Planet SolidWorks

April 19, 2019

The Javelin Blog

How to include SOLIDWORKS files in the SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Content Search

After enabling the content search in SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional, by default the Windows Search Service supports indexing the following files types:

  • Microsoft Office files
  • HTML files
  • MIME messages
  • Plain-text files

We can include other file types by installing its corresponding third-party iFilter.  After a new iFilter is installed the archive must be reindexed to include the new file type in the content search.

Can we include SOLIDWORKS files in the content search?

Yes….kind of.  With the SOLIDWORKS iFilter installed on the indexing server, we are able to index content in SOLIDWORKS files, such as annotations in drawings and custom properties.  The exception is; that it doesn’t include dimension values in drawings (unless they are linked to a custom property).

Drawing Annotation can be indexed

Drawing Annotation can be indexed

How to include SOLIDWORKS files in the PDM Content Search

Step 1 – Add the SOLIDWORKS iFilter to the server running Windows Search

There is no standalone iFilter for SOLIDWORKS files available to install separately, but we can add one by installing SOLIDWORKS or just SOLIDWORKS Explorer on the server.

Install SOLIDWORKS Explorer on the server

Install SOLIDWORKS Explorer on the server

Step 2 – Add and check in some files for testing

Check in SOLIDWORKS files for testing

Check in SOLIDWORKS files for testing

Step 3 – Verify the iFilter is installed and rebuild the index

  • Control Panel > Indexing Options
Indexing Options

Indexing Options

  • Advanced > File Types Tab
    • Ensure the SOLIDWORKS entries exist
Ensure the SOLIDWORKS entries exist

Ensure the SOLIDWORKS entries exist

As the iFilter was added after the content search was set up, we’ll need to rebuild the indexes to include the SOLIDWORKS files;

  • Indexing Options
    • Advanced > Index Settings Tab
      • Hit Rebuild
Rebuild Index

Rebuild Index

NOTE: Before testing, we need to wait for the rebuild to complete, in larger vaults this may take some time;

Indexing Complete

Indexing Complete

Step 4 – Test

Test the index

Test the index

To learn how to include PDFs please see our blog article.

The post How to include SOLIDWORKS files in the SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Content Search appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at April 19, 2019 12:00 PM

April 18, 2019

SolidSmack

Biomimicry, Electrically Assisted 3D Printing Makes Tougher Structures

Researchers have developed an incredibly ingenious new method of 3D printing very strong structures using techniques analogous to nature.

Researchers at the University of Southern California were inspired by the material called “nacre”. You haven’t heard of nacre? You probably have, as it is simply the scientific name for “mother of pearl”–the substance mollusks use to construct their very tough shells.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Applying an electric field during 3D printing [Source: ScienceAdvances]</figcaption></figure>

Why are they so tough? It turns out the secret is in the microscopic structure of the material. Nacre is composed of small “bricks” of calcium carbonate joined together with proteins. These are set in a sophisticated brick-and-mortar style arrangement that provides tremendous strength.

The question is, how could you do this with 3D printing?

Apparently some research has previously been done on generating this type of material in 2D environments. However, according to the researchers, the methods of doing so were quite complex and unlikely to be commercialized.

The researchers came up with an ingenious approach that used the familiar photopolymer resin 3D printing process. The difference was that they first mixed the resin with tiny graphene nanoplatelets. This would normally provide some additional strengths to the resin print, but there was another difference.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Concept for aligned 3D printed graphene nanoplatelets [Source: ScienceAdvances]</figcaption></figure>

An electric field was employed during 3D printing. This field caused the graphene nanoplatelets to simultaneously align with each other according to the electric field. When the resin and graphene nanoplatelet mixture solidified, the resulting object had a much stronger microstructure.

The researchers found that this printed substance had a strength more or less equal to that of natural nacre. They also found that the substance had an anisotropic electrical property that is not found in nature.

They explain:

”The bioinspired BM architecture enhances the mechanical strength and electrical conduction by aligning GN in each layer to maximize their performance by crack deflection under loading. The electrically assisted 3D-printing method can build a multifunctional lightweight and strong 3D structure with electrically self-sensing capability.”

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>A 3D printed helmet that senses when it is cracked [Source: ScienceAdvances]</figcaption></figure>

In other words, this material could electrically detect when it cracks! This is an incredibly interesting feature with countless practical applications. One application that the researchers suggest is a helmet, which could inform you when it is damaged.

Significant mechanical testing was done on sample prints, and they explained their results:

“The 3D-printed structure with aGNs shows significantly enhanced toughness, impact, and compression resistances due to the synergistic effect and crack deflection. The 3D-printed nacre displays lightweight property with comparable specific fracture toughness to the natural nacre. In addition, the alignment of GNs leads to the anisotropic electrical property, presenting a feasible direction for building protective wearable sensors that can self-sense the crack.”

A very interesting aspect of their process was that they were able to change the alignment of the graphene nanoplatelets for each individual layer of the print. One could easily imagine a sophisticated FEA System being used to devise the optimum alignment strategy for a given part. That would be a very different approach to part design.

Hopefully this approach will be commercialized so that all of us can make good use of it.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Biomimicry, Electrically Assisted 3D Printing Makes Tougher Structures appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at April 18, 2019 04:30 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to include PDF files in SOLIDWORKS PDM Content Search

After enabling the content search in SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional, by default the Windows Search Service supports indexing the following files types;

  • Microsoft Office files
  • HTML files
  • MIME messages
  • Plain-text files

How to include PDF files in the PDM Content Search

We can include other file types by installing its corresponding third-party iFilter.  After a new iFilter is installed the archive must be reindexed to include the new file type in the content search.

Step 1 – Add the PDF iFilter to the server running Windows Search

We can download and install the standalone PDF iFilter from Adobe here, but current versions of Adobe Acrobat® and Adobe Reader® include the iFilter when installed, so in most instances; it’s easier to install the full program so we can view PDFs on the server as well as index them.

Step 2 – Add and check in some files for testing

Add and check in some files for testing

Add and check in some files for testing

Step 3 – Verify the iFilter is installed and rebuild the index

  • Control Panel > Indexing Options
Indexing Options

Indexing Options

  • Advanced > File Types Tab
    • Ensure the PDF entry exists
Ensure the PDF entry exists

Ensure the PDF entry exists

As the iFilter was added after the content search was set up, we’ll need to rebuild the indexes to include the pdf files;

  • Indexing Options
    • Advanced > Index Settings Tab
      • Hit Rebuild
Rebuild the indexes to include the PDF files

Rebuild the indexes to include the PDF files

Note: Before testing, we need to wait for the rebuild to complete, in larger vaults this may take some time

Indexing Complete

Indexing Complete

Step 4 – Test

SOLIDWORKS PDM Content Search

SOLIDWORKS PDM Content Search

To learn how to include SOLIDWORKS files, please subscribe to our blog for future articles.

The post How to include PDF files in SOLIDWORKS PDM Content Search appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at April 18, 2019 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Acer Announces New ConceptD Lineup for Professionals

acer conceptd series

Hardware giant Acer just announced their newest product line aimed at professional creators and those who aspire to be one. The “ConceptD Collection” consists of two desktops, three notebook PCs, two UHD monitors, and a mixed reality headset, all of which are focused on increasing productivity with multiple video editing and CAD software programs.

<figure class="wp-block-image">acer conceptd series</figure>

Starting with the desktop computers, the ConceptD 900 features dual processors with 40 cores, 80 threads, an NVIDIA Quadro RTX 6000 GPU, and an ECC memory of up to 192 GB. These hardware specs aim to increase render times for animators and designers while also helping AI developers with increased graphics and computing power. The Concept 900 also has two onboard M.2 PCIe slots with a chassis that holds up to five RAID 0/1 drives.

<figure class="wp-block-image">acer conceptd series</figure>

The ConceptD 500 desktop, on the other hand, uses 9th Gen Intel Core processors with 8 cores, 16 threads, and an NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000 GPU. It isn’t quite as powerful as the ConceptD 900, but it still manages to make rendering and animating your complex CAD models a heck of a lot smoother. The computer also comes with four DIMM slots that can store up to 64GB 2666 MHz DDR4 memory for those looking to make the process of rendering designs even faster. To help with this, the ConceptD 500 also includes a PCIe M.2 NVMe SSD.

<figure class="wp-block-image">acer conceptd series</figure>

The ConceptD 9 notebook has a 17.3-inch screen with a CNC-machined Ezel Aero Hinge and Wacom stylus support. As for what’s under the hood, the laptop runs on the new Intel i9 processor, an NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 graphics card, plus a DDR4 memory storage capacity of up to 32 GB and two 512GB 2 PCIe NVMe SSDs. This allows users to run high-end 3D modeling programs on the go without having to store all their projects on an external hard drive.

<figure class="wp-block-image">acer conceptd series</figure>

Next is the ConceptD 7, whose main defining feature is its ability to handle heavy video editing and rendering programs. While the notebook still runs on the old Intel i7 processor, it makes up for it with its NVIDIA Geforce RTX 2080 graphics card and smaller frame. The ConceptD 7 has a 15.6-inch screen, weighs 4.63 pounds, and is only 0.7 inches thin.

<figure class="wp-block-image">acer conceptd series</figure>

Last in the notebook lineup is the ConceptD 5, which is the smallest and easiest to carry of the bunch. It runs on an 8th gen Intel i7 processor, uses a Radeon RX Vega M GL graphics card, and has a DDR4 memory of 16GB and 1TB of NVMe PCIe SSD storage. While it isn’t anywhere near as powerful as the ConceptD 9 and 7, it does weigh only 3.3 pounds and measures 16.9mm thin

<figure class="wp-block-image">acer conceptd series</figure>

Computers aren’t the only things making up the ConceptD product line; Acer also created two UHD monitors to showcase the power of their desktop computers. The ConceptD CM7321K 4K UHD monitor measures 32-inches and has 1152 zones of local dimming using Mini LED technology and Display HDR. The ConceptD CP7271K PANTONE Validated monitor measures 27-inches and is made for 3D creators with its Delta E<1 color accuracy.

Apart from the monitors, the company has also announced the ConceptD OJO Windows Mixed Reality Headset, which comes with a 4,320 x 2,160 display and a built-in software explicitly made to adjust the gap between your eyes and the screen.

“The ConceptD product portfolio was conceived to give creators the tools to focus on the creative process and make beautiful things,” said Jerry Kao, Co-COO, Acer Inc. “As the foundation of a full line of creator products, we’ve designed PCs with high-performance processors and graphics that can handle extreme workloads, and put them inside quiet, minimalist designs to inspire creators to unleash their creativity.”

The initial product line will start releasing in June all the way until August of 2019, with the desktops running up to $20,000, the laptops between $1,699 and $4,999, the monitors anywhere from $1,999 to $2,999, and the headset with an undetermined cost. Head over to Acer to get the full rundown.

The post Acer Announces New ConceptD Lineup for Professionals appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at April 18, 2019 11:24 AM

Build Your Next CAD Workstation with This $19 Online Course

Computer Hard Drive

These days, you can get just about any computer rig designed to your exact specifications. Whether you’re a RAM-hogging SolidWorks user, or simply just want a powerful workstation, there’s something for everybody. But no standardized hardware mod will ever replace the satisfaction of building your own rig from scratch.

If you’ve ever wanted to create your own custom-built PC but didn’t know where to start, boy do we have great news for you.

The How to Build a Computer Bundle consolidates five intensive online courses (a total of 126 individual lessons) ranging from how to create a blueprint for your desired desktop or laptop setup to how to overclock CPU processor functions to speed up rendering times.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

How to Build a Computer Bundle — $374 $19.00 (94% off)

Topics Covered Include:

  • Learn about the basic functions of a computer system
  • Pick out appropriate hardware for your build
  • Assemble all hardware needed for a fully functional computer
  • Wire everything within the case like an expert
  • Cover the most effective method of CPI cooling: closed-loop liquid cooling
  • Upgrade to a higher capacity storage device
  • Improve your RAM chip(s)
  • Clean & refresh your CPU cooling unit
  • Swap in an SSD
  • Learn about the various tricky aspects about RAID setups
  • Understand how to increase data read/write speeds & prepare your computer for a drive crash

Get It!

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Build Your Next CAD Workstation with This $19 Online Course appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 18, 2019 10:28 AM

April 17, 2019

The Javelin Blog

How to show Material and Mass in a SOLIDWORKS PDM Data Card

Information about a file can be added and accessed through metadata. In SOLIDWORKS this metadata is referred to as Properties. In SOLIDWORKS PDM, this metadata is contained within Variables. By the use of PDM Attributes, we can map a Variable value to a File Property.

This attribute acts as a conduit, allowing information entered in a PDM Data Card, to populate a SOLIDWORKS File Properties. Information can also be entered into a SOLIDWORKS File Properties and through the Attribute, pushed into PDM.

To prevent accidentally overwriting of this metadata, the Data Card should be the default location where information is entered manually. There are some exceptions though. In the case of SOLIDWORKS, some Properties (metadata) is generated internally. Examples of this would be Mass and Material.

Applying a Material to SOLIDWORKS Component

Material can be applied to a SOLIDWORKS component, from the SOLIDWORKS Feature Manager. Based on the material selected, SOLIDWORKS evaluates many mechanical properties of that component, such as Mass

Applying Materiel to a SOLIDWORKS Component

Linking to File Properties

These evaluated Properties can then be associated with the File Properties, for that component. This is done clicking on the pull-down, of the Value/Text Expression tab.

Adding Properties in SOLIDWORKS

For those that are not familiar with File Properties, the above menu is accessed by selecting File > Properties, from within SOLIDWORKS.

Of course, we don’t want to have to repeat this process for every single component we create, so we can instead create a SOLIDWORKS Template, where these File Properties have been added. We do not need to specify the material for the component in this Template. We only need to add the File Properties to the template.

Adding to a SOLIDWORKS Template

SOLIDWORKS Templates are created from the Save As dialog, by choosing the appropriate file type.

Saving a SOLIDWORKS Part Template

Developing a Data Card

When developing a Data Card in SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration, a Control will always be associated with a PDM Variable.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Data Card

SOLIDWORKS PDM Data Card

By Clicking on the Variable button of a selected Control, we can create or edit the associated  Variable. This PDM Variable can then be associated with a SOLIDWORKS, Property through an Attribute. The Attribute needs to match Property name in SOLIDWORKS, or the Variable Value will not be updated.

PDM Variable with Material Attribute

PDM Variable with Material Attribute

If done correctly, the Material properties defined in SOLIDWORKS will appear in the components Data Card and will be associated with a PDM Variable.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Data Card

SOLIDWORKS PDM Properties Variable

The post How to show Material and Mass in a SOLIDWORKS PDM Data Card appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at April 17, 2019 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Synchronized Robots Prove the Samsung Bendable Galaxy Fold Isn’t a Gimmick

Samsung Galaxy Fold Folding Test

Ever since it was announced last year, most people have been skeptical about the Galaxy Fold, Samsung’s new folding smartphone/ tablet hybrid.

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</figure>

And why shouldn’t they be? When your smartphone’s main feature is to near-seamlessly fold out into a tablet with no apparent split in the screen, you begin to wonder just how long the technology can hold until it quite literally, well, snaps. It’s this specific concern that Samsung wanted to address in its latest promotional video for the smartphone.

Rather than the typical hardware launch video consisting of many design process b-roll shots and interviews with developers and engineers, the company’s marketing team instead whiteboarded up an entirely different kind of concept altogether.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/McdgS3Popjk?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

For this video, the team affixed a handful of Samsung Galaxy Folds onto several folding machines and did a week-long folding test to show the phone can stand just as much punishment from a robot as a human’s tendency to fidget with anything they get their hands on. The test was made to see whether the Galaxy Fold could outlast 200,000 folds and unfolds, which roughly translates to five years of human use. Provided the average person opens and closes the phone at least a hundred times in a single day, the phone’s screen should work just as long as the operating system does.

<figure class="wp-block-image">samsung galaxy fold</figure>

Made from bonded layers of innovative polymer material, the phone’s 7.3-inch Infinity Flex Display is engineered to be 50% thinner than other Galaxy displays. According to the company, the display is flexible yet durable enough to maintain its stunning view through many folds and unfolds.

While it doesn’t solve the age-old problem phones have of operating more sluggishly as time goes on, at the very least Samsung can say their foldable screens still work like a charm half a decade from now. For those looking to get their hands on a Samsung Galaxy Fold at launch, they’ll be out this coming April 26, 2019. Find out more over at Samsung.

The post Synchronized Robots Prove the Samsung Bendable Galaxy Fold Isn’t a Gimmick appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at April 17, 2019 11:00 AM

App Smack 16.19: Enki, Product Hunt, Invoice Simple, and More…

iPhone Apps

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved smart device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional. This week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Enki – Coding, Learn to Code (iOS — Free)

The #1 app to learn data science, learn to code, stay on top of tech trends, or to keep improving as a developer! Topics include SQL, Data Science, JavaScript, Python, Blockchain, CSS, HTML, Security, git, CompSci fundamentals, Linux and Java.

<figure class="aligncenter">Enki - Coding, Learn to Code</figure>

GoodTask – To Do List Manager (iOS – Free)

GoodTask is a Powerful Task/Project Manager based on iOS Reminders & Calendars. You can use it as simple checklist to focus or as complex project management tool to get big things done.

<figure class="aligncenter">GoodTask - To Do List Manager</figure>

Invoice Simple, Estimate Maker (iOS — Free)

Invoice Simple is the easiest way to send professional invoices and estimates to your customers. It’s perfect for small business owners, contractors and freelancers needing a fast, easy to use mobile invoicing solution.

<figure class="aligncenter">Invoice Simple, Estimate Maker</figure>

Hours Time Tracking (iOS — Free)

With a visual timeline, smart reminders, detailed reporting, and an interface crafted by and Apple Design Award winning team, Hours turns a tedious process into — dare we say — an enjoyable one.

<figure class="aligncenter">Hours Time Tracking</figure>

Focus Timer – Keep you focused (iOS — $2.99)

Pomodoro & Study Habit Changer.

<figure class="aligncenter">Focus Timer</figure>

Product Hunt (iOS — Free)

Discover your next favorite thing. Product Hunt surfaces the best new products and apps, every day.

<figure class="aligncenter">Product Hunt</figure>

The post App Smack 16.19: Enki, Product Hunt, Invoice Simple, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 17, 2019 10:00 AM

Cool Tools: The 3Dconnexion SpaceMouse Wireless 3D Mouse

3D Connexion 3D Mouse

Long considered an indispensable asset for anybody working in CAD, the 3D mouse is a quintessential tool that belongs on the desktop of any industrial designer or engineer.

Within a 3D application such as SolidWorks, Rhino, Fusion 360, or Keyshot, the directional, zoom and rotate functions provide an intuitive extension of the users’ design intent. To put it quite simply, a 3D mouse helps get rid of those annoying repetitive keystrokes and allows the designer to come as close to possible to holding their digital 3D design in the physical world.

As pioneers of the 3D mouse territory, 3Dconnexion has blazed a trail with their SpaceMouse collection. And when it comes to the perfect balance of price, performance, and portability, we’re big fans of the company’s SpaceNavigator 3D Mouse.

Utilizing the company’s patented 6-Degrees-of-Freedom (6DoF) sensor, the intuitive 3D mouse also includes two buttons for accessing radial control menus to drive commands from directly within your applications. And with a wireless connection, you can be sure that this won’t be just another desktop peripheral clogging your desk with obnoxious wires.

<figure class="aligncenter">SpaceMouse 3D Mouse</figure>

The 3Dconnexion SpaceMouse Wireless 3D Mouse — $140.00

Features:

  • Superior 3D Navigation – Intuitively and precisely navigate digital models or viewports in 3D space.
  • Wireless Freedom – 3Dconnexion 2.4GHz Wireless technology ensures a reliable, real-time connection to your 3D content.
  • Easy to Use – Each SpaceMouse Wireless button opens its own radial menu providing convenient mouse-click access to four application commands.
  • Flexible Recharging – Supplied micro-USB cable handles re-charging and data at the same time. Just connect and continue working, Stylish Design – small footprint, elegant brushed steel base, two buttons.

PURCHASE NOW VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: The 3Dconnexion SpaceMouse Wireless 3D Mouse appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 17, 2019 09:00 AM

April 16, 2019

The Javelin Blog

How to Automate Bend Allowance in SOLIDWORKS 2019

In SOLIDWORKS 2019, setting up sheet metal parts has become a bit easier, making it possible to automate bend allowance selection by linking materials & sheet metal parameters. With the use of custom materials, you can set the bend allowances to change based on a range of values. This new feature can streamline & standardize the sheet metal part making process. Let’s see how it works!

Setting Up Your Custom Material

The first thing you would need to do is to set up our custom material, learn more about creating SOLIDWORKS custom materials. For this example, I copied the material profile of the Aluminium 1060 Alloy.

Once completed you may have noticed a Sheet Metal tab as seen below. This is new to SOLIDWORKS 2019.

Material Sheet Metal Tab

Material Sheet Metal Tab

From here you will be able to add sheet metal properties by using Gauge Tables, Bend Tables, or Thickness Ranges. I will focus on the Thickness Range option. From here you can define the range by creating a table like the one shown below.

Thickness Range Table

Thickness Range Table

You will notice that you can define the units, range type, units & bend allowance using the drop-down menu.

One point that must be noted is that the range in this table must be continuous. In other words, if for example you would like to define a range between 1 & 12, all values need a definition. So you cannot have a range from 1-6, then 8-12, because you are neglecting values between 6 & 8.

Applying Sheet Metal Properties from Material

When setting up your sheet metal part, you will notice that you will need to toggle the “Use material sheet metal parameters” as seen below.

Sheet Metal Parameters from Material

Sheet Metal Parameters from Material

Once toggled, you will notice that when you define the thickness, the Bend Allowance will change with it.

What to keep in mind when setting up Sheet Metal Parameters in Materials

  • You can only apply these changes to Custom Materials.
  • The thickness range must be continuous, covering all values between the max & min thicknesses.

Defining the bend allowance at the material level is a great tool that you can utilize in the sheet metal part design work flow. It can unburden the designer when selecting a thickness when creating parts, and it provides another way to manage our sheet metal parameters. For more tips on improving the your sheet metal work flow check out these articles:

The post How to Automate Bend Allowance in SOLIDWORKS 2019 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at April 16, 2019 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

New Autodesk Earnings Report Shows Growth in CAD Subscriptions

Fusion 360 CAD

Another fiscal year, another chart showcasing a company’s earnings. The fiscal year 2018 proved to be another high-earning era for Autodesk, as the CAD company reported in its most recent yearly earnings report.

The biggest highlights of the report include a Q4 2018 revenue of $737.3 million and 2018 fiscal year earnings worth $2.57 billion. Since the company separates its Annualized Recurring Revenue (ARR) and subscription plans from its actual revenue, Autodesk was able to provide information that their ARR for the past fiscal year amounted to $2.75 billion. Their software subscriptions (which the company leases through various channels) also generated an extra $550 million in Q4 2018 while they netted a total of $1.8 billion in earnings for the entire fiscal year.

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</figure>

The other small factors affecting the company’s earnings are Maintenance and Other revenues, which refer to the upkeep of software and training, consultation, and miscellaneous fees respectively. Maintenance revenue for Q4 generated $137.4 million while the entire fiscal year saw a $635.1 million inflow by the category. Additional income, on the other hand, netted $49.9 million while $132.4 million made up the fiscal year.

“We achieved multiple milestones in fiscal 2019 and are entering fiscal 2020 with strong momentum,” said Andrew Anagnost, Autodesk president and CEO. “With less than 20 percent of our revenues coming from maintenance, we are effectively finished with our business model transition and now look forward to executing on our multi-year growth strategy.  Our core design offerings and cloud-based solutions for construction, manufacturing and production are benefiting our customers as they undergo their own digital transformations, which offers an ongoing tailwind to our business. We are particularly excited about entering the new fiscal year with an unrivaled portfolio of cloud-based solutions for construction.”

A significant portion of this success can be attributed to the generative tools Autodesk has implemented within its Fusion 360 software. Apart from incorporating the new 3MF file format into the software, Autodesk has been working with institutions such as NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Farsoon Technologies to help them with their projects as well as showcase what the software can do.

<figure class="wp-block-image">autodesk fiscal earnings 2019</figure>

For those looking to get into further nitty-gritty details of the company’s revenue breakdown, find the full report over at Autodesk.

The post New Autodesk Earnings Report Shows Growth in CAD Subscriptions appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at April 16, 2019 11:30 AM

Cool Tools: KingMoore Tactical Military Build Belt

Tactical Military Belt

As somebody’s wise old uncle probably said at one point or another in history: never underestimate the power of a reliable belt. While it might be an easy item to overlook in the wardrobe department, having a belt with the right fit can make or break a day in the workshop — particularly if you’re bending up and down with that old Shop Vac hose.

While a good, solid leather belt and custom-engraved cowboy buckle are pretty awesome, we also love the simplicity of a straight-up, no BS, simple solution like the KingMoore Tactical Build designed after military-style belt systems. Oh yeah, and it’s just 15 bucks.

With breathable wear-resisting nylon and a metal clasp buckle, this easy-on-the-eyes belt is capable of infinite adjustments so you’ll always be sure to find that perfect fit. And when nature calls, the Quick Release mechanism is intuitive and smooth for a no-fuss, no-hassle unclasping. And just like most other things designed in the tactical or everyday carry gear market — what’s not to love about the purity and simplicity of plain old functional gear?

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

KingMoore Tactical Military Belt — $14.99

Features:

  • Heavy Duty Metal Buckle – This tactical belt features a military belt buckle made from heavy-duty metal.
  • Quality Nylon Belt – This tactical belt made from wear-resisting nylon webbing material that is more durable, breathable and fast-dry. 
  • Quick Release – Intuitive and smooth quick release functionality when you push the golden tabs down at the same time
  • Everyday Carry Gear – The tactical belt is applicable to all kinds of overalls, casual pants, tactical trousers, and outdoor trousers as well as outdoor uses such as outward bound training like outdoor rock climbing, tactics and prompt drop.
  • Ideal and suitable for active daily work

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: KingMoore Tactical Military Build Belt appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 16, 2019 09:31 AM

‘IDEO and a Story of Design’ Is an Inside Look at the Legendary Design Firm

Design Thinking Supplies

Ask any knowledgeable person about what they think IDEO is and you’ll likely get different—albeit similar—answers:

“It’s one of the original modern design firms.”

“It’s a do-it-all design agency.”

“It’s a problem-solving company.”

Luckily for those answering, all of these are correct in their own way. But to get to the ultimate answer of who IDEO really identifies as in 2019, the production company Dress Code went and asked the people closest to IDEO: the employees themselves.

<figure><iframe allowfullscreen="" height="450" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/326484284?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="800"></iframe></figure>

IDEO And A Story of Design is a short, 12-minute film that takes a look at the company from its founding in 1991 to the present day. It collates interviews from various members at IDEO—including founder David Kelley. Through these company-wide interviews, we can finally see the thought process, philosophy, and what ultimately drives them to innovate as they do in 2019, just as they did in 1991.

It’s interesting to see how two firms combined to create this one mega-firm. What was once two separate teams of designers and engineers eventually converged to work together to make the production process more seamless. As a result, one of the biggest draws of IDEO is its human-centered approach to designing for different groups. Rather than using hard data and surveys to find out what people want, the folks at IDEO have become experts at holistic ethnographic research. This, in turn, lets them design and engineer better solutions that bridge the gap between humans and the everyday things they interact with.

<figure class="wp-block-image">IDEO And A Story of Design</figure>

Another advantage the culture of IDEO has is its open-mindedness in bringing in people from wide-ranging backgrounds. Apart from traditional designers and engineers, the company also employs a range of psychologists, food scientists, and marketing experts. With a hodgepodge of experts from different fields, IDEO can manage to spread its portfolio to many wide-ranging fields as they relate to creating better solutions for living.

<figure class="wp-block-image">IDEO And A Story of Design</figure>

But don’t just take our word for it—the entire documentary is worth a watch!

The post ‘IDEO and a Story of Design’ Is an Inside Look at the Legendary Design Firm appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at April 16, 2019 02:00 AM

Cool Tools: The Ultimate Tool Box is the Trusco Tool Box

Trusco Toolbox

Founded in 1959 as a professional tool manufacturer to support Japan’s burgeoning manufacturing industry, Trusco—a combination of the words “Trust” and “Company”—is still manufacturing some of the best toolboxes, today.

While their stripped-down design makes them a must-have for many design aficionados, the pressed steel boxes are ridiculously useful for just about anything—tools or not.

Still manufactured in Fukui, Japan, Trusco tool boxes now come in more sizes than ever—capable of whatever storage challenges you throw at them.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Trusco Tool Boxes — $12.99 – $147.37

Features:

  • Steel body, formed for extra strength
  • Versatile sizing for specific storage solutions
  • Double-hinged construction for smooth opening
  • Dividers included
  • Equally useful in the home, office, or the shop

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: The Ultimate Tool Box is the Trusco Tool Box appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 16, 2019 01:00 AM

April 15, 2019

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Monday List 16.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

Apple iPhone Repair

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

The Legend of Jacinto’s Gold

And a quest for ancestral riches that may not exist.

<figure class="aligncenter">And a quest for ancestral riches that may not exist.</figure>

Hi-Fi Cocktail Bars Aren’t Just for Tokyo Anymore

A new breed of bar aims to please your ears as much as your taste buds.

<figure class="aligncenter">Hi-Fi Cocktail Bars Aren’t Just for Tokyo Anymore</figure>

What I Learned on My Vacation to Westeros

As a “Game of Thrones” tourist in Northern Ireland, you can see how the magic of a fantasy realm has eclipsed the history of the actual place.

<figure class="aligncenter">What I Learned on My Vacation to Westeros</figure>

How Big Business Is Hedging
Against the Apocalypse

Investors are finally paying attention to climate change — though not in the way you might hope.

<figure class="wp-block-image">How Big Business Is Hedging Against the Apocalypse</figure>

Internal Documents Show Apple Is Capable of Implementing Right to Repair Legislation

A leaked internal document obtained by Motherboard outlines a program that looks almost exactly like the requirements of right to repair legislation that has been proposed in 20 states.

<figure class="aligncenter">Internal Documents Show Apple Is Capable of Implementing Right to Repair Legislation</figure>

The Peloton Effect

The workout giant is changing at-home exercise — and spawning a flurry of copycats.

<figure class="aligncenter">The Peloton Effect</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 16.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 15, 2019 01:35 PM

The Javelin Blog

Creating 3D Textures in SOLIDWORKS 2019

Wouldn’t it be nice to give your model a sense of depth by adding 3D textures, maybe a surface with seemingly random bumps to make the part look more organic, or applying a random pattern full of different shapes and elevations that would seem impossible to model. Now your can with the new 3D Texture Tool in SOLIDWORKS 2019. By utilizing gray scale images, it is now possible to create textures that can produce complex surface finishes for 3D printing your models. Let’s take a deeper look at how it works.

Choosing a Grayscale Decal

Once our Part has been created, we can go ahead and apply the grayscale decal that we will use to create the texture. An example that is provided by SOLIDWORKS is seen below.

Grayscale Height Map Example

Grayscale Height Map Example

The reason why our decal needs to be SOLIDWORKS is because the gradient between white and black is used to represent an elevation, where white is a height of zero, and black is the maximum height or vice versa depending on how you toggle it . So, if we were to visualize the above example, it would look like a hill that is tallest in the middle as seen below.

3D Representation of Decal

3D Representation of Decal

But let’s make something more interesting. Let’s use a decal that has utilizes complex random patterns & gradients. Let’s go ahead and work with the image below as our decal.

Complex Decal

Complex Decal

Note, these kinds of graphics can be made using programs like Adobe Illustrator by utilizing gradients and vectors. There are also other programs that specialize in creating grayscale height maps from photos.

Setting Up the Decals

The first item on the agenda is to apply the decal to the part. Read our guide to applying decals. After adjusting the decal, we are ready to get started.

Decal Applied to Surface

Decal Applied to Surface

Though it was not done in the above example, it is always good have a decal that do not get cut off on the edges of the part. This will improve the blend between the main body and the surface features.

Using the 3D Texture Feature

To get it things started go to the Solid Bodies folder right click the solid body and select the 3D feature tool as seen below. Alternatively, we can go to Insert > Features > 3D Texture…

3D Texture Tool

3D Texture Tool

If you are familiar with SOLIDWORKS Simulation, you will notice that there are parallels between setting up the part as we are creating a mesh based on the part geometry and the interpretation of the decal.

Settings in the 3D Texture Property Manager

3D Texture Tool Property Manager

So a bit of an explanation with the settings that can be manipulated.

  1. The first item would be the texture list. It lists the decals that have been applied to the selected solid body. Here you have the option to select which decals will be used for the texture. It also provides a summary of the attribute applied to it.
  2. The Maximum Element size determines the size of the elements of your mesh. The smaller the size, the more detail your model will have, but at the cost of processing speed. It is recommended to keep the element size as big as possible to improve performance.
  3. The Texture Offset Distance determines the maximum height that the decal can go. In our first example we see that the decal is highest at the black region.
  4. The Texture Refinement Option determines the level of detail that we can capture from the decal as seen below.
Texture Refinement at 80% &amp; 10%

Texture Refinement at 80% & 10%

On the left, we see an example of the surface with a texture refinement of 80% and on the right at 10%. We can see that the mesh elements are made smaller to capture more detail from the decal. Once again computer performance & the user’s desired outcome play a role in determining the right amount.

The Final Render

After adjusting the settings just right to your preferences, we can apply a material and create the final render as seen below.

Capture of 3D Surface Derived from the 2D Decal

Capture of 3D Surface Derived from the 2D Decal

As we can see, we can make an organic surface that would be difficult & time consuming to create otherwise. Below is a video showing how the light plays with the staggered surface.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="572" id="video-40884-1" preload="metadata" width="800"><source src="https://www.javelin-tech.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Test1.mp4?_=1" type="video/mp4">https://www.javelin-tech.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Test1.mp4</video>

 

The 3D texture tool is a welcome addition to SOLIDWORKS 2019. It allows us to add organic surfaces or complex patterns that would be difficult to recreate normally and apply it to 3D printed models. So let your imagination fly, and I hope that you enjoy using this tool. For other ways to enhance your models, please check the following links:

The post Creating 3D Textures in SOLIDWORKS 2019 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at April 15, 2019 12:00 PM

April 12, 2019

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Bearing Load

Applying a force to a hole in Simulation will give a uniform load to all locations on the hole.  In reality most loading conditions would only apply to the lower half of the hole.  The load would start at zero on the side and then grow to the largest amplitude at the bottom of the hole.  If you are concerned of stresses in the hole region specifically, the Bearing Load feature should be considered.

The Bearing Load requires a Coordinate System where the Z-axis runs axially through the hole.  The X or Y direction needs to be defined as the direction of the load.  You also have an option of Sinusoidal or Parabolic distribution.

Here is a setup that makes it easy to see the differences.  We have 4 scenarios:

  1. Force applied to the entire hole face
  2. Force applied to half the hole face (with split line)
  3. Bearing Load with Sinusoidal distribution
  4. Bearing Load with Parabolic distribution
SOLIDWORKS Simulation Force Load on Hole Face SOLIDWORKS Simulation Force Load on Split Face SOLIDWORKS Simulation Bearing Load with Sinusoidal Distribution SOLIDWORKS Simulation Bearing Load with Parabolic Distribution

Reviewing the results, you’ll see how the different loading conditions affect the results.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Force on Hole - Displacement SOLIDWORKS Simulation Force on Half Hole - Displacement SOLIDWORKS Simulation Bearing Load - Sinusoidal Displacement SOLIDWORKS Simulation Bearing Load - Parabolic Displacement

In this scenario, the Bearing Load has been applied to the entire hole face.  The load is only applied to the lower half of the hole, the area below the Coordinate System.  If only a portion of the hole is selected, the area located in the same bottom half is used.  The SOLIDWORKS Help section on Bearing Loads provides a good illustration of how this applies.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Help - Bearing Loads

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Help – Bearing Loads

The difference between Sinusoidal and Parabolic distributions is explained in the Bearing Load Distribution section of SOLIDWORKS Help.

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation Bearing Load appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at April 12, 2019 12:00 PM

April 11, 2019

SolidSmack

MakerOS Bringing Blockchain to Product Dev With $2M Funding

MakerOS Blockchain EOS

We haven’t heard much from MakerOS over the past couple of years, but they have big news today.

If you have not encountered MakerOS, they are a Michigan-based service that provides a number of powerful management functions to design and making communities and industries. Their tagline is:

“MakerOS is an end-to-end management platform for your design, prototype, and production workflow.”

And that is exactly what they do. You can login to their system to accept orders, track them, issue invoices, connect with designers, file storage, etc. They even have a unique “overflow” feature in which work can be subcontracted to others if too many orders are received. Today they boast of providing over 50 management functions to their clients.

The system is ideal for companies providing making services to the public and industry, and certainly for 3D print services.

The investment announcement is as follows:

“SVK Crypto today announced it is leading a $2 million Series A funding round for innovative, end-to-end business management SaaS company, MakerOS. With participation from EOS Global, MakerOS intends to use the funds to expand the company and integrate the EOSIO blockchain technology in their software platform.”

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption> EOSIO is a blockchain software architecture in a growing ecosystem of apps.</figcaption></figure>

[Note to 3D print readers: “EOS” in the above is not the EOS 3D printer manufacturer based in Germany; it is instead another company that specializes in blockchain technologies and investments. They have apparently distributed over US$1B towards blockchain systems thus far. As of this writing, it is also #6 in market cap of the publically traded crypto currencies.]

What will these funds be used for? They explain:

“The new capital will be used to accelerate the implementation of the EOSIO blockchain protocol as the central feature of MakerOS’s Overflow service. This will enable businesses to connect, share and collaborate on projects with verified reputation – ensuring quality and standards are met.”

I find this quite interesting, as the blockchain tech should allow for portable, secure and reliable data flow within the MakerOS system. This is quite important for some in the industry, as designs can be critical intellectual property that cannot be exposed.

Blockchain tech would ensure there is a flawless ledger of transactional activity in case of disputes. Thus, for example, a company could undisputedly prove they “had it first” by referring to the blockchain.

That is, if they were using MakerOS after implementation of the new technology.

Another key benefit of the blockchain tech would be to allow for completely distributed operations. Much of MakerOS’ activity occurs between a manufacturing company and its suppliers and clients. In almost every case, these entities operate separately in a distributed manner. Sometimes they are required to operate entirely independently due to the nature of the organizations and their security regimes.

By introducing a blockchain-based technology that can provide trust even in distributed mode, MakerOS may be able to provide a way for otherwise disconnected parties to operate smoothly just as if they were all in the same building.

If MakerOS is able to develop appropriate uses for blockchain tech, we believe they should be able to attract a new class of clients to their service — and more than likely it will be the larger ones. Thus, the investors in MakerOS should be able to get their money back and much more.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post MakerOS Bringing Blockchain to Product Dev With $2M Funding appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at April 11, 2019 04:13 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Reports

SOLIDWORKS Simulation provides an automatic way to export your results to a Word document.  The document is based on a Word template that extracts a large amount of data from your study.  Therefore, Microsoft Office must be installed on the computer.  The report includes items like Mesh properties, Material properties, Stress plots, etc.

Generating a Report

After the study is completed, you can use the Report tools from the CommandManager.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Report Tools

If you want to capture a specific view/orientation or image file, you can use ‘Include Image for Report’.  You can specify where you want this image to be in the report from the ‘Section:’ dropdown.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Include Image in Report

Report Options

To customize the default sections to publish and any common information to include, this can be done beforehand under Simulation > Simulation Options > Default Options > Reports.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Report Default Options

When you proceed to publish the report, you still have the same options to modify as needed but the Default Options can save you time.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Publish Report

Example Report

The first page of the report gives a screenshot of the model with a cross-referenced table of contents.  There are numerous pages of data provided, but shown below is one of the Displacement plots and the screenshot image we included.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Reports

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation Reports appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at April 11, 2019 12:00 PM

April 10, 2019

SolidSmack

Incredible EDM Machining Process Literally Melts Part Lines Away

Electrical Discharge Machining

If you thought the age-old craft of metalworking couldn’t get any more precise, well think again.

In a recent semi-viral Twitter post from Singaporean news service Mothership.sg, engineers demonstrate how to cut metal so precisely that you can’t even see the grooves between the pieces when they are put back together. This manufacturing process is known as EDM (electrical discharge machining—not “electric dance music”), and consists of a defined electrical spark that runs across a metal surface—allowing for the ridiculously precise cuts to be made. Yeah—it’s pretty freakin’ awesome:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-twitter aligncenter wp-block-embed is-type-rich is-provider-twitter">
<script async="async" charset="utf-8" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js"></script>
</figure>

To put it simply, the spark used in the EDM process is created by running an electrical conductor close to the material. Once the conductor makes contact with a surface, an electrical current produces heat up to 12,000°C (21,500°F), which ultimately melts precise cuts through the material. What’s even more amazing is that the conductor controls the spark; it only cuts the surface and nothing else—producing precise cuts that can barely be seen when the pieces are realigned.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-4-3 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/L1D5DLWWMp8?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

EDM is most commonly used for making airplane parts and artificial bones—which makes sense considering the delicate nature in which they are used. For context, airplane parts need to have as little space between them to avoid splitting apart mid-flight, while replacement artificial bones naturally need to be as precise as possible as a replacement for a human body part. No matter which way you cut it (see what I did there), parts cut with EDM are nothing short of an amazing technical achievement—even if you can’t see them at all.

Feature Image via SL EDM

The post Incredible EDM Machining Process Literally Melts Part Lines Away appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at April 10, 2019 10:11 PM

App Smack 15.19: Urbanbase AR, Unfold, Enlight Quickshot, and More…

iPhone in hand

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved smart device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional. This week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

CARROT Weather (iOS — $4.99)

The crazy-powerful weather app.

<figure class="aligncenter">CARROT Weather</figure>

Urbanbase AR (iOS – Free)

Urbanbase AR lets you create your own virtual space with photographic AR items.

<figure class="aligncenter">Urbanbase AR</figure>

Big Bang AR (iOS — Free)

Join Tilda Swinton and CERN scientists on an epic interactive journey through the birth and evolution of the universe – in mixed reality. Go back in time 13.8 billion years and discover how space, time and the visible universe came to be.

<figure class="aligncenter">Big Bang App</figure>

Unfold — Create Stories (iOS — Free)

Set the mood for sharing your stories across social platforms.

<figure class="aligncenter">Unfold — Create Stories</figure>

LinkedIn Learning (iOS — Free)

Advance your career with LinkedIn Learning. Discover the most in-demand business, tech and creative skills with personalized recommendations and courses taught by industry experts.

<figure class="aligncenter">LinkedIn Learning</figure>

Enlight Quickshot (iOS — Free)

Quickshot is the new photo editor & camera app for the iPhone photographer who lives for the next adventure. You can count on unprecedented, AI-innovation behind all of Quickshots’ unique tools to capture your passion in the perfect shot, fast.

<figure class="aligncenter">Enlight Quickshot</figure>

The post App Smack 15.19: Urbanbase AR, Unfold, Enlight Quickshot, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 10, 2019 08:25 PM

Cool Tools: Hudson Durable Goods Waxed Canvas Work Apron

Hudson Durable Goods Work Apron

Few shop tools—yes, we’ll call it a “tool”—are as indispensable as a reliable work apron. While not a “tool” in the traditional sense, a good, durable apron can serve many purposes ranging from tool organization to even psychologically making yourself ‘present’ in the workshop.

But no two aprons are alike—and striking the balance between functional and economical isn’t always easy. Which is why we like the Cross Back Adjustable Apron from Hudson Durable Goods.

Made from thick and durable waxed canvas, this stylish work apron features design details that are as carefully considered as the long-lasting materials they’re constructed from. Additionally, the cross-back (X-back) straps ensure that weight from tools is spread evenly across the back to avoid neck strain. Best of all, since the apron is made from waxed canvas, it will only get better with age.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Hudson Durable Goods Waxed Canvas Work Apron — $29.99

Features:

  • Cross-back (x-back) straps spread the weight of tools to prevent neck strain
  • 2 large tool pockets (6.5 inches tall x 8 inches wide)
  • Chest pocket for cellphone/pencil/tools (4.5 inches tall x 4 inches wide)
  • Kangaroo pocket (large hoodie-style hand pocket)
  • Straps sewn on ends to prevent slipping through side grommets
  • Flat black canvas and gun-metal hardware for a low-key, unisex, professional look

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: Hudson Durable Goods Waxed Canvas Work Apron appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 10, 2019 06:27 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS SolidNetwork License Manager Options File Case Insensitive Setting

The SolidNetWork License Manager allows you to reserve licenses for a particular set of users.  You need to create an Options file for the License Manager.  This article provides more information on how it’s created:

How to Reserve Licenses on SolidNetWork License Manager for Users or Groups

<iframe class="wp-embedded-content" data-secret="hVwTsUcAz7" frameborder="0" height="282" marginheight="0" marginwidth="0" sandbox="allow-scripts" scrolling="no" security="restricted" src="https://www.javelin-tech.com/blog/2010/09/reserve-licenses-solidnetwork-license-manager-users-groups/embed/#?secret=hVwTsUcAz7" title="“How to Reserve Licenses on SolidNetWork License Manager for Users or Groups” — The Javelin Blog" width="500"></iframe>

However when you set up the groups and usernames in the file, the usernames are case-sensitive.  The usernames in the Options file must match what is shown in the License Manager itself when a user checks out a license.

For example 'USER', 'User' and 'user' will be seen as different users.

This may or may not match the Windows username.  For example here I’ve changed my Windows username to ‘Support’.  However when I checkout a Simulation license, the License Manager shows the user as ‘support’.  The source is the capitalization style that the user enters when they first logged on to a computer.  Without a ‘roaming’ Windows profile account, a change to the capitalization of a username would require a re-creation of the user profile to have it match in the License Manager.

Windows User Account Name

Windows User Account Name

SolidNetWork License Manager User Name

SolidNetWork License Manager User Name

If we setup the Options file with the username ‘Support’, it won’t be found as the License Manager considers the user as ‘support’.  Here I’ve reserved all 25 SOLIDWORKS Premium licenses to the user ‘Support’.  When we try to enable the Simulation add-in, it fails to obtain a license as there are no licenses left for username ‘support’.

SolidNetWork License Manager Options File

SolidNetWork License Manager Options File

Unable to Obtain SOLIDWORKS Network License

There is a FlexLM option that allows you to make usernames case-insensitive to avoid this situation.  At the top of the Options file, add the line GROUPCASEINSENSITIVE ON.  Now it will see the user ‘Support’ to be the same as ‘support’.

SolidNetWork License Manager Options File - CaseInsensitive

SolidNetWork License Manager Options File – CaseInsensitive

The post SOLIDWORKS SolidNetwork License Manager Options File Case Insensitive Setting appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at April 10, 2019 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Material Explorations | Fabric Nets Injected with Expanding Foam

Foam Furniture Design

In this modern age of everything-looks-the-same DIY furniture, it makes sense that some people want to make something unique to stand out from their friends’ IKEA apartment fixtures. While you could spend hours searching a thrift store for something out of the ordinary, the best way to find something one of a kind is to…well, make it yourself.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zHv5GHu-vJY?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Jisun Kim, a designer working on her Master’s Degree at Kingston University, had the bright idea of using fabric nets as stencils for different kinds of furniture. By filling these premade nets with expanding foam, she can create unique pieces that burst at the seams with self-expanding foam—yet still retain their use as a home furniture fixture.

<figure class="wp-block-image">jisun kim injected foam furniture</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">jisun kim injected foam furniture</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">jisun kim injected foam furniture</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">jisun kim injected foam furniture</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">jisun kim injected foam furniture</figure>

The idea came from her desire to make furniture crafting an accessible activity for everyone. By streamlining the process and making it fun to fill these nets with injected foam through the holes of the fabric, Kim hopes more people will enjoy making their furniture even without extensive knowledge on the subject.

<figure class="wp-block-image">jisun kim injected foam furniture</figure>

The foam-filled nets range from simple chairs and stools all the way to large-scale tables capable of hosting a family meal. While the finished products are rather non-traditional, Kim ensures these pieces are just as safe to use as their store-bought counterparts.

Find more of Jisun Kim’s works on her Tumblr page, where she occasionally posts upcoming projects amidst her personal posts.

The post Material Explorations | Fabric Nets Injected with Expanding Foam appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at April 10, 2019 02:46 AM

April 09, 2019

SolidSmack

Behind The Design | Nike Air Goes Full Sole! | Design & Manufacturing Innovations

AirMax_720_Reveal

Nike air technology has come a long way since aerospace engineer Marion Rudy pitched his air-bag innovation to Nike in 1977. These days Air technology is really strutting its stuff by going full sole! I’m talking AirMax 720, a shoe to behold with heal-to-toe air. But how is this possible and what has changed since the first generation AirMax hit the streets in 1987? Namely, continuous advancements in the methods and approach to air cushion manufacturing. Nike News recently posted a series of articles that chronicle many of the key technologies and manufacturing innovations that has paved the way to visible air. Let’s have a look and see what we can learn.

Blow Molding

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Source: Nike News</figcaption></figure>

The blow molding process was the mainstay for air-cushion manufacturing for multiple decades. The resulting cushions were inflated and sealed under air and a spritz of SF6 to create a stable constant pressurize bladder. This manufacturing approach offered designers and engineers plenty of latitude to explore both form and functional performance.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Vacuum Forming

Nike’s shift from blow molding to vacuum forming proved to be an arduous process. However, it opened up new opportunities for air technology. The solution, engineering, and manufacturing employed micro layered sheets of Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) to produce subsequent generations of air units. The thermoforming process necessitates a perimeter edge to provide enough real estate to bond component pieces together. For the air cushions, this region has become known as an outer swept pinch (OSP). It’s a ridge of TPU that’s durable and reliable enough to connect an air cushion to the bite-line of a shoe’s upper.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>AirMax 720</figcaption></figure>

Three reasons the outer swept pinch is essential

The Nike news article sites three reasons why the outer swept pinch is a pivotal innovation.

  • The OSP provides a thicker, more rigid frame to build a bag on, while still allowing the bag’s flexibility to shine (similar to how a tennis racquet’s stiff perimeter supports its bouncy strings).
  • The ridge allows designers to use large, unconstrained air chambers and to shape the top side of the Air-Sole to conform to the foot — an exceptionally difficult task.
  • An OSP’s parting and forming lines can be hidden, making the connection between bag and upper appear seamless.

I’ve only covered a few highlights of the mild-to-wild journey of Nike Air technology. For a full visual odyssey hop over to Nike News and check out their full article on the Evolution of Nike Air Max Visible Air.

The post Behind The Design | Nike Air Goes Full Sole! | Design & Manufacturing Innovations appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at April 09, 2019 11:28 PM

Cool Tools: The Palomino Blackwing 602 Pencil

Blackwing Pencils

Cherished by writers, designers, illustrators, and other creative professionals for its soft dark lead and unique flat eraser, the Blackwing 602 is worth trying at least once—but be forewarned: you may never go back to plain old #2 pencils again.

Originally manufactured by the Eberhard Faber Pencil Company from 1934 – 1988, the Blackwing brand was acquired by California Cedar Products Company in 2008 and reintroduced to a new generation of creatives in 2012.

And now, you can score your own 12-pack of the legendary pencil for just 23 bucks.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Palomino Blackwing 602 Pencils 12-Pack — $24.89

Features:

  • One pack of 12 Palomino Blackwing pencils
  • Pencils feature a soft and smooth graphite core that is perfect for artists and composers
  • Pencils feature a unique ferrule and allows you to extend and replace the eraser
  • Replacement erasers available in three different colors
  • Pencils made out of Genuine Incense-cedar

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: The Palomino Blackwing 602 Pencil appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 09, 2019 01:36 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Compare and DrawCompare Tools

SOLIDWORKS Compare gives you the ability to find slight differences between two models.  Perhaps you receive an updated model back and are not sure of all the changes made.  The Compare tool can find slight differences in:

  • Document Properties
  • Features
  • Geometry, or
  • Bill of Materials

SOLIDWORKS Compare Tool

Compare Parts, Assemblies or Drawings

Choose two models and select the items to compare.  You can use the tool to compare Parts, Assemblies or Drawings.  Some items may not be available in different situations.  For example this is comparing two part files so we cannot select Bill of Materials.

SOLIDWORKS Compare Task Pane

Document Properties

Once the Compare is complete, there will be tabs for each criteria with results.  The first item is Document Properties.  These files have differences between file size, last save date, mass properties, annotation display and units.

SOLIDWORKS Compare Document Properties

SOLIDWORKS Compare Document Properties

Feature Comparison

The second item is feature comparison.  It will indicate if there are unique (separate) features between the two parts or if there is change in an existing feature.  In this case there is only one difference with the Chamfer feature.  Selecting the features shows a modified value.

SOLIDWORKS Compare Features

SOLIDWORKS Compare Features

Geometry Comparison

Lastly we found changes in Geometry.  You can view by Volume comparison or Face comparison.  In this case the Unique Faces provides an indication that the fillet has been changed.

SOLIDWORKS Compare Geometry

SOLIDWORKS Compare Geometry

Use DrawCompare for Drawings

This tool can be used to compare drawings for its Document Properties and Bill of Materials.  However there is another tool called DrawCompare to provide graphical feedback of differences on the drawing sheet.  You can see any additions or removals between the two documents.

SOLIDWORKS DrawCompare

SOLIDWORKS DrawCompare

 

SOLIDWORKS DrawCompare Additions

SOLIDWORKS DrawCompare Additions

SOLIDWORKS DrawCompare Removals

SOLIDWORKS DrawCompare Removals

The post SOLIDWORKS Compare and DrawCompare Tools appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at April 09, 2019 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Foundation of Nike Air Lies in the Hands of an Aerospace Engineer

history Nike Air

Word pairings and associations can be everything; Peanut Butter and Jelly. Peas and Carrots. Meat and Potatoes. Nike and…Air.

To provide further insight for shoe nerds and design geeks into the making of one of the company’s most iconic shoe technologies, the Nike team released ‘A Brief History of Nike Air’ – a consolidated history of one of the most revolutionary design features to ever hit footwear design.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Nike Air</figure>

Nike Air traces its roots back to 1977, where retired aerospace engineer Marion Franklin Rudy presented an air cushioned shoe prototype to Nike co-founder Phil Knight. The idea was to add airbags to the soles of athletic shoes to cushion the user’s fall, and while other companies rejected Rudy’s idea, Knight loved it.

This led to a partnership which spurred Nike Air. The first shoes, which featured the first iteration of the air cushioning technology, were limited to a run of 250 pairs of the 1978 Tailwind. Nike created a test market during a Hawaii Honolulu Marathon to see if the shoes would sell. All 250 pairs sold out in a single day for a mere $50 each. After further testing on the shoe technology, researchers from the University of Tennessee discovered that walkers and runners using the Tailwind required less energy to propel forward than those using other—more traditional— running shoe designs.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Nike Air</figure>

To ensure the quality of the airbags used was top notch, Rudy helped create the Kim Tester, a machine which attacked the bags with utmost ferocity. Named after his daughter, the machine took an airbag from each production run and pummeled it repeatedly to test its durability. If the shoe design passed the test, the airbags were used in the next production line. If they failed, they were discarded, and a new batch was made.

The 80s and 90s saw more design changes to what would eventually become Nike Air. Nike Innovation Kitchen leader and all-around shoe design icon Tinker Hatfield designed the Air Max 1, which was further improved in the 90s when models like the Air Max 90, Air Max Big Window, Air Max 95, and Air Max Plus were released.

Nowadays, new Nike Air models are brainstormed by a team that prioritizes form, function, and seasonal styles for the shoe line. While the process isn’t as medieval as the Kim Tester, they still hold Rudy’s core concept at the center of their creative process.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Nike Air<figcaption>Nike Air Max 90</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Nike Air<figcaption>Nike Air Max Big Window</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Nike Air<figcaption>Nike Air Max 95</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Nike Air<figcaption>Nike Air Max Plus</figcaption></figure>

Read the full story over at Nike.

The post The Foundation of Nike Air Lies in the Hands of an Aerospace Engineer appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at April 09, 2019 02:24 AM

Cool Books: ‘The 3D Printing Handbook’ by 3D Hubs

3D Hubs Book

Since screaming on to the rapid prototyping scene in 2013, 3D Hubs has been relentless in making sure their message is heard. Billed as the “AirBnB of 3D Printing”, the company’s business model is based on experienced 3D printer technicians renting out their equipment to other users on a per-project-basis.

Not surprisingly, the 3D Hubs crew has learned a thing or two about what makes for “good design for 3D printing” — and now, they want to share it with all of us.

The 3D Printing Handbook | Technologies, Design, and Applications is written for design and engineering professionals looking to master the key aspects of 3D printing—from connecting parts to internal radius’—and everything in between.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The 3D Printing Handbook by 3D Hubs — $26.00 (Hardcover)

Features:

  • Insights into the mechanism behind all major 3D printing technologies
  • An understanding of the benefits and limitations of each technology
  • Decision-making tools for technology selection
  • Actionable design advice and guidelines
    Industry case studies from world-leading brands

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Books: ‘The 3D Printing Handbook’ by 3D Hubs appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 09, 2019 01:59 AM

April 08, 2019

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Monday List 15.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

DIY Cabin Design

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Six Ways to Stop the Internet from Ruining Your Day

The web is full of distractions that make it hard to concentrate on the job. This Georgetown computer science professor thinks he can help.

<figure class="aligncenter">MacBook Pro</figure>

Tesla Engineered the Perfect Demand Curve

Breaking down the boldest bets in business.

<figure class="aligncenter">Tesla Engineered the Perfect Demand Curve</figure>

Burning Man Meets REI

Outpost wants to disrupt the outdoor gear trade show business. Our writer descended on its California festival last fall to check out the felt hat–wearing, Bulleit bourbon–sipping crowd and to find out whether the buzzy experience is anything more than an Instagram-ready fad.

<figure class="aligncenter">Burning Man Meets REI</figure>

This New Generation of Weapons Could Mean More Covert Airstrikes Around the World

These tubes can, according to manufacturers’ websites, be fitted onto much of the Defense Department’s fleet of previously unarmed surveillance planes to enable covert attacks — and thus potentially vastly increase the number of aircraft capable of carrying out airstrikes, allowing the American military to discreetly move converted gunships around the world.

<figure class="aligncenter">This New Generation of Weapons Could Mean More Covert Airstrikes Around the World</figure>

Google’s New AI Head Is So Smart He Doesn’t Need AI

Jeff Dean, who joined Google in 1999 when the company was a startup, is now head of Google’s artificial-intelligence efforts.

<figure class="aligncenter">Google's New AI Head Is So Smart He Doesn't Need AI</figure>

A Sustainable Cabin You Can Build Yourself for $20,000

What started as an experiment will soon be available for DIYers everywhere.

<figure class="aligncenter">A Sustainable Cabin You Can Build Yourself for $20,000</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 15.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 08, 2019 01:44 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Spell Checker

SOLIDWORKS can check the spelling of the words in your document notes, dimension text, and drawing title block using a central dictionary. The Spell Checker is available with Microsoft Word 2000 or later. If a wrong spelling is found using the Spell Checker tool, you can replace the word using entries from Microsoft Word dictionary and SOLIDWORKS dictionary (swengineering.dic).

In order to check the spelling, go to Tools > Spelling:

The Spell Checker highlights the misspelled words and offers some alternative suggestions for these words.

Using SOLIDWORKS Spell Checker to Fix Misspelled Words

Using Spell Checker to Fix Misspelled Words

You can Ignore the misspelled words, Change them to the new suggested words, or Add them to swengineering.dic user dictionary.

You can also specify a different central library location by clicking on More Options > Dictionaries > Add a new dictionary.

Adding New Dictionaries to Spell Checker

Adding New Dictionaries to SOLIDWORKS Spell Checker

If you want to check for spelling in a sheet format, you need to be in Edit Sheet Format mode by right-clicking the drawing sheet and click Edit Sheet Format. Also the Spell Checker does not check for words in a table, and is only available in English.

The post SOLIDWORKS Spell Checker appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at April 08, 2019 12:00 PM

April 05, 2019

The Javelin Blog

3 Reasons why the Stratasys F120 is the best 3D Printer for SOLIDWORKS

3D printing is becoming very popular with designers, engineers, educators, and especially SOLIDWORKS users who want to create prototypes of their CAD models. We are often asked the question “What is the best 3D printer for SOLIDWORKS?”

That is a great question as there are many good 3D printers on the market right now and they vary in size, technology, and of course price. It also depends on your 3D printing requirements and the budget you have available.

Best 3D Printer is a Professional Machine

But the one thing you want to ensure when shopping around for a 3D printer is to choose a ‘commercial/professional’ machine and not a ‘consumer’ machine. In a previous article we outlined the advantages of a commercial machine over a consumer printer; but the main reason is if you use SOLIDWORKS for professional design work then you need a proven professional-grade commercial 3D printer that is going to last and consistently print good results for you every time. So for an affordable professional-grade machine we recommend the Stratasys F120.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UAwvSr6uLnc?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

In this article we will outline the three main reasons why we recommend the Stratasys F120 as the best 3D printer for SOLIDWORKS:

Professional 3D printing applications

Review the table below to compare the applications of a Stratasys F120 to leading consumer 3D printers. Note that the F120 is able to be used for ALL phases of your design process. Whereas a consumer 3D printer is not able to be used in applications beyond the concept phase:

PRODUCTION PHASE APPLICATION COMMERCIAL
Stratasys F120
CONSUMER
3D PRINTERS
Concept Phase Earliest Concept Good Good
Initial Product Iteration Good Good
Communication Model Good Fair
Focus Group Model Good Fair
Basic Fit Testing Good Fair
Ergonomic Testing Good Fair
Architectural Model Good  –
Complex Design Good  –
Functional
Prototyping Phase
Fit and Assembly Prototype Good  –
Solid Colour Models Good  –
Functional Test Parts Good  –
Manufacturing Phase Jigs, Fixtures, and Gauges Good  –
Surrogate Parts Good  –
Production/End-use Parts Good  –

 

1. 3D print with genuine ABS-M30 and ASA Plastic

The majority of today’s consumer products — and many commercial ones — are composed of thermoplastics. When designing a new product, you can best predict its end performance by prototyping with a material as similar to it as possible. The F120 creates parts with the same types of raw material found in injection molding facilities around the globe, this allows you to 3D print plastic parts for many different applications from concept modeling through product development and manufacturing.

Here are just a few benefits of the materials used by the F120 machine:

  • Mechanically strong and stable over time.
  • Layer bonding is significantly stronger for a more durable part than materials from competitors.
  • Greater tensile, impact, and flexural strength than materials from competitors.
  • Versatile Material: Good for form, fit and functional applications.
  • ABS-M30 and ASA work with soluble support material to create complex models, and support removal is hands-free.
  • Available in a variety of colours
    • ABS-M30 includes six colours: Ivory, white, blue, black, red, and dark grey
    • ASA includes ten colours: Ivory, white, blue, black, red, grey, dark blue, green, yellow, and orange

2. Higher quality models and better performance

The F120 is powered by Stratasys’ patented FDM® (Fused Deposition Modeling™) technology. It’s the technology on which thousands of design engineers test their designs and creates stronger more robust models than leading consumer 3D printers. Here are just a few reasons why the F120 is the best 3D printer to prototype:

2 (a) Easy collaboration

What’s more powerful: showing a 3D model, or a physical part that everyone can hold? Through every design iteration, the F120 turns your ideas into strong, functional models ready for collaboration and testing. The Best 3D Printer builds accurate, stable 3D parts in ABS plastic. They’re ideal for determining form, fit and function in everything from ergonomics to manufacturing processes.

Model House Shock Absorber Model Faucet Model Valve Model Air duct model Clip Model
2 (b) Product Functional Testing

When it’s time to test your concepts, F120 models stand up to functional testing whereas consumer 3D printer models can easily break. You’ll get more quality feedback, resulting in a better product. With a footprint of just 889 x 870 x 721 mm (35 x 35 x 29 in.), the F120’s ability to produce quick, inexpensive models will help you efficiently review multiple concepts right from your desk.

2 (c) Better quality model and machine performance

Typically consumer 3D printers have issues when producing models on a regular basis. You will find models that have stringing and oozing or are warped. Also printer performance is not consistent with material nozzles that get clogged, difficulties with printing small details and misaligned prints. The F120 has none of these issues and creates reliable consistent models every time.

Consumer 3D Printer Issues

3. Stratasys F120 can be used for manufacturing

Let’s have a look at the manufacturing phase applications in more detail as this is where the F120 is best 3D printer to aid your manufacturing:

3 (a) 3D print Jigs, Fixtures, and Gauges

Manufacturing relies on tools, including jigs, fixtures, templates and gauges, to maintain quality and production efficiency – now you can quickly manufacture them with an F120. Instead of spending time and money to machine, fabricate, mold, or cast your tools you can easily design them in SOLIDWORKS then print them with the F120 3D printer using production-grade material. The F120 will:

  • Reduce lead times by 40 to 80 percent.
  • Reduce costs by 70 to 95 percent.
  • Improve assembly accuracy.
Jig & Fixtures Example

Jig & Fixtures Example

3 (b) Create Surrogate Parts

Mock-ups, or surrogate parts, may be substituted for production components during the assembly and interface evaluation phase of a project. Surrogate parts preserve all of the critical details for an installation while minimizing expense and lead time when they are manufactured with an F120. Produced as needed, with up-to-date configuration changes, the F120 surrogates will:

  • Confirm clearances and interfaces for installation assessment;
  • Highlight serviceability issues and;
  • Validate routing interfaces for wiring harnesses and fluid conduits.
Best 3D Printer Surrogate Part Example

Surrogate Part Example

3 (c) Create Production/End-use Parts

Using a Stratasys F120 3D printer is a unique alternative for the production of end-use items. Having little in common with traditional manufacturing methods, the uniqueness of 3D printing can change the decision-making process, overturns old principles and creates new criteria. The primary advantage of 3D printing parts is that it removes constraints imposed by traditional manufacturing processes, such as injection molding or die casting and allows you to:

  • Replace expensive molding, machining or tooling.
  • 3D print a short or limited run production.
  • Create complex or small intricate parts which would be hard to manufacture with traditional processes.
Best 3D Printer End-use Parts

3D Printed End-use Parts

Conclusion: Stratasys F120 is the best 3D Printer for SOLIDWORKS

So there you have it, three good reasons why the F120 is the best ‘starter’ SOLIDWORKS 3D printer:

  1. Able to print with true ABS and ASA Materials
  2. Creates better prototypes than consumer 3D printers
  3. Can create end-use parts and manufacturing tools.

Learn about Stratasys F120 »

The post 3 Reasons why the Stratasys F120 is the best 3D Printer for SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at April 05, 2019 12:00 PM

April 04, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Beware of using a Cheap 3D Printer for Professional Work

The Truth about using a Cheap 3D Printer for work and how to get it right the first time with a low cost professional desktop machine

You’re ready to buy a desktop 3D printer to enhance your business. You’ve done your homework and the benefits are clear: freedom of design, faster prototyping and reduced time-to-market, to name a few. The question is, what printer is best for your organization’s needs?

To get professional 3D printing results, you need professional tools. But most people think they can make do with a consumer/hobby 3D printer. They quickly find out, however, that a cheap 3D printer does not meet their expectations.

Cheap 3D Printer Guide

Once upon a time, there wasn’t much choice. Most 3D printers were large and expensive, needed their own separate environment, and a highly trained operator. But that all changed once low-priced hobby printers catering to the “maker” movement entered the scene. These desktop printers offered the allure of 3D printing at an enticing low price.

But like so many things, you truly do get what you pay for. To get the most value from 3D printing, professionals need a 3D printer that comes in not only at a good price point but can deliver quality results. Again and again.

Top five reasons hobby/consumer printers are NOT suited to professional work:

  1. Unable to print parts consistently and frequently: Professional printers will print parts that are within ten thousandths of an inch to the 3D model/STL file. Hobbyist printers are unable to consistently print within that tolerance.
  2. Models have warping: Professional printers have been engineered to ensure the parts do not warp during the build. The parts come off the printers true and without warping.
  3. Model scaring and divots from post processing: Having support material (aka scaffolding for an overhanging build) guarantees build quality. Machines that use the model material as support material produce parts with ‘scars’ on the surface of the parts. Hobbyist machines require a manual process to remove the support structure which leaves divots and scars on the surface of the part where the scaffolding held onto the part.
  4. Monitoring required Professional printers are truly a set it and forget it type of solution. Every night we start prints in our lab at Javelin and we come to the office the next morning to our successful builds. Unfortunately hobbyist machines need monitoring to ensure success. Putting a machine in a workflow where an engineer needs to supervise it simply does not make sense.
  5. Reliability: If your printer does break down, which is frequently with hobbyist machines, who is going to fix it? Probably you and yes it will most likely be during a very busy point in your day. Professional printers purchased from Javelin can include nationwide Canadian coverage so you can rest assured that Javelin will provide the service needed to keep the machine running to maximum efficiency.

It doesn’t have to be a choice between great performance and price

The new Stratasys F120 Desktop 3D Printer provides industrial-grade 3D printing at an attractive price with consistent results that other desktop printers can’t match. Download our 3D Printer Guide and learn how the F120 stacks up against the competition:

  • Learn the truth about Desktop 3D Printers
  • Learn about the latest solution that checks all the boxes
  • Learn how to avoid the ‘low price’ trap

Complete the form below to download our guide and get it right the first time!

Desktop 3D printer guide

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The post Beware of using a Cheap 3D Printer for Professional Work appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at April 04, 2019 03:07 PM

DraftSight 2019 Packaging and Pricing Changes You Need To Know About

DraftSight packaging and licensing has changed for the 2019 release. The biggest change is the fact that DraftSight Standard will no longer be available as a free version, instead there will be a charge of US$99 annually for the software which you can purchase directly from the DraftSight Online Store »

What happens to installations of the DraftSight free version?

If you are currently using the free version of DraftSight, you may continue to use DraftSight 2018 or previous versions until December 31, 2019. You may reactivate your free version once more after the launch of DraftSight 2019. All free versions of DraftSight will cease to run after December 31, 2019.

PLEASE NOTE: If you decide to download and install the free 30-day trial of DraftSight 2019 Professional, or if you purchase any version of DraftSight 2019, you will not be able to redownload any previous free version of DraftSight (2018 or earlier).

What makes DraftSight 2019 different from previous versions?

DraftSight 2019 is the beginning of the next chapter in the journey to develop innovative design solutions for users. DraftSight 2019 gives you the freedom to do more with a 2D drafting and 3D design experience that lets you create, edit, view and markup any kind of 2D and 3D DWG file design. Its familiar user interface facilitates a quick transition from your current CAD application. Learn about the latest release in the video below:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Et8xp8y1IwU?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

What is the new pricing and packaging?

DraftSight 2019 is available as five different packages. The new packaging is as follows:

DraftSight Standard

  • For individuals, students, educators, hobbyists, and others that need a straightforward 2D CAD drafting solution with a familiar user interface.
  • New features for 2019 release include: Insert Centerlines, Paste to Active Layer, Discard Duplicate Entities, Quick Modify, and PDF Import
  • Exclusively sold on the DraftSight online store as an annual subscription at US$99/year.
  • Buy DraftSight Standard Now »

DraftSight Professional

  • For professionals and companies that need an advanced 2D CAD drafting solution with powerful, productivity boosting features and API to help bring their designs to life quickly and easily.
  • New features for 2019 release include: Using Formulas in Table Cells, Block Attribute Manager, Viewport Layer Freezing, Image Tracer, 3DEXPERIENCE® Marketplace Make Integration, and HomeByMe Integration
  • Exclusively sold on the DraftSight online store as an annual subscription at US$199/year.
  • Buy DraftSight Professional Now »

DraftSight Premium

  • For individuals, designers, makers, manufacturers, professionals, and companies that need a robust 2D drafting and 3D design experience to help meet their needs on drafting, modeling, prototyping, manufacturing, laser cutting and 3D printing.
  • It includes all DraftSight Professional features plus a comprehensive set of 3D DWG design and constraint capabilities.
  • Exclusively sold on the DraftSight online store as an annual subscription at US$499/year.
  • Buy DraftSight Premium Now »

DraftSight Enterprise

  • For large organizations with many users or multiple sites that need an advanced 2D CAD drafting solution with powerful, productivity boosting features and API to help bring their designs to life quickly and easily.
  • It includes all DraftSight Premium features, plus full technical support and network licensing to enable concurrent usage across the organization.
  • Exclusively sold via your local SOLIDWORKS Reseller as an annual subscription (US$399/year) or a perpetual license (US$499/licence + US$299/maintenance).
  • Existing DraftSight Enterprise customers can renew their licenses for the US$299 maintenance price.
  • Contact us to purchase DraftSight Enterprise »

DraftSight Enterprise Plus

  • For large organizations with many users or multiple sites that need a robust 2D drafting and 3D design experience to help meet their needs on drafting, modeling, prototyping, manufacturing, laser cutting and 3D printing.
  • It includes all DraftSight Enterprise features plus a comprehensive set of 3D DWG design and constraint capabilities, full technical support and network licensing to enable concurrent usage across the organization.
  • Exclusively sold via Resellers as an annual subscription (US$699) or perpetual license (US$899/license + $499/maintenance).
  • Contact us to purchase DraftSight Enterprise Plus »

PLEASE NOTE: DraftSight 2019 Standard, Professional and Premium are only offered as a 12-month subscription (the non-subscription is no longer offered for these products. DraftSight 2019 Enterprise and Enterprise Plus are offered as both subscription and non-subscription).

What’s the activation method for each product?

DraftSight 2019 Standard, Professional and Premium are activated by simply purchasing a serial number online and entering it during installation. Internet connection is required to activate your serial number.

DraftSight 2019 Enterprise and Enterprise Plus are activated by purchasing through your reseller, by choosing an SNL (SOLIDWORKS Network License) or DSLS (Dassault Systèmes License Server) network license.

Is there a charge for additional support?

If you’re a DraftSight 2019 Standard, Professional, or Premium user and would like to purchase additional full technical support, you can purchase DraftSight Prosumer, which includes installation, activation, configuration, and usage support via email and telephone. Here are the buying options:

Is there a trial version of DraftSight 2019 available?

Yes! A 30-day trial of DraftSight 2019 Professional is available upon installation. Use the form below to download DraftSight 2019 for Windows, then select “Free 30-Day Trial” in the installation window.

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What is the feature difference between the packages?

The following table highlights the differences between different packages:

Features Standard Professional Premium Enterprise
2D Design Tools
Create basic elements such as lines, polylines, arcs, circles, ellipses, layers, blocks, and others.
Included Included Included Included
2D Documentation Tools
Create basic annotation elements such as notes, dimensions, tables, hatches, clouds, and others.
Included Included Included Included
Community Resources
Offer learning resources and a collaborative environment to interact with your peers, ask questions, and share opinions.
Included Included Included Included
PDF Underlay
Attach pages of a PDF document to a drawing.
Included Included Included Included
Toolbox
Quickly generate hardware, holes, balloons, Bills of Materials (BOMs), welding and surface finish symbols.
Included Included Included
Batch Printing
Send a set of drawings and sheets to printers in a batch job.
Included Included Included
Drawing Compare
Compare graphically similar entities between two drawing documents.
Included Included Included
Power Trim
Trim multiple, adjacent entities by dragging the pointer across each entity.
Included Included Included
G-Code Generator
Communicate with a CNC machine for fabrication.
Included Included Included
DGN Import
Directly import and convert the DGN file format drawing into a DraftSight project for direct editing.
Included Included Included
DraftSight APIs
Allow end users or third-party developers to customize and automate DraftSight.
Included Included Included
Image Tracer
Convert an imported raster image file (ex. floor plan, logo) into vectorized line entities.
Included Included Included
Using Formulas in Table Cells
Use formulas in cells with arithmetic operators and the Sum, Average, and Count functions.
Included Included Included
Trimming of Hatches and Gradients
Trim hatches and gradients with the Trim and PowerTrim commands.
Included Included Included
3D Modeling Tools
Introduces 3D modeling using basic geometrical shapes (ex. Box, Pyramid) or other methods (ex. Extrude, Revolve) with Boolean operations (ex. Union, Subtract).
Included Included
2D Constraints
Use 2D Constraints to control drawing entities parametrically by specifying geometric and dimensional properties of entities.
Included Included
Network License
Enable concurrent usage and compliance across the organization.
Included
Deployment Wizard
Enable large groups of users to install or upgrade DraftSight.
Included
Technical Support
Answer questions or troubleshoot issues related to DraftSight.
Included

The post DraftSight 2019 Packaging and Pricing Changes You Need To Know About appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at April 04, 2019 01:36 PM

April 03, 2019

SolidSmack

Gravity Sketch Co-Founder Recognized As One Of The UK’s Most Influential Women in Business

Gravity Sketch Founder

These days, women are making increasingly profound strides in the business and executive world at levels that might have been unheard of even 30 years ago. Daniella Paredes Fuentes, co-founder of the Gravity Sketch VR 3D modeling tool, is one of these modern-day renegades.

<figure class="aligncenter">fuentes most influential women 2019</figure>

Daniella was one of nine women leaders who won the recent Women in Innovation Awards 2019. Helmed by the Innovate UK Technology Strategy Board of the UK government, the award not only grants its winners bragging rights, but also a £50,000 grant and business support from the government.

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</figure>

For those unfamiliar, Gravity Sketch is software that allows users to create 3D models using an AR/ VR headset. Just like other programs of its kind, Gravity Sketch lets you create drafts of CADs and work on them in a 3D environment. You can then either fine tune them using the headset or import them onto a computer and work using a more traditional sketchpad. What separates Gravity from other 3D modeling programs is its intuitive workflow that—quite literally—allows the user to sketch full-scale in a physical environment. While the finished models aren’t ideal for dimensional accuracy, they nonetheless serve as an in-between between a paper notebook and a more robust mechanical CAD program.

<figure class="aligncenter">fuentes most influential women 2019</figure>

The software has seen uses in the art, education, product design, and automotive industries, but with the extra funding, Fuentes hopes to increase Gravity Sketch’s applications in other fields over the next five years. With the recent additional funding and recognition, both Fuentes and the Gravity Sketch team can work towards making 3D designing more accessible for everyone.

The Women in Innovation Awards were started by Innovate UK back in 2016 to increase diversity in businesses. When the organization realized that 1 in 7 companies who applied for their support was woman-led, Innovate UK stepped in and made a competition specifically for them.

The post Gravity Sketch Co-Founder Recognized As One Of The UK’s Most Influential Women in Business appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at April 03, 2019 12:32 PM

The Red Mud Project Creates Ceramic Tableware From Industrial Waste

Red Mud Project

Many kids are told to never play with mud. In the case of a team of designers from London’s Royal College of Art, however, playing with mud is a foundation for making the world a better place.

Bauxite residue, also known as “red mud,” is a byproduct of the creation of aluminum. By refining bauxite ore into alumina, you get the precious metal everyone uses to cover their food and store their beverages in. Yet, about 1.5 times more bauxite residue is made than the alumina it produces, resulting in millions of tons of the stuff which are dumped into giant holes located around the world.

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</figure>

The Royal College of Art team, composed of designers Guillermo Whittembury, Joris Olde Rikkert, Kevin Rouff, and Luis Paco Bockelmann, have come up with a way to take all this red mud residue and turn it into usable and safe ceramic material.

<figure class="wp-block-image">red mud project</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">red mud project</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">red mud project</figure>

The red mud they use comes from a waste pit just south of France. By working with material scientists, Imperial College London, ceramicists, and factories dotted all across Europe; the team conducted numerous tests to create various molds for different types of ceramic glazes and tableware.

<figure class="wp-block-image">red mud project</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">red mud project</figure>

Using different firing temperatures, they were able to create various colored ceramics from the same material and mold. The result is a tableware set inspired by modern-day factories where most of the red mud comes from. You can see how some of the taller tableware reminds you of smokestacks, while the smaller ceramics mimic the buildings where factory workers are forced to pollute the environment by their corporate masters.

<figure class="wp-block-image">red mud project</figure>

This design choice to mimic the factories red mud comes from is an attempt to raise awareness of just how much waste is produced daily, but it also helps to highlight just how useful the by-products produced by the making of these materials are—and might help inspire other designers to look towards manufacturing waste when exploring materials for their designs, too.

Find out more over at the Red Mud Project.

The post The Red Mud Project Creates Ceramic Tableware From Industrial Waste appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at April 03, 2019 12:15 PM

Dyson’s New Lightcycle Lamp Will Last Up To 60 Years

dyson lightcycle

For those who aren’t fans of the dark, Dyson recently announced its new line of Lightcycle desk and floor lamps that—according to them—will last you for the better part of your life. At $599.99 for the company’s new Lightcycle desk lamp and $899.99 for the new Lightcycle floor lamp, these light fixtures are a far cry from that Ninja Turtle nightlight you still secretly keep in the hallway.

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</figure>

As any piece of Dyson hardware goes, the technology inside the lamps is part of what makes them so expensive. Most LEDs used in lighting tend to overheat from continued use, resulting in their deterioration. In the case of the Lightcycle lamps, Dyson installed heat pipe cooling technology that uses vacuum-sealed copper tubing combined with water cooling to increase the lifespan of their LEDs up to 60 years.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

This cooling system powers one of the most sophisticated light fixtures you’ve ever seen. Anyone with a general grasp of sensor technology knows how the lamp automatically turns on when you’re in its presence, but it also adjusts its brightness (which ranges from 100 to 1000 lux) and color (ranging from 2,700 to 6,500 °K) depending on your age, time of day, and what you are currently doing.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

An ambient light sensor regularly checks your background lighting and adjusts the lamp’s brightness. Age settings can be set using the Dyson Link App. Older folks tend to need more light than younglings, so the Lightcycle could automatically adjust to be dimmer for a 20-year-old but brighter for someone pushing 80. In total, users can choose from three activity settings: Relax, Study, or Precision depending on lighting environment needs.

Power-wise, the lamp comes with a single USB-C charger on the stand which serves to lessen the number of devices plugged into your laptop. It isn’t the biggest feature of the lamp, but it does help when you need something charged by your bedside table. The Dyson Lightcycle lamps are already available in China but will be available on the global market later this month.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Lastly, the lamp comes with a single USB-C charger on the stand which serves to lessen the number of devices plugged into your laptop. It isn’t the biggest feature of the lamp, but it does help when you need something charged by your bedside table.

Find out more over at Dyson.

The post Dyson’s New Lightcycle Lamp Will Last Up To 60 Years appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at April 03, 2019 12:03 PM

The Javelin Blog

Introducing the first SLA 3D Printer from Stratasys – The V650 Flex

Stratasys, the additive manufacturing quality and reliability leader, has announced a new 3D printer to their list of product offerings. The new V650 Flex is the first ever Stratasys 3D printer featuring Stereolithography (SLA) technology.

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Stereolithography is a form of 3D printing technology used for creating parts layer by layer, by projecting an ultraviolet (UV) laser onto a vat of photopolymer resin. Photopolymers are sensitive to ultraviolet light, so the resin is photochemically solidified and therefore forms a single layer of the part. Then the build platform lowers one layer at a time while a blade re-coats the top of the tank with resin. This process is repeated for each layer of the design until the 3D object is complete. Completed parts must be washed with a solvent to clean wet resin off their surfaces.

 

The V650 excels when it comes to single material large parts and is useful for prototypes for design validation, casting patterns and injection molding. Closed systems currently on the market are restrictive when it comes to variety and cost of materials. The open system Stratasys V650 SLA printer offers reliability, high print quality, large part production and versatility when it comes to choosing the materials best suited for your for needs. Productivity isn’t an issue since this industrial machine is designed for 24/7 operation and built for reliable production that’s backed by Stratasys service and resin supply.

Stratasys V650 Flex SLA 3D Printer

Stratasys V650 Flex SLA 3D Printer

Benefits

  • Open system (any 355nm resin)
  • 4 Somos Verified Materials (Somos Watershed XC 11122, Somos PerFORM, Somos Element, Somos NeXt)
  • Large build volume: 20″W x 20”D x 23”H
  • Interchangeable vats
  • Adjustable beam size (0.005″ – 0.015″ diameter)

Verified Materials:

  • Somos Watershed XC 11122: Low viscosity liquid photopolymer that produces strong, tough, water‐resistant, ABS‐like parts. Most importantly, parts are nearly colorless, and look more like clear engineered plastic.
  • Somos PerFORM: Medium viscosity liquid photopolymer that produces strong, stiff, high temperature resistant composite parts. Material of choice for applications such as tooling and wind tunnel testing.
  • Somos Element: Next generation liquid photopolymer specifically designed for producing investment casting patterns. Antimony‐free leaving only trace amounts of ash residue following burnout.
  • Somos NeXt: Extremely durable liquid photopolymer that produces accurate parts with high feature detail. Facilitates the production of tough, complex parts with improved moisture resistance and greater thermal properties.
SLA parts from SOMOS material

SLA parts from SOMOS material

About Stratasys

For over 30 years Stratasys has been pioneering 3D Printing technology. The Stratasys product line ranges from small desktop 3D printers to full production machines. Stratasys also offers end-to-end production of 3D printed parts and offers different technologies and materials such as FDM, Polyjet and now SLA, to be suitable for any industry or application. Stratasys 3D Printers play an important role in countless industries, including Medical, Automotive, Aerospace and Mold, Tool & Die. 3D Printing reduces the length of the prototype model process and reduces tooling costs and re-work.

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The post Introducing the first SLA 3D Printer from Stratasys – The V650 Flex appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Adam Ferrer at April 03, 2019 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

App Smack 14.19: Typography Insight, VSCO, Flow by Moleskine, and More…

Best iPhone Apps

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved smart device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional. This week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Typography Insight (iOS — Free)

Typography Insight is a toolkit for learning & teaching typography, designed for those who love type. You can learn about historically important typefaces, observe and compare them. Now you can access system fonts and thousands of fonts from Adobe Typekit with Adobe ID.

<figure class="aligncenter">Typography Insight</figure>

Microsoft Outlook (iOS – Free)

Outlook lets you bring all your email accounts and calendars in one convenient spot. Whether it’s staying on top of your inbox or scheduling the next big thing, we make it easy to be your most productive, organized, and connected self.

<figure class="aligncenter">Outlook Email</figure>

Flow by Moleskine (iOS — Free)

Bringing the legendary Moleskine notebook experience to iOS, Flow is an all-new way to create simple drawings, complex works of art, and beautiful notes all on your iPad and iPhone.

<figure class="aligncenter">Flow by Moleskine</figure>

Enki – Coding, Learn to Code (iOS — Free)

The #1 app to learn data science, learn to code, stay on top of tech trends, or to keep improving as a developer! Topics include SQL, Data Science, JavaScript, Python, Blockchain, CSS, HTML, Security, git, CompSci fundamentals, Linux and Java.

<figure class="aligncenter">Enki - Coding, Learn to Code</figure>

VSCO (iOS — Free)

Take your photography to the next level with quality presets and editing tools, and explore original content made by community members around the world.

<figure class="aligncenter">VSCO</figure>

Blendeo (iOS — Free)

Blendeo, the most advanced long exposure photo and video editor. First of its kind, it lets you change exposure time after capture to blend imagery that gets noticed.

<figure class="aligncenter">Blendeo</figure>

The post App Smack 14.19: Typography Insight, VSCO, Flow by Moleskine, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 03, 2019 11:50 AM

April 02, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Introducing the NEW Stratasys F120 Desktop FDM 3D Printer

The Stratays F120 printer has just been unveiled by Stratasys at AMUG 2019. The F120 is an industrial-grade 3D Printer developed to empower offices, work groups and educational institutes. The F120 is the newest member of the Stratasys F123 Series and will perform with the same reliability and ease-of-use as the larger 3D Printers in the series.

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Plug and Play

With the new F120, you can simply plug and play and have access to precise, reliable and professional 3D printing. Fast, easy material change-out, plus auto-calibration ensures you spend less time troubleshooting and more time prototyping. One of the key features of this new 3D Printer is continuous production for non-stop 24/7 production. The industrial-grade F120 was designed for high utilization and long life, while remaining affordable, accessible and reliable.

Stratasys F120 3D Printer

Stratasys F120 3D Printer

Specifications

  • Print Size: 254 x 254 x 254 mm (10 x 10 x 10 in)
  • Printer Size: Desktop size, 275 lbs
  • Materials: ABS-M30, ASA, SR-35 Support material
  • Installation: Easy customer installation
  • Material Delivery: 2 material spool bays, 1 for model, 1 for support

Ideal F120 Applications

Using FDM Technology the new Stratasys F120 is beneficial to various industries and will play a significant role in high schools and post secondary facilities, engineering/design agencies as well as small to medium enterprise work groups. With an F120, students can learn on the latest 3D technology, widen their design capabilities, and run fast reliable printing. Learning about additive manufacturing with an industrial grade F120 will help prepare students for a future in the industry.

For many industries, the ability to create realistic prototypes is extremely valuable. Altering designs and making modifications without having to re-manufacture the part several times reduces development cycle times and costs. Coil wound SR-30 support material ensures best performance to streamline the hands-free support material for post processing.

Enjoy industrial quality and performance from a plug-and-play machine sitting in your office. Reliable, high quality and easy to use technology ready to improve education and rapid prototyping. Improve your productivity and experience with a desktop system.

To learn more about the Stratasys F120 visit our site or contact us at 1-877-219-6757.

<noscript> <iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="1000" src="https://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2019-03-29/czh453" style="border: 0" type="text/html" width="100%"></iframe> </noscript> <script type="text/javascript"> var form = 'https://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2019-03-29/czh453'; var params = window.location.search; var thisScript = document.scripts[document.scripts.length - 1]; var iframe = document.createElement('iframe'); iframe.setAttribute('src', form + params); iframe.setAttribute('width', '100%'); iframe.setAttribute('type', 'text/html'); iframe.setAttribute('frameborder', 0); iframe.setAttribute('allowTransparency', 'true'); iframe.setAttribute('scrolling', 'no'); iframe.setAttribute('id', 'sizetracker'); iframe.style.border = '0'; thisScript.parentElement.replaceChild(iframe, thisScript); </script> <script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/iframe-resizer/3.5.3/iframeResizer.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> // Create browser compatible event handler. var eventMethod = window.addEventListener ? "addEventListener" : "attachEvent"; var eventer = window[eventMethod]; var messageEvent = eventMethod == "attachEvent" ? "onmessage" : "message"; // Listen for a message from the iframe. eventer(messageEvent, function(e) { if (isNaN(e.data)) return; // replace #sizetracker with what ever what ever iframe id you need document.getElementById('sizetracker').style.height = e.data + 'px'; }, false); </script>

The post Introducing the NEW Stratasys F120 Desktop FDM 3D Printer appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Adam Ferrer at April 02, 2019 01:12 PM

April 01, 2019

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Monday List 14.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

The Particular Sheen of America by AMTRAK

Amtrak clings to the hope that someday people will view its service not as something that sucks and that they hate, but as something that is actually nice and that they don’t hate.

<figure class="aligncenter">Amtrak Vacation</figure>

The World’s Greatest Delivery Empire

In China, Meituan has reshaped city life—and heightened a rivalry with a certain competitor.

<figure class="aligncenter">The World’s Greatest Delivery Empire</figure>

Why the Aeron I s Still the Most Coveted Seat in the Office

Within months, the chair became what New York magazine dubbed a “dotcom throne”—a four-­figure status symbol that rose and fell and rebounded with the fortunes of Silicon Valley.

<figure class="aligncenter">Why the Aeron I s Still the Most Coveted Seat in the Office</figure>

How the World’s Biggest Brewer Killed the Craft Beer Buzz

Steve Luke had plenty to smile about. Cloudburst Brewing, the tiny craft brewery he founded two years earlier in Seattle, had just won a bronze medal at the 2018 Great American Beer Festival in Denver. It was recognition on craft beer’s biggest stage — basically the Oscars of beer — but Luke, a lanky brewing virtuoso with a shoulder-length mane and a righteous beard, wasn’t content to bask. As the cameras clicked, he unbuttoned his plaid shirt to reveal another shirt beneath it that read in big, red block letters, “FUCK A-B INBEV.”

<figure class="aligncenter">How the World’s Biggest Brewer Killed the Craft Beer Buzz</figure>

Effortless Slippage

For about as long as there has been a networked world there have been people adorning it with the accessories and ephemera of the nation-state.

<figure class="aligncenter">Effortless Slippage</figure>

Free Shipping

We are increasingly surrounded by boxes. A new online purchase arrives on the doorsteps of one-third of American consumers each week. The volume of packages express-shipped by Amazon (more than 5 billion deliveries in 2017) shares an order of magnitude with the earth’s population (approximately 7.4 billion people). Look around your immediate surroundings and you might see the curved logo from one of the company’s boxes smiling at you now.

<figure class="aligncenter">Free Shipping</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 14.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 01, 2019 11:07 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to enable Content Search in SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional (Part 2)

In this article, we are going to look at how to enable the content search in SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional using the Windows Search Service.

The following is required:

  • SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional version 2016 SP0 or newer
  • The archive server service must be able to access the archive folders via locally attached or SAN storage. Network shares are not supported.

NOTE: In this example, the archive server and SQL server are on the different systems.  If they are on the same system, please see part 1 of this article

Step 1 – Enable Windows Search

  • Server Manager > Manage > Add Roles and Features
Add Roles and Features

Add Roles and Features

  • Features > Select Windows Search Service > Next
    • Then click Install
Select Windows Search Service

Select Windows Search Service

  • Confirm via services that the Windows Search Service is running, if not start it;
Start Windows Search Service

Start Windows Search Service

NOTE: This will need to be completed on BOTH the archive and the SQL server

Step 2 – Configure Windows Search to index the vault archives folder

On the archive server;

  • Control Panel > Indexing Options
Indexing Options

Indexing Options

  • Modify > Add the archive folder location including all of its subfolders > Ok
 Add the archive folder location including all of its subfolders

Add the archive folder location including all of its subfolders

 

Step 3 – On the archive server, share the vault archive folder

NOTE: The vault archive folder MUST be accessible from SQL server via a UNC path

  • Navigate to the vault archive folder > Right-Click Properties
    • Sharing Tab > Share
      • Note the UNC path
Note the UNC path

Note the UNC path

Step 4 – Configure the vault to use Windows Search for indexing

  • Administration Tool > Indexing
    • Check Index File Vault Archives
    • Ensure Windows Search is selected for the Indexing Method
    • Select the Archive Path > Edit
Ensure Windows Search is selected for the Indexing Method

Ensure Windows Search is selected for the Indexing Method

  • Add the UNC Path to the vault archive from the SQL server
Add the UNC Path to the vault archive

Add the UNC Path to the vault archive

Step 5 – Complete

  • We should now be able to search the content of files within the vault via;
    • Complete Search Card > Content Tab
      • Search in Content
Search in Content

Search in Content

Wrap up…

By default the Windows Search Service supports indexing the following files types;

  • Microsoft Office files
  • HTML files
  • MIME messages
  • plain-text files

To learn how to include PDFs and for SOLIDWORKS files please subscribe to our blog for future articles.

The post How to enable Content Search in SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional (Part 2) appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at April 01, 2019 12:05 PM

How to enable Content Search in SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional (Part 1)

In this article, we are going to look at how to enable the content search in SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional using the Windows Search Service.

This features requires:

  • SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional version 2016 SP0 or newer
  • The archive server service must be able to access the archive folders via locally attached or SAN storage. Network shares are not supported.

NOTE: In this example, the Archive Server and SQL Server are on the same system.  If they are on separate systems, please see part 2 of this article

Step 1 – Install Windows Search

  • Server Manager > Manage > Add Roles and Features
Add Roles and Features

Add Roles and Features

  • Features > Select Windows Search Service > Next
    • Then click Install
Windows Search Service

Windows Search Service

  • Confirm via services that the Windows Search Service is running, if not start it;

Confirm and Start Service

Step 2 – Configure Windows Search to index the vault archives folder

  • Control Panel > Indexing Options
Indexing Options

Indexing Options

  • Modify > Add the archive folder location including all of its subfolders > Ok
Add the archive folder location including all of its subfolders

Add the archive folder location including all of its subfolders

Step 3 – Configure the vault to use Windows Search for indexing

  • Administration Tool > Indexing
    • Check Index File Vault Archives
    • Ensure Windows Search is selected for the Indexing Method
    • Select the Archive Path > Edit
Configure the vault to use Windows Search for indexing

Configure the vault to use Windows Search for indexing

  • Browse and add the archive path for the SQL Server > Hit Ok and close both dialogs
Add the archive path for the SQL Server

Add the archive path for the SQL Server

Step 4 – Complete

  • We should now be able to search the content of files within the vault via:
    • Complete Search Card > Content Tab
      • Search in Content
Search in Content

Search in Content

Wrap up…

By default the Windows Search Service supports indexing the following files types;

  • Microsoft Office files
  • HTML files
  • MIME messages
  • plain-text files

To learn how to include PDFs and for SOLIDWORKS files please subscribe to our blog for future articles.

The post How to enable Content Search in SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional (Part 1) appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at April 01, 2019 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

3D Hubs Acquires $18M; Unveils Q1 2019 3D Printing Trends Report

3d hubs 3d printing trends q1 2019

Having started with two founders, a single 3D printer and a bicycle in Amsterdam, 3D Hubs sure has come a long way.

Thanks to their ability to interconnect a network of on-demand manufacturers and provide a near-seamless user experience, 3D Hubs has amassed a ton of data on the 3D printing market. Trends, transaction data, market leaders—all valuable industry information that could have quietly lived in a company meeting deck, closed off from the outside world. Thankfully, 3D Hubs is a company hell-bent on the progression of the 3D printing industry as a whole.

<figure class="aligncenter">3d hubs 3d printing trends q1 2019</figure>

The company recently released their 3D Printing Trends Q1 2019 Report analyzing five different data sources: transaction data, interviews from 3D printing market experts, independent surveys of 400 businesses closely linked with the industry, and reviews from the industry’s news and market reports. This data lets readers gain a deeper insight into the additive manufacturing industry and gives people in business a heads up as to whether or not they should invest in the technology for a specific sector.

For instance, transaction data shows that 31% of 3D prints were made for industrial purposes as compared to electrical uses which stand at 21%. Using survey data, it can be seen how 50% used online services for industrial parts, but only 38% of the said 50% use 3D printing for end-use parts, as compared to the 91% of all the companies who use 3D printing just for prototyping. Couple this with interviews from experts and you can see how the limitations of 3D printing applications can be attributed to lack of awareness and not the ability of a person to use the technology.

<figure class="wp-block-image">3d hubs 3d printing trends q1 2019</figure>

The report is also useful from a business standpoint. Several key findings show 75% of 3D Hubs’ consumer base is made up of small-to-medium sized enterprises (SMEs). 49% of these transactions happen in North America while 41% occur in Europe, with the most prints coming from California and the UK. Using this data, folks looking to get into the 3D printing business can focus on these locations to capitalize on the demand in the area.

<figure class="wp-block-image">3d hubs 3d printing trends q1 2019</figure>

The report also includes a recap of 2018’s past 3D printing trends and events as well as various heat maps which show the demand for 3D printing in different areas of the world. The demand in each country is then broken down by industry, application, materials used, and the printing process. Finally, it caps things off with numbers and figures which predict the forecasted growth of the 3D printing market.

Further, this also comes as 3D Hubs announced its $18 million Series C funding round courtesy of Endeit Capital. The fund is primarily aimed to advance 3D Hubs’ automation of important manufacturing features such as design validation, quoting, and smart order routing to its global suppliers. This new funding round, when added to past funding from Hearst Ventures, EQT Ventures, Balderton Capital, Booking.com’s founder Arthur Kosten, and Ultimaker founder Erik de Bruijin, brings 3D Hubs’ funding to a total of $30 million.

The post 3D Hubs Acquires $18M; Unveils Q1 2019 3D Printing Trends Report appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at April 01, 2019 10:00 AM

March 30, 2019

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 13.19

The Nintendo Flex Is a Redesigned Game Boy Concept for the 21st Century

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

The Nintendo Flex Is a Redesigned Game Boy Concept for the 21st Century

Even though it has official successors by way of the Game Boy SP and Game Boy Advance, no other handheld console hits you with nostalgia quite like the original Game Boy. Released in 1989 by Nintendo, this chunky block was what you brought around in the 90s whenever you were forced to go outside without some form of entertainment (the pain!).

<figure class="aligncenter">The Nintendo Flex Is a Redesigned Game Boy Concept for the 21st Century</figure>

These 3D Printed Customizations Make IKEA Products More Accessible For the Disabled

Known famously for their ready-to-assemble flat pack furniture, Swedish manufacturer IKEA isn’t exactly famous for being user-friendly for people with disabilities. Not only do you have to set up the products yourself, but some of the company’s lamps and cabinets have small switches or handles which are too difficult to work with for someone with a condition that impairs mobility, such as cerebral palsy.

<figure class="aligncenter">These 3D Printed Customizations Make IKEA Products More Accessible For the Disabled</figure>

The New Sketching App from Moleskine is Brilliant in Its Simplicity

Flow by Moleskine is a new digital app that turns your iPhone or iPad into a digital sketch or notebook. Unlike other digital sketching apps, however, Flow wears its notebook origins on its shoulders— going so far as incorporating different paper types and colors, as well as the ability to customize your drawing tools in an intuitive and neverending-blank-space workflow (hence the name).

<figure class="aligncenter">The New Sketching App from Moleskine is Brilliant in Its Simplicity</figure>

How to Build Your Own Bluetooth Speaker with Gowanus Audio

We stopped by Gowanus Audio in Brooklyn, NY to get a step-by-step rundown of their DIY Bluetooth speaker class. Founder, Pete Raho, generously shared details and tips in the video below so you can make it yourself!

<figure class="aligncenter">How to Build Your Own Bluetooth Speaker with Gowanus Audio</figure>

Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Mobile Workstation [Review]

I just ran out the door with a Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Mobile Workstation tucked under my arm. That’s no surprise to most people today but, at the same time, it’s comical that I can sprint to a meeting clutching a mobile workstation housing a 2.7Ghz 6-core processor, 64GB RAM, and 2 terabytes of SSD storage. I can though, and Lenovo has slammed this new ThinkPad right in the sweet spot of mobile workstation bliss with an option 3D professional can easily use as their primary tool for ‘Getting Things Done.” Let’s take a look at what this ThinkPad has to offer.

<figure class="aligncenter">Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Mobile Workstation [Review]</figure>

Girls 3D Print Club Encourages Hands-On 3D Printing

A Girls 3D Print Club in Cincinnati, Ohio helps highlight STEM opportunities for students.

<figure class="aligncenter">Girls 3D Print Club Encourages Hands-On 3D Printing</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 13.19 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 30, 2019 03:53 PM

March 29, 2019

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Loose Melon Wallop

Pins under the skin of the Metal Jibbler’s jaw scrapped its veins of conduit and carbon fiber. Five tons of its legs pushed through the trees and against the edge of our turrets on each side. We’d have to get the powder charges in five of the nine joints and use the complete heat-syncing capability of these links to do it.

David Tilton – Love the playfullness of David’s work, especially the colorful mechs. A small collection but awesome stuff from this Austin-based Concept Artist.

Pseudo Design Titles – Need a new job title? How about “Uncompromising Bandit for Unorthodox Design”? Your new role awaits.

Stranger Things 3 – Trailer to the third installment of your memories from the 1980s plus a massive new monster.

LEGO – Instagram follow of the week. Great source of inspiration and they @mention the creators where you will find even more.

Pass The Salt – How long does it take someone to pass the salt? Joesph’s Machines Rube Goldberg shows you.

Pool Trick Shots – And then there are these done with dominoes and pool balls.

Love Letter – In 1952, professor Christopher Strachey programmed the Manchester University Computer to string together romantic words. You can do the same here.

Dubler – Make music? Want to? This amazing new midi controller that is itself controlled by your voice (or other sound) is a must.

Space Rover – Krix Temmerman set out to make a small car for his son. Well, that got out of control and he made a full-on Rover.

Chicken Nuts – Because it’s Robbie Mendez and, well, chicken is good.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nKB6p9hB6h8?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The post Friday Smackdown: Loose Melon Wallop appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 29, 2019 08:25 PM

Girls 3D Print Club Encourages Hands-On 3D Printing

Girls 3D Printing Club

A Girls 3D Print Club in Cincinnati, Ohio helps highlight STEM opportunities for students.

GE Additive’s dedication to education is helping students of all ages gain access to 3D printing. Jessica Hughes of Hyde Park School is a teacher who is herself dedicated to that same mission. One of the early participants in the Additive Education Program (AEP), working with 3D printers in her classroom through the program since its 2017 launch.

Early on, Hughes noticed something, though: the boys in her classes had already had some exposure to and experience with 3D printing. The girls had some catching up to do. This disparity isn’t at all uncommon in 3D printing or other STEM subject areas, and many initiatives are arising to address this from an early age. So Hughes started a Girls 3D Print Club to encourage the girls to go hands-on with 3D printers.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_m1vwlv8qSg?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Hughes shared more of her experiences in working with 3D printing through AEP for the last two years in a Q&A GE Additive has shared with us.

What have been some of the highlights of being part of the program?

“For me, the best part has been having access to the curriculum that GE Additive has provided through the Polar Cloud. When I started teaching STEM almost three years ago, I had these 3D printers sitting in my room that I had no idea what to do with. I decided to jump in and give it a try but was left wondering how to teach children effectively, and how to connect additive technologies to real world problems, that they could understand and relate to.

I received the GE AEP grant & gained access to STEAMTrax curriculum on the Polar Cloud and that’s when it all clicked. We started with the ‘Tinkering with Turbines’ unit and my students blew me away, not only their innovative designs, but their research and understanding of alternative energies and their impact on the environment.

Using CAD design, and 3D printing skills, this curriculum encourages students at approach a problem in a systematic way. They start by identifying a need, visualizing solutions, and generating ideas. They send their creations to the printer and then evaluate and improve their designs. They are actively collaborating, problem solving, and overcoming obstacles as they follow the steps of the engineering design process. This is what STEM is all about.”

Could you explain how you’ve integrated additive and 3D printing into your lesson plans and wider STEM teaching at the school?

“My students start learning the basics of CAD design & how additive manufacturing is changing the way industries make parts for everything from planes to homes to human organs. From there, we learn about how 3D printers work and what prototyping is and why it is necessary in the design process. Next, we move through some simple challenges.

Designing and 3D printing things like jack-o’-lanterns, bubble wands, napkin holders, & marble mazes allows them the opportunity to experience moving from abstract to concrete using CAD design while also learning to manipulate print settings in the Polar Cloud.

After winter break, we begin to apply the skills we have learned to real world problems. We also move away from printing a single product to parts. This is where the STEAMTrax curriculum comes in.

However, my students also use what they have learned to design and print things for their core classes as well. They have created models of the Ancient Egyptian pyramids for a social studies class project, dice for math games, models of cells for science and a scene from a book for a book report in reading. When it comes to teaching additive to kids, the possibilities are endless.”

How have you tapped into the AEP community – what can new schools expect, how should they engage?

“The AEP group on Facebook has been a great addition this year. I have enjoyed hearing from other schools about what they are teaching and seeing projects from students around the world.

Having a place to share ideas, get feedback, troubleshoot, and grow as teachers has been so beneficial. I learned about new projects such as the coral reef rejuvenation project that is underway in Florida where kids can 3D print coral models and donate them to be installed in the Atlantic Ocean.

My students are so excited to participate. Group members are so supportive and welcoming. It is a great place to collaborate and learn from other educators in the program.”

What is the most complex part the students have printed… and the strangest?

“The most complex part I have had a student print was a drone body. We purchased a drone kit for our after-school drone club & decided to try to design, 3D print, & assemble a drone that we could fly. The drone parts had to be fitted with precision. This made it difficult for the students to print an accurate model.

As one of them stated,’Mrs. Hughes, I had no idea there was going to be so much math in this club. It’s ok though. I’m not quitting. I like math.’

They eventually got the parts to fit & we flew the drone for all of three seconds before it crashed to the ground and broke into 17 pieces. They said they wanted to see if there was rubber filament for next time.

The strangest print we have ever had was a condiment device that would leave no drop of condiment behind. It was called the ‘Mayo Master.’

It was the brainchild of one of the students in my all Girls 3D print club, sponsored by Greater Cincinnati STEM Collaborative, during our Inventor’s Challenge.

The students were challenged to come up with an invention that solves a problem they or someone they know faces on a day to day basis. This child was bothered by the amount of mayo that was left in the bottle when it stopped pouring out of the spout.

She went through about 14 iterations and worked so very hard, but the mayonnaise never cooperated with her device. It was a difficult process for her and there were tears, but she learned a lot about failing forward and how to take each misstep as a learning experience and grow from it. I have no doubt that she will one day redesign condiment containers for a large corporation.”

How have you grown as an educator?

“Learning 3D printing with elementary students has given me more confidence to try new things. I began this journey three years ago knowing absolutely nothing about additive manufacturing, CAD design and 3D printing.

My students & I have grown together as we learned persistence and problem solving through 3D design and printing.

Rather than leading lessons and delivering content, I have become a facilitator of makers.

It is awesome to see their faces light up when they create something from nothing and then get to see it being produced right before their very eyes. It is so empowering for them and for me.

I want to continue to teach in such a way that ignites the imaginations of my students and allows them to express their ideas in meaningful ways. This journey has been amazing for both me and my students.”

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

What’s next for Hyde Park School?

“Next year, we plan to expand our curriculum to include some of our younger students. They see the 3D printers in action every day & they want to learn how to make things too.

They ask me questions about how the printers work & what they are printing all the time. They often ask when they will get a chance to 3D print something. I would love to introduce the magic to them at an earlier age.

They are so eager & have such a great capacity to adapt to new technology very quickly. I know they will make some amazing things if given the opportunity.

Beyond the STEAM Lab, we want to find more opportunities for our students to use what they have learned to help impact their world. Projects like ‘Tinkering with Turbines’, ‘Creating Coastal Barriers’ and ‘Constructing Earthquake Resistant Structures’ have empowered my students to see themselves as problem solvers.

We want to keep that going because teaching young people to see themselves as makers helps them develop the sense that they can change the world. How cool is that?”

AEP  is fully focused on primary and secondary schools — grade levels where they have already placed 3D printers in more than 600 schools — for the next iteration. It’s still accepting applications for another few days; the deadline is Monday, April 1.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Girls 3D Print Club Encourages Hands-On 3D Printing appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at March 29, 2019 07:12 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Animation Control using Mates

SOLIDWORKS Animations have an option called Autokey.  This can be useful for simple animations where you enable the option, click somewhere along the timebar and then drag components.  It will add keys for all components that moved for its final position at that time step.  You need to be aware of the initial position of the component at the key before in the timebar.  This is the transition period where it moves between the initial and final positions of two keys.

SOLIDWORKS Animation Autokey

SOLIDWORKS Animation Autokey

This can cause headaches in larger more complex assemblies if many components are moving.  Accidentally dragging a component can add new keys or affect existing ones.  If you want to update the position of a component earlier in time, you need to ensure you have the timebar selected in the same position as the existing key.  If the timebar is selected at a slightly different location, it will automatically add new keys and more transitions as you drag components.  Using Limit Distance and Limit Angle mates can add additional difficulties.

You’ll have more control if you fully constrain the assembly with mates so you don’t accidentally drag a component and extra keys get added.  Use Distance and Angle mates with values.  These can be controlled with different values along the timebar.

SOLIDWORKS Animation Mate

SOLIDWORKS Animation Mate

You can find the mate in the Animation window under each component.  Right-click beside the mate anywhere along the timebar and Place Key to add a new one.  To adjust its value, simply double-click on each key and enter a different value.

SOLIDWORKS Animation Mate Initial Key

SOLIDWORKS Animation Mate Initial Key

This provides much more control and stability compared to dragging components around.

SOLIDWORKS Animation Mate Final Key

SOLIDWORKS Animation Mate Final Key

The post SOLIDWORKS Animation Control using Mates appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at March 29, 2019 12:00 PM

March 28, 2019

SolidSmack

Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Mobile Workstation [Review]

Lenovo ThinPad P1 Mobile Workstation Review

I just ran out the door with a Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Mobile Workstation tucked under my arm. That’s no surprise to most people today but, at the same time, it’s comical that I can sprint to a meeting clutching a mobile workstation housing a 2.7Ghz 6-core processor, 64GB RAM, and 2 terabytes of SSD storage. I can though, and Lenovo has slammed this new ThinkPad right in the sweet spot of mobile workstation bliss with an option 3D professional can easily use as their primary tool for ‘Getting Things Done.” Let’s take a look at what this ThinkPad has to offer.

<figure class="aligncenter">Lenovo ThinkPad P1<figcaption>The Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Mobile Workstation… in all of its glory.</figcaption></figure>

OVERVIEW

The Lenovo ThinkPad P1 is a 15.6″ ultralight mobile workstation announced August 2018 and the latest to join the family of ThinkPad P-series mobile workstations, which includes the P52, P52s, P72, and P51. The P1 is the thinnest and lightest of the bunch while boasting the power and capabilities of its older siblings. Balanced on power and size, the base configuration sits right between The P52 and P52s and gives them all some features to be completely jealous about. Though that numbering seems a bit odd, there’s a reason for it.

You see, the ThinkPad P1 is a near identical twin of the ThinkPad X1 Extreme (15.6″), an upgrade of the popular ThinkPad X1 Carbon (14″) business-class Ultrabook, first launched in 2012 and updated every year since 2014. Save for the higher end CPU and GPU options for the P1, The ThinkPad P1 and ThinkPad X1 Extreme are the same.

On a side note, the 7th Gen of the ThinkPad X1 Carbon was revealed at CES 2019 with a thinner chassis, latest tech, and estimated release date of June 2019. With the ThinkPad X1 Carbon leading the ThinkPad pack, you can see where the P1 designation comes from, why its foundation was brought over to the P-series lineup, and you could likely venture a pretty good guess on what’s to come in the next gen of the P1 ThinkPad. We’ll take a look at how each compare, but first let’s look at the setup Lenovo sent over.

What’s in the Box?

The ThinkPad P1 we’re looking at today houses an Intel Xeon E-2176M CPU (2.7 GHz, 12MB cache, 60core/12-thread) using 32GB DDR4 RAM with a NVIDIA Quadro P2000 (4GB) graphics card pushing the bright 400nits UHD (3840×2160) touchscreen display. It’s running Windows 10 Pro on a 2TB Samsung M.2 SSD and has space for another 2TB SSD. As configured, this ThinkPad would run you a cool $3314.

The standard options include Windows 10 Pro, a front-facing 720p camera with IR and mic (no camera shutter with the UHD display option), a 85-key backlit keyboard, and fingerprint reader. Ports include 2x Thunderbolt 3, 2x USB-A 3.1, 1x HDMI 2.0, a mini Gigabit Ethernet (adapter incl.), a 3.5 mm audio jack, and an SD card reader.

All of this together weighs in at a mere 4 lbs (1.81 kg). Still lighter than the base weight of any other P-series ThinkPad.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>The sublime, symmetrical internals of the ThinkPad P1, easily accessible via six small screws on the bottom panel. Notice the dual fans and air channels, massive battery, and expansion port for additional M.2 storage (highlighted yellow).</figcaption></figure>

Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Specs

On specs alone, the ThinkPad P1 sits comfy between the P52 and P52s while introducing you to the sleeker design of the ThinkPad X1. The table below breaks down the max available features. You can view additional specs here.

Category Spec
Size 14.24 inches x 9.67 inches x 0.74 inches
(361.8 mm x 245.7 mm x 18.7 mm)
Display 15.6 inches
3,840 x 2,160 (4K)
Touch, IPS, anti-reflective
OS Windows 10 Pro (or Home)
Processor Intel® Core™ i7 (up to 4.3 GHz, 9MB cache, and 6 cores/12 threads)
Intel® Xeon™ E (4.4 Ghz, 12MB cache, 6 cores/12 threads)
RAM Up to 64 GB DDR4 (2666 MHz)
Storage Up to 2x 2TB PCIe SSD M.2
Graphics Up to NVIDIA Quadro P2000
Max-Q
4 GB GDDR5 VRAM
Ports Two Thunderbolt 3 (4x lanes PCIe each)
Two USB-A 3.1
HDMI 2.0
Mini Gigabit Ethernet (requires adapter)
3.5 mm audio jack
SD card reader
Smart Card reader (optional)
Speakers Dual 2W speakers
Dolby Audio Premium
Wireless Intel Wireless-AC 9560
802.11ac (2 x 2)
Bluetooth 5.0
Camera 720 HD with IR and Mic
ThinkShutter option for FHD display
Keyboard 6 row, spill-resistant
backlit, 85-key
2.2 mm key travel
Security IR camera for Windows Hello
Fingerprint reader
Battery 4-cell LiPo
80 Wh
135 W charger
Weight From 3.76 pounds (1.7 kg)
Price Starting at $1,279.00 Lenovo | Amazon

How Do ThinkPad P-Series Workstations Compare?

What you may be curious about is how the specs break down across the P-series line of workstations. Though there are plenty of configuration options to tweak across them all, you’ll find each to max out at a specific point – we’ve used those max options to better compare each.

  Lenovo P Series Mobile Workstation Comaprsion
(max options unless otherwise shown)
  P72 P52 P1 P52s
CPU 8th Gen Intel® Xeon® E-2100M (6-core)
8th Gen Intel® Core™ (6-core)
8th Gen Intel® Xeon® E-2100M (6-core)
8th Gen Intel® Core™ (6-core)
8th Gen Intel® Xeon® E-2100M (6-core)
8th Gen Intel® Core™ (6-core)
8th Gen Intel® Core™ (4-core)
GPU NVIDIA® Quadro® P5200 NVIDIA® Quadro® P3200 NVIDIA® Quadro® P2000 NVIDIA® Quadro® P500
Memory 4 SODIMM, 128GB Max, 2400MHz 4 SODIMM, 128GB Max, 2400MHz 2 SODIMM, 64GB Max, 2667MHz 2 SODIMM, 32GB Max, 2400MHz
Storage Max 3 drives
Max HDD = 2TB (2TB)
Max NVMe SSD = 4TB (2TB)
Max 3 drives
Max HDD = 2TB (5400RPM)
Max NVMe SSD = 4TB
Max 2 drives
Max NVMe SSD = 4TB
Max 1 drive
Max HDD = 2TB (5400RPM)
Max NVMe SSD = 1TB
Display 17.3”
FHD (1920 x 1080) IPS, 300nits, 72% NTSC color gamut
4K UHD (3840 x 2160) IPS, 400nits, 100% Adobe color gamut, 10-bit color depth
15.6”
FHD (1920 x 1080) IPS, 300nits, 72% NTSC color gamut
4K UHD Touch (3840 x 2160) IPS, 400nits, 100% Adobe color gamut, 10-bit color depth
15.6”
FHD (1920 x 1080) IPS, 300nits, 72% NTSC color gamut
4K UHD Touch (3840 x 2160) IPS, 400nits, 100% Adobe color gamut, 10-bit color depth
15.6”
FHD (1920 x 1080) IPS, 250nits, 45% NTSC color gamut
4K UHD Touch (3840 x 2160) IPS, 300nits, 100% Adobe color gamut, 10-bit color depth
Battery 8 Cell (99WHr) 6 Cell (90WHr) 4 Cell (80WHr) 4 Cell (32WHr) Front
6 Cell (72Whr) Rear
Weight Starts at 7.5lbs (3.4kg) Starts at 5.4lbs (2.54kg) Starts at 3.76lbs (1.7kg) Starts at 4.3lbs (1.95kg)
List Price Starts at $1530 Starts at $1160 Starts at $1279 Starts at $1029

How Does the ThinkPad X1 Extreme and ThinkPad P1 Compare?

Even more interesting than how the P-series lines up with each other is how the ThinkPad X1 Extreme and ThinkPad P1 match up. They are, after all, the same in nearly all aspects. Though there are also plenty of configuration options for each, each can be configured with the same hardware, save for the graphics card. We’ve configured each to match as close as possible just to show the similarities.

Lenovo X1 & P1 Comaprsion
(Configured to match specs)
Category X1 P1
CPU 8th Gen Intel® Core™ i7-8850H (6-core, 2.6 GHz) 8th Gen Intel® Core™ i7-8850H (6-core, 2.6 GHz)
GPU NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 1050Ti (4GB) NVIDIA® Quadro® P2000 (4GB)
Memory 32GB, 2666MHz 32GB, 2666MHz
Storage 1TB SSD M.2 1TB SSD M.2
Display 15.6”
4K UHD Touch (3840 x 2160) IPS, 400nits, 100% Adobe color gamut, 10-bit color depth
15.6”
4K UHD Touch (3840 x 2160) IPS, 400nits, 100% Adobe color gamut, 10-bit color depth
Battery 4 Cell (80WHr) 4 Cell (80WHr)
Weight Starts at 3.76lbs (1.7kg) Starts at 3.76lbs (1.7kg)
List Price As configured $3096 As configured $3074

HIGHLIGHTS

The Design
The matte-black, soft touch finish is a welcome change from the shiny sleekness of the other P-series ThinkPads and certainly adds to the feel of quality. The display glass pushes the bezel to a near-indistinguishable edge on a screen that is hinged to lie completely flat against the tabletop. Ports on each side are positioned far enough back off the front edge to leave room for mousing about whether right or left handed. The power button is top-right, large and lit.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

The Keyboard
Hands down, best ever keyboard from Lenovo. The keys are responsive with strong feedback, beautifully backlit, and seamless to boot. Quiet as well. You lose the numpad on the P1 but gain a deck that’s centered on the screen, which I tend to prefer for mobile. I’ve gotten used to Lenovo’s ‘unique’ FN/Ctrl-key locations now (swapped compared to most standard keyboards), but if you still want to change that, Lenovo provides easy instructions on how to swap the Fn and Ctrl keys via the BIOS.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>A simple, but backlit, 85-key keyboard with great response.</figcaption></figure>

The Display
The 4K UHD (3840×2160) display brings out beautiful pops of detail and bright colors. 400 nits is brighter than a lot of screens but occasionally found myself wanting to go brighter and always had the brightness maxed. It’s a 4k screen that handles 8k @60fps wonderfully (using a downloaded version of this video). Outside of saving $285, the FHD (1920×1080) option seems unecessary, but you’ll loose the option for a camera with shutter if you do opt for the UHD touchscreen.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Handles high-resolution 8k video beautifully.</figcaption></figure>

6-Core Power
With the Intel i7 options (8th gen 8750H or 8850H), you get a solid 6-core/12-thread block to power your processes. Opting for the i7-8850 unlocks the option to add the Quadro P2000 – a total $250 upgrade – that’s worth it for the additional peak of power. Opting for a Xeon (E-2176) processors jumps you up to the $2k base price tier but would provide the 6 core/12 thread power along with 4.4 GHz and 12MB cache.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Utilizing 100% of all 12 CPUs (6 cores/12 hyperthreaded) @30fps in the KeyShot Camera benchmark.</figcaption></figure>

Flex Performance Cooling
I’m used to laptops that double as a heating pad for your legs. The ThinkPad P1, however, attempts to alleviate that effect with two large fans (as seen in the image up above) and a bottom grill that spans nearly the entire width of the base. You can guess the caveat to two large fans, rotating at high speeds – noise. As long as you’re pushing those CPU or GPU cores, you’ll have air being pulled across your legs or tabletop. I’m used to this in a 17″ lappy, but

The product tour video is an excellent overview of the tech and construction of the Lenovo ThinkPad P1 (and a testament to their design language). “It is thin, light, strong, and cool.”

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4oIwK0KDwWE?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

CONCLUSION

You’ll be hard-pressed to find a mobile workstation lighter and more power-packed that the Lenovo ThinkPad P1. It checks off all the professional requirements for on-the-go 3D modeling, 3D rendering, and A/V editing while keeping you tasking like a boss.

It wasn’t too long ago that we reviewed the HP ZBook x2. At the time the Lenovo ThinkPad P1 wasn’t out but Lenovo was surely aware of it and not having any of that business. The P1 doubles up on almost all the power specs and pops it in both cheeks on size, weight, and price.

If you stick with the Core i7 option you could keep the price below $2k, but if you opt for the Xeon E, your base price starts at $2k. As shown above, you don’t save money on configuring up a ThinkPad X1 Extreme either – In fact, configured similarly, the ThinkPad P1 actually comes in at a little lower cost.

SSD storage is the standard now folks, and though they’ll still drive up the price compared to having an HDD, I expect the cost to drop as they become more prevalent. Still, you’ll pay a premium for a high-capacity SSD added to the ThinkPad P1 (a $700 increase from 256GB to the 2TB option) and double that if you want two drives for a RAID configuration.

I know some have complained about the soft-touch, matte finish smudging easily- it can, but as long as you’re not sweating profusely or mindlessly typing with a bag of potato chips in your hand, it’s nothing that can’t be wiped away. If I had to nit-pick about anything, it would be the fan noise when pushing the CPU. The upside to that is a cooler base than you’re likely used to.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Though you could get carried away with the options for the ThinkPad P1, there is enough variation that a reliable, cost-effective system can be built for those on the go. The Intel Core processors will keep the cost down but the Intel Xeon E option would be my preferred upgrade, putting this ThinkPad in the $2000+ territory right off the bat, and other options like more storage and the 4k UHD touchscreen bring it closer to $3000. That’s less than I’ve spent on some for much more power. And I still can’t get over having all of this in a 4-pound package.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

To this day, I still use a Lenovo ThinkPad P40 Yoga as my mobile workstation, but would replace it in a heartbeat with the added power and performance of the ThinkPad P1. If you’re a 3D professional on the go and looking for a mobile workstation that matches the requirements you need, the ThinkPad P1 is an excellent, lightweight, very capable option with a lot of power and one I’d definitely recommend.

<figure class="alignright">Lenovo ThinkPad P1</figure>

Lenovo ThinkPad P1

Price: Starting at $1,279.00 Lenovo | Amazon
More information: Lenovo ThinkPad P1

The post Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Mobile Workstation [Review] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 28, 2019 12:53 PM

The Javelin Blog

Why am I unable to obtain a license for SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard?

Complimentary seats of SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard are included with SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium Network License that is on active SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service. But in order to use them you need to reactivate your SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard license every year.

Once you activate your network license manager after purchasing your licenses, permanent licenses like SOLIDWORKS do not need reactivation until the server is upgraded or moved to a different location. However, complimentary seats of SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard are not permanent and are based on active subscriptions, therefore they need to be renewed annually.

To reactivate your network license manager please follow the steps in the image below with the SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager:

Steps to reactivate you SNL license manager

Steps to reactivate you SNL license manager

Following this process will refresh the activation information for SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard. This process requires an active Internet connection for the SNL Manager Server software and should take only a few minutes to complete. You can also use the email activation method if there is not Internet connection available.

The post Why am I unable to obtain a license for SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at March 28, 2019 12:00 PM

March 27, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Reduce time and mistakes with a SOLIDWORKS PDM Design Checker Task

The SOLIDWORKS Design Checker is one of the most underutilized utilities in SOLIDWORKS and this is unfortunate, as this utility can help eliminate costly mistakes due to errors in a SOLIDWORKS document. Design Checker can also reduce the amount of time to check documents, by running user defined checks.

The SOLIDWORKS Design Checker ensures accuracy, completeness, and standards compliance for design elements such as:

  • Title blocks
  • Custom properties
  • Layers
  • Annotation and dimension fonts
  • Standard units
  • Materials
  • Overridden dimensions

In SOLIDWORKS PDM, a Task can configured to run the SOLIDWORKS Design Checker. Depending on the options that were used when Installing SOLIDWORKS PDM, this Task may not have been added. To add this Task, right-click on the Vault and select Import.

Importing Task

Importing Task

The Task to be imported will be located in the PDM installation directory, under Default Data.

SOLIDWORKS Design Checker Import

SOLIDWORKS Design Checker Import

Once completed, a message will be indicate that the imported was successful.

Import Complete

Import Complete

The imported Task will now appear under The Tasks node of SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration.

Design Checker Task in Task Node

Design Checker Task in Task Node

In order for the Task to run, we need to set-up Task Host Configuration, on the computers where we want to run the Task. To this right click on the PDM Icon, located in the Windows System Tray.

PDM Icon in Windows System Tray

PDM Icon in Windows System Tray

When the Task Host Configuration Window opens, select the vault that contains the Task and check the SOLIDWORKS Task Add-in, to enable it.

Enabling Task

Enabling Task

Once the Task Host has been configured, the computers that will run the Task, can now be added in the Execution Method tab, of Design Checker Task.

Execution Method

Execution Method

A Task can be launched by right clicking a file, in the File Explorer Vault View.  In the Menu Command tab, the name for that Task, that will appear in  File Explorer, is defined. The Status Bar Help Text option is the description that appears in the File Explorer status, bar when the user hovers over the Task.

Menu Command

Menu Command

From the Script tab the code which defines the text can be edited. Also, if multiple versions of SOLIDWORKS are installed on the Task Hosts, the version of SOLIDWORKS to be used can be specified.  Lastly, the configurable options for a Task, can be specified from the Task User Interface Type pull-down.

Script

Script

Note, changing Task User Interface Type,  will require a restart pf the Task Property menu. More importantly, this will change the options available for the Tasks Properties and not all Task Properties are compatible with a given Task. The Design Checker Task uses the General Task User Interface Type.

The Permissions tab, is where User and Group access to the task is defined.

Permissions

Permissions

There are also tabs to format Success and Error Notifications.

Success Notification

Success Notification

The Notifications can be set-up for Users and/or Groups. Under the User tab, there is the option to Notify the user, who launched the Task.

Error Notification

Error Notification

Once the Design Checker Task has been configured, it can be launched by right clicking a file, in File Explorer.

Launching Design Checker Task from File Explorer

Launching Design Checker Task from File Explorer

A Task can also be configured, to run from a Workflow Transition Action.

Running Design Checker Task from a Workflow Transition Action

Running Design Checker Task from a Workflow Transition Action

The post Reduce time and mistakes with a SOLIDWORKS PDM Design Checker Task appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at March 27, 2019 12:00 PM

LOCKED OUT of the SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal? (Didn’t this happen last year too!)

Typically shortly after the release of a new MAJOR version of SOLIDWORKS (fall time frame), we get calls from umpteen frustrated customers wondering why they are NOW locked out of their SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal account, when the week prior they had access to it. AND, it’s reporting their SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service has expired as the reason for the LOCKOUT. Their subscription is paid up and active…so what’s going on?!

Sound familiar? If you’ve been a SOLIDWORKS customer and a user of their Customer Portal account for more than a year or two, I bet it does.

Well, I’m happy to report that 99% of the time, this problem has a very easy fix! And you’re able to take care of it yourself in a matter of a minute or two.

How to unlock your account

You need to log into the Customer Portal and re-register at least one of your active SOLIDWORKS licenses using the Register my Products link. It’s the only UNLOCKED link under the My Support section as shown in the screenshot below:

Register your products

Register your products

Then enter your SOLIDWORKS serial number:

Enter your serial number

Enter your serial number

 

And here’s the IMPORTANT, ABSOLUTE CRUCIAL piece of this puzzle. You MUST select the NEWEST VERSION from the list.

At the time of updating this article, it’s SOLIDWORKS 2019. Even if you’re using SOLIDWORKS 2017 or SOLIDWORKS 2018, or older, PICK THE NEWEST!

The reason for this, your subscription status is only associated to the newest version in their database, so when the new version is populated and your account is still registered to a prior year version, it then sees your license, and therefore account, as being without subscription and you end up locked out…temporarily.

Upon clicking OK after selecting the product, and then Next, your account should return to unlocked status as your subscription should now be reporting current and active.

The post LOCKED OUT of the SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal? (Didn’t this happen last year too!) appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Adam Harte-Maxwell, CSWE at March 27, 2019 12:00 PM

March 26, 2019

SolidSmack

The New Sketching App from Moleskine is Brilliant in Its Simplicity

Flow Moleskine iPad App

Flow by Moleskine is a new digital app that turns your iPhone or iPad into a digital sketch or notebook. Unlike other digital sketching apps, however, Flow wears its notebook origins on its shoulders— going so far as incorporating different paper types and colors, as well as the ability to customize your drawing tools in an intuitive and neverending-blank-space workflow (hence the name).

The experience of the in-app canvas alone is worthy of praise. Instead of a typical white background with fixed borders, Flow’s optional dark or light paper backgrounds can be dotted, squared, lined, or blank entirely based on your preference. Once you pick your canvas and get to drawing, the background has infinite scalability and can scroll to your heart’s desire.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Flow by Moleskine</figure>

Drawing tools include multiple varieties of pens, markers, and pencils that can all be customized with different colors, sizes, and styles. Once you customize a tool (or set of tools) to your liking, you can save it/them for easy and readily-available access in your toolkit. These tools can then be paired with Apple Pencil to make the drawing experience on an iPad feel yet even more responsive and realistic to their analog counterparts.

Additionally, Flow adds a couple of customizable gestures (like double-tapping the screen to access Apple Pencil or swiping to open the toolbar) to make drawing easier. You can drag and drop drawings to Timepage to export them to your calendar, and, on iPad, you can even split the screen to open multiple documents at a time.

Flow was made with creators in mind, so it’s no surprise the app has everything a doodler could ask for. You can try it for free for seven days via iTunes, after which you need to pay a subscription for membership that lets you store your creations and customized tools via the Cloud.

The post The New Sketching App from Moleskine is Brilliant in Its Simplicity appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 26, 2019 05:56 PM

Cool Tools: KingMoore Tactical Military Build Belt

Tactical Belt

As somebody’s wise old uncle probably said at one point or another in history: never underestimate the power of a reliable belt. While it might be an easy item to overlook in the wardrobe department, having a belt with the right fit can make or break a day in the workshop — particularly if you’re bending up and down with that old Shop Vac hose.

While a good, solid leather belt and custom-engraved cowboy buckle are pretty awesome, we also love the simplicity of a straight-up, no BS, simple solution like the KingMoore Tactical Build designed after military-style belt systems. Oh yeah, and it’s just 15 bucks.

With breathable wear-resisting nylon and a metal clasp buckle, this easy-on-the-eyes belt is capable of infinite adjustments so you’ll always be sure to find that perfect fit. And when nature calls, the Quick Release mechanism is intuitive and smooth for a no-fuss, no-hassle unclasping. And just like most other things designed in the tactical or everyday carry gear market — what’s not to love about the purity and simplicity of plain old functional gear?

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

KingMoore Tactical Military Belt — $14.99

Features:

  • Heavy Duty Metal Buckle – This tactical belt features a military belt buckle made from heavy-duty metal.
  • Quality Nylon Belt – This tactical belt made from wear-resisting nylon webbing material that is more durable, breathable and fast-dry. 
  • Quick Release – Intuitive and smooth quick release functionality when you push the golden tabs down at the same time
  • Everyday Carry Gear – The tactical belt is applicable to all kinds of overalls, casual pants, tactical trousers, and outdoor trousers as well as outdoor uses such as outward bound training like outdoor rock climbing, tactics and prompt drop.
  • Ideal and suitable for active daily work

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: KingMoore Tactical Military Build Belt appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 26, 2019 02:01 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Bend Lines mapped to DXF Layers

When exporting a SOLIDWORKS sheet metal part to DXF/DWG, you have the option to save different entities to separate layers.  The layers can also be set to different colours and linetypes.  This is accomplished with a Mapping file setup in the Export options.

The first thing to do is enable mapping under Tools > Options > Default Options tab > Export.  Choose DXF/DWG as the file format.  Check the box beside ‘Enable’.  You won’t be able to select a mapping file as this will be saved out later.  Click OK.

SOLIDWORKS DXF/DWG Export Mapping File

SOLIDWORKS DXF/DWG Export Mapping File

Easiest way to export the Sheet Metal geometry to DXF/DWG is to right-click on the body in the graphics window and choose ‘Export to DXF/DWG’.

SOLIDWORKS Export to DXF/DWG

SOLIDWORKS Export to DXF/DWG

Then choose to save out the Sheet Metal information.  Choose what entities to output.

SOLIDWORKS DXF/DWG Export Output

SOLIDWORKS DXF/DWG Export Output

Once you click OK, now is when the Mapping dialog comes up.  You can define your layers on the left panel with colours and line styles.  Then in the Map Entities panel, use the dropdown under the Layer column to define the layer.  Both the colour and line style will default to BYLAYER (BL) but can be overridden.  The Entity column has a dropdown to select different entities, depending on which ones you chose to export.  In this case we can define layers for Bend Lines Up and Bend Lines Down.  You could define both Bend Lines to the same layer.

SOLIDWORKS Export DXF/DWG Mapping

SOLIDWORKS Export DXF/DWG Mapping

When you click ‘Save Map File’ it will keep all the settings in a file saved and set the export options to continue using this map file.

SOLIDWORKS Mapping File Location

SOLIDWORKS Mapping File Location

On export you will receive a preview where you can manually remove extra entities if needed.

SOLIDWORKS DXF/DWG Export Cleanup

SOLIDWORKS DXF/DWG Export Cleanup

Now the DXF/DWG will include the extra layers with the entities on each.

Draftsight DXF Layers

Draftsight DXF Layers

The post SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Bend Lines mapped to DXF Layers appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at March 26, 2019 12:00 PM

March 25, 2019

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Monday List 13.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

Instagram App

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

A Guide to LockerGoga, the Ransomware Crippling Industrial Firms

Ransomware has long been the scourge of the cybersecurity industry. When that extortionate hacking goes beyond encrypting files to fully paralyze computers across a company, it represents not just a mere shakedown, but a crippling disruption. Now a nasty new breed of ransomware known as LockerGoga is inflicting that paralysis on industrial firms whose computers control actual physical equipment, and it’s enough to deeply spook security researchers.

<figure class="aligncenter">A Guide to LockerGoga, the Ransomware Crippling Industrial Firms</figure>

Nike’s Air Jordan Brand Is Winning Over European Soccer Fans

The iconic basketball brand is storming onto Adidas’s home turf.

<figure class="aligncenter">Nike’s Air Jordan Brand Is Winning Over European Soccer Fans</figure>

Intel’s Latest Chip Push Suggests the Company Has a Short Memory

Its renewed bet on a volatile business has disappointed analysts who wanted a fresh look from the new CEO.

<figure class="aligncenter">Intel’s Latest Chip Push Suggests the Company Has a Short Memory</figure>

Should I Report a Do-Nothing Co-Worker?

Being indebted to others can makes us feel that the person in whose debt we are is in a position to lord it over us.

<figure class="aligncenter">Should I Report a Do-Nothing Co-Worker?</figure>

Apple TV+ Is Here—but It Has a Long Way to Go

Since the middle of 2017, when Apple hired two presidents away from Sony Pictures Television to oversee “video programming,” its Hollywood aspirations have fallen in the latter category.

<figure class="aligncenter">Apple TV+</figure>

Q&A: Instagram’s New Head of Product, Vishal Shah

Instagram’s new product chief talks about the app’s push into e-commerce, life after the departure of Instagram’s two cofounders, and Facebook’s controversial plan to unify its family of apps.

<figure class="aligncenter">Instagram photos</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 13.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 25, 2019 09:37 PM

These 3D Printed Customizations Make IKEA Products More Accessible For the Disabled

IKEA Thisables

Known famously for their ready-to-assemble flat pack furniture, Swedish manufacturer IKEA isn’t exactly famous for being user-friendly for people with disabilities. Not only do you have to set up the products yourself, but some of the company’s lamps and cabinets have small switches or handles which are too difficult to work with for someone with a condition that impairs mobility, such as cerebral palsy.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/a0PA_VpLlDw?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The ThisAbles project doesn’t remedy the do-it-yourself nature of IKEA products, but it does make them easier to use for the disabled. In conjunction with non-profit Israeli organizations Milbat and Access Israel, IKEA made 13 clever hacks to its existing products that make them more accessible to a broader range of users.

ThisAbles came as a result of a hackathon in an IKEA store, where teams of product designers and those with physical impairments got together to help determine product needs and how to work around them creatively. By the end of the development process, 13 products were developed — each with their unique purpose but collectively helped make life easier for those with special needs.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YkY3h2E-Dd8?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Among other products that came out of the exercise include a glass bumper that can be attached to cabinets to prevent collisions with wheelchairs, mega switches for lamps to make turning them on and off more accessible, and a variety of large handles for various cabinets to name a few. The add-ons are designed explicitly to be slipped on specific IKEA products, making them easier to add or remove depending on the situation.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/K4TV4ZW1EaM?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

So how do you get these disability-friendly slip-ons?

Instead of going to an IKEA store to buy them, the company has made all the designs available for free on the ThisAbles project webpage. As long as you have access to a 3D printer and the right printing materials, the detailed instructions will tell you which products you can make friendlier for somebody you know who may benefit from the design customization.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HZDYN0rYZU8?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The project isn’t stopping at 13 items though; more solutions are currently under development; and should you happen to have ideas of your own, IKEA is more than happy to take your suggestions and help turn them into reality.

Sans the do-it-yourself assembly, IKEA could soon be a leader at the forefront of accessibility design. Perhaps, even, their model is something that other companies could learn a thing or two from.

The post These 3D Printed Customizations Make IKEA Products More Accessible For the Disabled appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 25, 2019 09:15 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to flip the Bend Direction of a SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Part

The stated Bend Direction in a SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal drawing is based on the defined fixed face of the model.

Original Bend Direction in Drawing

Editing the Flat Pattern feature, in the Flat-Pattern folder, will display the currently defined “Fixed face”.

Edit Flat-Pattern Feature  

To change the Bend Direction, select a face that is on the other side of the material.

Flip Sheet Metal Bend Direction Selecting a Different Fixed Face

Selecting a Different Fixed Face

Once complete, the stated Bend Direction in the drawing, will also change.

Updated Bend Direction in Drawing

The post How to flip the Bend Direction of a SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Part appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at March 25, 2019 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools: The Hudson Durable Goods Waxed Canvas Work Apron

Waxed canvas work apron

Few shop tools—yes, we’ll call it a “tool”—are as indispensable as a reliable work apron. While not a “tool” in the traditional sense, a good, durable apron can serve many purposes ranging from tool organization to even psychologically making yourself ‘present’ in the workshop.

But no two aprons are alike—and striking the balance between functional and economical isn’t always easy. Which is why we like the Cross Back Adjustable Apron from Hudson Durable Goods.

Made from thick and durable waxed canvas, this stylish work apron features design details that are as carefully considered as the long-lasting materials they’re constructed from. Additionally, the cross-back (X-back) straps ensure that weight from tools is spread evenly across the back to avoid neck strain. Best of all, since the apron is made from waxed canvas, it will only get better with age.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Hudson Durable Goods Waxed Canvas Work Apron — $29.99

Features:

  • Cross-back (x-back) straps spread the weight of tools to prevent neck strain
  • 2 large tool pockets (6.5 inches tall x 8 inches wide)
  • Chest pocket for cellphone/pencil/tools (4.5 inches tall x 4 inches wide)
  • Kangaroo pocket (large hoodie-style hand pocket)
  • Straps sewn on ends to prevent slipping through side grommets
  • Flat black canvas and gun-metal hardware for a low-key, unisex, professional look

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: The Hudson Durable Goods Waxed Canvas Work Apron appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 25, 2019 09:38 AM

March 22, 2019

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Drone Lit. Fire.

Gentle steps across the cane forest floor and up the battle’s hill, we stole a look at the position of each drone scout, daring to evade its scan and light them enough to have the home base fire these links.

Michael Herm – Mech toy designer who will be launching on Kickstarter later this year. Follow also on Instagram here.

Let Go – The photography portfolio of Gabriel Isak mixed with surreal portraits, eerie lakescapes, and silohuettes galore.

Design | Art – An exploration of the graphical elements and appreciation of the design concepts across the ages of art history.

Miniature Pop-up – These books by artist Zhihui bring pop-up book detail levels to a new level, a very small new level.

Combophoto – While you’re on Instagram, another one. Stephen McMennamy combines two photos to make the ordinary quite extraordinary.

Miniman – Create your own personlized LEGO minifig, then download, share, or have a keyring made.

Chicken Town – “Word to the wise. There’s only one colonel in chicken town.”

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You Should See Me in a Crown – Billie Eilish and Takashi Murakami team up for this animated video. Gets Akira-style creepy too.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OHRxUnwtyME?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>


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by Josh Mings at March 22, 2019 05:01 PM

The Nintendo Flex Is a Redesigned Game Boy Concept for the 21st Century

Nintendo Game Boy Design

Even though it has official successors by way of the Game Boy SP and Game Boy Advance, no other handheld console hits you with nostalgia quite like the original Game Boy. Released in 1989 by Nintendo, this chunky block was what you brought around in the 90s whenever you were forced to go outside without some form of entertainment (the pain!).

Thirty years have passed since the first Game Boy, so it only made sense for industrial designer and Nintendo fan YJ Yoon to give the beloved Game Boy a much-needed retro-inspired makeover. The Nintendo Flex, as he likes to call his makeover concept, takes modern advancements in gaming technology and incorporates them into the classic Game Boy industrial design and user experience.

<figure class="wp-block-image">nintendo flex</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">nintendo flex</figure>

As to be expected, what was once a bulky handheld console now has a thinner, sleeker look. You’ll notice the Flex’s body curves towards the user, making it easier to grip the console. This curved design combined with a bigger screen allows a user to focus less on outside distractions and more on the game being played.

<figure class="wp-block-image">nintendo flex</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">nintendo flex</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">nintendo flex</figure>

The buttons have slightly been altered as well. Instead of the painful plastic arrow buttons on the left-hand side, a smooth depressed wheel lets players navigate menus and control their characters.

The other half of the user interface, the A and B buttons, remain largely the same with the only difference being they are now two different ends of a single button. Since players frequently shift between the two buttons so often, this streamlines the process and helps them navigate the Nintendo Flex without having to look at the physical console.

<figure class="wp-block-image">nintendo flex</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">nintendo flex</figure>

The top half of the Nintendo Flex has had some work done to separate it from its 1989 counterpart. The power button is now located on top of the console and locks the game cartridge in place, preventing accidental removals from your younger siblings. According to YJ Yoon, the aim was to hide the power switch whenever a game was inserted into the console, making gameplay more immersive.

<figure class="wp-block-image">nintendo flex</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">nintendo flex</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">nintendo flex</figure>

The bottom half of the console has seen some work as well. Linear pattern textures have been applied to the lower half side of the Flex which helps you get a better grip with your sweaty palms. This lower end is where you would typically find the speaker on the original Game Boy, but due to the palms covering the sound during gameplay, it has been moved to the top of the Nintendo Flex instead.

There isn’t much use for the Nintendo Flex with mobile phones and the Nintendo Switch controlling the market for handheld gaming, but it doesn’t hurt to wonder what could have been if Nintendo stuck with its classic console. Find more on Yoon’s design process for this experimental product over on his Behance page.

The post The Nintendo Flex Is a Redesigned Game Boy Concept for the 21st Century appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 22, 2019 12:49 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Mate Controller now provides Negative Values for Limit Angle Mates

In SOLIDWORKS 2019 you can now add negative values for SOLIDWORKS Limit Angle Mate in the Mate Controller. In an assembly with a Limit Angle Mate, click on Insert > Mate Controller to open the Mate Controller property manager.

In the following example, a Limit Angle mate (-100 degrees to 100 degrees) controls the angle of robot head.

Limit Angle Mate

Limit Angle Mate

In the Mate Controller PropertyManager, click Collect All Supported Mates.

Starting the Mate Controller and Collecting All the Supported Mates

Starting the Mate Controller and Collecting All the Supported Mates

In Collect All Supported Mates, select a LimitAngle mate to change its values. For Position 1, we are entering a positive dimension for the LimitAngle mate and then click Update Position (for example 90 degrees).

Positive Value for Limit Angle Mate in Position 1

Positive Value for Limit Angle Mate in Position 1

Under Mates Positions, click Add Position. For Position 2 , we are entering 0 for the dimension and click Update Position. We are going to add a third position (position 3) and enter a value of -90 degrees for the Limit Angle mate and then update the position.

The post SOLIDWORKS Mate Controller now provides Negative Values for Limit Angle Mates appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at March 22, 2019 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 12.19

This Bendable Wood Bench Is Material Manipulation at It’s Finest

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

Learn How to 3D Scan with Industrial Designer Eric Strebel

For some designers and engineers, 3D scanning physical objects to use as reference models can be the ultimate time-saver. Industrial Designer Eric Strebel is one such design professional—and as always, he has some insightful tips for fellow designers and engineers out there who want to kickstart their 3D scanning game—aka, photogrammetry.

<figure class="aligncenter">Learn How to 3D Scan with Industrial Designer Eric Strebel</figure>

Stanley Black & Decker to Connect Fleet of 3D Printers Using AstroPrint

AstroPrint announced a spectacular arrangement with Stanley Black & Decker. According to the press release, Stanley Black & Decker will use AstroPrint’s Enterprise Cloud “to connect, control, and optimize their fleet of 3D printers across multiple facilities.”

<figure class="aligncenter">Stanley Black & Decker to Connect Fleet of 3D Printers Using AstroPrint</figure>

SkillCoach | Sheet Metal Design & Fabrication – Classic Aviation Bomber Seat Build

Sheet metal design and fabrication is a topic I’ve aimed to cover for quite a while. So I thought I’d kick things off by highlighting one of the build projects by Ron Covell a master metal fabricator and teacher. His Youtube channel is packed full of tips and techniques for the aspiring fabricator. Additionally, if you hop over to his website Covell you will find a host of in-depth tutorials and hands-on workshop opportunities.

<figure class="aligncenter">SkillCoach | Sheet Metal Design & Fabrication – Classic Aviation Bomber Seat Build</figure>

‘Float’ Documents the Meticulous Craft of Building Competitive Model Airplanes

While most people outgrow making model airplanes at an early age, others soldier on well into their adult lives; even going so far as to create a sport out of it.

<figure class="aligncenter">‘Float’ Documents the Meticulous Craft of Building Competitive Model Airplanes</figure>

This Bendable Wood Bench Is Material Manipulation at It’s Finest

Life is too short to be sitting on an uncomfortably hard bench— most would rather be spending it on a nice leather chair instead. But what if you could bring that bum-conforming comfort to a wood bench? Heck — how would you even start…no pillows allowed? Such is the premise behind the BEND Bench.

<figure class="aligncenter">This Bendable Wood Bench Is Material Manipulation at It’s Finest</figure>

Origami-Inspired Robot Gripper from MIT Adapts To Whatever It Holds

While humankind has made great strides in creating Terminator-like robotic appendages, we’re still a ways from an artificial arm that moves and acts precisely like a flesh-and-blood appendage. Yet, a team of MIT technologists recently created a robot gripper that might help pave the path for one.

<figure class="aligncenter">Origami-Inspired Robot Gripper from MIT Adapts To Whatever It Holds</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 12.19 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 22, 2019 12:00 PM

Cool Tools: Trusco Toolboxes

Trusco Toolbox

Founded in 1959 as a professional tool manufacturer to support Japan’s burgeoning manufacturing industry, Trusco—a combination of the words “Trust” and “Company”—is still manufacturing some of the best toolboxes, today.

While their stripped-down design makes them a must-have for many design aficionados, the pressed steel boxes are ridiculously useful for just about anything—tools or not.

Still manufactured in Fukui, Japan, Trusco toolboxes now come in more sizes than ever—capable of whatever storage challenges you throw at them.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Trusco Toolboxes (Various Sizes) — $11.50 – $171.12

Features:

  • Steel body, formed for extra strength
  • Versatile sizing for specific storage solutions
  • Double-hinged construction for smooth opening
  • Dividers included
  • Equally useful in the home, office, or the shop

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Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: Trusco Toolboxes appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 22, 2019 09:39 AM

MIT’s Hairy Metamaterial

MITs Hairy Metamaterial

Researchers at MIT have developed yet another unusual metamaterial, and this one is simply hair.

We’ve seen some experiments in 3D printed hair previously, but those were essentially for fun and artistic merit. Those experiments used extrusion movements to pull strands from the nozzle, leaving thin and flexible hair-like structures that could be rearranged at will.

The MIT researchers are doing something quite different, and a lot more functional.

The research is from 2016, and shows great promise for more to come. They realized that hair-like structures could, in fact, be metamaterials, unusual shapes that implement physical function without requiring power for moving parts. The problem was that to create a CAD model of thousands of tiny hair structures would be extremely tedious and time-consuming.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/166604922" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Their research involved the development of a CAD system called “Cillia” which is capable of generating large numbers of digital hair structures, each with potentially slightly different attributes. They were able to vary length, orientation angle and diameter (from 150 to 50 micrometers) using their newly developed tools to create highly sophisticated hair designs.

Initially their tool was able to generate hair structures on flat surfaces only, but later, more advanced versions were able to generate them on curved surfaces.

These generated 3D models could then be physically produced on 3D printers with appropriate resolution.

Then the fun begins. It turns out that hair structures, if carefully designed, can implement useful mechanical functions. For example take a look at this hair surface, which seems to be directing a small object in a circular path:

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption> Hair-like metamaterials driving an object in a circular path [Source: MIT] </figcaption></figure>

What’s going on here is that the hairs are oriented at a particular angle, and when the arrangement is vibrated slightly, the object tends to move along the same direction as the hairs. In this case, the hairs are angled successively in a circular pattern, thus creating a method to move an object in a circular path.

There’s more.

The researchers were able to design a sophisticated hair surface that was able to sort coins. This structure was similar to the one above except that they varied the strength of the hairs so that some hairs would only be bent by heavier coins. By arranging an appropriate sequence of hair directions, they were able to develop a non-mechanical coin sorting system.

They were also able to produce a Velcro-like surface, which provides temporary adhesion between objects as seen here:

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption> A 3D printed Velco-like system [Source: MIT] </figcaption></figure>

I say we are seeing here a new class of metamaterials that could be used in a variety of ways in industry, many of which have yet to be discovered.

It seems to me that the designs for metamaterials we have been seeing recently are merely the tip of a gigantic iceberg. There are no doubt thousands and thousands of yet undiscovered meta-material designs that could be 3D printed.

At some point there should be a kind of master catalog of these metamaterial designs so that future designers can pick and choose building blocks for sophisticated equipment designs, in much the same way we today see libraries of open source software that are used in combination to create much of the incredible software universe we live in today.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post MIT’s Hairy Metamaterial appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at March 22, 2019 03:35 AM

March 21, 2019

SolidSmack

Origami-Inspired Robot Gripper from MIT Adapts To Whatever It Holds

MIT Origami Robot Gripper

While humankind has made great strides in creating Terminator-like robotic appendages, we’re still a ways from an artificial arm that moves and acts precisely like a flesh-and-blood appendage. Yet, a team of MIT technologists recently created a robot gripper that might help pave the path for one.

The Origami Robot Gripper is a robotic arm featuring a 3D printed silicone grip that contorts around an object to carry. At the machine’s heart is a gripper-to mount connector surrounded with silicone skin. Whenever the gripper closes in on an object, a vacuum collapses the silicone around it, effectively grasping the item without crushing it—and it’s capable of doing so for objects that are up to a hundred times its own weight.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/byqGFH6AZuk?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Inspired by the “magic ball” origami design, which is folded from a rectangular shape into a spherical one, the Origami Robot Gripper (they really need a shorter name for it) is meant to be a versatile hand which can conform itself to a wide variety of objects—regardless of the complexity of the shape.

<figure class="wp-block-image">origami gripper</figure>

What’s really cool is even with the ability to carry a hundred times its own weight, the gripper doesn’t crush objects, but instead uses the strength to get a firmer hold on them.

<figure class="wp-block-image">origami gripper</figure>

According to MIT professor Daniela Rus, one of her early plans is to make a robot capable of automatically packing groceries. After proving they can make a machine with a versatile grip, Rus hopes the technology will be used to pack eggs, different fruits and vegetables, and packages with weird designs (such as every shampoo bottle in existence).

<figure class="wp-block-image">origami gripper</figure>

Read professor Rus’ research paper on the Origami Robot Gripper in-full over at MIT.

The post Origami-Inspired Robot Gripper from MIT Adapts To Whatever It Holds appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 21, 2019 06:12 PM

Build Your Next CAD Workstation with This $19 Online Course

CAD Workstation

These days, you can get just about any computer rig designed to your exact specifications. Whether you’re a RAM-hogging SolidWorks user, or simply just want a powerful workstation, there’s something for everybody. But no standardized hardware mod will ever replace the satisfaction of building your own rig from scratch.

If you’ve ever wanted to create your own custom-built PC but didn’t know where to start, boy do we have great news for you.

The How to Build a Computer Bundle consolidates five intensive online courses (a total of 126 individual lessons) ranging from how to create a blueprint for your desired desktop or laptop setup to how to overclock CPU processor functions to speed up rendering times.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

How to Build a Computer Bundle — $374 $19.00 (94% off)

Topics Covered Include:

  • Learn about the basic functions of a computer system
  • Pick out appropriate hardware for your build
  • Assemble all hardware needed for a fully functional computer
  • Wire everything within the case like an expert
  • Cover the most effective method of CPI cooling: closed-loop liquid cooling
  • Upgrade to a higher capacity storage device
  • Improve your RAM chip(s)
  • Clean & refresh your CPU cooling unit
  • Swap in an SSD
  • Learn about the various tricky aspects about RAID setups
  • Understand how to increase data read/write speeds & prepare your computer for a drive crash

Get It!

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The post Build Your Next CAD Workstation with This $19 Online Course appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 21, 2019 04:25 PM

Cool Tools: The 3Dconnexion SpaceMouse Wireless 3D Mouse

3D Connexion

Long considered an indispensable asset for anybody working in CAD, the 3D mouse is a quintessential tool that belongs on the desktop of any industrial designer or engineer.

Within a 3D application such as SolidWorks, Rhino, Fusion 360, or Keyshot, the directional, zoom and rotate functions provide an intuitive extension of the users’ design intent. To put it quite simply, a 3D mouse helps get rid of those annoying repetitive keystrokes and allows the designer to come as close to possible to holding their digital 3D design in the physical world.

As pioneers of the 3D mouse territory, 3Dconnexion has blazed a trail with their SpaceMouse collection. And when it comes to the perfect balance of price, performance, and portability, we’re big fans of the company’s SpaceNavigator 3D Mouse.

Utilizing the company’s patented 6-Degrees-of-Freedom (6DoF) sensor, the intuitive 3D mouse also includes two buttons for accessing radial control menus to drive commands from directly within your applications. And with a wireless connection, you can be sure that this won’t be just another desktop peripheral clogging your desk with obnoxious wires.

<figure class="aligncenter">SpaceMouse 3D Mouse</figure>

The 3Dconnexion SpaceMouse Wireless 3D Mouse — $140.00

Features:

  • Superior 3D Navigation – Intuitively and precisely navigate digital models or viewports in 3D space.
  • Wireless Freedom – 3Dconnexion 2.4GHz Wireless technology ensures a reliable, real-time connection to your 3D content.
  • Easy to Use – Each SpaceMouse Wireless button opens its own radial menu providing convenient mouse-click access to four application commands.
  • Flexible Recharging – Supplied micro-USB cable handles re-charging and data at the same time. Just connect and continue working, Stylish Design – small footprint, elegant brushed steel base, two buttons.

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: The 3Dconnexion SpaceMouse Wireless 3D Mouse appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 21, 2019 03:36 PM

The Javelin Blog

Microsoft Office SOLIDWORKS PDM Add-In Integration

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional includes a Microsoft Office SOLIDWORKS PDM Add-In, which provides access to PDM tools within Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint documents.

The Microsoft Office Add-In

The Microsoft Office Add-In

Using the ribbon, you can perform PDM vault commands and view file information when a file is open in Microsoft Office applications.

All SOLIDWORKS PDM license types can be used with the integration. However, you much have a Contributor or CAD Editor license to check files out and in.

The Office add-in (Microsoft Office Integration) option is selected during the client installation if Office is detected on the system.

Microsoft Office Integration

Microsoft Office Integration

The SOLIDWORKS PDM ribbon is automatically added to the Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint documents when the Office Integration Add-ins is installed.

If it does not show, go to File > Options > Add-Ins > COM Add-Ins and press Go

Microsoft Word Options

Microsoft Word Options

Select Word SOLIDWORKS PDM Integration in the list of available Add-ins and press OK

COM Add-ins

COM Add-ins

The post Microsoft Office SOLIDWORKS PDM Add-In Integration appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at March 21, 2019 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard vs Professional

In a previous post we talked about SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard which is included with SOLIDWORKS Professional and Premium software with an active SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service. But what about SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional? What is the difference between the Standard and Professional versions?

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional

Well the professional version is a more comprehensive tool that not only allows you to easily create photo-realistic images but also create animations, and interactive content. With Visualize Professional you can tell a deeper product story using your existing CAD data by generating photo-quality imagery, interactive animations, and 360 degree spins to effectively communicate the most complex design.

What’s Included with the Professional Version?

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional includes all the great features of SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard, plus these additional features:

  • Demonstrate products more effectively with full animation of parts, models, appearances, camera views, and environments
  • Quickly show off the final design with one-click 360 degree spins
  • Work with exploded views directly from SOLIDWORKS configurations
  • Create interactive web content (VR and Panorama)
  • Camera fly-by videos
  • Create interactive presentations
  • Present and compare varying design solutions side-by-side with multiple viewports
  • Unleash your creative side with customizable Camera Filters
  • Instantly boost productivity and performance with integrated Render QUEUE and render farms that easily scale to meet even the most demanding schedules

Here is a comparison table for standard vs professional:

Capability SOLIDWORKS Visualize
Standard
SOLIDWORKS Visualize
Professional
Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) Included Included
Accelerated Rendering Included Included
Hybrid Render Mode Included Included
Physically-Based Raytracing Included Included
Intuitive User Interface Included Included
CAD and Graphic File Support Included Included
CAD Live-Update Included Included
Surface/Part Splitter Included Included
Interactive Depth of Field Included Included
Import SOLIDWORKS Animations
and Motion Studies
Included
Full Animation Suite Included
Animation Ribbon Included
Visualize Boost Support Included
PowerBoost Real-time Network Rendering Included
Browser-based Interactive Image
and Panoramic Outputs
Included
Customizable Photographic Camera Filters Included
Integrated Render Queue Included
Configurations Included
New Area Lights and Light Placement Included
Create VR Content Included

Example animation created with Professional

With the professional version you can create convincing, lifelike movies for product comparisons, print, web, design reviews, sales/marketing, or even interactive experiences. Take a look at the product animation below which demonstrates all the features of a cooking consumer product in a simple but impactful way:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/P7PAWqipaSM?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Which medium better describes your design concept?

A technical drawing? Or computer generated animation that looks identical to filming the real product? In today’s world, photorealistic content throughout the design process is not only the standard, it’s actually expected. To make the right design and engineering decisions, you need to utilize photorealistic immersive content, much more than a technical drawing could describe. Understanding how designs and products look in the ‘real world’ is a key component in any design review or customer purchasing decision.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional enables designers and engineers across all industries to create compelling visual content of their designs that’s a step beyond “photorealistic” with unparalleled ease and flexibility. By creating compelling photo-quality visual content of products early in the design process, a more informed design comparison decision can be made, as well as receiving useful early feedback from sales teams and potential customers.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7H4gEJXuC4Q?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Benefits of the Professional version for your business

By improving concepts that are viewed throughout the design, development, and marketing phases, SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional helps users select, validate, improve, and sell the best and most robust design concepts before committing expensive engineering, prototyping, and marketing resources to the project. It helps reduce errors and ensure that products get to market faster:

  • Improve internal design, engineering, and sales reviews to help make more educated final decisions
  • Drastically reduce the cost and number of physical prototypes, helping to arrive at final design decisions much more efficiently
  • Deliver photo-quality imagery and content to marketing much earlier to help promote the newest products via web and print
  • Added time savings allow for more design time, which results in an overall better final product

Get more information about SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional

Do you have to invest in expensive photo-shoots or production filming? Do you have to wait until the final product is available before you create your marketing content? As you can see with SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional you can create sales and marketing content during the design process and be able to start marketing before your product is actually released.

Talk to a Javelin sales representative to learn more about the professional versions, get pricing, obtain a free trial, and understand how it can impact your business.

Contact Us

The post SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard vs Professional appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at March 21, 2019 12:00 PM

Rock Solid Perspective

Agen judi bola confirmed Dortmund have had chance after chance

It’s perhaps worth recalling the scenario where Tottenham found themselves following the next match of the Champions League group stage. With just 1 point about the boardMauricio Pochettino had...

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by coffe at March 21, 2019 11:54 AM

Comeback from 2-0 down according to agen sbobet indonesia

Peter Beardsley has abandoned Newcastle stating he’s looking for a fresh challenge but the team haven’t explained whether the under-23 trainer’s death was connected to its...

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by coffe at March 21, 2019 11:51 AM

March 20, 2019

SolidSmack

This Bendable Wood Bench Is Material Manipulation at It’s Finest

Modern Bench Design

Life is too short to be sitting on an uncomfortably hard bench— most would rather be spending it on a nice leather chair instead. But what if you could bring that bum-conforming comfort to a wood bench? Heck — how would you even start…no pillows allowed? Such is the premise behind the BEND Bench.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PJdGRlAPddU?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Created by Mexican architect and designer Ricardo Garza Marcos, The Bend Bench aims to change people’s perceptions of the typical wood bench: instead of using a single piece of—or planks of—hardwood, Ramos adds a series of vertical cuts to make the bench more pliable…not unlike the sole of a Nike Free running shoe.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

After testing different wood types in his development process, Marcos settled on the Montezuma bald cypress tree (locally known as the ‘Ahuehuete’) for its combined sturdiness and flexibility. He experimented with different cuts, working out the proper spacing and depth before settling on the bench’s final design.

<figure class="wp-block-image">bend bench</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">bend bench</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">bend bench</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">bend bench</figure>

The finished Bend Bench uses 87 cuts spaced evenly across a 3-inch thick piece of Ahuehuete wood with two grooves on either end to hold the steel frame. While at first glance the bench looks like any ordinary flat surface, sitting on it causes the Bend Bench to cushion itself around your tired rump.

There’s no telling how long the bench will continue to bend over time—such as if it was placed in a public space—but you can’t deny that it is indeed a unique take on the classic design. Find more on the Bend Bench over at Ricardo Garza Marcos.

The post This Bendable Wood Bench Is Material Manipulation at It’s Finest appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 20, 2019 02:27 PM

App Smack 11.19: Brilliant, Kavtek, Blinkist, RoboKiller, and More…

iPhone Plus

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved smart device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional. This week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Brilliant (iOS — Free)

Whether you want to hone your quantitative skills, improve your knowledge of science and technology, be a smarter parent for your inquisitive kid, or simply stay sharp, Brilliant helps you grow as a curious and ambitious person.

<figure class="aligncenter">Brilliant App</figure>

Post-it® Plus (iOS – Free)

The Post-it® Plus App brings the simplicity of the Post-it® Note to your smartphone and tablet. Whether you use Post-it® Notes for collaboration or for personal note taking, the Post-it® Plus App helps you keep that
momentum going.

<figure class="aligncenter">Post-it® Plus</figure>

Microsoft Outlook (iOS — Free)

Outlook lets you bring all your email accounts and calendars in one convenient spot. Whether it’s staying on top of your inbox or scheduling the next big thing, we make it easy to be your most productive, organized, and connected self.

<figure class="aligncenter">Microsoft Outlook</figure>

Kavtek (iPhone — Free)

Kavtek makes it easier than ever to visualize your home improvement ideas using augmented reality. Change your flooring, paint walls, and place new products in your home to create a better space. The app includes furniture, flooring, paint, and more products from your favourite brands. Kavtek gives you an accurate impression of what your renovation and interior design projects would look like, instantly.

<figure class="aligncenter">Kavtek</figure>

Blinkist (iPhone — Free)

Where do the world’s smartest people get their ideas? From great books! Blinkist transforms the key insights of 2500+ bestselling nonfiction books into powerful packs you can read or listen to in just 15 minutes.

<figure class="aligncenter">Blinkist App</figure>

RoboKiller (iPhone — Free)

RoboKiller reduces unwanted calls by up to 90% in 30 days! RoboKiller is available with both monthly and yearly subscriptions, both with a free 7-day trial; opt-out at any time during the trial and you aren’t charged a penny. A subscription is required to utilize the service.

<figure class="aligncenter">Robokiller App</figure>

The post App Smack 11.19: Brilliant, Kavtek, Blinkist, RoboKiller, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 20, 2019 02:14 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to disable SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault Launch at Windows Startup

Every time I startup my Windows 10 laptop, I would be prompted to log into all my SOLIDWORKS PDM Vaults. Since I typically have 3+ Vaults this was one of those little annoyances that I finally decided to do something about.

After some searching, I found what I believe was the culprit. At some point some of my PDM folders made their way into my Quick Access favorites. Not because I pinned these folders to Quick access, but because they were frequently used. In my case, these were the SOLIDWORKS Design Library and/or the SOLIDWORKS Routing library folders.

To Disable SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault Launch

In order to disable SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault Launch at startup, I accessed the Windows Quick Access options by right-clicking on the Quick Access icon and selection Options from the shortcut menu:

Accessing Quick Access Options

Accessing Quick Access Options

In the Privacy section of the Quick Access Options, I deselected Show frequently used folders in Quick Access. As an added measure, I also cleared the File Explorer History.

Disable SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault Launch Quick Access Options

Quick Access Options

The post How to disable SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault Launch at Windows Startup appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at March 20, 2019 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools: Copic Industrial Design Sketching Markers

Design Sketching Markers

When it comes to sketching and communicating your ideas well, nothing beats a good old-fashioned pencil and a keen sense of perspective. That said, adding simple depth to your form sketches with light and shadow is a natural next step in taking your sketches to the next level.

And when it comes time to cranking ideas out fast, our favorite go-to is a fistful of 2-3 Sketching Grays from Copic that give us great contrast. These ultra-blendable, low odor, alcohol-based inks deliver rich and smooth strokes that are ideal for quickly communicating product concepts. And unlike water-based inks, which tend to pill and oversoak paper while blending, Copics mix on the surface fast and easy-like.

While there are plenty of Copic marker sets out there, we recommend sticking to this compact six-pack of Sketching Grays for maximum versatility. If you want to get extra-fancy, try adding a single bright ‘pop’ color for your arrows, callouts, and anytime you want a callout to really stand out. And don’t forget that marker paper pad, too!

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Copic Sketch Set of 6 Markers – Sketching Grays $29.34

Features:

  • Packaged in a clear plastic case, a sketch set is the ideal way to begin or add to a marker collection
  • Refillable markers and replaceable nibs, compatible with Copic air brush system
  • Alcohol-based ink is permanent and non-toxic, dries acid free

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: Copic Industrial Design Sketching Markers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 20, 2019 09:28 AM

March 19, 2019

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS License Buyers Guide

Need a SOLIDWORKS License? There are many varieties of SOLIDWORKS license available and they can be tailored to fit your needs.  This article discusses the different license types and will assist you in finding the best solution.  Contact our knowledgeable Technical Sales Team for more information.

SOLIDWORKS license options

SOLIDWORKS license

SOLIDWORKS License Types

So what’s available?  To start off, SOLIDWORKS goes far beyond a simple CAD software.  Within the same interface you can validate your designs by simulating real-world conditions, store and manage your data efficiently, communicate your ideas, program your CNC machine, apply quality controls with inspection tools, and much more.

There are two main categories of license to choose from:

  1. SOLIDWORKS Standalone License: If you have a designer that will always be using SOLIDWORKS on their computer, the Standalone license would be a good pick as it’s a license just for them.
  2. SOLIDWORKS Floating/Network License: If you have several designers but they won’t all be using SOLIDWORKS at the same time, the network license may be a better fit for your needs as it’s essentially a “pool” of licenses that can be shared between users.

SOLIDWORKS Standalone License

Standalone Standalone licenses have a serial number to be used by a single user.  We can breakdown Standalone licenses into two further categories, Perpetual or Term licenses.

  • SOLIDWORKS Perpetual License refer to a purchased license that is yours to keep.  The software can be installed on a computer and continued to be used indefinitely.
  • SOLIDWORKS Term License gives you the same features as a Perpetual license, but these have expiration dates so it can only be used during its purchased term.  This has a benefit of lower upfront costs to get you started where there are budgetary constraints or if you only need it for a short period of time.  This can be purchased as a 3-month or 12-month term.  Most products are available for Term licensing but contact one of our sales specialists for details.

Standalone licenses also give you the option to Activate on a specific computer, or use an Online mode where multiple computers are installed and you simply Log In when opening SOLIDWORKS to use the license.

  • SOLIDWORKS Activation: Locks the license to an individual computer.  It uses a hardware identifier so the license is tied to that particular machine.  Once activated, you can always open SOLIDWORKS on this computer regardless of network or internet connection.  To remove the activation from this machine (i.e. moving SOLIDWORKS to another computer or changing hardware) there is a transfer and deactivation process.  Only one machine can be active at a time.
  • SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing: provides the ability to automatically obtain the license when logging into SOLIDWORKS with an internet connection.  Once you close SOLIDWORKS, the license is released.  This allows you to install SOLIDWORKS on multiple computers and have easy access to the license by logging into SOLIDWORKS from one machine at a time.  You have the ability to use Offline Mode to lock it to a particular machine in the event of travel away from an internet connection.

SOLIDWORKS Network License

SOLIDWORKS Network license combines multiple licenses into a single serial number.  A small License Manager application is installed and activated on your server.  This activation is only stored on the server that hosts all licenses.  Client machines (user machines running SOLIDWORKS) obtain a license by looking to your server and uses a free license if available.  When SOLIDWORKS is opened, it pulls the license from the server.  When SOLIDWORKS is closed, it releases the license back to the server for others to use.

Network licensing cannot use Online mode.  You must be connected to the same network as your server to obtain a license.  If you will be working offsite (i.e. with a laptop) and unable to connect to the network, you can borrow a SOLIDWORKS license from the License Manager.  This uses a license from the server and locks it on the computer so a connection is not needed.

SOLIDWORKS Home Use License

You can register for a Home Use license with a network license only.  This provides a separate node-locked license to be used on home computers by users.  Please contact us for more information.

Do you need a SOLIDWORKS License?

Contact our Sales Team for more information about purchasing a SOLIDWORKS Standalone or Network license for your business.

Contact Us

The post SOLIDWORKS License Buyers Guide appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at March 19, 2019 03:42 PM

How to Select Identical Components in SOLIDWORKS

SOLIDWORKS 2019 allows you to select identical components by selecting one of the components.

  • This option works within the features including:
    • Pattern Components (Circular Patterns, Circular Component, Curve Driven Component, Linear Component, Pattern Driven Component, Sketch Driven Component)
    • Mirror Components
    • Move/Rotate Components (available with Collision Detection and Physical Dynamics)
  • Component Selection for features such as Defeature and Exploded View
  • And all components in the Feature Scope section for features such as Extruded CutHole Series, Hole Wizard, Revolved Cut, and Swept Cut.

Identical Component Selection Example

In the following example the goal is to mirror all the seven planks relative to the front plane. Within the selection box of Mirror feature, one of the planks is selected and after right clicking on the selected component in the graphics area and clicking on Select Identical Components, the rest of the components are selected automatically.

Right clicking on the Component to Access Select Identical Components

Right clicking on the Component to Access Select Identical Components

You can access this option by right-clicking a components in the graphics area and choosing Select Identical Component in the graphics area, by right clicking a component in the property manager of the feature, or by right clicking on a component from the flyout FeatureManager design tree.

All the Components Are Selected For the Mirror Feature

All the Components Are Selected For the Mirror Feature

You can also use this feature without starting a feature by just selecting a part in the graphics area and navigating to Tools > Component Selection > Select Identical Components.

Select Identical Components from the Menu Bar

Select Identical Components from the Menu Bar

All the identical components will be selected in the FeatureManager Design Tree.

Components Are Selected in the FeatureManager Design Tree

Components Are Selected in the FeatureManager Design Tree

The post How to Select Identical Components in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at March 19, 2019 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

‘Float’ Documents the Meticulous Craft of Building Competitive Model Airplanes

Float Documentary

While most people outgrow making model airplanes at an early age, others soldier on well into their adult lives; even going so far as to create a sport out of it.

Airplane modeling began as early as 1871, where a Frenchman named Alphonse Penaud invented a rubber band-powered airplane. Though it would be more than 30 years before the Wright brothers took off in their first aircraft, the model was a significant influence for the brothers’ design.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-vimeo wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-vimeo wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/18557380" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

You would be forgiven if you didn’t know there was an entire sport surrounding the design of model airplanes. In the world of competitive indoor model airplane flying, contestants spend hours working on a series of intricate pieces—all of which make up their unique airplane model. The goal is to make a plane with the least amount of weight and the longest amount of airtime. The competitor whose plane is left in the air while others are on the ground is the winner.

<figure class="wp-block-image">float documentary</figure>

Float is a documentary following two contestants, Brett Sanborn, and Yuan Kang Lee, as they compete in the cutthroat sport of indoor model airplane modeling. Along the way, the documentary goes in-depth on the creative process behind indoor model airplane crafting. Each craftsman takes into consideration multiple analyses such as the splicing of wood pieces to make frames, the cutting of plastic wings, and most importantly, the winding of the rubber band which powers the entire model airplane. It takes hours for a craftsman to make a plane from start to finish, only for it to fly for 40 minutes at most.

<figure class="wp-block-image">float documentary</figure>

The documentary is more than just a look inside the world of competitive model airplane flying though; despite the skill and patience needed to compete, the sport and community as a whole are dying. Float also aims to increase awareness of indoor model airplane flying and show that there is still a place for this simple analog past time in the digital age.

<figure class="wp-block-image">float documentary</figure>

If you’re interested in watching the film, screenings and a brief synopsis of the documentary can be found over at the Float webpage.

The post ‘Float’ Documents the Meticulous Craft of Building Competitive Model Airplanes appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 19, 2019 11:00 AM

Cool Tools: The Palomino Blackwing 602 Pencil

Blackwing Pencils

Cherished by writers, designers, illustrators, and other creative professionals for its soft dark lead and unique flat eraser, the Blackwing 602 is worth trying at least once—but be forewarned: you may never go back to plain old #2 pencils again.

Originally manufactured by the Eberhard Faber Pencil Company from 1934 – 1988, the Blackwing brand was acquired by California Cedar Products Company in 2008 and reintroduced to a new generation of creatives in 2012.

And now, you can score your own 12-pack of the legendary pencil for just 23 bucks.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Palomino Blackwing 602 Pencils 12-Pack — $24.95

Features:

  • One pack of 12 Palomino Blackwing pencils
  • Pencils feature a soft and smooth graphite core that is perfect for artists and composers
  • Pencils feature a unique ferrule and allows you to extend and replace the eraser
  • Replacement erasers available in three different colors
  • Pencils made out of Genuine Incense-cedar

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: The Palomino Blackwing 602 Pencil appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 19, 2019 09:01 AM

March 18, 2019

SolidSmack

Expand Your Design Skillset with This Graphic Design Bootcamp

Design Thinking

It’s not always easy to juggle multiple hats in the design and engineering worlds—but if there is a common language that will likely end up saving you a lot of time and frustration down the road, it’s having basic knowledge of visual communication.

While few could ever become an Aaron Draplin overnight, having a strong grasp on the fundamentals of color theory and layout could easily make or break your projects—particularly when communication specific details to stakeholders. Thankfully, you don’t need to go back to design school to get started with leveling up your visual communication game.

From setting up an Adobe Creative Cloud environment to building a portfolio website, the Graphic Design Bootcamp will accelerate your design sense and assist in further leveling up your existing design or engineering know-how. Best of all, SolidSmack readers can purchase the course for just $15—that’s 88% off the retail price of $125.00.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Graphic Design Bootcamp – $125 $15 (88% Off)

Features:

  • Access 65 lectures & 8 hours of content 24/7
  • Learn how to create pixel-perfect projects for print & web
  • Download all project files to use as references
  • Communicate in a private Facebook group w/ other students to share projects & critique work

GET IT!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content

Find more deals here:
StackSocial Amazon

The post Expand Your Design Skillset with This Graphic Design Bootcamp appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 18, 2019 05:09 PM

Learn How to 3D Scan with Industrial Designer Eric Strebel

3D Scanning

For some designers and engineers, 3D scanning physical objects to use as reference models can be the ultimate time-saver. Industrial Designer Eric Strebel is one such design professional—and as always, he has some insightful tips for fellow designers and engineers out there who want to kickstart their 3D scanning game—aka, photogrammetry.

Photogrammetry is a process in which a user takes photos of an object from different angles. Using these pictures, computer software calculates the form and size of an object and can recreate it as a 3D model. In his latest video, Strebel shows us how to prepare and scan a bottle using basic photogrammetry techniques:

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Y9K-a91w9UA?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">basic photogrammetry </figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">basic photogrammetry</figure>

First, the surfaces of the object need to be prepped for optimizing image capture—including removing surface imperfections and glare. To make the bottle non-reflective, Stebel first sprays the bottle with several colors of primer. He coats the bottle first in a grey primer, then switches back and forth between speckles of black and white primer to give it some texture. After spraying the bottle, he props it up on a makeshift stand using a hot glue gun.

<figure class="wp-block-image">basic photogrammetry</figure>

Just as crucial for ensuring proper output is prepping the “capture space”. In Strebel’s case, he places the bottle and stand on his workshop table since it is flat and has good lighting. To make the images look better in post-production, he lays a sheet of white paper above the light as a diffuser while he takes photos of different angles of the bottle. For his camera settings, Stebel has the camera set to manual with the aperture as low as possible to blur out the background and so he can get good depth of field. He also has the ISO locked and the camera autofocused.

<figure class="wp-block-image">basic photogrammetry</figure>

Once the photos are taken, he imports them into Agisoft Metashape—a stand-alone software product that performs automated photogrammetric processing of digital images to generate a 3D model—to generate the mesh of the bottle. The program determines the various angles where he took the photos and creates a transparent 3D image of the bottle. He cuts off the 3D model of the stand and surfaces the bottom of the bottle before exporting the finished data.

<figure class="wp-block-image">basic photogrammetry</figure>

The bottle data can now be used in different CAD applications for different purposes. In theory, you can even 3D print the same bottle if you need to. While Agisoft Metashape carries a $179 pricetag for the Standard version, new users can try it for free for 30-days.

As always, you can find more of Eric Stebel’s videos on design and product making on his YouTube channel.

The post Learn How to 3D Scan with Industrial Designer Eric Strebel appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at March 18, 2019 05:01 PM

The SolidSmack Monday List 12.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

Workshop Projects

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Every Move You Make, WeWork Will Be Watching You

A spate of acquisitions has given the workspace company tools to track and optimize office space.

<figure class="aligncenter">Every Move You Make, WeWork Will Be Watching You</figure>

See the ingenious toys made by refugee children

In a remote refugee camp in Uganda, South Sudanese kids create their own entertainment from mud, paper, and plastic.

<figure class="aligncenter">See the ingenious toys made by refugee children</figure>

The Epic Hunt for a Lost World War II Aircraft Carrier

In 1942, a volley of torpedoes sent the U.S.S. Wasp to the bottom of the Pacific. For decades, the families of the dead wondered where in the lightless depths of the ocean the ship could possibly be. Earlier this year, a team of wreck hunters set out to find it.

<figure class="aligncenter">The Epic Hunt for a Lost World War II Aircraft Carrier</figure>

When Elon Musk Tried to Destroy a Tesla Whistleblower

It started with a Twitter meltdown and ended with a fake mass shooter. A former security manager says the company also spied and spread misinformation.

<figure class="aligncenter">When Elon Musk Tried to Destroy a Tesla Whistleblower</figure>

The Mysterious, Stubborn Appeal of Mass-Produced Fried Chicken

Why do so many accomplished chefs call Popeyes their favorite fried chicken?

<figure class="aligncenter">The Mysterious, Stubborn Appeal of Mass-Produced Fried Chicken</figure>

Project Planning Tips and Tales

A collection of project planning ideas and inspirations, taken from Gareth Branwyn’s bestselling ‘Tips and Tales from the Workshop’.

<figure class="aligncenter">Workshop Projects</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 12.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 18, 2019 04:28 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to Search All Variables within SOLIDWORKS PDM

Ever have a scenario where you’re looking for a specific value but can’t remember which variable it’s stored in?  If you know where the value should be stored (for example part number), searching within SOLIDWORKS PDM is easy as we can search that specific variable and find what we’re looking for quickly, but as a user I found there were scenarios where I’d be looking for a value and not sure which variable it might exist in.  In this article we’re going to look at a couple of options to search all variables at once.

For these searches we’re going to be using the default Complete Search Card.  If you do not have a copy of this in your vault, please read our SOLIDWORKS PDM Complete Search Card Guide for importing it.

Searching all via the variables tab

  1. Complete Search Card > Variables Tab
    • Set the following:
      • Variable; <Any Variable>
      • Comparison; Text Contains
    • Then the value to what you’re looking for.
Searching all via the variables tab

Searching all via the variables tab

As this search includes all the variables in the vault you may see a slower than usual return of results

Searching all via the history tab

  1. Complete Search Card > Variables Tab
    • Check the option to ‘Look in card variable values’ and enter the value in ‘Text to find in history’.
Searching all via the history tab

Searching all via the history tab

The post How to Search All Variables within SOLIDWORKS PDM appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at March 18, 2019 12:00 PM

Setting Up the SolidWorks Interface: Part 2

Part 2 could go several different ways. There were so many things that I should have included in the first part, but it was already getting too big. Here is…

by matt at March 18, 2019 03:11 AM

March 15, 2019

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: The Sea Smark

Pablo-Dominguez-art

Ten times the bow dipped and the bow slipped beneath the pale gray waves. Then out from the shore, the beams struck our path, through a sea writhing with the tentacles of these links.

Pablo Dominguez – Incredible array of ships, scenes, creatures and more with experiments in VR modeling from this ILM Concept Artist.

Beatbox ENT – Tom Thum, beatboxer extraordinaire, has Dr. Matthew Broadhurst, an Ear, Nose and Throat surgeon, show you what happens when he makes those sounds.

Surf Physics – And then there’s this from TED-Ed – An animation that explains the physics behind surfing and surfboard design.

Dekaymotion – Instagram follow of the week. DeeKay Kwon is the creator of the wonderful (relatable) Designer & Client series.

Colourise.sg – Colourise your black and white photos.

The Internet in a Minute – This is an infographic of notable things that happen on the internet in just one minute (and comparison with last year). So. Much. Stuff.

Mirror Shots – Six types of photographs you can take with a mirror.

Panther ProgettoUno – Modern reimagining of the 19070’s Pantera by ARES DESIGN. A V10 with 650 HP.

Pi Song – Yesterday was 3.14. Canton Becker created a song based on the first one billion digits of Pi (π) that lasts for 999,999,999 hours (114 years).

How to Draw Buildings – Artist Tom McPherson takes you through the process of drawing Brighton Pavilion using a 4B pencil.

<script type="text/javascript"> amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "solid0a-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Deals We're Watching"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B01CU1EC6Y,B078HWZYQP,B07B8W2KHZ,B00EADTVLW"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "f23a539444f3d1e0dbe2952f60618fdf"; </script> <script src="http://z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>

Takeover – Metal n’ Bass crew Zardonic with a new one featuring

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</figure>


The post Friday Smackdown: The Sea Smark appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 15, 2019 05:21 PM

SkillCoach | Sheet Metal Design & Fabrication – Classic Aviation Bomber Seat Build

Sheet metal design and fabrication is a topic I’ve aimed to cover for quite a while. So I thought I’d kick things off by highlighting one of the build projects by Ron Covell a master metal fabricator and teacher. His Youtube channel is packed full of tips and techniques for the aspiring fabricator. Additionally, if you hop over to his website Covell you will find a host of in-depth tutorials and hands-on workshop opportunities.

As for me, I get excited when I see stuff being crafted in sheet metal. I’m sure it has something to do with the hours and hours I spent shaping metal in an effort to bring classic cars back to life. Or, the combination of power and finesse I employed to true up autobody sheet metal that had gotten smashed up! Yep, back in the day, I’m talk’n early 80’s, autobody repair and custom car design was my world. But anyhow, before I wax too old, let’s turn our attention to Ron’s Bomber Seat build and learn a little of his sheet metal fabricating techniques. Also, along the way, I’ll try to highlight a few of the tools-of-the-trade he uses to get the project done.

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</figure>

Introduction

One of Ron’s most popular YouTube videos has been Beading Machine Basics. In it, he builds an elaborate, highly detailed bomber seat. He pulls out all the stops in terms of the techniques employed and tools used. However, he admits that a number of his viewers were intimidated and shied away from attempting a bomber build.

Ron’s aim for the build shown in this video was to simplify the design and move the build into the realm of a DIY project. The design has been distilled down to a single sheet pattern that requires little to no welding. Additionally, the equipment required for the build, for the most part, are common tools found in fabrication shops, or that are available through suppliers such as Eastwood. Now that’s what I call ingenuity and user-centered design in action! Let’s have a look at Ron’s overall process in detail and see what we can learn. I personally gleaned a lot of design and fabrication nuggets that I know will help me when I hit the shop.

Design Process

<figure class="wp-block-image alignwide"><figcaption>Multiple scale paper study models were made in order to discover a pleasing form and develop a flat pattern.</figcaption></figure>

1 Ron’s first step for the bomber seat was to make a series of paper mock-ups in order to work out the proportions and various construction details. Paper is a quick and easy medium to work with as it is very forgiving and not to mention cheap!
Working with sketch mock-ups in this manner is common across many creative disciplines. I often encourage my ID students to move from 2D sketches to 3D mockups as it helps them discover more about the form and behavior of various materials as they are given shape.

Ron gradually zeroed in on his design, at which point he was ready to scale up his pattern and transfer it onto a piece of sheet metal. By the way, the image below shows how close the final seat was to the paper mock-up. A close look shows that Ron refined the aesthetics and flow of the seat perimeter by incorporating sweeping arcs. More on this in a minute.

<figure class="wp-block-image alignwide"><figcaption>Final seat superimposed over sketch mock-up.</figcaption></figure>

2 One key to simplifying the fabrication of this design is in the use of large radius bends to achieve seat depth. But the real 3D magic lays in the circular openings located where the pan and backrest come together. They are built-in relief mechanisms that enable the sheet metal to be bend in multiple directions (X, Y, Z) forming the 3D structure.

BTW, keep in mind that Ron is kick’n it “Old-School” throughout this build process. I’m talk’n well-honed analog skills! No full-featured sheet metal CAD apps used here. As such, he employs his knowledge of sheet metal behavior. Ron used his bending jig to help determine the length consumed in the corner bend regions. Armed with that knowelege he’s able to accurately layout his 2D pattern.

  • <figure><figcaption class="wp-block-jetpack-slideshow_caption gallery-caption">4″ diameter bending jig is used to fabricate seat.</figcaption></figure>
  • <figure><figcaption class="wp-block-jetpack-slideshow_caption gallery-caption">Forming a test piece around the jig helped determine how much length is consumed by the bend.</figcaption></figure>
  • <figure><figcaption class="wp-block-jetpack-slideshow_caption gallery-caption">4-1/2″ of compensation is required to properly size the pattern.</figcaption></figure>
<figure class="wp-block-image alignwide"><figcaption>A Sharpie permanent marker was used to prepare the 2D Pattern Layout</figcaption></figure>

If we eyeball the above pattern we can see that Ron’s target for the seat pan is approximately 18″ wide by 11-1/2″ deep. Look’s like the backrest height will come in at 17-1/2″. Note the large circles on the side with the triangular marks bisecting them, this is the bend relief area.

Fabrication Process

1 Having completed the 2D pattern Ron moved on to the fabrication process. The first trimming process happened in the corners where the back and base come together. To achieve a flush joint extra material was left in this area. The subsequent lap joint was formed using a beading machine. In a later step, several options such as plug-welding, spot-welding, or riveting were offered up for securing the joint.

2 On to form the sidewalls. What stood out to me during this stage of the fab was the ease and simplicity in which Ron was able to roll the sheet around the forming jig. All four sidewalls were formed using this single jig!

To minimize distortion during the forming of the back, a piece of MDF sheet was cut to match the seat pan shape and clamped into place. In this step, we see the value of the circular relief holes. Were they not present, the metal would kink as the back is moved into the upright position. But not today! In fact, no forming jig was required. For this bend, Ron simply used the ole eyeball to sight things up and hand rolled the back into position.

3 The next stages are where more specialized sheet metal fabrication tools come into play. Let’s have a look at a few of them. A series of pilot holes for punching the ovals were drilled after forming seat pan. A rotor brooch cutter made fast work of drill the array of holes accurately.

4 A spot welder was used to secure the side seam. These welders are also known as resistance welders. Here’s a link to a primer on Resistance-Welding to gain more understanding of the process.

5 The perimeter of the bomber seat was fashioned on-the-fly using a good old Sharpie marker. Ron tweaked the shape until he was satisfied with how the arcs flowed as they transitioned around the seat. A paper template was used to help accurately transfer contours the other side.

The sheet metal was trimmed using a combination of power shears for the rough cut and hand-snips for final tuning.

  • <figure></figure>
  • <figure></figure>
  • <figure></figure>

6 One of the iconic details of bomber seats is the array of holes. Functionally, these holes serve to reduce weight. However, aesthetically, they allow for a lot of creative expressions. For this seat build, Ron opted to use an oval shaped hole array as opposed to a pure circle. Ovals set in the vertical orientation, as in this case, will cover a little more seat real estate requiring fewer hole punch operations. A Mittler Brother’s oval punch and die set proved to be just the ticket for this project.

<figure class="wp-block-image alignwide"></figure>

7 On to the last step. The perimeter of the bomber seat was finished off with a custom J-Channel. To Fabricate the channel a sheet metal brake, the 4″roll-form jig, a metal shrinking tool and a crimping machine were used.

Studying the build of this bomber seat was fascinating! Here are a few Skillcoach takeaways.

  • Sheet metal is an excellent medium to work with. It is relatively inexpensive, stable, and can be fashioned using simple to elaborate tools and equipment.
  • When preparing tutorials and how-to material know your target audience. Ron did a nice job of restructuring his material to serve both the novice and advanced fabricators.
  • Paper study mock-ups are an excellent means to work out design details.
  • Sharpies are used everywhere!
  • Exercising patience at each phase of the design and fabrication process is key to accuracy and a quality outcome.
  • Owning the proper tools-of-the-trade are important, so save your pennies!

Well, I hope you’ve enjoyed dissecting Ron’s Covell’s bomber seat build with me.

Until next time, keep learning! – SkillCoach

The post SkillCoach | Sheet Metal Design & Fabrication – Classic Aviation Bomber Seat Build appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at March 15, 2019 01:02 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Drawing Open Progress Indicator

The SOLIDWORKS drawing open progress indicator introduced for SOLIDWORKS 2019 provides insightful information about the status of operations when a drawing is being opened. If a drawing takes longer than 60 seconds to open, the drawing would still remain open after the drawing has been loaded.

Drawing Open Progress Indicator

Drawing Open Progress Indicator

The first state in opening the file is loading all the components in the memory. The open progress indicator shows the number of components opened and the total number of files in the model.

Once the files are opened, the drawing will be updated. This includes all the mates, assembly features,patterns, and in-context models. If the drawing has multiple sheets, The total number of sheet and the sheet that is being updated is shown as well.

Information About Sheets That Are Updated in Open Progress Indicator

Information About Sheets That Are Updated in Open Progress Indicator

After the drawing is updated, as the last step the graphics is generated. The drawing open progress indicator also shows the elapsed time since opening the drawing and the amount of time required to open the drawing the last time the drawing was opened. For assembly drawings, the Previous time to open operation is specific to the assembly mode (such as Large Assembly mode, Lightweight mode, and Resolved mode).

After the drawing is opened, there is link for accessing Performance Evaluation. You can also access Performance Evaluation from Tools > Evaluate > Performance Evaluation.

The post SOLIDWORKS Drawing Open Progress Indicator appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at March 15, 2019 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 11.19

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

This Paper Airplane Folding Machine Is Peak Awesomeness

Remember when you were a kid, and the coolest talents your friends had were blowing bubblegum and making paper planes? Yeah, those were the days.

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How to Make a Soldering Unicorn (Yes, Really)

If you suspend the science behind it, the act of soldering is a work of magic. By heating a filler metal, one can join two or more materials which would otherwise not fit together (like pizza and pineapple, for example).

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This 3D Printed ‘Acoustic Metamaterial’ Might Be the Future of Noise Cancellation

Get ready to shelve your disgusting earplugs because this one is a doozy.

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Little Sophia Robot Brings STEM, Coding, A.I. Tech to Youngins’

Toys for little girls have come a long way. Instead of gangly, mobility-limited figurines with zero capabilities, young ladies can now opt for an awkward, less mobility-limited, learning, talking, facial expression recognizing robot friend to do their bidding. Its name is Little Sophia.

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Einscan-SP 3D Scanner [Review]

We seasoned digital craftspeople can take an idea from a digital model to a physical concept with lightning speed. Unfortunately, that process seems prefered over starting with a physical part to create a digital part.

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How to Make a Nintendo Switch Game Case Out of LEGOs

For many, half the fun of owning a Nintendo Switch portable gaming console is playing video games—while the other half is spent personalizing the hardware itself.

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The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 11.19 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 15, 2019 10:00 AM

Cool Books: ‘The Pushing Points Topology Workbook’

Nurbs modeling

When it comes to SubD topology, having the ability to construct a variety of meshes with clean polygon flows can mean the difference between yelling an obscene amount of profanities at your monitor or having a blast. Thanks to a new book from the renowned 3D artist, writer, and director William Vaughan, getting to that fun place won’t have to be so challenging after all.

Vaughan’s comprehensive 125-page Pushing Points Topology Workbook includes over 60 exercises to train anybody in managing their mesh topology. Even those who may consider themselves “experts” at SubD could certainly learn a thing or two from the master modeler—whose portfolio spans across Nickelodeon and Pixar.

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The Pushing Points Topology Workbook — $42.79

About Author William Vaughan:

William Vaughan is an award-winning artist, writer, and director. He has created thousands of original computer-generated characters, including Tofu the Vegan Zombie. William has trained thousands of CG artists throughout the world and authored more than one thousand tutorials and instructional videos. He has been published by major cg magazines, contributed to twenty books, has written and directed several award-winning films, and has created digital art for many top studios, including Nickelodeon and Pixar Animation Studios.

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

Feature image via Polycount

The post Cool Books: ‘The Pushing Points Topology Workbook’ appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 15, 2019 09:30 AM