

Confused?  Me too, let’s look at an example.

As-built vs latest

I’ve got an assembly I created ParentAssem.SLDASM then added a sub-assembly SubAssem.SLDASM (which contains SubAssemPart.SLDPRT)  to it and checked it in (version 1).

SOLIDWORKS Assembly

SOLIDWORKS Assembly Checked In

Then I modified SubAssem to add a new part within it SubAssemNewPart.SLDPRT.  Notice SubAssem.SLDASM goes to version 2.

Assembly revised as version 2

Assembly revised as version 2

Now let’s look at the difference between the As-Built and Latest ParentAssem.SLDASM. First As-built;

SOLIDWORKS PDM As-Built Assembly

As-Built Assembly

Next Latest;

Latest Assembly

Latest Assembly

Notice that SubAssemNewPart.SLDPRT appears in Latest because it was added after ParentAssem was checked in.

The post What is the difference between As-Built and Latest in a SOLIDWORKS PDM BOM? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Williams at February 22, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Coding Goes Analog with the Wooden Musicon Music Production Machine

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With online games and other interactive programs tailored to the needs of the coding novice, the days of learning basic coding principles through a traditional coding environment are long over. But what if we want to get away from the screen altogether?

Such is the premise behind Musicon, an interactive wooden musical instrument that doubles as a coding teacher created by designer Kamil Laszuk as a part of his graduation thesis in 2011 at the Academy of Fine Arts in Wroclaw, Poland.

Laszuk, who also holds a degree in music, was inspired by the traditional “barrel organ” to create an exploratory device with hundreds of moveable buttons that active various instruments including a drum, a xylophone, and a mill that can each be programmed via the analog buttons.

szkic-M-12


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“The design was based on research about the impact of music on children‘s psychophysical development,” explains Laszuk. “Since then, the project was continued in cooperation with an interdisciplinary team of education and music specialists. Finally, in 2016, after 18 months of intense prototyping was created a functional ready for serial production.”

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/exEMEex-A3Q?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Set to be launched on Kickstarter in March of 2017, find out more about Musicon over at Musicon Club.

The post Coding Goes Analog with the Wooden Musicon Music Production Machine appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 22, 2017 12:35 PM

This $400 Robotic Arm is the Desktop Peripheral You Didn’t Know You’ve Been Missing

Feature

Feature

Robots. They’re set to (maybe) take over the world. But first, they’re going to take over our…desks?

If the uArm Swift from uFactory is any indication of what the future of desktop peripherals might look like, robotic arms capable of 3D printing or pick & placing may ultimately be just as common as the desktop 3D mouse or a digital sketching tablet.

Available in both standard and pro models (with the pro more geared towards designers and engineers), the open source and programmable uArm Swift is perfect for just about any odd job you can throw at it—even handing you your beer.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kzEkjx6Lmfg?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Wait…what? A robotic air hockey player, too?

Starting at just $209 for the basic model, and $409 for the Pro model for early Indiegogo backers, the uArm Swift just might be the high-five throwing desk buddy you’ve been waiting for.

Find out more over at Indiegogo.

The post This $400 Robotic Arm is the Desktop Peripheral You Didn’t Know You’ve Been Missing appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 22, 2017 01:25 AM

IKEA is Finally Set to Launch Their Own Furniture Hacking Ecosystem

IKEA Delaktig

IKEA Delaktig

From converting a cheap wood dining room table into the ultimate productivity station to repurposing lamp components into clever light fixtures, there are very few things that cannot be done with IKEA’s expansive product line and a creative mind. Despite a growing community of IKEA Hackers, however, the company has never formally encouraged these hacks—as a matter of fact, they even sent a cease and desist letter to one of the more popular IKEA hacking community sites.

Well, all that’s about to change now.

SolidSmack-IKEA-Delaktig-Furniture-3

With the launch of their Delaktig (Swedish for “being part of something”) open platform designed through a collaboration with designer Tom Dixon, the company is finally embracing the hackability of their products with their own system designed to do just that.

While the concept was first revealed last year, it was unclear when it would go on sale, or even if the Swedish furniture giant was taking the concept seriously. Well, they are—and the first phase of the hackable flat-pack product range is scheduled to go on sale early 2018 and will be priced between $399 and $899. And it starts with an aluminum frame system that future IKEA furniture products will be compatible with.

Screen Shot 2017-02-21 at 8.02.15 PM

According to the company, they want to create furniture that is both multi-purpose and suits the increasingly-common needs of cramped urban living, where people might want to re-arrange the layout of their homes without buying new furniture. After all, with so many successful Kickstarted products and growing interest in hackable home goods, didn’t it just make sense?

While it’ll be interesting to see how consumers interpret the system, there’s no denying that in a world of increasingly open platforms, late is better than never.

Find out more about the project, which was done in part through a collab with Royal College of Art students, over at IKEA.

The post IKEA is Finally Set to Launch Their Own Furniture Hacking Ecosystem appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 22, 2017 01:01 AM

February 21, 2017

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: 3D Printed Quadruped Robot [Four Times the Awesome!]

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Glory be! I’ve always said I wanted a baby quadruped of my very own. Those gang members with knives laughed, but I still kept saying it. After I got them all shirts with a cute baby quadruped graphic on it, they stopped trying to cut me. Just goes to show you Huey Lewis & the News, that’s The Power of (Quadruped) Love.

And this quadruped by Instructables user Toglefritz (aka Scott), is sure to stir the emotions of anyone. It. Is. Muy fabuloso, vato. According to his photos, it’s the size of a large cat, and each of the four legs has a full three degrees of freedom.

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He has the whole project laid out, step-by-step, and includes assembly animations and videos–it’s one of the finest guides I’ve seen on Instructables. He provides the list of purchase parts (and links), the code libraries and, of course, the 3D model files (iges and stl) he created using Fusion 360.

All together it’s made up of Lynxmotion Botboarduino, a SSC-32 Servo Controller, 12 Hitec Servo, a 16 LED NeoPixel Ring, and 38 3D printed parts, all controlled via a modded wireless PS2 controller. Scott had his printed via 3D Hubs by a local printer and shipped out to him.

He goes into great detail on each step of the build and has some great tips along the way that are sure to help you with other builds. You can download the model on Github and follow the Instructable here.

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

 

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3D-Printed-Quadruped-Robot-01

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by Josh Mings at February 21, 2017 10:09 PM

Vention.io is a Web-based Machine Builder Platform & Social Marketplace

vention.io-3d-web-machine-builder-platform-00

A Montreal-based startup is about to shake the world of design automation. Vention, a new browser-based machine builder platform, launched in beta today. They provide a social marketplace of industrial equipment for purchase and a 3D machine builder with library of components to construct your own equipment.

The platform and 3D machine builder is 100% free to use. (The company relies on the sales of the products for revenue generation.) You can log in, immediately start adding parts from a library of pre-defined structural, motion, control, and hardware parts and components. The interface allows a drag-drop-and-snap in place method of assembling any type of structure through an AI-enabled 3D constraint system. As parts are added, all cost and weight is calculated in real-time and shown on the screen with fastener requirement calculated automatically.

On top of this, designs published to the public can be used as a starting point, modified or re-configured. New assembly designs can be started collaboratively, invitations set to additional collaborators or private groups set up. Download of the 3D part or 3D drawing file is available for offline design and download of the 3D assembly is available from within the machine builder.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85099" style="width: 1100px;">vention.io-3d-web-machine-builder-platform-01<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The Vention 3D Machine Builder interface with drag-and-drop library of parts and components.</figcaption></figure>

When talking with Etienne Lacroix, CEO of Vention, he explained that this isn’t 3D modeling software, but a whole new way of building assemblies for both professional CAD users and non-professionals alike.

“It became obvious to us that the next frontier for faster machine design wasn’t better design tools or higher performance hardware, but rather the integration between the two. The launch of our beta program is a first step in enabling our partners to experience a novel design and build workflow that will accelerate the machine design process more than 5-fold.”

Inside of this is a complete elimination of any 2D drawings or manual BOM management–it all happens automatically–and Vention is driving it all with a heavy focus on artificial intelligence both in the builder and the marketplace, a system built to constantly learn.  Here’s what the beta version of Vention platform includes:

  • A library of structural, motion, and control components.
  • A free cloud-based 3D Machine Builder.
  • Artificial intelligence-enabled 3D constraints
  • Real-time cost and weight in the 3D Machine Builder environment.
  • Automatic fasteners and bill of material management.
  • Access to a library of user-generated public designs.
  • Invitation of individual collaborators to a design.
  • Ability to set up a private design group.
  • Submission of new component ideas.
  • Personalized assembly instructions with purchase orders.

The company received an unspecified pre-seed round of funding led by Bolt and Real Ventures, along with some familiar names in the 3D software scene, Jon Stevenson, former exec at PTC and GrabCAD, and Rob Stevens, former exec at GrabCAD and Amazon Robotics.

I’m fascinated by the 3D machine builder and the technology behind it. It’s the most advanced 3D product assembly interface I’ve seen and, I believe, is a great example of the shift we’ll see in 3D product development over the coming years. The applications for this spread far beyond machine design, but Vention has started out with a focus that hits a wide set of industries where custom equipment builds are constantly needed in a sector no one else is thinking about. Keep an eye on this company and the tech they’re developing.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85103" style="width: 1100px;">Library part with ability to add to your own design, purchase, download and comment on.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Library part with ability to add to your own design, purchase, download and comment on.</figcaption></figure>

 

vention.io-3d-web-machine-builder-platform-02

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by Josh Mings at February 21, 2017 08:21 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS Data Management Product Line Expands to Offer Distributed Data Management

As announced at SOLIDWORKS World 2017 in Los Angles, we are adding a new data management product to our product line called SOLIDWORKS Manage. SOLIDWORKS Manage will leverage the ease of use and familiar Windows Explorer interface of SOLIDWORKS PDM with advanced capabilities to manage project timelines and resources, complex business processes, and advanced item management.  SOLIDWORKS Manage will also offer a powerful dashboard and reporting functionality to provide instant access to critical information. Current SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional customers will be able to easily upgrade to SOLIDWORKS Manage and start taking advantage of the new capabilities quickly.

SOLIDWORKS Manage will be able to take the place of separate disconnected tools an organization may be using to manage engineering resources and processes. For instance, we see organizations using Microsoft Excel to manage project timelines, which require a lot of time to keep updated and monitoring of user progress. With the project management functionality in SOLIDWORKS Manage, organizations can plan each stage of their projects, assign resources and tasks, and attach required documentation to the project. When users complete their work, project progress is automatically updated. Project managers can take advantage of the powerful Dashboard capabilities to see critical information in one easy-to-understand interface.

We are also adding great new functionality to our existing data management products: SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard and Professional. As shown in the What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2018 presentation, we are adding automated SOLIDWORKS revision table capabilities to both SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard and Professional. This new feature will update revision table information based on the drawing approval workflow and read user-entered information from the revision table into the file’s data card. In addition our SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard customers will now be able to automatically create PDFs of their SOLDIWORKS drawings at various points in their workflow. For example when a SOLIDWORKS drawing gets final approval, the PDF can be automatically generated.


The SOLIDWORKS 2018 data management product line will provide broad scalability and a wide range of capabilities from simple, easy-to-use SOLIDWORKS file management to full project, process and item management. When their needs grow, their data management system can easily grow with them without data migration. This provides customers with the ability to distribute data management to many different areas of their business.

To see how SOLIDWORKS data management products can help streamline your business, please click here or visit http://www.solidworks.com/sw/products/product-data-management/solidworks-enterprise-pdm.htm.

Author information

Kurt Lundstedt
Kurt Lundstedt
Product Manager - PDM Solutions at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

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by Kurt Lundstedt at February 21, 2017 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Electrical – Archiving

An important blog if you use SOLIDWORKS Electrical

OK, so the header is a bit drastic but this is very important to all users of SOLIDWORKS Electrical. Let me explain a little about how the software functions.

All installations of SOLIDWORKS Electrical rely on a Microsoft SQL database and shared locations for application data and projects. (Check out tools/configuration/application settings to see what is set)

 

If you check out the folders you will find your projects, and in the application data folder all the settings and data you have created when setting up Electrical.

So to back-up SW Electrical you need to consider backing-up the database, project files and all the settings to create those projects, help!

Of course we wouldn’t make your life this difficult; in fact doing a full back-up of a whole SOLIDWORKS Electrical installation is very, very simple!

So when would we recommend backing-up?

Doing a full back-up, an archive environment, can be time consuming, so we would recommend doing this at least once a month or with any major IT infrastructure change, it is imperative that this step is conducted to avoid data loss.

SW Electrical Full Back-up

To do a full back-up, open SW Electrical, close the project manager if open and go to file > Archiving and choose archive environment

solidworks electrical archive

The data selection tab enables you to choose what data to back-up and the level of granularity of the back-up

All Objects

Will back-up ALL the data and is what we recommend before any major IT infrastructure change e.g. Software UpdatesCustom

Enables you to select what types of data; here you can see I am choosing NOT to include my projects and SOLIDWORKS files in the back-up.If you hit next you can now scroll through choose what to do for each individual item

To remind yourself to back-up you can set a reminder!

So how do I back-up/archive individual projects?

In the projects manager you can choose to archive the project

An archived project consists of all its documents and all data used in its design (such as symbols, title blocks, or configurations).

Select the project from the list and click the Archive icon. In the Save As window, choose the folder and name for the archive file.

Projects must be closed before they can be archived. The archived project file extension is .PROJ.TEWZIP. Archived projects remain available in the Projects Manager.

 

Since SW Electrical 2016 there has been the ability to “Snapshot” a project

 

A Snapshot is a project back-up performed at a special time, such as a new revision index creation. The Snapshot offers the possibility to restore an old version of the project; it must not be confused with the project archive.

The Snapshot archive is placed into the project folder.
The creation of a Snapshot is automatic when you create a new revision index and if you have activated the options When book revision is verified.

It is also automatic when you activate the option After a period of (days). In these cases, a message box opens allowing you to create the Snapshot.

You can manage Snapshots using the Snapshots manager

solidworks electrical archive

So to recap;

  • Before you make any changes to your system, Software updates, Operating system updates etc.
  • DO A SYSTEM ARCHIVE
  • Also set the system to remind you to do a system archive frequently, the timing of this depends how secure you wish to be, also remember the archive file needs to be treated as any archive so consider copying it and moving it to secure storage.

Author information

NT CADCAM
NT CADCAM is the UK's most established SolidWorks reseller in England, Scotland and Wales. Offering a fully supported CAD and CAM product portfolio and high levels of expertise internally, makes NT CADCAM unique within the SolidWorks community, giving customers the confidence and assurance they need that their support issues will be dealt with both promptly and efficiently. As a SolidWorks Certified Training Centre, NT CADCAM provides clients with fully certified and accredited trainers who are experienced engineers.

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by NT CADCAM at February 21, 2017 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

The Syntax of a SOLIDWORKS “IF” Statement in an Equation

Hypothetical scenario: you have a design for a container wherein you have a length, width, and height. The length and width can be anything, but the height is driven indirectly by the length. If the length is greater than a certain value, then the height increases to a different value.

An IF statement would be great for this – except that I’m not using C++, I’m using SOLIDWORKS. No worries, we can still use that, but more on that in a minute.

Since it’s difficult to describe in the abstract, I’ll assign some numbers. My container is 4″ x 6″, and it’s 2″ tall. If the length drops below 2″, I want the height to drop to 1″ (otherwise, it might be top-heavy and tip over like my Christmas tree). So, if the Length > 2, then I want the height to be = 2, otherwise make the length = 1. While many programming languages form the syntax for this a bit different, the one that is most relevant to us here is how this is expressed in Excel:

if(Length>2,2,1)

That is to say:

if (Length >2, make this 2, otherwise make it 1)

This is all nice and good, but how do we apply this to the height of our container in SOLIDWORKS? If we double-click the Height dimension, then type = on our keyboard, we get access to the Equations dropdown. Under Functions, you will find IF() near the bottom. Here’s a screenshot:

SOLIDWORKS IF Function

SOLIDWORKS IF Function

Now, you might be tempted to go ahead and do this, even going so far as to typing Length. However, if you haven’t declared Length as a Global Variable then you won’t get very far doing it this way. An easier way to proceed is while you’re typing the if statement in the Modify Dimension dialogue window, just click the Length dimension. This will automatically populate the correct full name of the dimension in the equation. This is what I get:

=if( "Length@Sketch1">2,2,1)

When I clicked the 6.00 dimension, it automatically wrote “Length@Sketch1” into the equation.

Obviously, I recommend renaming the dimensions and sketches BEFORE you create your equations. In SOLIDWORKS 2017 SP0 it automatically fixes the references in this example, but other examples and versions may vary in their results. If you must rename afterwards, please do so sparingly, test thoroughly, and keep a backup copy of your file on hand.

The post The Syntax of a SOLIDWORKS “IF” Statement in an Equation appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Jim Peltier, CSWE at February 21, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The Rebuilds

Feature

Feature

This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “Into the Deep” from Galactic and work our way through tracks from New Move, Fur Trade, Ronnie Heart, Stolen Jars, and others before wrapping up with “Burn You Up” from Mike Clark and the Sugar Sounds.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:7cAvYB9aPJMUWfiwhLrs9q" width="100%"></iframe>

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by SolidSmack at February 21, 2017 12:35 PM

Amazon Launches Virtual STEM Club Subscription Featuring Monthly Projects Handpicked by Experts

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feature

Every once in a while, a new business model comes along that totally disrupts the status quo and changes the way we buy and become introduced to new products. Among others, the subscription service business model is just one of them.

While these days consumers can purchase everything from socks to pre-prepared dinners and shave cream to obscure snack foods, the STEM Club from Amazon just might be one our most favorite subscription model-based concepts yet.

Geared specifically for three different age groups (3-4, 5-7, and 8-13), the $19.99/month kits include a curated STEM-related project for each month of the year. And while many schools and other organizations have their own STEM club programs, this could be a perfect solution for those that do not.

Each of the age bracket groups is tailored specifically or the STEM-based interests of each age group:

STEM Club Toy Subscription: 3-4 year olds
STEM toys for 3-4 year olds are handpicked by Amazon’s toy experts to introduce simple concepts related to counting, building, and cause and effect. An early introduction to STEM can help build the foundation for more complex concepts as kids enter preschool.

STEM Club Toy Subscription: 5-7 year olds
STEM toys for 5-7 year olds are handpicked by Amazon’s toy experts to excite young learners with hands-on experiments and explorations of electricity, earth science, and simple math. Kids gain exposure to STEM topics through creating their own dinosaur fossils and other cool projects.

STEM Club Toy Subscription: 8-13 year olds
STEM toys for 8-13 year olds are handpicked by Amazon’s toy experts to engage budding scientists and engineers with more complex projects and experiments based on principals of physics, chemistry and engineering. Some projects contain instructional booklets and may require an adult.

Assuming they can consistently offer quality projects at the $19.99/month price point (with free shipping), this could be one of the sweetest deals for the designers and engineers of tomorrow. Find out more over at Amazon STEM Club.

The post Amazon Launches Virtual STEM Club Subscription Featuring Monthly Projects Handpicked by Experts appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 21, 2017 12:27 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Step-Up Series: Introduction to Nonlinear Analysis

Welcome back to the SOLIDWORKS Simulation Step-Up series! Over the next few weeks, we’ll be discussing all things SOLIDWORKS Simulation. Today, the North America SOLIDWORKS Simulation experts will introduce us to nonlinear analysis. First, we will briefly discuss the differences between linear and a nonlinear systems and then, we will learn about the different shades of nonlinearity in structural analysis with demonstration examples. Finally, we will wrap up with some general guidelines and flow charts to determine if a system is nonlinear or not and how to handle nonlinearity in SOLIDWORKS Simulation.

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We’ll hear from the team every few weeks over the next couple of months – they’ll share their expert perspectives and experience on topics such as shell strategies, tools for productivity, and analyzing reports.

Like what you see and want to skip ahead? No problem! Check out the full SOLIDWORKS Simulation Step-up series here or, click the banner below to experience more simulation!

nonlinear analysis

Have another series suggestion? Please let us know in the comments down below and we’ll see about making it happen. As always, thanks for watching!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation Step-Up Series: Introduction to Nonlinear Analysis appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 21, 2017 10:00 AM

February 20, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Copy Setting Wizard Made Easy

Does upgrading or uninstalling SOLIDWORKS give you nightmares?

If you’re the type of SOLIDWORKS user that spends a large amount of time setting up file locations and custom tool bars, the idea of uninstalling or upgrading your version of SOLIDWORKS can sound like a scene out of a horror movie. Though just like a horror movie, there is a light at the end of the tunnel! That light is called the Copy Settings Wizard.

What is the Copy Settings Wizard?

The Copy Settings Wizard is a tool that allows users to back up and save the precious customizations they’ve made to their SOLIDWORKS. This tool is incredibly simple and easy to use. This guide will give you the basic rundown on how to use this SOLIDWORKS tool.

Copy Settings Wizard

Getting Started

The copy settings wizard can be found in your start menu under SOLIDWORKS 20XX then SOLIDWORKS tools.  When you launch the wizard you’ll be greeted by a simple window that’ will prompt you to select one of two options.

  • The first option is to create a new save file containing your save data.
  • The second option available is to restore a settings file into your SOLIDWORKS.

Saving Settings

Each option listed in the program saves different information to your settings file.  These are labeled in a way that is straightforward and easy to understand.

Below is the default. We recommended that you leave the default settings because during restoration of this file you can choose to ignore settings that were saved.

Restoring Settings

When you restore settings from a saved settings file you’ll see a window very similar to the save window. I’ve included images of both windows (see above and below) so you can see the similarities and differences.

After choosing what settings you wish to import, select next. This will send you to one final window, this window will ask if you’re deploying this save file to only the local machine or deploying this across a network to multiple machines. If you select to deploy to multiple machines the following window will list available machines on the network that the wizard can save settings too.

NOTE: *When deploying across a network this option only works for users who have never run SOLIDWORKS on the selected computer.*

That’s All Folks!

The copy settings wizard can save users tons of time by backing up important information about the SOLIDWORKS user interface. Allowing users that upgrade or reinstall to be back up and running in a fraction of the time.

Author: Cody Salyer

Cody is a Support Engineer based out of the beautiful Salt Lake valley. He’s been with GoEngineer a little over a year supporting not only SOLIDWORKS but also Simulation and PDM as well. His background includes mechatronics and automation, where he has worked to develop automated systems to help remove or disconnect people from dangerous tasks.

Author information

GoEngineer
GoEngineer delivers software, technology and expertise that enable companies to unlock design innovation and deliver better products faster. With more than 30 years experience and thousands of customers in high tech, medical, machine design, energy and other industries, GoEngineer provides best-in-class design solutions from SOLIDWORKS, Stratasys, CAMWorks, Altium and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM). For more information, visit goengineer.com.

The post Copy Setting Wizard Made Easy appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GoEngineer at February 20, 2017 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Composer 2017 includes new features for the Composer Player API

In SOLIDWORKS Composer 2017 the Composer Player Application Programming Interface (API) has been enhanced with a number of new features.  Some of the new enhancements to the SOLIDWORKS Composer 2017 API are briefly outlined below:

Reset “Zoom Fit all” Property for Views

New methods have been made available to reset the value of the Zoom Fit All property of specified views.  This makes it possible to capture zoom level when updating a view after having zoomed in on an actor.

Selection Management

There are some newly added features and methods available in the Composer API to generate and retrieve selections from selection sets.

Events for Undo and Redo

Some new methods have been made available to be sent when the undo or redo actions are executed.

The full details of these enhancements can be found in the Composer Programming Guide (Help > Programming Guide).

SOLIDWORKS Composer 2017 API

SOLIDWORKS Composer Programming Guide

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer

To learn more about Composer, we invite you to attend a SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training course either online or in a Canadian classroom near you.

The post SOLIDWORKS Composer 2017 includes new features for the Composer Player API appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Flett at February 20, 2017 01:00 PM

February 19, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Creating Your Visualize Environment Can Make the Difference Between Rendered and Real Images

Have you ever tried to create a realistic image from the SOLIDWORKS rendering software but struggle to figure out why it doesn’t appear to be completely realistic? It has happened to me as well. I quickly found out that the scene was the main contributor to this. You can’t physically take a picture of your product floating in a generic environment, so it stands to reason that it won’t look realistic. Follow along as I show you the technique I used to get rid of the dreaded “rendered” look.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize is a recent addition to the SOLIDWORKS ecosystem of products, and it has the ability to create stunning realistic rendered images. I attempt to be a photographer in my spare time, so I thought I would give it a shot to see what the hype was about as well as attempt to actually create my first photorealistic image.

After installing, I had Jesse Sprague (our resident photo expert) give me the quick run through of the software and I was ready to begin rendering images. I was trying to create a rendering of an electric carving knife but this is where I ran into my first issue. The product does render out nicely but the exported image still has that rendered look.

At this point I thought it would look better in the scene it should be in, a kitchen. At this point, you would typically find an HDR environment to use as the scene. In this case, I couldn’t find one that would fit my needs. Furthermore, getting the product to look like it belongs in a specific place in an HDR can be a challenge. For this reason, I decided to build my own environment to get exactly what I wanted. I began scouring through 3D Content Central and GrabCAD for a kitchen model to place the product in.  I could not find a kitchen that I really liked so I decided I was going to make one! SOLIDWORKS is so efficient that I often find I can model things quicker than it would take to find one!

I started off by creating a countertop and backsplash and then the rest came quickly after that. I created all the cabinets and drawers using the same techniques. I decided to place a wall outlet and block of knives in there as well just to liven up the environment.

I even created some split line circles on the underside of the cabinets so that we could use those as lights. Jesse actually gave me this idea thinking it would add some dramatic effect to the image along with looking more realistic.  I added the blue color to the faces so that when the model is imported into Visualize they are grouped together. Once the files are imported into Visualize we can add a Warm light to those faces.

Now that my environment has been created I rendered the images using the same process I would have with an HDR environment (note that there is still an HDR environment lighting the entire scene but we’ve created more localized controlled lighting on the counter).

As you can see, they appear to be way more realistic than before.  If possible, creating the environment within SOLIDWORKS can certainly help create a more realistic image. Creating the environment can be time consuming, but once it is created you can reuse it for other products! It’s similar to setting up a physical studio with lights. You only have to do it once and then the rest is easy. On a side note, if you have Visualize Professional then you have the ability to render multiple camera views back to back like I did in this case. Starting the renderings as I left work using this functionality made sure that all the renders would be done by the next morning instead of having to start and wait for them to finish them individually.
Here, the product needs to interact with its surroundings. Because of this, a simple backplate would not produce results that look as realistic. In certain cases, a backplate would be a good solution. For more information on that technique, see our tech tip here:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nob_Ed-ytIk?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

I hope this technique leads to more realistic images for you as well.

Author information

CADimensions
We are an authorized SOLIDWORKS and Stratasys reseller with certified training & support centers located in New York and Pennsylvania, USA. We are 100% focused on living a CADLIFE and have our vendor's unconditional endorsement in the sales and support of their products.

The post Creating Your Visualize Environment Can Make the Difference Between Rendered and Real Images appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CADimensions at February 19, 2017 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Automatically add Scale Labels to all SOLIDWORKS Drawing Views that are not set to Sheet Scale

When you create SOLIDWORKS drawing views, you have the option of assigning the scale of each view.  If set as Sheet Scale, they will be linked to the overall scale assigned in the drawing properties (as seen in the Title Block).  Auxiliary, Detail and Section Views will automatically add a label indicating the scale if it’s different than the Sheet Scale.  However any other views (i.e. Front, Right, Isometric, etc) SOLIDWORKS won’t automatically add labels by default if the scale is set to something other than the Sheet Scale.

Section/Detail views have SOLIDWORKS Scale Label

Section/Detail views have Scale Label – Isometric view with custom scale has no label by default

To add a SOLIDWORKS scale label by default on all other views, there are options in the Document Properties for ‘Orthographic’ and ‘Other’ view types.  ‘Orthographic’ views are your standard Front, Top, Right, etc.  The ‘Other’ views would be Isometric, Dimetric, etc.  Simply enable the option “Add view label on view creation” and make sure the label options have it set as you wish for Scale and Delimiter.  Below I have them set to “Per standard” to pick up the ANSI standard of labels.

Document Properties - Orthographic Views scale label

Document Properties – Orthographic Views scale label

Document Properties - Other Views scale label

Document Properties – Other Views scale label

Now any NEW view added to your drawing will have a SOLIDWORKS Scale Label automatically added to any drawing view, but only if the view is set to a scale that doesn’t match the Sheet Scale.

New Views Added will have Scale Label if different than Sheet Scale

New Views Added will have Scale Label if different than Sheet Scale

Be sure to enable these options in your Drawing Templates to keep these settings for all future drawings.

The post Automatically add Scale Labels to all SOLIDWORKS Drawing Views that are not set to Sheet Scale appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at February 19, 2017 02:21 PM

February 18, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SWW17 Time-Lapse Tutorial: Hollywood Sign

With SOLIDWORKS World 2017 and 2018 being held in LA , I sure everyone feels the glitz and glamour that comes with Hollywood. In celebration of our amazing yearly event, we have made a few little Hollywood themed 3D printables. For this one we have used SOLIDWORKS and 3D printing to make our own little Hollywood sign replica. It was so cute, we got cheeky and made a second, but this one with the SOLIDWORKS logo!

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SOLIDWORKS is an amazing program to achieve super high levels of detail with amazing accuracy. But, its applications can be pushed much further than many perceive. This project is a perfect example of how the software can be used to make a landscape model with some engineered parts.sww17 time-lapse tutorial

The hill was a fun little surfacing exercise, specifically using splines on a variety of planes to make the shape and then make a solid from them. The majority of work in this project came from the letters. A simple JPG file of the Hollywood sign was imported into SOLIDWORKS, and we then traced the letters off that. This is a great feature which can help designers create models around reference images. The letters were extruded and trimmed and then little pegs were made to attach each letter to slot into the mountain and we toleranced so they would slide right in.

 

Next we decided to hollow out the inside of the mountain; this was a design consideration due to the nature of 3D printing. We could print it like it is, but the flat surface area was so large it could cause problems and dramatically increase the time to print. The larger the flat face on a bed is, the chance of warping is greatly increased. Also, the first few layers which are done at 100% infill take the longest for each layer. The print time was almost tripled because of this, so the mountain had to be hollow.

Hollowing out this mountain could be done with a shell, but sometimes that doesn’t work. So we wanted to show you the “hard” way. This method had you creating a rough shape as a separate body within the mountain, shaping this with cuts, fillets, and chamfers until no sections are protruding out. We then subtract the internal body from the mountain and hey presto! we have a cavity. Like we said, a shell you have worked on this model but that doesn’t always work and this is the work around.

 

We printed all the parts and  then we assembled the mountain. Here we spray-painted the mountain with a sand colored spray paint and then added little architectural trees to it. The process to do this is pretty simple. Drill a few small holes randomly on the model and then put a dab of glue on the end of the tree and then pop it in the holes. Do this until you either run out of trees, or are happy with the results. This is a technique used by architectural model makers.

 

The model was then lastly mounted on a piece of Perspex to look extra pretty. This is a short, fun little project that can be adapted to anything. Whether your mocking up your new garden shed to seek approval of your wife, or maybe you’re a hobbyist train collector creating landscapes, SOLIDWORKS and 3D printing can help you with the building blocks to where you can finish it in any way you wish.

 

We hope you learned from this and how you can apply SOLIDWORKS and 3D printing to different and unique practices not commonly seen. This is purely a guide to help you learn from and inspire you to make bigger and better things. We hope to see as many of you as possible at SOLIDWORKS world and don’t forget to party like a rock star.

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SWW17 Time-Lapse Tutorial: Hollywood Sign appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 18, 2017 04:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Optimus 3D Printer Puts a 3-in-1 Machine Shop on Your Desktop

febtop-3-in-1-3d-printer-laser-cutter-milling-machine-00

3-in-1 is the name of the game for Febtop Tech with the introduction of their Optimus Transformable 3D printer, which boasts a multiple configuration design that includes a 3D printer, laser cutter and CNC mill.

Considering this is the Swedish-based company’s first foray into the world of 3D printing it’s certainly impressive, but not the first design to integrate several machine tools into one. Some of you may remember ZMorph’s Multitool, introduced early last year and also featured a laser cutter and CNC mill along with its 3D printing capabilities.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85074" style="width: 800px;">Febtop’s Optimus Transformable 3D Printer is a Three-in-one design that features 3D printer, laser cutter, and CNC mill.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Febtop’s Optimus Transformable 3D Printer is a Three-in-one design that features 3D printer, laser cutter, and CNC mill.</figcaption></figure>

The Optimus gets its name from the machine’s two primary configurations — an vertical Delta 3D printer and a horizontal Cartesian mode for laser cutting and CNC applications — with Febtop stating it only takes 10-minutes to transition between the two. Without a doubt, incorporating additional functionality into their 3D printer design helps expand its capability, but the machine is affordable too, starting at $1,579 (for the complete setup), putting it within reach of the average maker and small businesses.

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Febtop states that after each transformation, the Optimus automatically recalibrates itself for optimal performance depending on the mode. They tested the accuracy of the platform in both modes 500-times over, breaking the machine down and reassembling it, to find it had no effect on its performance. They attribute this partly to the full-metal frame of the machine, along with the steel slider bars and risers used in both modes.

In 3D printer mode, the machine features a hot-swap print head of sorts that ranges from 0.2mm to 0.8mm and is outfitted with an aluminum/fan-cooled heat sink to keep things nice and cool and to prevent blockage. The rest of the specs in this mode are as follows:

  • 240mm X 300mm print size
  • 50 to 300-micron print resolution
  • Heated print bed with optional PEI sheet
  • Can use PLA, ABS, PETG, PC and HIPS materials

The Optimus specs for the CNC and Laser modes are as follows:

In CNC mode:

  • Spindle power/speed: 450W (DC)/12,000RPM
  • Build area of 400mm X 400mm X 80mm

In laser/engrave mode:

  • Work size of 500mm X 500mm
  • Laser diode adjustment range of 500mW, 2W, 5W, 10W

In CNC and Laser mode, the Optimus takes advantage of a host of material including wood (plywood, MDF, etc.), latex, foam, leather and various metals among a host of others. In fact, it’s safe to say that you can use just about any material you may need for any number of projects.

Driving the Optimus are a pair of 32-bit SoCs with one controlling the machine and the other tasked with touchscreen control.

Powering the Optimus are a pair of 32-bit SoCs, each taking on a separate function with one controlling machine operations and the other handling the touchscreen applications. The control box also features several plug-and-play connectors for both modes as well as an SD card slot and USB Port for transferring G-code. It also sports built-in Wi-Fi to take advantage of Febtop’s app that lets you control the Optimus using a simple interface (Android only at this point). As far as 3D modeling software goes, you can use nearly any platform- SOLIDWORKS, AutoCAD, Inventor, to output .stl. Additionally, Febtop is working on a modified version of Cura (slicing software) to directly support the machine. I’m curious if it can/will be able to support the company’s FEBCAD AR software–it isn’t specified whether it will or not at this point.

At the end of the day, the Optimus is a popular venture that has already surpassed their crowd-funding goal of $50K on Indiegogo with over $130K and a month left to go in their endeavor. Those who want to get one of their own can pledge $979 (3D printer only) and up. After the first batch sold out, the complete 3-in-1 package is currently available in a second batch at $1679.

febtop-3-in-1-3d-printer-laser-cutter-milling-machine-03

febtop-3-in-1-3d-printer-laser-cutter-milling-machine-01

The post The Optimus 3D Printer Puts a 3-in-1 Machine Shop on Your Desktop appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at February 18, 2017 02:31 AM

February 17, 2017

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: The Eyes Are Bulging

jordan-grimmer-art

The isolated stare of the bulging eyes shifted around the bottle glass. Tiny though it was, the suit it wore weighed more. Jets on each appendage, fueled by a small nuclear core, explained the hum, the crack, and the flash as it launched to pursue these links.

Jordan Grimmer – Floating ruins, crashed ships, and worlds you just want to hop into complete the handful of work from this Leading Light Design concept artist.

Jedha – How were the planets and scenes of Jedha and Scarif created for Star Wars: Rogue One? This ‘Behind the Magic’ from ILM shows you how.

Lagonda – Remember the Aston Martin Lagonda? Only 645 were made and this photo project from Recom Farmhouse and Tomek Olszowski captures it perfectly.

Light Vortex – I want to make this in my living room. One of three 4D light-based installations for the Music Festival, TeamLab Jungle in Japan this Summer.

Moog Masterpieces – This Spotify playlist is a collection of some of the greatest Moog synths over the years. 10 hours worth. And there’s this.

Logan – LOVE this poster created by Dave Rapoza for the IMAX screening of Marvel’s Logan. A totally different feel for the comic genre.

BMW X LEGO Hover Bike – I’m becoming a big fan of BMW. They have some cool ideas about the future and using LEGOs to create concepts.

Fight it Out – How long has it been since you’ve heard some good Japanese pop punk? Well, you deserve to give your ears the stiff beats and tinny vox of Mothballs newest.

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The post Friday Smackdown: The Eyes Are Bulging appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 17, 2017 10:54 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip: Thickness Analysis Command

Do you know how to use the Thickness Analysis command in SOLIDWORKS? This command is one of the most useful tools the software has to offer when designing plastic parts or castings. This is done by analyzing the thickness throughout the whole part then overlaying a colored gradient. If a point on a part is too thick or thin, this can be problematic; use this command to determine the thickness of each point to ensure your design is sound. To define what is considered too thick or too thin, use the “Analysis Parameters” group box to identify the limits. Watch the video below to learn more about the Thickness Analysis command in SOLIDWORKS!

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Want to see more SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips? Check out our playlist on YouTube to catch up on past videos or you can even jump ahead to the next video!

Do you have a suggestion for the next Tech Tip? Tell us in the comments; we’d love to hear your ideas!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip: Thickness Analysis Command appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 17, 2017 10:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS 3D Interconnect: Seamless Collaboration Between CAD Platforms

SOLIDWORKS 3D Interconnect is a revolutionary technology that allows a user to directly open files and use models from other native CAD systems in their native format.

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This groundbreaking new capability, introduced as part of SOLIDWORKS 2017, allows you to unlock powerful new workflows for easier collaboration with your customers and vendors.

With 3D Interconnect you can now:

  • Maintain direct integration of the native CAD files from PTC® Creo®, Autodesk® Inventor®, Siemens® NX, SolidEdge®, and CATIA®, and treat them like native components.
  • Avoid fixing errors or problems due to SOLIDWORKS awareness of all components in the native CAD files, like face and edge IDs.
  • Directly open imported files and treat them like Base Parts, so you can freely make design modifications without affecting the native file.
  • Update both part and assembly files as design changes take place with Update Model feature.

Whether you work with other companies using different CAD systems or you’re switching CAD systems, 3D Interconnect allows you to work with the native file format directly in SOLIDWORKS like never before.

Author information

GSC
GSC fuels customer success with 3D engineering solutions for design, simulation, data management, technical documentation, and 3D printing, as well as the most comprehensive consulting, technical support, and training in the industry. As a leading provider of SOLIDWORKS solutions and Stratasys 3D printing technologies, GSC’s world-class team of dedicated professionals have helped numerous companies innovate and increase productivity by leveraging advanced technologies to drive 3D business success. Founded in 1989, GSC is headquartered in Germantown, WI. For more information about GSC, please visit www.gsc-3d.com.

The post SOLIDWORKS 3D Interconnect: Seamless Collaboration Between CAD Platforms appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GSC at February 17, 2017 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to release a SOLIDWORKS PDM license when you Work Offline

In SOLIDWORKS PDM switching to Work Offline  mode will not automatically free a PDM license;

How To Release a PDM License

SOLIDWORKS PDM License in use

To release the license you must exit or Log off PDM via the System Tray;

Exit SOLIDWORKS PDM

Exit SOLIDWORKS PDM

Then you’re free to Work Offline without consuming a license;

SOLIDWORKS PDM Free License

Work offline without a license

The post How to release a SOLIDWORKS PDM license when you Work Offline appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Williams at February 17, 2017 01:00 PM

February 16, 2017

SolidSmack

New Silicone 3D Printing Method Unveiled by German RepRap and Dow Corning

german-reprap-silicon-3d-printer-00

In a big surprise, at least for me, German RepRap showed off a demonstrator 3D printer able to produce very strong silicone prints.

There are few 3D printers able to print in silicone. The sloppy material requires extrusion mechanics far different from typical hard plastic filaments, but some companies have developed syringe-based systems that can do so. However, German RepRap’s system is a bit different.

They’ve partnered with Dow Corning, a subsidiary of Dow Chemical Company, who has developed a new silicone material specifically for this purpose. It is an “A/B” material, meaning 1) it can be stored continuously in two separate formulations and 2) only becomes the final silicone material when you mix it together.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85054" style="width: 1100px;">3d printed silicone machine from German RepRap and Dow Corning<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">German RepRap’s two-step silicone 3D printing process</figcaption></figure>

Above you can see the German RepRap A/B mixing extruder rig, where this takes place. The print surface is the familiar ceramic that is slightly heated. The magic occurs when a heat source is passed over the the freshly deposited A/B mixed layer. Two passes are done to cure the silicone into a very strong structure. Removing prints is as simple as peeling them off with a razor blade.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85050" style="width: 800px;"> German RepRap's new 3d printed silicone process<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Removing a silicon 3D print from the ceramic build plate by German RepRap’s new process</figcaption></figure>

I’ve personally pulled and twisted some of these silicone prints and found them to be extremely strong regardless of the incredibly thin walls. German RepRap says this chemical/two-pass heating system is superior to the UV approach used by their competitors. They claim it’s strength is “90%” of injected molded silicone. The system is called Liquid Additive Manufacturing, or “LAM”.

And that’s the other thing. As with other 3D printing applications, this system can create geometries that are unachievable with injection molding. In other words, you can make production-quality silicone items never before attempted.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85049" style="width: 888px;">3d printed silicone parts from German Reprap and Dow Corning<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">A 3D printed silicone part with 1mm wide sections (left) and a very strong 3D printed silicone object (right)</figcaption></figure>

I saw this process on a modified X400 machine, but it’s only for demonstration purposes. The company hopes to migrate the tech into their X400 model to produce a powerful silicone 3D printer, which they may reveal at AMUG.

They’re hoping to develop a food grade certifiable silicone material next, which will open up many possibilities. After that, they are targeting a wide range of polyurethanes.

The machine is definitely of great interest, as it could create new niches in the field.

But there’s one thing that may slow them down. One of their competitors, Picsima, can also 3D print silicone, and it’s very likely they hold some number of patents on their process. I’m wondering if the new German RepRap process somehow steps on any portion of Picsima’s patents. I have no idea, but certainly someone will be looking closely at this.

Meanwhile, stay tuned for some interesting silicone prints in the near future.

Read more at Fabbaloo

The post New Silicone 3D Printing Method Unveiled by German RepRap and Dow Corning appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at February 16, 2017 04:19 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Cooling Down Beer in Your Freezer with SOLIDWORKS Simulation

Flow Simulation is a powerful tool for evaluating the thermal performance of any engineering design, whether you are heat treating metal, cooling down electronics, or keeping your engine at the optimum temperature the flow of fluids to transfer heat is easy to calculate with this easy to use SOLIDWORKS solution. In this example we’ll be testing a common problem in my household, bringing room temperature beer down to a drinkable temperature as quickly as possible. This video takes you through the setup of a Flow Simulation study from start to finish to analyze a time-dependent thermal problem. All you really need to get started are 3D models of the containers for the fluids and a few parameters such as temperature and alcohol content.

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Once you get the initial results it is important to check the results against known information to make sure your assumptions were valid.  For instance a fan blowing on the bottles would speed up the heat transfer in a freezer, and beer that is boxed up would cool down much slower.  I found out even opening the door too many times to check on the progress can significantly impact the outcome.  In this companion video we explore the steps you can follow to ensure any analysis is accurate for your specific situation.

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Just remember not to drink and design!  The world doesn’t need another Pontiac Aztec.  If you would like the assembly files from first video, please contact us at mlc-cad.com.

Author information

MLC CAD Systems
Celebrating Three Decades of Unbeatable Service! MLC CAD System's mission is to help design and manufacturing companies, entrepreneurs, creative individuals, research institutions and other organizations put their ideas and products into production using the industry's best software technologies including SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD, Mastercam, 3D Systems' 3D printers well as other leading CAD and CAM technologies.

The post Cooling Down Beer in Your Freezer with SOLIDWORKS Simulation appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by MLC CAD Systems at February 16, 2017 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017 for Large Assembly Modeling [WEBINAR]

New SOLIDWORKS 2017 Large Assembly Modeling functionality allows you to do more while you wait for components to fully resolve when loading. In previous releases, while waiting for components to load and fully resolve, you could only pan, zoom, and rotate the model. Now you can also do the following:

  • Navigate the FeatureManager design tree
  • Measure distances
  • Create cross sections
  • Hide and show components

Also in the FeatureManager design tree, an eye overlay indicates that the components are still being resolved. The overlay disappears when the components are fully resolved.

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Attend our SOLIDWORKS 2017 Large Assembly webinar on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 from 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (EST) to see all the enhancements for assemblies including:

  • Performance enhancements
  • Facility layout
  • New mates including magnetic mates
  • Configuration enhancements
  • Loading documents in memory only
  • Options to improve performance in large assembly mode
  • Sorting components by their opening time
  • SpeedPak enhancements
  • New search options to reduce opening times

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The post What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017 for Large Assembly Modeling [WEBINAR] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at February 16, 2017 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Blog | SOLIDWORKS Engineering & Design Blog

SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Recap – Where Magic Met Engineering

The Largest 3D CAD Event in the World!

Another year and yet another SOLIDWORKS World behind us. The event, held in Los Angeles this year, reminds me of the feelings we have around the holidays; we experience an abundance of excitement leading up to the event, the event comes and goes frighteningly fast and we are left with memories of an amazing time feeling anxious for what next year’s event will bring.

This year, the event kicked off with a fitting tribute to Los Angeles’ status of the entertainment capital of the world. We held our breath as Magician Justin Flom and Tim Clothier, CEO and founder of Illusion Projects, joined SOLIDWORKS CEO Gian Paolo Bassi on stage to debut a new illusion that was built in SOLIDWORKS: a 26-inch, track-mounted buzzsaw with a snug stock for Gian Paolo to insert his head! And Gian Palolo, was asked if he trusted SOLIDWORKS with his life. His replay of course, a resounding yes.

How’s this for a visual? Thankfully no one was hurt. And I saw it with my own eyes!

SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Recap

The event continued to bring excitement to us all as we learned about where SOLIDWORKS is headed. Over the years, SOLIDWORKS has been focused on building a Smart Manufacturing ecosystem. Up until this point, components of this ecosystem include: Costing, Inspection and Model Based Definition. But there is a need to boost efficiency that is validated by surveys and research, which is why SOLIDWORKS has developed their newest product, SOLIDWORKS CAM, a 2.5-axis milling and turning solution that is powered by CAMWorks. SOLIDWORKS CAM will allow users to program in either part or assembly environments in addition to working with configurations of components.

SOLIDWORKS World Day 1 Highlights:

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SOLIDWORKS World Day 2 Highlights:

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SOLIDWORKS World Highlights:

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As many of you know from years past, the final evening of SOLIDWORKS World is dedicated to the VAR Channel as we are all recognized at the SOLIDWORKS VAR Reception. This year, the Symmetry Solutions team was honored with the award for #1 in North America for Subscription Support. In addition, Account Managers Rick Passek and Ryan Howg achieved the 100 Seat Club Award.

What was your favorite part of SOLIDWORKS World 2017? Add your comments to this post.

We hope to see you next year when SOLIDWORKS World returns to Los Angeles February 4-7, 2018!

SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Highlights

Author

Nick Weirens, Marketing Manager

February 16, 2017 02:19 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to add a SOLIDWORKS BOM Equation to an Entire Column

The SOLIDWORKS Bill of Materials allows you to add Equations to cells for calculations.  Did you know that you can also apply a SOLIDWORKS BOM Equation to an entire column?

To start select a BOM column so it highlights all of its cells and launch the Equation tool.

Select column label to highlight entire row

You can select other columns from the dropdown.  For example multiplying one column by another.

Select Other Columns in Equation

You can also add a SOLIDWORKS BOM equation to a particular cell to add up the TOTAL value of all items in the column.  Add a row underneath and add the equation to the cell.

SOLIDWORKS BOM Equation

Total will add up all values in column above

You may not want to see this row as an Item Number, so you can hide the Item Number for this new row by right-clicking on the Item Number.

Hide Item Number

Just be aware that the TOTAL is only for values in the column ABOVE the row.

TOTAL only calculates values above the row

If you set the BOM properties to “Follow assembly order”, it will place the manually entered rows at the bottom automatically.

BOM Properties – Follow Assembly Order

Final Calculation

The post How to add a SOLIDWORKS BOM Equation to an Entire Column appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at February 16, 2017 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Cross References are jumping off the page?

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Cross References are used to indicate associations between symbols in our schematics.  If for example a complex electrical component has multiple symbols across a number of drawings, cross references can be used to show association between these symbols.

In some cases, you may notice that the cross reference information seems to jump way off the page to the right or the left as shown in the figure below:

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Cross References

Cross References Jumping to the right of the Sheet

The reason behind this is that we would not want our cross reference to interfere or overlap with our current schematics, thus placing them some intended distance away from a symbol may be a preferred practice.  Of course we can simply click and drag to move the cross reference information wherever we would like, however there is a way to also set up the default location given.

Changing the Cross References Offset Property

The specified cross reference offset is held within the particular sheets title block properties.  Thus to make a change to the offset value we can simply open the sheets title block editor and set our intended value with the SOLIDWORKS Electrical Cross References offset property.

Changing this value, we can define exactly where our cross referencing information is placed on our page.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Electrical training course either in a Canadian classroom near you or live online. For more information about electrical software and training solution call 1-877-219-6757.

The post SOLIDWORKS Electrical Cross References are jumping off the page? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Flett at February 16, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidWorks Legion

Presentations at SOLIDWORKS World 2017

Normally, members of the Product Definition team at DS SolidWorks Corp give two presentations at each SOLIDWORKS World.  Presentations can be either Hands-on or Breakout.  Hands-on sessions involve...

by fcsuper at February 16, 2017 10:08 AM

February 15, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Chariot Tutorial

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Chariot: This small but feature packed assembly consists of a few multi-body parts. The wheel and wheel boss are multi-body parts and have several examples of circular patterns. The chariot part is another multibody part made of extrusions and revolves features and has examples of the rarely used curve driven pattern and move face command. Other features in the parts include revolves, thins, full round fillets, split line curves, delete face and the combine command. There are two examples of the new bidirectional sweep function in SOLIDWORKS 2016.

There is even a little bit of chariot trivia sprinkled into some of the comments. Download this part to learn about mirroring geometry and about different types of patterns including curve driven patterns.

Download: Chariot
Complexity: Moderate
Features: Curve Driven Pattern, Bidirectional Sweep, Revolve, Split Line Curve

View all the Part Reviewer Tutorials here.

DraftSight Download: In conjunction with DraftSight, Dassault Systèmes’ 2D CAD product, the 2D drawing(.dwg) file of the Chariot tutorial is now available for download here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Chariot Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 15, 2017 10:00 PM

Millions of Free SOLIDWORKS Models on 3D ContentCentral

I had a customer the other day who was looking for some standard parts to add to his SOLIDWORKS assemblies and the only information he could find was 2D data when doing internet searches. I asked him if he had heard of 3D ContentCentral and being that he was a newer SOLIDWORKS user, he had not.

Once he went to the 3D ContentCentral site he was amazed at all the items he couldn’t find in any of his other searches. 3D ContentCentral literally has millions of models, there are hundreds of different vendors who have their entire catalog of files. There is also a huge library of quality user supplied content as well that users have added to the site. The best part is all of the models are FREE to download once you create an account.

3d content central

In personally using 3D ContentCentral I have found it is very easy to use there is variety of models and you can find anything from a AA Battery to Scooby-Doo.

Both the customer and user library are highly detailed models and a lot have multiple configurations and can even download then in different CAD formats and versions so they can be used anywhere.

So, the next time you are looking for that hard to find part more than likely is has already been created and is available on 3D ContentCentral.

 

Josh Altergott
Support Manager
Computer Aided Technology

Author information

Josh Altergott
Josh Altergott is Support Manager at Computer Aided Technology, a SolidWorks Value Added Reseller with locations in Kentucky, Missouri, Kansas, Indiana, Wisconsin and Illinois. He is a regular contributor to the CATI Tech Notes blog. http://blog.cati.com/

The post Millions of Free SOLIDWORKS Models on 3D ContentCentral appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Josh Altergott at February 15, 2017 04:00 PM

SolidSmack

Ask An Engineer: Should I Work for a Big Company or Small Company?

ask-an-engineer-dan-slaski-solidsmack-01

Welcome to our new ‘Ask An Engineer’ series, where Dan Slaski addresses questions that have you losing sleep or staring off into space during important meetings. Have a question for Dan? Send it in.

Question: Should I work for a big company or a small company?

Dear Consciously Corporately Constrained,
Recently my girlfriend and I were trying to decide where to go out to dinner. A new Italian restaurant opened up just around the corner. The location has seemed cursed. Over the past 5 years, the same location has been a Greek restaurant, Thai restaurant, cell phone store, and a Mexican restaurant. But I knew that this time, THIS TIME, things would be different. Because I Iove Italian food.

I imagine the Italian restaurant being our new favorite local eatery. They know us by name and don’t give us menus. Shortly after seating us they serve our favorite dishes or have us try a new specialty. After the restaurant closes the owners bring out a special bottle of wine and we have an engaging conversation late into the night. Or will overpriced Chef Boyardee served by surly former cell phone store employees be the reality?

Farther up the road is a Cheesecake Factory, known for its extensive and varied menu and large, calorically dense portion sizes.

So which one to choose? The familiar or the unknown high risk/reward option? How much do you value novelty and the potential for an Instagram-worthy meal?

I’ll start with some generalities about company size.  First is that big companies are more stable. Their ability to grow to their current level is an indicator of some good business practices. Their larger size allows them to absorb blows better. Whether that be projects that don’t work out or changing economic climates. They may have more name recognition, revenue pipelines, financial reserves, and the ability to reallocate funds within the company.

At big companies, you are likely to find a more traditional career growth path and more employee resources. From HR, to corporate benefits, software, tools, school reimbursement, and more experienced people in your field to act as mentors. For the self-motivated, utilizing these resources can be great opportunities to gain credentials. Small companies require you to wear many hats and this can be an opportunity to learn about the business side, entrepreneurship, and grit. You get accelerated experience and upside financial opportunities if the company takes off.

For us passionate designers, an equally important work factor is the nature of the work itself.”

For us passionate designers, an equally important work factor is the nature of the work itself. Small companies require a lot of employees and give them more responsibility and ownership. What excites you? To look at a large project and know you contributed to it or a smaller project where you were instrumental? Does the idea of being able to analyze and understand a part in extensive detail sound satisfying or boring?  Do you prefer being a generalist or a specialist?

These are generalities. I am always searching for that rare unicorn company that is the best of both worlds. Perhaps a department within a large company that is given the autonomy and freedom to work on risky next gen products or a stable small company. There are small companies that are well established and stable. They may have carved out a highly profitable niche, see growth as a risk, and prefer to be nimble and lean. Some big companies have had meteoric growths based on large influxes of capital with little to show for it.

Sometimes you just have to use common sense. I have been allured by companies with interesting technologies but no real market. Like a Filipino/Irish fusion restaurant and juice bar, you just know it isn’t going to make it.

Size is just one measure of a company and your fit potential. It happens to be easy to observe which is the reason it comes up frequently. Equally major factors are the company’s culture, financials, and leadership.

Size is just one measure of a company and your fit potential. It happens to be easy to observe which is the reason it comes up frequently. Equally major factors are the company’s culture, financials, and leadership.”

Research your prospective employer’s financials and try to find reviews of them at sites like GlassDoor. Culture and leadership can be difficult to glean. Ask probing questions during interviews. One I like to ask is, “What do you see as the biggest challenge facing your company/department?” I find people answer truthfully (it may be an opportunity for them to vent) and likely respect the open attempt to make an informed decision.  If you are replacing someone, ask why and try to get in contact with that person (be prepared and understand there are two sides to every story).

I wouldn’t put an overemphasis on the stability of big companies. Big companies don’t have the stability they were once perceived to have. Technologies and markets are changing at an ever accelerating pace and few are above the volatility.

Which better complements your strengths, will help you overcome weaknesses and set you up for success in the long term?  Do an open and honest assessment of your risk tolerance and the nature of work that suits you. And remember, there is always the Olive Garden.

The post Ask An Engineer: Should I Work for a Big Company or Small Company? appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Dan Slaski at February 15, 2017 03:54 PM

3 Features That Make Fusion 360 a Powerful Engineering Tool

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Presented by
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I know, I know. I sealed off simulation with the 5 reasons I would use Simulation in Fusion 360 months ago. You thought we were all done with that. Well, you were wrong, Mwahaha! After that article, Autodesk released an update to Fusion 360 with so many Simulation features it could make a steel I-beam pucker.

To get to the heart of this massive update, and go beyond my simple understanding of Fusion 360 Simulation in general, I talked with Vikram (Vik) Vedantham, who I’m certain can calculate the deformation of an unladen swallow’s wing in flight within an instance of a giggle and a sip of fine chianti. Vik is Senior Business Manager – Fusion 360/Simulation, and when I asked him why go down the route of adding advanced simulation features, I wasn’t ready for his answer.

“There’s a growing need to answer engineering problems as part of the design process, regardless of industry or application,” Vik told me. Ok, I was ready for that, but not for this. “The product innovation platform is being structured to help manufacturers have all the tools necessary not just to design, but ENGINEER products. The vernacular of Advanced Simulation is only a hat-tip to the industry precedence. The technology being built into the product innovation platform is more of an engineer’s tool, and will continue to evolve in that direction.”

I don’t know about you, but a design tool is exactly the way I looked at Fusion 360. It’s sort of a paradigm Fusion 360 is slowly crushing. Whenever doing any sort of analysis in the past, it was always a different software and always took time, with changes leading to decisions like, ‘just double up the fasteners on every side’ instead of pushing it through another round of analysis.

That. Ugh.

That right there is the time where I wish I would have had a simulation tool to ‘just show’ instead of ‘just double up’. But, as Vik implies, the goal is to create a shift in mindset from Simulation as a validation tool, to Simulation as a solution to create, engineer and optimize throughout the design cycle. In other words, it’s that paradigm-crushing goal to be a guide to engineering design decision-making.

With that. Here’s where Fusion 360 Simulation reveals the difference between design tool and engineering tool.

  1. Shape Optimization

Shape Optimization is a “state-of-the-art conceptual engineering” feature of Fusion 360 Ultimate that shows you where you can remove material based on set mass, loads and constraints. I asked if it’s like spraying a firehose at a chunk of clay, seeing where it collapses first, and they just shook their heads. Unlike that, Shape Optimization helps you solve two problems, both of which involve that initial design decision:

  1. Starting a new design – Acts as a guide and helps eliminate barriers to progressing in the design.
  2. Using an existing design – Allows continuation of familiar workflow through optimizing and lightweighting existing designs.

I don’t know about you, but I’d like to lightweight a bag of chips right about now. It’s not always apparent, but this is a big advantage, i.e. the decision of where to start and the associated cost of change. It’s extremely critical to start in the right direction, and we have all sorts of kick-off meetings to attest to this.  But imagine going to those meetings with design exploration already complete; Exploration beyond what an engineer or a team of engineers can fathom within their range of skills, experience and expertise. It’s a process that takes minimal setup and certainly becomes quicker to setup over time. You build your body, set your constraints, and regions to preserve, and offload it to the cloud.

  1. From Concept Design to Engineering Product

So, simulation for conceptual engineering makes sense, right? But what about the rest of the process? The detailed design, the conditions, even the manufacturing variables. That’s where the simulation technology in Fusion 360 is built to serve as a ‘GPS’ for product development, guiding decisions through throughout the design, allowing you to examine the conditions as the design nears manufacturing and beyond.

“Designers and engineers must factor in the operating conditions to design for durability and sustained performance,” Vik explains. “Will my design carry a dead load without failing? Will my design overheat? Will my design face excessive vibration? Will my design permanently deform? Will my design collapse? What happens under impact? Fusion now has an elaborate range of options to determine all of this.”

  1. Simulation for Everyone

There’s part of me that’s a bit uncomfortable with the idea of ‘simulation for everyone’, as are a few PEs out there as well. There is a myriad of arguments around who should be using Simulation, but one thing I think everyone can agree on is an understanding of simulation (or rather, the outworking of simulation) is extremely important.

Let’s not get hung up on that, though. Autodesk is looking at providing a complete tool that captures all aspects. Vik says, “Ease of use is at the core of Fusion 360. That idea continues into Simulation, with the goal making the tech simply an extension of the design process.” They want everything to be ‘a click away’ so once you’re in, you realize you’re a step away from understanding how your design behaves.

On top of this, it’s not only Simulation for everyone, it’s Simulation that uses the Nastran Solver. You know the one widely regarded as the gold standard in automotive and aerospace industries? Yeah, that’s kind of available to every Fusion customer now.

Those three things, along with our other five, set Fusion 360 apart as a tool that can be used as an Engineering tool. You get the collaboration and online result sharing right along with it. The added ability to offload to the cloud-based solver can’t be underestimated, though. With that, you have simultaneous solving that frees you up to continue working and, my fav, no need for IT support.

You might think that utilizing all this cloud power costs a fortune. However, Autodesk has set it up so you pay for only what you use, instead of dealing with high upfront costs. According to Autodesk, for the majority of engineers depending on the cloud as part of their workflow, the cost of leveraging the cloud in tandem with concurrent engineering is likely to stay well below the traditional investments. Of course, the new simulation technologies are just one of the nine major components that make up Fusion 360. You can get a better idea of the other features and compare Fusion 360 Standard and Ultimate here. Beyond this, interested to know what you all find interesting about Fusion 360 and what you’re wondering about the most. Anything we should have a look at?

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The post 3 Features That Make Fusion 360 a Powerful Engineering Tool appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 15, 2017 02:48 PM

RedLine For SOLIDWORKS Add-In Finally Gives Your Mark Up Capability Inside SOLIDWORKS

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Anyone familiar with SOLIDWORKS, or 3D CAD in general, knows you can’t easily markup a 3D model or drawing within the software. You still need to print the drawing or model, hand-deliver it to the conference room, shop floor or the friendly checker grinning at you expectantly over the edge of the cubicle. The. Joy.

The new RedLine add-in for SOLIDWORKS from InfinityDRAW changes this, allowing you to digitally redline your parts, assemblies and drawings right inside SOLIDWORKS. The potential time and money this saves alone is huge, not to mention the paper, ink, trips to the pen cabinet and energy of sorting through different redline stacks. It also addresses the lack of redline capability in SolidWorks but goes a long way toward alleviating the miscommunication that inevitably happens with paper redlines.

infinitydraw-redline-solidworks-add-in-01

There are actually two add-ins available –RedLine for SOLIDWORKS and RedLine for SOLIDWORKS PDM. RedLine for SolidWorks allows you to markup models on virtual surfaces or, as you’re used to, on the drawing sheets directly. RedLine for SOLIDWORKS PDM adds the capabilities to SOLIDWORKS PDM to markup eDrawings, SOLIDWORKS or Draftsight files, but also adds real-time redline notification, markup history and digital signoff — perfect for managers, manufacturing and drawing checkers ready and willing to lather your drawing with red.

infinitydraw-redline-solidworks-add-in-02

The markups stay with the SOLIDWORKS file as well and PDF redline reports can be generated with links to the affected files. The markups will also be retained if/when the file is printed. A mouse isn’t the easiest tool for writing or sketching redlines, but can be used. However, this just reinforced the use of touchscreen/stylus combos or Wacom tablet use for CAD.

There are no prices listed for the add-ins, but we’ve reached out to InfinityDRAW for pricing details. You can request more information via the InfinityDRAW website.

Clear, unambiguous communication is absolutely essential in an engineering environment. It’s amazing it took this long for something so integral to the product dev process to show up. Eventually… hopefully, we’ll see more workflow add-ins like this added to the CAD software of the future.

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The post RedLine For SOLIDWORKS Add-In Finally Gives Your Mark Up Capability Inside SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at February 15, 2017 02:29 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Vault is missing on new client?

If the SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Vault missing on a new client it’s possibly caused by the incorrect client type being installed.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Vault Missing

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Vault Missing

For a SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional vault to be visible in the Administration Tool or View Setup tool a Professional client is required.

To verify which client is installed:

  • Select Programs > SOLIDWORKS PDM > Administration > Help > About SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration
PDM Professional Vault is Missing

Verify Client Type

If the client type is Standard and you’re looking for a Professional vault then the client type requires changing;

  • Start > Control Panel > Programs and Features > SOLIDWORKS 20xx SPx > Change
PDM Professional Vault is Missing

Change Installation

  • Installation Manager > Summary > SW PDM Client Options > Change
    • Change the Client Type from Standard to Professional
Standard > Professional

Installation Manager > Summary > SW PDM Client Options > Change

  • Finish the modification.

Just to be sure we can verify our client again:

PDM Professional Client

Verify Client Type

Now the SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional vault[s] should be visible via the Administration Tool and View Setup Tool;

View Setup Tool

Vaults Found!

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Vault is missing on new client? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Williams at February 15, 2017 01:00 PM

Discover the Optimal Digital Design Process at a SOLIDWORKS 2017 Event

Over the next couple of months, Javelin’s 3D design experts will be hosting a SOLIDWORKS 2017 Event in a Canadian city near you. Each complimentary seminar will highlight the top enhancements in SOLIDWORKS 2017, provide performance best practices, and show you how to increase your productivity through the Optimal Digital Design Process. 

Are your SOLIDWORKS Settings and Skills as Productive as they could be?

SOLIDWORKS 2017 innovation platform and Javelin’s best practices will enable you to take full advantage of today’s digital design process. Productivity gains through tight integration and collaboration across multiple disciplines take design through to manufacturing. Two hours with us will save you countless design and engineering hours this year!

SOLIDWORKS 2017 tips and techniques from the experts

SOLIDWORKS 2017 tips and techniques from the experts

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Event Agenda

  1. Registration, snacks and beverages
  2. Review of the Optimal Digital Design Process
  3. SOLIDWORKS 2017 Top Enhancements
  4. Training on Performance Best Practices
  5. Q&A, Networking

What to expect at the event

  • Engage with Javelin SOLIDWORKS experts
  • Get skilled on the advanced tools and the latest features
  • Gain insight into the industry-specific tools that address your unique needs
  • Learn SOLIDWORKS 2017 tips & tricks
  • Discover the Optimal Digital Design Process and how it can help your business
  • Obtain a Productivity Checklist to use as a reference
Attend a SOLIDWORKS 2017 Event

Attend a SOLIDWORKS 2017 Event

Preview the Optimal Digital Design Process

From concept to sales and service, discover our complete solution for your business:

Optimal Digital Design Process

Optimal Digital Design Process

Locations & Registration

Register for an event near you:

EVENT DATE LOCATION TIME
Thursday, Feb 16, 2017 Vaughan, ON 2:30 PM — 4:30 PM REGISTER
Thursday, Feb 16, 2017 Edmonton, AB 2:30 PM — 4:30 PM REGISTER
Tuesday, Feb 21, 2017 Kitchener, ON 2:30 PM — 4:30 PM REGISTER
Wednesday, Feb 22, 2017 London, ON 2:30 PM — 4:30 PM REGISTER
Thursday, Feb 23, 2017 Windsor, ON 9:00 AM — 11:00 AM REGISTER
Thursday, Feb 23, 2017 Surrey, BC 2:30 PM — 4:30 PM REGISTER
Tuesday, Feb 28, 2017 Winnipeg, MB 2:30 PM — 4:30 PM REGISTER
Thursday, March 2, 2017 Ottawa, ON 2:30 PM — 4:30 PM REGISTER
Tuesday, May 2, 2017 Victoria, BC 9:00 AM — 11:00 AM REGISTER
Thursday, May 4, 2017 Kelowna, BC 11:00 AM — 1:00 PM REGISTER

The post Discover the Optimal Digital Design Process at a SOLIDWORKS 2017 Event appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Erin Elliott at February 15, 2017 12:50 PM

February 14, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Gear Heart Tutorial – Part 1

Many of us SOLIDWORKS users would be considered “gear heads”, or high-tech enthusiasts, but some of us take our “gear headed-ness” to such a high level that our enthusiasm for all things mechanical just pours from our heart. This tutorial series is for you, the SOLIDWORKS user that says “Nay, I am not just a gear head, I’m a gear heart!” In this four-part series we’ll be building a functional geared heart pendant using mostly essential SOLIDWORKS features, with a few unique part and assembly features sprinkled in.

In part 1 of the series we will be designing around a few existing gears in a multi-body part file and introducing the sketch picture tool to assist in laying out the heart shaped enclosure.

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Whether you’re interested in all things mechanical or want to exercise your artistic side, the Gear Heart Tutorial Series will help you better understand and expand your Gearing and Mechanical Mate skills in SOLIDWORKS! Can’t wait for the next video? View all of the tutorials on the playlist here.

Download the full Gear Heart SOLIDWORKS assembly here.

Are you a gear head? Share your creations with us in the comments below! As always, thanks for watching!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Gear Heart Tutorial – Part 1 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 14, 2017 10:00 PM

SolidSmack

Autonomous Robotic Bat Captures the Incredible Flight Pattern of a Real Bat

batbot-robot-01

Three dudes from Caltech just designed the first robotic bat. Alireza Ramezani, Soon-Jo Chung, and Seth Hutchinson scored the cover article with their research published in the latest issue of Journal of Science Robotics, detailing the successful construction and flight of the multi-articulating, adaptive flapping of our favorite flying mammal.

Modeled after the species, Rousettus aegyptiacus (the Egyptian fruit bat), the robot does indeed look and move like a bat–Well, a creepy, mechanical, translucent bat. The crew claims it is among the agilest of flying robots ever built. They also claim that because it’s so light and squishy, it poses far less risk to humans than quadrotors and other rotorcraft.

If you’ve ever been interested in how bats fly or advanced robotic motion, the research is nothing short of amazing. The group was inspire by the insight and applications of flapping aerial robotics and the inherent challenge.

From an engineering perspective, understanding bat flight is a rich and interesting problem. Unlike birds or insects, bats exclusively use structural flexibility to generate the controlled force distribution on each membrane wing. Wing flexibility and complex wing kinematics are crucial to the unrivaled agility of bat flight.

A carbon-fiber framework is the bones of the bot. The skin stretched over those bones is a custom fabricated, 56-μm silicone membrane. Loaded with sensors, an 8-channel receiver, four coreless DC motors, five magnetic encoders at each joint and controlled by an ST microcontroller, the whole package weighs a mere 93 grams (0.20 pounds). It’s also autonomous–no wires, no remote control. To determine the sophisticated movement, they looked at the changing flight pattern of bats, extrapolating and grouping them into three dominant degrees of freedom (DOF).

batbot-design

B2’s flight mechanism consists of the left and right wings, each including a forelimb and a hindlimb mechanism. The left and right wings are coupled with a mechanical oscillator. A motor spins a crankshaft mechanism, which moves both wings synchronously dorsoventrally while each wing can move asynchronously mediolaterally. The hindlimbs that synthesize the trailing edge of the wings can move asynchronously and dorsoventrally. If it were not for mechanical couplings and constraints, the morphing mechanism of B2 would have nine DOFs. Because the physical constraints are present, four DOFs are coupled, yielding a five-DOF mechanism.

Obviously, simple fabrics or nylon films would not work for the skin. They realized the limb movement defined the shape of the wings during flight and that any membrane used would impart a moment of intertia across the flapping axis and affect the torque output due to additional tensile forces. To solve this, the team constructed a custom, highly-durable, silicon-based membrane to match the elastic characteristics of a biological bat wing.

batbot-robot-02

To produce an ultrathin and stretchable skin, we used two ultraflat metal sheets with a 10-μm flatness precision to sandwich our silicone materials. This ensures an even and consistent pressure distribution profile on the material. We synthesized a polymer in which two components—one containing a catalyst and the other containing polyorganosiloxanes with hydride functional groups—began vulcanization in the laboratory environment… [adding] hexamethyldisiloxane, which reduces the thickness and viscosity of the silicone, in an experimentally determined ratio

While this little guy mimics the biology and kinematics of a real bat, it can’t actually take off by itself yet. For now, testing involves two different flight manuveuers: a banking turn, a swoop and a dive. They launched the bat by hand, and even though this affected the flight somewhat, the batbot compensated and stabalized within the first 20 wingbeats, matching commands to adjust the pitch and yaw for the various manuevers.

batbot-robot-03

The paper is a fascinating read, with the result revealing some very interesting findings on dynamics and control, design scheme and material science. There is supplemental material on the project, including videos and other data captured in the tests. You can view this material here.

batbot-robot-schematic-01

batbot-robot-design-04

batbot-robot-design-05

The post Autonomous Robotic Bat Captures the Incredible Flight Pattern of a Real Bat appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 14, 2017 04:14 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

A big thank you to the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Community at SOLIDWORKS World

Last week we had the pleasure of interacting with SOLIDWORKS users in Los Angeles, CA., at the SOLIDWORKS World convention.  This year was packed full of informative and impressive sessions that really excite the inner engineering geek in me; and invigorates the passion that so many designers and engineers have for the great SOLIDWORKS Innovation Platform.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Breakout Session

My colleague Alen Topic and I were lucky enough to present at the event this year on one of our favorite new additions to the SOLIDWORKS lineup, SOLIDWORKS Visualize, and wanted to give a big thank you to everyone that attended to make this a fun and creative session.

Users of All skill levels cam out for the Event

Users of all skill levels came out for the Event

We had users of all types, from experienced to brand new, witness how easy and powerful SOLIDWORKS Visualize can be and had a lot of fun in the process.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Community

Unleashing Your Renders SOLIDWORKS Visualize Session

Users were able to make a very high quality render (shown in the figure below), in a very short period of time with everything being done in SOLIDWORKS Visualize without the need for post processing programs.

Our SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Project

Our SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Project

We were able to show off a lot of the new capabilities of SOLIDWORKS Visualize as well and how easy they are to use. Features we demonstrated included cutting planes, part transparency, and importing motion studies for super easy and impressive animations straight from SOLIDWORKS!

SOLIDWORKS Motion Animation Example

The video below is an example of how we can take a force like gravity which can be incredibly difficult to keyframe for animation and export it from SOLIDWORKS in a couple clicks to easily create an advanced animation.

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SOLIDWORKS World 2017 was a blast and both Alen and myself, we had so much fun interacting with the SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS Visualize community, we cannot wait to see what 2018 has in store and see everyone again next year.

Learn SOLIDWORKS Visualize

If you were not able to make it to our breakout session at SOLIDWORKS World this year you can still learn how to create renderings by attending our SOLIDWORKS Visualize training course either live online or in a Canadian classroom near you.

The post A big thank you to the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Community at SOLIDWORKS World appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Ellery, CSWE at February 14, 2017 03:38 PM

Getting Started with SOLIDWORKS Composer

If you are new to the SOLIDWORKS Composer product, there are a number of extremely helpful free resources available for you to learn and quickly become a Composer expert.  Many people may not be aware of the great resources available to them right within the Composer product.

Turning on the “Getting Started” Composer Workshop you should see a number of Help options on your right side panel.  Another way to navigate to the same resources is to simply click on the Help button in the top right-corner of your Composer interface.  Here you will see a number of extremely useful resources, but most notably in my opinion the “Getting Started” and the “Video Tips” resources.

SOLIDWORKS Composer Getting Started

SOLIDWORKS Composer Help Options

The SOLIDWORKS Composer Getting Started resource will send you directly to an online content database, and provide you with a number of best steps and guides to getting started with your Composer product.

SOLIDWORKS Composer Assistance

SOLIDWORKS Composer Assistance

Perhaps even one step above that is the “Video Tips” resource which links to the SOLIDWORKS Composer YouTube channel which provides numerous short training videos for both those brand new to using SOLIDWORKS Composer as well as advanced topics for experienced users.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer

To learn more about Composer, we invite you to attend a SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training course either in a Canadian city near you or live online.

The post Getting Started with SOLIDWORKS Composer appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Flett at February 14, 2017 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Schooled in SOLIDWORKS Series: Quick tips from our UK Technical Manager

Level-up your SOLIDWORKS skills as our inside experts reveal features you never knew existed. In this month’s webinar, find out how you can use SOLIDWORKS MBD to improve quoting, CAM, CMM and more.

The best way to learn is to do. The second best? Pluck advice from people who are aces in their field. To help you do just that, SOLIDWORKS is holding a series of webinars hosted by the crème de la crème in our company. It’s your chance to hear from the people who know SOLIDWORKS products like the back of their hand… The next best thing to being in a room with them.

Each month an expert member of our team will share tips on how to get the most from SOLIDWORKS. You will learn to use our product not just as a design tool, but as a means to ease business challenges and ignite rapid progress towards your strategic goals. Sit back and power-up your knowledge of the world’s most advanced 3D design software. Submit your questions at the end.

This month we talk to Alan Coles, Technical Manager for SOLIDWORKS in the UK & Ireland.

Here’s a Q&A to introduce his webinar…

> Or register your interest now

  1. Please introduce yourself…

I’m Alan Coles, Technical Manager for SOLIDWORKS in the UK and Ireland. My role is to support our excellent network of Value Added Resellers in selling our products. I’ve been in this role for four years, but have been part of the SOLIDWORKS community since 2003. I’m based near the Dassault Systemes Cambridge office.

  1. What is your webinar about, who is it for and why should I attend?

This webinar will highlight how using a model-based approach, instead of 2D drawings, can save significant time and cost during your product development process. If you’re curious to learn about a more efficient way to communicate your manufacturing intent, this webinar is for you.

  1. What’s your best quick tip for anyone using SOLIDWORKS MBD?

My suggestion for any companies considering SOLIDWORKS MBD would be to think beyond just the model. There are a lot of downstream benefits of a model-based approach. These include tolerance analysis, CAM, CMM, quoting, process planning and more – whether your product development process is completed in-house or outsourced. We’ll discuss this in the webinar.

  1. What’s your favourite feature of SOLIDWORKS MBD?

From a user point of view, it’s got to be ‘Tolerance Status’.

  1. What makes Tolerance Status your favourite feature?

It gives immediate visual feedback to confirm if your model is fully defined for manufacture. This is a laborious task in 2D, a major source of error and a common cause for drawing queries.

  1. When does your webinar take place?

9.30am GMT – 10.00am GMT on February 23rd  This webinar will be hosted from the UK. Register here: http://www.solidworks.com/registerMBDwebinar_blog_0217/

 

If you would like further information on any SOLIDWORKS products, please complete your details here, and we will be in touch with you shortly:  http://www.solidworks.com/contactsales_webinar_blog_2017/

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Schooled in SOLIDWORKS Series: Quick tips from our UK Technical Manager appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS UK at February 14, 2017 12:00 PM

February 13, 2017

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: RC Speed Tank [Roll Out!]

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It’s embarrassing isn’t it? When you get caught in the garage with all the tires off, halfway between blowtorching the lower panels and wrapping tank tread around your freshly welded drive sprocket. Just tell your spouse the smell will dissipate over time. Then, quickly show them RC Speed Tank this to distract them.

Sven Drechsel has created a very simple RC tank project with the majority of the parts, even the tread, 3D printed. The rest of the projects involves some very basic electronics and screw-together assembly. This is a great beginner project for 3D printing and electronics, or for anyone interested in making a fun little RC toy. Since it’s a ‘Speed Tank’, you can bet it goes fast. How fast does it go? Sven says it’s a durable 25 km/h (15 MPH). Not too shabby! Here he is showing what it’s capable of IN THE SNOW.

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You can download all the files on Thingiverse. The details and part list is in German, but you can find the translation below with parts sourced in the USA. There isn’t much in the way of schematics or assembly instructions, but the assembly .stl will get you half way there.

Part List

2X 540 35T engine and 60A Brushed ESC 2X Pinion Gear (Module 1 / 11 teeth)
2X Pinion Gear Adapter 5mm to 3.2mm
12X 8x22x7mm 608 Ball Bearings
12X 4x13x5mm 624 Ball Bearings
2x 2200mAh LiPo Battery
1X Flysky 2.4GHz 6-Channel Transmitter/Receiver

Screws:
M4x15mm 8x
M4x60mm 12x
M3x20mm 4x
M3x10mm 4x
M3x45mm 84x

Nuts:
M4 20x
M3 88x

3D Printed Parts

2X Drive wheel
1X Basic plate
1X Front Bumper
1X Rear cover
84X Chain link
2X Caster chain tensioner
8X Caster
1X Side part mirrored
1X Side section
1X Stiffening mirrored
1X Stiffening

Assembly

Everything is designed to be screwed together and modular for easy assembly/repair. The nut locations are designed to be press fit for quick installation. Depending on your print setting and material shrinkage, the bearings should also press fit.

The 42 chain links are connected with the M3x45mm screws, then secured with M3 nuts, which can also be secured with an anchor or glue. The “caster chain tension” adds tension to the track assembly and is mounted at the foremost caster since it’s a different size.

Print support

Part support is only necessary for the Caster, Caster Chain Tension, Drive Wheel, and Baseplate.

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

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rc-speed-tank-3d-print-model-solidsmack-03

The post Model of the Week: RC Speed Tank [Roll Out!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 13, 2017 09:20 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Introducing SOLIDWORKS CAM: a Smart Manufacturing Ecosystem

SOLIDWORKS CAM is a 2.5-axis milling and turning solution that is powered by CAMWorks, a SOLIDWORKS Gold-level solution partner in CAM since 1998. SOLIDWORKS CAM will allow users to program in either part or assembly environments. In addition, SOLIDWORKS CAM will also be able to work with configurations of components to expedite the programming process.

Over the last several years, SOLIDWORKS has been building a Smart Manufacturing ecosystem. Components of this ecosystem, such as Costing, Inspection, and Model-Based Definition (MBD), have been a priority to take the next logical step that will improve efficiency for our users. Having integrated CAM capabilities is becoming more important than ever; especially when efficiency is involved. For example, users want to be able to check their components for manufacturability earlier in design process.  Using an integrated CAM system makes it easier to learn and understand how your components will transition from bits to atoms. Integrated CAM also allows for automatic updating of toolpaths because the CAM system can read changes as you make updates to parts.

This push to boost efficiency is manifesting itself in practice as validated by surveys and research reports. One example is Business Advantage’s CAD Trends Survey, which found that 34 percent of CAD users increased their use of CAM last year.  Of those surveyed, 70 percent think it’s “important” (36 percent think it is “very important” and 34 percent “quite important”) to have machining instructions automatically generated from 3D CAD models.  Six in ten (61 percent) want to see “more” (half of them want to see “much more”) software development effort on CAD/CAM integration.

Based on these trends, and the previous work on Smart Manufacturing ecosystem updates, the foundation of SOLIDWORKS CAM, Knowledge-Based Machining (KBM), was created.  KBM will allow companies to define standard machining strategies that can be used by everyone within their organization from quoting to programming.  This standardization will ensure that everyone is on the same page, which will reduce errors during the design-to-manufacturing process.  The more consistent a company can leverage existing data and processes, the more efficiently they can produce their products.  Consistency in workflow has been shown to reduce cycle times, improve quality and boost employee satisfaction.

SOLIDWORKS CAM is available for Beta starting April 1, 2017.  Commercial release for SOLIDWORKS CAM will be available with the release of SOLIDWORKS 2018. To learn more about SOLIDWORKS CAM

Author information

Mike Buchli
Mike Buchli
Mike is a Senior SolidWorks Product & Portfolio Manager at Dassault Systèmes

The post Introducing SOLIDWORKS CAM: a Smart Manufacturing Ecosystem appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mike Buchli at February 13, 2017 04:51 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to use SOLIDWORKS Auto Balloon for components hidden from view

When you require internal components of your assembly to be ballooned in a drawing, you may find that components hidden from view will not be ballooned using the SOLIDWORKS Auto Balloon tool even if they are present in the related BOM?

The drawing below shows one such example, where ‘Item No. 3’ are internal batteries which in this case have not been ballooned as they are not visible in the drawing view.

Balloon View Hidden Lines Removed: Internal Items not Shown

Now in most cases the best approach would be to generate an additional view where internal components are visible (such as a detail, section, or exploded view for example).  However, in some scenarios you may want all internal components to have balloons attached even if they are not visible we can do a simple trick that will apply internal ballooning.

Technique: Using a Display State

If the display state is changed to Hidden Lines Visible, now all internal components become visible and can be ballooned automatically with the SOLIDWORKS Auto Balloon tool.  Note that once the display state is changed to Hidden Lines Visible and auto ballooning is performed we can choose to keep the display in this state or we can toggle back to Hidden Lines Removed, and our internal item balloons will still be active!

SOLIDWORKS Auto Balloon Hidden Components

Balloon View Hidden Lines Visible: Internal Items Shown

Learn more about Drawings

Take our SOLIDWORKS Drawings course to learn more techniques, you can take the class live online or in a Canadian classroom near you.

The post How to use SOLIDWORKS Auto Balloon for components hidden from view appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Flett at February 13, 2017 01:00 PM

February 12, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Why is my SOLIDWORKS Sketch Pattern Under Defined?

In general, it’s good practice to create a Feature Pattern rather than creating all of the geometry in a single sketch with a Sketch Pattern.  Sketch Patterns are usually slower to rebuild than Feature Patterns and you also have less options available.

However if you create Sketch Patterns for simple geometry, you may have noticed that it doesn’t fully define the instances, even if you opt to Add Dimensions. In this tech tip we’ll answer the common question: Why is my SOLIDWORKS Sketch Pattern Under Defined?

Linear Sketch Pattern - Add Dimensions

Linear Sketch Pattern – Dimensions added

Why is my SOLIDWORKS Sketch Pattern Under Defined?

SOLIDWORKS 2016 – Instances Under Defined

The reason is because the sketch instances can rotate.  You could previously Fully Define the instances by adding a Horizontal or Vertical relation on one of the construction lines tied to the instances.

SOLIDWORKS 2016 – Instances Can Rotate

SOLIDWORKS 2017 has been enhanced so that the instances are now locked based on Direction 1 and won’t rotate.  The angle for Direction 2 is the angle between axes (with respect to Direction 1), so this will Fully Define the sketch with all dimensions added.

Fully Defined Instances Automatically in Linear Sketch Pattern

SOLIDWORKS 2017 – Fully Defined Instances Automatically in Linear Sketch Pattern

 

However the Circular Sketch Pattern will still remain Under Defined in SOLIDWORKS 2017, so just be sure to add Horizontal or Vertical relations (or any required relation/dimension) to the construction lines to fully define the pattern.

Circular Sketch Pattern – Under Defined

The post Why is my SOLIDWORKS Sketch Pattern Under Defined? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at February 12, 2017 04:59 PM

February 10, 2017

SolidSmack

Yes, The Oree Board 2 is a Keyboard Made of Wood

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I love the look and feel of handcrafted wood objects–a guitar, a speaker, a cutting board are all pretty typical, but a keyboard made of wood? I’m not sure I could get used to that. However, the Oree Board 2 may make me drop that plastic keyboard like a chunk of wood, err… you know what I mean.

The board itself is beautiful, crafted from a single piece of either maple or walnut, sourced from family-owned forests located in the eastern area of France. Le Point published this making of video a few years ago that looks at the lengthy process of making each one of the boards.

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The Board 2 is manufactured by CNC machining both the case and keys, which is then belt-sanded to smooth the rough edges and then further hand-sanded for a smooth finish. The keys are engraved with your preferred typeface and can even be custom engraved. Once sanded, food-grade varnish is applied for protection and to bring out the wood’s natural grain.

The keyboard connects wirelessly to your Windows PC, Mac or tablet via a Bluetooth 3.0 (Broadcom BCM20730) connection with a pair of AAA batteries required to power the plank. While Oree doesn’t state what exactly is under the hood, my guess is it uses the same scissor-type key buttons found on some traditional keyboards; better than standard membrane keys, but may not appeal to some.

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Oree also offers a pair of accessories to compliment the Board. A wooden Trackpad is available, which functions the same as any touch-based interface, but can also be used as a Numpad, switching between the two modes with a simple hand gesture. A hand leather carrying case is also available, and doubles as a tablet stand, perfect for those of you who prefer to be more mobile.

Surprisingly, the cost isn’t that much of a shock. At $129 you get a custom keyboard that, while smaller than a traditional keyboard, stands out. Sure, you could get a wireless, plastic keyboard with all the extra function keys. Don’t get me wrong, Oree uses scissor switches to maintain a low profile, making the board that much more compact and they are vastly superior to membrane switches regarding responsiveness and lifespan, but they could have made mechanical switches an option at that price-point.

They do offer a “Romance Edition” of the Board 2 as well that comes with the custom engraved initials of your significant other as well as a custom engraved poem on the back, which ups the price to $250 (just in time for Valentine’s Day). For those who would like more information on the Oree keyboard or to purchase, it’s available on their website.

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The post Yes, The Oree Board 2 is a Keyboard Made of Wood appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at February 10, 2017 05:49 PM

Friday Smackdown: Compendium of Boom

Raphael-Lacoste-art

The books lined the walls and hallway, some stacked, some shelved, volumes and volumes of pages oiled with time and fingers. We were not supposed to find it there, the vibrating velvet orange volume of verses. Saying it glowed, would be an understatement. Looking at it too long would start you shaking. It wasn’t the color, but what resided inside–a mix of nitrous, enriched uranium, and these links.

Raphael Lacoste – The worlds of Raphael Lacoste, indeed. from icy northern lands to floating cities, and those exploring them that make you want to take their place.

Open Mind – The surreal porcelain sculptures of Johnson Tsang will likely stretch your mind or give you an idea of how that would happen.

Data Selfie – A Chrome extension that reveals the amount of data that Facebook has about you and perhaps answers that question of why.

World Record Paper Plane – How do you fold the paper airplane with the world record for long distance flight? John Collins, who designed it, goes through the folds.

Google Maps Around the World – Matteo Archondis put together this hyperlapse of famous places around the world to celebrate the birthday of Google Maps. Every frame taken on Google Maps.

Sword Keys – Ingenious! The Sword Armory creates amazing sword-shaped keys blanks you can use for all those bland, normal keys on your keyring. Swords from He-man, Game of Thrones and more.

Kaffee Maschine – These motorcycles. A gallery of the 17 classic style cafe racer beauties made to date.

Control Panels – Control Panels can be the most esoteric and convuluted mess of buttons or the most simple of dials. Either way, they’re sublime, and this Flickr group knows it.

Punchin’ Air – The Meanies are still at it, with a album and a new video out on Poison City Records.

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by Josh Mings at February 10, 2017 05:12 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Introducing Simulation Engineer

At SOLIDWORKS World we announced the imminent launch of Simulation Engineer, a new structural analysis solution from our sister brand SIMULIA. And I was asked at the event why we need a new structural analysis solution, when we already have a very good solution with the SOLIDWORKS Simulation suite of tools. To answer this, I am going to have to take a step back…

To the casual observer it may seem that all structural simulation is the same.  Model your components, apply materials and some loads and away you go.  Sadly, that isn’t always the case. As with all things complexities arise as more conditions and behaviors have to be considered. To my mind, structural analysis ranges from the straightforward to brain scathingly difficult. Taking a simplistic view, and ignoring many aspects of structural analysis, I have ranked some of the basic tasks:

In the same way that not all cars are equal, not all structural analysis solvers are either. So what is an optimal solution for solving low-complexity problems is probably not the best for high-complexity problems although they are still both structural analysis solvers. As a result, we need to offer a range of solutions that deliver the best experience across a wide range of problems.

This is where the new Simulation Engineer solution comes in. It is tailored to solve very complex structural problems but can it solve the relatively simple cases? Yes, however, it would be like using a sledgehammer to crack a nut. The new Simulation Engineer solution expands the coverage of the SOLIDWORKS Simulation portfolio by delivering the world-leading Abaqus solver on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

SOLIDWORKS has spent the last 15 years making structural analysis more accessible through UI and workflow improvements that enable any designer to setup, run and understand their results directly inside of their CAD workflow. This focus has not dimmed with the introduction of Simulation Engineer. For example, while Simulation Engineer is on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, users can easily access and use this powerful solution with ‘one click’ from within their familiar SOLIDWORKS Simulation environment. This ‘one click’ will transfer geometry, materials and many boundary conditions over to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform kick starting the solution. One click, it’s as easy as making a purchase on Amazon. In addition to a new solver, Simulation Engineer users will benefit from a wide range of material models and a robust and automatic contact setup together with advanced meshing tools.  Together these technologies from SIMULIA result in a product that will deliver high-accuracy solutions for the most exacting of structural simulation problems.

Simulation Engineer will be available to select customers in the first half of 2017 with a planned full worldwide availability by the end of 2017. For more information, and to stay current on Simulation Engineer updates, please visit its product page.

Author information

Stephen Endersby
Stephen Endersby
Product Manager at SolidWorks

The post Introducing Simulation Engineer appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Stephen Endersby at February 10, 2017 02:46 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

My SOLIDWORKS Task Pane is missing?

One of my favorite toolbars is the SOLIDWORKS Task Pane. In case you don’t know it by name, I’m referring to the tabs on the right side of your screen. There’s a Home tab that has a couple of useful tools, such as easy access to the Rx Utility or the Copy Settings Wizard, a Design Library Tab — very useful if you add your working folder; the View Palette (very handy in drawings to drag and drop in standard views), and a few more. It’s always there when you need it, and it ducks out of the way when you don’t, giving you more space on your screen to do your work.

SOLIDWORKS Task Pane

Figure 1: Task Pane (tabs)

On occasion, we encounter users who are missing these tabs. The reasons can vary and are usually difficult to determine after-the-fact (if it occurs regularly, contact your VAR). However, returning the Task Pane is actually very quick and easy. It is considered to be a toolbar, and its appearance is controlled in the same manner. You can choose from either of the two following reactivation methods:

Reactivate SOLIDWORKS Task Pane Method 1

The first method I can use is that I can right-click in the blank space of any toolbar. This gives me access to the list of available toolbars and I can toggle the status of any of them by selecting it in the list (in this case, I’m looking for the one called Task Pane).

Right-click any toolbar and choose Task Pane from the resulting list

Right-click any toolbar and choose Task Pane from the resulting list

Reactivate SOLIDWORKS Task Pane Method 2

The second method I can use is to go to Tools > Customize, then under the Toolbars tab, I can select Task Pane from the list. Some scrolling may be required.

Go to Tools > Customize and under the Toolbars tab, find Task Pane in the list

The post My SOLIDWORKS Task Pane is missing? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Jim Peltier, CSWE at February 10, 2017 01:00 PM

February 09, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Introducing the new GrabCAD Print for SOLIDWORKS Add-in

In addition to the launch of the new Stratasys F123 Series at SOLIDWORKS World 2017 this week; Stratasys also launched another SOLIDWORKS 3D printing related product — a new GrabCAD Print SOLIDWORKS Add-in. The new Add-in has all the power of the GrabCAD Print stand-alone software allowing you to easily estimate cost and print parts, but with the added advantage of not having to leave SOLIDWORKS.

You can select materials, slice height, part orientation, and part layout. Then print on your Stratasys 3D printer; there is a growing number of GrabCAD Print-supported machines (Full Support: uPrint SE/SE Plus, Dimension 1200es / Dimension Elite, Fortus 250mc, the new F123 Series, and Limited Support: Fortus 380mc / Fortus 450mc, Fortus 900mc).

GrabCAD Print SOLIDWORKS Add-in

GrabCAD Print SOLIDWORKS Add-in

GrabCAD Print for SOLIDWORKS is the perfect add-in for engineers and designers who need to quickly build prototype parts. Your part design can be added to a representation of the 3D printer build tray using standard SOLIDWORKS commands.

The GrabCAD Print SOLIDWORKS Add-in is built on the same stable GrabCAD platform as the GrabCAD Print desktop, web, and mobile products.

How to obtain the GrabCAD Print SOLIDWORKS Add-in

GrabCAD Print is a Free SOLIDWORKS Add-in to access it you just download it from the GrabCAD websiteSOLIDWORKS versions 2014 through 2017 are supported (64-bit only).

NOTE: You must already have GrabCAD Print installed in order to use the SOLIDWORKS add-in. Read more about installing for the first time.

How to use the Add-in

After the GrabCAD Print SOLIDWORKS Add-in has been installed it should have been activated in SOLIDWORKS (if not go to Tools > Add-ins and check GrabCAD Print for SOLIDWORKS). You’ll find a GrabCAD Print CommandManager menu and a related Task Pane tab.

Step 1: Log in

Start by logging into your GrabCAD account by accessing the new GrabCAD tab in the SOLIDWORKS Task Pane, then enter your company account. This will allow the add-in to access your 3D Printer[s] and company network settings.

After entering your credentials and picking Sign up, your company account will be displayed in the Task Pane, select it and pick the Select account button

GrabCAD Print SOLIDWORKS Log In

GrabCAD Print SOLIDWORKS Log In

Step 2: Print Preparation

Open a Part*, and pick the Print Preparation tool found in the CommandManager:

Note that assemblies require the GrabCAD Print Desktop version

GrabCAD Print Preparation

GrabCAD Print Preparation

Step 3: Select Your Printer

Pick the Printer from the PropertyManager.

The available list will show the printers in your network with UPnP enabled, the remote printers connected through your company account (cloud icon), as well as offline printers (-x- icon).

The selected materials show what is currently in the printer, but you can change materials. The available slice heights are the same as in GrabCAD Print, as well as Insight and Catalyst.

GrabCAD Print

GrabCAD Printer Selection

Step 4: Set up your Print Tray

As soon as you open the print preparation tool, you can go straight into re-orienting the part. With a single click, you can pick a face to face, and then the automatic tray layout will put this in an optimized location for the selected printer.

You can also change the scale of the part and scale to fit the entire tray if required.

GrabCAD Print Tray Layout

GrabCAD Print Tray Layout

To adjust the smoothness and accuracy of the print go to the advanced tessellation controls, under the Options tab:

GrabCAD Print Tessellation Options

GrabCAD Print Tessellation Options

Step 5: Print, save, or view estimates

In the Actions group, you can choose between:

  • Estimate – shows time and material consumption estimations.
  • Print – sends the job to the currently selected printer.
  • Open in Desktop – Closes the add-in and opens the Print GrabCAD desktop application with your tray. This is how you get more advanced print prep, such as multiple parts per tray, slice preview, and printing to a Stratasys J750.
  • Save As … – Allows you to save a GrabCAD Print project file, or to STL of the current tray layout.

Hit “Go” to perform the selected action.

GrabCAD Action Button

GrabCAD Action Button

If you pick Estimate and select Go the cost of the print and consumption of material will be provided along with your tessellation settings and a thumbnail of the tray:

GrabCAD Print Estimation

GrabCAD Print Estimation

A few limitations for the SOLIDWORKS Add-in

All of the features listed below are available in the GrabCAD Print desktop application.

The SOLIDWORKS add-in:

  • Can not print directly from a .SLDASM file.
  • Can not print multiple bodies in a part assembled.
  • Can not prepare multiple trays at once.
  • Can not print with non-default infill and support styles.
  • Can not print to a Stratasys J750 printer.
  • Can not show a Slice Preview.
  • Can not let the user drag models freely around the tray.

Additionally, the SOLIDWORKS add-in can not be open at the same time as the GrabCAD Print desktop application.

Download our White Paper to learn more

Get our latest white paper to learn how software and the cloud are revolutionizing 3D printing’. The paper will tell you:

  1. What conditions exist right now that are driving the 3D printing revolution?
  2. Of these conditions, which can be considered trends? Where do we expect these trends to take us?
  3. Given where we’re headed, what innovations can you expect to drive the revolution even further as they mature?

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by Rod Mackay at February 09, 2017 08:32 PM

SolidSmack

MakerBot On Machine Reliability and Improving Performance

makerbot-3d-printer-reliability-dependebility-makercare-00

Our last post on MakerBot’s new print software spurred on some conversation, internally and via email. One consistent concern we get from MakerBot Replicator owners, and questions we ask as Replicator owners considering their new products, are, “Has Stratasys put effort into making MakerBot’s work more reliably and consistently?” and, “Do the new products work more reliably, with more transparent maintenance procedures?”

We wanted to get these questions in front of MakerBot, and they responded right away with comments from two of their top guys. They address what MakerBot is doing in the way of testing to ensure their 3D printers are producing high quality results, how they’ve re-engineered their machines and what they are doing to improve the design for servicability and getting started.

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Dave Veisz, VP of Engineering

For professionals and educators, machine reliability, and print success rate are paramount needs. Customers don’t want to spend time tinkering with their machines in order to get their desired print output. To this end, MakerBot has collaborated with Stratasys to develop a robust testing program to ensure reliable, high quality performance. The Replicator+ and Mini+ were fully re-engineered for increased performance and reliability. Both printers feature an improved gantry and Z-stage through stiffer materials and sturdier construction for consistent and predictable printing. Our new 3D printers racked up over 380,000 hours of subsystem and system reliability testing across 150+ units. This obsessive emphasis on testing and quality is ingrained in the company culture, and has paid off in positive feedback from the field.

Stratasys has been a key partner in machine and materials technology. They bring decades of innovation and some of the best minds in FDM. We have been able to leverage their expertise in product design and testing.

We’re proud of our newest lineup of printers and the level of quality and consistency we’ve achieved with them, but that doesn’t mean we’re slowing down. MakerBot’s software and firmware teams are constantly unlocking new efficiencies and quality improvements with newly released updates and features.

antonio-burton-makerbot-150

Antonio Burton, VP of Customer Support

The MakerBot Replicator 2 is a self-serviceable machine that requires consistent maintenance. We continue to offer support for the Replicator 2 with replacement parts available and an expert support team on phone and email to help our customers through any issues.

The MakerBot Replicator+ and Mini+ are built for especially long product lifetime without regular maintenance or repair. We know that this is especially important to designers, engineers, and educators, who don’t have time to self-service their printers. The Smart Extruder+, for example, is swappable, so the most critical part of the 3D printer can easily be replaced without any downtime. We also made it significantly easier to get started with these printers through the Guided Setup feature of the new MakerBot Mobile app, which guides users through the entire setup process step by step. Once you’re up and running, the new MakerBot Print software helps streamline the 3D printing experience for any workflow.

For those considering an upgrade, transparency and communication are critical values for us. We have an industry leading support team of in-house 3D printing experts, freely available for any question or concern. This team is based at our headquarters in Brooklyn, so they can easily access software, engineering, and other subject matter experts to help answer questions they’ve never heard before.

The Replicator+ and Mini+ are fully warrantied for 6 months and we offer the MakerCare extended protection plan for up to 3 years.

The post MakerBot On Machine Reliability and Improving Performance appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 09, 2017 06:39 PM

Makocam Returns with a New, Smaller 4K Camera

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A little over a year ago, Mokacam introduced a tiny 4K camera of the same name on Indiegogo where it was successfully crowd-funded several times over before it even got near the end date. With that much success, Mokacam is back for round two with a second, smaller version of the 4K camera, aptly named Alpha, and once again, they’ve already surpassed their target goal of $25K with over three weeks left to go.

Actually, Makocam is introducing two new cameras–the Alpha and the Alpha S. Both are nearly identical except for a few features (more on that in a bit). There have also been a number of upgrades since the first iteration of the camera was introduced a year ago, including a new tilt-screen and the ability to change the shutter speed via a rotating wheel, which can be adjusted from 1/2000” up to 32”.

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Let’s get to the specs for both to see what each offers regarding hardware starting with the Alpha S. The Alpha S features an Ambrella SoC outfitted with a Sony IMX 117 image sensor capable of rolling 4K video at 30fps and 1080p at 120fps. There’s a built-in 6-axis gyroscope, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, GPS and built-in 800mAh battery. However, there is an optional magnetic snap on 1100mAh battery that provides 4 hours of continuous filming (at 1080p/30fps).

The Alpha features nearly the same hardware, but replaces the Sony IMX 117 with a 16MP IMX 206 CMOS sensor rolling 4K at a slower 25fps and 1080p at 60fps. It’s also outfitted with the same suite of internal sensors as the Alpha S and the magnetic battery and can also be outfitted with the same LCD screen add-on.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84901" style="width: 620px;">A breakdown showing the Alpha’s internals, which is nearly identical between the two models.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">A breakdown showing the Alpha’s internals, which is nearly identical between the two models.</figcaption></figure>

As far as apps go, the Alpha’s can stream wirelessly to your mobile devices (iPhone/Android) via a Wi-Fi or Bluetooth connection, however, with Bluetooth, you can add trajectory and GEO-tagging information to your videos. The built-in gyroscope helps to eliminate shaky hand syndrome and there is a built-in tripod mount for increased stability if need be. For those who prefer seeing the action on the big screen, there is an HDMI port that lets you preview and playback your videos in all of their 4K glory.

makocam-alpha-4k-camera-02

Both versions of Makocam’s Alpha 4K cameras are available now on Indiegogo with starting pledges of $99 for the Alpha and $149 for the Alpha S. You can also get them bundled with the LCD view screen for $149 and $189 respectively. Those interested can also get an accessory pack for $59 that includes LCD display, magnetic battery, and remote. For more information on Makocam’s Alpha campaign head here.

makocam-alpha-4k-camera-02

The post Makocam Returns with a New, Smaller 4K Camera appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at February 09, 2017 04:18 PM

This is The New Flashforge ‘Hunter’ DLP 3D Printer

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Everyone’s getting into the resin 3D printer business. Now Flashforge, a long-time manufacturer of inexpensive and popular desktop 3D printers using plastic extrusion, has shown a resin-based unit they call the “Hunter”.

The Hunter follows the style of many comparable units, with a UV-protective translucent cover on the top, so you may observe the 3D printing process in progress.

We were told the Hunter includes a “self-made projector”, which differs from many resin-based 3D printers that employ standard, off-the-shelf video projectors. There are very few machines that have a purpose-built projector of their own design in them. The benefit of doing so is the ability to optimize the wavelengths to best fit the act of photo-curing the resin, whereas other projectors are optimized for watching videos.

It’s possible the company could use this capability to increase resolution somewhat by choosing different projection chips for the unit from OEM manufacturers, but I’m not sure they’ve done so on this machine.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84891" style="width: 1015px;">High quality 3D prints from the Flashforge Hunter 3D printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">High quality 3D prints from the Flashforge Hunter 3D printer</figcaption></figure>

Nevertheless, the quality of prints from this machine is exceptional.

The Hunter also includes linear motion systems and has a color touch screen.

I asked whether the machine would accept third party resin and was told that Flashforge would recommend their own materials for optimism results, but that it would be possible to use other resins. In fact, I got the impression they were testing a number of resins at this time.

The Hunter is said to have 62.5 micron (0.0625mm) resolution on the X-Y axis, meaning the pixel size illuminated by the projector are of that square size. The Z-axis resolution matters less on resin machines.

Can you get one? Nope, not yet. Apparently, the Hunter will become available in February and be priced at approximately USD$3,500, which just happens to be the exact same price as the Hunter’s most notable competitor, the Form 2 from Formlabs.

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The post This is The New Flashforge ‘Hunter’ DLP 3D Printer appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at February 09, 2017 03:28 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Free Trial now available through MySolidWorks

Interested in a SOLIDWORKS Free Trial? Now, for the first time, you can try SOLIDWORKS Online Premium Edition (with Model-Based Definition and Visualize Professional) anywhere, anytime, on any device through MySolidWorks (no download or installation required!).

Announced at SOLIDWORKS World 2017 in Los Angeles, CA., everyone now has the ability to obtain a free online trial of SOLIDWORKS 2017 software on the MySolidWorks platform. MySolidWorks allows you to try the software online, and includes 100s of free training videos for you to learn how to get started. Watch the video below to learn more:

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Getting the SOLIDWORKS Free Trial

STEP 1: First go to my.solidworks.com/try-solidworks and select the JOIN button to create a free SOLIDWORKS online account — and follow the steps in the browser to create a new online account. Alternatively if you already have a MySolidWorks account just pick the LOG IN button and log in as normal.

SOLIDWORKS Free Trial Access

SOLIDWORKS Free Trial Access

STEP 2: After creating a new account or logging in, you just need to launch the free trial, a language and server will be preselected for you based on your location, and all you have to do is select Launch.

SOLIDWORKS Free Trial Launch

SOLIDWORKS Free Trial Launch

STEP 3: SOLIDWORKS 2017 online edition will now launch in your browser and you just need to pick ACCEPT or OK on any messages and license agreement dialogs that appear. SOLIDWORKS 2017 will then be available to use:

SOLIDWORKS Online Edition

SOLIDWORKS Online Edition

Sample Files: You will find a variety of assembly, part, and drawing samples pre-loaded in your session. Inside SOLIDWORKS: File > Open… browse to <This PC\Documents\SOLIDWORKS Product Trial\>. Or, just hit the ‘R’ key.

Your Files: To save and access your design data, you should connect to an online storage account (Box, Google Drive, Dropbox) using the respective icons in the lower right. Any files you save locally will be erased when your session ends or times out.

Accessing other SOLIDWORKS applications

Pick on the Gear icon for the Apps Menu in the bottom left-hand corner of the screen, this is where you can access the different SOLIDWORKS applications like eDrawings or SOLIDWORKS Visualize, and you can also switch between applications, and quit the online session. This is very similar to the Start menu on Windows OS.

SOLIDWORKS Free Trial Apps

SOLIDWORKS Free Trial Apps

Accessing sample files

To test SOLIDWORKS 2017 you can try the exercises in the What’s New document, and you also have access to the what’s new files online.

  • DOCUMENT: Access the What’s New document by selecting Help > What’s New > HTML, or PDF, or What’s New Examples
  • FILES: To access the What’s New files go to File > Open and navigate to C:\Users\Public\Public
    Documents\SOLIDWORKS\SOLIDWORKS 2017\whatsnew\chapter name\filename.

TIP: Just hit the ‘R‘ key and the most recent sample files will be listed allowing you to quickly open a SOLIDWORKS file and edit it.

SOLIDWORKS Free Trial Help

SOLIDWORKS Free Trial Help

Accessing 100s of Training Videos

When you access the training catalog on MySolidWorks (by visiting My.SolidWorks.com > Training > Catalog) you’ll find a list of the latest lessons and a group of filters in the left-hand column. Using the filters you can quickly find the lessons you need and get your questions answered.

To filter the free lessons, in the left-hand column under Lesson Type pick Lessons and under Access Level pick Guest:

SOLIDWORKS Free Trial Lessons

SOLIDWORKS Free Trial Lessons

Want to buy SOLIDWORKS?

You can download our SOLIDWORKS Canada price list or contact us about a SOLIDWORKS Essentials training course.

The post SOLIDWORKS Free Trial now available through MySolidWorks appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at February 09, 2017 03:27 PM

Stop the SOLIDWORKS PDM Login Prompt when creating a new email in Outlook 2016

Are you receiving a SOLIDWORKS PDM login prompt when you create a new email in Microsoft Outlook 2016? Read on to learn how to disable the Outlook SOLIDWORKS PDM Login.

Outlook SOLIDWORKS PDM Login

Login Prompt when creating a new email in Outlook 2016

The Outlook SOLIDWORKS PDM Login is caused by the new Attach File feature in Outlook 2016, which provides a list of recent items;

Outlook Recent Items

Outlook Recent Items

You can cancel the login prompt and proceed to create your email.  However, if you do not want this prompt to appear anymore you will need to disable the recent items feature within Outlook via the registry;

Please note that caution should be taken when editing the registry, as changing or deleting the wrong key, can affect other programs, or the operating system. If you not are familiar with Windows Registry, please have someone who is, do this for you.

  1. Activate the Registry Editor (search for Regedit in the Windows Start menu)
  2. Browse to the key HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Office\16.0\Outlook\Options\Mail
    • Note: If the sub key ‘Mail’ doesn’t exist, you can create it.

  1. Within the Mail key, create a new DWORD (32-bit) value

  1. Name it MaxAttachmentMenuItems and set the value to 0

  1. After you restart Outlook the list of recent items should be disabled and you’ll no longer be prompted to login to the vault when forwarding that chain letter

The post Stop the SOLIDWORKS PDM Login Prompt when creating a new email in Outlook 2016 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Williams at February 09, 2017 01:00 PM

February 08, 2017

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Day Three Recap: The Future

Day three at SOLIDWORKS World focuses on the future. It’s about upcoming features in SOLIDWORKS, but also what’s possible for future of humanity. Before diving into day three, let’s quickly recap day two:

Kishore Boyalakuntla, SOLIDWORKS Senior Director, Product Portfolio Management and Brand User Experience Leader took the stage to discuss updates to the SOLIDWORKS product line.

First up is an update to SOLIDWORKS Make, which enables users to offer personalized products online in millions of variations, anywhere around the world. Here’s how ClearVision uses SOLIDWORKS Make to enable its customers to customize their own eyewear.

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Kishore then went on to discuss four ecosystems driving SOLIDWORKS: design to manufacturing, data management, simulation and IoT.

Design to Manufacturing

With releases of MBD, Inspection, Costing, Plastics Injection Simulation, DFM, and Composer, this ecosystem has exploded over the last several years. SOLIDWORKS CAM is the latest addition, ready to bring Smart Manufacturing to your workflow. Let’s see how Ring Brothers, custom car builders, use SOLIDWORKS in their projects.

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Data Management

The SOLIDWORKS data management ecosystem products have broad multi-discipline appeal within organizations because of their ease of use and familiar Windows explorer interface, which provide fast access to relevant data not achievable with generic network shares. New for SOLIDWORKS 2018 is SOLIDWORKS Manage, which adds new capabilities including:

  • Project timelines and resources
  • Complex business processes
  • Advanced Item Management
  • Dashboard and reports for critical data

Here’s how SOLIDWORKS PDM user Carter Retail uses the ecosystem to manage its projects.

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Simulation

Simulation is the next ecosystem; now adding Simulation Engineer, a validation tool for solving complex structural analysis problems, such as large deformations, component contact and complex materials. Simulation Engineer is part of the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform and leverages ABAQUS technology from SIMULIA. The product can be access in one click from SOLIDWORKS. Here’s how SSA Analysis uses the Simulation Ecosystem to validate challenging engineering problems.

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Internet of Things

The fourth ecosystem is the Internet of Things (IoT). Here, Kishore called upon Jon Friedman, SOLIDWORKS user and President/Co-Founder of Freight Farms, to discuss how his company is using the SOLIDWORKS IoT ecosystem to plant sustainable farms inside of shipping containers. During his talk, Jon compared Freight Farms to SOLIDWORKS. Essentially Freight Farms wants to be a platform to empower growers as SOLIDWORKS is a platform for designers and engineers.

Freight Farms’ Leafy Green Machine is a 40-ft shipping container that uses a hydroponic system to grow produce. The system is connected to regulate the atmosphere so the food grows the same in Indiana as it would in India. The yield for the Leafy Green Machine is the equivalent of 1,000 heads of lettuce per week with only 20 hours of labor required for optimal growth!

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Technology and companies like Freight Farms are especially important to Duane Elgin. He’s a sustainability evangelist and futurist who understands that human ingenuity is needed to address population increases and climate change. Duane joined Jon onstage and discussed how Freight Farms can address these problems by providing sustainable food to the masses and shielding growth against an unpredictable environment. The message from Duane is that humanity needs to cope with what we’ve created. Freight Farms is one way to solve problems in a time of transition.

It’s fitting that Model Mania, the “Big Game” of modeling began just days after one of the best “Big Games” in the last 51 years. Model Mania has taken place for the last 18 years and looks to find the fastest and most accurate modelers in the SOLIDWORKS Community. Congratulations to this year’s winners!

Today the SWW17 crowd had the pleasure of hearing a talk from Anousheh Ansari. In addition to being co-founder and chairwoman of Prodeo Systems, and the Ansari X Prize, Anousheh is the first female private space explorer. Born in Iran, Anousheh always dreamt of the stars. She credits her interest in science and engineering to being highly influenced by science fiction from the works of Jules Verne to Gene Roddenberry.

Anousheh spoke of a personalized, augmented, and engineered future on earth and in space. She expressed the importance of imagination in making this future possible. It’s not a shock to hear her say this when wonder and imagination, from things like day dreaming about joining the Star Fleet, sparked so many ideas that contributed to her spending eight days on the International Space Station. To drive the point home, she quoted Einstein, “Imagination is more important than knowledge.” Anything is possible if we first have the strength to imagine it and the will to make it pass. She closed the talk with a poem of inspiration from Karen Raven:

Only as high as I reach can I grow

Only as far as I seek can I go

Only as deep as I look can I see

Only as much as I dream can I be!

As is tradition, SOLIDWORKS World ended with a look at what’s being developed for future versions of SOLIDWORKS. The Product Introduction team always produces an amazing and entertaining skit, presenting demos of these features and this year’s talent show spoof “SOLIDWORKS Next Top Modeler” was no exception. The contest pitted four aspiring designers in a competition on who can best showcase features and updates like Generative Design and 3D Interconnect. For a full run down of the proceedings, and to see the technology preview, read this post from Director of Product Introduction Kurt Anliker.

Finally, CEO Gian Paolo Bassi took the stage to thank the 5,000+ users in attendance and even more watching the live webcast for participating in this year’s event. Gian Paolo stressed that his favorite experience at SOLIDWORKS World is sharing personal stories. A “family reunion” is a common term many users state when describing SOLIDWORKS World. It may sound cliché if you’ve never been, but for those users who attend SOLIDWORKS World every year, it’s a statement as true as tomorrow’s sunrise. While the sun may have set on #SWW17, we’re not done with Los Angeles. We’re coming back to LA-LA Land for SOLIDWORKS World 2018, February 4-7, 2018 – and we’re actually hoping to bring more sun with us the next time around! Thanks for all those who attended and worked hard to make SOLIDWORKS World 2017 a great success. See you at the next reunion!

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Day Three Recap: The Future appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 08, 2017 11:48 PM

New SOLIDWORKS Ecosystems Help Accelerate Innovation, Improve Bottom Lines

At SOLIDWORKS, not only do we focus on creating great products, but we invest significant time understanding and nurturing engineering and product ecosystems. SOLIDWORKS ecosystems take the complex interactions between several disciplines such as design (MCAD and ECAD), manufacturing, service, quality, supply chain, marketing, inventory, and end customers into account to deliver best-in-class and easy-to-use process solutions impacting business outcomes for our end customers.

We build ecosystems to improve business outcomes like accelerated innovation, expansion into new markets as well as multiple product lines, digital sales, and profitability, just to name a few. With SOLIDWORKS 2018, we are addressing four ecosystems that customers can leverage right away: Design to Manufacturing, Data Management, Simulation and IoT. This blog post will discuss the products in each ecosystem and how they were created to form a whole that will build your bottom line and accelerate innovation.

Design-to-Manufacturing Ecosystem:

At SOLIDWORKS we started with building the design-to-manufacturing ecosystem with the launch of Model-Based Definition (MBD) and SOLIDWORKS Costing. MBD is transformational in reducing manufacturing errors, accelerating design to manufacturing, and reducing communication gaps. It is the digital thread in a company that connects manufacturing to design where both stakeholders can help make designs better. Many large companies are implementing MBD to bring design and manufacturing closer than ever before. SOLIDWORKS Costing brings manufacturing thinking upfront into the design cycle. SOLIDWORKS Inspection helps connect inspection data on manufactured parts to design by automating the process.

With SOLIDWORKS 2018, we are launching SOLIDWORKS CAM as a product and in a process called ‘SOLIDWORKS SMART Manufacturing.’ Packaging and pricing will be disclosed during the SOLIDWORKS 2018 launch. SOLIDWORKS CAM is disruptive for two reasons: it will feature both tolerance-based machining and Intelligent Knowledge Base. Tolerance-based machining reads the information from SOLIDWORKS MBD and intelligently figures out the machining operations necessary to manufacture the part. This goes above the base level (step 0) of feature-based machining. Intelligent Knowledge Base learns your manufacturing behavior and intelligently adapts future manufacturing jobs to your preferences.

Data Management Ecosystem

More than 200,000 SOLIDWORKS users use SOLIDWORKS PDM to manage their data. This number of loyal SOLIDWORKS PDM users is a testament to the product’s intuitiveness, ability to manage without overhead, CAD integration, ease of implementation and effectiveness at providing a return on your investment. With SOLIDWORKS 2017, users of SOLIDWORKS Professional and Premium have PDM Standard for file management. Moving from the included PDM Standard to PDM Professional is a simple switch – there is no need for new implementation or arduous processes.

SOLIDWORKS PDM manages all products in the SOLIDWORKS portfolio including SOLIDWORKS Electrical (PCB is in the works). This is one of the key components of ecosystem thinking – SOLIDWORKS PDM managing all parts of our customers’ processes.

With SOLIDWORKS 2018, we are introducing SOLIDWORKS Manage. This product enables you to conduct Project and Process Management, Item Management and create dashboards and reports. For customers who cannot implement PLM systems, SOLIDWORKS Manage and Distributed Data Management is a game changer. More details on pricing, packaging of the product and the process will be unveiled at the SOLIDWORKS 2018 launch.

Simulation Ecosystem:

I remember in 2001 when we launched SOLIDWORKS Simulation, in some corners of the industry the feedback was, “If a designer who is not a FEA expert does simulation, they will create Frankensteins.” Obviously, that did not turn out to be the case. Most designs have a factor of safety and are small deformations. Also many designers have innate knowledge of their product and the proverbial ‘grease up their elbows,’ so they can easily interpret simulation results. SOLIDWORKS Simulation solutions cover a wide range from Structural Simulation, Fluid Flow Simulation and Plastic Injection molding simulation that are easy to use and can solve complex problems.

Also upcoming in SOLIDWORKS 2018 is Simulation Engineer from SIMULIA and a process called ‘Designer to Analyst Simulation.’ SIMULIA is a sister brand of SOLIDWORKS inside Dassault Systemes and has very high-end simulation products for Analysts and Researchers. Simulation Engineer is based on Abaqus technologies, which delivers best-in-class nonlinear solvers. Our customers now can scale from SOLIDWORKS Simulation to Simulation Engineer with one click.

IOT Ecosystem:

SOLIDWORKS has best-in-class MCAD products and we moved into ECAD as customers were telling us that many of their products in the future will be connected and managed through the IOT infrastructure. We launched SOLIDWORKS Electrical with thousands of customers using the product. Last year we launched SOLIDWORKS PCB, for Printed Circuit Board design. We’ve also partnered with Xively for the runtime management of IOT design.

SOLIDWORKS customers can design MCAD and ECAD with the disruptive innovations delivered with SOLIDWORKS and deliver runtime management of their devices with Xively. Several customers like Freight Farms are very successful in implementing this approach.

With SOLIDWORKS ecosystems of ‘Design to Manufacturing,’ ‘Data Management,’ ‘Designer to Analyst Simulation’ and ‘IOT,’ customers can innovate and scale with industry-leading products and processes. Please let us know if you want more information your reseller partner and SOLIDWORKS team is ready to assist you in your journey.

Author information

Kishore Boyalakuntla
Kishore Boyalakuntla
Kishore is the SOLIDWORKS Brand UX leader and and the Product Portfolio Management Senior Director.

The post New SOLIDWORKS Ecosystems Help Accelerate Innovation, Improve Bottom Lines appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Kishore Boyalakuntla at February 08, 2017 06:42 PM

SOLIDWORKS Next Top Modeler Previews SOLIDWORKS 2018

For the final act of SOLIDWORKS World 2017 General Session, the Product Introduction Team delivered the highly anticipated Technology Preview to show off some of the new functionality our developers are working hard to deliver in the SOLIDWORKS 2018 release. The long-standing Day 3 tradition of producing “infotainment” for our user community took a few new turns this year…here’s a quick recap…

For the 2017 version we took the skit down the path of why everyone ultimately comes to Los Angeles: to be discovered with fame and fortune to follow! With this in mind we turned the skit into a contest with each contestant delivering their most compelling performance with SOLIDWORKS. Our skit began back in December 2016 with tryouts and while there were many outstanding performances, there were only four spots in the finals. Rumor has it the contest was fixed and the finalists were chosen in advance, but this is simply untrue.

 

Lord Percy Buckingham-Smythe, our first finalist, delivered an outstanding performance showing off sketching enhancements every user will enjoy.

 

Mirror 3D Sketch Entities – When in a 3D Sketch you can now Mirror Sketch Entities

 

Sketch Planes as Symmetry Reference – 2D and 3D sketch entities can now be mirrored using a plane as the symmetry reference

 

Pen Sketching – Draw contours by freehand sketching using a pen or stylus on Windows 10 touch screen devices.

 

Our second finalist, Chesney Gallagher, showed off many new enhancements to SOLIDWORKS Assemblies that will make users much more productive… in his true Manchester style.

 

New SW Home Screen

 

Assembly Progress Bar

 

Assembly Visualization of SOLIDWORKS performance information

 

Enhanced Assembly Performance dialogue

 

Support for 12 mouse gestures

 

Use ALT key to hide surfaces during mate

 

William Roberts (aka Billy Bob), had no problem with the big stage delivering a resonating performance on 3D Interconnect enhancements that make it even easier to use non-native and neutral data formats in SOLIDWORKS.

 

3D Interconnect now supports STEP, IGES, ACIS, JT.

 

3D Interconnect supports updating neutral files.

 

3D Interconnect now preserves curves and sketches.

 

3D Interconnect now reads custom properties.

 

Finally, Tad Slater introduced Fabrication Delighters, Tab and Slot self fixturing design and SOLIDWORKS PDM enhancements.

 

New Tab and Slot feature works in parts, multi-body parts and assemblies.

 

SOLIDWORKS PDM bi-directional communication with drawing revision table

 

We added a few wrinkles into the 2017 skit, adding a user into a character role and having live audience and live stream attendee participation. Once the votes were counted, we narrowed the field down to our two finalist.

Our first finalist, Lord Percy, delivered a highly compelling presentation of all the new capabilities in SOLIDWORKS to handle large assembly design.

Can now set multiple objects to resolved in Large Design Review

 

Ability to turn off graphics (scenery) data

 

Revert all data back to graphics to increase performance.

 

Ability to insert and mate graphics components

 

Our second finalist, Billy Bob, took the stage and amazed the audience presenting Generative Design for SOLIDWORKS.

Part of the SIMULATION Product Family

 

Multiple Objective support

 

Manufacturing Controls

 

Complete SOLIDWORKS Integration with SIMULATION View

 

As the voting came to completion live on stage, it was a tie between Lord Percy (Large Assembly Performance) and Billy Bob (Generative Design). Shortly after, final results showed Lord Percy became the SOLIDWORKS Next Top Modeler with 52 percent of the vote.

As a reminder, everything shown at SOLIDWORKS WORLD and in this blog is a TECHNOLOGY PREVIEW and new functionality is always changing until fully vetted and not guaranteed to be in the next release.

Author information

Kurt Anliker
Kurt Anliker
Kurt is the Director of Product Introduction at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post SOLIDWORKS Next Top Modeler Previews SOLIDWORKS 2018 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Kurt Anliker at February 08, 2017 06:40 PM

SolidSmack

Autodesk CEO Carl Bass Steps Down, Spending More Time With His Robots

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This is right out of the blue. As of today, Carl Bass is no longer CEO of Autodesk. His 10-year stint as the San Fransisco-based company’s leader ends after transitioning the company to the cloud and subscription based product offerings, launching an open hardware platform, overseeing 30+ acquisitions and building Pier 9 workshop to help drive and nurture the passion behind it all.

Back in 2006 when Carl took over as CEO of Autodesk, he was named by then-CEO Carol Bartz as her replacement. Carl’s departure sees no new CEO named. Only that day-to-day operations will be overseen by Amar Hanspal, Senior Vice President and Chief Product Officer, and Andrew Anagnost, Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer, as interim Co-chief Executive Officers. This may seem odd, but was a decision reached by the Autodesk board of directors, on which Carl will still be serving with a nomination for re-election to the board at the 2017 annual meeting of shareholders.

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A letter to employees was published on Autodesk’s In the Fold blog, where Carl thanked everyone from Mrs. Bartz and shareholders to partners, customers and employees. He left everyone with the few words you may have heard him mention over the years, words he used to describe Autodesk and, I think if you look deeper, his own role in what they achieved.

“When I first became CEO, people asked how I wanted to define Autodesk and I often answered somewhat cryptically, ‘great, good and important.’ In my mind, great companies are defined, first and foremost, by their financial performance. Good companies are defined by their values and culture and how they treat their employees, their customers and the communities in which they do business. And important companies make a real difference in the world.”

He left a lot to the imagination with no detail of his plans from this day on, except to imply he’ll be spending plenty of time at his workshop in Berkeley, California. I don’t quite blame him.

“I am not leaving to spend more time with my family—that presumes my family wants to spend more time with me. I will, however, be spending more time in my shop with my robots. I also have some other plans and will have more to say on what I’m doing in the next few months.”

I asked Carl what he’s working on first. He says, “The first thing I’m working on is using machine learning to figure out how to drive my son’s go kart autonomously. It’s a very cool project in which we’re training it with data coming out of a video game we built. Also, been finishing up the renovation of my metal shop and building lots of stuff for the shop including this very cool folded metal staircase (fusion sheet metal showed up just in time).”

Al, Rita, looks like we’ll have to find another CEO for 2AM drinks in Vegas.

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Lead Photo Credit: James Martin, CBS

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by Josh Mings at February 08, 2017 05:51 PM

Behind the Design: How an End Grain Butcher Block Cutting Board is Made

larch-wood-butcher-block-cutting-board-design-00

I was always under the impression that I could get away with using an $4 bargain bin cutting board. I own two–a plastic one and another that looks like something similar to wood. They work for a while, but eventually look like they’ve been dragged behind my car–cut, warped, stained and burned.

But those end grain, butcher block cutting boards. Mmmmm-hmmm. I could never bring myself to pay the price for what seemed an overpriced slab of sticks, hewn, designed and manufactured like any other, but after watching how Nova Scotia, Canada-based Larch Wood crafts their own, my mind is completely change.

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Making a butcher block, end grain cutting board begins by machine-sawing Larch logs (aka Tamarac, aka Juniper) into a perfectly square piece of lumber, which is then further sawn into several boards. To maintain the integrity of the wood (prevent splitting, rotting, etc.), 20 pallets at a time are dried in a kiln for 16 to 20 days, then stacked and weighted to prevent warping.

The dried wood is then cut into several lengths for different sized cutting boards, which will then be ripped and planed into thin ‘sticks’ of wood about 1 ½ X 2 ½ inches. Those planks are feed through a molder, which whittles the planks down further to the exact size needed for the cutting board. All planks are inspected for defects and scrutinized for the end grain patterns.

larch-wood-end-grain-cutting-board-02

Once the desired pattern arrangement is laid out, each piece is glued together and placed onto a massive rotating machine clamp, squeezed together and set to dry before moving to being planed and cross-cut, sequenced, glued and clamped a second time, completing the final layup of the board and the first look at its one-of-a-kind appearance. The boards undergo a rigorous series of sanding, beginning with a rough-grit drum sander to remove excess glue and bring it down to final thickness. The sanding operations get finer and finer with a router operation in between to round the edges.

larch-wood-end-grain-cutting-board-03

Once completely smooth the board is seasoned with a combination of beeswax and mineral spirits, set to dry and buffed to bring out the luster of the grain. The end-result is a simply beautiful, completely unique cutting board made to last a lifetime. Certainly more so than that $4 slab of plastic.

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Larch Wood also manufactures end-grain countertops and custom flooring. You can see more of their products on their website and purchase the butcher block cutting boards here.

larch-wood-end-grain-cutting-board-05

The post Behind the Design: How an End Grain Butcher Block Cutting Board is Made appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at February 08, 2017 03:35 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

A preview of SOLIDWORKS 2018, learn what’s new in the next release

During day 3 of SOLIDWORKS World 2017 the SOLIDWORKS product introduction team previewed some of the great enhancements and new features coming in SOLIDWORKS 2018 later this year. The preview included Sketching, Assemblies, 3D Interconnect, Fabrication, PDM, and Generative design.

Check out some screenshots below along with a brief description of the new feature or enhancement:

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Sketching enhancements

The SOLIDWORKS team showed off some great new sketching enhancements, the ability to create profiles with a stylus was the best one:

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Mirror 3D Sketch Entities

Mirror 3D Sketch Entities – When in a 3D Sketch you can now Mirror Sketch Entities

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Sketch Planes as Symmetry Reference

Sketch Planes as Symmetry Reference – 2D and 3D sketch entities can now be mirrored using a plane as the symmetry reference

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Pen Sketching

Pen Sketching – Draw contours by freehand sketching using a pen or stylus on Windows 10 touch screen devices.

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Assembly enhancements

SOLIDWORKS 2018 will allow you to be much more productive with assemblies with the following enhancements:

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Hide Surface when Mating

Use ALT key to hide surfaces during mate

SOLIDWORKS 2018 12 Mouse Gestures now available

12 Mouse Gestures now available

SOLIDWORKS 2018 New Assembly Performance dialog

New Assembly Performance dialog

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Assembly Visualization

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Assembly Visualization

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Assembly Progress Bar

New Assembly Progress Bar

New SOLIDWORKS Home Screen

New SOLIDWORKS Home Screen

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Ability to insert and mate graphics components

Large Assembly – Ability to insert and mate graphics components

Revert all data back to graphics to increase performance.

Large Assembly – Revert all data back to graphics to increase performance.

Ability to turn off graphics (scenery) data

Large Assembly – Ability to turn off graphics (scenery) data

Can now set multiple objects to resolved in Large Design Review

Large Assembly – Can now set multiple objects to resolved in Large Design Review

SOLIDWORKS 2018 3D Interconnect enhancements

3D Interconnect enhancements that make it even easier to use non-native and neutral data formats:

SOLIDWORKS 2018 3D Interconnect Custom Properties

3D Interconnect Custom Properties

3D Interconnect now preserves curves and sketches.

3D Interconnect now preserves curves and sketches.

3D Interconnect supports updating neutral files.

3D Interconnect supports updating neutral files.

3D Interconnect now supports STEP, IGES, ACIS, JT.

3D Interconnect now supports STEP, IGES, ACIS, JT.

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Fabrication enhancements

Tab and Slot self fixturing design and SOLIDWORKS PDM enhancements:

New Tab and Slot feature works in parts, multi-body parts and assemblies.

New Tab and Slot feature works in parts, multi-body parts and assemblies.

SOLIDWORKS PDM bi-directional communication with drawing revision table

SOLIDWORKS PDM bi-directional communication with drawing revision table

Generative Design for SOLIDWORKS

A new feature to make it easier to create parts and integrate simulation:

Complete SOLIDWORKS Integration with SIMULATION View

Complete SOLIDWORKS Integration with SIMULATION View

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Manufacturing Controls

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Manufacturing Controls

Multiple Objective support

Multiple Objective support

Part of the SIMULATION Product Family

About SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service

As a SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service customer you will receive the latest SOLIDWORKS release when it is launched. Learn more about the benefits of SOLIDWORKS Subscription »

The post A preview of SOLIDWORKS 2018, learn what’s new in the next release appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at February 08, 2017 02:01 PM

How to repair a Corrupt SOLIDWORKS Electrical Drawing file

If an electrical schematic drawing ever becomes corrupt you may see the SOLIDWORKS Electrical Unknown File Format error messages shown below when attempting to open the drawing file.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Unknown File Format Error

Unknown file format Error

Cannot Rebuild Error

These error messages are an indication that there has been some form of file corruption within the specified drawing file.  Luckily we have a few options we can go through to attempt to repair a corrupt drawing.

Rebuild the Drawing

The first and most simple resolution is to right-click on the specific drawing sheet and select “Rebuild”.  If the “Rebuild” fails, you can also try a “Delete and Rebuild”.

Rebuild Drawing

Note that when a ‘Delete and Rebuild’ is performed any graphical items such as text, lines, and blocks will be lost.

Delete and Rebuild Manually

If a rebuild did not resolve the SOLIDWORKS Electrical Unknown File Format issue when opening the file again, then you can try to delete and rebuild manually by:

  1. Locating the .ewg file that the specific drawing is associated with.
  2. Right-click the drawing and select “Properties” to find the File Name.
  3. Once the file name is known, you can manually delete this file from the Application data folder (default C:\ProgramData\SOLIDWORKS Electrical\Projects\###\Drawings)
  4. Then rebuild the drawing by again right-clicking on the drawing and selecting ‘Rebuild”.

If none of the following techniques have resolved the issue, then contact your local Value Added Reseller for further support.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Electrical training course either in a Canadian classroom near you or live online. For more information about electrical software and training solutions call 1-877-219-6757.

The post How to repair a Corrupt SOLIDWORKS Electrical Drawing file appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Flett at February 08, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Asus Launches the 4K-Capable Tinker Board to Take on Raspberry Pi

feature

feature

From media streaming centers to touch screen ‘magic’ mirrors, there are seemingly few things that the Raspberry Pi cannot do when put in capable hands. But in the case that you find yourself needing more power for all your DIY hacking sessions, look no further than….Asus?

Yes – the same Taiwanese makers of the ZenBook, the ZenPad, and the ZenFone have taken the rocky bush plane into hobbyist territory with the release of the Tinker Board; a direct albeit more powerful competitor to the latest top-of-the-line Raspberry Pi.

Featuring a quad-core 1.8GHz ARM Cortex-A17 CPU, 2GB LPDDR3 RAM, four USB 2.0 ports, support for gigabit LAN and Bluetooth 4.0, a 3.5mm audio jack, microSD slot, microUSB for power, swappable 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi antennas, and a HDMI 2.0 port with support for 4K video, the $68 Tinker Board is just about ready for anything you could throw at it – including a 4K streaming media center for all those HD episodes of Gilmore Girls you’ve been dying to check off your watchlist.

In comparison, the latest Raspberry Pi 3 Model B runs a 1.2GHz ARM Cortex-A53, 1GB RAM, and HDMI 1.3. With this in mind, it’s clear that Asus has their targets set on hobbyists looking to set up their own smart home streaming media centers…or at least know that they have the capability to create one without making sacrifices.

To each their own! Stay updated on Tinker Board availability over at CPC UK.

The post Asus Launches the 4K-Capable Tinker Board to Take on Raspberry Pi appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 08, 2017 12:47 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS support Monthly News – February 2017

Hello to all,

Welcome to this new edition of the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News, coauthored by members of the SOLIDWORKS Technical Support teams worldwide.

Live from SOLIDWORKS World 2017 in Los Angeles

At the time I am writing this, the conference is still rocking in Los Angeles, California. We are 6000 passionate participants eager to learn, network, and have fun.

As usual, the SOLIDWORKS Technical Support team make their presence felt: we share knowledge, best practices, tips, and tricks with users during numerous breakout sessions. These are where we tickle your brain, challenge you and present new ways to solve problems and make the best possible use of SOLIDWORKS. In the picture below, I am just starting my breakout session.

As usual, we also maintain a continuous presence at the Technical Support booth in the DASSAULT SYSTEMES section of the Partner Pavilion, with specialists in each and every area (CAD, Simulation, PDM, Electrical, etc.) to engage with customers who stop by to ask a question or just to say hello..

Although SOLIDWORKS World is not really the place to actually solve technical issues (that is what some of our teammates stayed in the office for), we do everything we can to answer questions on the fly.

Critical Hotfix for DraftSight

It has come to the attention of the DraftSight team that, due to an expired certificate, Windows* 32 & 64-bit versions of DraftSight released from 2012 to 2017 will not launch and/or will stop running as of March 1, 2017.
To avoid usage interruption, please make sure to immediately download and install this critical hotfix, which can be found on the main product download page (https://www.3ds.com/products-services/draftsight-cad-software/free-download)

The affected releases are as follows:

Version (Windows 32 & 64 bit) Release Date
DraftSight 2017 SP0 November 2016
DraftSight 2016 SP2 July 2016
DraftSight 2016 SP1 April 2016
DraftSight 2016 SP0 February 2016
DraftSight 2015 SP3 June 2015
DraftSight 2015 SP2 April 2015
DraftSight 2015 SP1 February 2015
DraftSight 2015 SP0 October 2014
DraftSight V1R5.2 July 2014
DraftSight V1R5.1 April 2014
DraftSight V1R5.0 January 2014
DraftSight V1R4.0 October 2013
DraftSight V1R3.2 July 2013
DraftSight V1R3.1 January 2013
DraftSight V1R3.0 November 2012

*Note: Mac and Linux versions of DraftSight (Free and Beta only) do not require this hotfix as they are not affected by the expired certificate.

For questions or concerns, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller (VAR) for assistance.

Save your Design time, Use Excel Automation

By Joydeep P ROY

The productivity challenges while designing are always critical. At SOLIDWORKS, it is our constant effort to help Designers reduce their Developmental costs and increase their quality.

Therefore, Excel Automation was introduced in SP3 release of 2016 SOLIDWORKS Electrical Schematic.  This new functionality works very well and summary of the steps are listed below. The high level description would be that this command is used to generate drawings automatically, inserting macros in the schemes in an unattended way, reading the instructions from an Excel file.

The basic steps for this process are

  1. Create the macros you would like to use.
  2. Create the XLS file (instructions) from the file template.
  3. Import the XLS file using the XLS Automation feature to generate the drawings.

Only the following types of macros are compatible with XLS Automation:

  • Scheme macro
  • Line diagram macro
  • Mixed scheme macro

Note that the Excel file can be from version 97/2003 (.xls) or up to 2013 format (.xlsx…).

Here is a video of how to use this function. It is based on the Online Help, which consists of a demo Excel Automation files and steps.

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Simulation Step-Up Series

Last month, Ramesh discussed the topic of Contact modeling, with the first part of this topic. This month, Ramesh comes back with the second part.

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Next month, Ramesh will conclude on Contact Modeling with the second part.

Noteworthy Solutions from the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base

icon - SW When I use the SOLIDWORKS® 2017 software on a workstation that has a slow network connection to the SolidNetWork License (SNL) server, what causes the error ‘Could not obtain a license for SOLIDWORKS’?
This error occurs when the network connection from a workstation to the SolidNetWork License (SNL) server has a response time that is higher than 100 milliseconds (ms).  If a client computer connects to the SNL server over a WAN on a higher latency connection, it is likely that the license check out will fail with errors.
See Solution Id: S-072437

icon - SW General Hotfix for SOLIDWORKS® 2017 SP1 (SPR#995617 and SPR#996709)
A hotfix is available for SOLIDWORKS® 2017 SP1 that addresses the following issues:
– SPR#995617: Crash after selecting “Make Independent” option after suppressing two components in a virtual subassembly.
– SPR#996709: Crash while doing Replace Model in a drawing view.
The hotfix is included in the attachment of Solution Id: S-072577.

Icon - EPDM When using the SOLIDWORKS® PDM 2017 software on a high latency WAN client computer, what causes login to fail with the errors ‘Failed to obtain license’ and ‘License server is down or not responding’?
When a SOLIDWORKS® PDM 2017 client computer communicates with the SolidNetWork License Server (SNL), the default timeout to obtain a license is set to 100ms.  If a client computer connects to the SNL server over a WAN on a higher latency connection, it is likely that the license check out will fail with errors.
For more information, read Solution Id: S-072431.

Icon - EPDM General Hotfix for SOLIDWORKS® PDM 2017 SP1 (SPR#988611 )
A hotfix is available for SOLIDWORKS® PDM 2017 SP1 that addresses the following issue:
SPR#988611 ‘SOLIDWORKS PDM – Cards: When using a combo box drop list that is linked to a data card list the default value from the list does not get stored.’
Problem:
When using a combo box drop-list that is links to a data card list, the default value that that combo box control specifies does not get written to the variable when adding new files to the vault.
The hotfix for this issue is included in the attachment. To install the hotfix, follow these steps:
1.    Back up the file vault database.
2.    From a SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 SP1 client computer, double-click the file ‘SWPDM_2017SP1_SPR988611_HotFix.dbu’.
3.    Follow the steps in the wizard to update the SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 file vault database.
You only need to install the hotfix once per file vault.
For more information, read Solution Id: S-072533.

icon - Simulation In the SOLIDWORKS® Simulation software, how do I troubleshoot issues with the ‘Intel Network Sparse’ solver ‘Offloaded Simulation’ functionality?
When using the ‘Intel Network Sparse’ solver ‘Offloaded Simulation’ functionality, you may experience problems either listing computers, or running offloaded studies.
See Solution Id: S-072063.

– – – = = = o o O o o = = = – – –

That’s it for this month. Thanks for reading this edition of SOLIDWORKS Support News. If you need additional help with these issues or any others, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller (VAR) for assistance.

Also, comments and suggestions are welcome. You can enter them below.

 

Author information

Julien Boissat
Sr. Technical Customer Support Engineer, SolidWorks, EMEA at DS SolidWorks Corp.
I have been a Tech Support engineer for Simulation products since 2002. I was previously a product manager at SRAC, the original makers of COSMOS for those who remember that time! ;-). I am currently in charge of the content of the certification exams for simulation products. I also initiated and still author the Simulation Knowledge Base and participate as much as possible in the expansion and evolution of the SolidWorks Knowledge Base. Finally, I handle the SolidWorks Support Monthly News blog.

The post SOLIDWORKS support Monthly News – February 2017 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Julien Boissat at February 08, 2017 01:27 AM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Day Two Recap: The Best Community in CAD

In case the title wasn’t clear, day two at SOLIDWORKS World is dedicated to the SOLIDWORKS community,but before we dive into the proceedings, let’s quickly recap day one:

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You can read more about day one in this blog post.

SOLIDWORKS Vice President of Strategy and Community Suchit Jain kicked off day two with some impressive community updates. Comprised of millions of users, the SOLIDWORKS community is extremely diverse. This group is passionate about engineering, design and helping each other. This video speaks volumes about the best community in CAD.

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One way users can make the most of their experience using SOLIDWORKS is to become a certified user. Currently, there are 222,000 certified users worldwide including an elite group of 2,800 Certified SOLIDWORKS Experts (CSWE). Learn more about certification here.

Suchit’s presentation highlighted key categories of users from students and experts to entrepreneurs and makers. It’s SOLIDWORKS’ responsibility to provide the community with the tools, training and skills to advance careers, build businesses and enable the new, the next and the never before to become a reality.

Students

Tyler Wooten is a student enrolled at Texas A&M University. During his freshman year, Tyler became involved with Startup Aggieland, an incubator-style learning program where students and alumni can learn how to create successful startups. His experience led him to launch a non-profit aimed at assisting visually impaired students navigate Texas A&M University’s campus with help from 3D campus maps. Tyler recently became a Certified SOLIDWORKS Associate, which opens up employment opportunities upon graduation.

Experts

As previously mentioned, CSWEs are the pinnacle of SOLIDWORKS users. Eric Spendlove, Acrobatic Rigger and Designer at Cirque Du Soleil, is part of this elite squad. Eric uses the skills he mastered during the certification process every day at his job in Las Vegas.

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Entrepreneurs

The SOLIDWORKS Entrepreneur program is focused on democratization of innovation. Fledgling businesses that apply and are accepted into the program receive free access to design tools, designers, experts and fellow entrepreneurs to help them along in their business journey. Accelerators and incubators are important partners in the entrepreneurial process. One such incubator is Greentown Labs, the largest green tech incubator in the United States.

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Makers

The bar for people to create products is lower than ever thanks to advances in 3D printing, design software and the rise in maker spaces. SOLIDWORKS partners with the Fab Foundation  can be found in the more than 1,000 Fab Labs worldwide. In addition, there are 6,000 maker spaces in the world where aspiring artists, designers, engineers and entrepreneurs meet to create. SOLIDWORKS is dedicated to being a key contributor to this maker movement.

SOLIDWORKS user Jonathan Tippet began his career in maker spaces. Jonathan creates amazing creatures that mix artistry, science and SOLIDWORKS. His latest project, the Prosthesis anti-robot, is a human-piloted mech that you can actually see in person in the SWW17 Product Showcase.

Partners are a major contributor to the SOLIDWORKS community. We have more than 750 solution partners who compliment SOLIDWORKS and expand capabilities to help users create the best possible products. Suchit stressed recent work to push the boundaries of design with augmented and virtual reality partnerships with companies like HTC, NVIDIA, and Lenovo to bring these innovations to SOLIDWORKS.

To demonstrate Sid Palaniappan, SOLIDWORKS Senior Manager Graphics R&D Deployment, took the stage and walked the audience through a massive construction vehicle model from SOLIDWORKS user Resemin in a virtual reality environment using the HTC Vibe. Using the technology you can see the sheer scale of the model, get into the driver’s seat and virtually pull out any component!

The SOLIDWORKS community is everywhere and the best place to connect with fellow users virtually is at MySolidWorks. Suchit presented two new services to MySolidWorks that users can take advantage of now: Online Product Trials and eCourses, featuring full instructor-led online training that you can do at your own pace. You can read more about the news here. One million users connected took advantage of MySolidWorks last year – it is an excellent tool for support, training, and engaging with fellow users.

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SOLIDWORKS Education Update

2.7 million students are currently using SOLIDWORKS Education and Marie Planchard, Director of Education & Early Engagement, is always hustling to meet with students and mentors at schools, universities, and competitions around the world. Marie and the Education team are committed to providing the tools to make amazing technologies that emerge from education and research possible.

Marie highlighted several educational users including a team at Waseda University who are creating search and rescue robots to navigate disaster sites. Marie also discussed how users grow with the software and use their own experience to start businesses. One example is Erin Winick, founder of Sci-Chic, a science-themed jewelry business that makes engineering fashionable. Erin learned SOLIDWORKS in school and designs her products in the software. Sci-Chic is one of the newest members of the SOLIDWORKS Entrepreneur Program.

Dos Pueblos Engineering Academy is a high school using SOLIDWORKS to support its mission to transform education. Dos Pueblos Founder and Director Amir Abo-Shaeer and Mechatronics Teacher and Director of Information Technology Lyle Harlow joined the stage to share their passion for learning.

Dos Pueblos was founded upon the idea of creating an exciting and enriching community with a passion for learning and thirst for knowledge. The school takes a STEAM approach to education: Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Manufacturing. Students learn to use SOLIDWORKS from day one and will leave school prepared for higher education or trades with four years of hands-on experience with machining. Another interesting aspect of Dos Pueblos is the inclusion of art. Artistry will continue to be important in any product. Dos Pueblos believes that mixing art and science enables students to have experience with multiple disciplines. Currently, 400 students are enrolled at the Dos Pueblos Engineering Academy and 50 percent are female!

SOLIDWORKS is well established in schools, but a goal is to push for more exposure to kids. The goal is to peek interest in engineering at an earlier age. Last year, Chin-Loo Lama, SOLIDWORKS Senior User Experience Manager, introduced the SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids private beta program. Today, she announced that the Apps for Kids beta program is now available to the public. You can learn more about the news here. Chin-Loo also previewed two interesting future Apps for Kids features: Game It, which lets you place your designs in a gaming environment (it feels a bit like a mix between Asteroids and Galaga) and Print It, which enables you to print models your models in 3D anywhere in the world.

The SOLIDWORKS User Group Network (SWUGN) consists of 293 user groups in 38 countries dedicated to educating peers and providing networking opportunities for SOLIDWORKS users. Completely user-driven, SWUGN is an invaluable resource to the community. Today, the SWUGN Oscars Awards for User Leader of the Year, User Group of the Year and the Michelle Pillers Community Award were bestowed upon to these AMAZING users:

Next up rocket scientists Brian Zias, SOLIDWORKS Senior Technical Sales Manager, and Chris McQuin, Motiv Senior Electro-Mechanical Robotics Engineer, took the stage ready to “rocket.” Motiv is heavily involved with the Mars 2020 project, which is sending a rover to Mars. Chris shared perspectives on the complexities of designing for Mars exploration, including simulating for a thermal environment that fluctuates 200 degrees Celsius. Motiv also designs robots for earth, especially in the area of disaster recovery. After the Fukushima nuclear power disaster, the team was determined to help avoid secondary disasters like this in the future. How? Build robots capable of completing human tasks in areas not safe for humans. The robot, called the Robosimian, can climb rubble piles and autonomously scale walls!

Day two was action packed, but there was still one major highlight and first for SOLIDWORKS World: a combat robotics competition called the Robo Rumble! The rumble featured four teams: Fast Electric Robots, The Beaumonsters, Least Worst Robotics and Team Bad Kitty were all front and center ,slugging it out for the crown. Each team is part of the National Robotics League, an organization dedicated to promoting interest in manufacturing careers. Special guest commentators and judges were also called to preside over the event including BattleBots veterans Donald Hutson, Marc DeVits and Paul Ventimiglia. Donald has 20 years of robotics competitions under his belt and is creator of championship bot LockJaw, Paul engineered 2015 champion Bite Force, and Marc designed Icewave and uses SOLIDWORKS in his day job as CTO of Double Robotics. The three Robo Rumble rounds were fierce, but Team Fast Electric Robots won the day and the crown.

Day two was packed wall to wall with excitement and it’s not over yet. Expect more fireworks at the special event at Paramount Studios. If you’re not in Los Angeles, don’t forget you can stream day three live at 8:15 AM PST and see what’s next in SOLIDWORKS. Sign up and view here: http://sww17.wavecast.io/

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Day Two Recap: The Best Community in CAD appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 08, 2017 12:42 AM

February 07, 2017

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Additive Manufacturing at SOLIDWORKS World 2017

SOLIDWORKS World is now well underway and has not disappointed with all the glitz and glamour you would expect from the event being so close to Hollywood.

Partnerships have contributed a large amount to the success of the SOLIDWORKS ecosystem since the early days and today that is no different. Take the world of 3D printing, for example. What usedto be known as Rapid Prototyping has matured to a point where it is becoming a viable method for production, referred to as Additive Manufacturing. With these new capabilities on offer, at SOLIDWORKS we have been working closely with a number of partners to make 3D printing for our users as easy as possible.

The best place to see this ecosystem of additive manufacturing partners is the SOLIDWORKS World Partner Pavilion. This year it has been the best ones yet with 20 3D printer manufacturers in attendance. The 3D printers you will see this year range from the super-fast Carbon Continuous Liquid Interface Production printer to the super strong continuous carbon fiber composite printer and the new metal printer from Markforged. Both companies, along with most 3D printer manufacturers, use SOLIDWORKS.

SOLIDWORKS World was also the chosen event for Stratasys to announce its GrabCAD Print add-in for SOLIDWORKS and its new F123™ printer series. Rize also chose to premiere its new RIZE™ One 3D printer this week at SOLIDWORKS World. With three of the leading 3D printing companies choosing SOLIDWORKS World to announce major new products, it’s clear that SOLIDWORKS and these companies are working hard to bring the best solutions to your desktop today and in the future.

Along with the awesome hardware, designing for additive was a large part of SOLIDWORKS World. Featured on main stage was another partner we have been working with closely, nTopology. Its technology for lattice and microstructure design will be inside SOLIDWORKS with an add-in currently being developed. Additionally, SOLIDWORKS World attendees have been flocking in great numbers to the Additive Manufacturing learning path sessions, which were all focused on design for additive processes and delivered by Stratasys, Carbon, Xometry, Renishaw and Ultimaker, with an additional session on techniques to adopt additive manufacturing from SOLIDWORKS Product Management and a panel discussion with all the presenters from the learning path.

Understanding how to optimize designs for additive manufacturing is the first and most crucial step. With so many different additive processes available, a great way to access them without the overheads is via a service bureau. Xometry helps with both of these with a SOLIDWORKS Add-in that not only instantly quotes but gives design feedback too.

So much in a short space of time and lots more to come from SOLIDWORKS and partners in the additive manufacturing space. If you are considering using additive manufacturing, you can count on the SOLIDWORKS ecosystem. And if you’re attending SOLIDWORKS World 2017, there’s still time to meet with SOLIDWORKS experts and 3D printing partners in the Partner Pavilion. In addition, don’t miss the Additive Manufacturing Panel Discussion on Wednesday at 2:45. Check your agenda or the SOLIDWORKS Mobile App for more information.

Author information

Mark Rushton
Mark Rushton
Mark is a Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS.

The post Additive Manufacturing at SOLIDWORKS World 2017 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mark Rushton at February 07, 2017 06:51 PM

Step into the World of AR and VR

Experiencing Spock beam in, seeing virtual data like the coordinates of an incoming threat overlaid in the real world or being a blue character inside a virtual world were all just dreamy concepts teased to us through Hollywood blockbusters like Star Trek, Iron Man, Avatar and many more…until very recently.

What’s spurred the monumental evolution in the Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) space is an inflection point of graphics compute power, high-pixel density but small displays, low power/portability, and dropping costs but most importantly, the overwhelming declaration from gamers, designers and engineers to break out of 2D worlds.

So let’s back up a bit since this sudden shift has been just that…sudden, and give you a simple lay of the land. First of all, what are all these acronyms that end with “R” and why do they matter to you? Virtual Reality (VR) is a technique which immerses you into a fully virtual world (like being a video game character). Augmented Reality (AR) is a technique that overlays virtual content into the real world (made famous by Pokémon GO but hardly a reflection of its true capabilities).

Both techniques share the same basic set of technical requirements but can differ in terms of how they are experienced and on which devices. Think of them as two sides of the same coin. VR requires Head-Mounted Displays (HMDs), such as HTC Vive, Facebook’s Oculus Rift, Samsung GearVR, Google Daydream and StarVR. AR is a bit more flexible and can generate functional experiences on mobile phones, tablets or HMDs, such as Microsoft HoloLens, MetaVision Meta2, ODG R7-R9, Google Glass. The importance of these techniques and the delivery system of the experiences is what they can do for you. By taking advantage of these cutting-edge and rapidly emerging solutions, you can truly consume and create content in a whole new way that breaks the limits of 2D screens and interfaces. You can now feel content.


You might be asking, “but I use SOLIDWORKS….how do I export my file, clean it up, make it lighter, retain the materials and animation and other valuable features, get it into a viewer and show my boss my amazing new design on my Google Cardboard I got for free at a tradeshow?” or “how can I use these solutions to improve my designs?” You’ll be happy to know that SOLIDWORKS World 2017 is an impactful milestone for you, our partners and even ourselves because it will help answer these and other questions you may have about AR and VR.


Here’s how:

  • Day 1 – AR/VR goes mainstage – A full circle story featuring a SOLIDWORKS customer (MetaVision) and the capabilities of their Meta2 device previewing how you’ll be able to sell your design more immersively in the near future.
  • Day 2 – What’s coming to SOLIDWORKS? Design in VR! Get a glimpse into how you’ll be able to directly interact with your native SOLIDWORKS design in VR.
  • Partner Pavilion – For the duration of the show, you’ll be pleased to find examples of AR/VR solutions and previews all over the place including: In partner booths such as Lenovo, Nvidia, Dell, HP, ATI, Microsoft, WakingApp, MetaVision and many more. You’ll also find VR being demonstrated In the SOLIDWORKS R&D booth for exciting tech previews to help you address designing and selling your designs better by using these technologies and devices. Also, don’t miss the the DASSAULT SYSTEMES booth for a glimpse into the application of these solutions in other verticals.

Welcome to the new, the next and the never before. We hope that we are the first welcoming hand as you reach through your old-school computer monitors and experience virtual immersion, scale, context, collaboration and feel for the first time.

For those of you reading this at SOLIDWORKS World…you MUST try these amazing experiences in person so make sure you visit our partners and the SOLIDWORKS R&D booth in the Partner Pavilion. For those of you in your own worlds, we look forward to connecting with you soon. Just make sure you talk to us or your VAR to find out more.

Author information

David Randle
David Randle
David is a Senior Business Development Manager at Dassault Systemes SolidWorks Corp

The post Step into the World of AR and VR appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by David Randle at February 07, 2017 06:02 PM