Planet SolidWorks

April 07, 2020

The Javelin Blog

Get the Help and Practice you need to Pass the SOLIDWORKS CSWP Exam

We have recently released a new SOLIDWORKS CSWP Exam Preparation Live Online Workshop to help SOLIDWORKS users gain the knowledge and practice to pass the exam, learn more about the new workshop below:

CSWP Exam

CSWP Exam Preparation

Who is the CSWP Exam Prep Workshop for?

The SOLIDWORKS CSWP Exam Preparation Workshop is designed for every SOLIDWORKS user who wants to take their career to the next level by becoming a Certified SOLIDWORKS Professional in Mechanical Design. Certified SOLIDWORKS Instructors and sample exam materials will guide you through the required knowledge and strategies that best equip you for exam success.

Hands-on exercises are designed to mimic the exam requirements, so you will gain a thorough understanding of expectations. As a bonus, the instructor will offer timed exercises for a real-life exam experience.

While attending our workshop prepares you for the challenge of taking the CSWP – Mechanical Design exam, it does not guarantee you will pass.

How do I sit the CSWP Exam?

To complete the exam, you must have a license of at least SOLIDWORKS 2015. Free vouchers are available to current Subscription Service customers, or vouchers can be purchased from the SOLIDWORKS website.

How do I attend the Workshop?

The Workshop is comprised of 3 Online Live sessions, 3 hours per session, and 1 session per day. You will receive live instruction over the web from a Certified SOLIDWORKS Expert who will teach you how to take the exam and answer any of your questions. We have found that this method is more effective than recorded videos and we can provide the specific help to each individual user that attends the workshop.

How will the Workshop prepare me and my computer to take the certification exam?

To have the best chance of passing the exam first time we will help you to prepare by giving you the required knowledge plus assist you in preparing your computer to work as fast and efficiently as possible for the timed exam. The workshop will help you to:

  • Optimize your workstation for taking the exam
  • Become familiar with the Virtual Tester interface which you will use to take the exam
  • Quickly understand the expectations for each question in the exam
  • Organize your SOLIDWORKS environment to suit the requirements of the exam
  • Pre-set parameters such as global variables and equations to enable quick design changes under time constraints
  • Learn the most effective methodology for creating and modifying parts and assemblies fast, including:
    • Model complex parts from printed drawings
    • Identify and apply design intent
    • Make fast design intent changes
    • Use advanced evaluation tools
    • Master configuration management tools
    • Build and revise multi-level assemblies fast using standard and advanced mates
  • Understand best practices to complete the exam

What is included in the CSWP Preparation Workshop?

The Workshop is comprised of 3 segments/sessions, the topics covered during the sessions are listed below:

Segment 1: Model Parts from Printed Drawings under Time Constraints

  • Optimize workstation for taking the exam
  • Become familiar with the Virtual Tester interface
  • Configure SOLIDWORKS User Interface for maximizing performance
  • Identify the design intent in the printed drawings
  • Identify datums
  • Identify major dimensions and features that will change
  • Create Global Variable and Equations to increase change speed and accuracy
  • Plan the structure of the FeatureManager Tree
  • Advanced Sketch Management
  • Modify geometry on initial part to create a more complex part
  • Modify parameters on the part at different stages while maintaining all other dimensions and design intent
  • Use mass property analysis to validate model designs

Segment 2: Revise Design Intent and Configure Parts Fast

  • Complex design intent revision
  • Change and/or rearrange features of existing SOLIDWORKS parts
  • Error management and diagnostic tools
  • Create configurations
  • Change configurations
  • Configuration tables
  • Use mass property analysis to validate model designs

Segment 3: Build, Revise and Validate Assemblies

  • Create assemblies using bottom-up modeling
  • Add parts to an assembly
  • Basic and advanced mates
  • Insert sub-assemblies
  • Interference detection
  • Perform dynamic collision detection when moving components in an assembly
  • Replacing a component with another in an assembly
  • Create coordinate systems
  • Override mass properties, including center of mass
  • Use a coordinate system to perform mass properties analysis

When are the Workshops available and how much are they?

We have scheduled workshops for the next coming months, review our schedule for upcoming Workshop dates. We are offering a reduced price during the COVID-19 pandemic so get a quote to get the best price from us.

The post Get the Help and Practice you need to Pass the SOLIDWORKS CSWP Exam appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at April 07, 2020 08:32 PM

SolidSmack

Lenovo Fires Up 120-Day Test Drive for TGX Remote Workstation Solution

lenovo-remote-workstation-solution-p-series-workstations-01

Your fleeting fascination with a remote workstation solution in the past may have recently shifted into anxiety-driven race to find an option for yourself, your co-workers, or employees.

We didn’t get much warning, did we? If your high-efficiency, centralized teams have suddenly switched to a pajama-clad ‘work from home’ workforce, the scrambling to patch together software, server, and desktop access may have left you with a little ‘it’ll do for now’ relief, but what about the next time? Or even the next few months?

One option I’ve had my eyes on is TGX Remote Desktop from Mechdyne. They’ve partnered with Lenovo to offer a remote workstation solution that marries Lenovo Workstation hardware with TGX Remote Workstation Software to put workstation power in your hands wherever you need to work. And with it, Lenovo has announced a 120-day test drive.

How Does TGX Remote Workstation Work?

TGX Remote Workstation, simply stated, captures a desktop display and streams it on a remote display. Their software combines compression algorithms and hardware acceleration on the ‘Sender’ machine to provide ‘like-local performance’ on the ‘Receiver’ machine. Further, TGX uses H.264 compression video encoding and AAC compression to encode and play 44.1 kHz stereo audio.

How is TGX Different From Other RD/VDI Solutions?

There are a number of features that make TGX an option to consider, the first of which is performance. It provides 4k resolution and a highly optimized bandwidth to frame rate ratio, which reduces both latency and bandwidth consumption while providing control over the real-time desktop experience. With this, they also provide the ability to connect multiple users in the same session for remote team collaboration.

What Hardware is Needed for a TGX Remote Workstation?

On the host (Sender) side, you need:

  • A Lenovo ThinkStation P520 and P920, or P920 Rack
  • Optimized, Dedicated NVIDIA GPU Processing
  • Physical and Virtual Workstation Support
  • Microsoft or Linux OS Support
  • Full Remote Management

Your host can be a local computer, server, or cloud server (Amazon AWS, Google Cloud, Microsoft Azure, etc). It does support virtual machines and connection brokers and encrypts all network traffic using Secure Socket Layer (SSL) with credential hashed with 256-bit AES.

On your (Receiver) side, you need:

  • A modern Intel Processor (Core i5 and up)
  • 8 GB RAM (minimum)
  • Microsoft or Linux OS
  • NVIDIA Quadro GPU (recommended)

It’s important to point out that your computer doesn’t need to be the workhorse desktop you may have in the office. Lenovo recommends the ThinkStation P330 Tiny tower (starting at $809) or the ThinkPad P1 laptop (starting at $1559). Up to receivers can connect to a sender.

Lenovo has arranged a 120-day test drive for TGX Remote Workstation software to help those feeling the pinch of their current remote work situation. For details, contact Lenovo here (Select Request Test Drive to the lower right side or enter your information in the pop-up). Though it is only a trial, if you decide to continue using it, the cost is $455 for a one-year license. However, they do have options for multiple licenses.

There’s also a great set of TGX FAQs on the Mechdyne website that provides more answers on everything from performance to security and other information for your particular setup and needs.

The post Lenovo Fires Up 120-Day Test Drive for TGX Remote Workstation Solution appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at April 07, 2020 07:21 PM

Buggy Quarantine Project

In the past I used to complain endlessly about the bugs in software. Now it’s just another day at the office. Of course the title has a little double entendre.…

by matt at April 07, 2020 03:03 PM

SolidSmack

The Sound of a Steel Finger Joint Stool Being Made

steel finger joint stool

One reason we like to feature the process behind the design is how it breaks down what may otherwise seem complicated. For maker Jimmy Diresta, the process is an artform in itself. His videos are a soothing, manufacturing-noise-only, time-lapse of a project from beginning to end. It’s no less the case in his build of a steel finger-joint stool. Have a listen:

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</figure>

Let’s slow it down now and take a look at the steps he goes through:

1. Concept Design Sketches

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">steel finger joint stool</figure>

Inspired by old metal toys that use steel joinery techniques as well as looking at his clasped hands while on an airplane (ah, the muse of the maker), Diresta captured sketches of what would eventually become the final steal stack stool in his notebook.

2. Digitize And Cut The Metal Sheets

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">steel finger joint stool</figure>

Once the concept was finalized, he used Adobe Illustrator to digitize the pattern. The stool file is then loaded into his CNC machine — A Lincoln Electric Torchmate 4800 4×8 CNC Plasma Cutting Machine — where they are cut onto an 18-gauge cold-rolled steel sheet.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">steel finger joint stool</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">steel finger joint stool</figure>

3. Polish The Metal

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">steel finger joint stool</figure>

With the five pieces cut, four sides and the top, Diresta individually polishes them to remove the rust and imperfections before working what could arguably be the most important part of the stool, which is…

4. Assembly, aka Hammering It Together

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">steel finger joint stool</figure>

Instead of using conventional hardware like bolts or metal nails, Diresta’s stool is held together by the overlapping steel finger joints along each edge of the metal sheets.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">steel finger joint stool</figure>

By hammering the tabs around the adjacent pieces, they create an interwoven mesh of sorts that holds them together. With quite a number of tabs on each side, it takes considerable time (and effort) to get the stool assembled.

5. Apply Rust Block

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">steel finger joint stool</figure>

Polish it clean, spray it with rust-block, and this baby is ready to go! It may not look like the most comfortable thing to sit on but, dang, is it strong. !8 gauge steel is about 2lbs/sq. ft, so it’s pretty hefty as well. Though he doesn’t show it, the design lends itself to being stack with others.

You can find more of Jimmy Diresta’s soothing, manufacturing-noise-only work on his YouTube channel.

The post The Sound of a Steel Finger Joint Stool Being Made appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at April 07, 2020 02:44 PM

The Javelin Blog

What’s the Difference between SOLIDWORKS Macros, Add-Ins and Executables?

When working within SOLIDWORKS, there are a lot of processes that can become repetitive and take quite a long time to complete and most of us see if there’s a way to streamline the process and reduce time. Lucky for us, there are three ways that this can be done with:

  1. SOLIDWORKS Macros
  2. SOLIDWORKS Add-ins
  3. Executables

Let’s look a little deeper into each of the three methods above:

SOLIDWORKS Macros

Macros are most commonly used within the SOLIDWORKS interface which means that an instance of SOLIDWORKS must be running for this code to be run. Macros are most commonly coded in VBA (Visual Basic for Application), similar to the syntax used for VB.net.

An example would be if you had a drawing file (.SLDDRW) open in SOLIDWORKS and would like to save it as a PDF, you would create a macro from the Tools > Macro > New menu and place the code found in the article SOLIDWORKS VBA Macro Code to Save Drawing as a PDF and run it through the .SOLIDWORKS interface.

A SOLIDWORKS macro is essentially a shortcut to a task performed repeatedly in SOLIDWORKS, such as adding specific items to custom properties, changing image qualities prior to closing a working document, opening default templates etc. You can also record or build a macro in SOLIDWORKS and play it back to repeat the commands — however, keep in mind that this may not always work as intended as some actions through the user interface are difficult for the recording tool to capture.

SOLIDWORKS Add-ins

Add-ins for SOLIDWORKS will be created outside of the SOLIDWORKS interface, most commonly through the Visual Studio Platform. This Add-in will typically show on the ribbon menu when SOLIDWORKS is launched. After creating the add-in and compiling it using the .net platforms, you are required to load that add-ins DLL in the SOLIDWORKS interface and enable it through Tools > Add-ins like you would do any other SOLIDWORKS add-ins including Routing, PDM, Electrical etc.

If you use SOLIDWORKS PDM, you can create a SOLIDWORKS PDM Add-in which will be added to the Administration tool to run when certain commands are executed within the Vault, similar to the SOLIDWORKS Task Add-in and Dispatch Add-in.

Add-ins can have multiple “buttons” (functions) to run different commands in one ribbon, allowing for better integration and clarity within the software

Executables

Executable is an application that can be written in a Visual Studio platform and run outside of SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS PDM. With the right DLL file references, it will be able to access commands within SOLIDWORKS and PDM allowing you the ability to work with altering multiple files within a folder, changing their properties and updating file references using the document manager API. For PDM user’s this is similar to how the File Version Upgrade Utility was created, it’s a PDM Executable, that runs outside of PDM and SOLIDWORKS that goes in and updates the file references using certain parameters.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Macros/API

Macros, Add-ins and Executables are a great way to streamline your process and help organize your workflow. you can learn more about how to create these on SOLIDWORKS API Help as well as the training Javelin provides, SOLIDWORKS VB for Applications and SOLIDWORKS API training courses, which you can take live online, or in one of our Canadian classrooms. Check our schedule to learn more.

The post What’s the Difference between SOLIDWORKS Macros, Add-Ins and Executables? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Samony Riyaz at April 07, 2020 12:00 PM

April 06, 2020

The Javelin Blog

Pattern Driven Component Alignment Options in SOLIDWORKS 2020

In SOLIDWORKS 2020, when you use a Pattern Driven Component Pattern with a Hole Wizard feature as its driving feature, you can align the pattern distances to the hole axis for each hole. In the Property Manager of the Pattern Driven Component Pattern, you have two alignment methods under “Driving Feature or Component” when you have a hole wizard as the driving feature:

  1. Align to holes which would align the instances to the hole wizard feature. This option is the default alignment method for new pattern features.
  2. Align to seed which aligns the instances to the seed instance. This option is the default alignment method for existing pattern features.

In the example below, we are exploring the alignment options for a pattern using a hole wizard feature. In this example, we pattern a rivet to a hole feature in order to connect to plates to each other and we use the hole wizard feature for alignment. In the images below, you can see the top and side views of the two plates and the rivet that connects them together.

Top View of the Plates Assembly Before Creating the Pattern

Top View of the Plates Assembly Before Creating the Pattern

Side View of the Plates Assembly Before Creating the Pattern

Side View of the Plates Assembly Before Creating the Pattern

We create a “Pattern Driven Component Pattern” from the “Linear Component Pattern” in the Assembly toolbar.

Creating a Pattern Driven Component Pattern

Creating a Pattern Driven Component Pattern

For “Components to Pattern” we select the Rivet and for “Driving Feature or Component”, the hole wizard feature is selected. Then we click on “Select Seed Position” and select the seed component.

Property Manager of the Pattern

Property Manager of the Pattern

You can see the patterned rivet instances in the following top and side views.

Top View of the Assembly After Creating the Pattern

Top View of the Assembly After Creating the Pattern

Side View of the Assembly After Creating the Pattern

Side View of the Assembly After Creating the Pattern

The post Pattern Driven Component Alignment Options in SOLIDWORKS 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at April 06, 2020 12:44 PM

April 03, 2020

SolidSmack

Lámina is an Open-Source, Single Sheet Paper Lamp Design

flatlamp paper lamp

When you spend all day making complex design projects, it’s can be nice to just sit back, relax, and go with something a little simpler.

Tired of the over-sophistication of house products, Chilean product designer Lorenzo Vega saw fit to create a house fixture which is just as simple as its function.

Enter the Lámina Lamp – a simply-named, single-fold paper lamp which doesn’t require any prior origami knowledge to make:

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">flatlamp paper lamp</figure>

Was the GIF above too fast? Here’s the same folding process in still images:

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lamina paper lamp</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lamina paper lamp</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lamina paper lamp</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lamina paper lamp</figure>

Save for the plug and lightbulb which you can procure from any home store, the entire lamp structure is composed of folded paper. With it, the lamp’s cost becomes much cheaper, unlike store-bought lamps. pendants, and sconces that can set you back hundreds of dollars.

As an added bonus (depending on the material you choose), the paper defuses the light – making it easy on the eyes when turned on. And with paper, there are many types and colors that can be used.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lamina paper lamp</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lamina paper lamp</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lamina paper lamp </figure>

Lorenzo went through a number of shapes and folds before deciding on the final lamp design. Two concentric cones – a large one for the base and a smaller one to contain the bulb – are made when folding the single piece of paper, giving it a simple appearance while managing to illuminate your room.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lamina paper lamp</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lamina paper lamp</figure>

But the best part about the paper structure is how replaceable it is.

Should you accidentally rip the lamp or get it wet, you can easily procure another using the open-source files Lorenzo was so kind enough to make available on his Behance profile. With them, you can print out Lorenzo’s original Lámina Lamp design or make modifications of your own. Heck, you can even change the material to something sturdier which won’t fly away with a light breeze!

If you want to see more of Lorenzo’s work, you can see his entire portfolio on Behance.

The post Lámina is an Open-Source, Single Sheet Paper Lamp Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at April 03, 2020 06:12 PM

Friday Smackdown: Rusted Thrust Rods

Shin-jong-hun-art

A blanket of read posies collapsed against its metal skin, contrasted by the oil-charred joints and rusted thrust rods. We had five total, and a hundred more in various pieces. We had enough for the harvest, but first there were the couplers to build; the only way they could link minds through the protein absorption from these links.

Shin jong hun – Fabulous, beautiful environment art with wonderful, twisting trees, cloud-filled skies, and icy mountains from this Seoul-based artist.

Stop-motion cooking – Bebop is back with LEGO in real life, backing a cake, making a pizza, and slicing sushi, leaving us wondering how he does it all.

Lord of the Rings (with Lightsabers) – ImmersionVFX brings another crossover, this time with the Fellowship battling lightsaber-wielding orcs, taking 5 months to create.

Nature TTL Comp – Nature TTL’s Photography of the Year competition winners. Over 7000 entries from 117 countries.

As Above – A distant galaxy? An oddly active star cluster? The skin of a sea creature? No, this is a single-shot, slow-motion capture of a chemical reaction.

COVID-19 Humble Bundle – $1,071 worth of games and ebooks for just $30 with 100% of proceeds going to support organizations responding to COVID-19.

H O R S E – A horse struggles to exist. Concept, animation, sound, and music, by AJ Jefferies.

Endless – The Live beats movement is here. A new, collaborative music making loop app to jam with friends. For iPhone or iPad.

Life and Death of 3D – The best thing in movies for a hot minute, then… what happened? Don’t worry, it’ll be back in a few generations.

Logobly – Create a complete logo package in 60 seconds with all site, social, and branding needed.

Hambone Woodworks – Rustic American flags with torched wood – traditional, military, firefighter, police and more.

<script type="text/javascript"> amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "solid0a-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Deals We're Watching"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B085W5Q6P4,B07F9JNH92,B07ZDL64Z1,B0736VHL36"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "ab6136e73ede9713f87f2bfddc946584"; </script> <script src="http://z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>

USA Begins With US – Sorry, everyone else, but the Hot Country Knights have a hot new video.

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</figure>

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Friday Smackdown: Rusted Thrust Rods appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at April 03, 2020 06:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to change your SOLIDWORKS Installation

Do you have a SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium license but you don’t see the SOLIDWORKS add-ins included with your licence when you go to Tools > Add-ins…? You may have chosen the wrong installation package when you installed SOLIDWORKS. In this tech tip I’ll show you how to easily change your SOLIDWORKS installation.

Accessing Add-ins in SolidWorks

Accessing Add-ins in SOLIDWORKS

To change the installed SOLIDWORKS package:

  1. Go to your “Control Panel” > “Program and Features
  2. Find your version of SOLIDWORKS from the list of programs and right-click on it.
  3. Select “Change” from the shortcut menu.
Changing the SolidWorks Installation from Control Panel

Changing the SOLIDWORKS Installation from Control Panel

  1. Click on “Modify your installation” and click “Next“.
  2. Check your serial numbers to make sure they are correct and then click “Next” again.
Modifying the Installation in Installation Manager

Modifying the Installation in the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager

  1. If the right product is not selected, click on “Select different packages or products”.
Changing the Installation Package

Changing the Installation Package

  1. From here, make sure you select the right package and click “Next” to modify the installation and close the SOLIDWORKS installation manager.

The post How to change your SOLIDWORKS Installation appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at April 03, 2020 12:00 PM

April 02, 2020

SolidSmack

How Effective is a Facemask? Here’s a Simulation of Your Unfettered Sneeze.

Dassault Systemes COVID-19 Coronavirus Sneeze Simulation

If you ask any software development company what they’re doing to help with the COVID-19 pandemic, you may find they’re using their software in unconventional ways to solve, and in this case, simulate, the challenges that could help improve the design of so many personal protection equipment (PPE) initiatives.

Dassault Systèmes has released a video simulating a human sneeze, showing how all y’alls mucus particles blast through the air, contaminating surfaces.

<figure class="wp-block-video aligncenter"><video controls="controls" src="https://www.solidsmack.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/dassault-systemes-simulia-sneeze-simulation-01.mp4"></video></figure>

The video is a computational simulation developed using SIMULIA PowerFLOW and is based on published data including gas velocity as a function of time exiting the mouth as well as droplet particle size and distribution. The video shows how the turbulent jet helps distribute the mucus particles through the air and highlights the surfaces of the shielded individual that are being contaminated with a red/purple color.”

The simulation also suggests small particles are entrained behind the shield coming into close proximity of the shielded individual. These simulations can provide valuable insight into the flow physics of sneezes which can be used to aid in making decisions about PPE. The simulations are computationally efficient allowing for rapid exploration of design space that could include shield length, width, the distance between individuals, for example.”

Multiply this by 6 billion, throw in some randomization, and you’re in for a real mess — which isn’t too far from where we are. However, it’s solutions like this that are giving us a leg up to help us kick this coronavirus right in its glycoprotein mass.

It’s encouraging to see what so many companies are doing. It’s a testament to the tenacity and inventiveness of the private sector doing what a government could not even begin to even think about wrapping with red tape.

Have any other examples companies are using/rethinking their software to help?

The post How Effective is a Facemask? Here’s a Simulation of Your Unfettered Sneeze. appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at April 02, 2020 09:57 PM

Yes, This Self-Solving Rubik’s Cube Is Floating

self-solving rubik's cube

Apart from fancy dance moves and uncanny wit, the ability to solve a Rubik’s Cube has established how eclectically cool a person is for… at least the past 40 years. But what if you knew your cube so well, you could make it solve ITSELF. Japanese designer Takashi Kaburagi of Human Controller has spent the last few years creating a Rubik’s Cube which can do just that.

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</figure>

His first design in 2017 was made by placing a relatively large computer and a handful of motors inside a large Rubik’s Cube (you can tell how big it is by how a Cube face takes up the entire size of one of his hands). Once the Cube was scrambled, rotating the top face 360° would activate the computer and make it solve itself.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">self-solving rubik's cube</figure>

Fast-forward a year later and he has significantly improved the design. The 2018 version of the self-solving Rubik’s Cube is now the same size as a regular Cube and features a custom 3D-printed spherical computer which fits snuggly inside.

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The internals alone are a treat to look upon, yes? This new cube features a microcontroller board and uses magnetized wire to connect the sensors to the onboard computer. When scrambled and left for a set period of time, the electronics activate the six motors which solve the Rubik’s Cube automatically.

Takashi’s 2019 update doesn’t make quite the same leap as the 2018 design did from the 2017 version. It still retains the same size, computer, and self-solving technology, only this time the Rubik’s Cube floats.

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</figure>

You read that right: in an age where we still lack floating cars, at least we have a floating Rubik’s Cube. Using, what I can only assume are a ton of magnets, CGI, or black magic, Takashi has managed to scramble a Rubik’s Cube and get it to solve itself in mid-air.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/g-tnqDYay5E?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

He’s constantly improving on it, but you can definitely tell Takashi Kaburagi is becoming a savant when it comes to Rubik’s Cube designs. You can find more of his work on his YouTube channel, Human Controller.

The post Yes, This Self-Solving Rubik’s Cube Is Floating appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at April 02, 2020 09:10 PM

The Javelin Blog

Quick tips on how to work with Mesh files in SOLIDWORKS

If you need to work with Mesh files inside of SOLIDWORKS, you probably know how hard that is. These files have always been hard if not useless to work with!

But with the release of SOLIDWORKS 2018 a new Mesh Body type was added, which lets you imports an STL file (.stl) as a solid body!

Along with this there are many hidden tools inside of SOLIDWORKS to help working with those files without the need for additional add-ins.

But now what… How can I quickly grab dimensions or generate surfaces?

Watch this quick video below which highlights the following:

  • How to quickly insert an axis, WITHOUT having to convert faces!
  • Create a usable surface off of the mesh body
  • Take and compare measurements

Now keep in mind, if you are looking at doing full reverse engineering then SOLIDWORKS alone may not be enough. We provide many other solutions to convert your scanned data into usable CAD for your reverse engineering projects, such as Geomagic for SOLIDWORKS

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RTbhM9Hba9A?feature=oembed" title="Working with SOLIDWORKS Mesh Files" width="500"></iframe>

The post Quick tips on how to work with Mesh files in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vicky Guignard at April 02, 2020 06:31 PM

SolidSmack

Update: Photocentric Increases Ventilator Production (130 Valves in 38 Minutes)

Photocentric Ventilator 3D print

I’ve received a detailed update from Photocentric regarding a spectacular improvement in their COVID-19 production rate. 

If you recall, last week I reported on the Photocentric’s efforts to mass-produce a disposable ventilator valve. This component is, in some areas, in short supply and thus there could be interest in being able to produce them quickly. 

Photocentric Ventilator Valve Production

However, it’s a very tricky part to manufacture. Its tiny airway channels are challenging for any 3D printer to produce, and essentially eliminate the possibility of production through filament-powered 3D printers. 

The rough surface produced by most 3D printers could disrupt the proper airflow through the tiny channels, making some metal and SLS 3D printers also inappropriate for this application. 

Even on SLA 3D printers, which do have the necessary resolution to produce tiny, smooth surfaces, there are also material challenges. Most 3D print material is not biocompatible, nor suitable for medical use due to an inability to be sterilized properly. I wrote more on 3D printing for COVID-19 challenges here

The good news is that Photocentric produces SLA 3D printers and just happens to be a major supplier of photopolymer resin. They quickly re-engineered a resin that was indeed suitable for medical use and set about to see whether they could produce a sample ventilator valve design on their inventory of multiple SLA 3D printers.

With their large-format devices, they were able to produce near 40,000 units per week, quite an amazing result. 

Photocentric Maximum Production

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Massive 3D printer build plate of ventilator valves [Source: Photocentric]</figcaption></figure>

But now they have further optimized their process and materials and demonstrated the ability to 3D print 130 valves in only THIRTY-EIGHT MINUTES on their LC Magna device. At this rate, they could theoretically produce as many as 600,000 units per week if the same approach were used on all their equipment. 

I asked how, exactly, they were able to speed up production by an incredible factor of around 10X:

“We have developed chemistry of both the vat and polymer to enable low adhesion to the build plate – this allows for 10x faster speeds than before. This also enables thinner tip supports which maintain geometric shape of the object which also improves the vat life.”

They are, however, focusing valve production on their LC Magna machine, which is currently available and deployed to many customer sites worldwide. Each of these machines could theoretically produce tens of thousands of valves per week in regions that require them. 

Face Shield Production

It seems that Photocentric has learned of a different demand from their local health authorities, and is now directing the majority of their manufacturing capacity to produce face shields. They’ve created an optimized design (shown at top) that is very quick to 3D print.

How fast can these be made on Photocentric equipment? Check out this job configuration for their LC Maximus device:

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Full build plate of face shields for the LC Maximus 3D printer [Source: Photocentric]</figcaption></figure>

Photocentric spokesperson Roxanne Ellison explains:

“We’re now experiencing a huge demand for protection face shields so, therefore, our production has adapted to delivering the mass manufacture of these. In two weeks’ time, we are aiming to turnaround 20,000 protective shield parts in a day.”

This is an excellent example of the importance of connecting with health authorities who know what is needed, where it’s needed and when it’s needed. Manufacturers need to adapt to demands, and quickly. 

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Update: Photocentric Increases Ventilator Production (130 Valves in 38 Minutes) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at April 02, 2020 04:17 PM

Quarantine Diary – Day 10

Quarantine is nothing new to me. I’ve been working in my pajamas and eating take out and leftovers for 17 years. What’s different about it now is everyone else’s reactions.…

by matt at April 02, 2020 01:35 AM

April 01, 2020

SolidSmack

ZipStitch Redesigns the Zip Tie for On-The-Spot Laceration Treatment

ZipStitch

When I was younger, I believed in the all-healing capacity of the Band-Aid.

Small cut on the hand? Band-Aid. Large gash on the knee? Band-Aid. Swarmed by eels in the South Pacific. Band-Aid.

Took a while, but I finally realized that not every injury can be fixed by a simple piece of adhesive plastic. Thankfully, medical product companies like ZipLine Medical, Inc. are developing skin closures that help with more serious injuries.

Their ZipStitch product allows you to immediately address small to medium-sized lacerations when you can’t get to a hospital. Have a look:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XWRujCoBBJs?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Did you get that “Why didn’t I think of this” feeling, too? So simple and so effective. Two 1.5” adhesive hydrocolloid, pressure-sensitive strips, which last up to seven days on clean and dry skin, placed on either side of the open wound, with individual strips for the perfect amount of closure. Brilliant.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">ZipStitch</figure>

Once the strips are applied to the skin, you use the four polymer zip ties to adjust the skin closure around the wound. The ties don’t touch the wound itself, which prevents scarring while making sure there is ample blood flow to the damaged area. A bandage can be applied over the ZipStich to keep the ties from snagging on anything and allow the injury to heal.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">ZipStitch</figure>

Another cool feature is, unlike stitches that can be pulled and broken and wrap around the wound, the ZipStich acts as more of a scaffold above the wound. This prevents movement across the damaged area, prevents bacteria from being introduced below the skin/wound, and allows the healing process to progress. Not to mention, it’s just easier to apply that threading nylon through your skin.

The materials used for the ZipStich is eight times stronger than traditional threaded stitches, which is why it’s been used in hospitals for operations ranging from simple cuts and lacerations, all the way to knee replacement surgeries. Whether you’ve sliced your finger at home or opened your adomen in the great outdoors, it’s important to know how to treat the wound and when to use these, so be sure to check out their guide on treating a would with ZipStitch:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VjK-zE3ulcQ?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

It’s certainly on my first aid kit list and some of us at SolidSmack already have it in a kit. You can purchase it on Amazon find more on this revolutionary bandage on the ZipStitch webpage. There you’ll find out when to apply the ZipStitch, proper application procedures, and testimonials from folks who may or may have had a run-in with some misfortune.

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This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post ZipStitch Redesigns the Zip Tie for On-The-Spot Laceration Treatment appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at April 01, 2020 08:08 PM

Turbosquid’s Kraken Levels Up 3D Asset Management

Turbosquid Kraken 3D Asset Management

First, if you haven’t used Turbosquid to source models, check it out quickly. If you have used Turbosquid before, you know it’s incredibly useful to source just about any type of model you’re looking for. Tools, Cars, ROBOTS. Hust about anything.

You might assume Turbosquid is a 3D model repository for media and entertainment, not production 3D product development models. While the models and formats they support are those used most often in film, television or advertising, they’re used across all industries to add context and aid visuals. They can be used to source models for architecture, automotive, aircraft interiors, VR/AR, 3D printing, and more. They simply have a MASSIVE range of 3D models.

How do you support, sort, verify, organize, and manage hundreds of thousands of 3D models? Behind the scenes, Turbosquid has built a system for doing just that, refining it over 20 years as a leading site for 3D models. Now, they’re making that platform available to others challenged with organizing their 3D model library.

Kraken is a turn-key version of the platform they’ve developed for 3D asset management. And it’s built to sort massive amounts of 3D model data automatically categorizing, sorting, and building a visual, cloud-based repository for your onsite or remote teams. Their goal is to allow teams across varying companies to know what they have, where to find it, and automate the entire process.

To make the transition process less intimidating, Kraken Pro launches with an AI sorting tool that can automatically organize and tag large model libraries for teams that don’t know where to begin. Users simply provide access to their models via hard drive or cloud, and the AI tool will generate categories, keywords, tags and preview renders during importation. 3D’s biggest applications are currently supported (3ds Max and Maya), with support for Cinema 4D and additional formats coming soon.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Turbosquid Kraken 3D asset management<figcaption>The Kraken user interface displaying content, collections, and model data.</figcaption></figure>

To be sure, the structure, model organization, metadata gathering is different from what we’re used to in PDM/PLM/ERP systems where we’re looking material, quantity, weight, cost, and other properties. Yet, Kraken also includes advance customization with an API that allows integration with these systems, along with automatic file conversion and distribution to your most-used content/cloud services. At the very least it could provide a more visual, intelligent search interface, but has the potential to streamline data and lifecycle management with smarter filtering and search.

Pricing starts at a reasonable $599 for 10,000 models and 50 users with volume discounts available. Check it out at kraken3d.com.

The post Turbosquid’s Kraken Levels Up 3D Asset Management appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at April 01, 2020 04:27 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Cloud Based Collaboration

Now more than ever people are needing the flexibility of working remotely. They need access to their SOLIDWORKS design tools. They also need to access their data and continue to work collaboratively.

Join Javelin experts on Friday April 3rd at 1:30 PM EDT to learn about SOLIDWORKS cloud options and best practices, along with recent successes for our customers.

See practical demonstration on how you can automate your repetitive tasks and streamline your everyday functions. The amount of time savings, error reduction and cost savings will amaze you.

How to stay connected with SOLIDWORKS cloud-based collaboration

Over the last couple of weeks, our SOLIDWORKS technical experts have been busy publishing blog articles for our customers. Each article describes different ways to stay connected and access your SOLIDWORKS data securely while working remotely. During this webinar, the authors of these technical articles will discuss a few of the top (and perhaps most important) tools that you can leverage right now.

For reference, here are a few of our recent SOLIDWORKS Cloud articles:

Meet the Javelin SOLIDWORKS Experts

Javelin IT and SOLIDWORKS experts will be presenting and online to answer your questions:

Andrew Lidstone Ryan Moffett Scott Lidgey

The post SOLIDWORKS Cloud Based Collaboration appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at April 01, 2020 12:00 PM

March 31, 2020

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: ASTROLABICON 3D Printed Marble Puzzle [Finger Tingles!]

[WARNING: May lead to extreme tingling and happiness in the fingers.]

With coronavirus getting everyone running around screaming with their hands up in the air, people are doing 62% fewer things with their fingers. IT’S TRUE. Think about it. No more hugs, handshakes, or high-fives. No more going into that building or opening that door. No more kong vaulting the cubical walls or throwing donuts at the side of the neighboring building. What are we to do?

Just when we thought all hope was lost, Devin Montes shows up with something to keep our fingers busy and our minds busy. The host of the YouTube channel Make Anything has a 3D print design (quite a few actually) that combines fidget toy + brain teaser that’s sure to keep you focused and out of trouble. He calls it the ASTROLABICON PRO.

Rotate the two halves of this twisting hexasphericon and move the marbles along its shifting track to rearrange them until all like colors touch. The classic difficulty is to have 4 different colors, with 6 marbles of each color for a total of 24.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"><figcaption>An example of Devin’s Astrolabicon puzzle. Amazing!</figcaption></figure>

It’s a simple two-piece print he designed using Fusion 360. He designed each side with magnets located in a ring at the adjoining faces to rotate and change positions between the two parts. An additional ‘clip’ was designed to allow you to keep the beads in place as you attach the two pieces together.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>The magnet distribution and ‘snap’ rotation of the Astrolabicon puzzle. LOVE.</figcaption></figure>

He recommends a 0.12-0.15mm layer height and 10% infill for a support-free print using Polyalchemy PLA filament for the puzzle and ABS filament for the clip. There are just a few purchased items to include as well: 14mm acrylic (no hole) beads, 6mm x 3mm magnets, and some E6000 adhesive (if you don’t have some already).

You can download Devin’s FIDJ puzzle (and find the many, many other FIDJ puzzles) on MyMiniFactory. See more of Devin’s design (plus his favorite 3D printing gear) on his website. [Bonus: Devin has some great puzzles, but he also has some other nifty designs, like these 3D printed polypanel tool holders – Check ’em out!]

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

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This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Model of the Week: ASTROLABICON 3D Printed Marble Puzzle [Finger Tingles!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 31, 2020 09:12 PM

Could This Flat Tire Solution Be Designed Into Cars?

For those who don’t have the knowledge or ability, changing a flat tire can be a real hassle. It may not be so bad in a parking lot, but when you’re in the middle of a highway with cars zipping past, it can get a little stressful.

Instead of popping out all excited and changing the tire on the spot, the team at Ethar Co. – an idea and production company based in Malaysia – has come up with a solution: the Running Tire. And it makes us consider how it could be designed into the car itself. Have a look:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NNfEgfTbaeI?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The idea is pretty simple – wheels for your wheel. Drive your flat tire onto a cradle with three tiny wheels and drive somewhere it can safely be changed.

Though it’s pretty clever and looks kinda retro, it isn’t a permanent solution to your flat tire problem… for obvious reasons. Why, you ask? Well, the Running Tire max speed is 25 MPH (40km/h) and while it can make simple turns and handle small bumps, don’t expect to go all Fast and Furious with cradles Bungied to your wheel.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/TQrqn6MLdx8?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

It seems impractical for most circumstances, but for a lot of drivers who don’t know how to change a flat tire, or elderly who can’t, this tire cradle might be just the solution they need to get off the road safely.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1M9N9sYWWzI?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Outside of the videos, there isn’ t much info on carrying capacity or acceptable wheel size. Still, for an age-old problem such as this, it’s an interesting solution. One that makes us consider why it hasn’t been or how it could be adapted into the design of the car. As an automated design within the car’s fender, wheel hub, or rocker panel it would remove the need to get out of the car, make deployment easier, and get you on your way faster. Now that would be great to see.

Purchase info is lacking, but should you want to check out the Running Tire or contact Ethar about the product, you can find it on the Ethar Co. website or YouTube channel.

The post Could This Flat Tire Solution Be Designed Into Cars? appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 31, 2020 05:16 PM

The Javelin Blog

Which Materials should I use to 3D print PPE or Medical Components?

If you want to use your 3D printer to help in the fight against COVID-19 with the production of Personal Protection Equipment (PPE), medical devices, or components for medical equipment, like a ventilator, then you need to pick the right type of material.

FDM Materials

Ideally you want to use FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) materials used on professional 3D printers, such as ULTEM® 1010 resin with a Stratasys 3D printer. FDM parts are strong, reliable, and can be sterilized with an approved process such as steam autoclave. A list of the recommended FDM materials is shown below.

WARNING: Medical devices are typically sterilized at 121°C which will distort or melt most common 3D printing materials, such as PLA, used with consumer/hobby 3D printers.

Listed in the tables below are FDM materials that used in production and can be sterilized, along with the tested sterilization process. We recommend PPSF/PPSU, ULTEM 9085 and ULTEM 1010.

What about PolyJet Material?

With regards to Polyjet for manufacturing, a few recommendations from our technical team:

  • Any parts being printed for ventilators, that will be in direct contact to and from patient air, should not be produced with Polyjet unless they are being produced with MED610 and sterilized following the protocol that has been outlined by Stratasys. The same goes for any components in touch with fluids that enter/exit the patient. The risk of uncured resin/remaining support material on part surfaces unfortunately could impact the patient’s health.
  • Non-MED610 Polyjet material are applicable for:
    • PPE such as face shields
    • Brackets, housings, anything not coming into direct contact with patients
    • Medical device components:
      • We recommend Digital ABS for these components as it will provide the best performance from a material characteristic standpoint. Please keep in mind that some individuals have a sensitivity to Polyjet resin so ensuring parts are thoroughly cleaned is important.

 

FDM Material ABSi ABS-M30i ABS-ESD7
BIOCOMPATIBILITY Not Tested (1) Yes Not Tested (1)
ISO 10993-3: Genotoxicity
ISO 10993-4: Hemocompatibility
ISO 10993-5: Cytotoxicity 4 Checked
ISO 10993-6: Implantation Effects
ISO 10993-10: Irritation & Sensitization 4 Checked
ISO 10993-11: Systemic Toxicity 4 Checked
USP Class VI: Systemic Injection Test
USP Class VI: Intracutaneous Test
USP Class VI: Implantation Test
STERLIZABILITY Yes Yes Yes
EtO Checked Checked Checked
Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Plasma Checked Checked Checked
Gamma Radiation Checked Checked Checked
Autoclave (steam)
Flash Autoclave

 

FDM Material PC PC-ABS PC-ISO PPSF/PPSU ULTEM
9085
ULTEM
1010
BIOCOMPATIBILITY Not Tested (1) Not Tested (1) Yes Not Tested (1) Not Tested (1) Yes
ISO 10993-3: Genotoxicity
ISO 10993-4: Hemocompatibility Checked(2)
ISO 10993-5: Cytotoxicity 4 Checked Checked(2)
ISO 10993-6: Implantation Effects Checked(2)
ISO 10993-10: Irritation & Sensitization 4 Checked Checked(2)
ISO 10993-11: Systemic Toxicity 4 Checked Checked
USP Class VI: Systemic Injection Test Checked
USP Class VI: Intracutaneous Test Checked
USP Class VI: Implantation Test Checked
STERLIZABILITY Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
EtO Checked Checked Checked Checked Checked Checked
Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Plasma Checked Checked Checked Checked Checked
Gamma Radiation Checked Checked Checked Checked Checked Checked
Autoclave (steam) Checked Checked Checked
Flash Autoclave Checked Checked
Notes:
  1. Material has not been tested for biocompatibility. Refer to ISO 10993 for appropriate test requirements for the intended application.
  2. Biocompatibility tests conducted by raw material manufacturer.

The post Which Materials should I use to 3D print PPE or Medical Components? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at March 31, 2020 03:30 PM

While navigating in SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault View my Mouse Pointer Jumps around?

If the mouse pointer jumps around when navigating through folders in SOLIDWORKS PDM vault view, you can deselect the option to snap in mouse properties. When the option is selected, the pointer will jump from the folder or file you click on to an ambiguous point in the Windows Explorer toolbar.

Browse to the Mouse Properties in Windows Control Panel, select the tab “Pointer Options“, deselect “Automatically move pointer to the default button in a dialog box” under Snap To, and pick OK.

Snap To Mouse Properties

Snap To Mouse Properties

The post While navigating in SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault View my Mouse Pointer Jumps around? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at March 31, 2020 02:09 PM

SolidSmack

BOXX Slaps Some $$$avings on Their GoBOXX Mobile Workstations

If your work routine has been obliterated over the past few weeks, and you’re now working from home, you’ve likely noticed that a mobile phone doesn’t quite facilitate your hardcore 3D modeling regiment.

Well, BOXX Computers, well known for workstations that specialize in power for 3D professionals, is offering up some new deals on their mobile workstation line where you can save up to $400 on their GoBOXX mobile workstations.

The GoBOXX systems come sized in 15″ and 17″ with Intel i7 or i9 (8-core) options from 2.6 GHz to 4.9 GHz and an NVIDIA Quadro RTX 3000 or 5000 GPU. The displays are HD (1920×1080) with the laptops weighing in at around 5 lbs at a mere 0.69″ thick.

I’ve been on the lookout for options to be more mobile, even around the house, and the GoBOXX systems have been on my shortlist. Saving a few hundred bucks would certainly help to purchase things that are completely out of stock at the grocery store, so… bonus. You can find the details and codes to check out or pass along to your boss on the GoBOXX promo page.

And if the new workstations are a little pricy for your budget, they’ve got refurbished BOXX options that drop the price, by half in some cases, compared to the new computers.

The post BOXX Slaps Some $$$avings on Their GoBOXX Mobile Workstations appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 31, 2020 02:04 PM

March 30, 2020

SolidSmack

Stop Fumbling With Sushi And Make A Pair of Automatic Chopsticks

automatic chopsticks

There’s nothing worse than going to an Asian restaurant with no idea how to use chopsticks. For shame. Sure, you could do the sensible thing and ask for a spoon and fork, but something in the back of your head says, “That’s just bad manners!”

YouTuber The Q is back at it again, this time with an easy fix for your chopstick woes. I’m not sure if his project would save your pride but it’s sure to make people wonder what you’re doing, and we certainly think there are some prosthetic applications here. Let’s break it down:

1. Make the Housing Base

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">automatic chopsticks</figure>

After cutting and sanding a few blocks of wood, drill two holes in one piece to start mounting your components. One hole is cut to fit a motor while the other will be used to hold a gear in place.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">automatic chopsticks</figure>

2. Fit the Electronics

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">automatic chopsticks</figure>

After fitting in the motor on the base piece, clamp it in a vice. This makes it easier to solder the wires, add the electronics, and finish the battery enclosure for the automatic chopsticks.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">automatic chopsticks</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">automatic chopsticks</figure>

3. Enclose the Components

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">automatic chopsticks</figure>

Once everything is in place, the motor can be enclosed inside the wooden box. He adds a watch battery in the battery pack before screwing the last piece on top of the small box.

4. Attach Chopstick Holder and Spring

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">automatic chopsticks</figure>

To complete the build the chopsticks need to be attached to the gears and with a spring to help them return to the open state:

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">automatic chopsticks</figure>

First, two gears are added. One connects to the motor and the other to the hole right beside it. The motor is turned on and off with a switch on the side of the wooden box.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">automatic chopsticks</figure>

Two small copper hooks are attached to each gear. These allow a spring to engage the two gears and bring the chopsticks back to their original position.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">automatic chopsticks</figure>

Lastly, two formed metal brackets are glued to the gears. They look big and cumbersome compared to the rest of the build, but they have to be, considering they’ll be holding your chopsticks and supporting YOUR FOOD.

5. Snag Your Sushi!

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">automatic chopsticks</figure>

Now all you need is a pair of chopsticks! Despite the crude appearance, this automatic chopstick machine gets the work done. Grab a pair and automate your sushi eating adventure. Here’s the project from start to finish.

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</figure>

As always, The Q makes a ton of easy-to-do DIY projects, all of which can be found on his YouTube channel.

The post Stop Fumbling With Sushi And Make A Pair of Automatic Chopsticks appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 30, 2020 06:10 PM

March 27, 2020

SolidSmack

How To Make A CNC Machined Bender From “Futurama”

cnc bender

If you’re a fan of The Simpsons, you may have heard of a little show called Futurama. Made by Matt Groening, the same creator of those yellow folks from Springfield, Futurama ran for 140 episodes and featured a cryogenically preserved human being who wakes up 1,000 years in the future.

One of the things he has to contend with in this new future is a robot called Bender Bending Rodriguez (“Bender” for short) – a fast-talking, alcoholic robot who looks very much like The Simpsons’ Homer.

He also looks like prime material for metalworking, so much so that Andriy from Engineer BrunS was commissioned to make a CNC machined Bender for one of his clients:

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</figure>

1. Creating the Head

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cnc bender</figure>

Considering Bender’s straightforward design, it actually looks pretty easy to create his parts. Andriy first creates Bender’s head, making sure to leave the proper holes which will hold pieces which make up his eyes, ears, antenna, and mouth.

He then fills these holes with individually machined parts which he slots into holes located at the top and bottom of the headpiece.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cnc bender</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cnc bender</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cnc bender</figure>

2. Making The Legs

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cnc bender</figure>

With Bender’s head looking as cocky as his TV counterpart, Andriy can start working from the bottom upwards.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cnc bender</figure>

He machines a couple of small caps onto the bottom of a metal stand, onto which he adds two lanky metal rods which serve as Bender’s feet and legs.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cnc bender</figure>

While the build itself isn’t meant to be a fully poseable action figure, the legs in particular are machined into segments to give an illusion of flexibility. It also keeps in line with Bender’s character design, so it’s an added plus.

3. Shaping Bender’s Body

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cnc bender</figure>

Now equipped with somewhat sturdy legs, Andriy can work on building Bender’s body. He takes a rather large piece of metal, hollows it out, and makes Bender’s signature tubular torso.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cnc bender</figure>

In the show, Bender has a storage container in the center of his body which he opens using a knob. To mimic this, Andriy adds a small nub which fits on the side of the supposed opening.

4. Fitting Those Lanky Arms

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cnc bender</figure>

Bender wouldn’t be Bender without those wacky flailing arms, so to compliment his lanky legs, Andriy crafts segmented metal rods in a similar fashion.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cnc bender</figure>

Unlike his legs, Bender’s arms need hands to hold things with, so Andriy makes a couple of pieces which slip onto the arms. Just like the show, the hands only have three fingers, which is more than some robots can say they have.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cnc bender</figure>

Lastly, Andriy makes shoulder pieces which connect the arms to Bender’s body.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cnc bender</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cnc bender</figure>

Though I mentioned this build wasn’t an action figure, it does allow for some movement. Bender’s arms can be swung upwards to reveal a hidden compartment located under his head.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cnc bender</figure>

The head can’t be removed when the arms are down, so unless you know how to use it, this metallic Bender will keep your USB flash drives and keys safe (which is more than you can say for the real Bender).

Andriy CNC machines a ton of things on his YouTube channel, Engineer BrunS, a lot of which are inspired by pop culture, toys, and his own creative imagination.

The post How To Make A CNC Machined Bender From “Futurama” appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 27, 2020 09:33 PM

Friday Smackdown: Chin Flap Fur Shavings

Lurching forward with the gait of a bow-legged frog, it grappled the starboard blast door, slowing the ship in its departure. Lacking the chin flap fur shavings of the eldersquirrel, we would need to increase rear thruster capacity with a small squeeze of these links.

David Aguero – Massive, wonderful scenes of distant planets, spacecraft, and ancient creatures from this Argentina-based concept designer.

Fanal Forest – Yes, this is a real place. Yes, these are real photos. Located in Madeira, Portugal and photographed by Albert Dros.

Hexcolor.co – Another color palette generator? There cannot be too many. This one is particularly nice. Spacebar for a new one.

Quilling – Instagram follow of the week and your intro to quilling. The colorful paper art of Yulia Brodskaya.

Stallone – A Ferarri concept from designer Murray Sharp. From ideation to airflow consideration to final production renders.

The Falcon – This new electric motorbike from Cleveland Cycleworks is a customizable platform with a super sleek look.

Nuts – A rod going through nuts at different angles. An optical illusion from American magician Jerry Andrus that you can make over the weekend.

Unity Learn – During the COVID-19 lockdown, Unity is offering premium learning content for its game development platform. Start here.

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Letting Go While Holding On – Nine Inch Nails has released two albums for free. As one commenter said, the global pandemic now has a soundtrack. Enjoy the weekend.

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</figure>

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Friday Smackdown: Chin Flap Fur Shavings appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 27, 2020 09:14 PM

The Javelin Blog

Mitigating Supply Chain Risk with End-to-End Automated Additive Manufacturing

When considering Additive for its speed, flexibility, and efficiency, examine how to extend these benefits through the final step of the process.

Mitigating risk within supply chains is a goal that most manufacturers work toward improving incrementally. For this issue to be brought to the top of the priority list, it usually takes a major, often crisis-inducing event. While we’re probably most accustomed to supply chain issues caused by hazardous weather events or trade disruptions caused by diplomacy, this time around, the global COVID-19 pandemic is the source of economic disruption. The volatile state of the stock market is enough to put many companies on edge right now, not to mention the innate fear that they may not be able to meet contracted deadlines. While this pandemic is inhibiting a variety of industries from operating normally, it is especially impacting supply chains as we know them across sectors like consumer goods, automotive, food and beverage, transportation, and more.

COVID-19 has already impacted hundreds of thousands of people across the globe – and numbers only continue to rise. Considering the pandemic initially broke out in the province of Wuhan in China, many western-based companies who rely on Tier 1 and Tier 2 shipments from China were immediately impacted. As a result, we can expect to keep seeing the cost of shipments from China increase on account of premiums, as well as overtime and expedited freight costs. As demands for certain products spike in the short term, stockpiling will also surely force some businesses into vulnerable positions as they struggle to retain inventory. Now that the virus has given rise to quarantines across Europe and the United States, it is beginning to even impact companies who domestically source their raw goods and labor, as well.

As the situation progresses in the west while some eastern manufacturers begin to bounce back, it is in the best interest of companies to actively analyze the implications COVID-19 is placing on their supply chains. To gain an accurate understanding of their situation and best prepare for the coming months, it is recommended that businesses perform operational risk assessments, round up data across all supply chain tiers, and create a temporary inventory recovery process. While this pandemic makes once-sound supply chains increasingly high risk and unreliable, those who utilize Additive Manufacturing within their supply chain have a little less to worry about.

PostProcess parts

Where Additive Comes In

Thanks to its on-demand nature, Additive Manufacturing provides a myriad of production benefits while lessening the commercial impact of supply chain disruptions. The ability to produce parts in-house allows for total process control and dynamic flexibility. Having a stockpile of digital designs enables on-demand production, cutting the costs of setting up and managing an initial inventory. As Supply Chain Digital reports, “The cost-benefit [of additive] goes beyond the transportation in that we eliminate the need to get rid of obsolete parts. Only parts that are demanded are produced – no obsolete parts! This is a huge win for the environment and a clear cost saving to the brand.”

Additionally, in-house additive production allows for simple customization of parts, without having to go through a variety of channels. Because 3D printing has virtually no limitations when it comes to developing complex geometries, custom parts can easily be produced en masse, in much less time than more traditional methods would allow. This ability resolves common bottlenecks that arise around more complex assemblies of specialized parts.

While in-house additive production is renowned for low costs and quick turnaround times, its ability to lessen reliance on outside suppliers is especially critical during this period of pandemic and uncertainty. So as more U.S. manufacturers proceed with swapping out overseas labor for domestic 3D printing solutions, they can expect to see faster speed-to-market of new products, quicker order fulfillment, and an increased ability to rapidly adapt their business processes in this volatile market.

Post-Printing: A Help or Hindrance Your New Additive Operation

Those new to additive will need to understand the post-printing step’s notorious reputation for slowing down workflows. As the final leg of the three-step “design, print, post-print” cycle, conventional support removal and surface finishing processes tend to require copious amounts of manual labor or utilize out-dated equipment not designed for additive. For manufacturers turning on an additive operation utilizing finite in-house resources, it is not ideal to start the endeavor using valuable engineer or technician time on laborious finishing of 3D printed parts with inconsistent final part outcomes.

To avoid these sorts of bottlenecks while maintaining supply chain efficiency, an approach that employs an automated solution is key. Letting software take the wheel in the post-printing step can help additive manufacturing reach its full promise of a digital workflow – improved efficiencies, productivity, and consistency with minimal manual labor – ultimately allowing for increased throughput for the entire operation. To truly make the most out of a switch in your supply chain to incorporate 3D printing, scalable and automated post-printing should be a critical factor in your transition plan.

Learn more here about the effects of COVID-19 on the additive manufacturing realm from Gardner Intelligence chief economist Michael Guckes and Additive Manufacturing senior editor Stephanie Hendrixson.

Learn more about PostProcess and our automated solutions.

Contact Javelin to learn how additive manufacturing technologies can help you keep control of your supply chain.

The post Mitigating Supply Chain Risk with End-to-End Automated Additive Manufacturing appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by PostProcess Technologies at March 27, 2020 05:45 PM

Procedures for shutting down your 3D printer to avoid costly damage

Due to the current COVID-19 situation, there may be a need to shutdown your 3D printer for an undetermined amount of time. If this is the case, it is very important to follow the proper procedures for shutting down your 3D printer to avoid damage or downtime when the printer is powered back up.

Below are the step-by-step instructions for the proper way to shut down your PolyJet or FDM 3D printer.

PolyJet shutdown procedure

What can happen if I don’t properly shut down my PolyJet printer?
  • Print heads can become clogged and jammed and require replacement. If not properly purged, cleaned and in some cases filled with cleaning solution before shutting down, resin will solidify in the orifices and clog them.
  • Resin will drip from the nozzles into the machine when the printer is powered off and lose vacuum pressure, during a proper shut down process the printer will drain all the resin from the block and park the head over the purge area to prevent leakage into the printer.
  • Over extended periods (more than 10 days) the resin inside the printer can gel and clog all the tubing and manifolds inside the printer. This can result in severe damage to the printer,as most of the fluid delivery components (including print heads) need to be replaced. This type of damage could ultimately cost over 10 thousand dollars in repair.
Is there any case where I don’t need too shut down if I am not going to use the printer for more than 7 days?

Yes, if you can print a small object every 7 days then you won’t need to shut down; the printer can be left on indefinitely in this situation. The print only needs to be about 25-30 minutes long, a 1.5” x 1.5” x 1.5” cube would work, either hollow (filled with support) or matt (surrounded by support. By printing it in GLOSS, you will only jet a small amount of support material (for the raft) and we want to exercise both the model and the support head with this activity. After you complete the print, perform a heads cleaning wizard, in this fashion the printer can be left on indefinitely but only if it is used every 7 days.

What type of shutdown can I do on my PolyJet printer?

The type of shutdown you perform will be determined by two factors: how long you plan on shutting down and what type of printer. Because the J series printer uses a different print head, these printers can sit idle for up to 30 days before they require a full shutdown, whereas all the other PolyJet machines can only sit idle for 10 days before requiring a full shutdown.

Less than 10 days – If the printer will be sitting idle for less than 10 days, pick this option in the shutdown wizard. In this case, the printer will drain the fluid in the pint block (~20g) of model and support fluid and then open the purge door and park the head over the purge area. The process takes about 10 minutes.

More than 10 days – If you are planning on having the printer sit idle for more than 10 days, pick this option in the shutdown wizard. In this case, the printer will purge all the existing resin in the system out of the nozzles and fill the system with cleaning solution. The amount of resin used depends on what material is loaded but it will be in the hundreds of grams and the process can take up to 40 minutes. You will need to be present during the process to remove the support and model material canister and install the cleaning solution canister. There is a model cleaning solution and a support cleaning solution, make sure you have both types and they are not expired. Expired cleaning solution will not be accepted by the printer and like resin it also starts to gel as it ages and should not be used. For PolyJet desktop machine you will need at least one full container of model cleaning fluid and one full container of support cleaning fluid. For big box PolyJet printers that have one or more material cabinets, you will need a minimum of four model cleaning solution canister and two support cleaning solution canisters.

How do I do it?

Fortunately, there is a wizard for this (see below)!

On all PolyJet printers navigate to –> OPTIONS –> WIZARDS –> SHUTDOWN

Select which type of SHUTDOWN (more then 10 days or less than 10 days) and follow the prompts. Once the WIZARD is complete you can shut down the printer. Don’t forget to shut down windows first before powering off the printer.

shutdown wizard on Objet260

Starting shutdown wizard on an Objet260

Should I do anything before running the SHUTDOWN WIZARD?

Yes!! Please run a heads cleaning wizard before shutting down the printer; there’s never a bad time to run a heads cleaning wizard!

FDM shutdown procedures

What can happen if I don’t properly shut down my FDM printer?

With FDM, an improper shutdown won’t cause damage to the machine but can cause damage to the material loaded. FDM materials are all hydroscopic and will absorb moisture from the environment. If you leave material in an FDM machine and turn it off, over time the material will absorb moisture and become unusable. The Fortus machines have an air dryer system that pressurize the filament delivery tubes with dried air keeping moisture out. When the machine is running, moisture is kept out, however, once the machine is shut down moisture can readily migrate into the material. Moisture in the material will vaporize inside the extruder causing bubbles and pressure which can ultimately cause clogging and can lead to a head encasement. See below for an image of a head encasement on Dimension SST120ES; typically the whole head needs to be replaced if this happens.

head encasement

Running wet material can result in a head encasement

When to unload material?

Ultimately it depends on your environment. High humidity regions like the East and West coast or those who are not operating the printer in a climate-controlled environment will need to be more careful. The below guidelines are a good rule of thumb to follow.

For Fortus Series Printers:
  • If you are going to power off the machine indefinitely, you should unload the model and support material and store it correctly (see below).
  • If you are keeping the machine powered on but not planning on running it for more than 14 days, unload the model and support material and store it correctly (see below).
For F123 Series Printers:
  • If you are going to power off the machine, you should unload the model and support material and store it correctly (see below).
  • If you are keeping the machine powered on but not planning on running it for more than 14 days, unload the model and support material and store it correctly (see below).
  • If you are not going to run the machine for more than 72 hours unload the material from the printer and spool it onto the spool but leave the spool in the machine.
For uPrint and Dimension Series Printers:
  • If you are going to power off the machine, you should unload the model and support material and store it correctly (see below).
  • If you are keeping the machine powered on but not planning on running it for more than 14 days, unload the model and support material and store it correctly (see below).
How do I correctly store my material?

To maintain the material in its optimal condition, Stratasys recommends that the material be stored in its original packaging in a cool (65 – 75 ºF), dry environment (<50% RH).

After unloading all CANISTERS, CARTRIDGES and SPOOLS, they should be stored in the MYLAR bag that the material was received in (see image below). Large MYLAR Ziploc bags are also shipped with some materials (F123 spools) for storing; these can also be purchased. If you are re-using the MYLAR bag, make sure to tape it and seal the bag completely, otherwise moisture will get in the material.

For Fortus material canisters, you will need to replace the snout cover and re-seal the foil tape on the anti-rotation plug area before storing into a MYLAR bag. Also, its best to store material vertically; when lying flat the spool can unravel inside and cause cross winding.

storing material properly

Always store used material spools, canisters and cartridges in a sealed mylar or ziplock bag and store vertically to prevent cross winding.

Stay healthy and don’t forget to properly shut down your FDM and PolyJet printers to avoid costly damages and material losses.

The post Procedures for shutting down your 3D printer to avoid costly damage appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Pierre Hart at March 27, 2020 03:40 PM

DraftSight Enterprise Installation Guide

DraftSight is a feature-rich 2D and 3D CAD solution for architects, engineers and construction service providers, as well as professional CAD users, designers, educators and hobbyists.  There are various levels of DraftSight licenses available.  For companies with multiple users, DraftSight Enterprise provides network-based licensing for shared use. The following post provides you with a DraftSight Enterprise Installation Guide.

DraftSight Enterprise Installation Guide

Two installations are required for Draftsight Enterprise:

  1. Install a License Manager application on a server to host the floating licenses
  2. Install the Draftsight application on client machines which connect to the server and obtain a license

1. SolidNetWork License Manager Setup

There are two methods to host the DraftSight network licenses on a server: SolidNetWork License Manager (SNL) or Dassault Systèmes License Server (DSLS).  SOLIDWORKS network licensing makes use of the SolidNetWork License Manager to host licenses on a server.  This can be combined with DraftSight Enterprise licenses.  In general SNL is easier to install and maintain vs the DSLS method.

NOTE: This article will only cover the SNL method

New Install

If the SolidNetWork License Manager is not currently used for SOLIDWORKS licenses, the License Manager will need to be installed on a server.  To download the installation files, first create and register a SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal account with your DraftSight Enterprise serial number.

From the Downloads and Updates section, choose the latest version available.  The License Manager is backwards compatible so clients using a previous version can still obtain licenses.

SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal Downloads and Updates

SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal Downloads and Updates

SOLIDWORKS Products - Choose latest version available

SOLIDWORKS Products – Choose latest version available

On your server, run the downloaded EXE file and choose Install Server Components > Install SolidNetWork License Manager.

SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager Installation

Follow the prompts to add your 24-digit Draftsight Enterprise serial number (beginning with 0010 or 9010).  The next window provides information about the server.  By default communication is through TCP port 25734 though this can be changed if needed.  If firewalls are present, enable the checkbox and this will also use TCP port 25735 for communication.  Ensure all firewalls allow inbound and outbound traffic through TCP ports 25734 and 25735 on both the client and server machines.

License Server Information and Firewall

License Server Information and Firewall

Once installed, launch the SolidNetWork License Manager and follow the prompts to complete the activation.  Automatic activation is preferred, though Manual activation is available if the server does not have internet access.

DraftSight Enterprise Successful Activation

DraftSight Enterprise Successful Activation

Modify existing installation of SolidNetWork License Manager

If your server already has the SolidNetWork License Manager installed for SOLIDWORKS product licenses, you can simply modify the existing installation to add the DraftSight serial number.  Add a COMMA between multiple serial numbers.

Windows Control Panel Programs and Features

Windows Control Panel Programs and Features

Modify SolidNetWork License Manager Installation

Modify SolidNetWork License Manager Installation

SolidNetWork License Manager Additional Serial Numbers

SolidNetWork License Manager Additional Serial Numbers

IMPORTANT: Once the installation has been modified with the new DraftSight serial number, the License Manager must be reactivated to obtain the licenses.  See our blog article Re-activating the SolidNetWork License Manager after purchasing additional licenses.

License Usage

After successful activation, the SolidNetWork License Manager will have visibility of available licenses under the License Usage tab.

SolidNetWork License Manager License Usage

SolidNetWork License Manager License Usage

2. DraftSight Enterprise Client Setup

The Draftsight installation files for client machines can be downloaded at draftsight.com/download.  The installation files are the same regardless of license type.

Draftsight Client Download

Run the installer on each client machine.  The first page will allow you to select the license type.  Select SolidNetWork License (SNL).

DraftSight Installation License Type

DraftSight Installation License Type

The next page will require the port and server name that hosts the SolidNetWork License Manager.  By default the port is 25734.  Enter your own server computer name.

DraftSight Installation Server Location

Finally accept the license agreement and begin the installation.  Once complete, opening DraftSight will look to the server for an available license.  The client machines will also have a SolidNetWork License Manager Client application installed where users can access the License Usage tab to see the number of available licenses on the server.

NOTE: In the event that a user is unable to connect to the server and receives an error that no licenses exist, some troubleshooting steps are available in our article SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager Troubleshooting.

The post DraftSight Enterprise Installation Guide appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at March 27, 2020 02:02 PM

How to Share a SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault View

When creating a new SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault View, we have two options for Attach type;

  • Only for me
  • For all users on this computer
SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault View Setup

SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault View Setup

Or if creating using the SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration Tool;

SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration Tool

SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration Tool

which is essentially the same options, but we can choose either Yes or No.

What is the difference between these two options?

Only for me

If you choose Only for Me or select No when asked “Do you want to make the file vault view accessible for all users on this computer“, the registry keys are written in the HKEY_CURRENT_USER section.  Creating the keys in this location makes the vault view only available to the Windows profile that it was created in.

For all users on this computer

If you choose For all users on this computer or select Yes when asked “Do you want to make the file vault view accessible for all users on this computer“, the registry keys are written in the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE section.  Creating the keys in this location makes the vault view accessible to any Windows profile that logs into this workstation.

….but which option should I choose?

That would depend on your setup.  If you’re using a dedicated machine for your use; you can select For all users on this computer, as there isn’t a risk of users logging into a different Windows profile and gaining access to files that were checked out on the previous profile.  If multiple users consistently access the same workstation, and it’s a requirement for everything to be kept separate; then use the Only for me option, which will make the view unique to that logged-in profile.

Q: Wait; if I create a shared profile and someone else logs into my workstation, does that mean they will inherit all my permissions?

A: No.  User permissions are still controlled via the vault log in.  What could happen is; they will gain write access to files that were checked out on the other profile, or files could appear as private if they were cached on the other profile, and the current user doesn’t have viewing permissions.  When using a “Shared” view, both user accounts are accessing the same folder, therefore the same cached content is being accessed.  If another user is going to access a shared view, a clear of the local cache would help prevent this.

The post How to Share a SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault View appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at March 27, 2020 12:00 PM

March 26, 2020

SolidSmack

COVID-19 Healthcare Supply-Boosting Efforts: 3D CAD and How to Help

Have skills and itching to make a difference with the shortages in coronavirus-related supplies? There are lots of individuals, companies, and communities organizing and many other open-source personal protection equipment (PPE) designs available. Investigate the list below to find a way to put your vital CAD-modeling, 3D-printing, nunchuck skills, and other talents to use!

There’s a lot going on (and a lot of projects!), so just remember, DO WHAT YOU DO BEST and you can help no matter if it’s in small ways are big ways. If you have any to add, please let us know in the comments below.

Disclaimer: We’re not making any claims of the effectiveness or safety of any of the work these organizations are doing. Use the info at these links at your own discretion and risk!

PPE Proposals

Engineers Assemble (Ventilator)

You can add to or download from this open-source library of ventilator CAD files. There’s also a section for respirator masks:

➡ Engineers Assemble

Isinnova (Ventilator)

Here you can download the 3D printing files for connectors you can use to help convert a snorkeling mask into an emergency ventilator mask:

➡ Easy COVID 19

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">This hacked snorkel mask is shown on Isinnova's page for COVID19 engineering.<figcaption>This hacked snorkel mask is shown on Isinnova’s page for COVID19 engineering.</figcaption></figure>

Durable PPE Project 2020 (Mask)

Thanks to John “Johnny Mac” McEleney of Onshape for sharing this with us. The proposal found in this link is for figuring out how to produce more durable, makeshift filtering masks. This idea adapts scuba masks with 3D-printed connectors and filter materials commonly used elsewhere in hospitals:

➡ Durable PPE Project 2020

OpenLung BVM (Ventilator)

Thanks again to Johnny Mac for this also. This design is in progress and the aim is to use an already available “bag valve mask” (used in CPR) to hack a quick, low-resource ventilator:

➡ OpenLung BVM Ventilator

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Concept illustration pulled from OpenLung project on GitLab March 26, 2020. <figcaption>Concept illustration pulled from OpenLung project on GitLab March 26, 2020. </figcaption></figure>

CIIRC RP95-3D

he CIIRC RP95-3D protective half-mask was developed by a research team at the Czech Institute of Informatics, Robotics and Cybernetics CTU (CIIRC CTU) in Prague in one week. It is a personal protective device – a half-mask – with an exchangeable P3 filter that meets the highest degree of protection.

➡ CIIRC RP95-3D (Half-Mask) with an P3 Exchangeable External Filter

Copper 3D NanoHack (N95 Mask)

Copper 3D is working out a 3D-printable N95 mask design called “NanoHack” here:

➡ Hack The Pandemic

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Copper 3D's NanoHack printable mask design.<figcaption>Copper 3D’s NanoHack printable mask design.</figcaption></figure>

Inventas (Face Shield)

The product designers at Inventas have created an infection protection visor that does not depend on 3D printers. Instead, it uses a simple elastic band. They provide the instructions, templates, and files here.

➡ Inventas Face Shield

Stratasys (Face Shield)

Stratasys is heading up a COVID-19 initiative that brings together more than 150 organizations to produce 3D printed face shields. They’ve also provided the face shield design and files available for download.

➡ Stratasys Face Shield

Prusa Printers (Face Shield)

These guys give warnings about when creating a 3D printed mask design, but face shields are a different story. Prusa Printers is working on finalizing their 3D-printed shield design, now in its 2nd revision and being field-tested. You can learn more about here:

➡ Prusa Medical Shields

RepRap (O2 Concentrator)

You can view an open-source oxygen concentrator design that MacGyver would be proud of here:

➡ Open Source Oxygen Concentrator

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Here's a schematic for an open-source oxygen concentrator idea you can find at RepRap LTD. <figcaption>Here’s a schematic for an open-source oxygen concentrator idea you can find at RepRap LTD. </figcaption></figure>

Genesis Plastics (Face Shield)

Genesis Plastics Technologies, based out of Greeley, Colorado, announced they are also producing large quantities of face shields. They whipped up a design on the fly with a 3D-printed component to help in-state medical professionals facing shortages.

➡ Contact Genesis Plastics

Origin (PPE)

At the time of publishing, the PPE designs that Origin is working on were still under development. We’re told they’ll be made open-source once they’re good to go.

➡ Contact Origin

COMMUNITIES

3D HUBS COVID-19 Fund

3D HUBS is organizing a fund to support projects looking to manufacture critical equipment at scale. You can donate or apply for funding through this link:

➡ COVID-19 Fund

Folding@Home

This amazing project allows you to provide your computing power to run molecular protein folding simulations at home that goes towards finding cures for a wide range of illness, including the COVID-19 coronavirus.

➡ Start Folding@Home

Formlabs

Formlabs is matching up Formlabs customers willing to do 3D printing with those in the healthcare community in need of supplies. You can find out more at the link below and also sign up to be a volunteer.

➡ Formlabs COVID-19 Response

Open COVID-19

Dassault Systèmes has a community on its 3DExperience platform with lots of experts from different fields and countries to qualify ideas that emerge. You can find more information here:

➡ Open COVID-19

OSCMS: Open Source COVID19 Medical Supplies

When I first asked my network about how we could help with our bow-hunting, I mean, engineering skills, I was pointed to this international Facebook group:

➡ Open Source Covid19 Medical Supplies
1. Read: Our Intent, Needs, and Your Role (Google Doc)
2. Read: Careables.com Corona Care Maker Initiative (Google Doc)

EDUCATION

Coronavirus Tech Handbook

This open-source document covers a lot of areas including a section on “Engineering” that you can add to yourself. Sometimes this link is difficult to open due to high traffic. If that happens, you can try again at an hour more likely to be off-peak.

➡ Coronavirus Tech Handbook

HP COVID-19 Prevention Methods

Hewlett-Packard has free, 3D printable design files right now for respirators, face shields, hands-free door openers, and mask adjusters (to make them more comfortable for long periods of wear). You can also submit your own designs to them. Find out more at this link:

➡ HP COVID-19 Prevention Methods

Remote 3D Printing Presentations

Jason Lopes is an entertainment industry veteran currently working at Carbon. With children at home he sees the need for education on 3D printing. He is offering educators to host remote presentations to share his knowledge and fill the gaps. See his post on LinkedIn then reach out to him for details:

➡ Contact Jason on LinkedIn

MANUFACTURING

Vivek Krishnamurthy of HP also shared the digital manufacturers below who are “waiting and able to help hospitals and medical professionals alike in need of spare parts.”

Arizona:
Athena 3D Manufacturing
Paradigm Manufacturing

California:
FORECAST 3D
GoProto, Inc.
FATHOM
Dinsmore Inc.

Colorado:
Avid Product Development

Illinois:
Re3dTech
Custom Color 3D Printing
Fast Radius, Inc.

Idaho:
JawsTec

Massachusetts:
Empire Group

Michigan:
Forerunner 3D Printing
Extol, Inc.
Linear AMS

Minnesota:
DI Labs

New Jersey:
SICAM Corporation

North Carolina:
Additive America

Ohio:
Aerosport Additive

Pennsylvania:
ProtoCAM

Washington:
RapidMade, Inc.
Jabil

Wisconsin:
Midwest Prototyping

Contests/Challenges

CoVent-19 Challenge

This challenge is “An Open Innovation Effort to Design a Rapidly Deployable Mechanical Ventilator“. There are a bunch of MD’s on their team, so that’s a great sign. You can sign-up on this page to learn more:

➡ Covent Challenge

Designer Contest: Everyday Necessities

Prusa Printers is holding a contest in addition to its own development work. This one is focused not on medical supplies, but on the everyday things we all might run out of in this (hopefully) temporary chaos:

➡ Everyday Necessities

Other Lists

Dragon Innovation published a list of open projects and resources:

➡ COVID-19 Open Source Projects

A list of open-source projects can be found at Wikifactory:

➡ Wikifactory COVID-19 Projects (Project Template)

More Resources?

We’ll be updating this list as we are sent them or hear of others. If you have a project or know of one, please tell us in the comments or contact us with more information. Thank you!

The post COVID-19 Healthcare Supply-Boosting Efforts: 3D CAD and How to Help appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at March 26, 2020 09:48 PM

Leveraging Your Best Skills to Help Educators During the COVID-19 Crisis

3D Printing Education Course

During the crisis, many are anxious to “do something” to help, and 3D print experts are stepping up to do their part. 

Many groups and companies have organized COVID-19 projects to help hospitals, redirect their resources to manufacturing essential goods, and other ventures. But on an individual basis, it can be more challenging to figure out something effective to do. 

The scene for an individual is rather chaotic. There are now dozens of sites, lists, Slack channels, Facebook groups, forums and others purporting to “coordinate” activities, but the broad view of this work is quite confusing and not properly coordinated. 

I think a good approach is to simply do what you do best, directed at a specific aspect of the crisis. One person who’s doing this is Fabbaloo friend, Jason Lopes, who has been practicing advanced 3D printing for many years. His presentations at trade shows and conferences in the past have enlightened many. 

Lopes, who currently works at Carbon, writes:

“To all my network… I am writing as a father… one reality in my home that has been keeping me on edge is the abrupt change in life for my children’s school year. It truly breaks my heart some of the questions I have been getting from my daughter. As a maker I have always been involved in showing kids 3D Printing hoping that just one of them gets that “Aha” moment and a new approach… last night I was asked to help someone who teaches.. but now abruptly remote… If there are any educators out there that have been disrupted and challenged via “online schooling” and would like to work with me to offer some remote presentations on 3D Printing for your students please message me as I would love to pay it forward! (I definitely have some kick ass content!) Please share and let’s help this abrupt change that the kids are going through!”

This is an excellent way for Lopes to leverage his best skills to address a need during the crisis.

Coincidentally, one of the commenters on Lopes’ LinkedIn post was none other than Bre Pettis of MakerBot fame. Pettis now seems to have launched yet another startup, something called “SkillSchool”, which he has volunteered use of to Lopes for this work. SkillSchool seems to be an online curriculum development tool, likely leveraging Pettis’ previous experience as an educator. 

If you’re interested in this project or can assist in any way, please contact Jason via LinkedIn.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Leveraging Your Best Skills to Help Educators During the COVID-19 Crisis appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at March 26, 2020 09:16 PM

The Lost Art of Naming a Part

Part Naming - How to Name a Part

Nine months ago I got the news and I knew everything was going to change.  And now here we are, exhausted and bleary-eyed, holding the wonder we have created.  As I look down on our little miracle I hold softly cradled in my arms I think ahead. Yes, I made a part. I want the best for my little part, I want to give it the brightest future and the best opportunities.  The first step to giving my part a leg up is to give it a great name.

First Name – The Table Rule

The first name of the part should describe it in the most direct way.  For example, the clearest and simplest way to address a person is by their first name. If someone called out “Dan”, even a person I didn’t know, I would turn to see who called my name.

One could accurately call me by a nickname, attribute or title. Hey guy, dude, blogger, triathlete, bro, d-train, husband, engineer and so on.  None of these titles though are accurate enough to grab my attention.

How would the part you are naming introduce itself at a party full of parts? It wouldn’t say I’m “sheet metal” or I’m “angular bends“ or I’m “boxy thing” or I’m “Holey Plate” or I’m “326 grams”. While technically accurate, those names don’t get to the heart of what the part’s purpose is. It would say, “I’m Mounting Bracket, you can call me Brack”. Sup, Brack I’m Axle and this is Gus(set). 

If the item you are naming was on a table of assorted different items, this would be what you’d call it when requesting someone to hand it to you. Additional specificity isn’t needed (yet) because seeing the item provides context. “Please hand me that wrench,” is descriptive enough without calling out the style or size when there is only one wrench available.

Aside – One- or Two-word Name?

A common misconception is that every part’s name should be only one word.  There are many instances when a two-word grouping should be used instead of a single word.  The first instance is when the commonly accepted name is what is called an open compound word. Referring back to the table rule, would someone else understand what you mean by the single word name?  For example, “Please grab me the iron,” would cause confusion if you wanted a “soldering iron.”  Or it would be unclear to ask “Can I please see that hammer,” if your intent is to see baggy panted 1980s dance and rap icon MC Hammer.  Hot dog or vice president

Test:
If you use a one-word name conversationally, would it be clear what you meant?  Some words are so broad that they cross categories. A nut can be a kind of fastener or a healthy snack.

A compound noun or noun phrase
Iron -> soldering iron
Nuts -> Macadamia nuts
Bag -> Teabag
Printer -> 3D printer

Often, the reason two words are used is because a qualifying word is needed.  For example, deadly robot. The word “deadly” qualifies the word “robot” and thus forms a qualifying phrase. Qualifying phrases are important to avoid confusion such as in the instance of “Robot, deadly, not” versus “robot, not deadly”.  Is the robot not deadly or not a robot? Only one way to find out, start hurling insults at the robot and slander the character of its family.

Follow up Names – The Store Rule

A second name is needed when, instead of items of different types, there are items of the same class/category that require further differentiation.  This will always be the case unless you work for a business that sells exactly and only one item or has developed a product with Bieber or Gaga level iconic one name recognition status.

A store will have multiple versions of a given item, a restaurant will have variations of a dish, and George Foreman’s house will have five children named George Edward Forman. The second name begins to distinguish the item from other items of the same type when there isn’t visual or other context to aid.

Ultimately, the goal is a name chain that stands alone without any context.  If someone goes on a coffee run and you don’t specify your order, you are liable to get a small pumpkin spice latte “coffee” when you wanted a large nitro cold brew “coffee”. From coffee to tacos to manufactured parts, when what we require is something specific then the way we describe it must also be specific.

Part naming is the opposite of how we speak in English. We speak in ascending order of importance (large, nitro, cold-brew coffee) and we name in descending (coffee, cold brew, nitro, large). With the exception, of course, being master Yoda. “Coffee. Cold-brew. Nitro. Large. Yes, Hrmmm.Tip: Don’t let Yoda get a large — that dude is way too caffeinated already.  Also, counterintuitively he prefers a “dark” roast.

Aside – How Long Should a Name Chain Be?

In general, the briefer and simpler the name chain is the better. Shorter is easier to communicate, remember and less prone to human error.  Every name chain needs to be unique within an organization. The length needed, therefore, depends on the organization.

So, as simple as possible and yet also unique. Duplicate names in the system can cause manufacturing disruptions due to incorrect ordering, fabrication, stocking, dissemination, and assembly. The specificity must be unique within the company; not just as the company exists now but also as the company exists 100 years from now and beyond. You must… predict the future!

We hope our organizations will endure and grow over time making many part versions and variations. One approach to ensure uniqueness is to add additional name descriptors ad infinitum. A better approach is to punctuate the name chain with a name that is a highly individualistic attribute. The more individualistic, the less likely for future duplication. I like to use a measurable metric like an external bounding dimension.

Increasing the number of digits in a combination exponentially increases the permutations and security and so does a second individualistic attribute name.

Frog (Likely)
Frog, Talking (Very unlikely)
Frog, Talking, Klingon (Very, very unlikely)

Another option is to use a Machine, Time Travel to go into the distant future.  Then you can check out the PLM system, see if there are any potential duplicates and go back in time to give your part the simplest name possible. But wait, if you do that, then you will have created a new alternate reality.

Aside – Why Have Part Names?

When creating a name it is useful to think of why part names exist. Part numbers work as unique identifiers to distinguish one part from the next. This is needed for cataloging and organizing parts and the associated part purchasing information.  Part drawings provide all the details of the part.

What purpose then is there for a part name? The part drawing title block has a place for a part name. If there is a place for a thing there must be a thing in that place.  To do otherwise would cause a downward spiral from civilization and order to anarchy and chaos.

The actual reason for parts’ names is that part numbers aren’t normally humanly recallable. Much of the communication around parts is still done informally and by those that don’t have access to the part number database. From shop floor to shop floor communication or shop floor to engineer or purchasing to shipping and so on, when someone says “What’s the situation with that mounting bracket?” it may spark enough information for one party to provide the other party the information needed. 

Speaking of parties, that Brack is one crazy guy.

The post The Lost Art of Naming a Part appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Dan Slaski at March 26, 2020 06:45 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS User Group Network Virtual Events

SOLIDWORKS has recently announced a complete series of free SOLIDWORKS User Group Network Virtual Meetings from March through to May. You will be able to learn SOLIDWORKS tips, tricks, plus information on the latest products, features and technology.

The Online Events are taking place during the evenings for North American SOLIDWORKS Users. We invite you to register for the upcoming SOLIDWORKS virtual events.

Upcoming Virtual Events:

  • March 26: The SOLIDWORKS Certification Game
  • March 31: SOLIDWORKS Configurations Tips & Tricks
  • April 7: Mastering Assembly Mates in SOLIDWORKS
  • April 9: Accelerate Product Design with Cloud-Based Collaboration
  • April 14: The SOLIDWORKS Certification Game
  • April 16: SOLIDWORKS Simulation (FEA) & SOLIDWORKS Flow
  • April 21: Model Media Mania: Making Content from Your CAD
  • April 22: Discover the Power & Flexibility of Weldments
  • April 23: Accelerate Product Design with Cloud-Based Collaboration
  • April 28: Beginner Surfacing for Beginners
  • May 5: Tools for Additive Manufacturing
  • May 7: Accelerate Product Design with Cloud-Based Collaboration
  • May 14: Accelerate Product Design with Cloud-Based Collaboration
  • May 14: Productos Xpress (presented in Spanish)

Register for the events »

What is the SOLIDWORKS User Group Network (SWUGN)?

The SOLIDWORKS User Group Network (SWUGN) is for users to share experience and solve problems with design in SOLIDWORKS. The group meetings provide an opportunity to expand members’ knowledge of SOLIDWORKS features and how they are applied in the design process. You don’t have to be an expert to attend. The SWUGN is a complimentary event and is open to all SOLIDWORKS enthusiasts!

The post SOLIDWORKS User Group Network Virtual Events appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at March 26, 2020 05:43 PM

SolidSmack

The Uncensored Library Is A Minecraft Map Dedicated To Press Freedom

The Uncensored Library

It’s been used to recreate beloved animated picture structures and to teach children various skills, but now Reporters Without Borders, a non-profit organization dedicated to the right of freedom of information, and BlockWorks, a dedicated team of Minecraft designers, animators, and architects, are using Minecraft with another goal in mind: press freedom.

In countries where the press and social media are being strictly controlled by the government, people tend to believe things which are heavily manipulated. But most of these oppressive leaders tend to overlook Minecraft – a cheap, widely accessible video game in which players can create and share their experiences with others.

Among the many things you can create in Minecraft are books. Fully readable and completely uncensored, Reporters Without Borders and Blockworks have decided to use Minecraft as a platform to publish censored works for anyone to read, right under the noses of strict government officials.

And thus, The Uncensored Library was born:

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</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">The Uncensored Library</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">The Uncensored Library</figure>

Opened on March 12, the World Day Against Cyber Censorship, The Uncensored Library is designed with a Neo-Classical architectural style and is made up of over 12.5 million Minecraft blocks. It took 250 hours just to design the map, and an extra 3 months for 24 builders from 16 countries to build this digital marvel of architecture.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">The Uncensored Library</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">The Uncensored Library</figure>

Once you enter the library, books are sorted according to the country they were censored in. Egypt, Sri Lanka, Mexico, Russia, and Vietnam are the five countries which contain numerous volumes written by journalists who were either banned, jailed, exiled, or killed for telling their stories. Over 200 books reside in The Uncensored Library, with more on the way.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_7j-Ynup6BM?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">The Uncensored Library</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">The Uncensored Library</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">The Uncensored Library</figure>

It’s definitely a bit on the dark side, considering these books are being posted on a video game made for kids, but the map is an optional download for those who want to explore and read the untold tales of these countries.

You can find links to Minecraft and the downloadable Uncensored Library map on the official webpage.

The post The Uncensored Library Is A Minecraft Map Dedicated To Press Freedom appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 26, 2020 04:27 PM

The Javelin Blog

Do you have an Unexpected exploded body in your SOLIDWORKS part?

It is very common to create multi-body parts with an accompanying exploded view. However, there may be occasions where an exploded view needs to be removed, and the result of that removal leaves an unexpected exploded body in your part.

The part below has a weldment along with a couple of solid body parts made from revolving, cutting and then mirroring. This issue is known and is documented in the Software Performance Report (SPR) 631816, but there is a workaround for it.

multi-body part

Phantom Exploded Solid Body

Fix for Phantom Exploded multi-body part

The first step is to go through the solid bodies and find the weldment parts that are in an exploded state. From there, right-click and select the Parent/Child… option as seen in the image below.

Parent/Child… Option

In the Parent/Child Relationships dialog box, select any of the items in the Children section that are connected to the multi-body part by right-clicking and selecting Delete… as seen in the image below.

Deleting all Children relationships

Once that has been completed, the part will behave as intended. If you run into an unexpected exploded body in your part, I highly recommend letting your VAR know about it so that they can add you to the SPR, which will increase the likelihood that it will be fixed.

The post Do you have an Unexpected exploded body in your SOLIDWORKS part? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at March 26, 2020 12:00 PM

March 25, 2020

The Javelin Blog

3D Printing Face Shields for Canadian Medical Teams fighting COVID-19

To support the Canadian COVID-19 response, we are leveraging our manufacturing facility and medical industry experience to manufacture Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) Face Shields for medical workers, and provide 3D printing services for designers, manufacturers, and healthcare professionals creating medical-grade components for pandemic response initiatives.

3D Printed PPE Face Shield

3D Printed PPE Face Shield

We have a secure manufacturing facility following sterilization best-practices, with access to a variety of production methods and materials for creating medical parts. We work with a number of medical-grade, sterilizable production materials, including ABS-M30iPC-ISO, ULTEM™ 9085, and ULTEM™ 1010. By leveraging additive manufacturing, we are able to respond to the rapidly-changing needs of the healthcare community whilst ensuring our solutions meet the needs of the practitioners and patients we are supporting.

Do you work for a Canadian Health-care Provider or Medical Institution? Contact us to order PPE Face Shields

If you are a health-care provider or medical institution on the front-lines and need PPE Face Shields then please contact us.

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Medical 3D Printing Service

If you are a designer, manufacturer, or healthcare provider that requires assistance for the production of a medical device, prototype or short production run then our manufacturing team can help.

The Javelin team has extensive medical industry knowledge and can advise you on the right production method, material, and application for your requirements. We work with healthcare practitioners and medical companies for the production of:

  • Production components for medical devices
  • Bridge-to-production for rapid response requirements
  • Jigs, fixtures, custom components for treatment centres
  • Personalized medical devices

Get Started

The post 3D Printing Face Shields for Canadian Medical Teams fighting COVID-19 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at March 25, 2020 06:23 PM

Design vs Modeling

The distinction of design vs modeling is something I run into all the time. I try to be careful in the stuff I write to be clear that I don’t…

by matt at March 25, 2020 04:28 PM

March 24, 2020

The Javelin Blog

Learning 3D printing from home: guide for students and educators

Learn more about 3D printing

Explore everything about 3D printing in Education!  Whether you are an educator, researcher or a student, use these resources to learn more about 3D printing:

For Educators

Watch a webinar

Watch our 3D printing 101 webinar to learn:

  • What to look for in a 3D printer
  • The different types of technology available
  • How to get started
  • The importance of a course curriculum

Sign up for an upcoming webinar.

Research 3D printer options for classrooms

Javelin offers many 3D printers from desktop to production. Learn more about the best 3D printer options for the classroom.

Stratasys F120 Print Head Desktop 3D printing in classroom

Do cool projects, enter challenges or explore tutorials

Additive Manufacturing Education Symposium
Extreme redesign student competition

This contest asks students, to redesign an existing product to improve how a task is accomplished, or design something entirely new that addresses an unmet need. This is a quest to find the most creative, mechanically sound and realistically achievable design using 3D printing. This year’s Challenge is open until April 21st, 2020. Enter now!

Learn how to apply textures with SOLIDWORKS

SOLIDWORKS 2019 introduced a new 3D texture tool that leverages an image, turning its appearance directly into a 3D mesh body that is ready for downstream processing or 3D printing. Watch this video to learn how to apply textures to your models.

How to 3D print parts with moving components

Rather than 3D printing smaller parts and assembling them together, learn how you can 3D print parts with moving components in a single print! Read this step-by-step guide.

NASA regolith advanced surface systems operations robot (RASSOR) bucket drum design challenge

NASA is seeking to challenge the GrabCAD Community by sponsoring an open competition in which participants design a bucket drum for RASSOR that will provide the maximum amount of regolith extraction and retention while remaining free of obstructions during loading and unloading. Learn more here. 

Additional 3D printing project ideas

Want to explore projects like an organizer, camera accessories, catapult, glider, weight supporting structures, and more! Check them out here.

 

Need more information or have questions? Contact us! 

The post Learning 3D printing from home: guide for students and educators appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Kelly Clancy at March 24, 2020 07:40 PM

Show/Hide All Types vs Display Pane

There are things that make me realize that not all users use the software the same way. And then I start thinking “yeah, but …. why???” It’s SOOOOO obvious my…

by matt at March 24, 2020 06:38 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Online Training delivered by a Live Instructor

You are likely spending most of your time working from home now due to COVID-19 and this gives you the opportunity to develop your SOLIDWORKS skills with online training. If you want to learn online then you have a couple of choices, your choice will depend on your learning style i.e. do you learn well on your own from recorded material, or prefer guidance from a live instructor:

  1. MySolidWorks Video Based Training, which provides introductory training and a source of reference for SOLIDWORKS.
  2. Javelin Online LIVE Training (JOLT), which delivers a comprehensive instructor led training experience live over the web. This is a good alternative to classroom-based training, especially as there is no access to classroom training right now!

Disadvantages of Video Based Training

MySolidWorks Video based training is convenient however there are many disadvantages to this style of online learning when compared to live online training delivered by an instructor, here are just a few disadvantages:

  1. Not as comprehensive — watching a video is quick and easy but for a full training course a learner needs to view a lot of videos. What this means is learners often skip ahead with video based learning to speed up the process and typically miss out on important content, or suffer from video fatigue and retention of the material drops significantly over time.
  2. Not as effective — with no live instructor available to show you specific techniques and answer your questions it can be less effective. Plus Instructors are not as effective when they are recording training content without a live audience.
  3. Not as motivational — video based training has less engagement and learners typically tend to get distracted. Also without a live instructor you are not driven to complete exercises and there is no reward for completion.
  4. Requires more discipline — videos offer one way communication, this means that learners need to be dedicated to watching and listening without obtaining any feedback.
  5. Not as enjoyable for the learner — interaction and delivery from a live instructor is a much more enjoyable experience for everyone involved, rather than the static delivery of prerecorded content. One of the most effective methods of learning is through the interaction between a learner and an instructor.

Instructor led Training at home

Our customers need more in-depth SOLIDWORKS online training that still provides the convenience of learning online, without the requirement of being in a classroom. This is how the idea for Javelin Online Live Training was formed ⇒ to give customers the benefits of classroom training in an online format.

Watch the video below to learn about online live training from our training manager, and hear what our customers have to say about their learning experience:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5BYvpMOLxQM?feature=oembed" title="Javelin Online Live Training, a new way to learn SOLIDWORKS" width="500"></iframe>

A Better Learning Experience

Javelin Online Live Training or JOLT for short is our method of delivering classroom based training directly to your desktop. We know that your time is valuable and attending a training facility to take training is not possible right now. So for just a few hours a day you can take LIVE SOLIDWORKS training over the web, giving you the benefits of classroom training with the convenience of online training, whilst overcoming the disadvantages of video based training.

JOLT is delivered on a live interactive learning environment where you can ask questions, receive immediate answers from the instructor, and learn hands-on with SOLIDWORKS exercise files featured in the course. You receive a training manual and a headset before the course starts so you can follow along with the training and interact with the instructor.

I am in the process of taking an online surfacing course and like the ability to do that rather than travel to Javelin to take the course, additionally it will make it easier in the future to take additional training in this fashion.

— Randy Sutherland, MacGregors Group

Benefits of Online Live Training

Here are just a few of the benefits that online LIVE training provides for our customers:

  • Training that reduces work day disruption — It’s convenient and allows for little disruption to your working day. Most online courses are split up into 4 hours per day.
  • Live instruction from certified trainers — Certified SOLIDWORKS Experts are able to pass on their experience and provide best practices and tips during line online courses.
  • Live access to the Instructor — Get help by virtually raising your hand via the online training system, and privately chat with the instructor just like classroom based training.
  • Hands-on practical training — You get plenty of time to try out the exercises and learn by using your SOLIDWORKS software.
  • Receive a certificate when training is complete — Just like our classroom based training courses you will receive a certificate when you have completed a course.

Courses available

There is a wide variety of training courses available live over the web, including:

SOLIDWORKS CAD Training

Our SOLIDWORKS courses allow you to develop your skills with process based training. Start with the SOLIDWORKS Essentials course and move on to Part Modeling, Surfacing, and Advanced Assemblies, creating Drawings, and Animation. You can also take application specific courses including Sheet Metal, Weldments, and Routing courses. All the courses are hands-on and will allow you to learn how to use SolidWorks by carrying out common tasks.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Training

We take the complexity out of learning how to apply SolidWorks Simulation to the design process. You will learn how to become more productive through comprehensive hands-on training. Courses cover the different modules available with simulation including SOLIDWORKS Simulation Professional, SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation,SOLIDWORKS Simulation Dynamics, SOLIDWORKS Simulation Nonlinear and SOLIDWORKS Motion. Training is delivered by certified instructors with years of real world FEA and CFD design experience.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Training

Learn how to use the intelligent system design tools available with SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2D and SOLIDWORKS Electrical 3D, including a comprehensive parts database, and real-time integration of your 2D schematics and 3D models. Courses are delivered by SolidWorks Electrical specialists with real life electrical experience.

GD&T Training

Designed to help understand and interpret the fundamentals of GD&T. It is based on the ASME Y14.5 – 2009 standard. Formally the ASME Y14.5M – 1994 standard. Our fundamentals course is a valuable tool for any individual who has to create or interpret engineering drawings; for product and gauge designers; CMM operators and quality assurance personnel.

Live Online Training FAQs

Here are a few answers to frequently asked questions about our live SOLIDWORKS training:

At what time of day is the online training?

SOLIDWORKS online training is convenient and allows for little disruption to your working day. Online courses are often 3 hours per day from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM (ET). Online Essentials courses are 4 hours per day from 11:00 AM to 4:00 PM (ET) with a 1 hour lunch break at 12:00 PM.

Will I receive a certificate after completing a course?

Yes like our classroom training you will receive a certificate when the course has been completed.

Will I receive a training manual?

Yes, a SOLIDWORKS training manual is provided for applicable courses.

Do I need a license of SOLIDWORKS to take the training?

Yes, in order to carry out the exercise portion of the training you will need to have SOLIDWORKS available on your machine. We may be able to provide you with a free temporary license to take the training if you do not have one available. And short term licenses can be purchased if required.

Are the training sessions recorded?

No, the training sessions are live and are not recorded.

Can multiple people sit in on the same machine for training?

No, SOLIDWORKS Online Training is designed specifically for individuals who will need to log in and interact with the trainer whilst taking the training.

Get Started with Live SOLIDWORKS Online Training

If you are interested in taking a Javelin Online Live Training course for SOLIDWORKS then please review our online schedule.

Download our Training Price List

The post SOLIDWORKS Online Training delivered by a Live Instructor appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at March 24, 2020 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

A New Normal: How Onshape Helps Engineering Teams Adapt and Become More Flexible

Presented by
collaboration in Onshape

We’re enchanted with the idea of working from home. We imagine ease, flexibility, and access to a completely stocked pantry, fewer meetings, higher efficiency, and more getting things done. While we’re at the office, the idea seems simple. Then we get home, happy to leave work behind. And then a virus spreads around the world, society as we know it is upended, the world is nearly shut down, and we have no choice but to work from home. Suddenly, we’re left with the stark realization that we may not be prepared for that and exploring ways to make that possible.

Out of a number of people I’ve talked with, some companies have had to scramble, scheduling split office hours and shifts to reduce the number of staff on-site or simply sending everyone home. Others who are prepared to work remotely are facing problems with software, licensing, narrow bandwidth over wonky VPNs and even narrower patience with the whole ordeal. The situation that has pushed us here isn’t ideal but the outcome may be the kick we need to get more flexible options in place. It’s really an opportunity. An opportunity to find what works better. An opportunity to go through a process that will impact how we work, and where we’re able to work, forever.

The Future of Work

In an article published recently titled The Future of Work is Now, Onshape brought a heap of insight to an interesting shift in work conditions. Many (85% world-wide) already have a desire for a more flexible workspace. And the majority (62%) of countries surveyed already have flexible workspace policies. They provide some context on what it takes to make that happen and how Onshape fits the needs. It’s sure to spark some ideas.

Then you look at where we are right now. We’re in a spot where we or the companies we work for have been forced to be more flexible. In an instant manufacturing, supply chain, and retail have come to a standstill trying to adapt to conditions that are changing every day. So how do you adapt successfully? Maybe even permanently? How do you get to that spot where you can identify what’s needed and share the benefits of having more flexible work conditions?

Track the Pain Points. Identify Solutions.

If you’ve had a wrench thrown in your work routine or found yourself suddenly required to work from home, you’ve had to adapt quickly. It’s going to be easier for some than others. But you can take advantage of the situation, treat it as an opportunity, and map out solutions to issues as they come up. We’re used to post-project retrospectives – what went well, what could be improved. Don’t wait until after the opportunity has passed. Nail it down in real-time.

Grab a notepad or open a doc. Keep track of the pain points. What’s hindering me? Why can’t we progress faster? And keep track of them along the way. But it doesn’t stop with listing out the problems. Identify the solutions. What would solve my issue? What would help us complete this task?

A successful business is able to adapt, shift quickly, and keep projects rolling along. Those types of companies don’t dwell on the problems; they focus on what is going to provide the most flexibility. They invest in solutions to keep their employees moving forward. 

I think you’ll find the aspects that provide the most flexibility quickly boils down to a few key issues. In product dev teams I’ve worked with, they are always access, communication, and dependability. This goes for the people and the tools. And when you think about how this applies to engineering and design, Onshape shows where their platform shines. Where exactly are they delivering more flexibility in product development? Let’s look at those three areas and see how their approach to a solution is affecting product development. 

1. Access

Problem: When you’re in the office, you have everything at your fingertips. But when you’re outside the office, in a design review, at a manufacturer, or at your home, how do you access 3D CAD data, drawings, change requests, or the latest revision? And then how do you access the people responsible for making updates or design decisions? There are so many problems here with how we’ve done this in the past, from file sharing to VPN access. We’ve taken what hardly works for one person, applied it to a team, and assumed it will work to manage a product lifecycle.

Solution: Onshape, on the other hand, centralizes your workforce and your project, bringing access to every aspect of the project to everyone involved. It makes simultaneous collaboration on the same design possible. The status is always visible, you can see changes in real-time and can be notified for when those changes are made. You can set roles and security levels and add or remove people or vendors at any time. It automates and eliminates so many of the manual processes that we’ve tried to force-fit into a system that requires accessibility to the data and people.

2. Communication

Problem: When we’re in the office and everyone’s there, communication is easy. We can have design reviews, co-workers commenting on how to do something over your shoulder, and too many meetings. Outside the office, we’re disconnected, which can be nice and help us be more efficient. But we’re also outside of our project. We’re outside the discussions and changes. Outside where we need to be involved. We’ve tried to solve this with email, phone, Skype, or Slack, sacrificing context to feel like a productive communicator. It’s worked, but it could be better.

Solution: Onshape gives the communication context. It puts real-time comments in the project or model where the discussions need to happen. It consolidates the data with the communication and focuses the conversation where it’s relevant. And, even though you or the team may be in separate locations, it includes those involved in making the decisions and moving forward. 

3. Dependability

Problem: In the office, we can depend on having access to data and people, we have a computer and a software license when we need it, and all the files and binders of current and previous projects. Outside the office, that changes. Our productivity is dependent on our (or someone else’s) preparation. The instant data is not accessible, progress is not made. We lose all dependability on a system that was likely designed to limit accessibility, which then makes us dependable on people we’ve relegated to dependence on a system that is not dependable. 

Solution: Onshape has implemented the capabilities to prepare companies for when dependability matters. It may be as innocuous as finding a drawing or as important as not losing a day’s worth of design work. With the latter, it helps us not worry about losing data but also helps us not worry about others losing data. Though dependability resides so much within each one of us, Onshape brings in features that help us be more reliable team members, from task and release approvals to interactive reporting and analytics. We don’t think about dependability as something built into a system, but Onshape reveals an attention to this that increases flexibility across the entire organization that uses it.

We talk a lot about a more mobile, more flexible work environment as the future, complete with software that’s accessible, data that is current, and co-workers and vendors who are involved with every aspect. That’s where we should be. But it’s also where we are. We’re always going to have legacy data and processes. 

So, what are you doing to make your company more flexible and able to adapt? Are you prepared? Were you prepared? Treat these uncertain times that have forced you to adapt as an opportunity to find what works better; An opportunity to go through a process that will impact how you work, and where you’re able to work, forever.

In the meantime, check out Onshape. They have a live webinar Wednesday, April 1st about How Engineering Teams can Adapt to Changing Work Environments. I think we’re already having to adapt, but put it on your calendar and register here to watch it.

The post A New Normal: How Onshape Helps Engineering Teams Adapt and Become More Flexible appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 24, 2020 02:52 PM

Model of the Week: COVID-19 Coronavirus FaceMask [Be Prepared!]

With COVID-19 spreading, the state of the world has changed faster than you can change your shirt in the morning. We’ve gone from running about like productive worker bees to huddling in our house… nearly overnight. Part of me is like:

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And the other part is all like:

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

Just about every aspect of life has changed but what’s really encouraging about all of this is when things get tough, people get busy; They turn to meet needs that are not being met and that inspires others to do what they can to help with what they’ve got. And these engineers, designers, and makers… they’ve got a lot.

Prusa Research, makers of the Original Prusa i3 MK3S and Prusa SL1 3D printers, have jumped in to help with shortages of protective face masks around the world to create one that can be easily 3D printed. They’ve worked with the Czech Ministry of Health and now have a prototype in the field for testing and verification. The Prusa facemask was inspired by a facemask model created by Gizeh Triana and posted to GrabCAD. Prusa designers iterated on that design to make it easier to print and allow more to fit on a print bed.

We took it as a starting point and decided that we would adjust it for easier and faster 3D printing – e.g. there shouldn’t be any supports required and we should fit as many of them onto a single print sheet as possible… In three days, we were able to go through dozens of prototypes, two verifications with the Czech Ministry of Health and we even met our minister of health Adam Vojtech.

Here’s a look at the Prusa version RC1:

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</figure>

With a 3D printing farm that houses over 500 3D printers, they are able to print 800 units per day at $1 per print and potential to print even more. The facemask is a one-piece print, made of PET, that takes approximately 5.5 hours per print at a 0.25mm layer height with no supports required.

Currently, they have two versions and are in the process of printing 10,000 of the latest RC2 version for the Czech Ministry of Health. You can download version RC2 of the facemask from the Prusa prints website.

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

The post Model of the Week: COVID-19 Coronavirus FaceMask [Be Prepared!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 24, 2020 02:18 PM

The Javelin Blog

Using SOLIDWORKS PDM from home during COVID-19 shutdowns

This using SOLIDWORKS PDM remotely article is part of a series aimed at helping you to continue working during the impacts caused by COVID-19. For more information related to SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD software licensing options during this time, please see the comprehensive article from my colleague Scott Durksen.

When it comes to SOLIDWORKS PDM, we are somewhat more limited in options.  PDM (both PDM Professional and PDM Standard) requires a direct, live connection to (1) the Microsoft SQL server instance hosting the PDM database; (2) the PDM Archive Server; (3) the SolidNetwork License Manager (we cannot borrow PDM licenses like we can SOLIDWORKS licenses).

Here are our options for working in the SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault if we can’t be in the office where the servers are located.

1. Remote Desktop Tools

If you do not have access to a workstation grade computer at your home, then your best option would likely be to use Remote Desktop Tools to connect directly to your workstation in the office.  You can run these tools from any type of computer or even tablets.  These tools are likely the fastest and easiest way to get back up and running with minimal technical challenges if you are a SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS PDM user.  In this scenario, you will be using the SOLIDWORKS installation and PDM Vault View already set up on your work computer, and just connecting through remote desktop tool’s interface and controlling that system remotely from home.

Check out some of these products for remote desktop tools:

2. Virtual Private Network (VPN)

A VPN allows you to create a solid, encrypted connection from your home to your office network.  If you have access to a workstation grade computer in your home, then this option will allow you to do your SOLIDWORKS work directly on that computer while connect live to the PDM vault, as well as any network drives, just as if you were still in the office.  HOWEVER, don’t expect the same performance as if you were in the actual office.

The latency between you and the Database Server will likely dramatically slow down things like browsing in the vault, searches, and performing state changes.  Likewise, the reduced bandwidth compared to being in the office will make performing Gets and Check Ins much slower as the files will need to transfer across the VPN connection.  If the latency between you and the servers is over 100ms, it’s likely that you will experience occasional errors, if the latency is over 200ms PDM is fundamentally unusable.  In such higher latency circumstances, it would likely be better to consider either using remote desktop tools and leaving the workstation in the office (that way the PDM activity will take place on the local area network), or if you have SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional you can use PDM Web2 (see Option 3 bellow).

Improving Performance When Using PDM through a VPN

There are a few steps that can be take improve performance within SOLIDWORKS and the Vault View when using PDM through a VPN connection.

Option 1:  If possible, upgrade to SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 SP2 or newer to take advantage of the substantial improvements in the high latency environment performance.

Option 2:  Disable automatic updates in the PDM Add in within SOLDIWORKS.  Go to Tools > SOLIDWORKS PDM > Options and on the “Server” tab, uncheck all options under “Automatically update the tree in the extra tree pane” and ensure that the option “Reload tree when selecting a component that has been unloaded” is set to “Never”.

Disable automatic updates in the PDM Add in within SOLDIWORKS

Disable automatic updates in the PDM Add in within SOLDIWORKS

Option 3:  Disable the PDM Add In entirely and perform Check Ins and Check Outs from the Windows Explorer Vault View.

Disable the PDM Add In

Disable the PDM Add In

Connectivity When Using PDM through a VPN

When connecting to the office network over a VPN, you will need to ensure that the client system is able to ping the PDM Server(s) using their hostnames (if you are unable to resolve the server hostname, but can ping it by IP address, you will need to add the server hostname and IP address to your computer’s host file), and that the following ports are open for communication.

  • Licensing: TCP ports 25734 and 25735 (unless these ports have been modified from the default)
  • PDM Archive Server:  TCP port 3030 and UDP port 3030
  • SQL Database Server:  If using the default instance of SQL for PDM Professional, TCP port 1433.  If you are using a named instance of SQL for PDM Professional, or you are using PDM Standard (which always uses a named instance of SQL) you will need to determine the port currently being used and ensure that it is open for communication through the VPN.  Also, if using a named instance, ensure that UDP port 1434 is open.

Please Note:  If you are continuing to encounter issues with PDM being unable to find the SQL database server, even if it is able to ping the server and the ports are open, you may need to configure an ODBC Data Source for the home based computer to identify the SQL server.

If you are attaching a vault view for the first time on a remote computer, depending on the Windows user account you are using, you may be asked to provide credentials for an account that is authorized to attach to the vault when going through the View Setup tool.  This would be either a domain user account, or local account on the server that your IT has configured to allow attach access.

3. SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 (PDM Professional Only)

If you have SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional, you already have PDM Web2! It may just need to be installed and configured so you can begin using it.  The SOLIDWORKS PDM Installation Guide provides detailed instructions for installing and configuring Web2, or you can contact our Services Team for a “Turn Key” installation and configuration service.  Once Web2 is set up on the IIS server though, it will still need to be mapped to a web domain name by your IT so that computers located outside of your office can connect.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2

SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2

Web2 allows users to review and transition files through a browser on any device, and it also allows users to Check Out files, download them to a local computer and then upload them and Check In.

While this is not as simple or convenient as working in the PDM Vault View, it would allow users to continue to work if more direct options like Remote Desktop Tools or a VPN connection are not possible.

4. Cloud Based Desktops

If connecting to an office based workstation remotely is not an option, and you do not have a workstation grade system available that is capable of running SOLIDWORKS, another option to consider is Cloud based Virtual Machines.  If you would like more information Javelin’s Cloud Services, please contact us.

5. Working Offline

If there is no way to establish a live connection to the PDM Server(s) from your home, but you have your workstation with you, the final option would be to Work Offline in the Vault View.  This would allow you to work with any files that you have ALREADY cached or checked out when you had an active connection to the server.   When working offline any files you have already Checked Out will be editable and any cached files not Checked Out by you will be read only.  When you have a live connection to the PDM Server(s), you will be able to again Work Online, and Check In any files you had been editing.

Working Offline

Working Offline

The post Using SOLIDWORKS PDM from home during COVID-19 shutdowns appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at March 24, 2020 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Onshape CAD Tutorial | Using The Conic Sketch Tool To Shape Morph Stackable Food Storage Containers

Stackable Container Banner

Digital food storage is the name of the game in this tutorial. In a recent assignment, I sought to coach my CAD students at Virginia Tech through an Onshape modeling exercise in the kitchenware category. Our aim was to build a parametric model that was robust and could be morphed into different configurations by changing a few key dimensional values. I also wanted them to learn about the importance of space management both from consumer and point-of-purchase perspectives. I remembered how back in the day working at Rubbermaid Home Products Division, us designers accomplished this by incorporating nesting and stacking features in our designs. I thought that’s the ticket! And drafted up the assignment. To achieve both goals of morphing form and flexible parametric geometry, I introduced them to the conic tool in the 2D sketch environment. Some of you may recall that in a prior post “Make “Squircle” Shaped Objects Using the Fusion 360 Conic Tool” I wrote on modeling with conics. All the design principles I outline are relevant here. However, this time we’ll explore Onshape as an alternative modeling software.

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</figure>

In lieu of a post with extensive static step-by-step graphics, I’m offering up an unabridged step-by-step video tutorial. I’m sharing a video I created with my students and beginning users in mind. I did not want them or you to miss out on the slightest morsel of modeling goodness. I include commentary on the “Whys” and “Hows” from a design and parametric modeling point of view. So to the newbies, I say please watch the video in its entirety. And to the advanced, I say feel free to scrub through to your hearts’ delight!

A Word On Stacking

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>The stacked configuration uses embossed and debossed features that inter-lock.</figcaption></figure>

Stacking features are great from a consumer standpoint. They enable and promote storage configurations that are stable on shelves and inside the frig. Stacking is achieved by designing in features that inter-lock. In this model example, the base has a debossed cutout, while the lid has a raised or embossed feature. From a materials and manufacturing perspective, stacking features give rigidity to plastic parts that may otherwise be flimsy.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>The orthographic x-section view reveals the interlocking relationship of the lid and base.</figcaption></figure>

A Word On Nesting

Nesting is a configuration where objects of the same geometric shape fit within one another and thus save space. I remember our marketing/design manager at Rubbermaid would proclaim “Stack’em high and let’em fly.” His meaning? At retail the more product, you can display on a shelf or pack on an endcap, the greater the potential for product sell-through. With regard to geometry, nest height is linked directly with the draft angle (tilt) incorporated into the sidewall of a container. For a primer on understanding draft angle, see my posts Design Fundamentals: Draft Angles | Part 1 and my tutorial PTC Creo Parametric Draft feature Part1 (Beginner).

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Nested Bases – The draft angle on the vertical walls determine how close parts can nest inside one another.</figcaption></figure>

A Word On The Flexibility of Using Conic Sketch Sections

If you are looking for a way to quickly iterate design concepts then conics may be just the ticket! They are the chameleon of sketch entities. By changing the Rho value one moment your object can become circular, the next and oval, and in an instant a squircle which is a blend between a square and a circle! Have a look.

<figure class="wp-block-image alignwide size-large"><figcaption>Conic 2D sketch sections offer ease of parametric concept variant exploration.</figcaption></figure>

As you can see a whole family of product configurations can be generated in short order making design iteration snap!

Well, I’ll call this post a wrap. Enjoy the video and afterward give a go at modeling in Onshape.

Until Next time, keep learning! – SkillCoach

The post Onshape CAD Tutorial | Using The Conic Sketch Tool To Shape Morph Stackable Food Storage Containers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at March 24, 2020 03:59 AM

March 23, 2020

The Javelin Blog

How to shrink the SOLIDWORKS PDM SQL Transaction Log

Within Microsoft SQL, every SOLIDWORKS PDM vault database has a transaction log associated with it that records the modifications to the database.  In some scenarios, if this log grows large it can cause performance issues within SQL and the vault.  If you’ve recently changed the recovery model for the SOLIDWORKS PDM vault DB from full to simple, we can reduce the size of the transaction log with a shrink action.

How to shrink the SQL transaction log

  • Login to the SQL Server Management Studio using the sa (system administrator) account;
SQL Server Management Studio Login

SQL Server Management Studio Login

  • Expand the Databases folder
    • Select the vault DB
      • Right-click
        • Tasks > Shrink > Files
Shrink Transaction Log - Tasks > Shrink > Files

Shrink Transaction Log – Tasks > Shrink > Files

  • For File Type select Log, and click OK
Shrink Transaction Log

Shrink Transaction Log

The post How to shrink the SOLIDWORKS PDM SQL Transaction Log appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at March 23, 2020 12:00 PM

March 20, 2020

The Javelin Blog

Services to help you access your SOLIDWORKS Data via the Cloud

Right now with the COVID-19 outbreak a lot of companies are being forced to change the way they operate, with employees having to work remotely outside of the office. This means accessing the shared SOLIDWORKS data in your office becomes more of a challenge. In a previous post we presented the different methods available for accessing data through Remote Desktop Tools, VPN (Virtual Private Network) and Cloud options.

In this post I will outline the various PDM and Cloud services that Javelin provides, so you are aware of the options available and how you can get the help you to remotely access your data.

Javelin Cloud Services

Javelin Cloud Services

Remote SOLIDWORKS PDM Services

Javelin’s team of Certified Experts provide a variety of remote services including System Implementation, Health Check, Optimization and Upgrades.

  • SOLIDWORKS PDM Implementation Service: If you need to organize your business for working remotely then we can provide you with a SOLIDWORKS PDM implementation service that will ensure your PDM system is installed correctly and optimized for remote sharing. Certified PDM Implementation Experts will also advise you on best practices and make you self sufficient. We have refined the implementation process over 20+ years helping thousands of customers with data and document management issues.
  • SOLIDWORKS PDM Upgrade Service: If you are upgrading your SOLIDWORKS PDM from Standard to Professional in order to take advantage of web tools and access in the professional version; then you should consider our remote PDM Upgrade Service to ensure that the upgrade goes smoothly and downtime is kept to a minimum.
  • SOLIDWORKS PDM Audit Service: Javelin’s team of Certified PDM Experts can provide you with a comprehensive SOLIDWORKS PDM Audit to ensure you system is optimized for working remotely. Our analysis will determine if there are any issues with your system, establish it’s running at full capacity, verify your data is fully protected, and check that the latest enhancements and features are being utilized.

Javelin Cloud Services

Javelin’s Amazon Web Service (AWS) Certified Experts provide cloud infrastructure and application migration solutions to small and medium sized businesses. We can help you to Plan, Design, Build, Migrate, Run, Operate, and Optimize your cloud service.

  • Javelin Cloud Mentoring: Get the guidance you need to select the right service levels from AWS Services. Our team will evaluate your existing PDM infrastructure and provide a future needs analysis including:
    • Servers/Virtual Machines (VMs)
    • Storage Needs
    • Virtualized Hosts or Bare Metal
    • Internal network cabling
    • Routers and Switches
    • External bandwidth requirements and availability, which includes:
      • Match needs to AWS offerings:
        • EC2 instance types
        • EBS storage types
        • Network Needs and Configuration
    • We also provide an AWS network diagram for a proposed infrastructure
  • Javelin Cloud Network Configuration: The Javelin team can build a seamless connection between AWS and your current network infrastructure. The service includes:
    • Current infrastructure analysis
    • Switching and Routing
    • Network Speeds and Capacity
    • VPN Appliances
    • External Bandwidth Availability
    • Hardware recommendations for Optimal Performance
    • Hardware and Network configuration and testing
    • Javelin Cloud Server Services
    • Client-Side Configurations
    • DNS Configurations
  • Javelin Cloud PDM Installation and Setup: Javelin AWS and SOLIDWORKS PDM Services Team will provide you with the network configuration that best suits your PDM requirements on the Cloud:
    • AWS configuration and build out (SQL, PDM database and PDM Archive in place)
    • Configure Amazon SNS for AWS notifications delivery
    • Configure Amazon SES for PDM SMTP Notifications Delivery (if necessary)
    • Configure AWS VPC for Delivery of PDM SMTP Notifications to OnPrem SMTP Server (if necessary)
    • Create CloudWatch Alarms
    • AWS Backup Configuration
  • Javelin Cloud Health Check: Analyze your existing system and provide you with a report. The service includes:
    • On demand checkups (scheduled in advance as required)
    • EC2 resource usage analysis
    • Network usage analysis
    • EBS Storage usage
    • Our team will also provide you with recommendations for upgrade/downgrade of EC2, EBS, or other Amazon resources
  • Disaster Recovery Validation Service: Testing of backup systems to avoid major problems, typically includes 1 day to recreate, and 1 day of testing.
    • Verify consistency of backup data
    • Recreate PDM environment and restore data
    • Connect simulated client machines and test restored data
    • Provide reporting on results
    • Recommended annually
  • Additional Cloud Services: There are a number of IT services that our experts can provide you, these include:
    • VPN Consulting Services
    • Remote Desktop Tools Support
    • Office 365 Administration
    • PDM Administration
    • Azure, AWS Administration
    • Network Administration and Consultation
    • Setup of a cloud based CAD workstation featuring an Nvidia Tesla graphics processor

Interested?

If you are interested in any of these SOLIDWORKS PDM or Cloud services then please contact us »

The post Services to help you access your SOLIDWORKS Data via the Cloud appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at March 20, 2020 07:10 PM

Surfacing Course New Option: $7.50/mo

The new surfacing site is full of great material, but there’s a problem with it: No One Knows Except Me (well, and Alin, and Ben, and a few others). Some…

by matt at March 20, 2020 03:32 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to change the SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Recovery Model

With SOLIDWORKS PDM ProfessionalSOLIDWORKS PDM Standard, and SQL Management Studio by default within Microsoft SQL, the recovery model option for any new databases is set to full.  In some instances this can cause problems later as the full recovery model; causes the transaction log to grow exponentially as regular database backups are captured.  We have seen instances in the past where the transaction log continually grows to a point where it’s consumed all the available disk space and causes performance issues within SQL and the vault.  If you are backing up the vault DB daily we recommend the recovery model is set to simple, to prevent the transaction log from getting too large.

How to verify and change the Recovery Model option of the DB

  • Log in to the SQL Server Management Studio using the sa (system administrator) account;
Log In to the server

Log In to the server

  • Expand the Databases folder
    • Select the vault DB
      • Right-click > Properties;
Database Properties

Database Properties

  • Select Options and the Recovery Model should be listed;
Recovery Model Options

Recovery Model Options

  • And if necessary, we can switch it from Full to Simple via the drop-down, then hit OK;
Changing the DB Recovery Model to Simple

Changing the DB Recovery Model to Simple

NOTE: These recommendations are based on the SOLIDWORKS PDM uses of SQL when regular backups are performed.  More information regarding the Recovery Model and transaction log options can be found within the SQL documentation.

If your Recovery Model has been set to full for some time, and you’d like to clear up some storage space; a shrink of the transaction log may be required.

The post How to change the SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Recovery Model appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at March 20, 2020 12:00 PM

March 19, 2020

SolidSmack

Ultimaker Releases Ultimaker Cura 4.5 3D Printer Slicing Software

Ultimaker has released a new version of Ultimaker Cura 4.5, and as usual there are a couple of very interesting new features. 

Ultimaker Cura, formerly known simply as Cura, is perhaps the most popular 3D print slicing system. There’s a good reason for that statistic, and it’s because Ultimaker chose to release it as an open-source product. 

This allows other 3D printer manufacturers to easily bundle the increasingly powerful software with their equipment without much fuss and without the expense of developing their own slicing software. Why does Ultimaker do this, aside from being good folks? I believe it’s because it still promotes their own brand and also allows them to peek at 3D printing activities through statistics gathering. 

Ultimaker Cura 4.5 Upgrade

But back to the 4.5 upgrade. 

As usual, Ultimaker has fixed a number of bugs, increased performance slightly and, of course, added integrated support for a number of additional third-party 3D printers.

In version 4.5 there are 3D printer configurations for machines from no fewer than 81 vendors! And each vendor has multiple machines listed. ANET, for example, as 13 different machine configurations. 

One very valuable feature is that Ultimaker Cura still supports a number of older machines, such as MakerBot Replicator, Printrbot, and even the long-dead BFB machine. For those still operating older unsupported machines, Ultimaker Cura is incredibly valuable. 

There are two features that caught my eye in the 4.5 upgrade. 

Bridge Over Low-Density Infill

One is called “Bridge over low-density infill”. It’s a bit confusing at first, but basically what it does is determine if the infill below a model surface is low density (a specified value), then when it 3D prints that surface it will treat it with “bridge” settings. 

Bridge settings are specific changes to the extrusion profile that are used when an extrusion is to “jump” from one spot to another without anything underneath. The speeds and feeds are changed to allow this theoretically impossible move to occur, and it works very well. However, it seems there are cases where sparse infill introduces a similar scenario. Thus, bridging settings should be used. 

Brim Distance

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Ultimaker Cura Brim Distance</figure>

Another intriguing feature is “Brim distance”. A brim is a fat layer added to the perimeter of the first layer. The idea is to increase bed adhesion by simply adding more material. Typically this is done to avoid warping, where ABS prints tend to peel off the print surface. The brim adds extra material to prevent this from happening — or if it does, the brim warps but the part does not.

However, brims introduce another problem: you must remove them from the print afterwards. Usually this means the bottom edge of the 3D print will have a rough edge, as some of the brim may not come loose easily due to geometry. 

The new Brim Distance feature allows the operator to set a distance between the brim and the model proper. By increasing this distance, it’s possible to make brim removal easier. 

Easier is something I always want.  

The post Ultimaker Releases Ultimaker Cura 4.5 3D Printer Slicing Software appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at March 19, 2020 09:57 PM

2020 Apple iPad Pro: More Power, 3D Scanning, Magic Keyboard

2020 Apple iPad Pro

Your next computer is not a computer. It’s a magical piece of glass.

Apple

Apple has been holding the paper-thin border between tablet and laptop intact for a while, making it look easy to choose what you use for work and play. Others find it easy to chuck a moneybag down and opt for both, crossing capabilities where they’re able. It’s been one of the most overlooked balancing acts in computing by the company careful to keep the demand for both iPad and Macbook high.

With the fourth-generation iPad Pro announced by Apple this week the border between laptop-tablet usability seems to have shifted, nay, torn a bit with an iPad that slips features into a tablet… err, a magical piece of glass, that’s sure to turn the eyes of professional designers and engineers.

iPad Pro Features

The new iPad Pro comes with a new A12Z ‘Bionic’ chip, Wi-Fi 6 support, a 12MP Wide camera with 4k video support, a 10MP Ultra Wide Camera, and a LiDAR 3D scanner. The A12Z chip is a 64-bit ARM-based SoC (system on chip) that comes with 6GB RAM, contains the Apple U1 spatial awareness chip, and has an 8-core GPU — one more than the A12X chip in third-generation iPad Pro models.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/09_QxCcBEyU?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The LiDAR 3D scanner is going to be a game-changer for apps in product development. It has a 5 meter (16.4 foot) range, works indoors and outdoors, and uses the new depth frameworks in iPadOS to combine scanned depth points, while using both camera and motion sensor data, along with the computer vision algorithms in the A12Z chip, to provide an incredible response time.

Though system specs and power is important, the one feature lacking was a decent keyboard. That is now available. Called the Magic Keyboard, it features full-size, backlit keys, an iPad optimized, multitouch trackpad, a USB-C charging port, and hinging for adjustable viewing angle.

The new iPad Pro models don’t quite have the power a desktop workstation would have but these are the first iPad Pros that make me think I could get the majority of my work done when mobile or even sneer at my desktop when at the office and choose the iPad Pro.

What about you?

The new iPad Pro models will be available March 25th with the 11-inch iPad Pro starting at $799 (Wi-Fi) and $949 (Wi-Fi + Cellular) and the 12.9-inch iPad Pro starting at $999 (Wi-Fi) and $1,149 (Wi-Fi + Cellular). The Magic Keyboard will be available in May for $299 for the 11-inch iPad Pro and $349 for the 12.9-inch iPad Pro. Full tech specs are here.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

The post 2020 Apple iPad Pro: More Power, 3D Scanning, Magic Keyboard appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 19, 2020 09:11 PM

This LEGO Firewood Factory Splits Real (Tiny) Logs

LEGO Firewood Factory

Everything looks cute when it’s miniaturized. But when it’s made out of LEGOs is jsut LOOKS PLAIN AWESOME. YouTube creator The Brick Wall specializes in making LEGO Technic builds, and his newest set demonstrates the magic that is a fully functional firewood factory – complete with a delivery truck and log splitter.

How is wood cut with LEGOs? The process is much different from how it’s done at an actual mill:

1. Deliver the Logs

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">LEGO Firewood Factory</figure>

A LEGO delivery truck delivers a stack of “logs” to a wood sorter where it dispenses the wood one log at a time.

2. Cut the Wood Into Workable Chunks

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">LEGO Firewood Factory</figure>

The logs are then pushed down an aisle where they meet the first of two cutters. The first blade is a frame saw which cuts the log into sizeable chunks. Since these are LEGO parts and not industrial-grade machinery, it takes about 56 seconds to make A SINGLE horizontal cut 😂.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">LEGO Firewood Factory</figure>

3. Split The Wood Chunks Into Pieces

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">LEGO Firewood Factory</figure>

The wooden stumps are sent to another conveyor belt where two stationary blades split them vertically and horizontally. Unlike the frame saw, the wood is just pushed towards the two-way log splitter and once finished, falls into the collecting receptacle below.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">LEGO Firewood Factory</figure>

You can then use the wood to fuel your miniature (LEGO?) fireplace or make some tiny furniture for your action figures to sit on. Practical? Not so much

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/t2GsWkiFS74?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;start=8&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The Brick Wall’s YouTube channel is full of LEGO Technic projects which make complex solutions for the most menial tasks, but nevertheless they sure are entertaining to watch.

The post This LEGO Firewood Factory Splits Real (Tiny) Logs appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 19, 2020 06:12 PM

March 18, 2020

SolidWorks Patterns

Here’s a video I made a while back that shows the results of making several kinds of patterns. I can make some sample files available if there is any interest.…

by matt at March 18, 2020 06:37 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to Find Your Computer Name in Windows

Did you know that your computer has a name? If you were unaware of this detail, now is the time to give your computer the virtual hand shake and introduce yourself. Every computer that deals with a network has a name and an IP address. In this post I’ll show you how to find your computer / pc name in Windows.

Find computer name

Find computer name

Computer names are easy identifiers, whereas giving randomized characters can be difficult to remember. Take your car license plate for an example, it could be some arbitrary like (just an example) YH2D-P9N. I won’t remember that but, having an office computer and a home work station named James-Work and James-Home is much easier to remember.

The computer name is also known as the HOSTNAME in terms of SOLIDWORKS Licensing. Your IT, or software tech – like a Javelin Tech, may ask you for your computer name to ensure they have the correct computer.

So how do you find your computer name in Windows? Follow these steps for Windows 7, Windows 8 or Windows 10.

Windows 7

  1. Click the Start Menu
  2. Right Click Computer
  3. Select Properties
  4. The computer name will be under the heading Computer name, domain, and workgroup settings

Windows 8

  1. Press the Windows logo
  2. Key in +X to see the list of commands and options
  3. Click System
  4. The computer name will be under the heading Computer name, domain, and workgroup settings

Windows 10

  1. Open the Control Panel
  2. Click System and Security
  3. Then Select System
  4. The computer name will be under the heading Computer name, domain, and workgroup settings

QUICK TIP: For Windows 10 you can also just enter ‘pc name’ in the search box on the Taskbar (next to the start button) and Windows will direct you to find it.

Now that you know your computer name, this will help when troubleshooting.

The post How to Find Your Computer Name in Windows appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at March 18, 2020 03:44 PM

How to study for a SOLIDWORKS Certification Exam with MySolidWorks

One of the most common questions regarding SOLIDWORKS certification is ‘What is the best way to study for an exam?’.  A free online solution to SOLIDWORKS users is MySolidWorks – a resource library of tutorial videos designed to help you prepare for a Certification exam.

MySolidWorks Standard is available to active SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service customers and provides access to hundreds of SOLIDWORKS tutorial videos including Certified SOLIDWORKS Exam prep courses and sample exercises. If you are not a Subscription Service customer you can still access MySolidWorks as a guest user but the content is limited.

MySolidWorks Certification Exam Prep

MySolidWorks Certification Exam Preparation

How to sit an exam

We recommend starting with the Certified SOLIDWORKS Exam online course to get an idea of how to take a certification exam, we also have the latest information on getting your Free SOLIDWORKS Certification Exam Codes in order to take an exam at no cost.

Note that you may need to create an account if you are logging into MySolidWorks for the first time.

Preparing for an exam

After learning how to sit an exam you can then decide on which exam to take and prepare for. MySolidWorks provides the following learning paths for CSWA, CSWP, CSWE and various CSWPA exams:

Get Started with MySolidWorks

Visit the MySolidWorks training site now and start preparing to become SOLIDWORKS Certified.

The post How to study for a SOLIDWORKS Certification Exam with MySolidWorks appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at March 18, 2020 12:00 PM

March 17, 2020

SolidSmack

How Stone Balancing Works: The Unreal Stone Sculptures of Michael Grab

michael grab gravity glue

We’ve featured Michael Grab‘s work in the Friday Smackdown before, but we wanted to take a closer look at his process and share more of his work. At the very least, his work is inspirational. At most, it could provide ideas about how you approach your own design problem.

Michael is a balance artist – a practitioner of a special kind of art that involves balancing objects in such a way that they form complex and seemingly impossible arrangements. Michael specializes in stone balancing, building rock sculptures that are absolutely gravity-defying:

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</figure>

How Does Stone Balancing Work?

To create the structures and balance rocks, Michael doesn’t use any kind of adhesive. The only thing holding them together is his attention to detail and the laws of gravity. According to Michael, the process is more complicated than the structure themselves. You need:

1. On-the-fly problem-solving skills
2. Steady hands
3. A whole heap of patience

With this, there is a key aspect to balancing objects with irregular surfaces that are completely different from one to another. For stone balancing to work, it takes finding the right number of contact points and complementary surfaces.

Most solid balance points are the result of two surfaces coming together, ideally one concave and one convex, so the two rocks essentially hug one another via 3 (minimum) contact points per balance point.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

finding balance points to work with is another huge dimension of the creative process that goes mostly under the radar in photographs. the natural shapes of the rocks are really the only limitation i have to work with.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

one of the most useful points of advice i’ve encountered thus far for advancing skill was a bit from Bill Dan a few years ago. once you finish a creation, spend some time looking at it. from as many angles as possible. then take it apart and build it again with a slight complication (more rocks, smaller balance points, counterbalancing, etc).

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</figure>

To do this however, you need to slow down your breathing, concentrate, and take your time – much like yoga (or a very tense game of Jenga). In fact, Michael considers the whole process, from conceptualizing the sculpture to making the video, as his yoga practice. You may not get it the first try (or maybe even the fiftieth), but he says the journey is way more rewarding than the finished product.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/caiAzVzX7N4?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Michael elaborates more on his thought process at gravityglue.com. More of his balancing art can be found on his YouTube channel and he is active on Instagram as well. Ready to balance?

The post How Stone Balancing Works: The Unreal Stone Sculptures of Michael Grab appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 17, 2020 09:51 PM

The Javelin Blog

How can I work remotely during COVID-19 Isolation or Quarantine Response?

Working from home strategies have been increasing in popularity over the last few years.  Since the global pandemic of COVID-19 has begun, more workers, engineers and designers will need to work from home or remotely.  Remotely or at the office, talented producers need to be able to access their digital tools in order to keep producing great work.

Remote Desktop, Private Networking and Cloud Computing options have developed greatly and can provide access to the tools that you need.  Here are some options to discover, or contact us to talk about.

Work remotely with remote desktop tools

Work remotely

1. Remote Desktop Tools

In the event that you find yourself at home or working from home, without the access to your physical workstation, Remote Desktop Tools can help you out.  The Remote Desktop software gets installed on workstation and on the home computer.  The workstation client can be configured to allow remote access, using a secure username and password.  The home computer can then see and interact with the workstation computer, in a window on the home computer’s desktop.

Check out some of these products for remote desktop tools:

2. VPN

A VPN (Virtual Private Network) can provide a solid, encrypted link between your home or remote location to your office.  With a VPN connection, you can access all of the network drives, servers or workstations that you could if you were directly in your office.  VPN connections are a Server-Client relationship.  The server side is at the main office and will have a firewall, router or other appliance that supports incoming VPN clients.  The client side is your home computer with a VPN client or built-in Windows or Mac network connection.

VPNs will usually require an IT professional to help (Javelin may be able to help you with this).

3. Cloud Options

Cloud options are available for those that don’t have access to the hardware at home OR at the office to work on.  All you need is a simple laptop, desktop or even a Chromebook to connect!  Cloud Computing can give us all of the horsepower of a CAD design workstation and office infrastructure, in a remote desktop window, with a familiar Windows 10 interface.  Cloud based Virtual Machines can be scaled in hardware specifications to meet the needs of the workloads.  Billing is metered by the minute (or even millisecond!), so you only pay for the compute time that you use.  Some more advanced options could be connecting your SOLIDWORKS CAD software to your SOLIDWORKS PDM Data Management or SOLIDWORKS Manage solutions.

Need Help?

Javelin has an Amazon Web Services (AWS) Certified staff to help you get going with remote tools, networking or Javelin Cloud PDM and CAD solutions. Javelin’s AWS staff are skilled at cloud infrastructure and application migration, we can help you to Plan, Design, Build, Migrate, Run, Operate, and Optimize your remote service. Learn more about our Cloud Services »

The post How can I work remotely during COVID-19 Isolation or Quarantine Response? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ryan Moffett at March 17, 2020 07:49 PM

SolidSmack

Lenovo ThinkStation P520 Workstation [Review]

Lenovo ThinkStation P520 Workstation Review

It’s time to crack open a can of beef jerky, shutter the windows, and snuggle up with a tower workstation again. That’s not weird at all because this workstation happens to be a Lenovo ThinkStation P520. Yes, quell your exuberance. As you may know, the P Series is Lenovo’s top o’ the line PC family for professionals in engineering, automotive, media, and other graphically-demanding, performance-pushing industries. It’s considered mid-range by those who get their kicks by categorizing computers, so we wanted to see what we could throw at it. Lenovo was kind enough to send over the P520 to carry out some Quadro RTX 4000 tests we’ll have in an upcoming article. Until then, let’s have a look at what this puppy can do.

OVERVIEW

The Lenovo ThinkStation P520 Workstation sits smack-dab in the middle of Lenovo’s P Series Tower family flanked on one side by its compact twin, the P520c, and the entry-level P330 Tower Workstation and on the other side by the high-end P720 and P920 Tower Workstations. Though the entire P Series provides M.2 storage and NVIDIA RTX GPU options, the 520 slips you into 256GB+ Memory range and Intel Xeon W Series processing power.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large" data-amp-lightbox="true"></figure>

The base configuration starts at $1200 but you can pop that price above $10k with all the bells and whistles. If you just want a little more GPU power (like I did) and go with an NVIDIA RTX 4000 GPU to the base configuration, the price comes in at $1900. And let me say, totally worth it to go from the Pascal to Turing microarchitecture that adds the AI Tensor Cores and RT Cores for dedicated real-time ray tracing.

What’s in the Box?

The ThinkStation P520 setup here includes an Intel Xeon W-2133 (3.60 GHz, 6 Cores, 8.25MB Cache) processor with 16 GB RAM, a 500GB Samsung SSD, and is running Windows 10 Pro. It also sports the Side panel Lock Kit option and DVD Burner/CD-RW Optical Drive. Front ports include 4x USB 3.1, 15-in-1 Card Reader, and Mic/Headphone jack. Rear ports include 4x USB 3.1, 2x USB 2.0, 2x PS/2, 1x Thunderbolt, 1x GB Ethernet, 1x Line-in, 1x Line-out, 1x Mic. Altogether, this setup, as configured on lenovo.com, comes in at $2524 (after automatic discount).

The only difference I’d make to this configuration is opting for a primary 1TB M.2 SSD, switching the Quadro P4000 for a Quadro RTX 4000 and adding Wi-Fi (I move my rig around and like the redundancy). This puts the price at $3134 (after automatic discount).

Lenovo ThinkStation P520 Specs

On specs alone, the ThinkStation P520 Workstation bumps you up to the sub-$2k+ range and easily within the $2k range depending on features you need with options that bring more speed, storage, and gigabytes. The table below breaks down the max available features. You can view additional specs here.

Category Spec
Size 18.0 inches x 6.5 inches x 17.3 inches
(455 mm x 165 mm x 440 mm)
OS Windows 10 Pro (64-bit)
Processor Intel® Xeon™ W-Series (up to 4.5 GHz, 11MB cache, and 18 cores/36 threads)
RAM Up to 256 GB DDR4 (2666 MHz)
Storage Up to 8x drives/4 internal (Max: 3.5″=36TB, 2.5″ SSD=12TB, M.2=2TB); RAID 0, 1, 5, 10
Graphics Up to 2x NVIDIA Quadro RTX
Port options Front: 4x USB 3.1 (Gen 1), 1x Thunderbolt 3 (Type C), Mic/Headphone
Back: 4x USD 3.1 (Gen2), 2x USB 2.0, @x PS/2, 1x Thunderbolt Adapter, 1x GB Ethernet, 1x Audio Line-in, Line-out, Mic, 1x eSATA, 1x Firewire
Wireless Intel Dual Band Wireless 802.11ac + Bluetooth
Power Supply 690W 92% efficient, 900W 92% efficient
Price Starting at $1,200.00 Lenovo | Amazon
<figure class="wp-block-image size-large" data-amp-lightbox="true"><figcaption>The Lenovo ThinkStation P520 internals with ample space for expansions on RAM, Storage, and GPU.</figcaption></figure>

HIGHLIGHTS

The Design
There’s a lot to love about the design of Lenovo tower workstations. For a black box you spend so much time with, you want it to have the functional form you would expect from your best tool. Lenovo delivers this in spades for the P520 from ample up-front port to extra rear ports and all an unassuming honeycomb front face that allows plenty of airflow. The signature Lenovo-red touchpoints make grabbin, unlatchin’, pressin’, and flippin’ easy.

The Storage
The P520 is the first tower I’ve used that has more internal storage options than external drives I’ve traditionally used, and it’s the first tower I’ve used with an M.2 option. As mentioned, I’d choose that as the primary with the existing 512GB SSD as backup. Most of my data is on external drives though (mainly from switching computers so often) so I wouldn’t max out on internal storage, but nice to know I can expand if needed.

The Ports
It almost seems like there can never be enough USB port options. This is the first computer where I’ve been able to use all ports without resorting to expansion, adpaters or monitor ports. The Thunderbolt (USB-C) is a welcome addition as well.

The Upgrades
You may not switch out components or add upgrades very often, but this is one area where Lenovo ThinkStations shine. Internal access through the side panel (with lock kit option) is simple with a large schematic on the panel that identifies the location of each component and slot, along with memory and M.2 installation guide. With this info and the red line/arrow touchpoints, replacing or adding components is straightforward if you’ve never done it before and even easier if you have. To see an example, check out our article on swapping an NVIDIA GPU in a Lenovo Workstation.

The Quiet
What I appreciate most about the P520 (and the P-Series options I’ve used) is how quiet this machine is. There are three Delta Electronics Brushless fans in this rig (front, back, and on the CPU). I expected it to run hot when cranking the CPU, but had the cores averaging 71 degrees at 100% CPU usage, with the fans never ramping up to compensate, and only warmish air out the rear fine over a 90 minute render operation. I was not expecting that at all.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large" data-amp-lightbox="true"></figure>

CONCLUSION

With the options for tower workstations, the options within the Lenovo P-Series, and the options within the P520 ThinkStation itself, there’s no lack of finding a balance on price and performance. For my needs, I budget $2k-$3k every two years for a workstation. Though the base configuration is underpowered for my needs, the ability to upgrade graphics and storage is simple and leaves me room for more. With those options added, the P520 sits right inside the $2k-$3k range but, compared to other towers I’ve used in the past, it feels like using a computer that costs a few grand more.

The P520 options bring the combined power of Intel Xeon CPU processing and NVIDIA RTX GPU graphics that really deliver a high-end experience in a mid-range package. Along with ample ports, and ample space for upgrades and maintenance, you get a machine that can serve your current needs and expand on storage, memory, or GPU should you need it. Most surprising of all, it’s a system that performs exceptionally while sitting quietly beside your desk with not so much as a purr. All this adds up to a tower workstation I would want on design projects and one I would definitely have on the shortlist for workstation upgrades.

<figure class="alignright size-large"></figure>

Lenovo ThinkStation P520

Price: Starting at $1,214.00 Lenovo | Amazon
More information: Lenovo ThinkStation P520

The post Lenovo ThinkStation P520 Workstation [Review] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 17, 2020 07:16 PM

The Javelin Blog

Working with SOLIDWORKS at Home through COVID-19 Shutdowns

The continuing spread of the COVID-19 virus (Coronavirus) is causing significant impact around the globe.  While health is always of primary importance, this pandemic also affects business productivity.  As shutdowns and quarantines are rapidly expanding, more and more employees are being asked to work from home.  This can cause challenges with access to SOLIDWORKS software and data.

Several methods are available to use SOLIDWORKS at home or in a remote location.  In each case SOLIDWORKS will need to be installed on the remote computer.  Review our Installation Guide FAQs on our Technical Support page for installation instructions.

Here are the options based on different licensing structures:

SOLIDWORKS Standalone Licenses (Individual)

Standalone licenses are tied to individual users.  These serial numbers start with 0000, 0001, 9000 or 9001.  You can locate the serial number by opening SOLIDWORKS and go to Help > About SOLIDWORKS.  There are two options for this license type: activation-based or online.  It must be set to one or the other.

Option #1: Activation-based

Installations that run through the SOLIDWORKS Activation process have its license tied to the physical machine.  SOLIDWORKS can be installed on multiple computers with the same license but can only be active on a single machine at one time.  You can transfer the license from a work computer using the Deactivation process so a home/laptop computer can be activated.  Review our SOLIDWORKS Standalone License Deactivation and Activation article for instructions.

Option #2: Online

Online mode is an alternative to license activation.  The license is tied to a specific SOLIDWORKS user account that is created.  When SOLIDWORKS is launched on a computer using this option, the user logs in with their credentials.  When SOLIDWORKS is closed, the license is automatically released.  Therefore SOLIDWORKS can be installed on a remote computer with the same license and only requires logging in to launch.  Review our Online Licensing Overview article for further explanation and instructions.

NOTE: A standalone license defaults to activation-based.  Changing to online licensing requires first deactivating any active computers.

SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork Licenses (Floating)

SOLIDWORKS network licensing requires access to the server hosting the floating licenses.  These serial numbers start with 0010 or 9010.  Within the workplace environment, computers are connected to the network to obtain licenses.  Working remotely can be accomplished with two methods: VPN or Borrowing.

Option #1: VPN

VPN (Virtual Private Network) allows users to connect to the workplace network via an internet connection.  This simulates a physical connection to the network.

Option #2: Borrow

Borrowing a license requires an initial connection to the network, then a license is obtained and locked on a client machine.  At which point the computer can be disconnected from the network and Internet but will still allow access to SOLIDWORKS.  The license will be tied to this client machine until the license is returned.

IMPORTANT: Do not borrow a license when connected to VPN.  Only borrow when physically connected to the network.

 

For more detailed information on VPN and Borrow capabilities, review our article: Using your SOLIDWORKS Network Licenses away from the office.

Other possible options include the use of Remote Desktop Tools or Cloud Options.  Review our article How can I work remotely during COVID-19 Isolation or Quarantine Response for additional information.

 

If you are unable to set up a VPN connection or Borrow licenses for a specific reason, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller for potential options.

SOLIDWORKS has also generated their own blog article on the topic.  Click HERE to view.

The post Working with SOLIDWORKS at Home through COVID-19 Shutdowns appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at March 17, 2020 06:05 PM

Using your SOLIDWORKS Network Licenses Away from the Office

As SOLIDWORKS network licenses are hosted on a server connected to your network, clients must also be connected to the same network to obtain a license.  In some situations it may be required to use a license away from your office, such as working from home or offsite with a laptop.

There are two methods that can be used for clients to use a license:

  1. Connect to your network through VPN (requires Internet connection)
  2. Borrow a license through the SolidNetwork License Manager (does not require Internet connection)

VPN CONNECTION

VPN (Virtual Private Network) is a client-server relationship that requires a server on the end of the corporate network, and a client to connect to that network.  Clients can be network connections from an operating system or provided via an app such as Cisco connect-anywhere or OpenVPN.  Work with your IT department to implement VPN on your network.

From SOLIDWORKS System requirement page:
SOLIDWORKS does not test or certify VPN (Virtual Private Network) solutions but provides best-effort support.  Users may be directed to work directly with their VPN provider to resolve issues on a case-by-case basis.

 

From the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base Article S-057653:
What is the definition of a VPN (Virtual Private Network)?

A virtual private network (VPN) is a computer network that uses a public telecommunication infrastructure such as the Internet to provide remote offices or individual users with secure access to their organisation’s network. It aims to avoid an expensive system of owned or leased lines that can be used by only one organisation.

Details about support guidelines and policies for VPN (Virtual Private Network) can be found in the notes at the bottom of the SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS PDM System Requirements web page at: https://www.solidworks.com/sw/support/SystemRequirements.html

Please review the notes for the most current information regarding VPN usage.

 

If users have issues obtaining a license over a VPN connection, there may be issues connecting to the server or firewalls blocking communication.  Review our article SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager Troubleshooting.

BORROW LICENSES FROM THE SOLIDNETWORK LICENSE MANAGER

A connection to your network is required to initially borrow a license.  Once borrowed, the computer can be disconnected from the network and will not require any internet connection to run.

IMPORTANT: Do not borrow a license when connected to VPN.  Only borrow when physically connected to the network.  The use of an ethernet cable is highly recommended, rather than using Wi-Fi connections.

Open the SolidNetwork License Manager Client on the user machine.  This can be found under Start > SolidWorks Tools 20XX > SolidNetwork License Manager Client 20XX.  There should be 4 tabs at the top.  Select “License Borrowing”.

 

SOLIDWORKS Network License Borrow

The list of products that have an available license will be shown in the list.  Select the one required and specify the last day you will need the license.  Licenses are limited to a 30-day maximum borrow period.  This maximum period can be shortened using an Options file.

SOLIDWORKS will be available for use through to 11:59pm on the day specified.  At midnight of the following day, the license will expire on the client laptop and the license will be freed up on the server.  The license will need to be borrowed again after 30 days.

Once you have selected a product and the borrow until date, click Borrow.  This will move the license under the Borrowed Product Licenses window.  A Standard License will automatically be borrowed with any higher level license.

SOLIDWORKS Network Licenses Borrowed

A borrowed license will be shown In Use from the network pool until it is returned.  If you get back to the office before the date specified, you can manually return the license.  Reconnect to the network.  Select the license in the Borrowed Product Licenses list and click Return.  The license will be returned and become available to the network pool.

SOLIDWORKS Network License Return

The post Using your SOLIDWORKS Network Licenses Away from the Office appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at March 17, 2020 12:00 PM

Designing a Homemade Workout Bench with SOLIDWORKS Weldments

Given the global COVID-19 pandemic it has become taboo to be out in public. Now that my local gym and thousands of other gyms are closed to help prevent the spread of the virus that leaves us thinking, ‘what do we do if we want to work out?’.

SOLIDWORKS to the rescue!

With my hobbyist background in woodworking I created an easy at home workout bench inspired by some social media posts. Great advantage to this bench is its cheap and easy to make. Everything can be made from wood coming from a local hardware store or from scrap lumber lying around. With a quick search there is a lot of people getting rid of left-over lumber or companies getting rid of skids.

Homemade Workout Bench

Homemade Workout Bench

Workout Bench Design

Here’s a design with the drawing. Going through this, the core bench is made from a very study 4″x4″ and 2″x4″ with either I dowel or hardware for the rotational components. If you want to take this to the next level, you can put the legs on hinges with lock outs and add two wheels to allow the bench to be folded and wheeled into a closet.

Workout Bench Drawing

Workout Bench Drawing (click to enlarge)

Going a little further into the how I created the bench. There are some notches cut out of the main 4″x4″ beam. This was a simple cut extrude. The notches are for the bench angle. I have 4 positions in total: roughly 5°, 45°, 60° and flat. I controlled this using configurations suppressing and unsuppressing mates.

When building this I found using these deck brackets was the easiest with some nails or screws.

 

This can be created using basic hand saws and drill. Of course if you have power tools then that’s even better.

Workout bench section view

This is a section view half way through. With this view you can see the notches a little better. This controls the tilt on the back rest.

I used a custom SOLIDWORKS weldment lumber profile along with some basic and advanced mates all learned in the SOLIDWORKS Essentials class that we deliver live online. The drawing utilizes a full BOM for the completed assembly and a cut list for the structural frame. I have added the cut sizes of all the materials used in case you would like to make it.

The post Designing a Homemade Workout Bench with SOLIDWORKS Weldments appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at March 17, 2020 12:00 PM

March 16, 2020

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: Mechanical Phone Holder [Designed for Space!]

With all the quarantining and disease spread lately, you’ve probably thought, “When’s the next flight off this crazy planet?!” Alien abduction volunteers? “Take Wuhan!” Hey now! The virus has already spread. “Blow the planet!” Calm thyself. “I’m outta here!” Ok, granted you’ll take all your bacteria and viruses with you, but should you be planning a departure, you’ll want to pack away this 3D print for looking cool in the isolation of space.

Practical 3D printed device maker ‘SunShine’ has the perfect solution for any space-related travel or, for that matter, anywhere you need some extra awesome for holding your phone. How is it ‘designed for space’? SunShine designed it without the requirement for 1) gravity 2) extra parts and 3) multiple prints. Who needs those things, really. It’s a clever design and, for all y’all with an appreciation for gears and mechanical structures, looks dang cool.

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As a single print-in-place part, there are some (Cura) slicer settings you need to be aware of. SunShine uses a Creality Ender 3 Pro 3D printer and recommends a layer height of 0.2mm (or finer), line width of 0.4mm, three top and three bottom layers using Lines as the pattern, 30% Cubic infill, and make sure ‘Outer Before Inner Walls’ is unchecked with ‘Z Seam Alignment’ set to ‘Random’. He was kind enough to include a smaller test print piece as well to test all of your settings first. So kind!

You can download the Print-in-Place Phone Holder from Cults3D or Thingiverse. (Bonus! Check out SunShine’s Print-in-Place scissor jack stand for the phone holder here!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

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This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Model of the Week: Mechanical Phone Holder [Designed for Space!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 16, 2020 09:49 PM

Take A Look At How An Animatronic Gorilla Head is Made

Lustre Effects gorilla head

It may not be as common in our uber-CGI world of today, but back when digital effects weren’t so realistic, using animatronics and puppetry was the best way to get a fictional or non-fictional beast into your movie without having to train it.

The velociraptors in Jurassic Park, Gremlins, Yoda from Star Wars – these were made by artists and designers who literally brought these mechanical characters to life with tools, glue, electronics and a lot of time.

Using a gorilla head as an example, Lustre Effects, a China-based special effects studio, gives us a closer look at how these animated creatures are made from start to finish:

1. Sculpt The Clay Bust

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Lustre Effects gorilla head</figure>

Bringing something as complex as a gorilla head into the real world takes a lot of effort, so it only makes sense to sculpt every wrinkle, fold, and flaw. Using a digital model as a reference, the team painstakingly adds every crease, crack, and crevice onto the clay gorilla head.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Lustre Effects gorilla head</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Lustre Effects gorilla head</figure>

2. Craft The Gorilla’s Skin

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Lustre Effects gorilla head</figure>

The team can now start crafting the different parts of the gorilla’s head using the hardened clay bust. They create the grey skin using special foam latex which is painted different shades to give it an extra level of realism.

3.  Add The Eyes And Hair

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Lustre Effects gorilla head</figure>

It wouldn’t be a proper gorilla without bulging eyes and mangy hair, so they add them in as well. As if the detailed sculpting wasn’t a time-intensive effort, this takes it to another level. Using a picture of a gorilla as a reference point, the eyes are painted to match before it’s polished and fitted into the sockets. As for the hair, each strand is hand sewn into the mask with a needle to make it look like a real gorilla. The whole mask is them combed down to get the gorilla ready for the big screen.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Lustre Effects gorilla head</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Lustre Effects gorilla head</figure>

4. Make The Mechanical Skeleton

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Lustre Effects gorilla head</figure>

This is where art meets tech. Using various MCAD/ECAD software, the team creates a slew of internal mechanisms that control various parts of the gorilla’s head from tongue to eye and all the various facial muscles. If you think the moving individual parts are creepy, you should see the overall face.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Lustre Effects gorilla head</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Lustre Effects gorilla head</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Lustre Effects gorilla head</figure>

Instead of using a single skeletal plate, the entire gorilla skull is comprised of a series of moving plates which push and pull the latex in place of actual muscles. Even the eyes and mouth have their own moving parts. In a way, it creates an even greater appreciation for the actual muscle and motion of a gorilla.

5. Put on The Mask

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When you cover up the eerie skeleton with some skin, however, the finished head looks just like that of a real gorilla. Also interesting is how the gorilla is worn by one person to provide the larger movements, while a technician controls the fine motor movements with an off-camera controller. Altogether, it’s an amazing process.

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</figure>

Lustre Effects has a lot more animatronic works on their webpage, along with tons more projects which will delight fans of popular fiction.

The post Take A Look At How An Animatronic Gorilla Head is Made appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 16, 2020 07:26 PM

The Javelin Blog

FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) Support Material Removal

FDM (fused deposition modeling) Technology™ lets you 3D print parts in a broad range of well tested plastics. FDM materials offer specialized properties like toughness, elastomeric flexibility, electrostatic dissipation, translucence, biocompatibility, UV resistance, VO flammability and FST ratings. This makes them perfect for demanding designers and engineers in aerospace, automotive, manufacturing, medical and other industries.

1. Materials Overview

Stratasys offers a diverse variety of model materials (see table below) which are used in conjunction with two types of FDM support materials. Soluble Release Support (SR) material can be washed away in a solution of heated-water and a cleaning agent, while Breakaway Support Structures (BASS) are manually removed. Notable differences between soluble support and BASS materials are as follows:

Support Material Comparison
Soluble Support Breakaway Support Structures (Bass)
SR-20, SR-30, SR-35, SR-100, SR-110, QSR, P400-SR PC-BASS, PPSF-BASS, ULTEM™ 9085 resin support material,
ULTEM™1010 resin support material, SUP8008B, P400-R
Supports wash away in a detergent bath Supports removed manually
Build internal cavities/channels Do not require the use of a tank
Hands-free support removal Faster for simple support structures, which may require the
use of hand tools to reach and remove all support material
and may be time consuming

 

Materials Highlights
Model Material Support Material
ABSi Used with SR-20 support material
ABS-ESD7 Used with SR-30 support material
ABS-M30 Used with SR-20, and QSR* or SR-30 support material
ABS-M30i Used with SR-20 or SR-30 support material
ASA Used with SR-30 and QSR* support material
Antero 800NA Used with SUP8000B support material
FDM Nylon 6 Used with SR-110 support material
FDM Nylon 12 Used with SR-110 support material
FDM Nylon 12CF
(carbon fiber)
Used with SR-110 support material
PC-ABS Used with SR-20 and QSR* support material
PC Used with SR-100 or PC-BASS
support material
PC-ISO Used with PC-BASS support material
PPSF Used with PPSF-BASS support material
FDM TPU 92A** Used with QSR* support material
ULTEM™
9085 resin
Used with ULTEM™ 9085 resin support material
ULTEM™
1010 resin
Used with ULTEM™1010 resin support material

 

*QSR material is used on the F-Series printers only.

**Note: It is recommended to tank-clean FDM TPU 92A parts for optimal surface finish. However, tank immersion may cause swelling up to 0.5% resulting in the part temporarily being out of dimensional tolerance. Parts will shrink back to nominal size, but it may take up to 72 hours for this to happen depending on part size and geometry.

SR-20 Support Material SR-30 Support Material BASS Support Material

1.1 SR vs. BASS

Soluble Release (SR) support materials are very similar; however, they do offer some differences:

  • SR-20 tends to discolor the support removal solution faster than SR-30.
  • SR-30 is less likely to shatter and dissolves 69% faster than SR-20.
  • SR-30 doesn’t expand as much as SR-20 in solution. Therefore, fragile parts won’t break from support expansion.
  • SR-35 is easier to break off in larger pieces. It also dissolves faster and maintains solution bath life longer compared to SR-30.

1.1.1 BASS Removal Tips

Breakaway support structures are removed manually, rather than by use of a tank containing a solution of heated-water and a cleaning agent. This method is ideal for parts built using simple support structures. Depending on the part built it may be difficult to reach all support structures in order to break them away, resulting in a greater amount of time spent removing supports. The following tips will help expedite the process of removing BASS.

WARNING: Always wear safety glasses and safety gloves when removing support material by hand. The support material can be brittle and may cause cuts when manually broken off.

Tools

The use of hand tools can greatly reduce the amount of time spent removing BASS from finished parts. However, care should be taken to ensure that you do not scratch or gouge parts when using tools. For fragile parts, it is always best to take your time in order to eliminate the risk of damaging the part. You may find that traditional tools are insufficient for removing supports from your parts. If so, you may need to fabricate custom tools to better suit your support removal needs.

Agitation

Agitation aids in support material removal. Stratasys recommends using either a circulation or ultrasonic tank.

Heat

ULTEM™ resins, PPSF and Antero 800NA support materials are much easier to remove if heated. (PC-BASS does not require re heating as this material is generally easier to remove than ULTEM™ resins and PPSF supports). Placing a finished part into an industrial oven and allowing the part to heat will make support material easier to remove. However, if you decide to heat a part, do not place low temp parts (such as ABS-M30) into a high temp oven (such as 160° C (320° F)). This can damage the part, possibly making it unusable. Please also keep in mind that the more heating/cooling cycles conducted, the more difficult it will be to remove supports. In general, materials should be heated to the temperatures specified in the table below:

Reheating Specifications
Model Material Type Temperature
Antero 800NA Up to 130 °C (266 °F)
ABS-M30/ABS-M30i* Up to 80 °C (176 °F)
PC-ABS* Up to 80 °C (176 °F)
PC (with PC-BASS support material) Up to 100 °C (212 °F)
PPSF Up to 180 °C (356 °F)
ULTEM™ resins Up to 160 °C (320 °F)

 

* Model material utilizes soluble support material, not BASS. Reheating temperatures are provided as a guideline although support materials are generally not removed by hand.

2. WaterWorks Best Practices

Removing FDM support material incorrectly may affect the physical properties of the model material. Using chemicals that have not been verified to maintain those mechanical properties, immediately and over time, is not recommended. It is always recommended to follow post-processing best practices recommended for that material including time and temperature. This is why Stratasys recommends WaterWorks. Stratasys has tested the model materials for mechanical properties after soluble support removal using WaterWorks and found no adverse effects if used as recommended.

2.1 Choosing a Support Removal Tank

A variety of support removal tanks can be utilized to aid in the process of removing support materials from finished parts. Support removal tank options vary by method. You can choose a tank that circulates the removal solution, an ultrasonic tank that vibrates using high frequencies or an option that has both. The key is that the alkaline solution needs some sort of agitation, or cavitation as well as heat, to enable the support material to break away from the model material efficiently. Stratasys recommends using either a circulation or ultrasonic tank.

Parts can be secured in the tank using stainless steel, porous baskets or other containers, which lessens the chances of parts being damaged. The choice on which type of tank to use can depend on the types of geometries or size of parts you will be printing. Also, factors such as noise or other environmental factors in your location may influence your decision.

Flow tanks and ultrasonic tanks work at the same rate for some geometries and differently for others. A stainless steel tea infusing ball (3 inches), or similar container, works well for small parts. Larger parts with fine feature details can be secured to a basket with plastic cable ties, and even wrapped in a suitable plastic mesh material to keep them in place or from wearing together in the support removal tank. See “Placing Parts in the Tank” (Section 2.5.3) for more information.

2.1.1 Circulation Tanks

  • Uses heat and circulation.
  • Circulation amount and strength varies for each tank.
  • Generally used with lids, and therefore has less evaporation than ultrasonic tanks.
  • Quieter than ultrasonic tanks.
  • Secured parts may need to be checked periodically to ensure that they are fully submerged/stay submerged in the tank.

2.1.2 Ultrasonic Tanks

  • Uses heat and sound waves to create scrubbing bubbles, which gently clean parts.
  • Must be monitored to avoid solution overheating. Users often leave the lids off to dissipate the heat but tanks must still be monitored.

WARNING: Bath solution will have a high pH, use caution to avoid contact with skin.

  • Louder than circulation tanks.
  • Ultrasonic tanks are best for small or fragile parts with fine features and parts with thin channels, small holes and trapped cavities such as tubes.

NOTE: Parts made with FDM TPU 92A with internal cavities such as tubes and manifolds are cleaned more effectively in an ultrasonic tank. However, be aware that cleaning tanks typically used with F123 printers that use TPU 92A material use circulation and are NOT ultrasonic.

2.2 Safety Guidelines

When using WaterWorks soluble concentrate and a support removal tank observe the following
safety guidelines:

  • Follow the manufacturer’s documentation on tank operation and safety. Understand how to properly and safely use the tank before operation.
  • Always wear safety goggles (indirectly vented and chemical splash resistant).
  • Use rubber gloves that can withstand the high solution temperature and high alkaline solutions. (Gloves that are cuffed at the elbow are recommended.)
  • Follow your company and local regulatory statutes regarding safety practices.
  • Never place hands in a tank filled with solution and/or hot water.
  • Never turn on power to the heater or ultrasonics without water/solution in the tank.
  • Always use a proper tool to remove parts from the tank. Plastic or stainless steel removal tools are recommended that can withstand the high solution temperature and high alkaline solution in the tank.
  • If using a basket, remove the entire basket from the tank before removing parts.

2.3 WaterWorks Overview

WaterWorks™ (for use with F123 Series and Fortus® printers) in combination with Stratasys’ soluble support materials, dissolves FDM soluble support structures with a water based solution (rather than requiring you to manually remove supports). See Table 1-2 for model and support compatibility information. Stratasys software automatically creates any needed support structures to build specific parts. When applicable, WaterWorks provides the final step, enabling complex geometries and fully functional assemblies in a single build. WaterWorks concentrate comes in 1 liter bottles, and in cases of 12 bottles. Each bottle treats 42 liters (11 gallons) of water.

NOTE: WaterWorks may only be shipped via ground transportation.

2.4 How to Choose a WaterWorks-Compatible Tank

Stratasys offers a range of circulation, ultrasonic or combined options. Choosing the right size tank, or tanks, and technology will depend on a variety of factors. Stratasys offer something to match the build size of every printer in the range. You also need to factor in your part production rates and your throughput needs.

SCA-3600 cleaning tank

SCA-3600 cleaning tank

Consider your part sizes. While the SCA 3600 is perfect for the F123 series of printers, it may also work for Fortus 380/450 users if they are doing only batches of smaller parts and not filling the entire build envelope. If you will be regularly filling the build envelope of the Fortus 450mc with taller, wider parts, you will need a larger tank.

Also consider your ratio of post-processing equipment to printers. A 1:1 ratio may be necessary if you purchase the smallest tank, or you may be able to have up to three printers for for one larger tank.

2.5 Removing Support Material

WARNING: Always wear safety glasses and safety gloves when removing support material by hand. The support material can be brittle and may cause cuts when manually broken off.

Some parts have support materials that are hard to remove (e.g., parts with thin, deep channels), resulting in longer dissolving times.

To get longer life from your support removal solution it is always best to remove as much support material by hand before you put parts in the tank (except when using SR-100). It takes just a short amount of time to remove excess support material before putting the part in the tank.

Be aware of fine or fragile portions of your parts and do not use excess force. Just break off what will come off relatively easily before placing the parts in the support removal tank.

While some parts have support material that cannot be removed (e.g., hollow parts with non-accessible interiors). Therefore, it is suggested but not required that you remove some support by hand in order to save tank time and water life span, except when using SR-100. When using SR-100 it is necessary that you manually remove small amounts of support material prior to placing parts in the tank. This will help eliminate any likelihood of part breakage while in the tank. Thin walled or small feature part geometries (less than or equal to 0.02 in. (0.50 mm)) with encapsulated regions of support may be susceptible to breakage or cracking. This is due to slightly faster thermal expansion of the SR-100 soluble support material compared to the thermal properties of the polycarbonate (PC) model material.

NOTE: FDM TPU 92A parts should always be tank-cleaned to remove support material. Removing support material by hand from FDM TPU 92A parts may result in an unsatisfactory surface finish.

2.5.1 Adding Solution to the Tank

WARNING: Always wear safety goggles, and heat, alkaline, and water-resistant safety gloves when handling WaterWorks soluble concentrate.

To begin, fill the tank with water.

  • The ratio of water needed is 11 gallons (42 liters) of water per one bottle (2.1 lbs/950g) of soluble concentrate.

Make sure to fill the tank according to the operating instructions set by the manufacturer to avoid burning out the tank’s heater (or transducer in ultrasonic units).

Carefully open one bottle of soluble concentrate (per 11 gallons of water) and slowly spread the powder over the entire water surface in the tank.

NOTE: Always add the soluble concentrate to the water; never add water to the concentrate. Use caution to ensure that you do not breathe in powder when mixing soluble concentrate with water.

When finished, seal and store bottles with remaining concentrate. Dispose of empty bottles appropriately.

NOTE: Soluble concentrate bottles are made of recyclable plastic and can be recycled according to local recycling programs.

Over time evaporation can occur; periodically check for evaporation of water. If evaporation occurs add more water, do not add more soluble concentrate.

2.5.2 Tank Temperature

CAUTION: Never turn on power to the tank heater or ultrasonic units without water or solution in the tank.

Always power the tank ON according to the operating instructions set by the manufacturer.

When dissolving support material, set the tank’s temperature according to the information listed in the table below. Verify that the tank’s temperature configuration is correct for the type of support material being removed before placing parts in the tank. Always allow the solution to reach proper temperature before placing parts into the solution. Support material dissolves the fastest at the designated support material temperature. Filling the tank with hot tap water will help accelerate the time needed to reach designated operating temperatures.

Very high-volume users, such as service bureaus that process hundreds of parts a day, often elect to install a separate water heater in their post-processing labs. They do this to accelerate the heat-up phase when it is necessary to change out the support removal solution.

NOTE: Setting or allowing the tank temperature to reach a higher than indicated temperature is likely to damage printed parts.

Tank Temperature Settings
(Soluble) Support Material Type Temperature
SR-20 70 °C (158 °F)
SR-30 70 °C (158 °F)
SR-100 80-85 °C (176-185 °F) or 70 °C (158 °F) with a longer dissolve time
SR-110 Thin wall mode parts: 50 °C (122 °F), Normal mode parts: 60 °C (140 °F),
Brick mode parts: 70 °C (158 °F)
SR-35 / QSR 70 °C (158 °F)
P400-SR 70 °C (158 °F)

2.5.3 Placing Parts in the Tank

CAUTION: Make sure that parts are fully immersed in the solution. Parts can crack if they are not fully immersed or are ‘bobbing’ in and out of the solution. This is especially critical for small parts.

Follow the operating instructions set by the tank manufacturer as to where parts can be placed within the tank (e.g., free moving or secured in a basket or other porous container). In some tanks, for example, parts cannot be placed on the bottom. Multiple parts may be placed in the tank but there must be sufficient room within this tank to allow for adequate agitation.

Enclosures should be used to ensure that fragile parts are not damaged while in the tank. Always keep parts fully submerged within the tank’s solution; if parts do not stay fully submerged grime can build-up on the part’s surface.

Sparse filled parts will absorb solution; therefore, adding holes for draining is advised. Sparse filled parts will float within the tank’s solution so they should be anchored within the basket or tank to ensure they stay fully submerged.

2.5.4 Material Specific Guidelines

PC Material: PC parts left in a tank for excessive time may see a 5-15% drop in mechanical properties. It is good practice to allow PC parts to soak in the tank for 4 hours, and then check parts frequently to ensure that they are not left in the tank for too long.

FDM Nylon 6, Nylon 12 and Nylon 12CF Materials: Nylon 6/12/12CF materials may be brittle out of the oven. A very specific process should be followed when placing parts made with these materials into a tank containing WaterWorks solution.

  1. After removing nylon parts from the printer’s oven, always leave the part on the build sheet. Allow the part to cool on the build sheet until it is room temperature.
  2. Carefully pull the part off of the build sheet once it is room temperature. The part may be fragile so care must be taken.

All nylon parts must be placed into a WaterWorks solution bath; a minimum of 4 hours of re-hydration
is suggested.

2.5.5 Inspecting Parts and Solution

Various factors determine how long it takes to remove support material in the tank. To ensure timely and
efficient support removal:

  • Minimize the volume of support material on the part prior to placing it into the tank (see “Removing Support Material” – Section 2.5).
  • Minimize the amount of time parts spend in the solution tank.
  • Minimize the amount of dissolved solids in the solution tank.
  • Maximize the pH level in the solution tank.
  • Maximize solution agitation around parts.

For best part quality, inspect parts after 2 hours and then periodically until their clean cycle is complete.

NOTE: Polycarbonate parts left in the tank for excessive periods of time may see a 5% to 15% drop in mechanical properties. It is highly recommended that you check PC parts every 4 hours, and avoid leaving PC parts in the tank solution longer than 24 hours. This will alleviate any potential degradation of the part’s mechanical property.

Due to air pockets and circulation patterns it is recommended that you rotate the basket or free moving parts to dissolve support material faster. Inspect the tank periodically for over- heating and solution evaporation. The solution level must always cover the parts. Add more water if necessary; do not add more soluble concentrate.

2.5.6 Removing Parts from the Tank

WARNING: Always wear safety goggles and heat, alkaline, and water- resistant safety gloves when handling the concentrate.

To begin, turn OFF power to the tank. Allow the tank’s cover to drip for a few moments before removing the lid completely. Carefully remove parts from the tank; plastic or stainless steel removal tools (such as tongs) are recommended for removing parts. Removal tools need to be able to withstand high water temperature and high alkaline solution.

Parts must be rinsed after they’re removed from the tank, rinse parts as follows:

  • White Parts: Rinse parts thoroughly with water until part surfaces are no longer slippery (1-2 minutes). To reduce the possibility of staining, some white parts may need to soak for an hour to help pull soluble concentrate from part surfaces. Also, soaking parts in a dishwasher rinsing aid and water and then rinsing the parts will break the surface tension.
  • Colour Parts: Soak parts in water for one hour to dissolve and pull soluble concentrate from part surfaces. Also, soaking parts in a dishwasher rinsing aid and water and then rinsing the parts will break the surface tension.
  • Soft Water or Deionized Water: Sparse parts need to be drained and re-rinsed. A vacuum chamber can be used to pull solution out of the part.

NOTE: Failing to rinse or soak parts long enough can leave them with a white residue and/or streaks. If this occurs, rinse or soak the parts again to remove the residue. Part surface aesthetics can also be negatively impacted as a result of inadequate tank solution. Check the tank’s solution and change it if necessary (see “Changing Solution in the Tank” – Section 2.5.7).

Part with stains

Part with stains

For parts built using the sparse build style, allow parts to drain fully as solution can get trapped inside the part. Allow parts to dry thoroughly and then rinse parts (for 1-2 minutes) under hot water, once again making sure that you do not allow any water to get trapped inside the part.

Dry parts with paper towels, compressed air, or let them air-dry. If colored parts turn slightly white after drying, rinse them under hot water or soak them again as previously instructed.

2.5.7 Changing Solution in the Tank

How often the solution is changed is dependent on the tank used, how it is maintained, and the complexities of the parts built.

Once mixed to the correct dilution, the PH level in WaterWorks is around 12.6. The solution will need to be changed when the PH drops below 11.5, or if the solution is saturated with dissolved solids. It is possible for the solution to register the correct PH level, yet still not be cleaning the soluble support off the parts. This is when you need to check the saturation level of the solution.

Waterworks can handle roughly 1lb. of support to every 5.5 gallons of diluted solution in a tank. After that it becomes less effective. Some larger labs use TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) meters to evaluate tank changes in addition to checking the PH levels.  This is why Stratasys recommends manually breaking off as much support as practical.

The following conditions indicate that the solution should be changed:

  • The tank begins to cloud or exhibit low clarity. Some white parts (ABS) may turn brown or yellow.
  • Parts have a sticky residue and/or stick together in the tank due to excess dissolved solids in the tank.
  • Functional parts with moving features are not functioning properly.
  • Support material is not fully removed after a long cleaning cycle.

2.5.8 Disposing of Soluble Concentrate

The soluble solution has been specially formulated to be safely disposed after dilution and neutralization to an acceptable pH level. The pH level of fresh solution is similar to that of typical laundry detergents, dishwasher detergents, and common household cleaners.

pH Levels Comparison
Product pH Level
Fresh soluble solution 12.6
Laundry detergent 11 – 12
Dishwasher detergent 10 – 11
Common household cleaners 9 – 12

 

Check your local, state, and/or international regulatory statutes for what pH level is acceptable for disposal. Stratasys recommends that disposal procedures be verified by the proper authorities in your region. Stratasys cannot anticipate local, state, or international regulatory statutes. Stratasys cannot be held liable if the solution is not handled and disposed of properly. You may need to document how you dispose of the used solution.

2.5.9 Soluble Solution Drain Effluent

Dilute the solution with water using the appropriate ratio to meet acceptable pH levels. The Drain Effluent data below is based on a dilution of 1 part soluble concentrate to 5 parts water containing approximately 28 cubic inches (459 cc) of soluble release material dissolved in 11 gallons (42 liters) of water, resulting in a pH of 11.8.

Drain Effluent Specifications
Parameter Test Method Units Tank Value Diluted Value*
pH EPA 150-1 EPA 150-1 — 12.6 11.8
COD** EPA 410-1 mg/L 14,000 2,400
BOC*** SM 5210B mg/L 820 250
Total Solids EPA 1603 mg/L 27,000 4,500
Total Suspended Solids EPA 160.2 mg/L 430 54
Cadmium SW-846, 6010A μg/L <5 <5
Chromium SW-846, 6010A μg/L <5 <5
Copper SW-846, 6010A μg/L <10 <10
Nickel SW-846, 6010A μg/L <10 <10
Lead SW-846, 6010A μg/L <40 <40
Zinc SW-846, 6010A μg/L <20 <20
Mercury SW-846, 7470A μg/L <2 <2

 

* These values remain constant if the same ratios apply (e.g. 5.5 gallon cleaning device containing approximately 14 cubic inches of soluble release material with the same dilution ratio of 1 part soluble concentrate to 5 parts water).

** Chemical Oxygen Demand

*** Biological Oxygen Demand Check your local, state, and/or international regulatory statues for what pH level is acceptable for disposal. Stratasys recommends that disposal procedures be verified by the proper authorities in your region. Stratasys cannot anticipate local, state, or international regulatory statutes. Stratasys cannot be held liable if the solution is not handled and disposed of properly. You may need to document how you dispose of the concentrate.

2.5.10 Neutralization

The soluble solution can be further neutralized to lower the pH level by slowly adding acid (e.g., malic acid) to the tank before draining the solution.

To successfully neutralize a solution of soluble concentrate dissolved in 11 gallons (42 liters) of water to a
pH level below 11:

  1. Check local codes. Refer to the MSDS sheets for proper safety precautions and possible hazards for malic acid.
  2. Slowly add 14 ounces (397 grams) of malic acid to the tank solution (this amount is based on starting pH level); pH will reduce from 11 to 8. Please note that the tank will foam.

2.5.11 Tank Cleaning

To clean the tank:

  1. Drain, dilute, and/or neutralize the tank solution. See “Disposing of Soluble Concentrate” (Section 2.5.8) for instructions.
  2. Re-fill the tank with clean tap water and operate a few minutes to circulate clean tap water throughout the system.
  3. Drain the tank and wipe down all surfaces to remove traces of the soluble concentrate.

The post FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) Support Material Removal appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Stratasys Ltd. at March 16, 2020 12:00 PM

March 15, 2020

How To Work At Home

Working at home isn’t for everyone. The first time I tried it 22 years ago I had to move back to the office after a couple of weeks. I just…

by matt at March 15, 2020 10:48 PM

March 13, 2020

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Bag of Happy

When the opening collapsed and the purple sludge seeped past the ivy-lined crevices, time almost seemed to stop, frozen in a moment where we could neither see the other side nor extract the bag of happy from its resting place behind the swollen kneebone of these links.

Dániel Taylor – Rich, surreal, 3-dimensional, cel-shaded illustration style with careful color, gradients, and composition that grabs you by the eyes.

Case of the Missing Hit – We rarely share podcasts, but this is excellent. The mystery of a lost pop song that seems to have vanished from the world. Listen while you browse everything else.

Single Paper Zine – How to make a small (maga)zine from a single sheet of paper, inspired by the What’s a zine book, author Austin Kleon shows you how.

Subpar Parks – Instagram follow of the week. Artist Amber Share created these national Park posters based on bad reviews left by visitors. Hilarious.

Mammals 2020 – Mammal photography of the year winners. Foxes, hares, dolphins and more, in their natural habitats.

Urban Melancholy – Berlin has the most bridges in Europe. Here are some of them as photographed by Alexander Shoenberg.

Pen Tool Box Method – Ever wonder how to use the Pen Tool in Illustrator or Photoshop? This is a method for creating shapes quickly.

Playtronica – Online sampler to play a range of sounds with your keyboard.

9-5 – The Dolly Parton hit played with five different horns… by one person, the amazing Seb Skelly. Will put a smile on your face.

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Crazy – Appropriate song title for a week like we’ve had, wouldn’t you say? The amazing finger-style guitar work of Kent Nishimura.

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</figure>

The post Friday Smackdown: Bag of Happy appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 13, 2020 08:26 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Professional Package builds better teamwork and efficiency into the design-to-manufacturing process

When it comes to a manufactured part or product, a great idea has to be clearly communicated, thoroughly understood, clearly evaluated and discussed, improved upon and, ultimately, turned into something tangible: a finished product that does what it’s supposed to do, and does it well.

Even in the best of circumstances, it’s a long and hazardous journey from initial concept to a finished product. And how great an idea turns out to be in the end depends a lot on the process it went through to get there. An initial idea will pass through many hands and many minds, being molded and modified as it moves through the process—either improving or diminishing along the way.

The SOLIDWORKS® Professional package helps you to maintain the quality and consistency of your concepts as they move between stages, resulting in better work processes—and better finished products. Each of your team members has access to a full complement of the robust features and functions that today’s design, engineering and manufacturing professionals need to do their best work. Grounded in “smart manufacturing” principles, SOLIDWORKS Professional has the advanced data management, visualization, communication and collaboration tools that help people come up with great ideas and work together to take them as far as they can go.

SOLIDWORKS Professional

SOLIDWORKS Professional

Driving teamwork, delivering quality

It takes great teamwork, as well as great ideas, to make a great product—and the team is at the heart of all that SOLIDWORKS Professional can do. It’s a tool designed for collaboration, because it lets your entire team work within one unified ecosystem—and work better, smarter and faster. That adds up to lower costs, greater efficiency and better products.

SOLIDWORKS Professional Package: Doing better work together

When many minds can share a single vision, great things can happen. SOLIDWORKS Professional builds a unified vision into every great idea it touches. That’s because it is an integrated design-to-manufacturing system that serves all stages of the design-to-manufacturing process. It unites disciplines and departments within one application and around one shared 3D CAD model. And that pays big dividends when it comes to efficiency, cost savings and quality control.

SOLIDWORKS Professional breaks down barriers between the many stages and stakeholders in the product development process. Designers, electrical engineers, mechanical engineers, CNC programmers and others can all work from the same 3D CAD model at all stages in its development, with the contributions of each party assimilated into the model in real time. That makes a big difference for these reasons:

  • There’s no need to translate models from one system to another.
  • There’s no need to wait for one process to be completed before the next can start—teams can work concurrently at every stage of the process.
  • Teams can collaborate throughout the design process, which allows for earlier detection and correction of flaws and errors.
  • Changes made in one segment of the design-to-manufacturing process are immediately reflected everywhere in all imaging, specifications and documentation—and are immediately available to all teams.

Benefits like these add up to smoother, more productive, more efficient interactions between all members of your product development process, including easier hand-offs, fewer reworks and faster time to completion. That makes your development process more accurate, efficient and cost-effective than ever before, resulting in better-quality products and a shorter time-to-market.

SOLIDWORKS Professional includes these essential add-ins:

  • CircuitWorks for integration of electrical and mechanical designs
  • eDrawings Professional for easy sharing of 3D and 2D designs across a wide range of file and format types
  • PDM Standard for optimizing and managing project data, including files, variations, imagery, notes and documentation
  • Visualize Standard to generate photo-quality renderings of designs, enabling the most accurate representation possible of the final product without prototyping.

Learn more about the add-ins below:

CircuitWorks: Integrating electrical and mechanical design

Mechanical and electrical designers often face competing priorities and challenges. It can be difficult to integrate their work while maintaining the optimal quality of each. CircuitWorks™ helps to bridge the gap between these divergent disciplines, enabling electrical and mechanical designers to effortlessly share, compare, update, and track electrical design data. This heads off ECAD-MCAD integration problems and enables closer collaboration to better create complex designs and resolve issues.

CircuitWorks

CircuitWorks

CircuitWorks enables you to quickly create and refine electronic designs, including PCB diagrams, and maintain company standards via an extensive built-in library of 3D electrical components. Users can import electronic design data in a broad variety of formats, create and compare different board iterations, integrate design change notes, conduct electronic cooling analyses, accommodate mechanical design requirements (such as heights, slots, mounting and component locations) in electronic design specifications, and track all changes throughout the mechanical and electronic design processes. Taken together, these capabilities result in shortened development time frames, reduced costs, and higher product quality.

The clearest picture: eDrawings Professional

Chances are that all of your team members and key stakeholders aren’t all located under one roof—or even necessarily on one continent. That’s when eDrawings® Professional comes in especially handy. eDrawings enables your complex designs to be easily packaged as 3D and 2D formats, ready to be emailed, viewed, reviewed and revised wherever you need them to be.

eDrawings Professional

eDrawings Professional

Using eDrawings Professional, you can view native SOLIDWORKS files, as well as a wide range of other formats, including DWG/DXF™, 3DXML, Creo, Pro/ ENGINEER® and STL files. You can also view simulation results and SOLIDWORKS model animations, gaining insight into part performance and behaviors not visible in static images.

eDrawings Professional also lets you measure, mark up and add comments to shared files. Password protection enables you to safeguard your IP from unwelcome eyes, and the eDrawings for IOS app enables them to be safely and accurately viewed on a variety of today’s most popular phones and tablets. It all adds up to a great tool for effective teamwork—across miles, time zones or entire continents.

PDM Standard: Keeping project data under control, and putting it to work

Any engineer knows that the more moving parts a system has, the more opportunities there are for errors and malfunctions. SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard keeps your projects’ “moving parts”—the files, variations, imagery and documentation—firmly under control and strictly accounted for. PDM Standard serves as the guardian and librarian for all of your vital project data, making it easy to control, use and protect.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard

SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard

PDM Standard ensures permissions-based, secure access to files and information; files can be checked out, viewed or modified only by appropriate personnel at the appropriate time. Workflow notifications provide alerts to managers when files are accessed, modified or have their status changed. Powerful search capabilities make it easy to locate and access related files, and seamless Windows® integration makes the system extraordinarily easy to use. Your team can easily and securely collaborate within the SOLIDWORKS ecosystem, whether from across the room or across continents—and you can still be sure of absolute data security and integrity, with complete version control—all within a system that’s easy to deploy, learn and use.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard: What you see is really what you get

Shared understanding is centered around a shared vision—literally. SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard provides a powerful toolset for the creation of photo-quality images, bringing designs out of the 2D plane and into vivid, visible life. While eDrawings Professional enables your team members to get the clearest possible technical view of your design, Visualize Standard delivers an experiential view of it as a completed, real-world product. Short of a physical prototype, Visualize Standard provides the best possible representation of how the finished product will look and function, thanks to sophisticated ray tracing and rendering capabilities that bring your designs to fully illuminated, textured, animated life.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard

Through Visualize Standard, nontechnical personnel such as sales, marketing or communications staff can get a more complete and clear understanding of your product, and get a jump start on their efforts to sell it, advertise it, or develop informational materials for it. The integrated Easy Mode makes learning and using SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard a breeze, helping you to create sophisticated marketing materials for print media and websites before your product is finished, enabling you to go to market faster than ever before.

SOLIDWORKS Professional: For the winning team

SOLIDWORKS Professional can optimize your team’s productivity—and supercharge your company’s success. Find out more about what the advanced collaborative and visualization capabilities of SOLIDWORKS Professional can do for you.

The post SOLIDWORKS Professional Package builds better teamwork and efficiency into the design-to-manufacturing process appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Dassault Systèmes at March 13, 2020 12:00 PM

March 12, 2020

SolidSmack

The YX ONE Electric Wheel Board Lets You Shred Off-road and Uphill

YX ONE Skateboard

If you’re a skateboarder like myself, you know how awesome it feels to fly down a hill. But you know what stinks? Going up that hill. With no momentum or pedal of any sort, skateboarders have little choice but to awkwardly push themselves up or (ugh) walk.

In an attempt to remedy the propulsion problem and take boards with wheels to the next level, designers from Dublin-based Moby Bikes are creating the YX One – an electric skateboard that can traverse all terrains, especially those pesky uphill slopes.

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The All-Terrain Wheel Skateboard

The YX One looks a little different than your average skateboard. In fact, it’s a bit of stretch to even compare it to one. For starters, it has three wheels: two 10-inch tires on the front and one 13-inch wheel at the rear. It’s closer to a Morgan 3 Wheeler in this regard.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">YX ONE Skateboard</figure>

Housed between the wheels is a rear-wheel motor that connects to a single control handle with brake and speed control switch. This 750w motor is powered by 48-volt, lithium-ion batteries which allow the skateboard to go up to 25 mph (40km/h) and up to 37 miles (60km) on a single charge.

The limits change depending on the rider’s weight and terrain traversed so expect to shred longer and further on even terrain and shorter when going up and around a mountainside.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">YX ONE Skateboard</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">YX ONE Skateboard</figure>

Depending on what kind of ride you want, you can also set the YX One to one of three power modes. The first is for more precise turns and movement with the other two modes allowing for better balance at higher speeds.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">YX ONE Skateboard</figure>

The handle, while sticking out quite a bit, provides stability and adds a number of capabilities. Hitting a button on the edge of the handle, for instance, activates the disk brakes, something you’ll want when moving at 25 mph (40 km/h).

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">YX ONE Skateboard</figure>

The handle also provides acceleration. A speed switch at the front of the handle allows you to change the aforementioned power modes, changing the way the YX One moves and how it handles.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">YX ONE Skateboard</figure>

Lastly, it provides control. Since you’ll be moving much faster than a normal skateboard, the handle allows you to exert a downward force onto the YX One. This lets you tilt the board in the direction you want to go much faster while still keeping your weight centered.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">YX ONE Skateboard</figure>

The History of the Wheel Board

Before it was commercialized, the YX One was the brainchild of one Israeli inventor, Eyal Aloni. Eager to share his love for snowboarding and windsurfing to us landlubbers, Eyal created what he called a “tilt board” – a much wider skateboard with a similar three-wheel feature and control handle of the YX One.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">YX ONE Skateboard</figure>

After years of prototyping and selling his boards locally, he decided to share his invention with the world. Thus, the YX One was born.

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</figure>

The YX One has already reached its funding goal on Indiegogo and is currently undergoing pre-production. If all goes well, the all-terrain wheel board will be available in July 2020. Price? The retail price was set at $2300 with earlybird discounts between $1108 and $1385. A bit higher than other all-terrain electric options, but a bit more power too.

Full specs and features can be found on both the YX One Indiegogo page and their official website.

The post The YX ONE Electric Wheel Board Lets You Shred Off-road and Uphill appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 12, 2020 10:13 PM

How Shapeways Really Runs A 3D Print Service

shapeways 3d printing business

Matt Boyle is the VP of Engineering at Shapeways and, in a recent post from him on StackOverflow, reveals some of the methods the company uses to provide high-speed, global 3D print services. 

Shapeways History

Shapeways has been one of the longest-running 3D print services available to the public. They launched in the Netherlands long ago, even before the advent of desktop 3D printing when the patents started expiring in 2009. Their initial strategy was to allow consumers to request printed parts instead of attempting to operate complex 3D printers themselves. 

Over time Shapeways introduced “stores” for artists to market their designs, and thus drive more 3D printing activity for their back end infrastructure. However, as the consumer 3D printing craze ebbed, Shapeways has more recently been focusing on industrial 3D printing applications, although still supporting their original consumer base. 

I visited Shapeways’ Brooklyn site in 2013, but it’s likely changed significantly since then. Probably I should arrange for another visit. 

That visit revealed the secrets behind Shapeways, which included the revelation that submitted 3D models are often unprintable and had to be inspected by humans and sometimes sent back to the requestor for redesign. 

Today’s Shapeways

Boyle explains three steps are taken upon job submission, validation, pricing, and repair: 

“Model validation services are charged with validating that the model can be printed in the first place. These checks make sure that the file is valid, that we can process it, and that the model is manifold—water-tight. Pricing calculation services are responsible for generating pricing components of our models, including but not limited to volume, part count, and surface area. Finally, fixing services help us repair our customer models and ensure that they’re printable. This includes steps like repairing meshes, decimating models to reduce triangle counts, and fixing inverted matrices on the model.”

It seems that Shapeways has optimized this process through cloud automation. They developed a kind of “pipeline” through which the countless requests flow through these steps toward production. Boyle adds:

“Once we implemented these services, we had to string them together into what we call a Model Processing Pipeline. This pipeline is a chain of the services described above that takes in a 3D file at the start and outputs a fully priced, printable, rendered 3D Model on Shapeways.com. We defined these pipelines in another service called the Director, which is effectively a directed acyclic graph of model processing services.”

This happens automatically and the result is displayed in 3D for the requestor. However, Boyle explains that typical web-based 3D viewers require the entirety of the 3D model to be passed along, which could provide an opening for the bad guys to intercept the 3D model and copy it. To counteract this threat, Shapeways had to design their own safe 3D viewer, using a new tool they designed called ShapeJS. 

Shapeways Production

Boyle reveals the size of current Shapeways operations: 

“Shapeways has two 3D printing facilities running around 80 machines in total, a supply chain network of over 70 production partners for overflow and special materials, and a global distribution footprint. We process over 10,000 individual (and often unique) parts through our system on a daily basis. In order to coordinate all of this activity, we’ve built an Enterprise Resource Planning (or ERP) tool, Inshape, from the ground-up, focused on the unique challenges presented by 3D printing.”

It seems that Shapeways also built its own specialized “packaging program”. This is a system that accepts a series of customer 3D models and “packs” them into the build volume of the industrial 3D printers used by the company. This is a very important technology because it allows each print run to maximize revenue by getting as many customer requests into each job. 

This is a non-trivial problem, as Shapeways has the problem of mixing customer parts within the same job. Tiny parts, for example, could easily be confused with others. Thus one solution I saw during my visit was the creation of temporary “cages” that would hold a group of parts together. These would be 3D printed and then discarded after the parts group was removed. 

The business of a 3D printing service is now highly complex, and to make it most profitable, much must be automated. It seems that Shapeways has done so. 

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post How Shapeways Really Runs A 3D Print Service appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at March 12, 2020 09:15 PM

Coronavirus Cabin Fever Got You Down?

Working from home? Need something to fill the gaps? Maybe you should take some initiative and learn something new. Maybe surfacing. Or maybe you’re just interested in some advanced techniques…

by matt at March 12, 2020 09:02 PM

The Javelin Blog

3D Printing with PLA Tips and Tricks

A thermoplastic made from renewable resources, PLA helps you produce design concepts quickly and economically in 11 different colour options. Benefit from the speed of fast-draft mode on the Stratasys F123 Series, and keep material expenses down. PLA offers fast printing, good tensile strength and a high stiffness ratio. Plus its low melting point and HDT mean less heat and power required to print parts.

3D printed PLA parts

3D printed PLA parts

These tips and tricks are designed to help you create better and more stable parts using PLA materials on the Stratasys F123™ Series 3D Printer (F170, 270, and 370).

Part Design

Thin-walled parts are not optimal with the use of PLA, especially ones that only get a single contour of toolpath generated as there is an issue with the open seams. Therefore, creating parts thick enough to get a double contour and hiding the start will print as expected.

Processing Guidelines

Most PLA parts are designed to be printed without support so don’t be afraid to use the “base only” support option.

When using PLA support the following tips are useful:

  • Using linked contours are best since they hide the start of a toolpath, which may be under-extruded.
  • Avoid using support when building small features. PLA can generally bridge one inch fairly well and small overhangs without support.
  • In the event a part fails because it popped off the substrate or support base, reorient the part in Insight™ or GrabCAD Print™ and increase the surface area.
  • Support removal is easy on large flat areas and increases the surface area of the part to tray, therefore increasing adhesion.

Packing Guidelines

You can print many parts in a single build so fill the tray. This may increase the time between layers, but will make support removal easier. If you have a part with small or detailed features, try building this part by itself or as a pack of the multiple parts that are the same.

System Preparation

Trays can be reused, especially when there is a large amount of surface area between the base and the tray. However, note that the adhesion decreases with each use. When printing a critical part always use a fresh build tray.

Support Removal

Use the knife/scraper to get between largest areas of part and support for cleaner and easier support removal.

TIP: Necessary tools – pliers, knife or scraper

When removing support, if you are having trouble getting it to pop off the tray, try a different side as different areas of the part may have higher adhesion than others (likely around seams).

TIP: When printing a square block, the first side’s base may not remove easily. Turn the part 90 deg and try to remove from that side. When printing a cylinder, try turning in 20 degree increments until you hit an area where the base removes easily.

Don’t try support removal on parts that are freshly printed (<60 seconds) as the model could still be warm and is more likely to deform. Same for parts that trigger – Minimum Layer Timer or are solid. Give them more time to cool or you risk deforming the parts when you handle them.

The post 3D Printing with PLA Tips and Tricks appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Stratasys Ltd. at March 12, 2020 12:00 PM

March 11, 2020

SolidSmack

eMachineShop Adds Free, Online 3D File Viewing & Sharing (No Signup Req’d)

free 3d file step viewer sharing

Yep, you’re right. I just double-checked. It is, in fact, 2020. How easy is it to view and share 3D models online? Well, easier — we’ve made a lot of progress over the last decade — but you would think viewing and sharing photorealistic 3D models would be common and incredibly easy.

Until it gets easier, we’ll prep our models properly and take the little 3D sharing wins when we have them.

Online STEP File Viewer

One such win is a new, free online STEP file viewer from eMachineShop. eMachineShop is more commonly known for, well, their machine shop services — 3D printing, CNC machining, sheet metal, and injection molding — and their free eMachineShop CAD software.

Now, they’re complementing their free product and paid services with a simple viewer that breaks the barrier of sharing 3D models quickly online. You simply visit the site, upload your model (from your computer, Google Drive, Dropbox, or URL) and click Share to grab a link, QR Code, or embed code to share it with whomever you like. That… is simple.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Upload and go. The eMachineShop STEP file viewer.</figcaption></figure>

Is it high quality? As you can see in my duct example above the surfaces are extremely tessellated for curved surfaces but machined parts look much better. You can see many, many examples in their STEP File Viewer Gallery.

Is it secure? Not in the slightest. The STEP file can be downloaded by anyone, anywhere it is shared, whether you intend to or not. They do allow the option to ‘Delete from server’ or ‘Request Takedown’ but that is the extent of the protection.

What it is, is free, simple viewing and sharing of 3D models, STEP files specifically. It doesn’t require that you sign up with eMachineShop or even use their product or services. And the practical side is that I can upload an item I need to be manufactured, and share it with the team, a machinist, or other departments.

Could the viewer have more features? Yup. I’d at least suggest re-tessellation options or just higher tessellation on import for models with curves, but for the ability to upload and share quickly, it works great.

What I think more interesting is how they’re using it to complement their other product and service. Their Viewer is free and their CAD product is free, but it facilitates the use of their paid manufacturing services with the option to ‘Get a Quote’ built into both free products.

Of course, this isn’t the only free, online STEP viewer, or 3D model viewer for that matter, or the first to offer dynamic price quotes. What sites/services have you used or do you use for online file viewing?

The post eMachineShop Adds Free, Online 3D File Viewing & Sharing (No Signup Req’d) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 11, 2020 11:09 PM

Making a Sharp Knife From The Hardest Wood in the World

lignum vitae wood knife

YouTube creator Kiwami Japan is famous for making hand-made knives using materials that odd, rare, and not exactly sharp to begin with. He’s made knives out of Amazon boxes, aluminum foil, and even family-friendly gelatin.

In another one of his fascinating videos, he makes a knife from a single piece of solid wood. And not just any wood, mind you; this particular knife is made from Lignum Vitae.

What is Lignum Vitae?

The Roughbark Lignum Vitae tree, native to the Caribbean and northern coast of South America, is known to be one of the heaviest and hardest woods on the planet, living up to a group of woods nicknamed ‘Ironwood’. Lignum Vitae registers 4,500 pounds-force (lbf) on the Janka Hardness Scale, over twice that of Bois d’arc (Osage orange) wood, a more common hardwood in North America. The reason it isn’t as well-known as more popular wood types, like oak or pine, is that it’s slow-growing, heavy, and very hard to work with.

Its difficult workability is evidenced by Kiwami’s efforts to make a single knife. Let’s go through the process.

1. Cut the Basic Shape of the Knife

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lignum vitae wood knife</figure>

Using a Japanese Pull Saw (or Ryoba) he cuts the wood to length, then trims a thin section off each side and a sharp angle cut on the front to create the thin blade portion of the knife. The sawing process is all done by hand taking much more time than cutting normal wood.

2. Sand it Smooth

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lignum vitae wood knife</figure>

It wouldn’t be a Kiwami Japan knife video without the sanding and sharpening process. He starts by rough-sanding the sides with an 80-grit piece before working his way up to 120-grit sandpaper. He also sands the handle of the knife to make the edges smoother and easy to grip. Finally, the sharp edge of the blade, a chisel grind (or single edge angle – common among Japanese culinary knives), gets an initial 80-grit sanding before having a 320-grit sanding, then a 600-grit sanding.

3. Sharpen the Blade

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lignum vitae wood knife</figure>

With the knife shaped and initial blade grind completed, the final sharpening is done. Four whetstones passes are used: 6,000-grit, 8,000-grit, 12,000-grit, and finally, 30,000-grit. The consecutive passes work together to smooth the wooden blade and prepare it for the final sharpening and polish.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lignum vitae wood knife</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lignum vitae wood knife</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lignum vitae wood knife</figure>

4. Strop it Sharp

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

For the final step, the blade is stropped on a stropping paddle lined with a thin piece of leather. One of the best things you can do to keep an edge on your knife is to strop it when it gets the least bit dull.

5. Slice and Dice

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lignum vitae wood knife</figure>

After stropping the knife, the Lignum Vitae knife is ready to go! It slices, it dices, it shaves, and can even cut through a plastic water bottle.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lignum vitae wood knife</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lignum vitae wood knife</figure>

Though the blade is obviously thicker than metal and made of heavy wood, it gets the job done when put through Kiwami Japan’s infamous vegetable cutting tests. What’s most interesting in this whole process is how regular knife making tools and techniques were successfully used to shape, hone, and sharpen the wood blade.

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</figure>

Kiwami Japan has hundreds of knife making videos on his YouTube channel in which he takes unconventional materials and turns them into works of knife-making art.

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The post Making a Sharp Knife From The Hardest Wood in the World appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 11, 2020 10:00 PM

Have You Ever…

Did you ever get into a surfacing project and run into a problem you didn’t know how to solve? This is why the Surfacing Episode has been written. There are…

by matt at March 11, 2020 03:02 PM

The Javelin Blog

Is there a Free Tool available to View, Measure & Print DWG / DXF Files?

At the end of last year DraftSight Standard switched from being a Free Tool to an Annual Subscription product. DraftSight is only US$99 a year (which you can purchase directly from DS) but this left a gap in the market for a free DWG Viewer that allows you to view, print, and interrogate DWG or DXF files. But DS actually also provides a Free DWG / DXF Viewer in the form of the eDrawings Viewer.

With the eDrawings Viewer you can:

  • Load DWG and DXF files
  • Pan, zoom and view drawing files
  • Turn Layers on and off
  • Measure lines, arcs, points, and other entities in a DWG or DXF file
eDrawings Viewer

eDrawings Viewer

Supported AutoCAD File Types

For viewing, printing and measuring .dxf files and .dwg files the eDrawings Viewer supports the following file types:

  • DXF and DWG files up to AutoCAD® 2018.
  • AutoCAD fonts (SHX), if AutoCAD is installed. Otherwise the text is rendered in a default Simplex font.
  • Images and OLE objects in DWG files.
  • If you import a DXF/DWG file that has external references (XREFs), eDrawings tries to automatically resolve the XREF. If the XREF cannot be resolved, the Resolve XRef dialog box appears.
    • Click Skip file to import the DXF/DWG file without the XREF file, or navigate to the XREF file, select it
    • Then click Open to open it.

Turning Layers on and off

The eDrawings Layers pane lists the layers included with the document in the graphics area. The initial state of layer display reflects how documents were saved in the original document.

Resaving documents in eDrawings saves the layers in their initial state.

Hidden annotations and dimensions and empty layers are included. Layer states apply to the whole document, not by sheet or view. Markups capture the state of the layers, so if a markup is retrieved, layers are displayed as they were when the markup was created. Shaded data for components in assemblies is published with the layer data.

To hide or show layers:

  1. Click the Layers icon.
  2. Select or clear the named layers in the Layers pane.
eDrawings DWG Layers

eDrawings DWG Layers

Measuring DWG entities

The Measure tool measures exact dimensions in part, assembly, and drawing documents. Callouts display results, including the type of measurement, the value, and units.

On the Measure pane, you can:

  • Set selection filters. If you do not select a filter, all entities are available for measurement.
  • Change the units.
  • Select the entities that you want to measure e.g. from point to point or line entities as shown in the image below.
eDrawings DWG Measure

eDrawings DWG Measure

What if I need to edit DWGs?

If you need to edit rather than view, print or measure DWGs then you will need to purchase a license of DraftSight Standard. You can also obtain a 30 day trial of DraftSight Premium.

Get the FREE eDrawings Viewer

Download the FREE SOLIDWORKS eDrawings Viewer software to view, print, and review all types of eDrawings files. In addition, the eDrawings viewer is a free:

  • AutoCAD® Viewer (DWG and DXF)
  • SOLIDWORKS® Viewer parts, assemblies, and drawings.

Download eDrawings

The post Is there a Free Tool available to View, Measure & Print DWG / DXF Files? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at March 11, 2020 12:00 PM

March 10, 2020

SolidSmack

The Simple Process to Turn An Old Beer Keg Into A Badass Barbecue Grill

beer keg bbq

If you still have some of those old beer kegs from your college days, then you must really have a penchant for nostalgia. “Those things will come in handy someday.” Oh, I know, and I’ve got the PERFECT project.

Apart from smelling like decades-old beer, those things are heavy, take up a lot of space, and, as maker/creator The Q shows us, are the perfect size for a portable, backyard barbecue grill.

All you need to turn your keg into a meat grill is a good electric saw, some hinges, a drill, a few metal poles, and a little bit of creativity. Let’s take a look.

1. Cut Your Party Keg in Half

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">beer keg bbq</figure>

Start by cutting the beer keg in half. You’ll reconnect these two pieces later using a couple of hinges but first, you’ll need to

2. Drill Holes for Hinge, Legs and Handle

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">beer keg bbq</figure>

Drill six holes for each hinge (three on each side of the cut line) to connect the hinges. Pro tip: Use the hinge as a template. On the bottom half, drill four larger holes to install metal tubing for the grill’s legs. Locate holes at one end, just off-center to add a chain that holds the lid open. On the top half, in the center just above the cut line, drill two additional holes for a grill handle. On the bottom half, add two more holes in the front and two in the back to hold the grill. Drill one final hole up top which will be used to install a thermometer. These Titanium Step drill bits come in handy for the range of holes you’ll need.

3. Prime and Paint the Exterior

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">beer keg bbq</figure>

Whether you’re going for a Coca-Cola motif or something else, mask off any part you don’t want to paint. Use a base layer of Rust-Oleum primer spray paint, then follow with the color of your choice. The red looks nice, doesn’t it?

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">beer keg bbq</figure>

4. Attach the Hardware

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">beer keg bbq</figure>

Once the paint has dried, remove the tape and stencil to begin assembling the grill. If you don’t have steel tubing, all-thread rod comes in handy for the legs. Attach the lid with the hinges, then chain on the end and the handle up front.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">beer keg bbq</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">beer keg bbq</figure>

5. Cook Your Meats

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">beer keg bbq</figure>

As advertised, this is an actual working grill. You can cook or burn various foods, depending on your grill skills and boast how you made your own grill from that old vintage beer keg that’s been laying in your garage. Here’s the quick play-by-play of the build:

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</figure>

To check out more of The Q’s DIY builds, his YouTube channel is definitely the place to be.

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by Carlos Zotomayor at March 10, 2020 08:47 PM

Spring Is (Almost) Here. Make This Wi-Fi Camera Birdhouse

It’s highly likely that no fewer than 57 birds are watching, spying, and scheming against you at any moment of the day. All those conspiracies about avian cabal plots are between 0.5 and 1.2% true, so it only makes sense that we turn the tables and use our superior technology to divert any impending economic collapse brought on by the sly fowl.

Jude Pullen is always one step ahead and has the solution to 1) observe birds raising indoctrinating their young and 2) work out those weekend project muscles with a project the kids will enjoy too. So, how’s it done?

Well, if you’ve discovered your neighborhood birds are onto you, you may have priced game cameras or birdhouse cameras going for as much as $100. However, in one of his latest projects, Jude shares how to make your own DIY Wi-Fi Camera Bird Box, and do it on the chirp… Uhm, CHEAP.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

DIY Wi-Fi Birdhouse with Camera

Jude has a long history in product design and one thing I love about the guy is his unconventional approach to finding solutions and relating it in practical terms anyone can understand. With a few items and some super clever hacks, he shares how to create a wi-fi birdhouse, along with some variations that provide various other options for viewing your nesting friends.

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</figure>

1. Upgrade Bird Box to Add Perch

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

Jude worked with his son, adding a perch to the bird box, because what bird is just gonna fly into a dark hole? Grab your drill and a dowel rod and add a perch to that lil’ ol’ bird box.

2. Use 3 ml Syringe for Camera Mount

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

Sure, you could just jam a camera up in the bird box, but Jude’s approach is much sleeker and serves multiple purposes. A standard 3 ml syringe is just the right size for the camera he’ll use, plus it can be sealed up when not in use. Trim at the 2.5 ml or just a little longer than the thickness of wood where you’ll place the camera.

3. Drill the Hole for the Camera

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

You could put the hole anywhere, but Jude centers it over the nesting area, drilling with a 10mm drill bit perpendicular to the floor of the bird box. The syringe piece (with the fingerholds) is glue into place from underneath.

4. Insert and Align the Camera

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

So what camera does he use? It’s an HD wireless endoscope. You may even have one in your toolset. They’re super handy and, it just so happens, perfectly fits the inside diameter of the 3 ml syringe.

Those are the basic steps, but Jude provides a lot more instruction, more photos, and more variations to try out on the Wi-Fi Camera Bird Box Instructable where he’s posted the items and tools he’s used along with the step-by-step. Check it out along with his other Instructables!

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by Josh Mings at March 10, 2020 07:11 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Term (Rent) License vs Perpetual License you own

SOLIDWORKS Term Licensing is a licensing option that lowers the upfront cost of SOLIDWORKS software and allows for more flexible deployment options for start-ups, makers, consultants, contractors and businesses of any size.

Term Licensing is essentially renting a SOLIDWORKS License for a 3 month or 1 year term rather than purchasing a perpetual license which you own.

What is SOLIDWORKS Term Licensing?

Term Licensing is for individuals and companies that want access to SOLIDWORKS best-in-class design solutions with lower upfront costs compared to traditional perpetual licensing.

With a term license you can use SOLIDWORKS products with a quarterly subscription. A term license gives SOLIDWORKS users access to a variety of SOLIDWORKS applications with the same full version as a perpetual license — but with a flexible and affordable approach that’s easy on a software budget and easy to manage.

SOLIDWORKS Term License

Term License

Why choose a SOLIDWORKS Term License?

Term Licenses are ideal for companies that need to maximize their cash flow, this could include the following:

  • Licenses are required for short term projects or for the specific phase of a project where specific software such as simulation is needed to validate a design.
  • Licenses are to meet staffing requirements such as contract staff or intern that require SOLIDWORKS for a short time period.
  • new division or project has been initiated and cash-flow is a concern.
  • start-up/new business requires SOLIDWORKS software at the minimum cost to get started.
  • Term licenses are cost effective for a short period of time, note in the graph below that the cost of a term license is higher than a perpetual license at the 2 – 3 year mark.
SOLIDWORKS Term License vs Perpetual License

SOLIDWORKS Term License vs Perpetual License Cost over Time

SOLIDWORKS Products available for a Term

There is a broad range of SOLIDWORKS products available for a 3 month or 1 year term. Pick the links below for pricing:

SOLIDWORKS Term Licensing FAQs

Get answers to frequently asked questions below:

What are the minimum and maximum length Term licenses available?

Products are available for a 3-month or 1-year term.

Is a 1-month Term License available?

No, the minimum length is 3-months.

Do Term Licenses include a Grace Period?

Yes. Since customers are paying for the right to use SOLIDWORKS products for a specific amount of time, a grace period will be added to the expiration date to allow customers sufficient time to install their products and resolve any installation or licensing issues.

If I own a Perpetual License can I also add a Term License?

Yes. For instance if you have a SOLIDWORKS Premium license and you wanted to add SOLIDWORKS Simulation Premium for a 3-month period a term license could be purchased.

How many machines can be activated with a Term License?

A Term License may only be active on one machine. To move your software from your current computer to a new computer, you will have to use the license transfer functionality inside SOLIDWORKS (Help > Transfer License).

Can a Term License asset be transferred from one machine to another?

Yes. The transfer process is similar to Perpetual assets.

How are SOLIDWORKS Term License products installed?

Term products are installed like any other SOLIDWORKS standalone products. Customers need to run the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager and enter their Serial Number(s).

During the activation process, Term License products will only be activated for the length of the term license (3 months or 1 year + the appropriate grace period for initial purchase).

Do Term License products require internet access during the entire term commitment period or just during activation?

Term License products only need internet access during the activation process. If a product is installed on a computer that has no internet access, SOLIDWORKS can be activated by emailing the request file. This is similar to Perpetual licenses.

What services and level of support do SOLIDWORKS Term License customers get access to?

Term customers have access to the same benefits and services as SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service customers: Technical support, knowledge base, software upgrades and enhancements, customer portal and MySolidWorks.

But please note: these benefits are applicable only for the length of the term license and if customers want uninterrupted support, they only need to renew (or repurchase) their term license.

Does a term license include access to My.SolidWorks.com and if so, what version of MySolidWorks is included?

Yes, SOLIDWORKS CAD Term License customers have access to MySolidWorks Professional with one user per term license asset. All other Term License customers get access to MySolidWorks Standard.

Can customers using SOLIDWORKS Term License products collaborate with colleagues or customers using traditional Perpetual Licenses?

Yes. SOLIDWORKS Term License products are no different than their traditional perpetual license counterparts – the only exception being that the activation has an end date. Therefore all file formats are compatible and a company can use a mix of SOLIDWORKS Perpetual and SOLIDWORKS Term License products.

Are Customers entitled to SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard, SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard and SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard with a Term License of SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium?

Yes. Term customers enjoy the same benefits as SOLIDWORKS perpetual license customers, meaning SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard, SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard and SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard will be included with SOLIDWORKS Professional or SOLIDWORKS Premium Term Licenses. And in those instances, all products – SOLIDWORKS, Visualize Standard, PDM Standard and CAM Standard will all have the same expiration date.

Can I run a SOLIDWORKS Perpetual License Add-in product with a Term License of SOLIDWORKS?

Yes. You can run a perpetual license of an add-in with a Term License of SOLIDWORKS CAD as long as the term license of SOLIDWORKS is not expired and the add-in is licensed independently of SOLIDWORKS CAD or SOLIDWORKS Simulation.

For example, you can run a perpetual license of SOLIDWORKS Plastics with a Term License of SOLIDWORKS CAD. Similarly, you can run a Term License of SOLIDWORKS Simulation with a perpetual license of SOLIDWORKS CAD. However, you cannot run a perpetual license of SOLIDWORKS Routing (Premium Add-in) with a Term License of SOLIDWORKS Standard.

Can a customer use SOLIDWORKS Standard on Term License if their company has an existing SOLIDWORKS PDM setup?

Yes.

Are Term Licenses available for Education, Research, or Global Licenses?

No. Currently EDU, Research, and Global Licenses are not available with Term Licensing.

Is Term Licensing available to both new and existing SOLIDWORKS customers?

Yes. Term Licensing is available to all new and existing SOLIDWORKS customers.

Are Term License products available for a Network License?

No. Term products are only available as single-user licenses.

Is Subscription Service optional with Term Licensing?

No, Term Licenses always include subscription.

Is Term Licensing Service Pack specific?

No.

Can a customer without active Subscription Service for a Perpetual license, order a Term License?

Yes.

Can Term License customers update to the next major version when available?

Yes. Customers are considered on subscription and have access to the same benefits and support as Perpetual License customers on subscription.

Can I renew my Term License by myself or do I need to contact Javelin?

Customers need to contact us to renew their Term License assets.

When can I renew a Term License product?

A customer can renew a Term License product at any time. The additional Term commitment period is added to the existing product End Date.

How many times can a Term License be renewed?

A Term License can be renewed indefinitely.

Is the Expiration or End Date calculated from the day the software is purchased, installed or activated?

The End Date is calculated based on the day the Purchase Order (PO) is placed in the system

The post SOLIDWORKS Term (Rent) License vs Perpetual License you own appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at March 10, 2020 12:00 PM

March 09, 2020

SolidSmack

3D Print This Master Sword to Keep Your Nintendo Switch Games Safe From Dust and Monsters

Master Sword 3D printed case

Despite being cheaper than the Xbox One or PlayStation 4, the place where the Nintendo Switch really gets your money is in the peripherals. Extra controllers, charging docks, and yes, even cartridge containers are sold separately from the base console and total just as much (if not more) than the Switch itself.

We’ve covered our fair share of money-saving Switch cartridge holders in the past, including a couple of LEGO containers – one which looks like a Nintendo GameCube and another resembling the Switch. What we haven’t seen, however, is a container based on the games we play. And folks, this one in AWESOME.

The Legend of Zelda is one of Nintendo’s most famous franchises, so it only makes sense that someone would take the game’s iconic Master Sword design and use it to 3D print a Switch cartridge holder:

“It’s dangerous to go alone! Take this!”

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/IEVXsusTiEM?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Made by YouTube channel Kickass 3D Prints and designed by Kris and Tasia of kDaesign on Etsy, this Master Sword is made from PLA and PETG. They recommend using an Ender 3 3D printer and gray Comgrow 1.75mm PLA Filament. The design is only seven parts and includes a sheath to protect the sword and the six Nintendo Switch cartridges which can be stored within.

If you include the sheath, the total length of the case comes in at 18.75 inches. The width of the handle measures 5.35 inches while the sheath’s width comes to a thinner 1.75 inches. The overall depth of the sword cartridge case is .75 inches. I’d prefer to make it bigger and, since

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Master Sword 3D printed case</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Master Sword 3D printed case</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Master Sword 3D printed case</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Master Sword 3D printed case</figure>

The parts are 3D printed first before being hand-assembled. Afterward, it’s simply a matter of painting the sword to match Zelda’s.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Master Sword 3D printed case</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Master Sword 3D printed case</figure>

One particular detail that requires some additional work is the grip. While its design has changed over the course of many games, the Master Sword has always had a grip wrapped with leather straps. As a budget build, however, a few lengths of string are wrapped and glued around the handle. (I’d definitely go for the leather look though.)

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Master Sword 3D printed case</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Master Sword 3D printed case</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Master Sword 3D printed case</figure>

After some hefty part gluing, the Master Sword is complete. You won’t slay any monsters with this sword anytime soon, but you’ll definitely havea kickass storage case for your games. You can check out more of Kickass 3D Prints’ geeky prints on the YouTube channel.

Head over to Thingiverse for the Master Sword cartridge holder files as well as the companion Hylian Shield 3D print files. If you don’t have a 3D printer and still want to get your hands on this, kDaesign has both available on their Etsy page. Oh, the shield design is up for a lil’ rework and will be out sometime before March 19, so keep an eye out for that.

Going to print it? Let us know in the comments!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post 3D Print This Master Sword to Keep Your Nintendo Switch Games Safe From Dust and Monsters appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 09, 2020 10:42 PM

The Javelin Blog

New Online SOLIDWORKS CAM Training Courses Now Available

This month two new SOLIDWORKS® CAM courses have been released. A SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard training course and a SOLIDWORKS CAM Professional training course.

SOLIDWORKS CAM is a fully integrated, Knowledge Based Machining (KBM) technology that allows you to integrate 3D design and manufacturing processes under one system; to evaluate designs earlier in the process to avoid unexpected costs and delays in finishing products on time.

SOLIDWORKS CAM Training

SOLIDWORKS CAM Training

SOLIDWORKS CAM leverages the rich content in the 3D CAD model to speed up product development and reduce error prone, time consuming, repetitive manual steps in the current development process, like programming CNC machines. Knowledge Based Machining (KBM) is the foundation for streamlining the programming process, learning as you program which frees up your time to focus on the critical areas of the components.

NOTE: SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard is an add-in to all versions of SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD software.

SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard Training

This course teaches how to use the SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard software to generate, modify and post process 2.5 axis milling toolpaths used for the machining of SOLIDWORKS part files. Lessons include:

  • Lesson 1: SOLIDWORKS CAM Basics and User Interface
  • Lesson 2: Automatic Feature Recognition (AFR) and Operation Modification
  • Lesson 3: Interactive Feature Recognition (IFR)
  • Lesson 4: Interactive Operations
  • Lesson 5: Merging Features and Operations
  • Lesson 6: Avoid and Contain Areas
  • Lesson 7: Pattern Features and Mirror Toolpaths
  • Lesson 8: Advanced Features and Operations
  • Lesson 9: Customizing the Technology Database

The training course is available to take live online and takes 5 Days (5 hours per day) to complete.

SOLIDWORKS CAM Professional Training

This course teaches how to use the SOLIDWORKS CAM Professional software to machine parts utilizing advanced functionality such as: CAM or SOLIDWORKS configurations, VoluMill™, mill machining in the context of an assembly, and 3 plus 2 machining. Additionally, the course teaches you how to generate, modify and post process 2 axis turning toolpaths used for the machining of SOLIDWORKS part files.

  • Lesson 1: SOLIDWORKS CAM Configurations
  • Lesson 2: High Speed Machining (VoluMill™)
  • Lesson 3: Assembly Machining
  • Lesson 4: 3 Plus 2 Machining
  • Lesson 5: Turning Basics
  • Lesson 6: Chucks, ID Features and Operations
  • Lesson 7: Modifying Feature and Operation Parameters
  • Lesson 8: Probing

The training course is also available to take live online and takes 4 Days (4 hours per day) to complete.

Upcoming courses

Check our training schedule for upcoming SOLIDWORKS CAM training or contact us about custom training solutions.

The post New Online SOLIDWORKS CAM Training Courses Now Available appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at March 09, 2020 04:17 PM

MySolidWorks Professional now includes ALL SOLIDWORKS eCourses

Starting February 6, 2020, DS are changing how SOLIDWORKS eCourses are offered. All SOLIDWORKS eCourses will be included with MySolidWorks Professional, and will no longer be offered for sale individually. Review the SOLIDWORKS eCourses available on MySolidWorks.

MySolidWorks Professional is available for users with an active SOLIDWORKS Subscription, and is an additional US$360 per year, per user.

MySolidWorks eCourses

MySolidWorks eCourses

SOLIDWORKS eCourse Library

Choose from the following 17 courses:

  • Creating Animations using SOLIDWORKS
  • SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation
  • Mold Design Using SOLIDWORKS
  • SOLIDWORKS Routing: Piping & Tubing
  • SOLIDWORKS Routing: Electrical
  • Sheet Metal
  • Weldments
  • Surface Modeling
  • SOLIDWORKS API Fundamentals
  • API Fundamentals of SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional
  • SOLIDWORKS File Management
  • SOLIDWORKS Plastics
  • SOLIDWORKS Simulation Premium: Dynamics
  • SOLIDWORKS Simulation Premium: Nonlinear
  • SOLIDWORKS Motion
  • SOLIDWORKS PCB Essentials
  • SOLIDWORKS Electrical: Schematics

FAQs for SOLIDWORKS eCourses

Here are answers to frequently asked questions about MySolidWorks Professional and SOLIDWORKS eCourses:

Q) What are SOLIDWORKS eCourses?

A) SOLIDWORKS eCourses are complete courses converted from the SOLIDWORKS instructor-led training manuals into self-paced eLearning. These courses employ professional-quality design, guided practice, offline exercises, and highly interactive content.

Q) Are there other types of training offered through MySolidWorks?

A) Yes, SOLIDWORKS Lessons are short product video tutorials which provide a brief overview of product functionality.

Q) Beginning Feb 6, what training will be available to MySolidWorks Professional users? 

A) All SOLIDWORKS eCourses and all SOLIDWORKS Lessons will be available to MySolidWorks Professional users.

Q) Beginning Feb 6, what training content will be available to MySolidWorks Standard users?

A) All SOLIDWORKS Lessons will be available to MySolidWorks Standard users.

Q) Who is entitled to MySolidWorks Standard?

A) MySolidWorks Standard is available to all customers with a SOLIDWORKS Subscription or a SOLIDWORKS Term License.

Q) Beginning Feb 6, will individual SOLIDWORKS eCourses be available for sale as they are today?

A) No, SOLIDWORKS eCourses will no longer be available for sale as a 3 month subscription.

Q) What if I have already purchased a 3 month subscription to an individual SOLIDWORKS eCourse?

A) As a compliment to existing SOLIDWORKS eCourse users, access will be provided to all SOLIDWORKS eCourses for the duration of the original SOLIDWORKS eCourse subscription.

Compare MySolidWorks versions

Listed below are the features included with MySolidWorks Professional, Standard and Student versions.

Features Professional Standard Student
SOLIDWORKS Online Product Trial – try SOLIDWORKS anytime, anywhere, on any device…no install required Included Included Included
Search – Get answers to questions from across all SOLIDWORKS community resources. Included Included Included
Access Learning – SOLIDWORKS training videos. Included
1000+
Included
600+
Included
600+
Access to the SolidWorks Customer Portal, explore and search Advanced Forums, and the Knowledge Base. Included Included
Access to MySolidWorks Manufacturing Network which connects SOLIDWORKS users and reliable manufacturers with 3D Printing, Sheet metal, CNC Machining and Injection Molding capabilities. Included Included
Cloud File–Storage Services Share large design files via Dropbox, OneDrive, Box, Google Drive, etc. View your CAD files online with eDrawings. Included Included
Access to My VAR provides you with Javelin content feeds for SOLIDWORKS blogs, videos, news, and a schedule of upcoming events. Included Included
Access and search Software Performance Reports (SPRs), online help, and more Included Included
Get certified with SOLIDWORKS with access to CSWA Certification Prep Courses Included Included Included
Get certified with extensive access to ALL certification prep courses including CSWP, CSWE, & CSWPA Included
SOLIDWORKS eCourses are complete courses converted from the SOLIDWORKS instructor-led training manuals into self-paced eLearning Included
Value For users with active SOLIDWORKS subscription. $360 per year, per user Included with SOLIDWORKS Subscription or SOLIDWORKS Term License Included with an active Student Engineering Kit (SEK) and Student Edition (SWSE) Licenses
Access Access Access

The post MySolidWorks Professional now includes ALL SOLIDWORKS eCourses appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at March 09, 2020 12:00 PM

March 06, 2020

The Javelin Blog

The Critical Business Issues that High Tech Companies need to focus on

Understand the opportunities and threats that high tech companies face in their industry, and learn how to solve them.

It is a very exciting time for the high tech industry. Companies have a lot of opportunities to innovate with options such as smart and connected products. At the same time, the market moves at a rapid pace. To add further complexity, design trends such as miniaturization create unique challenges for high-tech companies.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gp-bTzkTwRk?feature=oembed" title="Shred-tech Rips Through Competition with Innovative Products and Solidworks Electrical" width="500"></iframe>

By supporting excellent collaboration with an integrated ECAD/MCAD design environment, companies can overcome many challenges. To address the top critical business issues facing the industry, Tech-Clarity has identified the following six critical business issues high tech companies should focus on:

  • Take cost out
  • Avoid quality problems
  • Enable Higher Productivity and Operational Agility
  • Facilitate Innovation
  • Ensure Performance and Reliability
  • Comply with Environmental and Regulatory Requirements

Complete the form to download the White Paper and learn how your company can solve high tech’s top six critical business issues.

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The post The Critical Business Issues that High Tech Companies need to focus on appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at March 06, 2020 01:00 PM

March 05, 2020

SolidSmack

Wacom Just Dropped a Discount Bomb. Creativity Explosion in 3, 2, 1…

Your carpal tunnel is about to have a sad face and you’re about to toss your mouse… set it aside at least. “NO! TOSS IT!” Ok, ok, throw that punk out the nearest window. Why? Wacom just dropped a discount bomb, launching its Spring Sale event, on Intuos and Cintiq tablets along with other deals on refurbished devices and accessories.

The deals include:

You can snag the deals above or visit their spring sale page to see all the tablets on sale. You’ll likely have sales tax added, but 5-10 day ground shipping (in the US) is free. There’s no end date specified but it is ‘for a limited time only’ and it looks like the Cintiq Pro is (just now!) out of stock, so hurry yo’ creative bad self up.

The post Wacom Just Dropped a Discount Bomb. Creativity Explosion in 3, 2, 1… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 05, 2020 04:51 PM

Curves and the Flex Feature

SolidWorks terminology gets all messed up when they start talking about “curves”. They have formal curve features, which include Projected Curve, Composite Curve, XYZ Curve, Reference Points Curve, Helix/Spiral. But…

by matt at March 05, 2020 04:37 PM

SolidSmack

How to Make An Anatomically Correct Skull From A Billiard Ball

billiard ball skull

To be a good – nay, GREAT – artist or designer, you need to see the beauty in everything – a sunset, a yapping dog, a wad of lint. Some people make deceptive paper sculptures. Others make wallets out of rocks. But no matter what they use, you can bet the end result is something truly unique and awesome.

Bobby Duke is one such maker who takes everyday objects and turns them into works of art. In one of his more recent projects, he takes an old billiard ball and carves it into an anatomically correct human skull sculpture:

After a quick conversation with Winston – his insightful skull reference – Bobby takes a marker, carves out some reference points, and begins cutting away with his rotary tool. He soon realizes that cutting a colored ball ends up dulling its color, so he decides to work with the infinitely cooler black 8 BALL instead. Time to grind.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">billiard ball skull </figure>

Bobby grinds down the outer layer of the ball to get the general shape and adds additional reference points, then grinds further to define the overall form. Like many sculptors, he uses a technique where he redraws reference points on the material. As more of the skull detail emerges, it helps with the more intricate details such as the eye holes, jawline, and teeth. Let’s have a look-see:

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">billiard ball skull</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">billiard ball skull</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">billiard ball skull</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">billiard ball skull</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">billiard ball skull</figure>

Smaller details require more precise tools, so Bobby switches out his tungsten carbide cutter for a couple of different-sized helical bits. These allow him to get right in there and drill the eyeholes, nose, and the other complex parts of the skull’s anatomy.

As he delves deeper into the sculpting process, Bobby relies less on his reference points and instead looks back and forth at Winston the skull (who is sadly off-screen) for inspiration.

With much of the form complete, he starts into the nitty-gritty of sculpting the finer details. Using even tinier bits on his rotary tool, Bobby grinds away at the nose area, jawline and, finally, the skull’s teeth.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">billiard ball skull</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">billiard ball skull</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">billiard ball skull</figure>

The teeth are especially difficult to sculpt because apart from being individually tiny, they also taper wider on top and get narrower as they reach the base.

After hollowing out the portion underneath the skull and adding a few more details, he starts sanding the skull: first with one of his diamond bits and then with sandpaper.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">billiard ball skull</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">billiard ball skull</figure>

To give the skull a little more of an authentic look, Bobby etches some sutures across the frontal portion of the skull. “Sutures?” Yes, those joints where your bone dome slides together after birth to protect your brain.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">billiard ball skull</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">billiard ball skull</figure>

Finally, he applies polish using a buffing wheel to make the whole thing look both menacing and freaking cool.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">billiard ball skull</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">billiard ball skull</figure>

Here’s the video that shows the process from start to finish.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HuDX96t_a_4?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Mr. Bobby Duke’s YouTube channel, Bobby Duke Arts, combines his unique sense of humor with his love of making DIY art projects. If you want to see him talk to himself and inanimate objects while he makes art, be sure to check it out!

The post How to Make An Anatomically Correct Skull From A Billiard Ball appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 05, 2020 02:55 PM

Swapping an NVIDIA Quadro RTX GPU in a Lenovo ThinkStation

I know what you’re waiting for. It’s been a long day. Co-workers are finishing up their work, cleaning the sweat from their keyboard and tidying up that cubicle for the day that awaits them tomorrow. You? You’re waiting until everyone leaves. Because, once they do, you can SWAP OUT THAT GPU, BABY!

And not just any old GPU, a new NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000 – 288 Tensor cores, 36 RT cores, and 8 gigabitties of GPU Memory. We’ll be replacing a P4000 in a Lenovo ThinkStation, a ThinkStation P520 to be exact, a mid-range workstation that’s VR-ready and able to take on all the complex modeling, rendering, and animation tasks you can throw at it. We’ll be making it even better though with a new Quadro RTX GPU/graphics card.

We’ve got it boiled down into 10 basic steps you can finish up in all of about 10 minutes. So, let’s get started.

But, Before You Start!

Update! (Highly recommended) As noted by the venerable Al Dean in the comments, before you power down and begin your GPU swapping shenanigans, it is highly recommended that you uninstall the dang display driver for your old GPU. Yeah, yeah, there are all sorts of, “You don’t have to uninstall, but…” arguments. Suffice it to say, just uninstall it quickly for that shiny, clean GPU install feeling. Al recommends DDU. Done? Now, let’s get started.

Tools:

  • Phillips-head, right-angle screwdriver
  • Hands

Steps:

1. Remove the Cover from the Desktop Tower

Depending on the workstation you have, you may need various power tools or only your hands to remove the cover. Lenovo has made it easy to access the desktop internals with a quick flip-out latch handle that makes it super simple to pop right off.

2. Release the PCIe Card Latch

Again, very simple. Gently lift/pull and rotate the latch outward toward the rear of the computer.

3. Disconnect the Installed GPU Connector

Pressing the tab at the top of the connector, pull gently to remove the connector from the installed GPU.

4. Disengage the PCIe Card Retaining Latch

This is the small latch at the back of the computer where the GPU attaches to the motherboard. Gently flip the latch toward the front of the computer. It doesn’t move much, but you’ll now be able to…

5. Open the Front Fan Assembly Latch

Ah, thought it was time to remove the card? Well first, flip the switch (with the little red arrowhead) on the front fan assembly, down toward the bottom of the computer. Now you can…

6. Remove the GPU from the Computer

This is a two-hand job. Grip each end of the graphics card with your fingers. It works better to wiggle it out of the slot than trying to pull straight out. Gently lil’ wiggle it until it’s out of the slot. Then remove it from the tower.

Note: Your old card may be attached with a screw on the backside of the computer. If so, the right-angle phillips-head screwdriver will come in handy here.

7. Swap the Card Retainer

Remove the three screws from the old graphics card and put it on the your new Quadro RTX card. NVIDIA cards have the same attach points so it goes very quick. If the screws are a little tight on the old graphics card, use the right-angle screwdriver to break loose.

8. Install the New Quadro RTX GPU

What we’ve all been waiting for. In reverse of removing the old card, gently slide in the retainer and position the card evenly over the PCIe slot. Give it a firm press into the slot. The card retainer should close once it’s completely in. If not, close it and you’re done.

9. Close the Front Fan Assembly Latch

Now you’re just working backward, reversing the steps you did early to remove the card. Find that latch at the bottom of the front fan assembly and flip the sucker back up to lock the retainer in place.

10. Attach the GPU Connector

Don’t miss this step! Grab the connector you removed from the old GPU, line it up with the attachment on the back of the GPU and gently slide it until the tab on top of the connector snaps onto the GPU.

And you’re done! Oh, you might want to put the cover back on. That would have made 11 steps though, which would just have been weird. The same process as taking it off but in reverse… you’ll figure it out.

Like this? Let us know in the comments! And if you have another process you would like to see broken down like this, let us know as well!

The post Swapping an NVIDIA Quadro RTX GPU in a Lenovo ThinkStation appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 05, 2020 02:15 PM

Essentium Introduces High Speed, Low-Cost Engineering Materials

essentium 3d printing engineering materials

Essentium announced a pair of new materials for its high-speed 3D printer. 

The Texas-based 3D printer manufacturer’s claim to fame is its highly engineered HSE series of 3D printers that can operate at 3D print speeds unseen in most other FFF devices. They are able to do so due to the precise engineering of the machine’s motion system, some of which they borrowed from prior experience with high-speed electronics fabrication gear. 

But just because the 3D printer’s motion system can rapidly move doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll get a successful 3D print. You must also have a material and material profile to match. 

Slower 3D print speeds are more forgiving, but as you raise the print speed — the speed at which the print head is moving — the material flow must match precisely in order to achieve a fully formed extrusion bead. This is one of the design dilemmas that faced Essentium when they seek to develop a high-speed 3D printer. 

Normal 3D print materials may be suddenly discovered to “misbehave” when subjected to extreme scenarios as would be encountered in the Essentium HSE series, and 3D printing might not be as successful. 

That’s why Essentium has been developing a set of materials specifically designed for use on their high-speed equipment. These materials, along with their associated print profiles, will successfully 3D print, even at high speeds. 

So far, Essentium has produced quite a range of material options, including: 

  • PCTG
  • PLA XTR
  • PA (Nylon)
  • PA-CF (Carbon fiber infused)
  • TPU 74D
  • PCTG ESD-safe
  • TPU 95A ESD-safe
  • TPU 80A ESD-safe
  • TPU 74A ESD-safe
  • High Temp PA ESD-safe
  • TPU 90A Flame Retardant
  • TPU 95A Low Friction
  • TPU 80A Low Friction
  • PEEK
  • High-Temperature PA
  • High-Temperature PA-CF (Carbon Fiber)

Now the company announced two more to add to their extensive materials collection: 

  • ABS
  • ULTEM AM9085F

ABS is a very well-known 3D printing material that now joins Essentium’s portfolio. Meanwhile, ULTEM is a powerful material that is high temperature-resistant, chemical resistant and very strong. This makes it ideal for aerospace applications where weight is a challenge. 

However, there’s a bit of a twist here. Essentium has taken steps to lower the costs of these materials. This is likely due to the findings in their surveys that indicated 3D printer operators believe the material cost is a significant barrier, and that closed material configurations are no longer desirable

We’ve learned that the pricing of the ABS material, which turns out to be SABIC CYCOLACTM MG94, will be priced as follows:

  • 750g: US$70.95
  • 2.5kg: US$235.95
  • 5kg: US$471.90

Their new ULTEM material, SABIC ULTEMTM 9085, is priced similarly: 

  • 750g: US$206.95
  • 2.5kg: US$689.95
  • 5kg: US$1,379.90

The ULTEM pricing might seem high as compared to the ABS pricing, but you must remember that ULTEM is a specialty material that usually carries an even higher price. It’s a great option for those seeking to print high-performance parts at high speed on Essentium’s HSE series.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Essentium Introduces High Speed, Low-Cost Engineering Materials appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at March 05, 2020 01:05 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM Hide When Sibling Parallel Transition is Chosen

What does the option “Hide when sibling parallel transition is chosen” do in SOLIDWORKS PDM?

Hide when sibling parallel transition is chosen

This option hides transitions after a commitment is made to enter a parallel transition.

In other words if there are two or more parallel transitions that can be chosen from this state, once one is chosen the other parallel transition will not be available as an option. Once you commit to a parallel transition you do not have the option of changing to the other parallel transition unless you revoke the approvals already made to the parallel transition that was chosen.

Note 3 ways to reach ‘Approved’ state from the ‘Under Edit’ state.

  1. Normal transition ‘Approvals Skipped’
  2. Parallel transition ‘Design Approval’
  3. Parallel transition ‘Admin Approval’

Workflow

All of these approvals will be shown before a choice is made, as shown below;

Change State Options

When ‘Hide when sibling parallel transition is chosen’ is not checked…

Transition Properties

… Then sibling parallel transitions will be shown when a parallel transition is chosen. In this case the ‘Design Approval’ parallel transition was chosen.

Change State Options

When ‘hide when sibling parallel transition is chosen’ is checked…

Change State Options

… Then sibling parallel transitions are hidden, as well as any other transitions from the source state.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Hide When Sibling Parallel Transition is Chosen appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at March 05, 2020 01:00 PM

March 04, 2020

SolidSmack

Felix Semper Makes Some Truly Mind-Boggling Paper Sculptures

You might not recall the man’s name, but you’ve surely seen his work somewhere online. Felix Semper, a self-taught Cuban-American artist whose claim to fame is sculpture, doesn’t sculpt wood or stone; he sculpts paper.

In a recent interview with WPBT2, he provided some insight into the process behind the paper sculpting that took him a year to perfect.

What I do, is take sheets of paper, individual sheets of paper, glue them in stacks, and then I cut them to about the size I think the sculpture is going to be, and then I start carving it. So, all this process is, is eliminating paper. It’s kinda like the original technique of sculpting but in a different method.

He has a painting studio and a separate sculpture studio where he creates his paper sculptures. Here’s a look at what that’s like in a short video Felix share of himself working in the sculpture studio:

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</figure>

Though he mostly works behind closed doors, the studio video gives you an idea of the approach (and mess) that goes into creating sculptures from layered chunks of paper. We just wish he would share a little more of this amazing process. He has also expanded from layers of glued paper to using layers of wood and other recyclable materials. The interview provides more context as to why they’ve been so popular (first 5 minutes):

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</figure>

You can find a collection of Felix Semper’s stretchable work at felixsemper.com. He has a few of his famous sculptures for sale. Currently, you can buy a Coke can, burger, or Campbell soup can but they’ll cost you about $3,000-4,000 a pop. To see the sculptures in all their paper-flexing glory, you should definitely check out his YouTube channel as well.

The post Felix Semper Makes Some Truly Mind-Boggling Paper Sculptures appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 04, 2020 08:43 PM

The Javelin Blog

Search within different variables using SOLIDWORKS PDM Quick Search

With the new Quick Search feature included in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020, it’s possible to search within multiple variables right from Windows Explorer;

SOLIDWORKS PDM Quick Search - Searching within multiple variables

SOLIDWORKS PDM Quick Search

By default, when searching using an AND or NOT operator, it will search for both values within the same variable.

In this example, we want to search all files for any parts that contain Brace in the Description variable AND Stainless Steel in the Material variable;

Brace AND Stainless Steel
Incorrect PDM search

Blank PDM search results

This search returns blank because none of the selected variables to search contain both values Brace and Stainless Steel

How to search in different variables using Quick Search

To search within different variables when using a AND or NOT operator requires a colon (:) prefix;

: Brace AND Stainless Steel
Correct search syntax

Correct search syntax

The post Search within different variables using SOLIDWORKS PDM Quick Search appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at March 04, 2020 01:00 PM

March 03, 2020

Making a Chain

The other day I was modeling this bicycle, and I was trying to remember how to make a chain. I’ve made chains before, and knew there was a hard way,…

by matt at March 03, 2020 09:13 PM