Planet SolidWorks

December 08, 2016

SolidSmack

The Little Designer Book Aims To Inspire Little Designers

dreamfactory-little-deesigner-book-00

dreamfactory-little-deesigner-book-00

Nestor Llanos is a 3D designer who has done a great deal pushing the envelope of 3D printing forward, but now he’s helping start others on the same path, with a book called “The Little Designer“.

Llanos was the Lead Design Engineer for the “Strati” 3D printed car developed by Local Motors, one of the more recent projects in his twenty year career in car design and 3D printing.

As an expert on the topic, he wanted to have his children get involved, saying:

Basically, I wanted to engage my own children in age appropriate 3D printing and 3D digital modeling technology. After that, I saw and I found that I could do more for children, and I decided to write “The Little Designer” book to teach children the experience that I have taught mine.

The intent is to offer this book to schools to assist children’s learning of 3D technologies, both design and printing.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_83760" style="width: 1039px;">A page from the Little Designer Book showing how to 3D model<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">A page from the Little Designer Book showing how to 3D model</figcaption></figure>

What I find interesting about this project is the emphasis on fun characters that might resonate more easily with younger children. He’s made a small universe of characters called “BuddyLand”. The book takes the reader though some very simple steps to design these characters and ultimately 3D print them.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_83761" style="width: 1019px;">Another page from the Little Designer Book showing how to 3D model<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Another page from the Little Designer Book showing how to 3D model</figcaption></figure>

I believe that if younger children are introduced to the technology in this way, they might more easily be involved in higher level educational 3D printing material they may encounter at higher grades in their school system.

Eventually, this will lead to an increasing number of 3D-literate engineers emerging from our higher-level institutions and powering the economy of the twenty-first century.

One challenge already encountered by Llanos is that many schools still lack the presence of even a simple 3D printer. And some schools that previously purchased them have found them out of service eventually due to poor reliability of earlier units. In such cases, readers of the Little Designer Book will be able to design, but not 3D print their models.

That’s where Llanos created another solution: He’s launched the website “Dreamfactory”, which provides a way for kids to use TinkerCAD to access pre-made BuddyLand 3D models and print them through typical 3D print services.

You can’t have enough children knowing about 3D.

Read more at Fabbaloo

The post The Little Designer Book Aims To Inspire Little Designers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at December 08, 2016 05:43 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2017 enhances the Comments functionality

SOLIDWORKS comments have been enhanced in the 2017 release. SOLIDWORKS PDM is great for documenting files, but sometimes we need to comment and document features and other items within a design. That just got easier in SOLIDWORKS 2017. Now all items with a comment can be shown with a special indicator in the FeatureManager Design Tree.

 

Showing Comment Indicator

Showing Comment Indicator

Now it’s easy to see which items have comments, and they can be viewed just by hovering. All comments are grouped in a folder at the top of the FeatureManager Design Tree.

Quickly View Comments

Quickly View Comments

SOLIDWORKS Comments now support many new item types such as mates and folders. Top level comments can be created as well, and now the time and date stamp is automatically added to any comment! You can also attach images or make a one click screenshot. Double click any embedded image to view it in full scale. All comments can be viewed in a sortable, discussion thread style window. This is a great way of capturing design intent and maintaining a history of design decisions.

View All Comments

View All Comments

With these great improvements, customers are able to implement the use of SOLIDWORKS comments in applications such as company best practices and internal training!

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 enhances the Comments functionality appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Jamie Hill, CSWP at December 08, 2016 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Three New MBD Tutorials Built into SOLIDWORKS

Model-based definition (MBD) is a new approach to specifying product design requirements on 3D models directly. Most engineers are familiar and versed with 2D drawings, but when it comes to MBD, it certainly takes some learning and time to get used to. This is why in addition to SOLIDWORKS MBD, we have developed many additional learning resources and industry references to support your MBD journey.

These resources have been very helpful to many manufacturers in their implementation process. For example, some companies use the twelve learning modules at MySolidWorks as an MBD on-board training step.

How about more? In addition to the above resources and an existing tutorial on DimXpert inside the SOLIDWORKS product, three new MBD tutorials have been added starting with the SOLIDWORKS 2016 SP4 release in July 2016 as shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3: SOLIDWORKS MBD overview, advanced DimXpert and advanced MBD.

Figure 1. The SOLIDWORKS MBD overview tutorial.

Figure 2. The advanced DimXpert tutorial.

Figure 3. The advanced MBD tutorial.

 

You can access them by following these steps:

1. Expand the Help menu of your SOLIDWORKS window.
2. Click on SOLIDOWRKS Tutorials as shown in Figure 4.
3. A tutorial list box will pop up as shown in Figure 5.
4. Click on the “All SOLIDWORKS Tutorials” button.
5. As shown in Figure 5, the three new MBD tutorials are pointed at by the green arrows. The previously released one on DimXpert is pointed at by a yellow arrow.

Figure 4. SOLIDWORKS tutorials under the Help menu.

Figure 5. Four highlighted MBD-related tutorials.

Each of the new example-based lessons takes about 30 minutes to go through so that you don’t have to sit for too long in one session. As shown in Figure 6, not only can you play with a fun drum beater model, you can also follow the detailed step-by-step instructions to learn the popular techniques of SOLIDWORKS MBD, such as DimXpert, 3D Views, 3D PDF Template Editor and 3D PDF publishing.

mbdmodule_treadmill.pngFor example, Figure 7 shows the hammer head model in SOLIDWORKS and the detailed instructions on the right hand side for your hands-on practices. This example is illustrating how to define a size dimension to an intersection circle.

Last but not least, these tutorials are available included in every seat of SOLIDWORKS for free. I would highly recommend you take full advantage of these tutorials. Many of the tips and tricks can only be internalized through hands-on practices. Don’t just look at or talk about MBD. Let’s roll up our sleeves and get our hands dirty.

To learn more about how SOLIDWORKS MBD can help you with your MBD implementations, please visit its product page or watch the webcast below.

Author information

Oboe Wu
Oboe Wu
Product portfolio manager of SOLIDWORKS MBD, passionate about smart manufacturing opportunities, Keen listener to customer challenges, Sharp problem solver with 20 years of experiences in engineering, Sleepless father trying best to take care of a baby daughter.

The post Three New MBD Tutorials Built into SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Oboe Wu at December 08, 2016 01:00 PM

December 07, 2016

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Waffle Iron Tutorial

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="355" id="PreviewFrame3D" name="PreviewFrame3D" scrolling="no" src="http://www.3dcontentcentral.com/external-site-embed.aspx?format=3D&amp;catalogid=11199&amp;modelid=720836&amp;width=250&amp;height=250&amp;edraw=true" width="400"></iframe>

Waffle Iron: This model shows a few of the mold tool features available in SOLIDWORKS. In this case the waffle iron is made from reversing the waffle geometry. The multi-body part has some simple sheet metal features along with standard features. There are also a few examples of hybrid modeling using solid and surface features to create some of the geometry. The features used in the waffle iron part include: revolves, sweeps, lofts, boundary surfaces, trim surface, filled surface, offset surface, knit surface, planar surface, edge flange, combine, mirror, projected curve and one delete face.

Also included in the model is an example of a circular pattern of a linear pattern. A projected curve is used to create 3D geometry from two 2D sketches. The part does includes two of the automated mold features including: parting line, and tooling split. Download this file to see examples of a wide variety of features and to learn about reverse engineering geometry using mold features.

Download: Waffle Iron
Complexity: Moderate
Features: Sheet Metal, Revolve, Boundary Surface, Parting Line, Tooling Split

View all the Part Reviewer Tutorials here.

DraftSight Download: In conjunction with DraftSight, Dassault Systèmes’ 2D CAD product, the 2D drawing(.dwg) file of the Candy Castle Assembly tutorial is now available for download here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Waffle Iron Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at December 07, 2016 10:00 PM

SolidSmack

New Formlabs Engineering Resins Fistbump Manufacturing in the Face

formlabs-engineering-resin-00

formlabs-engineering-resin-00

Formlabs, who is now responsible for making a generation of designers and engineers giggle gleefully when they hear the word ‘resin’, has recently released a whole array of new engineering resins aimed at professionals for use in prototyping, molding and more.

Formlabs is widely known for their consumer and commercial grade resin… and their 3D printers too, I suppose. Though I don’t have a Formlabs printer (yet), seeing what people and companies are doing with the printer, along with the new materials, have rekindled ideas for products I had long ago, products that would have required a lot of work and even more mold/die cost.

These new (and one improved) resins come on the coattail of Formlabs’ new Dental SG resin, which they debuted in April of this year and is the company’s first Class 1 bio-compatible resin for producing surgical guides to aid in dental surgery. The new resins carry on the professional use focus to simulate the full spectrum of injection-molded plastics. Have a look:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ddv1JccHDjk?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Designed for use with the Fomlabs Form 2 SLA-based 3D printers, they were developed completely by their in-house materials team. There are four resins all together. Here’s what we’ve got.

High Temp (New)

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_83744" style="width: 1000px;">formlabs-engineering-resins-01<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The Formlabs High Temp resin can withstand temps of up to 289 0C @ 0.45MPa.</figcaption></figure>

Formlabs’ High Temp resin was designed to handle projects that routinely encounter, well high temperatures and has a HDT (Heat Deflection Temperature) of 289 0C at 0.45MPa, so far the highest rating for 3D printing materials currently on the market. This mean it’s perfect for thermoforming applications or casting projects. Other suggestions include mold prototyping, heat-resistant fixtures, projects that incorporate hot air and fluids as well as environmental testing.

Flexible (New)

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_83745" style="width: 720px;">The Formlabs Flexible resin simulates an 80A durometer rubber, perfect for parts that need to deform and bend but return to their original shape.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The Formlabs Flexible resin simulates an 80A durometer rubber, perfect for parts that need to deform and bend but return to their original shape.</figcaption></figure>

Formlabs’ Flexible resin was designed to simulate an 80A durometer rubber, which can flex, deform and bend but snap back into shape when there is no more pressure. The resin is perfect for prototyping parts with soft materials such as handles, grips or molds and even wearables. Perhaps protective pads, helmet inserts or even as backing for ergonomic furniture.

Durable (New)

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_83746" style="width: 720px;">The Formlabs Durable resin was designed to simulate polypropylene plastic similar to spray bottles or food containers.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The Formlabs Durable resin was designed to simulate polypropylene plastic similar to spray bottles or food containers.</figcaption></figure>

Formlab’s Durable resin was designed to be comparable to polypropylene plastic (PP), which can bend to a certain degree without breaking and has high-impact strength and deformation properties. This resin is suitable for prototyping consumer products such as packaging, food containers or spray bottles as well as for producing low-friction parts.

Tough (Updated)

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_83747" style="width: 800px;">formlabs-engineering-resin-04<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Formlabs’ Tough resin was reformulated and simulates ABS, being strong while under stress with better shatter resistance.</figcaption></figure>

The last resin in Formlabs list is the reformulated Tough material, which was designed to simulate ABS but with increased strength, shatter resistance and deformation resistance. Essentially a solid, tough material perfect for parts such as snap-fit joints, assemblies, rugged parts, enclosures and industrial applications. All of Formlabs’ new resins (and old) are available now with a starting price of $149 for a 1-liter bottle, with Tough or Durable resin available for $175 and Flexible or High Temp available for $199. More information of Formlab’s new resins can be found here.

Molding Made Easy?

Is easier molding and casting a step towards a better manufacturing future? I would say YES, wouldn’t you? Examples abound, but may I present one idea you may have pondered creating in the past.

Exhibit A: Custom transforming toy (circa 2008)

jizatoy-transformer-toy

When I think back 8 years or so, and the time I wanted to get into injection molding, I was inspired to create Transformer-like toys like the “Perfect transformation Wheelie” by JIZAITOYS (pictured above). That’s not 3D printed though. Back then, he started with clay, forming molds of each piece. My ultimate reaction was, ‘too much work!’ However, with the Formlabs printers and this new resin… Yeah, I think it’s time to revisit the concept.

Side note: JIZAITOYS inspired dozens of little companies to pop up creating their own third party “masterpiece” level Transformers toys. Unfortunately, a Chinese company copied JIZAITOYS’ mold and sells their creations. 

The post New Formlabs Engineering Resins Fistbump Manufacturing in the Face appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at December 07, 2016 09:07 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

An Overview of ScanTo3D in SOLIDWORKS

Starting in 2016 for SOLIDWORKS Professional (Premium for 2015 versions and older), there is a great add-in that works for those who need to transfer physical objects into a 3D model. The add-in is called ScanTo3D. For users who need to create organic shapes where it would be really difficult to model from scratch, ScanTo3D will help in importing scan data into SOLIDWORKS to convert the mesh to a surface or solid model.

Let’s say you wanted to model up your hand. How would you even start doing this? How would you handle all the different lines and curvatures of your hand? If you are lucky, you have a 3D scanner where you can take a scan of your hand save it as a Mesh file or Point Cloud file.

Notice the different file types we can save it as that SOLIDWORKS will recognize such as a .3ds, .obj, and .stl mesh file. When you have the direct mesh file, you can run that file through the Surface Wizard where you can have it automatically translate the data to physical surface bodies. You can then use those bodies to repair any faces or any of the various Surfacing tools to eventually convert the surface body to a solid body.

When working with the a Point Cloud file, the process is very similar except before you run it through the Surface Wizard, you have to run it through the Mesh Prep Wizard. What this will do is convert the point cloud file into a mesh file where you can then convert it to a surface body.

One thing to clarify about ScanTo3D is it is not a complete reverse engineering tool. This means that you will be able to attain physical bodies, but post processing may be required to clean up any over lapping/obscure faces. You will notice that when the files are imported, they may not always be clean enough where you can easily convert to a solid. This is where your Surfacing skills will shine to be able to knit all the faces together and make a solid body.

That being said, you will still be saving a lot of time overall since a lot of the heavy lifting will be done by utilizing your scan to attain the surface geometry instead of modeling the surface by hand…pardon the pun.

If you want more information about this tool and like to see it in action, take a look at my YouTube video or visit Hawk Ridge Systems to set you up with a demo!

Author information

Hawk Ridge Systems
From design to production, Hawk Ridge Systems delivers best-in-class solutions in 3D design, CAM software, and 3D printing.

The post An Overview of ScanTo3D in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Hawk Ridge Systems at December 07, 2016 04:00 PM

SolidSmack

The $379 reMarkable Tablet Just Might Be the Best Digital Sketching Tool to Date

feature

feature

Despite there being more options than ever before for on-the-go digital sketching, it’s still all too easy to get lost in the maze of accessories, dongles, and apps needed to create a single line. Oftentimes, just pulling out an actual piece of paper is more effective when creativity strikes.

And while tablets such as the Surface Pro and iPad Pro are capable of taking on much more than digital sketching, might they be overkill for those tasks that are supposed to be meditative and free of constant Twitter alerts?

Such is the premise behind reMarkable, a new tablet designed to clear the clutter away from digital reading, writing, and sketching.

overview

Designed to resemble a thin stack of 8.5″ x 11″ white paper, this minimal tablet features an E Ink display with a paper-like surface to give users as close to a feeling of working with paper as possible while retaining all the modern conveniences of digital tablets including cloud storage and the ability to carry up to 100,000 pages on the 6.7 mm thin device.

reMarkable-1

“No tablet has fewer functionalities than reMarkable (you can quote us on that),” says the company. “Paper is the ultimate tool for thinking because it’s simple. We designed reMarkable to not get in your brain’s way. Get in the zone and stay there.”

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/34I27KPZM6g?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

As any professional will tell you, the digital sketching experience is only as powerful as the stylus and lag, yet the Paper seems to trump both of these with an Apple Pencil-like stylus that—like the Wacom Intuos Stylus—requires no battery charging or Bluetooth set-up. Additionally, the texture of the tip was designed to work in harmony with the surface of the tablet to create the most lifelike pen-to-paper experience as possible.

Ironically, in the age of hardware specs versus actual work done, the reMarkable just might be the more valuable tablet option for many. At just $379 for the entire setup (pre-order), it’s at least worth at try for those who miss that paper experience yet can’t let go of digital storage.

Find out more over at reMarkable.

The post The $379 reMarkable Tablet Just Might Be the Best Digital Sketching Tool to Date appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at December 07, 2016 01:02 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

2016 Holiday Gift Guide: The Holiday’s Hottest Products Get Their Start With SOLIDWORKS

Every release of SOLIDWORKS is packed with hundreds of new features and enhancements that enable our users to not only get their jobs done faster but to also innovate better. There’s no stronger evidence of the fruits of our labor than to see some of the world’s hottest new products that got their start in SOLIDWORKS.

With the holidays right around the corner, we’ve compiled a list of great gifts and cool gadgets that will make everyone on your list happy. You’ll notice that many of the products that made this year’s list are smart products. As today’s products get smarter, so does SOLIDWORKS. SOLIDWORKS 2017 includes many new features that make designing these complex, connected products easier than ever.

So without further ado, here are the top holiday gifts ideas that made our 2016 SOLIDWORKS Holiday Gift Guide.

For those with a need for speed. The cyclists on your list will be familiar with BMC, one of the world’s leading manufacturers of bicycles. The Switzerland-based bike maker offers an extensive line of bikes, including mountain, commuter, as well as some of the world’s fastest road bikes.

bmc_bikes.jpg

For the bowlers. Anyone who has spent any amount of time in a bowling alley knows the name Brunswick, the bowling balls favored by professional bowlers. Brunswick Bowling Products uses SOLIDWORKS to develop balls that provide a range of actions to support varying lane conditions.

For the young fashionistas. Check out this line of 3D-printed, science and engineering-inspired jewelry made of plastics and/or metals created and sold by startup Sci Chic, which was founded by Erin Winick, an inspiring entrepreneur and mechanical engineering student at the University of Florida.

scichic

For the snow boarders. For snowboarders, the bindings are a critical piece of equipment because they serve as your direct connection to your snowboard, precisely translating your muscle movements to your board for optimum maneuverability on the slopes. Read about how Burton Snowboards uses SOLIDWORKS to keep its equipment on the leading edge.

For the active YouTubers. Originally created as a way for surfers to film themselves from the beach, the SoloShot3 is an amazing new hands-free camera that  follows users’ movements automatically, enabling them to capture epic video selfies.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/q1t_xJZ9xyA?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

For those with wanderlust. Whether they are on skiing, cycling, running or just hiking, dehydration can stop even the most active person in their tracks. Stay hydrated with CamelBak water bottles, packs and filtration systems, which tout such high durability, that they come with a lifetime warranty.

camelbak_bottle.jpg

For the caffeine junkies. We all know who the coffee addicts are in our lives. Make it easier for them to get their brew on with the Cool Gear BRU deluxe tumbler and brewer, a single-serve, at-home brewing system for cold brewed ice coffee anytime.

For the ballers. When the pros want to practice their swings, they often turn to pitching machines from Jugs Sports. The company’s baseball and software pitching machines will give hitters everything from 70-MPH fastballs to 55-MPH change-ups—all with a touch of a button.

jugs_sports.jpg

For the bite-sized builders. For the future engineers and designers in your family, Mega Bloks offers a wide assortment of building kits—from American Girl to Star Trek to SpongeBob SquarePants—and for ages 1-8+ years. Their only limitation will be their own imaginations.

sponge_bob.jpg

For the SOLIDWORKS fanatics. Why not gift the passionate SOLIDWORKS users in your life with a ticket to the coolest CAD event of the year, SOLIDWORKS World 2017 taking place at the Los Angeles Convention Center, February 5-8. Register before January 6th, and save $100 off a full-conference registration.

3ds_swk_sww2017_banner_registerjan6_cta_925x250

Author information

Barbara Schmitz
Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks
Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post 2016 Holiday Gift Guide: The Holiday’s Hottest Products Get Their Start With SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Barbara Schmitz at December 07, 2016 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Edit all of your File Locations Options at once in SOLIDWORKS 2017

When I think I have found what is to be my favorite feature within SOLIDWORKS 2017, along comes something better. The new SOLIDWORKS File Location option reviewed in this article promises to be one of those “better” somethings…

SOLIDWORKS File Location View/Edit Technique

Here at Javelin, we often preach about file locations and best practices regarding where to store them and what to do with them.

The big secret has always been that there is no easy way to see all of your file locations at once; unless you were willing to export your settings out of the registry and work on them from a notepad interface (again, not very easy). Originally this article was going to be about that old-school registry file / notepad editing procedure, however SOLIDWORKS 2017 came along and changed my plan.

File locations from registry

File locations from registry

New SOLIDWORKS File Location View/Edit Technique

I am pleased that I can now share with you an alternative method to edit all of your SOLIDWORKS File Location Options in one, easy to use, table. To access the table:

  1. Access Tools > Options > System Options
  2. Select File Locations.
  3. Within the File locations Section of the Options dialog, pick the “Edit All” button
File Locations

File Locations

The new “Edit All” option will present you with a fully populated table that will list every stored file location that SOLIDWORKS uses, as well as the locations assigned to each of these options. This has great comparative benefit for those of us who diagnose issues with SOLIDWORKS installations on a regular basis, as any issues with the file paths can be readily seen in the list.

A sample of the new File Location Table is below:

SOLIDWORKS File Location Table

SOLIDWORKS File Location Table

Edit File Locations

Of course there are quite a few file locations listed, and editing these can be a daunting task, until one notices the “Find / Replace” button that is located at the bottom of the window.

Using Find and replace you can perform batch re-direction of any similar file-paths within your list.

This function is great for anyone administering SOLIDWORKS as they can readily re-direct a single user’s directories in one shot (for multiple users we need to start thinking about administrative options and applying a settings file).

In the example shown below, we have many directories pointing to “C:\MY CUSTOM SOLIDWORKS FILES.   Using the “Find / Replace” option we might change all of those to read “C:\MY DIRECTORY”

Find and Replace file locations

Find and Replace file locations

With the new tabular form, the results from this change are easy to see in green, before committing to any changes.

File locations changed

File locations changed

Hopefully everyone will be able to use this as one of their first stops when checking out a freshly installed release of SOLIDWORKS 2017!

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post Edit all of your File Locations Options at once in SOLIDWORKS 2017 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at December 07, 2016 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

App Smack 49.16: Copied, Ulysses, Hyper News, Fluenty and More…

Feature

Feature

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device, be it iPhone, Android or Windows!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Copied

Copied is a full-featured clipboard manager. Save text, links, and images that you’ve copied to your clipboard from any app. Quickly copy your saved clippings from the Copied Today Widget or input them directly into any app using the Copied Keyboard.

Copied

Ulysses

Ulysses is your one-stop writing environment on iOS. Whether you’re a novelist, a journalist, a student or a blogger – if you love to write and write a lot, Ulysses gives you a uniquely streamlined toolset, covering every phase of the writing process:

Ulysses

Hyper News

Hyper News let’s you watch the latest news videos anywhere you are – even without internet! How? The app automatically preloads fresh videos every time you’re on WiFi – so you can enjoy lightning-fast playback on the subway, the plane… anywhere on-the-go. Supercharge your daily commute. Bad connections and data plans won’t stop you anymore!

HyperNews

Fluenty

Tired of typing? Want to sound smarter? Fluenty sends cleverly brilliant, AI-generated responses to your messages with a single tap on your smartphone or smartwatch.

Fluenty

Quizlet

Create your own flashcards or choose from millions created by other Quizlet students and teachers on thousands of subjects.

Quizlet

Vimeo for Android

Discover amazing videos from the world’s best creators, and upload your own—all on your phone and tablet—with Vimeo for Android.

Vimeo

The post App Smack 49.16: Copied, Ulysses, Hyper News, Fluenty and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at December 07, 2016 11:00 AM

December 06, 2016

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: 3D Printed Camera Lens [Say, ‘AWESOME!’]

3d-printed-camera-lens-fabulous-00

3d-printed-camera-lens-fabulous-00
Mathieu Stern is a photographer, and also a collector of old, cheap and weird camera lenses. So, it makes sense that he would set out to create his own 3D printed camera lens, and you know what? “What?” Well, it takes a dang good photo. Check THESE out.

3d-printed-camera-lens-shot-01 3d-printed-camera-lens-shot-02 3d-printed-camera-lens-shot-03

Mathieu says, “I never really learned how to make 3D models on a computer–I started by making a cardboard first prototype with a found lens from 1890 I had in a box. It was ugly and not easy to use but I was able to focus and take the measurements I needed to create a 2D design.”

He got rejected by a lot of 3D printers (because of the cost of creating it and the lack of funds to make it happen), but he finally found a printer willing to take a chance. FABULOUS, a 3D printer in France, took his idea and turned it into a photo shooting prize to behold.

“I met Arnault Coulet, CEO of a French 3D printing agency called FABULOUS. His team and he designed the 3D prototype and printed the lens. Luckily for us, he saw all the crazy potential and fun we could create with this project.”

The lens is simple, a 135mm f/1.8 lens that was made up of two cylinders threaded together. The first cylinder, containing the glass lens (the nineteenth century one he found in a box), moves back and forth to allow focusing. The smaller, inner cylinder attaches to the camera. This section contains a slot for a diaphragm plates with various shapes which add visual effects to the image. The created the 3D model (in Rhino?) and 3d printed it using PLA on a Leapfrog 3D printer.

In the end, it was proof a camera lens could be printed and printed at a cost of only “a few Euro.” You can download the files via Sketchfab!

3d-printed-camera-lens-fabulous-03

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3d-printed-camera-lens-fabulous-02

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

The post Model of the Week: 3D Printed Camera Lens [Say, ‘AWESOME!’] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at December 06, 2016 11:23 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Using the ALT Key while Routing in SOLIDWORKS 2017 will speed up your workflow

The ALT key has been a staple of SOLIDWORKS functionality for a very long time now. It is one of our primary modifiers to intact various functionality, or cancel automated functionality. The ability to cancel functionality has been extended into the SOLIDWORKS 2017 Routing Add-in!

When using the Drag & Drop functionality to pull a routing component from the Design Library — pressing the ALT Key will allow you to place a fitting and avoid the creation of a Route based upon placing the component.  This means less trips to the cancel button to cancel the route properties setup after it auto-starts.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Routing ALT key to cancel route creation

ALT key to cancel route creation

 

Stay tuned to the Javelin Blog for additional tips that may speed up your own workflow using SOLIDWORKS 2017!

The post Using the ALT Key while Routing in SOLIDWORKS 2017 will speed up your workflow appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at December 06, 2016 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Agenda Now Live

Are you interested in learning new skills and best practices that might advance your career? Would you like to master new tips and tricks to overcome everyday challenges? Maybe you’d like to become the in-house expert on simulation or model-based definition (MBD)? If you answered yes to any of those questions, it’s time to register for SOLIDWORKS World 2017, taking place at the Los Angeles Convention Center in Los Angeles, California, February 5th through the 8th.

Thought-provoking general session speakers, ample opportunities to network with over five thousand like-minded peers, and a cool tech-packed Partner Pavilion are just some of what awaits you at the greatest CAD event of the year. In addition, you and your team can choose from over 200 tech-savvy, breakout sessions for everyone, whether you’re a beginner, intermediate or advanced user.

agenda_blog_tech

 

In these sessions you’ll learn new techniques from SOLIDWORKS experts that will help you take your design skills to the next level. Topics will range from PCB and electrical design, rendering, flow simulation and MBD to simulation and product data management. You can find a full conference agenda online here.

If you have attended SOLIDWORKS World in the past, you know that the popular, hand-on tech sessions fill up fast. To make it easier for those who are already registered to attend SOLIDWORKS 2017, online session scheduling is now available for full conference registrants. Don’t delay; register today and you’ll get your pick of sessions to attend.

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Arrive in Los Angeles early and take part in the CAD Manager’s Boot Camp to expand your knowledge about CAD best practices, tools, and methodologies. This boot camp fills up quickly, so be sure to pre-register.

After three days of opportunities to sharpen your design skills and learn new best practices, you can bring back all that knowledge and put it to work for your organization for instant ROI. And, if you’ve been waiting to get your SOLIDWORKS certification, now is the time because it is FREE for full-conference attendees!

Author information

Barbara Schmitz
Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks
Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Agenda Now Live appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Barbara Schmitz at December 06, 2016 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The Cut Outs

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This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “Fade Into You” from the one and only J Mascis before working our way through tracks from Shakey Graves, Twin Peaks, Beirut, Sun Rai, and others before wrapping up with “Somehow.” from Phony Ppl.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

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The post SolidSmack Radio | The Cut Outs appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at December 06, 2016 11:13 AM

December 05, 2016

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

PlantWorks is a complete 3D Plant Design & Visualization Solution for SOLIDWORKS

If you are looking for a 3D Plant Design tool to help you develop early visibility of your proposed plant, or are simply looking at reorganizing your shop floor — we have a great solution for that! It is PlantWorks!

3D Plant Design created with PlantWorks

3D Plant Design created with PlantWorks

PlantWorks Demonstration

PlantWorks is a really nice piece of software that has been developed by Javelin. The tool was designed to help you create and lay out your plants quickly and easily. It is built right inside of SOLIDWORKS and has its own toolbar on the CommandManager, plus an accessible library in the task pane. From there, you can easily drag and drop components from your library onto the plant floor. Giving you a good visual to see if your machines are going to fit or interfere with anything else.

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3D Plant Design is made easy with PlantWorks

PlantWorks includes a standard component library which allows you to easily drag and drop plant components into your design. You can also create a custom library of components specific to your business. The PlantWorks library insertion process is intelligent so that only specified parameters are available when inserting library components, thus making the plant creation process more automated for users.

  • Works with lightweight models.
  • You don’t need to be a solidworks user to layout a plant and “mate” components without knowing all intricacies of libraries, mating etc.
  • Projects are also unique libraries
  • Parts are copied to the project folders to keep separate files.
  • View and interpret layout drawings easily
  • Includes a standard component library
  • Perform collision detection tests
  • Ability to create custom libraries
  • Simulate a plant ‘walk-through’ with SOLIDWORKS MotionManager
  • Easily identify pipes and mezzanines
  • Fully integrated with SOLIDWORKS®
  • Create realistic renderings of your plant design with PhotoView 360
  • Publishable to SOLIDWORKS eDrawings Professional®

PlantWorks also manages your library files and provides simple to use tools for quickly positioning components into your plant layout.

When completed, you can then simulate a plant ‘walk through’ with SOLIDWORKS MotionManager. Which can really have you differentiate from other companies when presenting to potential clients. If you would like a complete walk through of how the tool can help you and company.

Get a custom demo of 3D Plant Design

Click here to request an online demonstration of PlantWorks from Javelin. Or buy the software online from our web store.

The post PlantWorks is a complete 3D Plant Design & Visualization Solution for SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Vicky Guignard at December 05, 2016 09:33 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Redesigning Santa’s Sleigh using SOLIDWORKS

In this Blog we will look at redesigning Santa’s Sleigh using various SOLIDWORKS Features.

Every year Father Christmas has to fly in his sleigh to deliver presents to boys and girls all over the world in just one night. To put this into perspective, it takes a little under 24 hours to fly from London (UK) to Sydney (Australia) in a streamlined Boeing 747, whereas Father Christmas’ mode of transport is believed to be a rather non-aerodynamic sleigh.

If we take a few different figures we can get a rough idea of how aerodynamically suitable the perceived sleigh design is or, alternatively, how much resistance the reindeer are expected to overcome. For example, the earth’s circumference around the equator is a little under 25,000 miles, Father Christmas has around 12 hours to complete his delivery. If he averaged a speed of Mach 2.74, which is about 2,100 mph at sea level, he would cover 25,200 miles in that 12 hour period.

Using this value for velocity we can get a good idea of any aerodynamic flaws which may be in the traditional sleigh design.

The renders below show a traditional type of sleigh modeled in SOLIDWORKS 2017 using both solid and surface modelling techniques and then being all brought together in an assembly to fit the guide brackets for the reins and the seat to the main body of the sleigh.

SOLIDWORKS Santas Sleigh Redesign

We can now run the model through the Flow Simulation add-on to find out just where the problems lie in terms of areas of high pressure as well as how the air generally behaves as it interacts with the sleigh.

An external study was set up, the fluid chosen was ‘air’ at a flow rate of Mach 2.74, using a global mesh with an overall cell refinement level of 3, and automatic refinement during the simulation used to concentrate the mesh in and around the sleigh in areas were the flow changes. Cell refinement levels of 2 between fluid and fluid cells and a level of 3 along the fluid and solid boundary were used during the simulation.

The cut plots below show the largest areas of high pressure on the sleigh are concentrated at the front, i.e. the leading edge. This high pressure creates a bow shockwave and, these are areas where the air is slowed down from 950m/s to just 340m/s (more than 50% less than the surrounding air flow).

Inside the sleigh, e.g. the seating area, the velocity also hugely decreases, and in some areas is recirculated in the opposite direction. Shockwaves also occur at the top of the seat, at the rear end of the present bay and underneath the sleigh around the centre. All of these disturbances in the airflow lead to increased drag and therefore more power required from the reindeer.

SOLIDWORKS Santas Sleigh RedesignSOLIDWORKS Santas Sleigh Redesign

Now we have seen the areas of the sleigh which could use some adjustment and improvements, we can modify the model’s geometry to optimize the aerodynamic performance.

Using combined knowledge from the Solid Solutions Management technical support team, the sleigh has been remodeled and the outcome can be seen below.

SOLIDWORKS Santas Sleigh Redesign

The sleigh was made using surfacing techniques, adding a thin sharp nose cone which creates less drag than the previous design, a canopy was also added to allow the model to flow into a smoother overall shape. Vertical and horizontal stabilizers were added and the model was finished with a rear
cone which comes to a point at the back.

The improved model was then put through the Flow Simulation add-on with the same parameters used as before, to ensure a fair comparison. The cut plots below show an oblique shockwave forming around the nose cone which interacts with much less of the air around the sleigh and has a much lower pressure of around 315kPa at the leading edge, whereas the traditional design had a pressure of 889kPa.

Due to the addition of a canopy, the new design has not had to deal with internal turbulent flow and as such the drag encountered will again be significantly reduced.

SOLIDWORKS Santas Sleigh Redesign

SOLIDWORKS Santas Sleigh Redesign

If you are feeling creative this Christmas and are tired of the same old tree decorations, why not create your own?

With just a 3D printer and a Standard licence of SOLIDWORKS you can create your own from home so you don’t have to go out into the cold this winter, just grab a mince pie, fire up SOLIDWORKS and get designing!

From the models used in the Flow Simulations we created our very own using the MakerBot Replicator Mini Compact 3D Printer. A few modifications were required before printing could go ahead on the traditional sleigh design; a revolve to loop some ribbon through to hang from a tree, the ski’s on the bottom as well as their struts had to be thickened to allow for the necessary support for the model and also the brackets for the reins were taken from the model as they could not be created properly at such a small scale, and also the model was scaled to a little under 100mm in order to fit onto the printing bed.

SOLIDWORKS Santas Sleigh Redesign

The sleigh with the improved aerodynamics was modified by filleting the edges of the wings and the tail fin and adding the revolve to create the loop for the ribbon.

SOLIDWORKS Santas Sleigh Redesign       SOLIDWORKS Santas Sleigh Redesign

Here are a couple of renders produced using SOLIDWORKS Visualize.

SOLIDWORKS Santas Sleigh Redesign

SOLIDWORKS Santas Sleigh Redesign

By John Van-Kesteren – SOLIDWORKS Applications Engineer

Author information

Solid Solutions Technical Team
Solid Solutions commenced business as a SolidWorks Training and SolidWorks Support provider in 1998 and has consistently achieved strong growth year-on-year to become the UK’s leading SolidWorks 3D CAD reseller. Growth has been completely organic and has been consistently driven by a focus on recruiting the best from academia and industry and by delivering high quality services to more than 4,000 customers. Our customers range widely in size and are drawn from a broad spectrum of industry sectors. SolidWorks software is used by over 2 million engineers and designers across the world. As a company we are dedicated and focused at providing first class training and support to help you realise the best return on your investment.

The post Redesigning Santa’s Sleigh using SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Solid Solutions Technical Team at December 05, 2016 04:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

What We Learned from BattleBots Season 2

With Season 2 of BattleBots on ABC now playing internationally, it’s time to start thinking about Season 3.  Many teams are gearing up for another year and hoping to make the cut.  We have had a great opportunity to go behind the scenes and get to know many of the teams that are using SOLIDWORKS to design their 250lb weapons of destruction. We also have several videos, blog posts with the teams, and even some SOLIDWORKS models available for download.  So, if you are looking to know more about the passion and innovation behind these teams, we have packaged these materials into one location.

Check out video interviews with Team BiteForce, IceWave, and Brutus.  We have conducted Q&As with several teams, including long-time BattleBots competitor Donald Hutson of Team LockJaw, as well as newcomers Teams Lycan and Reckless.  Learn how Marc DeVidts leveraged his knowledge of robotics from BattleBots competitions to start his own robotics company:  DoubleRobotics.  See how Paul Ventimiglia took his knowledge from other competitions to help him win the BattleBots Championship (The Giant Nut).  Interested in building your own robot?  Check out our infographic on “How to Build a Killer robot.”  Get the inside scoop on how these teams come up with their crazy contraptions, how they got started, and how they decided on what weapons and armor to use.

If you’re not familiar with BattleBots, and want to get up to speed, you can see all of the videos from last year (Season 1) here

…and be sure to stay tuned, as we see what’s ahead for season 3 of BattleBots on ABC.

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Author information

Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling is a Senior Marketing Manager at SolidWorks

The post What We Learned from BattleBots Season 2 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Cliff Medling at December 05, 2016 02:12 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Inspection 2017 Enhancements

Following enhancements have been implemented in SOLIDWORKS Inspection 2017:

  1. Ability to lock balloons to prevent renumbering
  2. Manual ballooning of inspection drawings in SOLIDWORKS Inspection add-in
  3. VDA shape has been added as an option for inspection balloons. VDA standard is used by German automotive manufacturers.
VDA Standard

VDA Standard

  1. Mouse Wheel Zoom can be used to navigate Inspection projects.  This option is enabled by default on the Application Options tab of the Options dialog box.
SOLIDWORKS Inspection 2017 Enhancements

Mouse Wheel Zoom option

As in SOLIDWORKS, roll the wheel up to zoom in, roll down to zoom out, press and hold the wheel to pan.  Additional keyboard shortcuts are available:

Shortcut Description
Alt + Left Go to the previous sheet.
Page Down Go to the previous sheet.
Alt + Right Go to the next sheet.
Page Up Go to the next sheet.
Alt + Up Scroll up.
Alt + Down Scroll down.
Home Go to the first sheet.
End Go to the last sheet.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS Inspection 2017 Enhancements appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sanja Srzic at December 05, 2016 01:00 PM

December 04, 2016

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Engineers empower chefs with induction heating analysis using EMS for SOLIDWORKS

Induction heating is a process of heating an electrical conductor (usually ferromagnetic materials and metals) by electromagnetic induction. The heat generated in the conductor is due to the eddy currents induced in the conductor. In the simplest form, an induction heater consists of a coil through which a high frequency AC current is passed. This high frequency AC current causes rapidly alternating magnetic field which then causes eddy currents in the conductor. The eddy currents are responsible for heating the conductor, the higher the resistance to the flow of current, the more the heating. This phenomenon of eddy currents heating the conductor is called Joule effect.

Conducting Rod

Figure 1: A conducting rod is heated using induction

One needs to contrast between conduction and induction. In the case of induction heating, the heat is generated inside the object and the object does not need to be in contact with the heat source. Hence induction facilitates rapid heating. There are many applications where induction is used such as induction furnace, induction welding, induction cooking appliances etc. The rest of this article is about the induction cooking application.

What is induction cooking?

In the case of induction cooker, a cooking vessel usually made of a ferromagnetic material is heated by induction. Contrast this to the same vessel heated by flame or an electric coil. Induction heating brings about a rapid increase in temperature of the vessel. As shown in figure 2, a coil of copper is placed under the vessel. There is also a layer of ceramic between the coil and the vessel. This is commonly referred to as top plate.

Elements of induction cooking

Figure 2: Elements of induction cooking appliance

When high frequency AC current is passed through the copper coil, large eddy currents are induced in the vessel. The surface resistance of the vessel heats it rapidly which enables cooking. Now there are choices of the material used for the cooking vessel but it is highly recommended that the vessel be made of a ferromagnetic material like cast iron or some specific grades of stainless steels. It is not recommended to use Aluminum or Copper vessels (you can use Aluminum or Copper with modification to the cooking appliance by including a ferromagnetic disk which functions as a hot plate). The use of ferromagnetic material has 2 advantages:

  1. The electrical resistance is higher than pure conductors and hence the heat produced is more.
  2. The skin depth (more about this in a later blog post) of ferromagnetic material is lower than pure conductors and hence there is more surface resistance resulting in higher joule heating.

Why induction based cooking is attractive?

  • It is energy efficient. It provides faster and more consistent heating with higher thermal efficiency. According to a technical document from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 2001, the efficiency of energy transfer for an induction cooker is 84%, versus 74% for a smooth-top non-induction electrical unit.
  • The heating performance is uniform and compares to a gas burner.
  • A control system usually shuts down the heating element if the cooking vessel is not present or is not large enough.
  • They are easy to clean and maintain because the cooking surface is flat and doesn’t get too hot to burn and stick spilled food. Figure 3 shows that heat is produced only in the vessel.
Induction Cooking

Figure 3: Heat is produced only in the vessel and not in the top plate

Simulation using a standard induction cooker coil arrangement

Figure 4 shows a CAD model of a coil and iron core arrangement which can be used for induction cooking. An induction heating analysis was performed using EMS for SOLIDWORKS with AC excitation at 24 KHz. The inductance of the coil was computed and the magnetic flux density was visualized.

Induction heating analysis

Figure 4: CAD model of a typical coil using for induction cooking

The inductance value calculated by the software was 94.44 micro Henry and compared very well with the laboratory measurement result (93.8 micro Henry). Figure 5 shows the plot of magnetic flux density in the coil and the iron cores.

Induction Coil Analysis Results

Figure 5: Plot of magnetic flux density in the coil and the iron cores

Conclusion

It is engineers who gave chefs a perfect solution to an energy efficient cooking appliance. EMS for SOLIDWORKS can help engineers design and simulate various types of induction coil arrangements for cooking application. As it is completely embedded inside SOLIDWORKS, EMS can directly simulate SOLIDWORKS designs thereby avoiding loss of CAD data due to translation. For a full range of applications that EMS can handle, visit www.emworks.com. This blog post was inspired by the excellent work done by a budding fellow engineer, Majdi El Fahem as part of his senior design project.

EMS for SOLIDWORKS

EMS for SOLIDWORKS is the first and only completely embedded Gold Certified software for SOLIDWORKS which helps SOLIDWORKS users study their magnetic, electric and electromagnetic designs seamlessly. It can utilize the geometry created using SOLIDWORKS directly for simulation. Its user interface emulates SOLIDWORKS and hence there is no learning curve associated with the EMS software for SOLIDWORKS users. Want to try a SOLIDWORKS electromagnetic simulation?

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The post Engineers empower chefs with induction heating analysis using EMS for SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Arvind Krishnan at December 04, 2016 03:37 PM

December 03, 2016

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

How to Tolerance a Part: Simple Steps to Specify Part Tolerances – Part I

Lots of emphasis has been made in conveying the tolerance specification on a part. However, little has been done in terms of procedures to arrive at tolerances on a part. More time spent in arriving at tolerances lessens the risk of re-work and revision of tolerances and their associated costs.

Industries, in general, follow the design-build-test-redesign process to arrive at optimal tolerances for desired quality objectives. This extends the product development time and is fraught with undesirable cost escalation.

Simple steps to arrive at part tolerances are provided as under:

  1. Define Quality Objectives (DFQ) in measurable terms
  2. Classify Quality Objectives into two categories, namely, Performance and Assembly
  3. Perform Design Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (DFMEA) and classify the Quality Objectives as Critical, Essential and Desirable, based on the Risk Priority Number (RPN)
  4. Perform Design for Assembly assessment in alignment with DFQ and arrive at assembly sequence
  5. Select functional features involved in assembly with upstream part/assembly, as datum along with required datum precedence – reflecting assembly sequence
  6. Identify features of the part that influence the DFQ objective and specify tolerances based on Fit and Process Capability.  Rest of the part features would be defaulting to general tolerances provided as company standard tolerance table
  7. Develop the cause-effect vector loop for the DFQ objective and see if the specified tolerances meet the same
  8. If the Tolerances meet the DFQ Objective, then increase the tolerances until Cost of Precision over-rides cost of Poor Quality
  9. If the Tolerances do not meet the DFQ Objective then reduce the same until compliance to DFQ objective is achieved.
  10. Perform Cost of Precision Vs Cost of Poor Quality analysis and justify the tolerances provided.

The 10-step process enumerated above seems too long and arduous to comply with, especially in the amount of time and/or effort required.  In consideration to the time/effort/costs involved in Re-Work, Scrap, Recall, and the painful process of revisiting the tolerances after product release, the effort is worth the time spent. When the products do not meet the quality standards either on the shop floor or at the customer place, the rehashing of tolerances and re-work goes through the exact same steps as given above, albeit painfully.

DFQ Process is shown as under:

Design for Quality Process

Design for Quality Process

 

Define Quality Objectives (DFQ) in measurable terms

If a toleranced dimension cannot be measured, then the same should not find place on the drawing. Assembly tolerances are best examples of DFQ Objectives. Gap, Clearance, Assembly Run out are some examples of DFQ Objectives. An example of a Gap Measurement is shown below

measurable-dfq2

Classify Quality Objectives into two categories, namely, Performance and Assembly

In the figure shown below, the pulley is mounted on a shaft supported on bearings. The vibrations at the bearing support need to be under control for the system to have a trouble-free life.

measurable-dfq-performance-objective2

In this example, location of the centre of mass of the assembly that is rotating, about the instantaneous axis of the assembly, is important to control vibrations. This is a classic example of Performance Objective.

DFMEA & RPN Classification

Design Failure Modes & Effects Analysis forms the heart of the Design for Quality process. Unfortunately, this is considered as a non-value added practice, leading to either out-sourcing of the activity or adopting a cut-and-paste approach to completing this document. The RPN (Risk Priority Number) determines the critical nature of the failure mode in classifying the influencing toleranced dimensions as Critical, Essential or Desirable.  A Sample example of DFMEA is shown as under wherein one can see the influence of tolerances for the failure mode enumerated therein.

Risk Priority Number Calculation in DFMEA

DFMEA – Tolerances influencing RPN and Failure Mode

Design for Assembly – Criteria for Tolerance Selection

Normally most of the industries use Cycle time reduction as the criteria for determining Assembly process. If the assembly process is not in alignment with the DFQ objective, disaster is waiting to happen.  Assembly sequence directly influences the product quality.  It is common knowledge that simplified assemblies outweigh simplified part designs.  It is important to note that a part cost may be higher, but if the assembly cost is lower, with fewer things to go wrong in assembly, it is bound to succeed.  This has been missed out by many industries leading to disastrous product launches, assembly-line ‘experts’ who perform selective assembly based on experience, untimely product phase out and significantly reduced profitability.  ‘Final Assembly is the moment of truth’ – by Charles M. Fine (MIT) comes to mind while espousing the cause of Design for Assembly.

More to come in the next article in this series…

Author information

Natarajan Ramamoorthy
Design Professional with almost 3 decades of experience working with numerous companies, providing designs for new products, VAVE on existing products, conducting Design Audits and Dimensional Management programs. Teaching Finite Element Analysis, Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing (GD&T), Tolerance Stack Up Analysis for well over 2 decades. Certified ASME GDTP Technologist. Education: MSME from The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA Past: Consultant, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI, USA

The post How to Tolerance a Part: Simple Steps to Specify Part Tolerances – Part I appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Natarajan Ramamoorthy at December 03, 2016 04:00 PM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 48.16

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Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top ten stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

Behind the Design: Herman Miller Remasters the Classic Aeron Chair

As anybody who sits in front of the computer for at least eight hours a day knows, a great office chair is an absolute necessity if you plan on walking upright without pain any time in the next 20 years (or good heavens, the next 20 minutes).

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James Dyson Opens His Own Engineering School to Curb UK Skills Shortage

Despite drastic efforts to increase STEM education across the country, as well as a renewed interest in industrial design thanks to a new crop of product design startups in London, the number of skilled UK engineers is actually on the decline.

DysonInst-5

Adidas Unveils World’s First Biodegradable Running Shoe Made From Synthetic Spider Silk

From 3d printing to recycled ocean plastic, Adidas has thrown everything we know about traditional sneaker manufacturing on its head as a part of their sustainability-focused Futurecraft initiative.

feature21

Watch a Chain Link Fence Get Weaved Like a Giant Metal Sweater

As you might have guessed, manufacturing chain link fences involves a similar process to that of knitting a sweater—assuming that the machine is a mad giant with a flock of steel wool—bearing sheep.

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Papercube is an Insane Miniature Laser Cutter and Factory Made from LEGO

We don’t really know where to begin with this one, so we’ll just start by putting our hands on our heads to keep our brains from exploding.

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5 New, Must See Features Coming to Fusion 360

Let’s have a look.

fusion-360-ultimate-au-five-features-01-1100x619

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 48.16 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at December 03, 2016 07:01 AM

December 02, 2016

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Shin Nibbles

Michael-Vincent-Manalo-art

Michael-Vincent-Manalo-art

Down in the alley, there were always more than enough shin nibbles to go around. You never knew if you were going to walk out scarred for life, or with new rat friends singing a quintet on your forearm. Though half of them had eyes and legs missing, they certainly knew where to find the roots of these links.

Michael Vincent Manalo – Slightly surreal, slightly symmetrical, completely enchanting work from the Taiwan based artist in his quick sketches and digital paintings.

The Lycurgus Cup – In 300 A.D., the Romans had some pretty fancy glassware. This cup when lit from behind turns red, and lit from the front turns green.

Galaxy jigsaw – It’s appropriate that this galaxy jigsaw puzzle from Nervous System has infinite number of ways that it can be assembled. 133 pieces, made from plywood, pre-orders available.

16-Pointed Shuriken – Make this simple 16-pointed paper ninja throwing star and amaze your other ninja friends.

T120 Bonneville – This bike is beautiful. Just look at that cushy seat, and that tread.

Echo vs Google – Adam Jakowenko decided he would have Alexa and Google Home ask each other questions on an infinite loop asking each other the same question over and over.

Rogue One Jackets – Columbia, outfitters of fine outdoor clothing, have created a series of officially licensed Rogue One inspired jackets/coats.

Iron Giant LEGO Set – This LEGO set needs to happen. IF only his arm did the transforming thing.

The One Moment – Is there anything better than a new OK GO video? New, from the album Hungry Ghosts.

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The post Friday Smackdown: Shin Nibbles appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at December 02, 2016 11:41 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

How to Create and Use Custom Appearances in SOLIDWORKS

A vast library of appearances and textures are included in every SOLIDWORKS install. Additional ‘out-of-the-box’ appearances can be added or created, however. Read on to find out how…

Adding

There are over 10 different file types that are recognized as image files within SOLIDWORKS and are therefore usable as custom appearances. Any image can be used, even a photo taken by the user. Which is especially useful if the user wants to see their product within its natural environment.

In order to use these images, all you have to do is save them in a location of your choice i.e. “Documents” and select the “Add file location” button as shown below in Image 1, then select the folder that the files are in. This should then populate the bottom half of the task pane with the containing image files, see Image 2 below. These appearances can then be dragged and dropped onto the model and specifying the level that you want it applied to; face, feature, body, part/assembly.

 

Appearances Image 1

Image 1

 

Appearances Image 2

Image 2

Creating

Alternatively, instead of using an image file of your choice, an existing appearance can be manipulated in order to achieve the desired result.

To achieve this, right-click on the appearance in the Appearance manager-> edit appearance. In order to manipulate the appearance and generate a new separate appearance, the advanced button needs to be selected, as shown in Image 3. This enables the user to change the path for the texture file, as seen in Image 4, and also enables two additional tabs; “Illumination” and “Surface finish”.

 

Appearances Image 3

Image 3

Illumination

This tab consists of a number of slider bars enabling the user to alter the image in a variety of ways i.e. transparency, reflection, etc.

 

Surface finish

On the surface finish tab, there are a variety of choices, each of which presents the user with a completely different texture on the appearance. For example I have applied the “Treadplate 2” texture to the face of some geometry and it appears as follows;

 

Appearances Image 4

Image 4

 

Appearances Image 5

Image 5

 

In order to find out what each of the commands does, by toggling on “Dynamic help” as seen below in Image 6. By hovering over the commands, the user is presented with a visual illustration of what the command does.

 

Appearances Image 6

Image 6

 

Appearances Image 7

Image 7

 

If the required texture is not present amongst the drop down list, you can add your own when selecting “From file” amongst this list. Note this is just an appearance, the geometry of the part does not necessarily change. The two methods used of displaying these textures is either “Bump mapping” or “Displacement mapping”, as seen below.

 

Appearances Image 8

Image 8

 

The basic difference between the two techniques is that bump mapping does not manipulate the geometry, it only uses lights and shadows, whereas displacement mapping does manipulate the geometry in order to obtain the texture.

Once the appearance has been manipulated to the users requirement, it can then be saved as a separate appearance file (*.p2m) as shown in Image 9. If the location chosen is not being pointed to by SOLIDWORKS then the following message is displayed, it can then be added:

 

Appearances Image 10

Image 9

 

 

Appearances Image 11

Image 10

RealView Graphics

RealView Graphics is required to display the bump mapping result, as shown below. Displacement mapping is mostly used for rendering. If RealView graphics is unavailable, it is most likely because you do not have a compatible graphics card. Check certified graphics cards and drivers by clicking here.

 

Appearances Image 9

Realview Graphics

Author information

Innova Systems Experts in SOLIDWORKS Training & Support
Innova Systems - Experts in SOLIDWORKS Training & Support specialise in the supply, consultancy and training of SOLIDWORKS software. We offer the skills and experience to help companies develop new products using SOLIDWORKS empowering smarter, faster and more cost effective design. We stand by our customers and believe our support service is second to none. Based in Cambridge we have a central location to service a UK wide customer base.

The post How to Create and Use Custom Appearances in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Innova Systems Experts in SOLIDWORKS Training &#38; Support at December 02, 2016 04:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

See Open Source Rocketry Take Flight!

Mavericks is on a mission to help humans explore space faster. A non-profit organization that provides STEM education to students, Mavericks is giving the next generation of engineers hands-on experience designing, building and launching rockets into space.

Mavericks is focused on establishing community-based space education and research programs and web-based education services that enable educators to facilitate hands-on space exploration activities in the classroom, with a priority towards engaging girls and minorities in at-risk communities to pursue advanced education and careers in STEM-related fields. The foundation’s programs enable students in middle schools, high schools, and universities in partnership with educators and mentors, to design, build, and operate spacecraft and launch vehicles, in support of their own space exploration missions in their classrooms and local communities.

Just this year, SOLIDWORKS teamed up with Mavericks to conduct one such mission. The experience was captured in the latest installment of Born to Design, a video series celebrating our desire to discover and transform ideas into life-changing projects. Here’s a preview of the work needed to send a rocket into space:

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CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE FULL VIDEO to learn how Tom Atchison, founder of Mavericks, is revolutionizing space exploration while fostering the growth of the next generation of scientists and engineers. Then see how the team tackled aerothermal challenges and connect team members from around the world.

Author information

Mike Fearon
Mike Fearon
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post See Open Source Rocketry Take Flight! appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mike Fearon at December 02, 2016 01:30 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 Using Variables in the Convert Task Output File Name

A nice new function has been added to the out of the box SOLIDWORKS PDM Convert Task in SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2017.  When building the file name for the output file, it is now possible to select Data Card Variables right within the interface.

In previous releases of the SOLIDWORKS PDM Convert Task, it was possible to add Variable values to the output file name, but it required extensive manual editing of the task script.

Now in 2017 this function is built right into the default task script.

To take advantage of this new feature:

  1. Update the Task Add In to the latest version.
  2. Then double click the Convert Task (or any custom task created from the Convert Task) and go to the  “Output File Details” page.
  3. Click the > box next to the output path and select the Data Card Variables desired.
SOLIDWORKS PDM Convert Task Select Variables

SOLIDWORKS PDM Convert Task Select Variables

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 Using Variables in the Convert Task Output File Name appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at December 02, 2016 01:00 PM

December 01, 2016

SolidSmack

Behind the Design: The GRIPsher Multi-Tool

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Admittedly, I am a multi-tool user as probably most engineers are no matter what field they are in and I can say with certainty that not all multi-tools are the same.

I’ve owned a Leatherman Sidekick, a Gerber Multi-Plier 600 (needlnose) and a SOG S66N and while they all are great in their own right, they do have their drawbacks, most notably of which is quickly gaining access to the multitude of tools packed tightly within, without slicing myself in the process.

Sure, using my multi-tools around the house isn’t anything special and, all cuts aside, does not pose any major health concerns. Soldiers on the other hand need to be able to access their multi-tools quickly in certain situations to accomplish any given tasks, with one of those situations being under heavy fire.

Imagine, 1) trying to first gain access to the multi-tool among the array of pouches and 2) trying to open those tools while wearing gloves and 3) while being shot at – you get the picture.

Army veteran and MIT engineer Christian Reed took it upon himself to design a multi-tool that does away with those issued by making it easily accessible and easy to use- even while wearing gloves. He designed his first prototype of the GRIPsher while serving overseas and as you could imagine, it wasn’t easy to accomplish.

gripsher-ultimate-multi-tool-01

I will let Christian describe the design process he went through to create his GRIPsher Multi-Tool, which was started using SolidWorks to create the design where he “began to sketch out some designs (while deployed) and eventually made the first GRIPsher CAD model. As is often the case when designing strictly in CAD (without any calipers on hand either), it was much smaller than I wanted it to be. I learned this when I sent an STL model back to my friends in the states to get printed.”

Apparently, government funding does not include stipends for 3D printers, a tool you would think they would capitalize on. Regardless, when he returned home he bought an Flashforge 3D Printer to continue prototyping his multi-tool, but switched it out for a Formlabs Form 2 to gain greater detail in less time.

At this point, the design process was streamlined and he printed a few more ‘Gen-1’ models of the GRIPsher, which allowed him to focus on areas of the tool that needed reinforcing. “So using a split screen, I made an entirely new model using larger dimensions, but also added and changed a few features. I took more time to better define my model and use [sketch and assembly] relationships so changes would not blow up everything once they were made,” explains Christian.

gripsher-ultimate-multi-tool-02

“At this point, I was getting close to the final design, so I began to use a waterjet to cut a few 2D samples and test things like the bottle opener, making sure the arms were strong enough to support testing the green jaws on the bottom. I was still using the Form 2 to help either make parts that I would attach to the metal ones I had already made or for models to represent the final shape and fit I wanted to test.”

Prototyping with ABS, PLA or other filaments can only take you so far when prototyping and testing tool designs, so it was time for the stainless steel phase of his endeavor. “3D printing had certainly reduced my cost and increased the speed at which I could iterate, but I needed to test some of the more intricate functions. The first round of Stainless Steel prototypes came out well and I only made a few changes, adding a feature or two for the second round (which is the one seen on Kickstarter).”

gripsher-ultimate-multi-tool-03

He then though of integrating additional features into the design based on user feedback as well as what he thought should be included to give it increased functionality, but sometimes design changes don’t always work out. “One that I had originally wanted to put in was tweezers (which I thought would be a pretty easy thing to do). However, this turned out to be problematic, as designing one that could actuate the way I wanted to proved to be harder than I thought,” said Christian.

The final design of the GRIPsher Multi-Tool was introduced on Kickstarter in September with the funding goal surpassed in just a few days. It ended with successful funding of over $50,000, which says a lot with the GRIPsher Multi-Tool costing only $35. Along with regular pledges, veterans and active military members were able to get theirs free–You read that right, Christian is providing his multi-tool to those who are serving or have served in the military at no cost.

What’s more, civilians have the option of pledging $60 or more, which will get them their own tool and have an additional tool donated to an active military service member. For more information on the GRIPsher Multi-Tool head to their Kickstarter site – they’ll have more on their website along with orders soon.

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gripsher-ultimate-multi-tool-04

gripsher-ultimate-multi-tool-05

 

The post Behind the Design: The GRIPsher Multi-Tool appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at December 01, 2016 10:15 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Dr. Strange Eye of Agamotto Enclosure Tutorial – Part 4

The all-seeing Eye of Agamotto is Dr. Strange’s most powerful of artifacts. While Strange is seen wearing this amulet around the clock, I sometimes wonder where he stores it when he is off-duty. He can’t possibly just leave something so precious just hanging in the closet while he sleeps? In this 4-part series, we’ll be designing a plastic enclosure for the Sorcerer Supreme to store the Eye while he is not using it to weaken evil mystical beings, probe the minds of others, or create portals to other dimensions. As you’ll see later in this series, we’ll be using the Eye’s powers to transport into the mysterious universe of fastening features! Stay tuned and you’ll come away realizing that these features aren’t so Strange, even for the uninitiated.

Welcome to the final part of our 4-part series where we are designing a plastic injectable enclosure around Dr. Strange’s all-seeing Eye of Agamotto. The Eye has transported us into the world of Fastening Features and up to this point we have added Lip/Groove, and hardware Mounting Boss Fastening Features. We are going to continuing navigating this world by adding in a few Snap Hooks and Snap Hook Grooves to our enclosure. We will wrap up our series by showing users how to create an Exploded View and Exploded Line Sketches directly within the Part modeling environment rather than having to move into the Assembly modeling environment.

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Even if you’re not protecting Earth from magical and mystical threats, we’re sure you have some precious artifacts in your arsenal! Use this tutorial series to help create an enclosure to store your most valuable belongings! Join us over the next few weeks as we cover a wide variety of topics such as Surface Lofts, the Lip/Groove Fastening Feature, and the more advanced Mounting Boss Fastening feature. Can’t wait for the next video? View all of the tutorials on the playlist here.

Where do you store your most power artifact? Share your creations with us in the comments below! As always, thanks for watching!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Dr. Strange Eye of Agamotto Enclosure Tutorial – Part 4 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at December 01, 2016 10:00 PM

SolidSmack

3D Platform Has Powerful New Extruders

3d-platform-large-format-3d-printer-extruder-00

3d-platform-large-format-3d-printer-extruder-00

You might be familiar with 3D Platform, a company dedicated to making large-format 3D printers. Now it seems they’re working on ways to make large prints much faster.

Many of the currently available large format 3D printers are simply scaled up versions of RepRap-style extrusion machines. This style of machine works perfectly well at the small scale, but there are some challenges to overcome when the dimensions get a lot larger.

While there are certainly challenges with materials, the fundamental issue is the speed of printing. It’s fine for a desktop machine to produce a fist-sized object in three hours, but that print speed often becomes excessive at scale. Remember,  doubling the size of one axis means eight times as much volume to print. And in the case of prints the size of 3D Platform’s units, that means an awful lot of printing.

For such machines, print elapsed times of many days or even weeks is not uncommon.

Extreme durations are certainly achievable due to the robustness of machine design, but will clients really want to wait that long for printing? Is there a way to speed things up? 3D Platform is doing some work in this area, as it would be a great advantage for not only their current equipment, but also for the larger gear they’ve proposed recently.

What have they been working on? Two things.

First, they’ve been experimenting with massively thick 6mm filament. This is a much larger filament offering 4X as much volume per millimeter of filament than the more common 3mm filaments, and almost 12X as much as 1.75mm filament found in many desktop units.

This “fat” filament could deliver a lot more plastic to the hot end, theoretically speeding up printing. Of course, this will likely be matched with appropriately-sized hot end nozzles in excess of 1mm in diameter.

The second innovation being developed by 3D Platform is enhanced heating. They’ve been working on a 300W heating element for their hot and and in future intend on offering a 900W version. This added power enables plastic to move much more rapidly through the hot end: more energy can soften the plastic faster. In “cooler” machines, if you run the plastic too fast there isn’t enough time to soften sufficiently and a jam may result.

3D Platform suggests that these improvements may speed up 3D printing operations by up to 7.5X. That’s a very significant figure: imagine a gigantic one week print taking only a single day.

Or seven gigantic prints in a week.

Read more at Fabbaloo

3d-platform-large-format-3d-printer-extruder-01

The post 3D Platform Has Powerful New Extruders appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at December 01, 2016 05:59 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

What’s new with the Wrap Feature in SOLIDWORKS 2017?

One of the many new features within the new release of  SOLIDWORKS 2017 is the enhancements made to the wrap feature. The update now allows users to apply sketch geometry to all face types and multiple faces simultaneously.

In this blog we will explore the options available to us in the property manager of the wrap feature and how the different options will create different appearances to the final design.

To express this feature, we will look at the recently designed Solid Solutions Hover Mower.

SOLIDWORKS Wrap Feature 2017

 

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Wrap FeatureWhen in the property manager of the wrap feature there are a number of options to choose from as seen in the accompanying image:

 

Wrap type: the wrap type dictates the protrusion applied to the sketch be it raised (emboss), indented (deboss) or simply imprinted on the surface (Scribe)

Wrap Method: the two wrap methods include the traditional analytical method whereby the sketch can be applied to cylindrical and conical faces and the new Spline surface method, used when applying a sketch to any face type.

Wrap Parameters: the selection made here define the sketch used and the faces to which the sketch needs to be applied to. Finally, the thickness value dictates the depth of the protrusion.

Pull Direction: this parameter determines the direction of the protrusion. Should a plane be selected, then the direction of pull will always be normal to the plane.

Accuracy: Controlled by a slider, this allows the user to determine how accurately the sketch is mapped to the surface, with a greater accuracy reducing the tolerance at which the defining geometry deviates from the sketch.

Preview: as with other features this indicates how the feature will look when applied to the model.

 

Within this case study of the Lawnmower, we can see how the various options alter the design of the model. Below we can see an example of how the wrap type varies from emboss, deboss and scribe when applied to the cutting blade of the lawnmower.

The feature is used here to add detail and inform the operator of the lawnmower the mounting orientation of the blade, should it be removed from the device and replaced.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Wrap Feature

Deboss

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Wrap Feature Deboss

Emboss

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Wrap Feature Emboss

Scribe

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Wrap Feature Scribe

Further to this the spline surface method was used to apply the perforations to the surfaces of the grass box. These perforations are essential to the air flow through the system to drive the impeller which help provide the lift for the lawnmower to hover. The design of the grass box can be seen below:

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Wrap Feature Lawn Mower

This concludes our summary of What’s New with the wrap tool in SOLIDWORKS 2017.

Go ahead and try it out for yourself!

By Jassim Alali

Applications Engineer

Author information

Solid Solutions Technical Team
Solid Solutions commenced business as a SolidWorks Training and SolidWorks Support provider in 1998 and has consistently achieved strong growth year-on-year to become the UK’s leading SolidWorks 3D CAD reseller. Growth has been completely organic and has been consistently driven by a focus on recruiting the best from academia and industry and by delivering high quality services to more than 4,000 customers. Our customers range widely in size and are drawn from a broad spectrum of industry sectors. SolidWorks software is used by over 2 million engineers and designers across the world. As a company we are dedicated and focused at providing first class training and support to help you realise the best return on your investment.

The post What’s new with the Wrap Feature in SOLIDWORKS 2017? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Solid Solutions Technical Team at December 01, 2016 04:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS Visualize User Spotlight: Jacek Koczmierowski

The Visualize Featured User spotlight has now launched! Join us here for a bi-monthly Q&A highlighting how one of your peers uses SOLIDWORKS Visualize in their daily workflow. This month’s featured Visualize user is Jacek Koczmierowski from Warsaw, Poland.

What you are seeing are not photographs or videos! They’re images created in SOLIDWORKS Visualize!

Q: Thanks for joining us this month, Jacek! Tell us a little about yourself and your role at your company.

A: I’m Jacek Koczmierowski and I work at DPS Software – the biggest Value Add Reseller of SOLIDWORKS in Europe. In our company my responsibilities include conducting trainings of SOLIDWORKS Products. I’m interested in design, renderings and industrial design. Of course my favorite training class is SOLIDWORKS Visualize!

Q: After seeing your images, it definitely shows you have amazing control of Visualize. How long have you been using this software?

A: I have been using Visualize since the first day when Visualize was released. When I heard that SOLIDWORKS will have its own product for professional rendering, I was really excited and I knew that it would be a great product! I use SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional, which has a lot of awesome features that I really love.

 

 

Q: How has the addition of Visualize improved the reach of your company?

A: As my company sells SOLIDWORKS products, extending our portfolio with SOLIDWORKS Visualize gives us a big opportunity to address the Customer who needs a professional tool for rendering. Additionally, some of our marketing images are created in Visualize.

Q: Do you think SOLIDWORKS Visualize is a ‘must-have’ for your customers to stay ahead of the competition?

A: Yes. Previously there were a lot of situations, where PhotoView360 from SOLIDWORKS was not enough. Currently Visualize fulfils this gap. With SOLIDWORKS Visualize, we can provide our Customers a tool which is super easy to use and generates amazing photo-quality results.

Q: What features do you use the most in Visualize?

A: It’s hard to say, because I use many of them. If I have to choose one, I would say I always use the Camera Post-Processing options, like Vignette and Depth of Field. It helps to make my renders more photorealistic.

Q: Your images from Visualize are truly remarkable. What is your favorite feature in Visualize?

A: I have a few favorite features; for sure it’s the Render Queue manager in SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional. With this feature I can save a lot of time and focus on preparing renderings, not on waiting until each rendering completes. Moreover, I really love Part Splitter feature – it’s very simple but really helpful if you want to split some geometry in your 3D model.  And last but not least, the Configuration feature which helps to create many variations of the same 3D model in one Visualize project – it’s great!

 

Q: What tip would you share with all the new Visualize users out there?

A: First of all, I take special care of appearances. For each model I create custom appearances using bump and specular texture mapping. It’s really important because in the real world, everything has some kind of bumps, texture, dust, etc. Using this site (http://cpetry.github.io/NormalMap-Online/) you can create your own bump or specular texture. Please remember that seamless textures are much better!

If you want to create renders which will look like a photo, you should pay attention to Environment and Lighting. You can play with it by changing the rotation of your scene (HDR) or by adding some additional lights in Visualize Professional. If you want something more, I’d recommend using HDR Light Studio, which is a plug-in available with SOLIDWORKS Visualize products.

For those who are looking for sites with high quality textures, it’s worth trying these:

https://www.poliigon.com/

http://episcura.com/

http://www.textures.com/

Finally, keyboard shortcuts are small but a useful “trick.” You can show all keyboard shortcuts by pressing F12 key in Visualize. Using keyboard and mouse shortcuts will save you time and make your life much easier!

 

Q: Anything else you’d like to add about your Visualize experience that our Visualize community will enjoy reading?

A: Be patient while rendering and don’t give up after some troubles and failures at the beginning. At the same time, don’t be afraid to experiment and try unknown features. Some of my discoveries were done accidentally. The greatest inspirations come from the world around you. Keep calm and Visualize!

Here are some more examples of Jacek’s amazing work. Thanks for sharing, Jacek and happy Visualize-ing!

 

 

 

 

 

If you have SOLIDWORKS CAD Professional or Premium and are on active Subscription, then you get SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard complimentary! And this included seat of Visualize Standard can be given to anyone in your company…even a different department! Visualize is a separate stand-alone product and does not occupy the SW CAD license. Sign into your SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal and click any of the “Download Visualize” links to get started.

Want to be spotlighted in this monthly blog post? Simply post your Visualize content to this SOLIDWORKS Visualize Forum link for consideration.

Explore more SOLIDWORKS Visualize blog posts right here.

 

Author information

Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner is the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager.

The post SOLIDWORKS Visualize User Spotlight: Jacek Koczmierowski appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Brian Hillner at December 01, 2016 01:30 PM

SolidSmack

Watch a Chain Link Fence Get Weaved Like a Giant Metal Sweater

feature

feature

As you might have guessed, manufacturing chain link fences involves a similar process to that of knitting a sweater—assuming that the machine is a mad giant with a flock of steel wool—bearing sheep.

Typically made from galvanized or LLDPE-coated steel wire, chain link fences feature a distinctive zig-zag pattern that isn’t just there for looks; each “zig” and “zag” is designed to create an optimal hook for the wire resulting in the unmistakable diamond pattern.

The machine was, in fact, modeled after a cloth weaving machine in 1844 by a Norwich, UK man by the name of Charles Barnard, co-founder of the firm Bishop & Barnard.

While manufacturing has changed more or less over the past century, the gist of the knit-like manufacturing process remains the same—as evidenced in this more recent video of a fully-automatic chain link fence machine:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nX_GeQ718WM?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The post Watch a Chain Link Fence Get Weaved Like a Giant Metal Sweater appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at December 01, 2016 01:05 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Change Multiple Sheet Formats at Once!

Changing the sheet format of any SOLIDWORKS drawing can be an unwanted task, especially if one has multiple sheets upon which to swap the format.

Sheet Format

Sheet Format too large for views

 

SOLIDWORKS 2017 has new functionality that swoops in for the assist. A new “Select Sheets to Modify” button now appears within the Sheet Properties dialog as shown in the figure below:

Sheet Properties dialog

Sheet Properties dialog

This option will allow you to select from a list of existing sheets, so that you can apply sheet properties, sheet formats,  and zone parameters to as many sheets as you would prefer — all at the same time!

Changing a SOLIDWORKS Sheet Format

  1. Open the Sheet Properties dialog via right-click on any Sheet.
  2. From the Sheet Properties tab, select the “Select Sheets to Modify” button.
  3. Select the sheets to change by selecting the checkboxes and Select OK.
  4. Set the desired Sheet Properties and Zone Parameters.
  5. Click Apply Changes.

    Sheet Selection

    Sheet Selection

The results are exactly as you would expect, all of the specified sheets have their sheet properties modified!

New SOLIDWORKS Sheet Format Applied

New Sheet Format Applied

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 Change Multiple Sheet Formats at Once! appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at December 01, 2016 01:00 PM

November 30, 2016

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Epoxy Syringe Tutorial

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Epoxy Syringe: This practical, familiar model shows various techniques on geometry creation. Multi-body part design creates two solids representing the cylinder and piston of this epoxy syringe. This model is mainly created with extrusion but some hybrid modeling is shown. Surface geometry is used to cut internal geometry of a solid model body where a shell feature would not work.

There are examples of surface modeling including: cut with surface, filled surface, extend surface, offset surfaces, surface trim and surface knit. There is an example of creating a Rib using the “Parallel to Sketch” option. Solid features include: extrudes, revolves, combines, mirror, delete face, split lines curves and the split command. There are examples of circular and linear patterns and mirrored geometry. Download this part to learn more about Hybrid Modeling and how to mirror and pattern Rib geometry.

Download: Epoxy Syringe
Complexity: Moderate
Features: Cut with Surface, Extrudes, Split Line Curves, Parallel to Sketch, Mirror, Pattern

View all the Part Reviewer Tutorials here.

DraftSight Download: In conjunction with DraftSight, Dassault Systèmes’ 2D CAD product, the 2D drawing(.dwg) file of the Epoxy Syringe tutorial is now available for download here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Epoxy Syringe Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at November 30, 2016 10:00 PM

The Secret Enhancements to SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Every year SOLIDWORKS makes enhancements to the software, much of it based on user feedback. They publish a “What’s New” document so that you can browse through and read about the hundreds of improvements that they made. There are improvements that get made that don’t make it into the document, however. I don’t know if they forget (after making hundreds of changes I’d forget some too) or if they consider them too minor. Regardless, I’ve been playing around with SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2017 service pack 0 and have found a few of those, and I thought I’d share them with you.

1.  Renumber drawings

The interface that shows up when you right-click on the book in the document tree and select renumber drawings has changed. There are more options, and you can change the formula not only for the documents, but the books and folders in the project as well. They also got rid of the “start numbering at” field. Some users may not approve of that, but personally I think that was a good idea since that was the only place that option was available, and every time you renumbered the documents it would default to 1. It is much better practice to just bake the start number into the formula.

OLD

enhancement1

NEW

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2. Ability to Edit Cable labels

Ever wanted to edit how the cable information is displayed when you reserve it on the Line Diagram? Or when you associate wires to cables in the Schematic? Now you can! Those get their own formulas so you can label it exactly like you want. Strangely it is on the Font tab of the project configuration instead of the Mark tab though.

enhancement3

3.  Colored text in the document tree

This one is just a nice visual indication. Any documents that are opened by you will appear with blue text on the document tree. If it is the active window, it will be bold blue. And any documents are opened by someone else on their machine, it will show up with red text.

solidworks electrical enhancement4

4.  Inserting rails and ducts

When you are inserting rails and ducts in the 2D cabinet drawing, you used to select the middle, and then when you moved the mouse it would change the length around that midpoint. Now when you place it, the length changes based on the left or top edge. I’d like to see some further improvement since the first click is still the (initial) midpoint, but it is a step in the right direction.

If you are currently using any of the 2017 releases, have you found anything else? Submit a comment below!

Brian Cooke is a Certified SOLIDWORKS Electrical Specialist and Electrical Application Engineer at 3DVision Technologies, a SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller with locations throughout Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana. He is a regular contributor to the 3DVision Blog.

Author information

3DVision Technologies
Founded in 1995 in Cincinnati, Ohio 3DVision Technologies Corp. has enjoyed over 18 years of success as one of the finest SolidWorks providers in the Great Lakes Region. 3DVision Technologies is a team of experienced mechanical engineers that support the visions of engineers globally. With solutions for the design and manufacturing industries including 3D solid-modeling, computer aided analysis, product data management and 3D Printers our products solve engineers' most important product development goals: higher quality products, less time to market, lower development costs, better design communication, collaboration and review.

The post The Secret Enhancements to SOLIDWORKS Electrical appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by 3DVision Technologies at November 30, 2016 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

CPQ for Manufacturing with DriveWorks

Online 3D CPQ for Manufacturing

DriveWorks configurator software is the ultimate choice in 3D CPQ for manufacturing.

DriveWorks software is optimized for sales and engineering teams and has been rigorously tested and endorsed by real manufacturing companies, as well as by Microsoft and SOLIDWORKS as Gold Partners.

The ability to configure, price and quote easily has become essential for manufacturing companies of all sizes, in all industries. Customized products are becoming the norm. Transform the way you do business by closing the gap between initial sales inquiry and manufactured product with DriveWorks CPQ for manufacturing.

CPQ for manufacturingAny Device. Anywhere.

Break free from the constraints of conventional configurators. DriveWorks configurators look and work great on any device, allowing you and your customers to configure custom designs anywhere.

CPQ for manufacturingEasy to Set Up. Easy to Use.

DriveWorks configurators are easy to set up with no programming skills or consultants required. Empower your sales teams, distributors and customers to configure complex custom designs quickly and easily.

CPQ for manufacturingImpress More. Sell More.

Impress your customers from the start with an easy to use configurator and quick, accurate quotes and responses. Respond more quickly and effectively than your competitors and win more orders.

CPQ for manufacturingBetter Quality. Better Reputation.

Providing more than just CPQ, DriveWorks product configurators are based on rules, calculations and logic, improving the quality of outputs, reducing costly errors and strengthening your reputation.

driveworks5

Immersive 3D

Let your customers see their custom products in impressive 3D and view the effects of their design changes immediately.

driveworks6Compelling Documents

Automatically send eye-catching branded documents that are personalized to each customer and order.

driveworks7Simple Templates

Get started quickly by customizing DriveWorks Sales Configurator and Catalogue templates with the intuitive Form Designer.

driveworks8Seamless Links

An easy to use workflow provides seamless links between teams as well as company systems such as CRM, ERP and CAD.

driveworks9

Time Saving Automation

Reduce repetitive tasks by automating customer responses and repetitive engineering tasks.

driveworks10Modular & Flexible

Additional modules can be added as and when you need them to create a product configurator that suits your needs.

 

Try out one of the many configurator examples on DriveWorksLive.com and contact us with your questions.

The post CPQ for Manufacturing with DriveWorks appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by John Mignardi at November 30, 2016 03:25 PM

SolidSmack

Adidas Unveils World’s First Biodegradable Running Shoe Made From Synthetic Spider Silk

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From 3d printing to recycled ocean plastic, Adidas has thrown everything we know about traditional sneaker manufacturing on its head as a part of their sustainability-focused Futurecraft initiative.

Described by the company as a “[creative hub] where imagination meets innovation,” their mission is to “expose the illusion of impossible and venture beyond the limits defined by the past” as a way to “disturb the present and create the future.”

And while it’s one thing to create a workshop full of mediocre outsole prototypes made on 3D printers without plans to scale manufacturing, the company is…well, actually managing to get closer to that goal without sacrificing the performance needs of athletes.

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More recently, the Futurecraft team teamed up with AMSilk, a fellow German company that manufactures synthetic spider silk called Biosteel. Along with having incredible strength worthy of supporting the foot of an active athlete in a lightweight shoe, the Biosteel also happens to be biodegradable. Together, the two companies collaborated on an entirely new type of running shoe that merges sustainability with performance: the Adidas Futurecraft Biofabric.

© adidas Group (photographer: Hannah Hlavacek)

© adidas Group (photographer: Hannah Hlavacek)

Says James Carnes, Vice President of Strategy Creation at Adidas:

“In a year of ground-breaking innovations from Adidas, the announcement of our partnership with AMSilk – and the unveiling of the Adidas Futurecraft Biofabric shoe – is another step in our commitment to redefining the sports industry.

This concept represents premium innovation. By using Biosteel fiber in our products, we have achieved an unrivaled level of sustainability. We are moving beyond closed loop and into an infinite loop – or even no loop at all. This is a pioneering stride forward beyond sustainability into a new territory of bionic innovation.”

© adidas Group (photographer: Hannah Hlavacek)

© adidas Group (photographer: Hannah Hlavacek)

While the shoe is still in a prototype phase, the company is hoping to launch it in stores next year.

The post Adidas Unveils World’s First Biodegradable Running Shoe Made From Synthetic Spider Silk appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at November 30, 2016 02:38 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

The Best Solution Should Come with the Best Resource: Unlock MySolidWorks Professional When You Purchase SOLIDWORKS

MySolidWorks is the online hub for over a million SOLIDWORKS users worldwide and tens of thousands of users use it every day to learn something new about SOLIDWORKS, to connect with the SOLIDWORKS community, or prepare for their certification exams.

Now through December 30, 2016 you can get more than just the best CAD solution when you purchase SOLIDWORKS with subscription. You can also unlock the best resource to help you design faster, and smarter with a free one-year subscription to MySolidWorks Professional (a $360 value). This offer is eligible for each new license of SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional, Premium, SOLIDWORKS PDM or SOLIDWORKS VISUALIZE you purchase with subscription.mysolidworks-visualize-course

Help your team get up to speed or jumpstart your SOLIDWORKS knowledge today. With the added value of MySolidWorks Professional you get:

  • Extended online training accessible anytime and anywhere, on any device
  • Over 1,000 online product tutorial videos with access to the most popular SOLIDWORKS training content including SOLIDWORKS Essentials, Advanced Part Modeling, Assembly Modeling, Electrical Design, Sheet Metal Design, Mold Design, and more.
  • Access to SOLIDWORKS certification prep courses designed to help you stand out professionally
  • In addition to the Certified SOLIDWORKS Associate (CSWA) preparation course, access all certification prep with CSWP, CSWE, and CSWPA preparation courses (Drawing Tools, Mold Tools, Sheetmetal, Surfacing, Weldments)
  • The latest SOLIDWORKS community news and resources – keeping you up to date.

MySolidWorks Professional adds value to your investment in subscription. It is the place to get the best answers to your questions about SOLIDWORKS® in one location. See below for more information about the added-value of MySolidWorks Professional.

mysw_pro_chart.png

Buy SOLIDWORKS with subscription by December 30th, 2016 and access over 1,000 product video tutorials at no additional cost for up to 12 months. Take advantage of this limited-time offer by contacting your reseller today.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post The Best Solution Should Come with the Best Resource: Unlock MySolidWorks Professional When You Purchase SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at November 30, 2016 01:30 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Reduce SOLIDWORKS assembly open times by specifying external reference search locations

If there is one topic that repeatedly sends our customers to sleep, it’s file references. But what if I could tell you that could save time whenever you open an assembly? Where is this magic time saving switch you ask?   It is squarely located within the “External References” section of the SOLIDWORKS 2017 options dialog, found under Tools > Options > System Options > External References.

Typical External References

In many cases our referenced file locations are pointing at locations that we (or our team) turn to for the most commonly reused components. If you have things setup in a logical manner it may mean that these directories are shared and that only a few people on your team have “gatekeeper” access to the location to add files.  If this is the case, it is more than likely that any files that you have misplaced are not located within your commonly referenced folders.

Typical External References

Typical External References

The fewer folders that SOLIDWORKS has to recursively wade through in order to locate a particular file, the faster it will open each and every assembly.  This is especially true with large assemblies which may have components referenced across a variety of network locations.

Full Speed ahead with your Search

In order to avoid SOLIDWORKS perform a recursive search back through those common component and shared libraries, you can uncheck the new option: “Reference Documents specified in File Locations”

External Reference control

External Reference control

This will prevent SOLIDWORKS from searching in those locations (the list typically gets longer the older the installation is).

If you choose to leave this checked; you can instead take advantage of a sub-option to avoid any open folders and anywhere you have recently saved items by selecting “Exclude active folders and recent save locations”

For system administrators looking to make this a default option that is locked for your users, please see my previous article on Locking User Options.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post Reduce SOLIDWORKS assembly open times by specifying external reference search locations appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at November 30, 2016 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Weekly App Smack 48.16: ViewRanger, NOISE, DashClock Cloud Monitor and More…

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It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device, be it iPhone, Android or Windows!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

ViewRanger

Discover thousands of inspiring trail guides, download detailed topo maps, and navigate your outdoor adventures with ViewRanger’s integrated navigation system.

Viewfinder

NOISE

Your touch screen becomes a real musical instrument with NOISE, which lets you shape sounds by drumming the screen, gliding your fingers along it, pressing into it, and lifting off. You make music through intuitive gestures on a grid of colorful pads. Each pad is a particular instrument or a note in a scale.

Noise

Redbooth

Redbooth is an intuitive task management and planning solution for individuals and teams to move work forward and accomplish great things.

Redbooth

DashClock Cloud Monitor

Easily keep track of your cloud storage by monitoring your DropBox, Google Drive and Box account storage in a single place.

DashClock

Alpha Security Antivirus

Alpha security is a light and effective app boost, Antivirus, wifi security guard, private browser history cleaner, comprehensive app lock system and phone accelerator to optimize your device.

AlphaSecurity

Medium

A place where conversation pushes ideas forward and words still matter.

Medium

The post Weekly App Smack 48.16: ViewRanger, NOISE, DashClock Cloud Monitor and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 30, 2016 12:58 PM

November 29, 2016

SolidSmack

The Artful Repurposing of Vinyl Records

Hap-LP-flowers-04

Hap-LP-flowers-04

Michael “Hap” Hapner is a midwest artist whose niche is repurposing everyday artifacts into colorful Spot & Dot art pieces. Our paths crossed recently at a Antique Vintage Artisan Market in Berrien Springs Michigan. Hap had brought along a sampling of his garden flower art pieces.

Michael-Hapner-250While most of the vintage wares were muted with tones that only the passage of time can authentically produce, Hap’s pieces were brilliant in color and had intricate patterns. His work immediately caught my eye and drew me in. It was this closer inspection that helped me understand the link these works of art possessed that fit them squarely in the vintage theme. I realized I was looking at bonafide classic Long-Playing records a.k.a LP’s. That’s right vinyl records folks! I’m talk’n the micro-grooved 33⅓ rpm record and the 45 rpm single variety.

image source image source

In an instant, in my mind, I was whisked back to yesteryear when my mom would pull the coffee table off to the side to make room for dancing. We’d put a stack of our favorite 45’s on and commence to “cut’n a rug” as she called it.

Stack of 45s-n-tunes-01
<audio class="wp-audio-shortcode" controls="controls" id="audio-83593-1" preload="none" style="width: 100%; visibility: hidden;"><source src="http://www.solidsmack.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Twistingthenightaway-SamCooke.mp3?_=1" type="audio/mpeg">http://www.solidsmack.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Twistingthenightaway-SamCooke.mp3</audio>

We’d dance to the likes of Twisting the Night Away, by Sam Cooke, and Dancing in the Street, by Martha Reeve, and the Vandellas. I relished the memory these colorful works of art momentarily afforded me. As we talked, it was clear that his art pieces that pay homage to the world of music are the ones he’s most fond of.

Hap-LP-flowers-03image source

Hap-LP-flowers-04image source

While we did not talk his crafting process per-say, its clear that Hap strategically uses the same elements of heat and pressure that went into making the original records. If you want to learn more about the making of vinyl records and their current cultural significance check out some of our previous posts.

Hats of to Michael “Hap” Hapner for transforming this normally 2D flat media into a 3D sculptural canvas bursting with color. His repurposing efforts allows each vintage disc of vinyl to live on. In their new form these works of art both entertain and sooth a whole new generation of folks.

Thanks Hap!

The post The Artful Repurposing of Vinyl Records appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at November 29, 2016 05:56 PM

Vintage Macs Find New Purpose in Mr. Plant’s Latest Terrarium Series

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When it comes to finding new uses for old tech, there’s more than one way to skin the cat. From turning an old tablet into a smart home controller to creating a dedicated home entertainment server with an old laptop, the possibilities for keeping your devices protected against the principles of Moores Law are seemingly limitless if you get creative enough.

But using old hardware as planters? That’s a new one

For his Plant Your Mac! collection, artist Christophe Guinet (AKA “Mr. Plant”) took a stab at converting a collection of “vintage” Macs—playing off of each’s own industrial design—into a series of species–specific terrariums as a statement against the growing state of computer production and planned obsolescence.

Plant_you_Mac_imacerium_monsieur_plant_2016_3

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“[All of my] compositions show us the beauty of nature through everyday cult objects,” he explains. “[I want to] minimize the harmful impact on the environment is in contrast to the escalation of consumerism and the race to keep producing new objects which are more technical and more ‘hyped’.”

Plant_Your_Mac_Carnivor_Monsieur_plant_2016_5

Plant_you_Mac_MacFire_monsieur_plant_2016_2

While Apple, in particular, is doing more than most other manufacturers when it comes to sustainability efforts, the underlying principle behind the series still stands: can’t everybody just take a break and get outside more?

Plant_you_Mac_macbonzai_monsieur_plant_2016_1_ok_carre

Check out the entire series over at Guinet’s website.

The post Vintage Macs Find New Purpose in Mr. Plant’s Latest Terrarium Series appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at November 29, 2016 01:09 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Mate Controller now supports Path Mates

If you are a newcomer to the Mate Controller functionality within SOLIDWORKS, then check out the video below to learn how it works:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wYfTkdDdrFo?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

For SOLIDWORKS 2017 a number of new features have been added to the Mate Controller which make its operation easier than ever before. Among these features are:

  • The ability to set Assembly mates to a “Driven” state, so they can be pushed around or “influenced” by other movements in the assembly.
  • The ability to generate configurations from positions you create within the Mate Controller.
  • The ability to use a Path Mate for specifying a position with the Mate Controller.

Using a Path Mate:

  1. In order to select a path mate for use within the Mate Controller, the path mate is required to have the “Distance Along Path” or the “Percent Along Path” option chosen.
  2. Once your path mate is in place in the assembly, You will be able to select it as one of the supported mates within the mate controller.
  3. It should then appear in the Mate Controller dialog, with the ability to modify the driving dimension (Percentage or Distance).
SOLIDWORKS Path Mate within Mate Controller

SOLIDWORKS Path Mate within Mate Controller

Stay Tuned for more articles relating to the Mate Controller enhancements mentioned above!

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 Mate Controller now supports Path Mates appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at November 29, 2016 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Why Women Hold the Key to Engineering’s Future

Half the world’s population is female. Sadly the employment rate in the engineering and, by extension, entire scientific community doesn’t reflect that. It’s embarrassingly low, at just six percent for female engineers.

Women hold the key to engineering’s future - and this is why 1

That’s a problem. And not just because of the inequalities of gender imbalance. The UK is a country built on engineering prowess – and right now needs up-and-coming graduates to fill scores of vacancies. With the sufficient talent and jobs, the British economy’s looking at an extra £27bn by 2022. That ought to pay for a couple more slide rulers for the nation’s kids.

But to claim that pot the industry requires 200,000 engineering trainees or graduates per year. That means doubling the current numbers joining the industry. With the measly 6 percent of females, major work needs to be done to enhance the attractiveness of the trade – the wages, working conditions and overall prospects of employment – to women.

 

The cultural shift to science

Women hold the key to engineering’s future - and this is why – Spacex

There’s an urgent need to engender belief and interest in the sciences beyond vocation and that’s not just engineering, but all STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering, and maths). To make science appealing and inspiring is a significant cultural step that the country needs to take if it is to attract more women. If we can actually achieve that, then the UK might start reducing its deficit of trained engineers.

So how’s that done then?

Well, cultural inroads are finally being made – and made determinedly. In June this year, the Women’s Engineering Society celebrated National Women in Engineering Day to both publicise the lack of females in the industry whilst championing those who are. During 350 school events across the country, with a further 200 elsewhere and a top trend on Twitter, the message was put across loud and clear that the industry needs women.

A gender imbalance in science leads to a gender imbalance in the kind of research undertaken. Without a healthy gender mix, whether subconsciously or otherwise, scientific research will be geared largely towards the concerns of those leading it. Fresh perspective and differing needs lead to greater discoveries and constant peer revisionism, the crux of progressive scientific research. Greater diversity results in more naturally creative and innovative work environments.

>> Females in tuition: tackling gender imbalance in UK engineering


The future has a Y chromosome

Attracting more women into STEM, and more specifically to engineering, isn’t just a female concern. It’s a drive that would benefit the whole strata of research and boost business. Starting now, with pressure groups such as WISE, awareness campaigns and a cultural shift away from stereotyped gender expectations from an early age, the UK can reclaim its industry foothold on the world’s stage again. That’s the key to engineering’s future.

The gradual momentum has started. The celebration and recognition have begun. With a positive start, we can generate and maintain a snowball effect of females turning their attention and efforts to the STEM industries. If it can become a trend, rather than a quirk, the world of engineering will be richer in both research and finance – and a more industrious force altogether.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Why Women Hold the Key to Engineering’s Future appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS UK at November 29, 2016 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The Extruded Parts (Autumn Edition)

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This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “Anenome” from The Brian Jonestown Massacre and work our way through tracks from Real Estate, Foxygen, Tame Impala, Youth Lagoon and others before wrapping up with “Nancy From Now On” from Father John Misty.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:46q5r4dFGByYN2crL2OaaB" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Extruded Parts (Autumn Edition) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 29, 2016 11:13 AM

November 28, 2016

SOLIDWORKS Blog | SOLIDWORKS Engineering & Design Blog

Urban Snowmobiling in Saint Paul: Levi LaVallee Rips It Up

You MUST Watch This!
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Author

Nick Weirens, Marketing Manager

November 28, 2016 07:13 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Case Study: Bolt Analysis

Hardware such as bolts, nuts and washers are generally used for connections and fixtures. They form an integral part of the component structural integrity. Bolts are governed by standards such as ASTM and are typically stamped with an identifying marking on the head during the manufacturing process. The bolts selected for any application typically take into account the manner in which it is applied while taking into account the most prevalent mode of failure. It follows that it would be in the designer’s best interest to understand how bolts fail to avoid those situations.

Consider a simple bolt modeled in SOLIDWORKS:

Roundhead Bolt 12mm DIA x 152MM LONG ASTM A307

bolt-analysis-image-01

 

It is worth noting that the tensile strength for that grade of bolt is approximately 60,000 PSI. Therefore, using plain carbon steel as a template, the tensile strength was adjusted accordingly.

bolt-analysis-image-02

 

Next, we can set up a test scenario using SOLIDWORKS Simulation where the bolt is fixed at the top with a base tensile load of 10,000 PSI applied at the bottom.

bolt-analysis-image-03

 

We can now mesh the bolt:

bolt analysis image 4

 

After running the Static analysis, we can do a section plot to understand how the stress are distributed in the cross section of the bolt. We find that the highest point of stress concentration occurs at the neck as expected with a value of 28,067 PSI.

bolt-analysis-image-05

 

Note that this value is fairly close to yield strength of the material 31,994 PSI. If a stress value approaches the yield strength, the general assumption of linear behavior of the material begins to breakdown. Therefore it is in our best interest to run a non-linear analysis as well.

bolt-analysis-image-06

 

Creating a new non-linear study and running a similar analysis we find that the actual stress is approximately 27,197 PSI.This value is less than the linear analysis but it is still close to yield.

Given these results it would be in the designer’s best interest to either reduce the load, increase the bolt diameter, or chose a higher grade bolt.

Sometimes bolt failure can occur due to other circumstances as well.  Specifications such as how much a bolt must be tensioned at installation can make a difference.  In other cases large batches can yield bolts with manufacturing defects which may fail below the yield stress.

Author information

FEA Training Consultants Inc.
FEA Training Consultants Inc. is an authorized SolidWorks value added reseller specializing in SolidWorks 3D CAD design, SolidWorks Finite Element Analysis(FEA) and SolidWorks Fluid Flow (CFD) Analysis. Our training and support for SolidWorksCAD design software is the BEST in its class. We are Ontario's leading VAR specializing in advanced SolidWorks Simulation (stress, thermal, vibration, dynamics, fluid flow analysis, etc.).

The post Case Study: Bolt Analysis appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by FEA Training Consultants Inc. at November 28, 2016 04:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Myomo Develops Custom, Fabricated Devices to Assist Paralyzed Users

Myomo started in the lab of Professor Woodie Flowers at MIT, who’s probably best known for being the founder of First Robotics. Two of his researchers developed a robotic solution to help people who suffer from neuromuscular disorders move again. Working with the local rehab hospital in Boston, they showed that they could help someone with a spinal cord injury overcome gravity and get their hand to their face when they otherwise could not.

The MyoPro is an upper extremity powered orthosis; or an exoskeleton that you wear over your arm and it can help you move your arm to perform daily tasks, like opening doors or lifting laundry baskets when you’re otherwise unable. It uses sensors that can detect when a user attempts to exert their muscle and it uses an electric motor to move their arm for them.

The MyoPro is a custom-made device for each person. First, a cast is taken of their arm to fabricate the proper fit. Then device settings are tuned specific to the amount of help that person needs to address their specific medical profile.

According to Sam Kesner, director of research and advance development at Myomo, SOLIDWORKS is exclusively used in the design of the MyoPro. “We use the primary modeling function to design all of our parts. We generate drawings and use them to interface with manufacturers. We also use simulation to prove the design out and try to reduce weight of the design as much as possible.”

Watch the video to see how the MIT spinout used SOLIDWORKS solutions from the very beginning to design every aspect of the device, collaborate with business partners, and fulfill regulatory requirements for medical devices. Click here to watch the video (registration may be required).

Author information

Kristen Wilson
Kristen Wilson
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, SolidWorks at Dassault Systemes
Senior Brand Offer Marketing Manager, Dassault Systemes SolidWorks. PR flack turned marketer, tech geek and football fan.

The post Myomo Develops Custom, Fabricated Devices to Assist Paralyzed Users appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Kristen Wilson at November 28, 2016 01:30 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to group component instances to condense the assembly tree size in SOLIDWORKS 2017

The Assembly tree for a large assembly file can turn into a very long list of components. In most cases many of the components are repeated such as bolts, nuts, washers, fittings, etc. Making folders and collecting the repeated components was the best technique to organize the components so they could be easily hidden or used in a configuration.

But now in SOLIDWORKS 2017 you can automatically group the same components with the same configuration into a folder-like structure in the assembly tree. Grouping components will condense the length of the assembly tree and make it easier to find components, especially in large assemblies.

SOLIDWORKS Group Components in Tree Display

In the assembly tree, right-click the top-level component and pick Tree Display > Group Component Instances from the shortcut menu, as shown in the figure below:

SOLIDWORKS Group Components Instances in Large Assemblies

Group Component Instances in Large Assemblies

The assembly tree before and after applying the grouping is compared in the following screenshots. It is clearly shown that the assembly has been significantly condensed after grouping, and the components are much easier to find. The number shown in brackets next to a component indicates how many instances of that component exists in the assembly.

Feature Manager Tree Before and After Grouping Components

Assembly Tree Before and After Grouping Components

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post How to group component instances to condense the assembly tree size in SOLIDWORKS 2017 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWP at November 28, 2016 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Monday List 48.16 | What We’re Reading This Week

feature

feature

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

How Humans Can Force the Machines to Play Fair
Theoretical computer science can be as remote and abstract as pure mathematics, but new research often begins in response to concrete, real-world problems. Such is the case with the work of Cynthia Dwork.

01

If Animals Have Rights, Should Robots?
We can think of ourselves as an animal’s peer—or its protector. What will robots decide about us?

02

Sketch Things Better with the 7 Ways of Seeing
You can make sketches in a sketchbook, on a piece of paper, on index cards or even on sticky notes.

7-ways-sketching

Affluenza Anonymous: Rehab for the Young, Rich, and Addicted
It’s easy to sneer, but maybe there’s something to the premise that wealthy kids have a particular set of mental health and addiction problems.

01

Here’s What Placebos Can Heal—And What They Can’t
The latest research in biochemistry reveals that your brain can actually self-medicate.

04

Running Into Danger on an Alaskan Trail
“It happened so fast: One moment I was running trails, the next I was staring a black-bear sow in the face, so close I could smell it, wild and pungent and alarming, and I knew it could smell me, too, my fear.”

06

The post The Monday List 48.16 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 28, 2016 12:41 PM

November 26, 2016

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Create industrial fabric, textile, and composite material Flat Patterns with ExactFlat

In my previous post I described how scanned data for a car seat model is imported and created in SOLIDWORKS with the help of ExactFlat. In this post I’ll describe the workflow to generate a SOLIDWORKS flat pattern from scanned data with ExactFlat. Below is an illustration showing the scanned car seat with the flat pattern created in ExactFlat.

ExactFlat formed and flat pattern

ExactFlat formed and flat pattern

ExactFlat Workflow

ExactFlat gives industrial fabric and textile manufacturers the ability to take their product design from screen to machine. The manufacturing workflow would follow a path like this:

ExactFlat Workflow

ExactFlat Workflow

ExactFlat Tools

The ExactFlat SOLIDWORKS add-in has all the tools needed to create the SOLIDWORKS flat pattern, plus additional tools shown below:

  • Seams
  • Hems
  • Hardware
  • Marker Output
  • Cost Calculations
  • Material Usage
  • Nesting Calculations
  • Material Assignment

Below is the car seat flat pattern with seams added.

SOLIDWORKS Flat Pattern

Seat Flat Pattern

Output to the shop floor is assigned through a Marker View, with all the appropriate layers being mapped to either the cut or pen tools  (also shown below):

Flat Pattern Marker View

Flat Pattern Marker View

The entire SOLIDWORKS Flat Pattern creation process can be viewed below:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vo6rQxA7kQc?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Conclusion

ExactFlat provides a complete start to end solution for pattern creation from scanned data. This could have been for any downstream application for fabric, soft goods, and composite product design.

To learn more about ExactFlat view our recent on-demand webinars in our blog or visit our ExactFlat product page.

The post Create industrial fabric, textile, and composite material Flat Patterns with ExactFlat appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Salmers at November 26, 2016 09:55 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Simulation: Get connected with Contacts

One of the big advantages of the SOLIDWORKS Simulation products is the possibility to test assemblies. This gives you a better understanding of the behaviour of parts during different loading types in an assembly. An important part of the study setup is the contact definition, so SOLIDWORKS Simulation knows how the different parts must be connected to each other. In this Tech Blog I want to give you a brief overview of the different contact options: Global Contact, Component Contact and Contact Set.

Short background
With contacts it’s possible to define the way parts are connected to each other. The following three options are available:

  • Bonded
    With this option two parts behave as if they were welded. So, in fact two parts will act as one part.
  • No Penetration
    This contact type prevents interference between two parts, but allows gaps to form. Note that this is the most time-consuming option to solve.
  • Allow Penetration
    This option treats two parts as disjointed. The loads are allowed to cause interference between parts. Using this option can save solution time if the applied loads do not cause interference, so you do not need to apply a No Penetration contact type between parts. Do NOT use this option unless you are 100% sure that loads will not cause interference.

contact_types

The contact options mentioned above can be defined at different levels in a Simulation study, these are: Global Contact, Component Contact and Contact Set. Let’s take a look how to use these in a proper way.

Global Contact
When analysing an assembly or multibody part, the Global Contact condition will be defined automatically in your study. And its type will be set to Bonded by default. You can see this in the Connections folder in the Study Tree.

global_contact_1

It’s important to know that Global Contact is only going to act at initially touching faces between all components in the assembly. So, if there is an initial gap (no matter how small it is) between the faces of two parts, then the Global Contact definition is not going to do anything. In this case the user has to define a Contact Set, which will be discussed later in this blog.

In some cases, you will need to define a Global Contact condition manually. To do this, right-click the Connections folder in the Study Tree and select Component Contact. Then, in the Component Contact PropertyManager, under Components, select Global Contact. This will automatically select the complete multibody part or top-level assembly. After you selected the desired Contact Type, you can hit OK and the Global Contact is defined.

Component Contact
The Component Contact condition behaves the same as Global Contact. This means that, in the case of Component Contact, the faces of two parts need to be initially touching. A Component Contact condition will always overrule the Global Contact condition. So, when all parts are bonded together by a Global Contact, you can still apply a No Penetration contact between some parts in the assembly.

To apply a Component Contact, right-click the Connections folder in the Study Tree and select Component Contact. Then, in the Component Contact PropertyManager, under Components, select the bodies to which you want to apply the chosen Contact option. Note that the chosen Contact option will be applied between all the touching faces of all selected components. If you want to apply an exception to one of the faces selected by the Component Contact, you will need to apply a Contact Set, which will be discussed later in this blog.

Starting from SOLIDWORKS 2016 a new option was added to the Component Contact PropertyManager: Non-touching faces. It is only available when the Contact Type is set to Bonded. The option works with both Global and Component Contact and it breaks with the traditional method that faces for a Global or Component Contact need to be initially touching. So, with this option checked, the program creates bonded contact between face pairs that are not touching, but are within a user-specified maximum distance. This can be a real time-saver!

non_touching_face_option

Contact Set
During the explanation of the Global Contact and Component Contact conditions, I already hinted a bit about the use of the Contact Set condition. So here are the main two reasons why you should choose for a Contact Set:

  1. Exceptions
    A Contact Set condition overrules the definition of a Global and/or Component Contact condition. So, this is the ultimate tool to get the right contact definition at the location you desire.
  2. Initial gaps
    As mentioned earlier the Global and Component Contact conditions can only be used for initially touching faces. So, with the help of a Contac Set you can close this gap and define the right contact definition for these areas.

To apply a Contact Set, right-click the Connections folder in the Study Tree and select Contact Set. Then, in the Contact Sets PropertyManager, under Type, select the faces to which you want to apply the chosen Contact option.

It is a good habit to select the largest face in the bottom selection box (Faces for Set 2), because this face may be meshed with a larger element size. This is especially interesting for No Penetration contacts. Make sure to define contact sets per one face reference. For example, in the image below, one contact set is defined for the red faces and one contact set is defined for the green faces. Would all of these faces be selected in one contact set condition, then the program is not able to make the right contact conditions.

contact_set_example

Conclusion
As we have seen it is quite important to use the right contact definition at the right location in your Simulation Study. To summarize:
Specify Global, Component, and Contact Set definitions efficiently to define the problem. Note that for Global and Component Contact, you do not select specific entities since they apply only to initially touching areas. Use Global Contact to define the most common desired condition and then override it by specifying Component Contacts and Contact Sets wherever needed. So, Global Contact is overruled by Component Contact, and Contact Set will overrule them both. The image below covers the hierarchy of contact definitions and is good to remember.

contact_hierarchy

This is bringing me to the end of this tech blog for now. I hope you enjoyed reading it and learned some valuable things to use in your next Simulation Study!

Written by Martijn Visser

Author information

CAD2M
CAD2M is certified reseller of SOLIDWORKS, SolidCAM, DriveWorks and our private label dddrop 3D printer. The CAD2M approach integrates this range of products into an all-in-one solution that covers the complete product development process. Take the full advantage of working in 3D with our advice, training and expertise. For more information, visit www.cad2m.nl.

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation: Get connected with Contacts appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CAD2M at November 26, 2016 04:00 PM

November 25, 2016

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Dr. Strange Eye of Agamotto Enclosure Tutorial – Part 3

The all-seeing Eye of Agamotto is Dr. Strange’s most powerful of artifacts. While Strange is seen wearing this amulet around the clock, I sometimes wonder where he stores it when he is off-duty. He can’t possibly just leave something so precious just hanging in the closet while he sleeps? In this 4-part series, we’ll be designing a plastic enclosure for the Sorcerer Supreme to store the Eye while he is not using it to weaken evil mystical beings, probe the minds of others, or create portals to other dimensions. As you’ll see later in this series, we’ll be using the Eye’s powers to transport into the mysterious universe of fastening features! Stay tuned and you’ll come away realizing that these features aren’t so Strange, even for the uninitiated.

In the third installment of our tutorial series, the power of the Eye is transporting us into a new world: the world of Fastening Features!  While this world may seem mysterious to the uninitiated, you’ll walk away from this tutorial realizing fastening features aren’t so Strange after all.  We will step gently into this new universe by introducing users to the Lip/Groove fastening feature and we will progress to introducing the more advanced Mounting Boss Fastening Feature.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CVdOjzV9KrY?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

Even if you’re not protecting Earth from magical and mystical threats, we’re sure you have some precious artifacts in your arsenal! Use this tutorial series to help create an enclosure to store your most valuable belongings! Join us over the next few weeks as we cover a wide variety of topics such as Surface Lofts, the Lip/Groove Fastening Feature, and the more advanced Mounting Boss Fastening feature. Can’t wait for the next video? View all of the tutorials on the playlist here.

Where do you store your most power artifact? Share your creations with us in the comments below! As always, thanks for watching!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Dr. Strange Eye of Agamotto Enclosure Tutorial – Part 3 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at November 25, 2016 10:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Scan Data Workflow for Pattern Creation and Manufacturing

So you bought a scanner…you thought it would be easy to take scanned data and turn it into something useful without a lot of work. Maybe it isn’t as easy as the product demonstration you saw? The goal of this post is to help you with a scan data workflow for using your scanned data for downstream applications like pattern creation and CAM.

Scanner

Scanner

Scanning has so many positive attributes and shows the promise of why you bought it in the first place. The key to scanning is to be able to get the output you need without a lot of work. With this key point in mind, you need to consider the types of surfaces/objects you are scanning and the technology you are using.

Types of surfaces/objects you are scanning

For this article, I will consider the geometry to be scanned as the determining factor of the process and break it down into two distinct types of geometry:

1. Ornate, Organic Surfaces

This type of geometry requires technology that can easily capture very fine surfaces with abrupt changes. Typically, the data created has a very low tolerance to capture the detail, resulting in very large files that require specialized software to manipulate the dataset efficiently. Good examples of this would be a human face, or a highly detailed crystal flower vase, or similar items. Technologies used to capture this type of data would be laser scanning or light scanning technologies.

2. Flowing, Mathematical Surfaces

This type of geometry requires technology that can easily capture large, designed/manufactured surfaces with edges that are defined by the manufacturing process, (molded, stamped, sewn, formed, forged). Typically, the geometry created has tangent or curvature continuous surfaces that flow from one surface to the next. This data can be accurately represented by spline networks, (cross-sections) and classic surfacing techniques. This type of data collection can utilize very small data sets. Good examples of this would be a car fender, boat hull or an upholstered chair. Technologies used to capture this type of data would be single point digitizing or laser scanning or similar technologies.

Scan Data Workflow

The workflow for these two processes look like this:

Scanned Data Workflow

Scanning Workflow

Workflow for scanning Ornate and Organic Surfaces

The focus to get a usable output is on the scanning part of the process itself. As there is so much detail in the geometry, all effort is spent during the scan to make sure that this is captured. This can be quite time consuming based on the shape of the part itself.

The idea is to be able to take enough data that you can go directly to using the scanned data in downstream applications.

Workflow for scanning Flowing, Mathematical Surfaces

For this surface type, upfront knowledge is required when scanning to get only the data that is required. Understanding the reference data you need reduces how many data points to take and makes the job real easy!

This provides a couple of upside benefits:

  • Scanning time is much quicker: you don’t have to take so much data
  • Geometry creation is fast as you have exactly the data you need, you don’t have to figure out what you want to keep and what you want to discard,

Here is an example of a boat hull with different scan resolutions to show you what I mean:

Scan Sample A; Full Scan 10% Scan

To accurately capture the geometric shape of the scanned part, very little data is needed. Capturing the outline and defining contours (cross-sections) that can accurately describe the part’s shape is all that is required.

This scan was done in a similar fashion to what a laser scanner would produce. Lots of data over the entire part.

Filtering points

Having a quick filtering tool to reduce the amount of data down to what you need is a critical part of the process. The above example Scan A has 8714 points, Scan B has 870!

Processing time to bring in Scan B is 3 seconds!

The process to bring in these raw data points is very simple. The data is in a human-readable, flat ASCII format that can be viewed in Notepad or Excel. Here is what the data looks like:

Scanned Data

Scanned Data

Scan workflow example

In this example, here is what the workflow looks like to import the scanned data into SOLIDWORKS with ExactFlat:

Scan Process

Scan Process

Finally, after about 3 minutes of work converting the data to a surface model, the finished part is ready to go in SOLIDWORKS!

Scanned model in SOLIDWORKS

Scanned model in SOLIDWORKS

For parts with symmetry, scanning time is cut in half as only half the part needs to be scanned and modeled. Below is a great example of a car seat utilizing the same process as above incorporating symmetry to cut scanning and modeling time down by as much as 50%!

Car seat scanned data

Car seat scanned data

Critical factors to consider when scanning

Scanning can be a great way to capture parts digitally that need to have replacement parts manufactured, engineering changes made, or entire new designs created. Utilizing the technology and understanding the key driving parameters for what types of scanning you need to do are important to the success of your project!

 

  • Understand your project based on geometry detail
  • Map out the data you want to acquire, use masking tape/guides to get the correct sectional data.

If you already have a scanner, you have just about everything you need to get started.

The Scan Data Workflow described above was put in place to create flat patterns of complex geometry that typically takes a long time to develop using manual methods. Scanning is a key part of this process as you need to have the data first before you can create the patterns. Look out for my next post on creating the flat pattern within SOLIDWORKS.

Conclusion

I hope you found this post helpful for understanding the basics for creating an efficient workflow to use scanned data to create usable geometry for an engineering application. Sometimes there are gaps between adjacent technologies that need to be bridged before a workflow can become very efficient.

To learn more view our recent ExactFlat on-demand webinars in our blog or visit our ExactFlat product page.

The post Scan Data Workflow for Pattern Creation and Manufacturing appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Salmers at November 25, 2016 07:49 PM

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Lock Column Width & Row Height formatting now saved in BOM Templates

BOM Tables in SOLIDWORKS can sometimes create as many issues as they often solve, as you take the time to manipulate the shape of your table against a given drawing template.  After all of the manipulation via dragging columns and rows to a perfect height, you discover you have to do it again, for the very next table.

SOLIDWORKS lock column width

SOLIDWORKS lock column width

The advanced formatting in tables can assist us to some degree, as the ability to Lock row heights and column widths was introduced in SOLIDWORKS 2010.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 will save oodles of time when inserting BOM tables as Lock Column Width & Row Height settings are now saved with the template!

This is only available when saving the template as a *.SLDBOMTBT file, as the other template options do not retain the same data when saved.

Save BOM Template

Save BOM Template

Getting started

Follow this simple procedure to get started with a BOM table template immediately:

  1. To save the table template file, select the Multi-Directional Arrow from the Upper-Left corner of the table, right-click, and select “Save As” from the shortcut menu.
  2. You will be prompted for the desired filename and save location.
  3. Upon insert into a new drawing, you can choose what template is used to control the appearance of the table.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 Lock Column Width & Row Height formatting now saved in BOM Templates appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at November 25, 2016 01:00 PM

November 24, 2016

SolidSmack

2016 Black Friday Deals for Product Designers and Engineers

black-friday-2016-puppy-01

black-friday-2016-puppy-01

Ahh… do you feel that? That turkey bone stuck in your throat as you ponder discounts and deals on all sorts of gadgets, gizmos and product dev tools? Well, wash that bone down with a swig of cranberry sauce quick, because we’ve got our eye on the best deals of the day. Keep an eye out too, because we’ll be posting more throughout the day. See a deal too good to pass up? Send it in and we’ll get it on the list.

Ready? Here are the best deals and discounts we’ve found for Black Friday 2016!

Seagate 8TB Drive

A massive 8TB of external storage plus 2 USB 3.0 ports – 32% OFF
black-friday-2016-solidsmack-06-seagate-8TB

Code Black Drone

Small with 6-axis flight control system and ob-board HD camera – $30 OFF
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All Gerber Products

From knives and axes to… knives and axes! – Up to 28% OFF
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Kano Computer Kit

Build a computer, learn to code with this Pi powered kit. Our kids love this and is highly recommended – $50 OFF
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Autodesk Fusion 360

Sculpting, mechanical design, simulation, collaboration and CAM all in one. Deal starts Friday, Nov 25th. – 80% OFF
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Inventables X-Carve

Desktop CNC Machine to cut, carve and mill. – $100 OFF
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Canary Security Camera

Set-up, see, hear and stream your home in minutes, from anywhere. – $30 OFF
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Amazon Echo

Voice-activated device to play music, control devices and more. – $30 OFF
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KeyShot Pro and HD

Use code BF2016 at checkout all day Friday, until midnight PST – 20% OFF
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Rostock Delta 3D Printers

The Rostock, Orion and Eris Delta Printers all on sale through 11/28 – Up to $100 OFF
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Sonos PLAY:1

Awesome sound that streams your music in multiple rooms – $50 OFF
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Prismacolor Premier

36-count! Absolutely the best colored pencils and rare to find them at this price – 26% OFF
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iPad Pro

iPad Pro 12.9″ and comes with Apple Pencil and Smart Keyboard – 22% OFF
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Paper Wallet

The unique paper wallets that hold a whole lotta stuff – 30% OFF
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HDRI Packs

Two excellent, high-quality HDRI Packs at 30% OFF – Exterior | Interior
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SolidProfessor Courses

SolidProfessor Standard, Professional, and Premium memberships are 25% off for Black Friday (promo code FRIDAY) and Cyber Monday (promo code CYBER) – 25% OFF
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Brother HL-3170CDW Digital Color Printer

High speed color printing with Wi-Fi and Amazon Dash enabled – 20% OFF
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LifePower Portable Power Outlet

Packing 99.9 Wh of energy (27,000mAh) using the same lithium ion battery tech as Tesla – 30% OFF
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AKG Noise Cancelling Headphones

An amazing design with amazing sound, noise cancelling too – 40% OFF
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HTC Vive VR

Room-scale VR with loads of 3D apps and games on Steam – $100 OFF
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Graphic

All three! Graphic for Mac, iPad and iPhone for just $27.99 – 20% OFF
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GoPro Hero

Record 1080p30/720p60 video, capture 5PM single, Time Lapse and Burst photos up to 5 fps – 31% OFF
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Crosley Record Player

Three-speed turntable and style for miles, plus a USB connection to rip it up – 31% OFF
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Stay tuned! More to come. Share your finds in the comments!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

The post 2016 Black Friday Deals for Product Designers and Engineers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 24, 2016 05:24 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

How Does That Turkey Thermometer Work?

I’m going to finally answer a burning question you have wondered for many years. How does a turkey popup thermometer work?

From airplanes to bicycles, the history of engineering has time and time again shown us that simplicity in design, works! A staple of many family Thanksgivings throughout America, the turkey and the red popup thermometer, never let us down. (It may put you down however) Let’s take a look at the components involved.

turkey thermometer

Figure 1: Thank you How Stuff Works

2016-11-14_11-46-53

The ingenious part of the design is a small amount of a low melting point substance. As you can image, this is super top secrete stuff and is a closely guarded potion of metal. I was not able to find out the exact alloy, but I believe it may be a nickel/tin mixture of sorts. Regardless, when this metal goes through a phase change from solid to a liquid state, (usually at around 180F), the red stick is released, and all poor Tom needs at that point is a little gravy.

Then I had a thought. What if I could engineer this thermometer to be used for everything from a piece of toast to a rump roast? Even I may be able to cook then!

As an Application Engineer for TPM in Raleigh NC, home of the RTP (Research Triangle Park), it is very common that we run into thermal issues in electronic designs. Processors are getting faster, and run hotter than ever. Typically I would approach this sort of a problem with SOLIDWORKS FLO and utilize the Electronic Cooling module functionality. But…this is not a pacemaker, it’s a turkey.

For this Blog, I’m assuming thermal conduction is ideal and I have chosen to illustrate the transient thermal analysis environment of SOLIDWORKS Simulation. I’ve also done my best to replicate food from a material property standpoint. Keep in mind, there are several ways to approach this.

2016-11-14_13-11-10

Half section of preprocessed model

First, I needed to setup my sensors.

I may know the temperature I want my toast. This would be a sensor.

I may know the temperature of the environment it will be in. This would be another sensor.

I may not know how much (volume) of the secrete metal I need for a given setup, or if I need a new alloy all together. The temperature of the secrete metal then becomes a sensor as well.

2016-11-14_13-35-15

Now the fun begins. I can start to play with these variables. Ie: Toast temp, Environment temp, and don’t forget time. The question then becomes, what are we solving for?

2016-11-14_13-43-29

Figure 2: Time and increment (resolution)

2016-11-14_13-41-30

Figure 3: Convection input, and Initial temperature of 32F…. If your turkey is frozen.

To simplify, I’m using toast as an example. Note: When using sectioned geometry, be sure to account for this in your thermal loading values. Let’s assume we don’t know how long we want to cook our frozen piece of toast. However, I do know the temperature (power) at which we will cook our toast. (I know you toast…toast, but that doesn’t work for this). I also know the melting point of the metal. All I need to know is at what point my desired toast temperature, and the melting point of the metal converge.

Figure 4: Heat applied to back and right side. Plot represents 30 seconds into cooking.

Figure 4: Heat applied to back and right side. Plot represents 30 seconds into cooking.

Figure 5: Almost done....yummy!!

Figure 5: Almost done….yummy!!

Figure 6: This study achieved 180F in both the metal and the food at about 150 seconds. Of course the outside is a little crisp!

Figure 6: This study achieved 180F in both the metal and the food at about 150 seconds. Of course the outside is a little crisp!

So, go ahead and try it out. It’s a fun study, and a great way to learn about our thermal offerings. If any of you really have some time on your hands, you can run this in SOLIDWORKS Flo first, then import the convection information into the transient study for a complete understanding of the system. For additional tips and information please visit: http://blog.tpm.com/topic/manufacturing

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!


By: Rob Stoklosa • SOLIDWORKS Application Engineer • TPM

Author information

TPM
TPM, Inc. is the Carolina’s largest 3D CAD provider and a leading technology company proud of its reputation of providing cutting-edge solutions to the engineering and design community for the past 40 years. Founded in 1973, TPM Inc. serves more than 3,000 customers across the Southeast each year. Inspired by our founder, Jerry Cooper, we are committed to offering our clients the best: 3D Design Software, 3D Printing and Scanning Options, Data and Document Management Solutions, Large-Format Graphics, Wide-Format Plotters and Office Equipment, and Reprographics.

The post How Does That Turkey Thermometer Work? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by TPM at November 24, 2016 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Active Directory users no longer automatically updated!?

Any SOLIDWORKS PDM vault administrator that uses the Windows Active Directory integration within PDM to manage users will have noticed the slow process of expanding the users node via the administration tool.

When the users node is expanded SOLIDWORKS PDM software has to validate each user in the vault against the Active Directory groups and users in the Windows login settings.  Multiple validation requests are required for each user and in some environments and this can take a long time. In extreme cases there have been reports of 20-30 minutes to complete.

This can be frustrating if you’re only trying to access the users node for a simple change. Which is why SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2015 SP4 and newer by default does NOT automatically check for changes in Active Directory and is a manual process to complete.

Manually Validating Logins

To validate the logins; Administration Tool > [right-click] Users > Validate Logins;

Validate Logins for Active Directory

Validate Logins for Active Directory

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS PDM

Attend our SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration training course to learn more about administering SOLIDWORKS PDM.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Active Directory users no longer automatically updated!? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Williams at November 24, 2016 01:00 PM

November 23, 2016

SolidSmack

Behind the Design: Herman Miller Remasters the Classic Aeron Chair

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feature

As anybody who sits in front of the computer for at least eight hours a day knows, a great office chair is an absolute necessity if you plan on walking upright without pain any time in the next 20 years (or good heavens, the next 20 minutes).

And unsurprisingly, behind every great office chair is a deep knowledge of human-centered design. When it comes to the upper echelon of the modern office chair, it’s hard to have a conversation without mentioning the Aeron from Herman Miller.

HM_Aeron4

The brainchild of design engineers Bill Stumpf and Don Chadwick, the Aeron provided a gigantic step in human ergonomics and material innovation without the standard use of foam, fabric, or leather when it was released in 1994. Unsurprisingly, the Aeron took off as the office chair of choice in many web startups during the 1990s.

But just like computers and cloud services, office chairs need a reboot every once in a while, too.

HM_Aeron2

Earlier this year, Herman Miller tapped Don Chadwick to start from scratch and remaster the Aeron for a new generation. New features include an updated suspension system, a new tilt mechanism, additional spine support adjustments, and more while also stripping off weight.

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Says Herman Miller:

“While its iconic form has remained largely unchanged, the Aeron Chair has been remastered from the casters up to meet the needs of today’s work. With the help of original co-designer, Don Chadwick, we thoughtfully updated the chair based on the latest research around the science of sitting, and advancements in materials, manufacturing, and technology.”

Find out more over at Herman Miller.

The post Behind the Design: Herman Miller Remasters the Classic Aeron Chair appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at November 23, 2016 05:18 PM

James Dyson Opens His Own Engineering School to Curb UK Skills Shortage

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DysonInst-5

Despite drastic efforts to increase STEM education across the country, as well as a renewed interest in industrial design thanks to a new crop of product design startups in London, the number of skilled UK engineers is actually on the decline.

Enter James Dyson.

As the sole owner of Dyson Ltd, James Dyson is no stranger to taking matters into his own hands when it comes to problem-solving. Heck, it’s been said that he spends over $6 million per week to solve design and engineering problems in his R&D department alone.

To help curb this skills shortage, the British inventor is opening a new college to train engineers in the UK starting in the fall of 2017.

DysonInst-6

Called the Dyson Institute of Technology, the Wiltshire, England—based school will be housed at the company’s existing headquarters and will offer 25 seats to engineering students per year. Rather than paying to attend the school, Dyson will instead pay them $20,000 salary (as well as bonuses) while they work alongside Dyson’s design and engineering teams four days a week, while the fifth day will be spent in the classroom reflecting on their learnings.

DysonInst-1

“We are competing globally with Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and Singapore,” explained Dyson. “It’s all the major technology nations and we have got to be better than them. It is a problem in America and Europe and has started to become a problem in Japan. It seems that the fast-growing economies or emerging nations really recognize the value of engineering, but when you reach security there is less interest in what makes you successful.”

DysonInst-2

Although the program doesn’t involve tuition fees, they do require that potential candidates have at least an AAB at A Level or equivalent (340 UCAS points), including an A grade in both Mathematics and at least one other STEM-related subject.

“The Dyson Institute of Technology will not only offer students the chance to study on cutting-edge, degree-level programs, it will also play a vital role in educating the next generation of much-needed engineers,” added UK Universities Minister Jo Johnson.

DysonInst-3

While 25 students a year will hardly solve the entire country’s growing skills shortage, perhaps Dyson’s bold move is something that other companies—both in the UK and elsewhere—should start looking at more closely.

Find out more about the school or how to apply over at the Dyson Institute of Technology.

The post James Dyson Opens His Own Engineering School to Curb UK Skills Shortage appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at November 23, 2016 04:46 PM

Papercube is an Insane Miniature Laser Cutter and Factory Made from LEGO

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We don’t really know where to begin with this one, so we’ll just start by putting our hands on our heads to keep our brains from exploding.

Created by a student at the Jade University of Applied Sciences in Lower Saxony, Germany, the Papercube is a “LEGO Mindstorms Education-Based Process for Manufacturing Paper Cubes” at least according to the video.

More importantly, though, is that somebody sat down with hundreds of LEGO Mindstorm bricks and created an entire miniature factory for doing one thing and one thing only: laser cutting and folding miniature paper boxes.

Consider us impressed:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BHBlOzzV-Qk?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The post Papercube is an Insane Miniature Laser Cutter and Factory Made from LEGO appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at November 23, 2016 04:45 PM

Model of the Week: Fidget Spinner [Spin, Baby, Spin!]

fidget-spinner-3d-model-thingiverse-00

fidget-spinner-3d-model-thingiverse-00

Think about it. What are you suppose to do with your fingers when you’re not CAD’ing about or peeling through the pages on SolidSmack? You could eat… or make stuff… or give your co-worker a very awkward massage, OR you could fidget. Fidget, fidGET, FIDGET. I’m a pen spinner myself, but Francesco Pantaleone has just revealed to me another way to fidget my life away.

Francesco says, “This Trispinner is smaller than other designs on Thingiverse” ….wait, there are more?! Sure enough. There are no less than a thousand other fidget spinners on Thingiverse, but this one, THIS ONE, is designed so it spins between the fingers at every position. “LET THE FIDGET TRICKS MADNESS BEGIN!!”

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zfdpgpnjL9o?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

It’s a beautifully simple design printed with ColorFabb Woodfill at 0.20 mm layer height on a Prusa i3 MK2. I am absolutely impressed with the results on that printer – look how tight those layers are! Though not specified, it looks like it uses standard 608 ZZ bearings (22mm OD x 8mm ID x 7mm Width).

You can download the files (three in total) on Thingiverse. (BONUS! Grab one of his other LEGO models on his project page!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

fidget-spinner-3d-model-thingiverse-01

fidget-spinner-3d-model-thingiverse-02

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

The post Model of the Week: Fidget Spinner [Spin, Baby, Spin!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at November 23, 2016 04:44 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Assembly Visualization Sort Assembly Components by Open Time

A new capability to sort SOLIDWORKS components in the assembly tree by the time it takes to open the component file has been added to SOLIDWORKS 2017.

The file size of a SOLIDWORKS part file may not be considered very important unless many of them are inserted in a large assembly. Among many files found in a large assembly, some have a larger file size due to their specific design. Having a good understanding of which components take longer to load allows us to have a closer look at specific files; in order to simplify or even remove it from the top-level assembly. This will help you to decrease the overall time for opening your large assembly file.

Assembly Visualization

With an assembly file open in SOLIDWORKS, you can select Assembly Visualization from the Evaluate tab or under Tools > Evaluate > Assembly Visualization. As shown in the following screenshot, the SW-Open Time column shows the time in seconds to load each component. Plus, a Value Bar can be turned on to provide a visual indication of the open time to make identifying parts with the longest open time even easier.

SOLIDWORKS Sort Assembly Components by Open Time

SOLIDWORKS Sort Assembly Components by Open Time

Sort Components Based on Ascending/Descending Open Time

Clicking on the SW-Open Time column column header will sort the components by ascending values; and clicking on the column header for a second time changes it to descending values. In the figure below the values start from 0.23 sec. down to 0.02 sec.

Sort base on descending open time

Sort based on descending open time

Add More Columns to Assembly Visualization

As shown in the following image, it is possible, in the Assembly Visualization, to add various columns such as Total Weight, Density, and Volume. This capability allows monitoring the feature tree components all in one place. Clicking on the “More” will open up Custom Column window which allows us select a number of other possibilities for columns.

Add More Columns

Add More Columns

Custom Columns

Custom Columns

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 Assembly Visualization Sort Assembly Components by Open Time appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWP at November 23, 2016 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Weekly App Smack 47.16: Hopper, Detour, Inscape, Photoshop Fix and More…

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It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device, be it iPhone, Android or Windows!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Hopper

Hopper is like a super-fast, all-knowing travel agent that will help you save up to 40% on our next flight by predicting the future lowest price!

Hopper

Detour

Immersive audio walks that guide you through the world’s most interesting places with the people that know them best. Whether exploring solo or with friends, Detour will change the way you experience places.

Detour

Inscape

INSCAPE creates immersive meditation and relaxation experiences by merging tradition, modern thinking, and of-the-moment technology to address the three main reasons people meditate: health, performance and meaning.

Inscape

Adobe Photoshop Fix

Adobe Photoshop Fix enables powerful, yet easy image retouching and restoration on your Android phone.

PhotoshopFix

Polarr Photo Editor

Used by the world’s most professional photographer groups, Polarr offers advanced auto-enhance tools and sophisticated filters to edit every detail of your photo.

Polar

Alto

We have a different way of doing email.

Alto

The post Weekly App Smack 47.16: Hopper, Detour, Inscape, Photoshop Fix and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 23, 2016 12:58 PM

November 22, 2016

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

2D Airfoil: Multiparametric Optimization in Flow Simulation

In the Fall and Winter of 1901, Orville and Wilbur Wright completed the most comprehensive study of airfoils to-date in their experimental wind tunnel in Dayton, Ohio. They crafted a series of parametric experiments to explore the relationship between wing shape and aerodynamic performance. Specifically, they investigated 2D airfoil characteristics of camber (curvature) and thickness, as well as 3D wing parameters like planform aspect ratio and shape.

Wright Brothers example airfoil testing

Wright Brothers example airfoil testing (http://wright.nasa.gov/airplane/models.html)

Today, we engineers have access to incredible software and computing power. You are probably aware of parametric studies that are available in SOLIDWORKS as part of a Design Study, a Parametric Optimization in Simulation Professional, and Parametric Study in Flow Simulation. With the release of SOLIDWORKS 2017, Flow Simulation introduces Multiparameter Optimization. This means we can set up a Design of Experiments in Flow, varying model or study characteristics and evaluating the performance of our design.

I decided to give this a try by optimizing a low-speed (M ~ 0.25) airfoil suitable for use on a small aircraft. I set up the base sketch to vary in airfoil thickness, camber, and position of max camber:

Varying thickness, camber, and position of max camber

Varying thickness, camber, and position of max camber

The Flow Simulation was set up to match a Reynold’s Number of 3.1 x10^6. I used this because I had previously validated my meshing strategy by matching to NACA 2412 section lift and drag results with these same flow conditions. My study is a 2D domain and is a fixed 6 degree angle of attack. I am not going to dive in to meshing or much of the “windtunnel” study set up. There are good posts and forum discussions about this already. Some quick tips are to use equidistant mesh control and at least one Solution Adaptive mesh refinement to capture the complex pressure field that develops.

It’s a few simple clicks to select the dimensional parameters I want to vary, and the range they should vary within. We then specify how many Experiments to create. I chose 50 design points, because that seemed sufficient to get a good idea of response, but not enough that it wouldn’t solve overnight on my laptop. Before beginning this design study, I made sure to optimize my mesh and calculation controls to get an accurate enough answer in a minimum amount of time. For your studies, this might mean dialing back the mesh level or refinement controls from what you’d use in a single-point validation study.

Flow Simulation solver

Flow Simulation solver

Initial output I get is an Excel sheet with my three input parameters and my three selected goals: lift coefficient, drag coefficient, and lift-drag ration. You can interact with this plot and the data on plotly:

Results of 3-parameter DoE

Results of 3-parameter DoE

So, in just a few hours I was able to create this response plot to understand how lift and drag varied against thickness, camber, and position of max camber. The airfoil geometry with the absolute highest lift-drag ratio is skinny, low-cambered, and max camber location near the leading edge. This makes sense, and resembles a section used on a glider.

The power of Flow Simulation’s new feature is that you can not only explore the design space automatically, but also ask it to find the optimum geometry based on a weighted response function. I might want an airfoil with higher lift coefficient, even though it might not be the simple highest lift-drag ratio. Instead, I asked Flow to give me the geometry that maximized the function: lift-drag ratio + 15*lift coefficient -5*drag coefficient:

Flow Simulation 2017 Multiparametric Optimization output

Flow Simulation 2017 Multiparametric Optimization output

Pressure gradients, optimal airfoil

Pressure gradients, optimal airfoil

velocity-sreamlines

The output function can be defined as a linear weighted combination of any of your defined goals. The optimal airfoil in this case has a thickness of 2″, camber of 0.12 (% of chord length), and x/c of 0.26.

The resulting airfoil looks similar to the wing shape of the 1903 Wright Flyer – the first to achieve controlled, powered, manned flight. Of course there were more variables at play for the Wright Flyer than just airfoil, including the 3D wing shape (planform area and aspect ratio) and dihedral angle. In my next blog, I will explore a full 3D wing and reveal more of the power of Multiparameter Optimization in Flow 2017. Let me know below if you’d like more in-depth explanation of meshing or solving steps, or share how you could use Multiparameter Optimization.

Author information

Brian Zias
Brian Zias
Senior Territory Technical Manager at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS
Brian is a 10-year, expert SOLIDWORKS CAD, FEA, and CFD user and community advocate. His interests include engineering, simulation, business, and predictive analytics. Brian holds a BS in Aerospace Engineering and an MBA in Data Science.

The post 2D Airfoil: Multiparametric Optimization in Flow Simulation appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Brian Zias at November 22, 2016 10:00 PM

Introduction to Cabinetry in SOLIDWORKS – Part 2: Technical Drawings

Here, in part 2 of our look at cabinetry design, we are exploring Technical Drawings inside SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD. Part 1 covered Multi-Body Parts. Although this series is based around an introduction to cabinetry, all topics covered are useful to any user of SOLIDWORKS.

This part will feature the method of creating a technical drawing of the cabinet and setting it to include items such as a cut list table.

intro_to_cabinetry_cadtek_general-assy

Technical Drawings

Within the video below you will be shown how to create a drawing of the model, how to add dimensions to the model views and how to change views to exploded. Jamie will also show you how to;

  • Insert a table into your drawing showing the cut list items
  • Creating a bounding box for your cut list parts
  • How to export bodies to DXF/DWG for use on a laser cutter

Using these methods can help those who have to read the technical drawings, manufacture and assemble your models. They will be able to see the dimensions and how the parts fit together, allowing them to create your model with little effort.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ItBXa9pFWzg?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

See the original article here. Look out for part three in the coming weeks which will focus on Smart Parts.

Cadtek Designer Profile – Jamie Thain

jt_cadtek_profilepic

Those who subscribe to our YouTube Channel will recognize Jamie from many of our most popular SOLIDWORKS tutorials. He has been with Cadtek Systems for 6 years, prior to which he was working with some of the biggest design houses in the UK, including 4 years spent with Dyson. Adding to this wealth of experience Jamie has recently been awarded Elite Applications Engineer status. This is the highest level available within the SOLIDWORKS Community. His natural flair for design and presenting is evident not just in his role at Cadtek but also as lead vocalist in the band “Bosra Sham”, a contemporary soul project based in the UK.

Author information

Cadtek Systems UK
Cadtek has been established for over 27 years. Based in the UK, we have unrivalled experience in providing design solutions for designers and engineers. We work across all disciplines and multiple industries. An award winning Elite Reseller we can help you understand and choose the right 3D CAD solution. Call 0800 804 7766 to speak to an account manager. For more information, visit cadtek.com.

The post Introduction to Cabinetry in SOLIDWORKS – Part 2: Technical Drawings appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Cadtek Systems UK at November 22, 2016 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Are you experiencing DPI Scaling issues within SOLIDWORKS?

Are you seeing double or triple within your SOLIDWORKS display? If the image below looks familiar, and you are seeing this on a regular basis with your  graphics area, then you may be a victim of SOLIDWORKS DPI scaling issues!

SOLIDWORKS DPI Scaling Issue

DPI (dots per inch) Scaling Issue

Why does the scaling issue occur?

If you are using Windows 8.1 or Windows 10, along with a high-density external display; the operating system will automatically choose an appropriate scaling setting for the display being used. In many cases, users want to modify the scaling setting, as they would prefer that certain elements of the windows user interface appear smaller or larger. This is especially true for elements such as the text labels associated with Desktop Icons.

To enlarge these items, the DPI scaling is usually set globally within the operating system (Windows Control Panel > Appearance and Personalization > Display).

This global setting can have an undesired affect to some applications, leading to “blurry” fonts and other behaviours on applications that do not recognize the global DPI Scaling applied by the operating system. Depending on your Graphics Card & Driver combination; SOLIDWORKS can be one of the applications that experiences issues in recognizing the global DPI Scaling.

Resolving the DPI Scaling issue

To repair the graphics issues within SOLIDWORKS, please follow the five steps listed below:

STEP 1:

Navigate within windows explorer to find the SOLIDWORKS Executable file (SLDWORKS.exe).
By default this is located at C:\Program Files\SOLIDWORKS Corp\SOLIDWORKS

STEP 2:

Right-click on SLDWORKS.exe and choose Properties from the shortcut menu:

Properties option

Properties option

STEP 3:

Once inside the Properties dialog, choose the Compatibility Tab.

Select “Change Settings for all Users” button at the bottom of the properties dialog box.

Properties dialog

Properties dialog

STEP 4:

Within the compatibility for all users dialog, select (Check) the box labeled “Disable display scaling on high DPI settings

Disable display scaling on high DPI settings

Disable display scaling on high DPI settings

STEP 5:

Restart the system and see if the display issues persist.

Hopefully this has put an end to your SOLIDWORKS dpi scaling issue.

The post Are you experiencing DPI Scaling issues within SOLIDWORKS? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at November 22, 2016 03:40 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Is Your Design Solution Running You Ragged?

Global research has shown that many electrical designers and engineers are using old technology to draw their projects. In many cases, common systems used in design today have their origins in the 1980s or early 90s. If you are using any of these tools to draw your electrical control systems for machines and panels:

  • An office suite tool
  • An off the shelf graphics package
  • A generic 2D CAD package
  • A partially functional or outdated electrical CAD package, or
  • A paper based solution

Then you are spending as much time doing manual data entry and checking as you are designing. As engineers and design professionals, our greatest impact and value is in what we create, not doing manual tasks that moderns design tools frequently automate 100%.

In doing so you are missing out on a whole host of benefits.

By asking yourself the six simple questions below you will start to see how this is impacting you.

Q1. How many hours do you spend in a typical week manually numbering or renumbering wires and devices in a project?

The process of manually numbering devices and wires, or renumbering them after a design has been modified, can easily take hours per day during that phase of the project. Not only is it a very time consuming process but it is also inherently vulnerable to human error. Everyday distractions such as phone calls or queries from colleagues can cause loss of concentration which means focus on the task is momentarily lost. Numbering sequences can, as a result, include gaps in the numbering sequence, or even duplicated numbering of wires or devices. These errors are likely to go unnoticed at the design stage but will become evident during build, generating unnecessary confusion and creating critical issues which you as the designer will be called upon to resolve, usually under stressful and time critical circumstances.

A fully functional electrical CAD package will include automated wire and device numbering, removing this task from your checklist and allowing you to concentrate on those parts of the project which deserve the attention of an experienced and qualified engineer. It can be particularly frustrating when numbering projects manually to have to renumber a whole project after a few small amends have been made. Automation will correctly and accurately number, or renumber, a whole project in a few seconds, not only allowing you to complete projects much more quickly but also to be confident they are not carrying errors through to the build stage.

plc

Q2. How long do you spend searching or researching for parts details while creating your designs?

If you are using an improper design solution for your electrical projects you will have had to assemble your own symbols and parts libraries as none will have been provided with the tool. This will present an unwanted and time-consuming task from the outset and will go on to waste your time as long as you continue to use that solution. Purpose built electrical CAD solutions will include a broad range of symbols ready for you to use and will make it easy for you to create custom symbols as needed for your designs. Alongside the symbols will be a wide-ranging set of manufacturer’s parts ready for you to select from. In this way, applying your engineering principles is made into a speedy and simple process, allowing you to quickly and confidently select the parts you need based on a range of key data provided for each part.

Q3. How do you know that your designs are functionally correct?

With your current solution, can you be 100% confident that the finished projects you pass on to the client or to the build team are correctly configured? Are you totally sure you didn’t accidentally place a Normally Closed (NC) device where a Normally Open (NO) version was required? Are you sure your voltage drops are all within acceptable tolerances? A true electrical CAD solution will continually check the configuration of your design and highlight any issues to you on the screen. The integral functional intelligence of the software will help you to ensure that all of your designs are valid and that you are not pushing issues down the line which will come back and bite you at some point. Mistakes or oversights in projects will surface either during build or, worse still, following commissioning, when issues such as excessive voltage drops could lead to overheating causing critical failure of electrical systems in such a way as to not only bring down systems but also endanger human life.

Q4. How often do you forget to add items to the Bill of Materials for the project?

With the best will in the world we are only human and mistakes do happen. When compiling a Bill of Materials manually it is so easy to miss off some items from the list, or create duplicates, so even though the design drawings are complete, when it comes to build, the job comes to a halt due to missing parts which haven’t even been ordered. Using a specialist electrical CAD package will provide you with automated reporting, including Bills of Materials, which will not only save you time but will also ensure that all parts in the design are included in the list and can be ordered ready for successful build.

Q5. How often do you get calls from the build team over problems with a project?

Using any of the unsuitable design solutions as listed above will mean working in the absence of built-in intelligence and specialised functionality of true electrical CAD and will place an unsustainable reliance on human vigilance when processing designs. By the very nature of human behaviour, errors will slip through the net due to time pressures or distraction, leading to negative consequences later on. Demands on your time can be minimised and unwanted stress reduced by switching to an electrical CAD solution which provides a Quality Assured design process, with inherent accuracy. Angry calls from confused installers can become a thing of the past, meaning you as the designing engineer can focus totally on your current project and work with maximum speed and efficiency.

Q6. How much does your work erode into your personal time and impact your family life?

As every year goes by it gets harder to protect our personal time and maintain a positive work life balance. There are a number of ways using an unsuitable electrical design solution can contribute to that erosion of your time and lifestyle. It may be out-of-hours phone calls which impact you most obviously, with calls coming from installers regarding problems with jobs. Being in this situation on a routine basis can make it hard for you to “switch off” while at home leading to sleepless nights worrying about jobs and distractions taking you away from family activities. The simplest one of all is time itself. Failing to use a professional electrical CAD package will mean that your end-to-end design process takes much longer than it should, typically 2 or 3 times longer, to complete a project.

How many times have you had to stay late because a project wasn’t finished in time? The combined effect of these issues is likely to have had a negative impact on you and your family, stopping you from enjoying time with your loved ones in the way that you should. Moving across to a purpose built electrical CAD package will bring a host of professional features which will not only dramatically speed up your workflow but will introduce a new level of accuracy and consistency to your projects. You will reap the benefits in terms of shorter days in the office, reduced stress, less out-of-hours calls, smoother installations and even optimised procurement solutions with accurate Bills of Materials.

Understand the full potential and benefits of an easy to use modern Electrical design solution, please click here and explore the Innovative and time saving technologies and eliminate the tedious and errors prone manual tasks that allows you to regain your sanity and work on what really matters, building better designs.

Author information

Louis Feinstein
Senior Product Manager Solidworks Electrical

The post Is Your Design Solution Running You Ragged? appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Louis Feinstein at November 22, 2016 02:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 Latest Version Overwrite

New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 is the SOLIDWORKS PDM Latest Version Overwrite feature which enables users to overwrite a file while retaining the current version value.

Previously in SOLIDWORKS PDM a new version was created for every check in of a file.  Repairing something as simple as a typo would create unnecessary versions using up disk space in the archive server.

NOTE: This function should be used with caution as it permanently deletes file versions.  Permission should be limited to the appropriate personnel.

This feature will require the ‘Can overwrite latest version during check in’  folder and state permissions.

Can overwrite latest version during check in option

Can overwrite latest version during check in option

Latest overwrite option in workflow

Latest overwrite option in workflow

As an example here is a file in my vault which has a spelling mistake; note the file version is 6/6.

File with spelling mistake in description

File with spelling mistake in description

To repair this using Latest Version Overwrite I’ll first need to check out the file and correct the issue.

Spelling mistake corrected

Spelling mistake corrected

Then during check-in I will check the Overwrite Latest Version box, then select check in.

Check Overwrite Latest Version

Check Overwrite Latest Version

The spelling error is corrected and the file version remains at 6/6.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Latest Version Overwrite - Complete

Latest Version Overwrite – Complete

 

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

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by Justin Williams at November 22, 2016 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The Edge Formers

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feature

This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “So Good at Being in Trouble” from Unknown Mortal Orchestra and work our way through tracks from The War on Drugs, Mac Demarco, Beach House, Real Estate and others before wrapping up with “If I Gave You My Love” from Myron & E.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

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by SolidSmack at November 22, 2016 11:13 AM

November 21, 2016

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Do You CPQ? Configure, Price & Quote with DriveWorks

Do you CPQ? If your company sells a product that is configurable, then you are likely CPQ’ing all day long.

CPQ stands for Configure-Price-Quote. CPQ can be defined as a system that allows a customer to specify their requirements and receive a quote for the products that will meet their needs.

CPQ systems make it easy for your customer to specify what they need and for you to rapidly provide them with a price. If the process of receiving a quote from your company is not easy, your customer is likely to go to a competitor.

CPQ DriveWorks

A few examples of configurable products

Who needs CPQ?

CPQ applies to products that can be described as “the same as but slightly different”. Not everyone wants to, or can, buy from a catalogue. Sometimes one size does not fit all. Mass customization is becoming the norm and the best companies are working on strategies to be successful at it.

You need CPQ if your business:

  • Is losing business because it takes too long and too much effort to create a quote
  • Is losing business because your lead times are too long and design is the bottleneck
  • Has dealers across a wide geographic area or a mobile sales force
  • Cannot design new products or enter new markets because you are too busy on standard items
  • Needs a competitive advantage

cpq3

Where do I CPQ?

CPQ should be available where the customer is. There are several types of customers that need to be satisfied.

If you have sales reps or dealers that work remotely, consider a CPQ system that presents a web-based interface. DriveWorks enables companies to develop powerful online configurator applications that are supported by 3D graphics and designed to gracefully guide your customer through the specification process. CPQ interfaces can be launched from within CRM systems like Salesforce or Microsoft Dynamics.

If your customer is the shop floor and creating drawings is a bottleneck, DriveWorks can be used to automatically generate drawings and other manufacturing content.

If your customer is the actual end-user of your product, DriveWorks makes it easy to interact with your company. Your CPQ system can

  • Be accessible 24/7 on any device
  • Provide instant information like pricing or a 3D preview
  • Enable a secure Point of Sale if they want to buy now
CPQ DriveWorks


CPQ DriveWorks on multiple devices

I’m a CAD user, how does this affect me?

In many cases, some level of design work is needed to support pre-sales activities. Sales teams need engineering or design data to generate a quote. The work that must be done to develop new configurations,

  • Can be repetitive and boring
  • Can be very time consuming
  • May prevent you from designing innovative new products
  • Is a waste of time, especially for opportunities that are lost

Our ERP system has a CPQ (or configurator) module

ERP systems typically have Configurator systems that allow you to generate pricing info or BOM’s. These are great systems that help companies sell their products in an efficient manner. Unfortunately, there can be limitations with ERP-based configurators.

CPQ DriveWorks

What happens if the customer needs a size that does not exist in an ERP-based configurator?

DriveWorks can be set up to either accept the input selections from an ERP configurator or work as an integrated standalone application that,

  • Accepts user inputs to define the geometry that will satisfy the requirement
  • Connects with the ERP system to generate pricing data (in real time during or after the specification process)
  • Connects with a CRM system to auto-populate customer information and tag files generated with properties that define a specific project, customer, sales opportunity or all the above
  • Connects with CAD to automatically generate all the drawings and other manufacturing information

How long does it take to create libraries of all the variants that can possibly be configured?

DriveWorks enables companies to develop their product libraries and associated data either “overnight or over time”. DriveWorks can be used to generate the data to populate tables and databases within the ERP system either in bulk or as the customer demands.

CPQ DriveWorksDrawings aren’t the only documents needed to support sales and manufacturing

DriveWorks enables companies to automatically generate a wealth of information that is needed to make a sale or manufacture a product. The list of automated outputs includes but is not limited to,

  • Flat Patterns for routers, flame cut or waterjet cutters
  • Photo renderings to help your customer visualize the product you will deliver
  • Cut lists to feed the shop floor
  • NC Toolpaths (when integrated with CAM systems)
  • Installation Drawings to help the shop or your customer assemble the product
  • Sales opportunities that can be managed by a Rep or Dealer
  • Items for new products in an ERP system
  • New contacts for the CRM system

CPQ – The competitive advantage

Many sales teams and design teams still use tools such as spreadsheets, design tables and simple templates to make their jobs quicker and easier. Unless they are connected, your company may spend significant time trying to figure out what went wrong or why you keep losing business. Our team at Javelin has been helping companies introduce CPQ technology since 2006, and our customers will tell you that CPQ technology is their competitive advantage. Contact us today to discuss your goals and work with us to map out your path to success.

Want to Learn More about DriveWorks?

Check out our recent webinar ‘Automate to Dominate with DriveWorks‘:

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by John Mignardi at November 21, 2016 06:58 PM

SolidSmack

5 New, Must See Features Coming to Fusion 360

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fusion-360-ultimate-au--five-features-01

Presented by
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If you want to find out what Autodesk is up too, Autodesk University is the place to be each year. Last week that happened… yep, I just checked and we were in fact at AU last week. It was a bit of a blur, but I know two things for certain, nay THREE — Titos is the best vodka, beatboxing should kick off more conference keynotes, and Autodesk shot out five feature previews for Fusion 360. They’re features many have been gnawing the last bit of their fingernail beds in anticipation of. Some are surprises, some are expectations and others just change the game completely.

In our last article, we looked at what Autodesk had done with Fusion 360, but it’s at Autodesk University–during the keynotes, special sessions and the bartop conversations in particular–where you not only see what’s coming to Fusion 360, but what people are doing with Fusion 360. As you know we loooove the latter, and it’s those people who influence the direction and development of features in Fusion 360. What are those features? Let’s have a look.

1. Integrated Electronic PCB Design

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This comes from Autodesk’s acquisition of CadSoft with their massive ELEMENT14 userbase and the EAGLE Schematic/PCB Design software. The software will be fully integrated with bi-directional associativity between MCAD and ECAD environments.

2. Sheet Metal Fabrication

Hello. I’ll just let half of you pass out right now… and the other half when you hear it’s ‘Coming Soon’ to Fusion 360. For good reason though–with stiff competition, they’ve been perfecting this to be the best sheet metal available. It looks amazing, from flange creation, miters, feature creation and flat patterns of course, PLUS automatic nesting.

3. Nastran Simulation

Ever since Autodesk revealed the results of the NEi Software acquisition with Autodesk Nastran, it has been suspected the capabilities would make their way into Fusion 360. The wait is over. Fusion 360 has a new solver, new Contact Manager, Buckling, Bolt Connection, multiple load cases, nonlinear studies, shape optimization and super improved mesh refinement. Lattice optimization also coming to Fusion 360 for light weighting. Bit of a large update.

fusion-360-nastran-generative

4. Additive Build Solver + 5-Axis Machining

The CAM capabilities in Fusion 360 were already great, but this is next level right here. Included now are both additive and subtractive capabilities that cover the gamut of machining needs in product development. Along with this are new fixture types, new tools, WSC Probe for stock positioning, 4-axis index and wrapping, and 5-axis swarf machining.

5. Browser Access

Fusion 360 is coming to the browser. Though not specifically mentioned, this is an outworking of Project Leopard (still in beta). No date has been set, but the intention is clear–the ability to use and access Fusion 360 anywhere on any device. Though the current desktop download/installation has been a criticism, it’s a move driven by customer need and cloud capability. Now, both are there with Fusion 360 Browser Access ‘Available Soon’. Note: the shot we got at AU above shows CAM. However, CAM won’t be supported initially, but toolpaths, simulations, and other related data will update in the browser view when geometry is changed.

fusion-360-browser-tablet-full-cloud

BUT WAIT…

If you were not watching (I wasn’t), you may have missed (I did) the announcement that Fusion 360 Ultimate IS BACK.

don't-call-it-a-comeback-750

fusion-360-ultimate-2016-advanced-sim-cam-01-tnThey originally announced Fusion 360 Ultimate in October of 2014, adding features that didn’t exist in Fusion 360 at the time, including 3-axis CAM. Then they took all of those features and bundled them into the lower price of Fusion 360 Standard for $40/mth ($300/yr). Now, they’re playing with our emotions and bringing Fusion 360 Ultimate back, adding advanced (buckling, nonlinear) simulation and advanced (Probing, 4/5-axis) machining for $190/mth ($1500/yr).

Here’s more on the features:

fusion-360-ultimate-features-2016

So, Ultimate is back, and Autodesk has revealed features, many that you’ve been waiting for and some requested since Fusion 360 was first announced. Personally, I can’t wait for sheet metal, and I’m wondering what’s going to be the most useful for you, but most of all, I’m wondering how you’re using it–do let me know in the comments. And if you haven’t tried it yet, snag Fusion 360 here.

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by Josh Mings at November 21, 2016 06:33 PM

CLO is CAD for Soft Goods. Finally.

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clo-enterprise-cad-soft-goods-00

CLO is to soft goods what SolidWorks is to machine parts. Game, consider yourself changed.

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How we can illustrate this? Hmm. Ah yes…

Form-fitting Spandex Activewear. For Dogs.

You awake with clammy forehead skin, itchy fingers, and the germ of an idea that will change the world. You roll out of bed, gorilla walk across the snack food strewn floor, and wince as the piercing cold blue of ultra-bright OLED shatters the warm, musky darkness. SolidWorks.

You heave a sigh of relief as you enter your Parametric Happy Place, crack the knuckles of your sausage-like fingers, and, quietly, contemplatively, you hear yourself mutter: Maximum effort. It’s design time.

You stare blankly at the screen.

clo-solidworks-soft-goods-cad-design

Have you ever tried to design spandex dog garments in SolidWorks? Words like “hopeless”, “asinine”, and “meat-headed” come to mind.*

* If you have actually attempted to design spandex dog garments in SolidWorks and are offended by any of the above word choices, get over it.

There have traditionally been two overarching phyla in the 3D design kingdom: Digital Content Creation (DCC) tools, and Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools. DCC’s are designed for makin’ pretty pictures for print, games, and movies. CAD is for designing hard-body objects in the real world. CAD is for designing objects in wood, metal, plastic, ceramic, glass: buildings (AEC), mechanical engineering (MCAD), and exterior shape design (Surfacing).

There is no existing category of 3D tools for the design of soft goods. Products made of wool, cotton, nylon, and Spandex are still, to this day, largely designed the old way. Designers pass 2D illustrations to skilled pattern makers, who, in turn, hand-make round after round of successive prototypes. Once a prototype is approved, its pattern can be drawn in a 2D vector drawing tool like Adobe Illustrator, then used to drive 2.5D CNC cutting machines for production. It’s slow, arduous, and, most importantly, requires a lot of guesswork, trial, and error.

Intrepid studios have long experimented with various 3D tools for soft goods design. DCC apps are favored by those who like the freedom that non-reality offers, but are then hindered by the lack of dimensional control or useful pattern output. CAD apps are typically favored by studios working with crossover products like shoes, luggage, or wearables. These products already contain elements of hard-goods design for which CAD is the perfect tool: rubber soles, wheels, plastic frames, and metal fixtures. CAD falls down, however, when asked to design the kinds of complex organic forms that Spandex demands.

CLO (big-sister to Marvelous Designer) is not a DCC, nor is it CAD. It represents an entirely new phylum. It allows users a level of fluidity, speed, and flexibility on par with that of a Visual Effects (VFX) design tool like Z-Brush, the ease-of-use on par with quasi-CAD poly modeller Sketchup, and the downstream manufacturing efficiency of a CAD tool.

With CLO, you can design soft goods around an existing 3D model, not unlike a cobbler’s last. Design patterns using simple 2D vector drawing tools, position them in 3D space, sew them together, and simulate the fall of the fabric across the last.

Most of the demos you’ll see are based around human mannequins, but you could just as easily import a dog, an iguana, or the latest MCAD data from that 9-axis robotic arm you’ve been designing. When the visual result in CLO looks good, you can export your pattern curves for the CNC cutter, and off you go.

As wearables come into vogue, we’ll need more and more tools like CLO to fill the role that CAD plays in the hard-goods world. I hope to see more of them. For now, try out Marvelous Designer. It’s free to try, and CLO really just adds pattern export features.

Do you use either? What for? And bonus if you’re using it in a workflow along with an MCAD tool like SolidWorks.

The post CLO is CAD for Soft Goods. Finally. appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Adam OHern at November 21, 2016 04:38 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Quick Tip – Odd Angle View Creation

What do you do when you need to make a drawing of a part with an obscure angled plane? Take this part for an example:

odd-view

As you can see, the view that is needed for the angled section would be difficult to get to be directly perpendicular to the hole going through it so we could give an accurate dimensional callout. Even a projected view will be difficult using the existing geometry. Luckily, SOLIDWORKS can create this view quite easily. Let’s start with the part file:

  1. Open the part file:odd-view-1
  1. Select the face that has the hole through it:odd-view-2
  1. With the “Ctrl” button held down, select the face that has the edge that I want to be horizontal on my new view. This selection will control the orientation of the view and how it is displayed:
    go-engineer-odd-view-3
  1. Once you have both of these planes selected, right mouse click next to the green arrow that is coming out of the plane, and select the “Normal to” icon:
    odd-view-4
  1. This rotates the part to look straight on the face with the hole in it, but also rotates it so the second plane we selected gives us the horizontal rotation that we want:
    odd-view-5
  1. We can save this view in the model by hitting the space bar to activate the view command:
    odd-view-6
  1. With this dialog box active, you can select to save the current view as a saved view for use in your drawing. Select the “New View” icon:
    odd-view-7
  1. Name your new view:
    odd-view-8
  1. This now shows up in the “Saved Views” listing in the dialog box:
    odd-view-9
  1. You can now use this view in your drawing to show accurate dimensions, this view can now be dragged into your drawing and used as any other view
    odd angle 10
  1. As you can see from the cross hairs, this view is recognized with accurate diameters that are oriented the way we need to properly detail the features shown.
    odd-view-11

Thank you for taking the time to look at this quick tip from GoEngineer!

Author: Bruce Cain

Author information

GoEngineer
GoEngineer delivers software, technology and expertise that enable companies to unlock design innovation and deliver better products faster. With more than 30 years experience and thousands of customers in high tech, medical, machine design, energy and other industries, GoEngineer provides best-in-class design solutions from SOLIDWORKS, Stratasys, CAMWorks, Altium and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM). For more information, visit goengineer.com.

The post Quick Tip – Odd Angle View Creation appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GoEngineer at November 21, 2016 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Can I upgrade my SOLIDWORKS version without upgrading my PDM client?

A question I frequently get asked on support is; “Can I upgrade my SOLIDWORKS version without having to upgrade my SOLIDWORKS PDM client?”

Upgrade SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS Administration

Can I upgrade my SOLIDWORKS version without upgrading my PDM client?

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional officially supports the same version of SOLIDWORKS and two older versions.  As an example; SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2016 officially supports SOLIDWORKS 2016, 2015 and 2014.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard

SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard officially supports same major version of SOLIDWORKS. As an example; SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard 2016 officially supports SOLIDWORKS 2016.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard will not prevent you from using an earlier version of SOLIDWORKS, but it’s not recommended as certain tools such as Toolbox will not work in the older version.

Service Packs of the same release

You can use a different service pack of SOLIDWORKS PDM (e.g. 2016 SP2) with a different service pack of SOLIDWORKS (e.g. 2016 SP4)  within the officially supported versions.

Newer and older [year] version compatibility

The combination of a newer major version of SOLIDWORKS and an older major version of SOLIDWORKS PDM is NOT supported.

The post Can I upgrade my SOLIDWORKS version without upgrading my PDM client? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Williams at November 21, 2016 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Boldly Going Where Design Hasn’t Gone Before: the Promise of AR/VR

The excitement around virtual reality (VR) was high when it made a splashy debut two decades ago followed by its closely associated brethren augmented reality (AR) more recently. Each held promise to revolutionize many industries by enabling users to enter virtual or mixed reality worlds and interact with objects just as they would in the real world.

Engineers could design their products intuitively without the interference of traditional computer user interfaces. People could walk through homes that were not yet built. Customers could try out products that only existed digitally to test and fall in love with them prior to final design. Sounded too good to be true, and sadly, it was.

The real reality was that the technology, while exciting, was in its infancy. So many of the required elements of VR and AR—both on the hardware side and the software sides were not yet sufficient to create environments that mimicked the real world. After all, to fulfill its promise, users needed to feel as if they are truly immersed in either a virtual or mixed reality world, which required more powerful computers, better input devices (helmets, gloves, etc.), and software that took advantage of both—all at price points that made the technology economically feasible.

robert_conley_customer.jpg

Where are we now?

The good news is that significant advances have been made on all fronts. Computers are faster and several heavy hitters (Google, Microsoft, Facebook, to name a few) have spent a considerable amount of time and capital developing input devices that have the potential to bring VR to the masses.
But how could these advances impact the use of VR/AR in product design? Engineers have long known the benefits of virtual prototyping, being able to conduct simulations to prove out designs long before manufacturing. Taking that one step further, what if you could immerse that virtual product in its real world, which by definition is AR?

Our users have been doing just that since 2013 when it was announced that eDrawings would be adding an AR-based update to its iOS app. What AR brought to the eDrawings app is the ability to accurately communicate scale and proper context when it comes to virtual products. That’s important because whether you’re designing a small product, such as a remote control, or a mammoth-sized object, such as a piece of industrial machinery, everything ends up being the same size on your screen. While you can zoom-to-fit to maximize the work space, there is no visual reference on the screen to give you context in terms of its real size and how it would compare with objects in it real-world environment.

dsc_4171_edit20_2_.jpg

Wouldn’t it be great if you could take your design and put a virtual model of it on the table right next to you or in your room so you could then look at it next to real products, slide and spin it around on the table, and get a complete sense of the product’s true size, scale, and proportions? The eDrawings app lets you see a product at full scale so its true size is clearly communicated.

Where do we go from here?

There are several areas of product development that could benefit from mixed reality solutions in the future. The first one is sales and marketing. Enabling companies to let their customers try out products in these environments would enable them to know in advance how the market will respond to their products and what areas of their products need to be tweaked prior to release but also help their customers connect with products in a way they have never been able to before, emotionally. This is also the area with the easiest immediate path to ROI.

The second area is collaboration; enabling design participants to enter into a common virtual environment, in which they can naturally interact with virtual products in order to provide more accurate feedback, participate in real-time discussions or interactive design reviews. The result of which would be better, richer information being fed back into the development pipeline.

The final area, and perhaps the one with the highest bar of requirements, is the idea of designing products in either virtual or mixed reality environments. Will the devices and UX evolve enough that designers can be immersed for long periods of time in order to accomplish design tasks? In addition, will these devices be accurate enough to maintain the tolerances that engineering precision requires? Will the costs come down to a level at which this is economically feasible for companies?

ar_clean.jpg

It’s really a new paradigm that would have to be adopted. Early adopters will most likely be younger engineers and designers who have never known a non-digital world. For this group of users, there is no hurdle to adoption from a cultural perspective, no fear of mistakes; they just want to explore. For other users, there will be more apprehension, much like there was when the initial space mouse first came out. It introduced a new paradigm in the way we interacted with computers.

There are many challenges with integrating AR and VR into production environments. When you take into account the newness of these devices and the mixed stages of our users (younger early adopters and more reluctant users) merging the gap to develop a cross-reality design experience is not easy. We are, however, committed to investigating the best ways to provide future solutions that leverage the best of VR, AR and MR.

We already have the tools and the know-how to help people work together in a more immersive, collaborative way. Our millions of users are already creating amazing 3D content; this new paradigm will empower them with a better way to share the experience of that content, in a beautiful, engaging way. Users trust us to deliver premium experiences in terms of building and showing off their products. We want to make sure we’re addressing a lot of different users and a lot of devices, to lower that bar to entry for our users.

Note: This post was co-authored by Chin-Loo Lama, User Experience Design Senior Manager, and David Randle, Senior Business Development Manager at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Boldly Going Where Design Hasn’t Gone Before: the Promise of AR/VR appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at November 21, 2016 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Monday List 47.16 | What We’re Reading This Week

Feature

Feature

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

The Passion of Martin Scorsese
In his new film, “Silence,” he returns to a subject that has animated his entire life’s work and that also sparked his career’s greatest controversy: the nature of faith.

01

The Berry of the Future Is Fed a Specialized Diet and Picked by a Robot
The world is changing. Driscoll’s is changing with it.

02

Don’t Give Up on the Guitar. Fender Is Begging You
Every quitter hurts.

04

How Pete Kostelnick Ate 13,000 Calories a Day While Running Across America
Here’s what it takes to fuel someone who’s running over 70 miles a day for 42 days

03

Snap’s Spectacles Are the Beginning of a Camera-First Future
The Story of Spectacles, the new camera-filled sunglasses from Snap, goes back further than you think.

05

10 episodes of Belcher family values from Bob’s Burgers
With a name like Belcher, the family at the center of Bob’s Burgers could have easily become just an animated vehicle for uninspired fart jokes.

06

The post The Monday List 47.16 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 21, 2016 12:00 PM

November 20, 2016

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

May the Legos Be With You

If most of you out there reading this are anything like me, I grew up playing with the coolest toys… Legos!  My brother and I would dump our giant plastic tote and build houses, cars, spaceships, really anything that we could think of. So when I learned about our interns’ Lego project, a task to help them become proficient in SOLIDWORKS, I quickly asked if I could join in. I mean, who honestly wouldn’t want to play with Legos at work!

The purpose of the project is to model each individual Lego piece, and then build the assembly in SOLIDWORKS. The project started with getting my Lego kit.  I was lucky enough to get an 87-piece Star Wars Resistance X-Wing Fighter.

legos1

I quickly dove into modeling the basic one by two Lego blocks, using calipers to get their dimensions. I soon realized that this seemingly simple project was quickly getting pretty complicated. I figured configurations would be the best approach for the different “standard” Lego parts.  I was able to make small changes, like the length of the part, and choose which of the Lego parts that change affected, by selecting specific configurations for individual features in the PropertyManager (left). For example, by right-clicking on the claw feature and selecting Configure Feature, I could unsuppress or suppress the claws for each configuration (right).  With them suppressed, it gave me my basic 1X2 block, and also allowed me to quickly model  7 similar pieces.

legos2

One thing I really enjoyed about this project was that it was what I made of it, meaning I could add as much detail into the parts as I wanted. It wasn’t necessary for me to add the Lego logo, however, in doing so, I got to practice using a Sketch Picture (Tools>Sketch Tools>Sketch Picture) and tracing splines to extrude the logo.

Many of the parts tested me on determining the most efficient design intent. Below are two examples of how I made some of the parts for my X-Wing.

I created the cowl of the X-Wing by first sketching on planar surfaces for the profiles of the back, bottom, sides, and angled front. I then created 3D sketches between the profiles to create a Filled Surface feature of the curved surfaces at the top.  Once I had a fully enclosed surface, I used Knit Surface and made sure Create Solid was selected. I then made the final finishing touches by shelling the part and adding the Extrude Cuts on the front and back.

legos3

The projectile part ended up being very simple to create. I started by creating a sketch that contained most of the geometry, and then used the Revolve command. After that, the only thing left was to add the Extrude Cut in the middle of the part.

legos4

legos5

After I finished modeling the parts, I got to assemble everything. The most useful command I found while creating the assembly was Interference Detection on the Evaluate tab. This feature helped me determine where the parts overlapped due to any mistakes I had made in measuring/modeling. I then went back and modified the parts to fix the interferences.

legos6

With my assembly complete, I decided to add appearances and materials to the parts, and used the Render Tools tab to produce a quality picture from PhotoView 360. Not too bad when you compare it to the real thing!  I was even able to use Display States to change the colors to make Poe Dameron’s X-Wing.

legos7

As I said before, we were free to put as much detail into the project as we wanted. Casey Colligan, a fellow SOLIDWORKS Support Engineer here at CADimensions, was given a race car Lego set for his project. Casey used his completed Lego model to hone his SOLIDWORKS Visualize skills and produce some photorealistic renderings.

legos8

I highly suggest a project like this to anyone who wants to brush up on their SOLIDWORKS skills. You’ll quickly realize the areas that you need to practice to become a better user. Plus, you’ll have tons of fun doing it!

Author information

CADimensions
We are an authorized SOLIDWORKS and Stratasys reseller with certified training & support centers located in New York and Pennsylvania, USA. We are 100% focused on living a CADLIFE and have our vendor's unconditional endorsement in the sales and support of their products.

The post May the Legos Be With You appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CADimensions at November 20, 2016 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Add Configurations from within the Mate Controller

The Mate Controller had been a handy tool in past releases that could be used to review the positions of an assembly when attempting to drive multiple mates at one time.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 provides us an additional outlet to explore our designs as we can take those positions and save each position to an individual configuration for later use (perhaps a drawing).

In order to generate configurations from the Mate Controller Dialog:

  1. Open the Mate Controller (Insert > Mate Controller).
  2. Collect all the supported mates (or mates required)
  3. Leave “Position 1” at a time of zero and select “Add Configuration”
  4. Change the position of a desired mate to move the assembly into a new position
  5. Save a new Position as “Position 2”
  6. Select the “Add Configuration” while you have “Position 2” selected in the drop-down list.
Mate Controller Configurations

Mate Controller Configurations Button

Continue to repeat steps 4 through 6 in order to continue on saving multiple configurations.

Make Controller Configurations added

Make Controller Configurations added

Once complete, the results of the configuration creation will be available from within the configuration manager. They can then be applied anywhere you would use a regular configuration.

PLEASE NOTE:  Be careful with other mates that may be driving your assembly, that were not included in the Mate Controller during the setup of the configurations. It may be necessary to individually configure these mates, so that they do not conflict with the positions generated by the Mate Controller, when the configurations are first activated.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 Add Configurations from within the Mate Controller appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at November 20, 2016 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS 2017 brings relief to your sheet metal three bend corners

One of the common flange challenges that a sheet metal designer bumps into is the need to add a corner relief in their designs. In many cases this is where two bends come together, in other cases it is where three similar bends come together in a single corner.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 has the tools to address both of these sheet metal needs with the introduction of the SOLIDWORKS 3 bend corner relief option, that has been added into the corner relief command as shown below.

SOLIDWORKS 3 Bend Corner Relief Option

3 Bend Corner Relief Option

This SOLIDWORKS 3 bend corner relief option takes some getting used to, mainly due to the fact that the three bends included in the operation must all have bend lines that meet exactly at one point.

Three bend corner

Three bend corner

SOLIDWORKS makes the selection option easy however as there is an auto-collect option that will automatically pick up the correct corners for additional processing .  Once the corner and the bends are collected, you can move on to the bottom of the property manager and select the type of relief that should be employed on your model.

Three bend corner relief flattened

Three bend corner relief flattened

Give this option a try, We’re betting it will be more challenging to model a sheet metal component with three similar bends than it is to add the new types of relief corners to your design.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 brings relief to your sheet metal three bend corners appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at November 20, 2016 01:00 PM

November 19, 2016

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Cardboard Box Tutorial

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="355" id="PreviewFrame3D" name="PreviewFrame3D" scrolling="no" src="http://www.3dcontentcentral.com/external-site-embed.aspx?format=3D&amp;catalogid=11199&amp;modelid=723558&amp;width=250&amp;height=250&amp;edraw=true" width="400"></iframe>

Cardboard Box: This model shows some basic sheet metal features along with some standard solid features. Sheet metal features are used so that the part can be flattened out to create a flat pattern. This model goes over some of the nuances of working with cardboard versus sheet metal.

The features used in the box part include: extrude, base flange/tabs, edge flange, combine, mirror, split, move/copy body and delete face.  There are multiple examples of sketched bends and unfolds.  Also included is an example of a “sketch picture” to help you plan your work and work your plan. Download this file to learn about reverse engineering geometry using a sketch picture and how to create a flat pattern.

Download: Cardboard Box
Complexity: Moderate
Features: Sketched Bends, Sketch Picture, Flat Pattern, Combine, Base Flange/Tabs

View all the Part Reviewer Tutorials here.

DraftSight Download: In conjunction with DraftSight, Dassault Systèmes’ 2D CAD product, the 2D drawing(.dwg) file of the Cardboard Box tutorial is now available for download here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Cardboard Box Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at November 19, 2016 10:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip: Sheet Format vs Drawing Sheet

Drawings contain extremely important information about a design, such as model dimensions, a bill of materials, or tolerance standards. All of the information in the drawing is stored either at the Drawing Sheet level, or within the Sheet Format. To distinguish them, you can think of the Sheet Format as a base layer that contains reference information about the model. With the Sheet Format set, the direct model information can be added on top of the sheet in the drawing sheet, including different drawing views and dimensions. To learn more about the differences between the Sheet Format and Drawing Sheet, check out the video below!

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1i41-XEWYdE?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

Want to see more SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips? Check out our playlist on YouTube to catch up on past videos or you can even jump ahead to the next video!

Do you have a suggestion for the next Tech Tip? Tell us in the comments; we’d love to hear your ideas!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip: Sheet Format vs Drawing Sheet appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at November 19, 2016 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 Remote Load/Mass for Beams

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 now unlocks the ability to apply Remote Load/Mass features to beam elements.  This is available in Static, Frequency, Buckling and Linear Dynamic studies.  There are now buttons to select joints and beams, similar to other load types.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Remote Load Beam Option

Beam options in Remote Load/Mass

You can apply the same options of Direct Transfer or Rigid Connection.

Type of Remote Load

Type of Remote Load

Use the Direct Transfer option if the omitted components are more flexible (weaker) so forces and moments will be applied to the beams.  In this case it causes the beams to bend in as the remote load displaces.

Direct Transfer Displacement

Direct Transfer Displacement

Use the Rigid Connection option if the omitted components are very rigid.  In this case it would keep the two selected beams apart, as rigid links are being applied between the load and the beams.

Rigid Connection Displacement

Rigid Connection Displacement

Convert a solid body to a remote mass

You can also convert a solid body to a remote mass and assign it to beams.  Right-click on the solid body in the Simulation tree and choose Treat as Remote Mass.  You have the option of applying to joints and beams.

Treat as Remote Mass

Treat as Remote Mass

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 Remote Load/Mass for Beams appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at November 19, 2016 01:00 PM

November 18, 2016

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Dr. Strange Eye of Agamotto Enclosure Tutorial – Part 2

The all-seeing Eye of Agamotto is Dr. Strange’s most powerful of artifacts. While Strange is seen wearing this amulet around the clock, I sometimes wonder where he stores it when he is off-duty. He can’t possibly just leave something so precious just hanging in the closet while he sleeps? In this 4-part series, we’ll be designing a plastic enclosure for the Sorcerer Supreme to store the Eye while he is not using it to weaken evil mystical beings, probe the minds of others, or create portals to other dimensions. As you’ll see later in this series, we’ll be using the Eye’s powers to transport into the mysterious universe of fastening features! Stay tuned and you’ll come away realizing that these features aren’t so Strange, even for the uninitiated.

In this portion of the series, we’ll take a close look at how our reference part file and the enclosure part file are related, and we’ll use that relationship to our advantage to create the uniquely shaped cradle needed in our enclosure’s ribs. In this tutorial, you’ll learn a few surfacing commands like Offset Surface and Cut with Surface, as well as the advanced Swept Cut command.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1R0va2H82CE?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

Even if you’re not protecting Earth from magical and mystical threats, we’re sure you have some precious artifacts in your arsenal! Use this tutorial series to help create an enclosure to store your most valuable belongings! Join us over the next few weeks as we cover a wide variety of topics such as Surface Lofts, the Lip/Groove Fastening Feature, and the more advanced Mounting Boss Fastening feature. Can’t wait for the next video? View all of the tutorials on the playlist here.

Where do you store your most power artifact? Share your creations with us in the comments below! As always, thanks for watching!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Dr. Strange Eye of Agamotto Enclosure Tutorial – Part 2 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at November 18, 2016 10:00 PM

InFlow Technology

SOLIDWORKS 2017 What’s New: SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Database Replication – #SW2017

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2017 now supports database replication which can be useful in high latency or high usage environments. This is only available in PDM Professional (and not PDM Standard) and requires Microsoft SQL Enterprise Edition 2012 or higher.

The way it works is by setting up secondary SQL server(s) that can assist a primary server with "read" type database requests which in turn reduces the load on the primary server. The primary server will still handle any read/write operations such as check ins/outs, workflow transitions, and datacard updates. The secondary servers will handle operations such as folder browsing, contains, where used, UI responsiveness, search, BOM, data card viewing, RMB on folder, reference trees in operation windows which will greatly improve performance in these areas.

Setup of data replication will be unique for each environment and are driven by the established PDM Groups. Groups can be assigned to a specific secondary database server along with the frequency that you want the secondary server to update. Again, this will be determined by the particular environment.

So whether you have a multi-site environment or even a single site environment with high usage, database replication may be something worth checking out.

I hope this part of the What's New series gives you a better understanding of the new features and functions of SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017. Please check back at our InFlow Site where we will continue to blog about everything PDM 2017. Also please look at our CATI Blog as the CATI and MCAD Support Teams will continue to break down many of the new items in SOLIDWORKS 2017. All of these articles will be stored in the category of "SOLIDWORKS What's New." You can also learn more about SOLIDWORKS 2017 by clicking on the image below to register for one of CATI's or MCAD's Design Summits.

Jeff Barker

PLM Solutions – Team Leader

www.inflow-tech.com

 

by Jeff Barker at November 18, 2016 09:56 PM

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Crumbleton Weeger

Nicolas-Ferrand-art

Nicolas-Ferrand-art

No one quite knew his age or the powers residing within the metal stump at the end of his arm. The children would say it glows just before a rain and the mouse antler swarms. Others claimed it controlled time through dust particles sifted through our nostrils, and others still, said it had the ultimate power to generate these links.

Nicolas Ferrand – Machines. Lots of them. And the inside of ships. A wonderful eye for perspective and loads of detail in the art from this Motreal based EA Concept Artist.

LEGO Braiding Machine – Ingenious little machine made from LEGOs for quickly braiding string. And yes, there are instructions available too!

History in Color – Famous and not-so-famous black and white photos from the past, perfectly colorized by Dana R. Keller.

Globe-making – The process from start to finish for the largest globe-maker during the 1950’s, taking up to 15 hours of work per globe.

International Idioms – What are the most unusual idioms in the world? These are a few that might be the raisin at the end of the hotdog for you.

Rogue One Featurette – Behind-the-scenes of the upcoming Star Wars Story, Rogue One, with Director Gareth Edwards and cast.

ClickClickClick – There’s a site that will narate what you do on the site, from waiting, to moving, to clicking a button, triple-clicking a button… think your every move can’t be watched?

Frog Trick – Magician David Blaine does the unthinkable and completely shocks Drake, Stephen Curry, and Dave Chappelle.

Fav Deals this Week!
HK Keychain Belt Clip (Free Shipping)
G-Tube Bluetooth Speaker (20% Off)
Swagger Carbon Fiber Scooter (20% Off)
Amazon Prime ($20 OFF – Today Only)

Hallelujah – He penned the struggles of life and faith and put it to song, “And even though it all went wrong, I’ll stand before the lord of song, With nothing on my tongue but hallelujah.”

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="375" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YrLk4vdY28Q?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The post Friday Smackdown: Crumbleton Weeger appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at November 18, 2016 06:25 PM

Get Ready. The Next Wave of Metal 3D Printing is About to Begin.

sls-machine

sls-machine

In 2009, something happened that started a 3D printer boom. That’s going to happen once again.

Why? Because there’s another round of patents set to begin expiring. In 2009 the original patents for plastic extrusion 3D printing technology finally expired, opening up a legal path for companies such as MakerBot, Ultimaker and projects like RepRap to design very inexpensive machines from which much of today’s 3D printing industry emerged.

Now there’s another key patent expiring. It’s by the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft zur Foerderung der Angewandten Forschung E.V., or Fraunhofer Society for the Advancement of Applied Research E.V. and is entitled, “Selective laser sintering at melting temperature”. Here’s the abstract:

A method is disclosed for manufacturing a molded body, in accordance with three-dimensional CAD data of a model of a molded body, by depositing layers of a metallic material in powder form. Several layers of powder are successively deposited one on top of the other, whereby each layer of powder is heated to a specific temperature by means of a focused laser beam applied to a given area corresponding to a selected cross-sectional area of the model of the molded body, before deposition of the next layer. The laser beam is guided over each layer of powder in accordance with the CAD cross-sectional data of the selected cross-sectional area of the model in such a way that each layer of powder is fixed to the layer below it. The method is characterized in that the metallic material in powder form is applied in the form of a metallic powder free of binders and fluxing agents, that it is heated by the laser beam to melting temperature, that the energy of the laser beam is chosen in such a way that the layer of metallic powder is fully molten throughout at the point of impact of said laser beam, that the laser beam is guided across the specified area of powder in several runs in such a way that each run of the laser beam partly overlaps the preceding run, and that a protective gas atmosphere is maintained above the interaction zone of the laser beam and the metallic powder.

Yes, you read that right: this is the patent for 3D metal printing. Or at least the a common process used today by metal 3D printer manufacturers.

sls-patent-expiring

With this patent expiring in December, it should become possible for others to develop – hopefully at much lower cost – 3D metal printers, in the same way that companies like MakerBot did with the plastic extrusion process.

However, there are some challenges here.

First, there is the matter of safety: this process requires fine metal powder, and that’s something that can become airborne. Metals are frequently toxic so you don’t want to be breathing them into your lungs. 3D metal printers would have to ensure safety by including a method of securing loose powder.

Another safety concern will be that some metal powders are actually explosive. Remember the now-retired Space Shuttle? Its solid rocket boosters were powered by aluminum oxide. You know, aluminum powder and oxygen, that stuff in the air around you all the time. This all implies that 3D metal printers must somehow remove the oxygen from the presence of the powder, lest something really bad happen.

Finally, melting metal powder requires a great deal of heat, typically provided by a very powerful laser. Those are not inexpensive and require a great deal of input power.

While I strongly believe there will be low-cost 3D metal printers swiftly emerge based on the patent’s expiry, they’re not going to appear in people’s homes due to the reasons above.

But for industry, particularly small manufacturers who cannot afford the large commercial metal 3D printers, this could be a big deal.

Read more at Fabbaloo.

Image: Andreas Bastian

The post Get Ready. The Next Wave of Metal 3D Printing is About to Begin. appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at November 18, 2016 04:51 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to Get Coupon Codes for FREE CSWA and CSWP Exams Every 6 Months

There are various levels of certifications available in the SOLIDWORKS Certification Program:

One of the many benefits of being a SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service customer is the ability to obtain free SOLIDWORKS certification codes for the CSWA or CSWP exams.  You can request free certification codes twice per year, one from January 1 to June 30 and the second from July 1 to December 31.

Not many people know that every 6 months SOLIDWORKS issues new codes, thus permitting existing CSWP users to continue their quest for the coveted CSWE certification by getting free codes to the CSWP specialized exams

Obtaining Your Free Certification Codes with Active Subscription:

1. If you have not yet created a SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal account, please do so by following the instructions found in this article.

2. Once you have logged in and all the features of the portal are unlocked, click on the “Certification” link under Community (Fig. 1).

free SOLIDWORKS certification codes

Fig. 1

3. Now look at the right of the screen (Fig. 2) and select the link for “Certification Offers for Subscription Service Customers“. You will find the exam codes and detailed instructions on how to use them.

Fig. 2

4. The next page provides a special redemption code as you have logged in with a registered Customer Portal account (sample code shown in Fig. 3 below).  This redemption code can be used to obtain a Certification Voucher for one free core CSWA or CSWP exam, PLUS one free Certification Voucher for one of the specialized CSWP exams.

NOTE: If you are retrieving redemption codes for multiple users at your company, simply refresh the page and a new code will be generated

Fig. 3 - Sample code (use the one provided to you when you log in)

Fig. 3 – Sample code (use the one provided to you when you log in)

5. To obtain the Certification Voucher required to write the exam, you will need to send an sms or text message on your mobile phone.  The message will be sent to 617-795-3131 (from Canada or the US).  In the text message (upper or lowercase), enter your redemption code followed by the exam code(s) you wish to write.

  • CSWA: CSWA
  • CSWP: CSWP
  • Drawing Tools: DT
  • Mold Tools: MT
  • Sheet Metal: SM
  • Surfacing: SU
  • Weldments: WD

For example, if I want to attempt the CSWA core AND the CSWP Drawing Tools specialized exam with the sample redemption code above, I would text:

gxspd4njn cswa dt
Fig. 4

Fig. 4 – Sample code

If I only want to attempt the Sheet Metal specialized exam, I would text:

gxspd4njn sm

6. After a moment, you will receive a responding text with your free Certification Voucher(s).
NOTE: The vouchers will expire 180 days after you receive the text message.

Fig. 5

Fig. 5 – Sample codes

7. You can now use the Certification Vouchers to start your exam.

  • Only request an exam voucher when you are ready to take the desired exams.  The exam vouchers have an expiration date of 180 days after they are received.
  • Two redemption code transactions will be allowed per mobile phone every calendar year: One redemption code transaction will be allowed from January 1 to June 30 and then a second redemption code transaction will then be allowed from July 1 to December 31.
  • Once the exam voucher is entered into the VirtualTester client, the test must be taken immediately.
  • Exam vouchers are non-transferrable.  Violation of this policy may lead to the freezing of your VirtualTester account and cancelation of your certificates.

Writing a Certification Exam with your Free Certification Voucher

1. When you are ready to start the test, start SOLIDWORKS on your computer and ensure you have internet connection.  Using dual monitors is recommended, but not required.

2. Download and run the Tangix TesterPro client that will be used to write the exam.  This can be downloaded from http://tangix.cachefly.net/Tangix_TesterPro_Client.exe.

3. If you already have a VirtualTester account, log in with your credentials.  Otherwise create an account using the form and proceed.  Record your password for future exams.

Fig. 6

Fig. 6

4. At the next screen, enter your Certification Voucher(s) received from the text message and Submit.  Follow the prompts to start the exam.

NOTE: Once the Certification Voucher is entered, the test must be taken immediately

Fig. 7

Fig. 7

Good Luck!

Troubleshooting Errors Receiving Certification Vouchers

If you receive errors obtaining your free SOLIDWORKS certification code voucher through text message, please review the following document on the SOLIDWORKS website.

The post How to Get Coupon Codes for FREE CSWA and CSWP Exams Every 6 Months appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at November 18, 2016 04:40 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Obtaining Your Complimentary Serial Number for Visualize Standard

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard 2017 is fully integrated with the regular SOLIDWORKS Install and is available as part of subscription for Professional and Premium CAD users.

As a result of it’s integration as part of the SOLIDWORKS install a new serial number is required for users which is available for Standalone and Network License users.

solidworks-visualize-render

If you purchased Visualize Standard separately or have purchased Visualize Professional then nothing changes, you use the same serial number as Visualize 2016. However Professional users do also have a new serial number to obtain for Visualize Boost (network rendering).

For those of your using the complimentary license included with your SOLIDWORKS Professional and Premium Subscription some extra steps are required:

1 – Login to the SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal using the account your SOLIDWORKS serial number is associated to.

If you do not have an account you will need to register first.

2 – Once logged in click on “My Products”

3 – If you see a SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium with a + symbol next to it click this to expand to see your SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard Serial number and skip to step 10. This will be listed as “With SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard”

If you do not see such as serial number click “Home” go back to the main Portal login page as you will need to register your product to obtain the serial number

4 – On the main customer portal page select “Register My Products”

5 – Enter your 24 digit SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium Serial number*

6 – Click Next

7 – Pick the tick icon to choose a product/ version

Select the chevron next to SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium 2017

 

8 – Click Ok then Select Next to finish.

9 – Click home to go back to the main page of the customer portal.

10 – Select My Products, the “with SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard” serial number should appear.

 

11 – You can now enter this new Serial number when installing SOLIDWORKS 2017

12 – Or if SOLIDWORKS 2017 is already installed you can modify your SOLIDWORKS Installation from the Windows Control Panel > Programs and Features. Pick the SOLIDWORKS install then select “Change”

Select the “Modify the individual installation” option

Expand SOLIDWORKS Visualize, check the box and enter your newly obtained serial number

* The process is the same for network license users, if you do not have a record of the full serial number please contact support.

Also new for SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional users is Visualize Boost (network rendering) this can be obtained from My Products using a similar process to above.

If you have any issues please get in contact with Solid Solutions Support and look out for more info on What’s New for SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2017

By Alan Sweetenham
Elite Applications Engineer

Author information

Solid Solutions Technical Team
Solid Solutions commenced business as a SolidWorks Training and SolidWorks Support provider in 1998 and has consistently achieved strong growth year-on-year to become the UK’s leading SolidWorks 3D CAD reseller. Growth has been completely organic and has been consistently driven by a focus on recruiting the best from academia and industry and by delivering high quality services to more than 4,000 customers. Our customers range widely in size and are drawn from a broad spectrum of industry sectors. SolidWorks software is used by over 2 million engineers and designers across the world. As a company we are dedicated and focused at providing first class training and support to help you realise the best return on your investment.

The post Obtaining Your Complimentary Serial Number for Visualize Standard appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Solid Solutions Technical Team at November 18, 2016 04:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Promoting Your Company with the Help of SOLIDWORKS

One thing that separates SOLIDWORKS from other 3D design vendors is our passionate community. We know we are successful because of you. The most effective way to promote the SOLIDWORKS brand, our products and our services is to show how our customers are using our products successfully in real-life situations. This can be in the form of customer product images, case studies, testimonials, or product demonstrations based around customer data sets.

Sharing your product development story with SOLIDWORKS is a great way to promote your business/product, while helping the SOLIDWORKS brand. The benefit to SOLIDWORKS is the association with world-class companies. The benefit to you is an increase your own brand awareness and benefit from free marketing of your products. Any deliverables we create, such as images, videos, animations, or product demonstration material, will be made available for you to showcase on your website, in your trade-show booth, and to your customers.

openingscreen.jpg

There are several ways that we can tell our shared story:

  • Written case studies
  • Featured images in collateral and at SOLIDWORKS World events
  • SOLIDWORKS Customer Testimonials on our Blog
  • Models used in product demonstrations, such as SOLIDWORKS Launch
  • Splash screen for SOLIDWORKS software
  • Video testimonials or SOLIDWORKS Born to Design

The first step is expressing your interest and spending some time with us to outline your story. We would like to learn the reasons why you chose SOLIDWORKS, how you are using the software, and what benefits you have received. You can start by filling out at form here.

Once we decide how to best tell your story, we will work very closely with you to minimize the time commitment on your end, and to make sure we have the story right. You will have full oversight over the content we use (we will work with you to protect proprietary information) and will provide final approval.

The typical case study requires:

  • Approval from your legal team
  • About an hour for a telephone interview
  • Supporting images, models, and/or other content
  • 3D CAD models work the best to showcase your products
  • Review, mark up, and approval of the layout and text

In exchange, we will supply the following to you:

  • High-resolution photorealistic images
  • Testimonial posted on www.solidworks.com
  • Potential blog post and promotion via industry trade media

These marketing initiatives have proven to be very successful for both SOLIDWORKS and the customers who have participated. With minimum time requirements – and no cost to you – you can dramatically increase your brand recognition across a broad spectrum of potential future customers, employees, partners, value-added resellers, and media.

sw2016_premium_cover.jpgHere’s how Knapheide Manufacturing Company benefited:

“We have had a lot of success with our partnership with SOLIDWORKS. Being featured in a SOLIDWORKS case study and video gave us more legitimacy in our conversations with customers and visibility in the SOLIDWORKS community. We leveraged the videos in conversations with potential customers to showcase our engineering prowess, advanced development technique and commitment to design. The content also helps us network with peers, suppliers and other engineers in the SOLIDWORKS user community. We have made many new contacts and it has been great to get to know people who do the same thing we do every day. This gives us an opportunity to learn more about what SOLIDWORKS has to offer and connect on our use of the software.”

 

Author information

Kristen Wilson
Kristen Wilson
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, SolidWorks at Dassault Systemes
Senior Brand Offer Marketing Manager, Dassault Systemes SolidWorks. PR flack turned marketer, tech geek and football fan.

The post Promoting Your Company with the Help of SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Kristen Wilson at November 18, 2016 02:42 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Offloaded Simulation allows you to solve your SOLIDWORKS Studies on another computer

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 introduces SOLIDWORKS Offloaded Simulation where you can solve a study on another computer to free up resources on your machine for parallel tasks.  The equation solving tasks (not meshing) are run on another computer connected on the same network domain.  Solving tasks are run purely on the second computer and not shared between computers (i.e. not cluster computing).  But this allows you to continue working on your machine without using resources for solving.

*Available for SOLIDWORKS Simulation Premium licenses with static and nonlinear studies

SOLIDWORKS Offloaded Simulation

SOLIDWORKS Offloaded Simulation

NOTE: Only the coordinator computer requires the SOLIDWORKS and Simulation Premium license.  The node computer (network-connected client computer) requires a small SOLIDWORKS Simulation Worker Agent program installed and active, but no license is used.

Static or Nonlinear studies need to be created on the coordinator machine.  When running the study, the node computer does the calculations and saves to a Temp directory.  Once the solving is completed, results are copied back to the coordinator machine so you can view and post-process the results on your main coordinator machine with the SOLIDWORKS and Simulation license.

Client (Node) Computer — Installing SOLIDWORKS Simulation Worker Agent

On the network-attached computer that will perform the equation calculations, you will need to install and launch the Simulation Worker Agent program.  This is included in the overall SOLIDWORKS Installation files.  Run the Setup.exe on the client machine, choose the Individual Installation and when you get to the Summary page, click on “Change” beside Products to Install.

Installation Manager - Summary Page

Simulation Worker Agent Installation – Summary Page

Only select the SOLIDWORKS Simulation Worker Agent to install.

Simulation Worker Agent Installation - Product Selection

Simulation Worker Agent Installation – Product Selection

Once the installation is complete, launch the Simulation Worker Agent application from Start > All Programs > SOLIDWORKS 2017 > SOLIDWORKS Simulation Worker Agent.  Ensure that it shows the status as Idle so it is available to perform calculations.  Click on Activate Worker Agent if you don’t see the Status information.

Simulation Worker Agent - Idle

Simulation Worker Agent – Idle

SOLIDWORKS Offloaded Simulation Coordinator Computer – Setup and Manage Network Simulation

The coordinator machine is the one with the SOLIDWORKS and Simulation license.  Therefore this is the one where you setup the studies and review you Simulation results.  This is also where you specify which computer on the network to run the Simulation calculations.

After setting up your study, click on the “Offloaded Simulation” button in the Simulation toolbar.  This enables the Intel Network Sparse solver in the study Properties.  Then you can click on Manage Network to see the available computers that have the Simulation Worker Agent application running and idle.

Offloaded Simulation - Manage Network

Offloaded Simulation – Manage Network

Offloaded Simulation - Intel Network Sparse solver

Offloaded Simulation – Intel Network Sparse solver

The top computer in the Manage Network dialog highlighted in green will actually be your local coordinator machine.  Choose another one to have the network client machine run the calculations.  If a computer is shown as red, they are unavailable as they are worker agents already running a job, or an acting coordinator machine with an active offloaded simulation.

While the SOLIDWORKS Offloaded Simulation is running, the client computer will have the Simulation Worker Agent status changed to Active.  Once the study completes its calculations, the results are copied back to the coordinator’s hard drive for post-processing.

Connectivity

To ensure that coordinators and clients can communicate, the following is required:

  • Both coordinator and client machines must be on the same subnetwork.  To test, open Command Prompt and type net view.  This will return a list of computers on the same subnetwork and should show both machines.
  • Make sure that Windows Firewall does not block the following executables of offloaded simulation (by default found under C:\Program Files\Common Files\SOLIDWORKS Shared\Simulation Worker Agent):
    • mpiexec.hydra.exe
    • hydra_service.exe
    • pmi_proxy.exe
    • SOLIDWORKS Simulation Worker Agent.exe
  • If the offloaded simulation still cannot connect, consider turning off the Windows Firewall for the domain network

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post Offloaded Simulation allows you to solve your SOLIDWORKS Studies on another computer appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at November 18, 2016 01:00 PM