Planet SolidWorks

August 23, 2019

The Javelin Blog

How to avoid updating views in SOLIDWORKS Composer by mistake?

The SOLIDWORKS Composer Lock View tool can be used to avoid updating a view by mistake. Once the view is locked it can be unlocked when needed.

Views in SOLIDWORKS Composer do not just change the orientation of the model like SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD. Views capture all the properties of viewport, zoom scale position, camera orientation and all the property changes of the collaborative and geometric actors.

Hence, moving the mouse around could change the zoom scale and camera orientation which could accidentally update the view even if we do not want to update it.

Locked and Unlocked Views in SOLIDWORKS Composer

Locked and Unlocked Views in SOLIDWORKS Composer

How to lock and unlock a view or multiple views?

This problem of updating the view by mistake can be avoided if we lock a view.

  • In the Views pane > select the view to lock > Right click on the view > Click on lock view.
  • Select multiple views holding Ctrl to lock multiple views using the above method.
  • A lock symbol appears on the view thumbnail, indicating that the view is locked. You can no longer update it.

Lock and unlock views

  • To unlock the view, select one or multiple views (holding Ctrl) and right-click it, and click Unlock Views. You can now update a view if needed.

Gain more SOLIDWORKS Composer Skills

To learn more attend our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training course either in a Canadian classroom near you or Live Online.

The post How to avoid updating views in SOLIDWORKS Composer by mistake? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at August 23, 2019 12:00 PM

August 22, 2019

SolidSmack

SkillCoach | Discovering R3DS Wrap 3 | The Perfect App for Preparing 3D Scan Data for MCAD!

If you are in search of a workflow that will enable you to efficiently prepare 3D scanned data for use in Mechanical Computer-Aided Design (MCAD) software environments, then you’ll want to know about R3DS Wrap 3 (Wp3). In short, Wp3 is a software application that non-rigidly fits a lightweight optimized basemesh to your imported scan data precisely matching it in all its glory! As if this were not enough, Wp3 basemeshes are formatted using four-sided or quad shaped polygons instead of triangles which is truly golden when it comes to preparing for use in MCAD! More on this in a moment.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-vimeo wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-vimeo wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/181450922" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="770"></iframe>
<figcaption>RS3D Wrap 3.0 Workflow Overview</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-embed-vimeo wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-vimeo wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/342721139" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="770"></iframe>
<figcaption> RS3D Wrap 3.4 New Features!</figcaption></figure>

Digital Human Model MCAD Integration

You might ask “Why is this so unique or special?” Well, say you are designing a wearable product such as a facemask or goggles. More than likely, you’ll want to import an anatomically correct 3D head model into your MCAD software environment. In my experience until discovering Wp3 its always been a big hurdle to efficiently format, import and convert my human digital models into something truly usable and flexible inside my MCAD software apps. For example, say you want to measure, create sections, or dynamic manipulate the surface topology of your anatomical model, unfortunately, you would quickly find that importing raw scan data is not the ticket. Scan data in the form of point-clouds or triangular meshes such as .STL often end up being not much more than a glorified visual reference. If such embellishments or collecting a few key measurements are all you need, then you should be good to go with .STL or point-cloud data. That is unless your system has bogged down struggling to keep pace with processing the massive file sizes normally associated with scan data.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>3D Scan Data of Vince Haley a.k.a SkillCoach Fitted w/ Wrap 3 Quad Basemesh</figcaption></figure>

Resolving MCAD Incompatibility Problem

The issue is one of incompatibility. MCAD software apps, in general, are hungry for NURBS formated geometry which is mathematically driven, not faceted triangles. If you feed MCAD apps NURBS there’s a world of possibilities as to how you can use and manipulate the geometry. You want to cut a cross-section, no problem. Need to extract a surface patch or draw curves directly on the surface, done deal!

CAD App Mesh To NURBS Conversion

<figure class="alignleft is-resized"><figcaption>Creo 5.0 Freestyle NURBS Converted DHM</figcaption></figure>

So how does one accomplish the necessary conversion to NURBS? A moment ago I declared that Wp3’s quad shaped polygonal meshes configuration was golden. Why because I’ve learned that a growing number of MCAD software are incorporating tools for converting mesh data to NURBS. One key requirement is that the mesh data is formatted using quads. For example, PTC Creo 5.0 via the Freestyle module allow you to import a quad mesh. Once you exit the Freestyle feature, voila, the geometry is automatically converted to NURBS! Autodesk Fusion 360 has similar functionality where a quad mesh is first converted to a T-spline SubD body using the FORM tools within the Design workspace. Upon exiting FORM, drum roll please……..you guessed it, NURBS! Now that’s what I’m talking about!

My aim for this post is not a how-to, but rather to make you aware of this amazing workflow for preparing scan data for efficient and effective use in MCAD. If you know of other software apps that convert mesh data to NURBS shoot me a PM @Skillcoach and I’ll be sure to call attention in a later post. Additionally, I hope to follow up with a step-by-step tutorial showing my Wrap3 to CAD workflow. In the meantime go ahead and download the fully functional 30 day trial of R3DS Wrap3 and give it a go.

Until next time, keep learning! – SkillCoach

The post SkillCoach | Discovering R3DS Wrap 3 | The Perfect App for Preparing 3D Scan Data for MCAD! appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at August 22, 2019 10:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Fun SOLIDWORKS Part Building Challenges for Beginners

So you’ve just completed a SOLIDWORKS Essentials training course, or you are looking brush off those cobwebs and start using SOLIDWORKS again. Whatever the case may be, you need to start practicing. Here are a few parts that you might find challenging, but are all doable using what you’ve learned in essentials. They are also great for 3D printing because they are fun to play with.

Part 1: The Roling Sphericon

The first part is called a Sphericon. Though it does look intimidating to make, once you figure out the recipe, it’s actually quite simple, and you can create your own variations of it. This part is great for practicing general sketch tools & features. Give it a try, and if you get too frustrated, please check out this video to learn how to make it.

Beginner Parts

Sphericon

Part 2: Oloid

This part is described as a mathematically perfect piece of art because of its symmetry and consistent center of mass. This part is a great way of reinforcing what you learned in the surfacing and equations.

Great Beginner Part for Using Equation

Oloid

 

Part 3: Face Table

This part is based on the Rubin vase, where a side profile of a face is used to define the stem of the table. This is a great exercise that reinforces making sketches fully defined, and it is an excellent gift to give someone if you use their face to make the profile.

Great Beginner Part

Face Table

 

Part 4: Octagon table

This part is a great puzzle to because it doesn’t seem obvious as to how it was made. The part was all features based, and no sheet metal tools were used.

Fun Beginner Parts

Octagon Table

Improving your SOLIDWORKS modeling skills takes time and effort, but it can also be fun when trying to create interesting parts. There are so many mathematical objects, optical illusions, and cleverly designed parts to discover!

The post Fun SOLIDWORKS Part Building Challenges for Beginners appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at August 22, 2019 12:00 PM

August 21, 2019

SolidSmack

This is What a Microchip Looks Like Under a High-Powered Microscope

Microchip

Most readers of SolidSmack know how computer microchips work. But have you taken a good look at one, recently? I mean, a REALLY good look?

To get a better sense of just how tiny the electronics in a microchip are, the Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network (or NISE Net for short) zoomed into an old microchip to see up close what makes them tick:

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Fxv3JoS1uY8?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Starting with a high-definition digital DSLR camera, the crew gets an excellent naked eye look at the chip. There isn’t much to see here, other than the accumulating dust on the outer sides of the chip and a closer look at the opened insides at the center.

<figure class="wp-block-image">zoomed in microchip</figure>

However, you can see the crevices on the circuit board as the camera zooms in, as well as the individual components located on the edge of the board. While still visible to the naked eye, you would most likely need the help of a magnifying glass to see the more intricate parts of the microchip.

<figure class="wp-block-image">zoomed in microchip</figure>

Once the view is switched to a scanning electron microscope (SEM), however, the chip starts to look more like a miniature city composed of interweaving electronics. Beginning with a close up look of a millimeter’s length of electronics, the SEM allows a person to zoom in up to a micron’s length (roughly 1,000 nanometers) of the microchip.

<figure class="wp-block-image">zoomed in microchip</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">zoomed in microchip</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">zoomed in microchip</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">zoomed in microchip</figure>

You would think a thousand nanometers is as small as things can get, but using a more powerful scope, the SEM allows you to see squared transistors measuring 20 nanometers making up the much larger electronics. 

<figure class="wp-block-image">zoomed in microchip</figure>

Take note this is a dated microchip. Microchips today are even smaller and have more compact circuitry on the nanometer level which leaves very little extra space within the chip. All this is made possible by the advancements in nanotechnology which allow for smaller and faster chips in today’s modern electronics.

If you’re feeling a particularly new interest in nanotechnologies, the NISE Net YouTube channel has all of your miniature needs set.

The post This is What a Microchip Looks Like Under a High-Powered Microscope appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 21, 2019 05:34 PM

The Best Apps of the Week (34.19): SketchAR, Invoice Simple, NOMO, Playbook, and More…

iPhone Apps

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved smart device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional. This week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

SketchAR: learn how to draw (iOS — Free)

Learn how to draw using new SketchAR 5.0 technology – computer vision and augmented reality merged together to speed up the learning process and make it more entertaining.

<figure class="aligncenter">SketchAR: learn how to draw</figure>

JFK Moonshot (iOS – Free)

Using the latest in augmented reality technology, we immerse users into 1969 with a full-scale recreation of the Saturn V rocket and a 5-day real-time tracking simulation of the mission and moon landing. Users can take a deeper dive into President Kennedy’s vision with interactive AR games, archival NASA footage and educational multimedia experiences.

<figure class="aligncenter">JFK Moonshot</figure>

LOST iN City Guide (iOS — Free)

elebrated local artists, chefs, musicians and tastemakers take you on a personal tour of their town via editor-vetted recommendations for eating, drinking, culture, outdoors and nightlife.

<figure class="aligncenter">Lost in City Guide</figure>

Invoice Simple, Estimate Maker (iOS — Free)

Invoice Simple is the easiest way to send professional invoices and estimates to your customers. It’s perfect for small business owners, contractors and freelancers needing a fast, easy to use mobile invoicing solution.

<figure class="aligncenter">Invoice Simple, Estimate Maker</figure>

NOMO – Point and Shoot (iOS — Free)

Here are your new cameras! NOMO was designed to help casual photographers to focus on taking pictures, instead of all the post-production retouches

<figure class="aligncenter">NOMO - Point and Shoot</figure>

Playbook: Build a Startup (iOS — Free)

Are you a Founder? You just started your Startup? You have an idea you are working on? You just launched and want to grow, raise money and hire a team? -> Then this App is for you!

<figure class="aligncenter">Playbook: Build a Startup</figure>

The post The Best Apps of the Week (34.19): SketchAR, Invoice Simple, NOMO, Playbook, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at August 21, 2019 04:29 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to apply Textures to 3D Printed Parts with SOLIDWORKS

SOLIDWORKS users often need to create complex or repeating features, but these features can be time-consuming to generate, especially on complex models. Some designs, such as a textured surface or a grip, require textures or bumps which can be functional or just for aesthetic purposes. SOLIDWORKS 2019 introduces a new 3D Texture Tool that leverages an image file, turning its appearance directly into a 3D mesh body that is ready for downstream processing or 3D printing.

The workflow for the process is:

  1. Isolate faces of the model to be 3D printed using the SOLIDWORKS Split feature
  2. Apply 2D textures to the split faces
  3. Use the SOLIDWORKS 2019 3D Texture feature for displacement mapping
  4. Layout the part on a 3D print tray
  5. Print the part with textures on a Stratasys F123 3D printer

Watch the video below to learn how SOLIDWORKS 2019 3D Texture tool works with Stratasys F123 Series 3D Printers:

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Learn more about 3D printing with our White Paper

Our Stratasys Prototyping white paper will show there’s never been a better time to invest in 3D printing, a fact made possible by the introduction of the Stratasys F123™ 3D Printer Series.

  • Learn how to eliminate barriers in rapid prototyping to achieve a better bottom line
  • Learn how 3D CAD software and 3D printing equipment work together to produce optimal results
  • Learn how multiple iterations lead to better designs
  • Learn about the cost effective 3D printing materials available with the F123 series
  • See examples of 3D printed parts from an F123 series printer:
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The post How to apply Textures to 3D Printed Parts with SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at August 21, 2019 12:00 PM

August 20, 2019

SolidSmack

How To Sand And Polish a Boring Kitchen Appliance to a Reflective Finish

sanding and polishing

After sanding a sheet of aluminum to a mirror finish, YouTube creator Skills and Trade decided to take their sanding skills a step further and try their hand at sanding and polishing a mini-fridge. Here’s what went down:

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GWNMWrXsCwI?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Contrary to what you might think, there is absolutely nothing wrong with the fridge. It doesn’t have rust on its edges, nor does it look aged in any form or manner. In fact, the only reason they seem to be sanding and polishing it is, well, because they have a friggin’ sander and they can.

<figure class="wp-block-image">sanding and polishing mini fridge</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">sanding and polishing mini fridge</figure>

Just like with their previous aluminum sheet project, they spray Alumicut lubricant over the front of the mini-fridge before starting the sanding process with 200-grit sandpaper. Immediately after taking the sander to the surface, the door begins to shed its dull metal appearance and starts to take on a mirror sheen.

<figure class="wp-block-image">sanding and polishing mini fridge</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

The sheen only gets shinier once they pass it over with 400-grit sandpaper. The first sanding is done with some spray-on Alumicut while the second pass is done by placing the sandpaper on an interface pad before putting it on the Hookit pad of the sander. Doing so helps smooth out the lines and swirl marks from all the sanding.

<figure class="wp-block-image">sanding and polishing mini fridge</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">sanding and polishing mini fridge</figure>

Sanding with the 800-grit and 1,500-grit sandpaper is then done by placing the sandpaper on an interface pad and smoothening out the remaining lines. 

<figure class="wp-block-image">sanding and polishing mini fridge</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">sanding and polishing mini fridge</figure>

The final sanding consists of 3,000-grit and 5,000-grit sandpaper, respectively. The door is then sanded down until it becomes a reflective surface (you can tell so by the reflections of the drill and overhanging sky).

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">sanding and polishing mini fridge</figure>

After wiping off some of the Alumicut, the polishing can now commence. Taking a towel dabbed with polish, they smear the door until it becomes dark and faded. Once every inch is covered, they swap the interface pad on their drill for a polishing pad which is placed on the Hookit pad and begin polishing.

<figure class="wp-block-image">sanding and polishing mini fridge</figure>

A protective sealant is then applied before wiping the whole thing down for excess polish, sand, and other materials. Sadly, the entire fridge can’t be given a mirror sheen as no amount of sanding and polishing can make the other surfaces reflective.

<figure class="wp-block-image">sanding and polishing mini fridge</figure>

Still, viewing the mini-fridge from the front lets you see just how out of shape you are before opening it for some more snacks. More sanding and polishing videos can be found on the Skills and Trade YouTube channel, so be sure to check it out!

The post How To Sand And Polish a Boring Kitchen Appliance to a Reflective Finish appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 20, 2019 12:46 PM

SolidSmack Radio | The End-Effectors (Powered by Spotify)

Spotify Playlist

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’re kicking things off with the classic “Lust for Life” from Iggy Pop before diving into tracks from Spoon, Wilco, Lana Del Ray, Ariel Pink, and others before wrapping up “Catfish Kate” from the original alt-rockers, the Pixies. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<figure><iframe height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/3Lvj2xlRKGYg9tbqYfwf09" width="100%"></iframe></figure>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The End-Effectors (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at August 20, 2019 12:14 PM

The SolidSmack Monday List 34.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Baltimore Wasteland in Epic Turnaround Tale

At Sparrows Point, a modern distribution hub rises where a steel plant once stood.

<figure class="aligncenter">Baltimore Wasteland in Epic Turnaround Tale</figure>

Cybersecurity Tips From a Master of Deception Turned Consultant

Frank Abagnale, the infamous impostor from Catch Me If You Can, says computer crooks have no compassion.

<figure class="aligncenter">Cybersecurity Tips From a Master of Deception Turned Consultant</figure>

Neil Young’s Lonely Quest to Save Music

He says low-quality streaming is hurting our songs and our brains. Is he right?

<figure class="aligncenter">Neil Young’s Lonely Quest to Save Music</figure>

The Man Who Wrote the Guidebook for Civilian Bomb-Squad Technicians

Identifying munitions was a part of my job in the military as an explosive ordnance disposal (E.O.D.) officer, and it has carried on in my career in journalism.

<figure class="wp-block-image">The Man Who Wrote the Guidebook for Civilian Bomb-Squad Technicians</figure>

So You Want a Good Travel Camera

The key to becoming an Instagram standout? Graduating from your iPhone to a portable, professional setup.

<figure class="aligncenter">So You Want a Good Travel Camera</figure>

The ‘Overqualified’ Trap Can Hit You at Any Time

You don’t have to be near retirement to battle a perception that you’ve accomplished too much; here’s what to do about it

<figure class="aligncenter">Overqualified</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 34.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at August 20, 2019 12:02 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard Milling Setup 4/9: Extract Machinable Features

Now that we have set-up our machine, defined the stock and the coordinates, SOLIDWORKS CAM will automatically extract machinable features from the model for machining. First, we need to set the options.

SOLIDWORKS CAM Options

Access SOLIDWORKS CAM Options

Here we may select the types of features SOLIDWORKS CAM will automatically detect.

Extract Machinable Features

Extract Machinable Features Options

Enter the largest drill size you are using in Hole Recognition Options. Diameters over the entered value will be machined with an end mill.

Click Extract Machinable Features in the CAM command manager or picking the right-mouse-button on Mill Part Set-up1 and select the command.

Extract Machinable Features

Extract Machinable Features

A list of machinable features with the default machining strategies will be generated. Selecting or hovering on a feature in the tree will show the feature in the model. Here we will change the machining strategy. Editing the default strategies in the technology database will be covered in future articles about the TechDB.

RMB on Circular Pocket1 and select Parameters.

Feature Properties

Feature Properties

Here, we will change Circular Pocket1 to Rough and Finish strategy.

Finish Strategy

Finish Strategy

Machinable features may also be edited by picking the right-mouse-button and selecting Edit definition or double-clicking. Editing definitions for features will be covered in future articles about interactively generating features.

Next, we will generate an operation plan.

The post SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard Milling Setup 4/9: Extract Machinable Features appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Shawn McEachern at August 20, 2019 12:00 PM

August 19, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Access and control backup file options in SOLIDWORKS Composer

SOLIDWORKS Composer stores a backup of the original document before any changes are saved to the file. It is one version before the last saved version of the document. SOLIDWORKS Composer Backup file settings/options can be accessed through File > Preferences > Application Preferences dialog box opens > Advance settings.

Accessing backup settings

Autosave advanced setting:

Automatically backs up the currently open Composer files in a backup folder, at the interval specified by the AutoSaveInterval setting.

The Backup folder is located in the User folder specified in the Application Paths page in File > Preferences.

AutoSave Interval setting:

Specifies the interval, in minutes, at which the currently open Composer files are to be backed up in the backup folder.

AutoSave versioning advanced setting:

Allows versioning by creating an additional backup version of the currently open Composer files in the backup folder, at the interval specified by the AutoSaveInterval setting. In this case, for a given Composer file, backup versions are saved in a dedicated folder in the User\backup folder (the folder name being the same as the file name). The file name format is filename_YYYYMMDD_HHMM (current year, month, day, hour, minute).

Clear the above option if you want each backup to overwrite the previous one.

AutoSave versioning max number of files:

When AutoSaveVersioning is selected, specifies the maximum number of backup files to keep. The higher the number, the more disk space will be required. The value has to entered between 1 and 100.

Gain more SOLIDWORKS Composer Skills

To learn more attend our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training course either in a Canadian classroom near you or Live Online.

The post Access and control backup file options in SOLIDWORKS Composer appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at August 19, 2019 12:00 PM

August 16, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Using existing geometry to create Etch Marks in SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Parts

When designing sheet metal parts within SOLIDWORKS you may want to add in etch marks to be etched later by the laser or HD plasma machines. Adding etch marks helps communication for later options. My example here is a part that’s going to be laser cut and I want to notify the machinist what size I want these holes to be and the center point for locations.

Holes to be laser cut

Holes to be laser cut

Create Configurations for laser cutting

I start off with my finished parts with all the profiles and holes in. I would then create configurations called Laser and Machined. While on the Machined configuration I have a of couple options: I can either suppress the Hole Wizard features or create another feature to cover/fill the holes. We do this because most laser machines cannot tap holes or create nice counter-bores. It also depends on the tolerances you may want, as you may want the slots or straight thru holes to be machined.

Sheet Metal Configurations

Sheet Metal Configurations

Fill existing holes

I’m going to create another feature to fill the Hole Wizard holes. I find the easiest way to do this is to start a sketch on the face, selecting the Convert Entities, for the selection select the face and right below the selection field click on Select All Inner Loops box. What this will do is select all internal loops. This prevents a bunch of single clicks to grab the internal geometry.

Fill the Hole Wizard holes

Fill the Hole Wizard holes

I would then apply an up to surface Boss Extrude. This will completely fill the holes, but leaves us with an important sketch. I then expand the extrude and show the sketch.  This shows the geometry we just used to fill the holes.

Line Format

Line Format

Changing Sketch Colour

If you don’t use the function called Line Format, now’s a good time to use it. What it can do is change the colour of a Sketch.

NOTE: Some of the nesting programs work with SOLIDWORKS etch marks using colour. Changing sketch geometry to be a specific colour will instruct the nesting program which geometry is to be etched and not cut.

Pre-selecting the sketch will activate more option for the Line Format tool.

Sketch selected

Sketch selected

Selecting the paint brush from the Line Format toolbar will bring up a dialog box for colours.

Set Sketch Colour

Set Sketch Colour

Select the colour that will activate the etch layer in the nesting program. I tend to use a pink or magenta.

Colour set for etch layer

Colour set for etch layer

Get more information

For more SOLIDWORKS colour related topics please check out this article or attend a SOLIDWORKS training course.

Learn more about our range of Laser Cutting/Etching machine for SOLIDWORKS and our Laser Cutting and Engraving Services.

The post Using existing geometry to create Etch Marks in SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Parts appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at August 16, 2019 12:00 PM

August 15, 2019

The Javelin Blog

How to create a Fade-in-out effect for Digger views in SOLIDWORKS Composer animations

The SOLIDWORKS Composer Digger tool lets you zoom parts of your model to show a detail view of complex geometry, you can change opacity, visibility, and capture a 2D image.

Digger keys in animation

Digger keys in animation

Follow the steps below to use the SOLIDWORKS Composer Digger in animations and apply a fade in and fade out effect without using the actual fade in and fade out tools on the timeline.

STEP 1:

  • Place the timeline bar at 2.5 seconds where-ever you want the digger size to be maximum.Now toggle on digger using space-bar or Home > Digger tool.
  • In the view-port drag the center of interest on the geometry actor you would like to zoom in onto.
  • Resize the digger using the radius handle and click on set digger key on timeline toolbar, to capture the digger key in key track.

STEP 2:

  • Copy the step 1 digger key by holding Ctrl and dragging and dropping it at 2 seconds.
  • Using the radius handle reduce the digger circle size.
  • Capture new digger size by settings the digger key again.

I copied the digger from step 1 to step 2 position to maintain the location of digger in viewport.

STEP 3:

  • Now copy the digger key in timeline from 2.5 sec  to 3.5 sec holding Ctrl + drag and drop.
  • This will allow us to maintain the same digger size between 2.5- 3.5 seconds.

STEP 4:

  • Copy the digger key from 2 seconds to 4 seconds, this will allow us to maintain the same position and (small) size of the digger circle.

STEP 5:

  • Place the timeline bar at 4.5 seconds
  • Toggle the digger off using space- bar or Home > digger tool and now capture the digger key again to make sure digger remains off through out the animation.

Hence, just resizing the digger helps us to create the fade-in and fade-out effect while using digger tool in animation.

Learn more about the SOLIDWORKS Composer Digger

To learn more about the SOLIDWORKS Composer Digger, we invite you to attend a SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training course either in a Canadian city near you or live online.

The post How to create a Fade-in-out effect for Digger views in SOLIDWORKS Composer animations appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at August 15, 2019 12:00 PM

August 14, 2019

SolidSmack

Watch How Much Damage a Hard Hat Can Take in Slow-Motion

construction hard hats

From developers to ironworkers, just about everybody knows to wear a hard hat in hazardous work environments like construction sites. Keeping your noggin’ covered with these helmets keeps workers safe from falling debris and the occasional negligence by their coworkers.

But just how effective are these hard hats in a dangerous incident? And is there real security from wearing one, even when you don’t know rubble is falling straight for your head?

To answer these questions, Matt Mikka over at the YouTube channel Warped Perception took three different hard hats—a $3 orange hard hat, a $12 yellow hard hat, and a completely transparent hard hat (price unknown)—and dropped a load of punishment on each of them to test how well they perform in an actual incident. And since it would be boring to watch all of this falling rubble in real-time, they add a little bit more to the visual spectacle by recording all of their ‘drop tests’ in slow motion for maximum effect:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RPq53jVTHSc?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Matt first tests each hat by putting it a mannequin and dropping a bunch of bricks on it from 20-30 feet.

<figure class="wp-block-image">hard hats slow motion</figure>

While you can’t see much of what’s going on inside the orange hard hat, you can see—thanks to that sweet slo-mo—how it protects the mannequin’s head from the falling debris. The suspension system between the head and the hat is what keeps the wearer safe, as it provides space to cushion the fall of unexpected objects.

<figure class="wp-block-image">hard hats slow motion</figure>

Still, you can’t expect to come away unscathed. As the transparent helmet shows, improper positioning can lead to injury even if you are wearing a hard hat. That said, it’s clear that without a hat, there would be much more dire consequences.

Matt then explains how most—if not all of the time—construction workers don’t expect to get hit on the head with debris and are roaming around doing their thing. This leads to some awkward body positions by nature of the work at hand that aren’t ideal to be in when something massive lands on your head. The use of the hard hat is to help prevent fatal damage to the brain, and you can only hope for the best that you’re in a fortunate position when something substantial does fall your way from above.

<figure class="wp-block-image">hard hats slow motion</figure>

After dropping a ton of bricks on the first mannequin and rightly snapping her neck, Matt moves on to another creepy mannequin and tries to drop some 2x4s on her. 

The first drop doesn’t quite land square on the noggin, but shows another feature of the standard hard hat: its rounded shape helps bounce off some punishment from the wearer’s head. When the 2×4 drops, the contour of the hard hat makes the board sort of slide off the top of the head and land harmlessly behind the mannequin. While the impact can still definitely be felt, the body itself is relatively unharmed.

<figure class="wp-block-image">hard hats slow motion</figure>

The second 2×4 drop hits the bullseye on the helmet and promptly snaps the board in two! The hard hat takes the brute force of the falling board and softens it into something the head can (theoretically) handle.

<figure class="wp-block-image">hard hats slow motion</figure>

To illustrate the force absorption capabilities of the hard hats, Matt takes a pneumatic drill and tests it on yet another underpaid and oppressed mannequin. With each pump of the drill, you can see how the suspension system takes the force applied and pushes the hard hat down, softening the blow on the person’s head.

<figure class="wp-block-image">hard hats slow motion</figure>

But when all is said and done, these are mannequins that Matt is testing his hard hats on. To see if an actual human being wearing the helmet feels pain, he gets a child to hit him on the head with different sized sticks. While the first stick makes his ears ring from all the banging, the bigger second stick seems like it could do some damage if Matt wasn’t wearing his trusty hard hat. But seeing how he is, both bits of wood don’t harm his head in any way possible.

<figure class="wp-block-image">hard hats slow motion</figure>

Find more of Matt’s informative slow-motion videos over at Warped Perception.

The post Watch How Much Damage a Hard Hat Can Take in Slow-Motion appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 14, 2019 09:47 PM

The Best Apps of the Week (33.19): Timepage, Actions, Mubert, Bear, and More…

iPhone Space

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved smart device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional. This week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Bear (iOS — Free)

Bear is a focused, flexible writing app used by everyone from bloggers and web developers to aspiring authors and students! It has quick organization, editing tools, and export options to help you write quickly and share anywhere.

<figure class="aligncenter">Bear</figure>

Timepage (iOS – Free)

Timepage is a revolutionary smart calendar that is effortless to use. It makes every day more productive by combining your events, maps, contacts and weather into one easy app.

<figure class="aligncenter">Moleskine Timepage</figure>

Actions by Moleskine (iOS — Free)

Keep on top of everything in your head, whether it’s movies to watch or the details of your next big project. Designed for busy people who live by making lists to stay on track at work and home, the digital card based design is a clutter-free way to visualise everything that needs doing.

<figure class="aligncenter">Actions by Moleskine</figure>

Adobe Spark Page (iOS — Free)

Spark Page makes it easy for anyone to turn words and images into a beautiful gliding web story. Transform your next newsletter, report, invitation or travel adventure into a gorgeous visual story that delights readers on any device. Get inspired by a wide variety of curated designs, then simply tap to select a beautiful, unique look. Gorgeous fonts, color and magazine-style design are automatically incorporated — no design experience required. 

<figure class="aligncenter">Adobe Spark Page</figure>

Adobe Premiere Rush (iOS — Free)

Feed your channels a steady stream of awesome with Adobe Premiere Rush, the all-in-one app for creating and sharing online videos— fast and easy. Powerful tools let you quickly create videos that look and sound professional and just the way you want. 

<figure class="aligncenter">Adobe Premiere Rush</figure>

Mubert (iOS — Free)

Mubert is the first generative music streaming service. The Mubert mobile app uses patented artificial intelligence technology and its user-contributed sample database to generate experimental electronic music, tailored perfectly to each listener. Choose a genre or pick your activity and enjoy endless music with one click.

<figure class="aligncenter">Mubert</figure>

The post The Best Apps of the Week (33.19): Timepage, Actions, Mubert, Bear, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at August 14, 2019 09:22 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to create SOLIDWORKS Electrical Passive Symbol?

You should create SOLIDWORKS Electrical Passive Symbols for the following situations:

  • Symbol has no mark defined
  • Symbol is not be shown on Bill of materials,
  • Symbol has no manufacturer part information defined
  • Or the Symbol does not consume a device mark or a device tag.

A few examples of passive symbols are ground, wire crossings and terminal jumpers.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Passive Symbols

Ground                                 wire crossings                     Jumper wire

Passive Symbols are stored in the database for the projects but are not taken into account in processing or reports.

How to convert a regular symbol into a passive symbol?

To create a SOLIDWORKS Electrical Passive Symbol follow these steps:

  • Go to Library Tab > Symbols manager > Filter and locate the symbol you want to convert into passive symbol
  • Right click on symbol > symbol properties
  • Now change the symbol type from regular schematic, wire diagram or connection label type to passive symbol.
  • Once the symbol is changed into passive symbol type it should disappear from the bill of material list in the reports.

How to create passive symbol

Read our blog article to learn why you should use SOLIDWORKS Electrical Passive Symbols.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Electrical training course either in a Canadian classroom near you or live online. For more information about electrical software and training solutions call 1-877-219-6757.

The post How to create SOLIDWORKS Electrical Passive Symbol? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at August 14, 2019 12:00 PM

August 13, 2019

SolidSmack

Xometry Just Slapped a Carbon 3D Printer on Your Desktop

That Xometry, they’re just not satisfied to bring you nearly every mill, print, metal, and mold option available. They had to go and bag a partnership with Carbon — you know, the company that dropped jaws with their breakthrough CLIP tech that prints high-res parts 25-100x faster.

Yeah, well, if you’ve seen a Carbon printer, drooled a bucket over the results, but are not quite ready to pony up $50k/year for a Carbon M2 DLS 3D Printer subscription, Xometry just made it possible for the cost of using their manufacturing on-demand service and hearing your boss giggle with delight. Teehee!

From the press release:

Customers can now get an instant quote, design feedback, and lead times for parts produced with Carbon DLS™ technology through the Xometry Instant Quoting Engine℠. Carbon DLS™ uses digital light projection, oxygen permeable optics, and programmable liquid resins to produce products with end-use durability, resolution and surface finish.

Xometry has seven material options for Carbon DLS prints and multiple material finish options to boot. In less than a minute, I uploaded a .step file to their Instant Quote Engine and got a quote for a print (plus delivery options) using a printer I’ve longed to use but never had access to.

Xometry File Support
Xometry support 100MB uploads for file types: STEP (.step, .stp), SOLIDWORKS (.sldprt), Mesh (.stl), Parasolid (.x_t, .x_b), Autodesk Inventor (.ipt), Dassault Systems (.3dxml, .catpart), PTC, Siemens (.prt), ACIS (.sat).

After a combined $118M raised in venture capital, that includes their latest Series D amount of $55M, it’s clear Xometry is upending the thoughts around on-demand manufacturing. They’ll be launching in Europe and no doubt adding more capabilities to their already vast repertoire of material manufacturing might. Keep an eye on these peeps.

The post Xometry Just Slapped a Carbon 3D Printer on Your Desktop appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at August 13, 2019 05:46 PM

This E-Bike is Powered by a DeWalt Power Drill

DeWalt Drill

You’ve been told time and time again how riding a bike can be beneficial for both the environment and your health. But if you’re not inclined to strap into the pedals for a pedal-pusher first thing in the AM, why not turn to an electrified solution? As Russian online power tool store Kuvalda shows in a recent marketing video, all it takes is strapping a Dewalt power screwdriver to the wheels of a conventional bike and voila, your commute is now 100%-exercise free.

<figure class="wp-block-embed"></figure>

Taking a closer look at the DIY e-bike, you can see it is made from welded pipes and what I can only assume are recycled bicycle parts (the handle and seat, specifically). Seeing as you don’t need to manually turn the wheels, the pedals have also been removed in favor of a couple of improvised pipe footrests.

<figure class="aligncenter">screwdriver e-bike </figure>

What’s most intriguing is the “engine” powering the bike. Instead of a normal bicycle gear shift, there are a set of gears at the back that transfer the power drill’s energy into the bike’s wheels. Squeezing the handles turns on the drill, while letting go of them effectively turns off the power system.

It looks as though there isn’t a brake system in place for this prototype, as the rider is always stopping the bike using his feet. Since this bike was made as an experiment and not as a vehicle you might actually take on the road, it’s totally fine that they scrimped on some safety features for the meantime.

<figure class="aligncenter">screwdriver e-bike</figure>

Head over to Kuvalda’s Instagram page to see more entertaining uses for power tools that just might intrigue you enough to create your own bonkers e-bike or other off-kilter projects.

The post This E-Bike is Powered by a DeWalt Power Drill appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 13, 2019 04:17 PM

This Keychain-Sized OLED Display Plays Vintage Video Games

KeebProject Board

Kids today may never learn to appreciate how far technology has come in such a short time. They’ll never know the struggles of rewinding VHS tapes before returning them to Blockbuster, and video games can now be downloaded straight to their mobile phones instead of taking a trip to the video arcade for every quick gaming fix.

For a maker known only as “Bob,” recreating that vintage arcade experience in a pocket-sized device was reason enough to pay homage to the classic video games of yesteryear in a modern(ish) package.

<figure class="wp-block-embed"></figure>

The KeebCard is his pocket-sized device for playing vintage games including  Pong and Snake. Using just three mechanical keyboard switches and an ATTINY85 microcontroller, users can control the games on its tiny 128×32 OLED display.

<figure class="wp-block-embed">
View this post on Instagram

As requested

A post shared by Bob (@thekeebproject) on <time datetime="2019-08-09T22:41:43+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Aug 9, 2019 at 3:41pm PDT</time>

</figure>

Though you definitely need good eyesight or a good pair of eyeglasses to view a screen the size of your finger, the Keebcard definitely works and can be carried in your pocket provided you don’t accidentally sit on it.

<figure class="wp-block-embed">
View this post on Instagram

The project that started it all: my business card that plays Tetris

A post shared by Bob (@thekeebproject) on <time datetime="2019-08-07T16:20:20+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Aug 7, 2019 at 9:20am PDT</time>

</figure>

The device runs on a single watch battery located at the back and is based on one of Bob’s older business card ideas. By inserting a watch battery in the front slot, you could play Tetris by holding his card vertically and using the keys to change the positions of the falling blocks. After refining the idea and changing the design, the Keebcard was born.

Sadly, this particular Keebcard is just a prototype and isn’t for sale… yet. But Bob plans on releasing a series of DIY soldering kits which should make assembling a Keebcard of your own much easier. We’ll be sure to update you when it happens!

The post This Keychain-Sized OLED Display Plays Vintage Video Games appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 13, 2019 02:26 PM

SolidSmack Radio | The Fresh Rivets (Powered by Spotify)

Spotify Playlist

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’re kicking things off with “Catfish Kate” from the Pixies before diving into tracks from Surfer Blood, Ariel Pink, Lagwagon, Four Tet, and others before wrapping up “James Bond” from the Stoogiest Stooge, Mr. Iggy Pop. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<figure><iframe height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/7yWs91BZsIW0jaezFNF4Xg" width="100%"></iframe></figure>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Fresh Rivets (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at August 13, 2019 01:43 PM

The SolidSmack Monday List 33.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

How to Kick a Mindless Scrolling Habit

If you’re hooked on the scroll, here’s how to separate you from your phone.

<figure class="aligncenter">How to Kick a Mindless Scrolling Habit</figure>

What Can I Do When a Colleague Takes Credit for My Work?

…it’s a problem that your boss thinks she has a competent proposal writer when she hasn’t...

<figure class="aligncenter">What Can I Do When a Colleague Takes Credit for My Work?</figure>

Bezos: A CEO Who Can Write

The more I read Jeff Bezos’ twenty-one annual letters to Amazon shareholders, the more I like his views on growing Amazon’s business, on focusing on constitutionally discontented customers. I also became convinced that letters give us a unique opportunity to see a genius explain his work.

<figure class="aligncenter">Bezos: A CEO Who Can Write</figure>

Intel’s Punching Bag Finally Has a Chance to Compete

Back from the brink, AMD is taking advantage of its larger rival’s stumbles.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Intel’s Punching Bag Finally Has a Chance to Compete</figure>

The Endgame for LinkedIn Is Coming

After two years, Microsoft still hasn’t delivered on its grand vision for LinkedIn. And it may never do so.

<figure class="aligncenter">The Endgame for LinkedIn Is Coming</figure>

The Biomechanical Perfection of Simone Biles in Flight

Behold the triple double: The gymnast’s precise control of her body as she moves through space sets her apart. Add tremendous strength and speed, and you’ve got a champion.

<figure class="aligncenter">The Biomechanical Perfection of Simone Biles in Flight</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 33.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at August 13, 2019 01:29 PM

The Javelin Blog

How Educators and Students create realistic full-colour multi-material 3D models

Ask anyone in education what their top objectives are, and they’ll probably say it’s to enable students and faculty to achieve more, faster than what’s possible now, while saving money in the process. Ask what’s holding them back and you’ll probably find a diverse variety of obstacles in their day-to-day processes that hinder them in meeting those goals.

Having the right tools is crucial to accomplishing learning objectives, developing in-demand skills for science, technology, engineering, art and math (STEAM) fields, empowering innovation and building college and career readiness. Additive manufacturing, widely known as 3D printing, is one of those tools that has helped many educators, as well as businesses, health care providers and researchers improve how they teach, design, manufacture and research.

3D Printing Education

Students with colour 3D printed models

While no tool is an all-in-one solution, 3D printing is a strong step in that direction, particularly in its most sophisticated forms. 3D printing makes it possible to build things that aren’t feasible with traditional processes like machining or injection molding. It creates models, prototypes, tools and some finished products faster and with fewer constraints, empowering designers to make better-informed decisions and refine their design more quickly.

3D Printing in multiple materials and colours

PolyJet™ technology is a colour 3D printing process with the capability to make parts, prototypes and models in multiple materials, colours and colour textures. All of these characteristics can be combined in one 3D print job, allowing complex parts with diverse properties to be produced quickly.

Bay Toy printed with Stratasys J750 Packaging printed with Stratasys J750

Stratasys J750

The latest innovation in this technology is the Stratasys® J750™ 3D Printer. The most sophisticated and versatile 3D printer on the market, it provides a breakthrough in the realism of 3D printed prototypes with the ability to build in full colour and a broad range of material properties. It also maximizes uptime and the diversity of jobs that can be handled with one system. In practical terms, it means you don’t just get a vague glimpse, but a detailed evaluation of your future part.

Stratasys J750

Stratasys J750

A 3D printer won’t solve all of the world’s problems, but among creative minds, the Stratasys J750 is an impressive tool to bring teaching and research achievements in line with aspirations.

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The post How Educators and Students create realistic full-colour multi-material 3D models appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at August 13, 2019 12:00 PM

August 12, 2019

The Javelin Blog

How to automatically create a SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Flat Pattern Configuration

If a job can be automated in SOLIDWORKS and reduces the amount of time it takes to create I say do it, especially if it works every time. The flat pattern can be created automatically while making a drawing and since most parts require a drawing why not make your life a little easier with this tip.

Sheet Metal Box

Sheet Metal Box

What I have here is a basic 12″ x 12″ x 12″ box that you’ve probably seen a few times if you’ve followed these sheet metal articles. For this scenario I have to make a drawing for this part so it can go to the shop for forming. I also need a flat pattern to send to the laser. We can complete two processes in just one activity.

Flat Pattern in drawing view

Flat Pattern in drawing view

From the part I’m going to the white page at the top for New –> Make a Drawing From Part/Assembly –> choose the template I want. I’m going to create my views to assist in the bend operation. I’m going to take a top view, section that to get my side view, then make a detail view of the bend and finally, a small iso view in the corner.

Once I have my view it’s time to add in my flat pattern, but we haven’t created it yet. When I go to Model View –> scroll down to Orientation area and check the box for Flat Pattern this automatically creates a flat pattern view and configuration in the part.

SOLIDWORKS Flat Pattern Configuration

SOLIDWORKS Flat Pattern Configuration

With the flat pattern in place there are other options you may want, such as Flat Pattern Display or Flip View. A well experienced break press operator once told me to have most, if not all bends, to be up on the drawing the best I can. I then dimension up the drawing to my liking and go back to the part to verify that the flat pattern configuration has been created. From here you can right click and save out as a DXF or DWG.

Flat Pattern

Flat Pattern

More Flat Pattern Tips

For some more Flat Pattern related tips and tricks please read these articles:

The post How to automatically create a SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Flat Pattern Configuration appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at August 12, 2019 12:00 PM

Applying Decals with Background Masking in SOLIDWORKS – Part 2

Building on the previous article about adding a decal and masking the background, there are occasions where we need to take masking a step further to get  the desired result.

I’m going to add another decal below my Javelin decal. This is the same procedure of right clicking in the open area and clicking Add Decal. Browse for the required picture and select the face. I’m going to position and size this to match the previous decal.

Additional decal added

Additional decal added

Back to the Image tab and the Mask Image area. We again want to remove the background and just have the text on the new decal. The option we did last time was to select Use Decal Image Alpha Channel, but that doesn’t work. We can do a Selective Color Mask.

Here we can click on the eye dropper and select the background. This usually works out but this time we have some left over background. Next step is to use an Image Mask File. This requires a secondary image.

Applying a colour mask

Applying a colour mask

Open up the Windows program Paint or Paint 3D, you can then open up the decal image.

Launch application

Launch application

 

We are going to Save As without modifying, I recommend changing the name slightly and then the Save As Type to Monochrome Bitmap. You will receive a prompt mentioning the image quality reduction, so just select Yes to this.

Mask applied

Mask applied

Back to SOLIDWORKS, with the Image Mask File we need to browse for the need picture we created. This should remove the background at a better quality than before. If it doesn’t there is also an Invert Mask box that can be selected.

The post Applying Decals with Background Masking in SOLIDWORKS – Part 2 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at August 12, 2019 12:00 PM

Modeling Decorative or Artistic Shapes in CAD

Sometimes you’ve got to model things in CAD that CAD was never really meant to model. After all, manufacturing covers a lot of ground, and you need to be in…

by matt at August 12, 2019 10:03 AM

August 11, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Applying Decals with Background Masking in SOLIDWORKS – Part 1

Have you ever applied or used decals in SOLIDWORKS? What I learned is that not everything has the background colour you need for the decal you have. Sometimes you just want the background of the decal to match the colour of the object you’re putting in. Thankfully SOLIDWORKS  has a solution for that and it’s called (background) masking.

What I have here is a basic mug and I want to add the Javelin Logo as a decal to it as shown in the image below:

SOLIDWORKS Mask Applied

SOLIDWORKS Decal Mask Applied

To add in a decal go to the Display Manager tab –> select the Decals button –> right click in the open area below and choose Add Decal

Add Decal

Add Decal

Next, we need to browse for our picture and click open.

Browse for mask image

Browse for mask image

Now we need to select the face we want the decal to be on, I’m going to select the round face of the mug.

Select a model face for the decal

Select a model face for the decal

Next we need to go to the Mapping tab to size and position the decal. For my decal I rotated the position 108° around the mug, changed the width to 1.5″ and left the aspect ratio to fixed.

Mapping Properties

Mapping Properties

When all the parameters are changed to your liking hit the green check mark.

Model with decal applied

Model with decal applied

We noticed this isn’t what we want. The background is black and doesn’t match the colour of the mug. If we edit the decal we can do a mask to see if we can hide the background. When editing the decal under the Image tab, you’ll notice that part way down is the masking area. Here we can select Use Decal Image Alpha Channel to hide the background. I found this to be the easiest way to hide the backgrounds of images.

Decal Mask Applied

Decal Mask Applied

Get more information

For other decal related tips please subscribe to be notified when to Part 2 has been posted. Also please check out these SOLIDWORKS Decal articles.

The post Applying Decals with Background Masking in SOLIDWORKS – Part 1 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at August 11, 2019 12:00 PM

August 09, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Aligning linear diameter dimensions in SOLIDWORKS drawings

Diameter dimensions can be modified to display as linear dimensions if needed.

To convert the diameter dimension into linear follow these steps:

Step 1:

Right click the Diameter dimension > Display options > Display as linear

Display diameter as a linear dimension

Display diameter as a linear dimension

OR this can also be done by selecting the dimension >  property manager launches on left > go to Leaders tab > select the linear dimension icon.

Using Leaders tab to display linear dimension

Using Leaders tab to display linear dimension

Step 2:

Now, move the dimension in such a way that value centers in between the extension lines.

Center the dimension

Center the dimension

Step 3:

Drag the little dot (handle) right beside the value and re-position the dimension as a linear dimension.

Re-position the dimension

Re-position the dimension

The post Aligning linear diameter dimensions in SOLIDWORKS drawings appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at August 09, 2019 12:00 PM

August 08, 2019

SolidSmack

This Structural Design Kit Is The Ultimate Desk Toy for Engineers

Structural Design

You may have built the London Tower Bridge using LEGOS three times over, but having a structure made of solid bricks just doesn’t have the same *oomph* as a real bridge with cables keeping their towers from collapsing on each other.

The Mola Structural Kit 3 is the third incarnation of Mola’s modular systems which are made to teach structural behavior and construction. Using a combination of magnetic connectors, cables, and bars, you can make your own structures and see if they hold up to today’s building standards.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gBONtmnVWFo?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The kit is designed so even those without a degree in engineering can play around with the pieces. You can either follow the included manual to build some predefined structures or make your own metal monstrosities. Seeing as the third kit includes even more pieces (235 to be exact) than past iterations, you can get even crazier with your building or bridge designs than ever before.

<figure class="wp-block-image">mola structural kit 3</figure>

This particular structural kit focuses on cables and cable connectors. Included in the Mola Structural Kit 3 is 3 meters of cable which can be used to build bridges and suspended structures. Using the “cutting tool” provided (which is obviously a nail cutter), you can easily measure and cut the required amount needed for your project. The cables fit perfectly with the connectors and the metal bars they support, plus you can reuse previously cut cables by snapping on a linear cable joint.

According to creator Marcio Sequeira, the idea for the Mola Structural Kits came to him during structural classes in university. Since most of the ideas taught to students came in the form of abstract theories, he wanted to create a physical tool which could help anyone interested in the behavior of structures craft and test their own miniature buildings.

<figure class="aligncenter">mola structural kit 3</figure>

Mola launched and successfully funded Structural Kit 3 via a Kickstarter campaign, where it hit over $300,000 in funding from 1,144 backers. Not too shabby. You can find more details and their three kits on the Mola website.

The post This Structural Design Kit Is The Ultimate Desk Toy for Engineers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 08, 2019 06:49 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to save a ScanTo3D (.3ds) file from a SOLIDWORKS part?

You must have the SOLIDWORKS ScanTo3D Add-in enabled before you can save parts as the ScanTo3D 3DS file format. There are a few ways for you to enable SOLIDWORKS add-ins as described in this blog article.

However, saving the part files directly as a ScanTo3D file format shows the warning message stating: “No available entities to process through 3DS.”

SOLIDWORKS Error Message

SOLIDWORKS Error Message

The problem is due to incompatible types of files. A .3ds file is a ‘mesh file’. It is not compatible directly with graphics, solids and surface bodies.

You must create a mesh file from the file to be exported and then save to .3ds file format.

Create a compatible Mesh file:

STEP 1:

Save SOLIDWORKS .STL file from a SOLIDWORKS part file through File > Save as > .STL

STEP 2:

Now open SOLIDWORKS .STL file in SOLIDWORKS using File > Open > select the file type as ScanTo3D Mesh (.STL).

Change file type to ScanTo3D 3DS when importing .STL

Change file type when importing .STL

STEP 3:

The file will then be in a mesh format and can then be exported directly to .3ds file format through File > Save as > Scanto3D Mesh Files

The post How to save a ScanTo3D (.3ds) file from a SOLIDWORKS part? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at August 08, 2019 12:00 PM

August 07, 2019

SolidSmack

Slow-Mo Explosions of Colored Dyes, Paints, and Powders

360 slow mo camera

Ask any person with working eyes and they’ll tell you everything is more interesting in slow motion. Be it Neo dodging bullets in The Matrix, watching two bricks of solid titanium get welded together, or seeing an iMac succumb to a 9mm armor-piercing round, even the most mundane activities can be cooler when viewed through the lens of a rapid-fire, slow-mo camera.

Case in point: these splashes and explosions of color, captured in slow-motion by YouTube channel Macro Room, show the beauty of fluid dynamics. Using a rotating 950 fps slow-motion camera set above a circular base, they were able to capture various objects as they were dropped, submerged, and covered in different colored dyes, paints, and powders.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bVx-PFkDf_E?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Highlights of the video include dropping clear balls into glasses filled with different colored liquids. Using a clamp mechanism to suspend the ball in mid-air, they first rotate the camera (not the base!) at high speed so it completely captures the drop. Once the camera reaches its max velocity, a switch is triggered dropping the ball into the container below.

Some examples:

<figure class="wp-block-image">360 slow mo camera</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">360 slow mo camera</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">360 slow mo camera</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">360 slow mo camera</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">360 slow mo camera</figure>

The result is less mess and more beauty in the symmetry, shadows, light, bubbles, and mix of color worthy of a desktop wallpaper. Various colors splash out of their containers, scattering across the base below them.

Another experiment they manage to capture in slow-mo is the dropping of dyes onto submerged objects. After placing a flower and skull into separate glass containers filled with water, they drop a small dye balloon which pops upon contact and sends color throughout the whole container. While the naked eye can barely glimpse the object mid-explosion, the slow-motion camera manages to stretch that split second so you can fully appreciate it.

<figure class="wp-block-image">360 slow mo camera</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">360 slow mo camera</figure>

They also do some experiments with submerged dye balloons. After dropping a pin into the water container and making contact, the balloon promptly bursts into a bevy of blue and green colors (it even looks like it has circular clusters of color popping out in those initial bursts).

<figure class="wp-block-image">360 slow mo camera</figure>

The second experiment involves three dye-filled water balloons and a very pointy toy airplane. Starting its decent off-screen, the plane blasts its way through all the balloons at once, leaving three suspended globs of liquid which look nearly solid when frozen mid-frame.

<figure class="wp-block-image">360 slow mo camera</figure>

If you’re a sucker for videos with awesome camerawork, the Macro Room YouTube channel and Instagram page have more than just slow motion content. They have time-lapse videos, zoomed-in perspectives of various everyday objects, and much more!

The post Slow-Mo Explosions of Colored Dyes, Paints, and Powders appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 07, 2019 10:40 PM

This Impressive Magnetic Levitation Showcase Highlights Its Promising Future

Magnetic Levitation

During the CES Asia tech event this past June in Shanghai, China, tons of companies showed off new and exciting ventures in the world of technology. For many attendees, the convention was a science fiction dream come true—with plenty of futuristic tech that seems years off.

Among other companies presenting their latest wares was the start-up DeepMag Technology.

As a magnetic levitation and electromagnetic application solutions provider, DeepMag aims to build a world where transportation, education, and entertainment all make heavy use of the powers of magnetic levitation:

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</figure>

Using the natural power of magnetic fields, DeepMag has made plenty of eye-catching products that make use of levitation.

<figure class="wp-block-image">magnatic levitation</figure>

The first few items are a couple of lightbulbs which hover above their stands. By creating a magnetic field between the bulbs and the stands, they were able to conduct a current which runs through the magnets and into the lightbulb. This current also allows them to turn on without ever needing to be physically connected to the base.

To further highlight how the tech works, one of the exhibitors removed the lightbulb from the magnetic field. Doing so interrupts the electrical current and turns off the lightbulb. Putting the bulb back in its proper place restores the current, illuminating the lamp once more.

<figure class="wp-block-image">magnatic levitation</figure>

The second showcase from DeepMag is a levitating tray which can hold the weight of four water bottles. The tray alone doesn’t have too many practical applications, but when you consider the technology can also be used on more substantial things like cars or anything that could be transported, then you begin to see just how much promise magnetic levitation holds.

By showing its uses in smaller household products, they hope to work electromagnets into our daily lives. This includes amusement park rides, faster public transportation, and yes; even hoverboards and hovercrafts.

Considering how powerful and mesmerizing the technology is, it might just be a matter of time before we kick off the ground for good.

The post This Impressive Magnetic Levitation Showcase Highlights Its Promising Future appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 07, 2019 05:58 PM

The Best Apps of the Week (32.19): Email Me, Boomerang, OneDrive, and More…

iPhone Apps

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved smart device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional. This week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Email Me – Send Notes & Memos (iOS — Free)

Email Me is the easiest and fastest way to email something yourself so you will never forget things ever again.

<figure class="aligncenter">Email Me - Send Notes & Memos</figure>

TED (iOS – Free)

Get personalized recommendations that match your unique interests, or browse TED’s library of thousands of inspiring, informative, transformational videos for free.

<figure class="aligncenter">TED</figure>

Email Client – Boomerang Mail (iOS — Free)

Join millions who use Boomerang to email productively. Schedule Email, Track Responses, Snooze, Inbox Pause, Reminders and more! Works with Gmail, Outlook, MS Exchange & Hotmail accounts.

<figure class="aligncenter">Email Client - Boomerang Mail</figure>

SoundHound – Music Discovery (iOS — Free)

Hey, what song is that? SoundHound makes it simple to identify music playing around you. Whether you’re in the car or out and about — open the app, hit the big orange SoundHound button, let your phone listen for a few seconds, and we’ll tell you exactly what’s playing! It’s been called pure magic — and with 300M+ downloads and billions of songs discovered — we tend to agree.

<figure class="aligncenter">SoundHound - Music Discovery</figure>

Microsoft OneDrive (iOS — Free)

Do more wherever you go with Microsoft OneDrive. Get to and share your documents, photos, and other files from your iOS device, computer (PC or Mac), and any other devices you use. Use the Office mobile apps to stay productive and work together, no matter where you are. The OneDrive app for iOS lets you easily work with your personal and work files when you’re on the go.

<figure class="aligncenter">Microsoft OneDrive</figure>

IFTTT (iOS — Free)

Over 630 apps work with IFTTT including Twitter, Telegram, Google Drive, Twitch, Weather Underground, Dropbox, Slack, and devices like Google Home, Amazon Alexa, iRobot, LIFX, Philips Hue, and your iPhone. The IFTTT app also integrates with the Health app, so you can easily track and maintain your habits.

<figure class="aligncenter">IFTTT</figure>

The post The Best Apps of the Week (32.19): Email Me, Boomerang, OneDrive, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at August 07, 2019 05:39 PM

Bottle Modeling Tricks

There are a lot of cool things you can do with bottle modeling. Some of these are just tricks of the shell command. These don’t just apply to bottles, but…

by matt at August 07, 2019 04:37 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to replace a Print Head on a Stratasys F120 Desktop 3D Printer

The Stratasys F120 is designed to be reliable, easy to work with, and more importantly easy to maintain. Take a look at the video below to see how easy it is to replace a print head on the Stratasys F120:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8ZL2A7iG7BI?feature=oembed" title="Stratasys F120 How to: Replace a Print Head" width="500"></iframe>

How is the Stratasys F120 different?

The Stratasys F120 has all the features and benefits of larger industrial-grade 3D printers. Print complex designs with confidence thanks to soluble support. Enjoy unrivaled ease of use and accuracy with every print.

Stratasys F120 Print Head Desktop

Stratasys F120 Desktop Machine

The F120 provides Plug and Print functionality:

  • Easy to use with a top-rated user experience.
  • Office-friendly with minimal prep and no special venting or power required.
  • Extremely minimal training burden with GrabCAD print. No tinkering involved.
  • Optimized and tuned to spend more time designing and less time setting up or reprinting.
  • Connected (local/global).

The F120 is reliable, accurate and durable:

  • Nonstop printing- large material cartridge allows long overnight or weekend runs. No downtime.
  • Variable speed control means the fastest printing in its class.
  • Be confident print jobs will be error-free. Success on your first print attempt means minimal wasted material.
  • Soluble support with engineering materials (ABS and ASA) allows the most complex parts and assemblies in a single build – freeing users from design/manufacturing limitations.
  • [Education] Teach students on industry-leading 3D printing technology.

Learn More

The post How to replace a Print Head on a Stratasys F120 Desktop 3D Printer appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at August 07, 2019 03:58 PM

Unable to Save after Changing a SOLIDWORKS Weldment Profile?

So you are working on a SOLIDWORKS Weldment part, you go to save, and suddenly the following error message appears:

Unknown Error while Saving

Figure 1: Unknown Error while Saving

If you are unable to save after changing a Weldment Profile, this could be caused when there is a set of custom properties whose value is defined by a cut list property; e.g. length, mass, and the setting “Update automatically” is turned off, as seen in the image below. Right click on the Cut List then select Update Automatically will turn it on, as indicated by the check mark on the left.

Update Automatically Toggle

Figure 2 Update Automatically Toggle

Solution Weldment Save Issue

So if you are unable to save after changing a Weldment Profile, the first step would be to remove all custom properties associated with the cut list. Next, right-click the Cut list folder and select Delete from the drop-down menu. This will reset the items populated in the Cut list. From there, make sure Create Cut Lists Automatically & Update Automatically are toggled on. That should get your file up and ready to save!

To learn more about weldment properties, please check the following articles:

The post Unable to Save after Changing a SOLIDWORKS Weldment Profile? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at August 07, 2019 12:00 PM

August 06, 2019

SolidSmack

Launch Small Objects at Unsuspecting Coworkers with This Insane CNC’d Desktop Trebuchet

Desktop Catapult

Everyone has slow days at the office, so it’s only natural; each person has a unique way of coping with boredom. Some workers of the 90s had Solitaire on their early Windows PCs, the 2000s workforce had Full Tilt! Pinball installed on almost all computers, and almost everyone nowadays has a smartphone for playing just about anything.

But creator Alex Presley says “no” to all of these mind-numbing computer games. Instead of relying on digital software to solve his boredom, he created his own miniature trebuchet which he uses to launch projectiles at unsuspecting co-workers.

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</figure>

Made entirely out of aluminum save for the stainless steel counterweight, this trebuchet (or catapult, if you’re not feeling very medieval) is a thousand times smaller than its normal-sized variant but can still launch objects up to a good ten feet away.

<figure class="wp-block-image">mini desktop trebuchet</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">mini desktop trebuchet</figure>

After assembling the aluminum pieces—all of which were custom-designed by Alex—he creates a slingshot on the other end of the counterweight using some string and a bit of cloth cut from a pair of shorts. He sews this makeshift slingshot onto the counterweight and proceeds to launch some ball bearings from the trebuchet.

<figure class="wp-block-image">mini desktop trebuchet</figure>

According to Alex, the mini trebuchet is amazingly accurate every time he fires it. The ball bearings land in almost the exact same spot despite the distance they travel, so you can be sure to hit your co-workers on the head as long as they aren’t moving.

<figure class="wp-block-image">mini desktop trebuchet</figure>

He plans on increasing the trebuchet’s launch distance in the future as well as make a more effortless loading technique for the projectiles. If you want your own trebuchet for your work desk to deal with unexpected bouts of boredom, Alex Presley has made them available for purchase on his Etsy page.

The post Launch Small Objects at Unsuspecting Coworkers with This Insane CNC’d Desktop Trebuchet appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 06, 2019 05:16 PM

SolidSmack Radio | The Open Enclosures (Powered by Spotify)

Spotify Playlist

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’re kicking things off with the classic “Hey Ya” from Surfer Blood before diving into tracks from YACHT, Toro y Moi, Grimes, Blood Orange, and others before wrapping up with the classic “When I’m Small” from Phantogram. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<figure><iframe height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/6J1NeMvD08DM8lziS3Jylc" width="100%"></iframe></figure>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Open Enclosures (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at August 06, 2019 05:03 PM

The Javelin Blog

Linear Vs Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis Explained

For some designers, finite element analysis (FEA) can feel like a complicated venture. The truth is, if you know SOLIDWORKS, you already have the background to take advantage of simulation capabilities, and using Linear vs Nonlinear analyses.

Both Linear Static and Nonlinear analyses provide limitless design insight; giving you the information you need to make data-driven decisions based on how your designs will react under real-world conditions. The trick is knowing when Linear Static will provide enough detail versus when to dive deeper into your design with Nonlinear analysis.

Watch the demo video below to see Simulation expert Mike Sande cook up a food-inspired description of Linear vs Nonlinear analysis:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VKpBWqergVU?feature=oembed" title="Linear vs Nonlinear Simulation" width="500"></iframe>

Learn more about Linear vs Nonlinear Analysis

Fill out the form below to access a white paper where you will learn about the differences between linear and nonlinear analysis and realize there are optimum times to use one type of analysis versus the other. You will discover that neglecting nonlinear effects can lead to serious design errors. After reviewing the examples taken from everyday design practice, you will see how nonlinear analysis can help you avoid overdesign and build better products.

Linear vs Nonlinear

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Nonlinear Displacement Plot Time Steps

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The post Linear Vs Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis Explained appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at August 06, 2019 04:48 PM

The basics of SOLIDWORKS xDesign Demonstration Video

Watch and learn how SOLIDWORKS xDesign combines 3D CAD modeling and cloud collaboration using a web browser. In this 90-minute, on-demand video you’ll learn how to create parametric models and assemblies or let xDesign’s Design Guidance suggest solutions for you.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/iMBTfHmBbq0?feature=oembed" title="Basics of xDesign - SOLIDWORKS World 2019" width="500"></iframe>

SOLIDWORKS xDesign

SOLIDWORKS xDesign combines ease of use with innovative design methodologies and cloud collaboration from inside your browser. SOLIDWORKS xDesign is hosted on infrastructure owned and operated by Dassault Systemes.  After being in business for more than 35 years, and gaining the trust of more than 200,000 companies worldwide. Considering multi-million dollar annual investments in the infrastructure and security, DS 3DEXPERIENCE cloud services are here to stay. They are trusted. They are secure. They are here to protect you and your business.

SOLIDWORKS xDesign

SOLIDWORKS xDesign

No installation required!

To get access to SOLIDWORKS xDesign, all you need is a web browser and login credentials. This allows for near instantaneous deployment, allowing companies to quickly add to their CAD portfolio as and when the need arises:

  • Available anytime, anywhere, on any device.
  • Works on mobile devices.
  • Works on non-Windows devices.

Simple to use

SOLIDWORKS xDesign is created with the end user experience in mind.

  • CAD and non CAD users alike, can get running with minimal or no training.
  • Innovative features that improve workflow include:Design Guidance.
  • Single Modeling Environment.
    • Social Collaboration.
    • Cloud 3D Print Connectivity to FabLab environment and more.

Embedded Data Management

With xDesign all models are stored and managed on the cloud, iterations are created providing the user with a scalable data management capability out of the box – no deployments and set-up of traditional PDM systems.

  • Every user (depending on their security and access rights) can access data anywhere, anytime, from any device to complete essential tasks.
  • Easily manage or review models or participate in community discussions.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS xDesign

Working on the cloud provides significant value during the product development process without needing to leverage enterprise data management tools. With transparent data management, embedded social innovation, and extensive collaboration capabilities, you now have the ability to share, communicate, and control your projects. Visit our website to learn more about SOLIDWORKS xDesign and 3DEXPERIENCE.WORKS

The post The basics of SOLIDWORKS xDesign Demonstration Video appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at August 06, 2019 02:52 PM

How to display the connection dots/points for symbols and wires in SOLIDWORKS Electrical?

Some SOLIDWORKS electrical users like to display connection points within their electrical projects for both symbols and wires, but some do not. Connection points/dots for symbols and wires can be toggled on and off at the project level or specifically for each symbol.

Connection dots ON/OFF

Connection dots ON                                                     Connection dots OFF

Control connection dots at project level:

  • To toggle on the connection dots for all the symbols and wires within your electrical project go to Project Tab > Configurations > Project
  • This launches the project Configuration dialog box
  • On the graphic tab, the display of the symbol connection dots can be controlled by display drop down options: never, always, when connected and when not connected.
  • Additionally, the wire connection dots can be toggled on and off using the checkbox.

Doing so, we can show or hide connection dots of all the symbols and wires used within a project.

Project level - Connection dots control

Project level – Connection dots control

Control connection dots for each symbol:

On the other hand, we could also control the connection dots display for each symbol.There are two ways we can control this display:

Method 1:

  • Firstly, this can be accessed through Library Tab on the Ribbon > Click on Symbols Manager > This opens the symbols manager dialog box.
  • Right click on any symbol > click on properties OR select a symbol and click on properties on the symbols manager management tab
  • This launches the properties dialog box of the symbol
  • On the bottom section toggle on or off display connection points.
Accessing connection dots through library

Accessing connection dots through library

Method 2:

  • Secondly, if we have already used the symbol within our drawing, right click on the symbol > click on symbol> open symbol > this opens the symbol in .dwg file and on the right hand side properties section.
Accessing connection dots through symbol properties in a dwg

Accessing connection dots through symbol properties in a dwg

Doing so, we can control to show or hide connection dots for each symbol within our electrical drawings.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Electrical training course either in a Canadian classroom near you or live online. For more information about electrical software and training solutions call 1-877-219-6757.

The post How to display the connection dots/points for symbols and wires in SOLIDWORKS Electrical? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at August 06, 2019 12:00 PM

August 05, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Using SOLIDWORKS Sketch Ink in Your Workflow

I’ve always used a tablet ever since I took my first graphics arts class back in high school.  I’ve found it to be an invaluable tool over the years, helping me with the creative process. When I found out that SOLIDWORKS has integrated tools that work with tablets, I had to give it a try. With Sketch Ink, users can draw out their sketches and convert them into sketch entities when ready. So let us get into using SOLIDWORKS Sketch Ink in your workflow.

My Tablet Setup

For my session, I used a Wacom Cintiq Pro 13. The Cintiq line is great because it has a built-in display that interacts with the stylus and having SOLIDWORKS directly on my drawing screen made it easy to navigate with the pen and shortcut keys on the side of the tablet. The pressure sensitivity that Wacom is known for is there, but SOLIDWORKS has not utilized it yet. Using the pressure sensitivity creatively is something I can see them building on in future updates.

Getting Started with Sketch Ink

I decided to test out Sketch Ink on a dog house that I was building. I wanted to add a window with curved design elements on it to the main section of the door using only the tablet & stylus. Below are the tools that are part of the Sketch Ink Tab’s arsenal.

Sketch Ink Features

Figure 1: Sketch Ink Features

The Shape & Sketch entity functions require further discussion. The Shape buttons take your initial sketch and clean up the lines to look more like geometric elements; e.g., arcs, lines. The Entities button converts the sketches into workable sketch entities. Toggling on the Auto buttons converts your sketch as you draw, while the Update buttons allow you to update your sketches when ready manually.

Sketch Ink Features 2

Figure 2: Manually Added Features

It is also worth noting that other features are available in Sketch Ink, as seen above. These functions were manually added to the Sketch Ink tab. I found the Convert to Spline tool was useful when I was not happy with the Auto Shape outcome.

After using the SOLIDWORKS on a tablet, I found that the setup that worked best for me was to keep Auto Shape on, then use Update to Entities when I completed sketching.

Sketch Ink Sketches

Figure 3: Lines May Autosnap

I did notice that when sketching with Auto Sketch on, The line auto snaps, as seen above. Zooming in close would alleviate this, and moving forward, I would zoom in as much as I could before starting a sketch.

A feature that I found useful was the ability to add dimensions by selecting a sketch entity and then writing down the number, as seen below. Writing dimensions saved me a lot of time compared to switching hands to type on the number pad. I did notice, however, that I was not able to edit dimensions afterward.

Sketch Ink dimensions

Figure 4: Writing in Dimensions

I also found that adding relations was fast with the aid of my tablet buttons, though it did take a little bit of time to get accustomed to it. In the end, I was able to make the modifications to the door, as seen below.

Tablet Dimensioning

Figure 5: Final Outcome

Sketch Ink is a great tool to use to write an idea down, kind of like when you are hit with that spark of genius at a coffee shop, and all you have is a napkin. Though there is a bit of a learning curve, using a tablet can also improve productivity once you get accustomed to the environment. With the right tablet, Sketch Ink can be a great tool in your arsenal. I can’t wait to see where SOLIDWORKS takes this tool in the future!

The post Using SOLIDWORKS Sketch Ink in Your Workflow appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at August 05, 2019 12:00 PM

CAD Graphics BlogWorks | 3D CAD

A Parachute Option... for Cloud-Data?

When aviation was in its infancy, it was enthralling, and aviation still is for many who are captivated by the thought of flying in the clouds. However in those early years of flight, when things didn't go as planned, mortality was high because parachutes were an afterthought. Today, ICON Aircraft, Inc. has developed a parachute system directly into their A5 model. In business, CEO's and others in the upper echelons of commerce often seal their hiring with a parachute clause. In these situations, the intent of the expression 'parachute' is that when things don't work out as planned, you can come out of the situation relatively unscathed.

ICON Parachute System (IPS); courtesy of ICON Aircraft, Inc.
In a similar sense, cloud-based platforms are fine when things are going business-as-usual, even exciting when everyone is in wow-mode. But what happens when all of that ends? What happens when the visionaries who created the business model decide to leave? What happens when a cloud-based provider no longer wants to be in business, or the company strategy becomes to sell-off to another owner? Is there a data parachute option for users who voluntarily want out, or those who are forced out?

Some might recall that Solidworks was sold to Dassault Systemes in 1997, only two years after its first release in 1995. Could something similar happen to Onshape as it continues its trajectory of success? Also, there have been closings of cloud-based programs before. Remember TeamPlatform for cloud-based design collaboration? It was a noble venture that after being purchased by 3D Systems was thereafter closed. With that in mind, the end of Microsoft eBooks has provided a fresh view of what a very prominent cloud-based platform closing looks like. A fresh reminder that it doesn't matter how many backup servers are dedicated, if it's in the cloud, you really don't own it. Granted there are distinct differences between eBooks and cloud-based CAD programs currently on the market, and even how data rights management (DRM) are handled. However, there are similar principles that demonstrate the real vulnerabilities and risks involved when relying on a program owned / controlled by others.

It's understandable how enticing a cloud-based platform can be for owners and developers. It provides them with 100% total control and real-time analytics on how the program is being used, by whom, when, etc. What company wouldn't want that depth of consumer insight on the use of their products? For example, Onshape is a reputable and well-received platform for CAD and they are no doubt benefiting from this insight as they continue to  develop and mature. Conglomerate Dassault Systemes is trying vigorously to stay relevant with their burgeoning 3DExperience cloud-based platform, evident by how frequently the marketing names for their new products are being revised that their domain admins are struggling to keep up.

It's also understandable that many startups and small lean-mean-business-machines have embraced cloud-based platforms. Why shouldn't they when every day and everybody you work with has a go-for-it, throw caution to the wind and take it on, kind'a day? For startups and small businesses, it's all about risk and seeing what happens!

Onshape is touted as being like a Google Docs for CAD. That analogy seems a very appropriate way to help understand how it works, how data is edited, managed and made accessible to others for collaboration. The striking exception in this analogy however, is there is no off-line mode with Onshape. There is no way to work with Onshape data untethered from the provider. And that seems to be at least one of the aspects of the trepidation felt by so many others regarding cloud-based CAD platforms. Fusion 360 by Autodesk has addressed this need with a hybrid approach, but not everyone wants a full program download nor maintain the hardware needed to operate the program. Add the fact made evident with Microsoft recently closing shop on their eBooks, that local files you thought you owned can and will vanish if a provider implements DRM tactics. Hence the reluctance by many to embrace cloud-based CAD. Users simply don't have control over their cloud-data in a tangible way that feels akin to ownership.

In our complex and dynamic world, it's no surprise that technology, companies, and programs are ever changing, being improved, or phased out. The surprise is when it affects us personally. So it's easy to understand that dependency on a cloud-based CAD platform or provider should warrant a user to question how to recover should the service abruptly end or fail to meet expectations.

Some might argue that there is dependency in every aspect of computing and that is true when talking about computer or server operating systems, programs, devices and the like. The difference is there is still a measure of autonomy with such systems. When product support ends, the user still has general control of their data, of when they want to phase out and trade up or convert. When a cloud platform ends, there is little to no control for the user. In such cases, any action plan and timing is inextricably defined by the owner of the platform.

To borrow the cliche, "it's not if but when" your CAD provider changes their business-as-usual approach. It could be tomorrow, it could be next year, or in five years. Honorable intentions aside, when change comes from your CAD platform, and it will, what data parachute options will you have? While it remains to be seen, based upon current technologies, the better cloud-based CAD provider will include the self-sufficiency of off-line mode for assurance and access to data, AND they will be prudent enough to include a data parachute. In other words, providing users upfront with the means to access their data using a simple export engine, and / or the means to translate data into another format if you want, when you want, independent of the platforms own existence. Perhaps through a consortium approach that can rightfully address the current risks to cloud-data.

As beautiful as the clouds may be on a bright sunny day, how confident would you really be to fly with a provider that sells itself as reputable and reliable, yet purposefully neglects to provide you with a pre-flight safety plan in the event you encounter the unexpected? So, with a cloud-based platform entrusted with your data, wouldn't you expect to have a parachute option?

by Unknown (noreply@blogger.com) at August 05, 2019 02:48 AM

August 02, 2019

The Javelin Blog

How to relocate SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault Database Files

To maximize PDM performance, the SQL database files should be located on the fastest hard drive available. If the mdf and ldf files for the database need to be relocated, this can be done using the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio.

Before moving the files, ensure that a backup of the database has been performed and that the vault has been locked so that no users are currently working.

Step 1:  Locate the Database files

Right click on the vault database and select Properties.

Database Properties

Database Properties

Click on the Files page to find the current file path and file names.  Browse to this location through the Windows Explorer and then close the Properties window in the SQL Server Management Studio.

Find the current file path and file names

Find the current file path and file names

Step 2:  Detach the Database

Next, again right click on the Vault Database that is being moved and in the fly out menu under Tasks select Detach.

Detach the Database

Detach the Database

Check the box for Drop Connections and click OK to complete the detach operation.

Drop Connections

Drop Connections

Step 3:  Move the .MDF and .LDF files

In Windows Explorer, move the database and log files (.MDF and .LDF) to the new location.

Move the database and log files

Move the database and log files

Step 4:  Re-Attach the Database

Back in the SQL Server Management Studio, right click on Databases in the tree on the left hand side of the window and select Attach.

Re-Attach the Database

Re-Attach the Database

In the Attach Databases dialog box click Add and browse to the new location for the database (.MDF) file and select it, the log file (.LDF) will automatically be added.

Add and browse to the new location for the database

Add and browse to the new location for the database

Click OK to re-attach the database.

OK to re-attach the database

OK to re-attach the database

Step 5:  Restart the Database helper service.

Go to Services and Restart the SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Server.

Restart the SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Server.

Restart the SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Server

The post How to relocate SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault Database Files appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at August 02, 2019 12:00 PM

August 01, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Utilize Touch Mode in SOLIDWORKS for Touchscreen Computers

More and more, we run into touch screens. Laptops and monitors are starting to come standard with touch capability. I’ve had a touch screen on my computer, and for a while, it hadn’t occurred to me use it in SOLIDWORKS. So when I did, I found it intuitive and fun to use.

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You could arguably do everything without using a mouse & keyboard after getting accustomed to the touch features. I also noticed that it was easier to work with people, as they could interact with the model without having to take turns with the mouse. It looks like we are getting one step closer to the VR reality system we see in all those Iron Man movies. So let’s go over the gestures and features that help users utilize Touch Mode in SOLIDWORKS.

Gestures in Touch Mode

All the gestures are integrated into SOLIDWORKS 2018 and up. If you’ve used a cellphone, some of these gestures will be second nature to you, but here is a list of them for review.

Gestures used in Touch Mode

Figure 1 List of Gestures Used in Solidworks 2018 & Up

Though you will have access to the majority of the functionality in SOLIDWORKS, with these gestures alone, making edits such as mating or dimensioning will still be challenging to do. That is is why SOLIDWORKS has introduced Touch Mode

Getting Started with SOLIDWORKS Touch Mode

To bridge that gap, SOLIDWORKS has introduced touch mode to bridge that gap when it comes to editing. To turn Touch Mode on, we would need to go to View > Touch Mode, as seen in the image below. Here a menu on the left will pop up with several buttons to assist you when using the touch screen.

Let’s review the buttons in the image above from top to bottom.

  1. The first icon has the same functionality as the Esc key, allowing you to exit a selection or tool.
  2. The second icon works like the S key, opening up your shortcut toolbar & running a search in the help if you type something.
  3. The third button allows you to select multiple items in the model space.
  4. The last button deletes the selected item.

There is another set of gestures worth mentioning. When you hold down your finger, a circle begins to get drawn like the one seen below.

Hold in Touch Mode

Figure 3 Hold Gesture in Touch Mode

If you let the image of the circle complete, the magnifying glass pops up, as seen in the image below in the right. If you move your finger outward before the circle closes, the mouse gesture wheel pops up.

Hold mode in Touch Mode

Figure 4 Mouse Gestures or Magnifying Glass in Touch Mode

With all these features in Touch mode, using SOLIDWORKS without a keyboard and mouse is possible, and can be faster once you get accustomed to the controls. It also allows for collaborative work in a group, as everyone can get quick access to the screen. These are some of the benefits of utilizing Touch Mode in SOLIDWORKS .  Touch Mode is an excellent addition to the user interface, and will only get better as SOLIDWORKS roles out updates!

The post Utilize Touch Mode in SOLIDWORKS for Touchscreen Computers appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at August 01, 2019 12:00 PM

July 31, 2019

Is Modeling Specialist a Thing?

I can say from having written a fair amount about at least two CAD packages, that in order to say something definitive, you really have to put a lot of…

by matt at July 31, 2019 05:28 PM

The Javelin Blog

Problem running the latest or another version of eDrawings: “Input string is not in a correct format”?

Recently an eDrawings user contacted our tech support asking why he couldn’t run newer or other versions of eDrawings on his machine. In this particular case the user was trying to run eDrawings 2019 but he already had eDrawings 2018 installed on the same machine.

Installing and running eDrawings 2019 resulted in an error message:

“Input string is not in a correct format”

Follow the steps below to resolve this issue:

Check to see if ‘GraphicsInfo’ key is created under HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\eDrawings\e2019 in the registry editor.

If not , I would assume that you have ‘GraphicsInfo’ created for eDrawings 2018 , so what you can do is the following :

  • Open the registry editor.
  • Navigate to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\eDrawings\e2018 , right click ‘GraphicsInfo’ >Export , save it on the desktop.

Registry Editor – Export and modify the Graphics info key

  • Edit the exported registry key in note-pad , and change the path to e2019 it should look like this.[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\eDrawings\e2019\GraphicsInfo]
  • Save the file after editing

Modify the reg file in notepad

  • Double click the reg key from desktop to enable it > Yes > Yes > OK
  • Start eDrawings 2019

Now, SOLIDWORKS eDrawings 2019 should be up and running.

Learn more about eDrawings

Learn about the latest updates in SOLIDWORKS eDrawings 2019, and discover more blog posts for eDrawings.

The post Problem running the latest or another version of eDrawings: “Input string is not in a correct format”? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at July 31, 2019 12:00 PM

July 30, 2019

The Javelin Blog

How to sync SOLIDWORKS Composer sub-assemblies with SOLIDWORKS

If you use SOLIDWORKS Composer in tandem with SOLIDWORKS Mechanical Design to generate the models, chances are that you have had difficulty updating the Composer file after an update in a sub-assembly. In this article,  we will explore a way to set up your Composer document so that you can update sub-assemblies within the Main assembly of your file. In this example, we will be working with the table design seen below. The table is made up of two sub-assemblies with a Linear pattern applied to the “Leg Assembly.”  We will import the top level assembly (“Desk Assembly”) into SOLIDWORKS Composer.

Getting Started

Figure 1: Desk Assembly

After importing the Desk Assembly into Composer, we will save the file as a Composer product (.smgXml).

Note: If you save as *.smg or you receive an *.smg from someone else, then save the *.smg as *.smgXml. This operation “shatters” the *.smg file into its child files: *.smgXml, *.smgGeom, *.smgSce, and *.smgView.

Saving & Adding Sub-assemblies

The next step would be to open all the associated sub-assemblies and save them as .smgXml files as well. From here we will reopen the top level assembly and add the sub-assembly files we just made to it. Adding the files can be done by right-clicking the sub-assembly in the ad selecting Product > Add Products… to select the file. The image below illustrates the process.

Update composer files

Figure 2 Add Products to Sub-assembly

From here, we repeat the process with all the subassemblies involved. Once this completed, we will see a red assembly icon in the subassembly, as seen in the image below.

The product sub-assembly is embedded in the existing sub-assembly. This step is IMPORTANT because it retains the relative position of the sub-assembly in the top-level. If you add the sub-assembly product to the top-level or root node, then the position of the sub-assembly is wrong.

From here we can go ahead and delete the other part actors in the sub-assembly. In the example below, we will be deleting the original part files (highlighted in orange) that make up the Leg Assembly.

Adding Sub-Assemblies

Figure 3 Added Product & part removal

From here we will be able to make updates to the sub-assembly every time a change made.

Updating Composer Files

In our example, we would like to change the configuration of one of our sub-assemblies. To do that, we would open the Composer Project file of the sub-assembly in question, and update the file by going to File > Update > Solidworks Composer Document.

We will notice that when we open the top level assembly file, the changes are already there. In our example below, we can see that the grid structure has changed after the update.

Figure 4 Top Level Assembly After Update

The first time you open the file, you may notice the actors disappearing when changing views. Don’t worry, once you turn them back on in the assembly tree and save, you will be fine moving forward.

Conclusion

The procedure above is a great way to minimize the affect sub-assembly changes affect the Composer file. However, it takes a bit of planning at the beginning the teams working with each software to come up with an assembly structure that works for both parties. Being able to Set up your Composer document so that you can update sub-assemblies can save a lot of time when updating files. To ensure that you are able to update files successfully, please seen the following article: SOLIDWORKS Composer Documentation Update Best Practices

Want to learn more about Composer?

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Composer training course either live online or in a Canadian city near you.

The post How to sync SOLIDWORKS Composer sub-assemblies with SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at July 30, 2019 12:00 PM

July 29, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Multiple-year versions of SOLIDWORKS Installed? Set File Locations the easy way!

When it becomes necessary to install multiple year versions of SOLIDWORKS, we recommend our best practices guide for the installation.  This article assumes that the aforementioned guide was used, and employs a technique designed to work with the settings we use in that guide.

Once the multiple versions have been installed, your system will now have many different data folders belonging to each different year version of SOLIDWORKS, but that doesn’t guarantee that each year version is necessarily pointing to the correct folders intended for that particular year.  Therefore, it is a good idea to ensure that each year version points to the correct year version files in System Options > File Locations by using the Edit All functionality introduced in SOLIDWORKS 2017.

This is recommended in order to avoid confusion later, or overwriting of any files from one year version’s onto another’s.

Update with Edit All > Find/Replace

In the illustration below, we’re updating all file locations for SOLIDWORKS 2019 so that they point to the 2019 folders rather than the 2018 ones (which are used by a co-existing installation of SOLIDWORKS 2018).

When entering the appropriate year versions in the Find and Replace fields, we can update ALL file locations to which SOLIDWORKS will look, all in one shot!

The great thing about this procedure is that it is not only quick to do, but also gives us a nice preview in which all would-be changes show in green text, just like when we rename files in a Pack and Go.

To apply changes, click “Save” and then “OK”

Ensuring that SOLIDWORKS 2019 is pointing to the 2019 files rather than the SOLIDWORKS 2018 installation  (changes shown in green).

The post Multiple-year versions of SOLIDWORKS Installed? Set File Locations the easy way! appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at July 29, 2019 12:00 PM

July 26, 2019

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Chang Figrumper

The landscape spread before his peglegs, all nine of them, some wrapped to his hobbled trochanters with makeshift tarsal claws cut from barnside tin. He’d seen decades of fighting, hair matted, antennae torn, but still plenty of seeds scraped from the hulls of these links.

Aleks Petruk – Huge color for huge scenes that you’ll find secret mysteries in and details that make it all the more interesting.

Coffee Bean Lettering – It seems, shall we say, a monotonous task to create lettering with coffee beans, yet Will Paterson does it so well.

1999 – Remember that year? How did the films that year memorialize the relative stability of the decade? Now You See It looks vissays the ‘Cubicle Movie’.

Melted Decay – The large-scale sculptures of Diana Al-Hadid are just breath-taking, and all a bit creepy in their drippy decay.

Floating – Instagram follow of the week. If you’ve ever wondered how to paint water, pools, or rather, the way light travels through water. This.

White Head – Oh boy. The paper sculpture by John Clark is just the type of low poly 3D art I love. See the sculpts and check out his paintings as well.

Comic Code – I’m sorry.

Mission Control – I always wanted a Diamondback bicycle – this makes me want one more – not that I could, ya know, flip like that or anything.

<script type="text/javascript"> amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "solid0a-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Deals We're Watching"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "cc30d2b453dd262193d5be5877d04121"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B07J2Z5DBM,B07B2SW3HG,B01N33P85V,B07GNCC7HC"; </script> <script src="http://z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>

Vacant – Single #2 from Eric Krasno’s album Telescope that takes a look at characters living in various Brooklyn brownstones.

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</figure>

The post Friday Smackdown: Chang Figrumper appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 26, 2019 09:52 PM

Lifewand Is An Anti-Choking Device Made For Children

lifewand

It’s quite surprising how many people don’t know the Heimlich maneuver. Rather than taking five minutes to look up a simple tutorial on YouTube, most folks would rather live in ignorance until one of their friends or family starts choking on a piece of food or worse… something which isn’t food. By then, it’s usually too late.

But this topic is getting a bit too dark. Let’s switch gears. In this age where just about anything that can be made will be made, it was only a matter of time before someone thought of making an automated anti-choking device.

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The lifewand is designed by medical engineers to remove any obstruction in a child’s throat; be it food, plastic, or a tiny LEGO block. To get it to work, all you have to do is place the device over the child’s nose and mouth like a baby Xenomorph from Alien. Once the lifewand covers a face, it activates a pressure-sensitive vacuum which sucks out whatever may be obstructing the person’s throat.

While the lifewand was made primarily for children, there are variants for different age groups. There’s a small mask for kids aged 1-6 years old, a medium mask for those between 6-13, and a large mask for those 14 years old and up.

<figure class="wp-block-image">lifewand </figure>

Lifewand was designed to be portable and easy to hang on a wall, so even if your kids aren’t around, you could potentially save the life of one of your house guests by placing the device over their face. Sure, they might find it a bit weird at first, but they’ll be thanking you later once their windpipe is unobstructed and they’re still drawing breath.

<figure class="wp-block-image">lifewand</figure>

The Lifewand project is currently on Indiegogo, where currently has a backing of 20% out of its $300,000 flexible goal with a month to go. Earlybird offers are still available and shipping is estimated for December 2019. If you can’t be bothered to learn the Heimlich maneuver or just want an automated method of preventing choking hazards, find more details there.

The post Lifewand Is An Anti-Choking Device Made For Children appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 26, 2019 08:29 PM

The Javelin Blog

3D Printing Service – Brake Pedal Cover: TPU 92A Material

Here at Javelin Technologies, our 3D printers are hard at work. Whether it’s a 3D printing service job, a benchmark, or a part for internal use, the 3D printers are rarely idle. Our Oshawa and Oakville locations house a wide range of technology including Stratasys FDM and PolyJet 3D printers, Desktop Metal 3D printers, Post Process Finishing Machines, Universal Laser Systems and Artec 3D Scanners. This week the Stratasys F170 at our Oakville office was busy 3D printing brake pedal covers using FDM TPU 92A material.

TPU 92A Material

The Stratasys F123 series allows FDM TPU 92A material to be printed, providing a flexible yet durable part for numerous applications. FDM TPU 92A is a thermoplastic polyurethane which is ideal for prototyping elastomers providing exceptional elongation, tensile and tear strength. Parts are tough enough to be used as advanced conceptual models, functional prototypes, manufacturing tools and production parts.

3D printed elastomer FDM TPU 92A material brake pedal with support Completed 3D printed TPU brake pedal part

3D Printed Brake Pedal Covers

The brake pedal covers are highly complex parts with intricate details. This part is applied on brake/clutch pedals on vehicles to protect OEM brake pads, resulting in a longer service life. The Stratasys F170 3D printer loads TPU material like any other material with similar print times and the soluble support enables highly complex parts. It takes approximately 4 hours to print the parts, then they are placed in a support removal tank to remove the soluble support. Once the soluble support is removed from the part, they are ready to be used and the flexibility of these TPU brake pedal covers makes them very easy to install.  

3D Printing in Action

Watch this video of the F170 printing the TPU brake pedal covers.

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Learn about the Service

The post 3D Printing Service – Brake Pedal Cover: TPU 92A Material appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Kelly Clancy at July 26, 2019 06:33 PM

SolidSmack

This is What The iPhone Would Look Like If It Was Made in The 1980s

You can’t enter a coffee shop nowadays without at least seeing one iPhone on a single person. First released in June 2007, Apple’s iconic phone has become one of the leading smartphone lines around the world.

Goes without saying, right? But what if the iPhone was released earlier than 2007? What if, say, it came out in 1984?

Thanks to nostalgia aficionado Future Punk, we can see EXACTLY how the iPhone would be advertised if it was released in the 1980s. Times were different back then; Apple was still using their rainbow-colored logo, the Internet was still a budding network of computers, and blocky computers were still in vogue. All of these trends can be seen in Future Punk’s fake 3D advertisements for the Macintosh portable computer.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/oTxB-ex-2zI?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The iPhone of the 1980s looks almost nothing like the phone you see today. For those born in the 21st century, there’s a simple reason — the phone mimics the Apple Macintosh computer design of the 1980s and 90s (yes, they had computers ‘back then’) which were chunkier, blockier, and pretty much look like giant calculators.

This handheld Macintosh computer has no touchscreen, and instead uses the old school number keypad to input data. It also has a much smaller screen and a ginormous front speaker located near the top of the device. These phones in the first commercial harkens back to the design of the Macintosh II and Macintosh SE.

The second commercial takes on the next gen Apple Mac design and the addition of color in the late 90s/early 00s, with these Macintosh phones coming in a bevy of eye-popping Apple-esque rainbow colors.

<figure class="wp-block-image">macintosh iphone advert</figure>

To keep with the whole 80s vibe, Future Punk keeps the commercials super low-res. The phones themselves aren’t real but are 3D models which he made specifically for the adverts. Even the static you hear throughout the commercial sounds very 80s, with the low-quality voice narration followed by the Rolling Stones’ “She’s A Rainbow” to compliment the Macintosh’s wide range of color options.

Future Punk made the 3D Macintosh Blender files available for download on his Gumroad page, so if you’re feeling in the mood to mess around with some nostalgia, you can take the files and make a commercial of your own. For more of Future Punk’s 80s and 90s-inspired creations, check out his YouTube channel and Patreon.  

The post This is What The iPhone Would Look Like If It Was Made in The 1980s appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 26, 2019 04:14 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Backup / Recovery Settings Explained

The loss of data, whether from hardware failure, software issues or simply human error is a constant concern for all designers.  To help protect your data you may take advantage of Product Data Management software such as SOLIDWORKS PDM, but if you do not have these tools available, or even if you do, there are a few quick simple changes that you can make to your SOLIDWORKS settings that can help you to protect your hard work.

Accessing SOLIDWORKS Backup and Recovery Options

In SOLIDWORKS go to Tools > Options and under the System Options go to the Backup/Recover options page.  There are three sections here that we can have control over.

SOLIDWORKS System Backup/Recover Options

SOLIDWORKS System Backup/Recover Options

SOLIDWORKS Auto-recover:

The Auto-recover option is enabled by default in SOLIDWORKS and will create a new auto-recover file every 10 minutes.  The Auto-recover files will only be created if: (1) the file has already been saved once, so if you have either opened an existing file, or have saved and named a new file; and (2) if there has been a change to the file since the last time it was saved, this would be indicated by the * symbol next to the file name at the top of the screen.

If for any reason your SOLIDWORKS session is terminated unexpectedly, such as by a crash or power outage, the Auto-recover functionality will detect the file that was created in the last session and ask you if you want to recover it.  Again, this will only work if you have saved the file at least once, making it a really good habit to save your file right away when you first create it and give it a name.  You can choose to increase or decrease the auto-recover interval if you wish, but 10 minutes is a good time frame normally.

You can also change the file location for the auto-recover files, for instance you could point it to an easier to find location if you wish to, however be aware that the auto-recover location MUST be on a local hard drive, you cannot use a network location either pointing to the UNC path or the Mapped Drive, the auto-recover file will not be created if you do.

Autorecover

Autorecover

SOLIDWORKS Backup:

By default the SOLIDWORKS Backup option is disabled when you install SOLIDWORKS.  If you are not using any PDM system then the first setting change you should make in SOLIDWORKS is to enable this option.  You can keep 1 or more backup copies of your document after each save.  Normally I like to keep 3 copies just to be safe.  This means that each time you hit save, before your current changes are saved, the original file as it was at the time of the last save operation will be copied to the backup folder.  This way if you make a change that you want to undo you can easily retrieve the previous version of the file from the backup folder.  Just like with the Auto-recover folder location, you can point the backup folder to a different location, and just like the Auto-recover you CANNOT save backups to a network location.

Also, If you are storing your SOLIDWORKS files on a network location and accessing them directly from there, you should not choose the option “Save backup files in the same location as the original”, instead make sure that you are using a folder location on the local hard drive.

Even if you have a PDM system in place you may want to consider turning on the backup option.  When you check out a file from the vault and start making changes to it, there will not be a new version created in the vault until you check that file back in.  So while you are working on the file it will behave exactly like any local SOLIDWORKS file.  If you will be working on the file over the course of several days without checking it back in (not a good idea unless you are forced to, such as if you are working offline while disconnected from the vault), it is a very good idea to take the precaution of enabling backups directly in SOLIDWORKS.

Backup Files

Backup Files

Save notification:

Have you noticed this pesky notice that pops us near your cursor when you haven’t saved for a few minutes?  Remember he’s just trying to save your hard work from electronic oblivion so pay attention to him and don’t just rely on your auto-recover settings.  You can adjust the frequency and duration of the notification if you like.

Save Notification

Save Notification

The post SOLIDWORKS Backup / Recovery Settings Explained appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at July 26, 2019 12:00 PM

July 25, 2019

SolidSmack

3D Printed Magnetic Liquids Could Revolutionize Medicine

Researchers at the Berkeley Lab have developed a technique for 3D printing liquid structures that are reconfigurable.

Microscopic Machines

The researchers were experimenting with ferro-fluids, which are liquids infused with ferric nanoparticles. These iron oxide particles are only 20 nanometers across, so they are extremely tiny.

The liquid was 3D printed into 1mm droplets through the use of a modified conventional 3D printer. The droplets were 3D printed into a liquid. So far, this seems pretty routine.

By doing sophisticated analyses, they were able to determine that a phenomenon known as “interfacial jamming” occurred, where the nanoparticles in each droplet rushed to the edge of the droplet, forming a kind of boundary between the two and maintaining droplet internal structure.

The researchers then applied a magnetic field to the 3D printed solution through the use of a nearby electrified coil. As they anticipated, the ferro-particle infused droplets moved towards the magnetic field.

Again, this seems quite normal.

Then, something very unexpected occurred. When the researchers removed the magnetic field, they observed the droplets doing this:

<figure class="aligncenter"><figcaption>3D printed magnetic droplets move synchronously </figcaption></figure>

Berkeley Lab says:

“Through magnetometry measurements, the scientists found that when they placed a magnetic field by a droplet, all of the nanoparticles’ north-south poles, from the 70 billion iron-oxide nanoparticles floating around in the droplet to the 1 billion nanoparticles on the droplet’s surface, responded in unison, just like a solid magnet.”

Controlling Ferric Nanoparticle Droplets

Somehow the droplets had become magnetic due to the exposure to the magnetic field. Ferric materials becoming magnetic has been long observed in solid materials, but never in a liquid previously.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EAMhNA_k7UM?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

It seems that the “jammed” nanoparticles on the droplet boundary act in an analogous manner to solid ferric particles. Free-floating nanoparticles might become magnetic, but it would be of no consequence because a free-floating particle would simply rotate as required when exposed to a magnetic field.

To put this in an understandable analogy, imagine two inflated balloons. One balloon is full of beans. When you rotate the balloon, the beans simply fall according to gravity — which is acting as the “magnetic field” in this analysis.

Now imagine the second balloon having all the beans glued to the inside of the balloon. When you rotate the balloon, they move with the balloon. It’s almost like a solid structure, except in this experiment, it’s a liquid.

Magnetic Liquid 3D Printing Properties

Berkeley Lab explains more:

“Among the magnetic droplets’ many amazing qualities, what stands out even more, Russell noted, is that they change shape to adapt to their surroundings. They morph from a sphere to a cylinder to a pancake, or a tube as thin as a strand of hair, or even to the shape of an octopus – all without losing their magnetic properties.”

Having the ability to produce magnetic droplets of this type opens up some very interesting possibilities. Essentially, these researchers have developed the means to create a construction toolkit for liquid structures and even machines.

Through ingenious thinking, it could be possible to develop all manner of microscopic devices that make use of this approach. They could be activated or powered through external or adjacent magnetic field generators, even enabling mobile microscopic devices that could perhaps alter their shape to, say, squeeze through small apertures.

Magnetic Liquid 3D Printing Futures

This seems to be the path the researchers are taking, as their next steps seem quite ambitious:

“Liu and Russell plan to continue research at Berkeley Lab and other national labs to develop even more complex 3D-printed magnetic liquid structures, such as a liquid-printed artificial cell, or miniature robotics that move like a tiny propeller for noninvasive yet targeted delivery of drug therapies to diseased cells.”

Once again, 3D printing technology has opened up an entirely new industry that eventually could be of huge benefit to society.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post 3D Printed Magnetic Liquids Could Revolutionize Medicine appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at July 25, 2019 04:44 PM

The Javelin Blog

Design for Additive Manufacturing with SOLIDWORKS Simulation Topology Study

Additive manufacturing is no longer a bleeding edge technology; this powerful method is being used across countless industries, for applications ranging from rapid prototyping to jigs/fixtures and production end-use parts. Widespread adoption of the materials and geometric freedom provided by additive manufacturing pushes the boundaries of traditional simulation validation processes.

Topology Study produces organic geometry that is optimized for its intended application

Topology Study produces organic geometry that is optimized for its intended application

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 introduced Topology Study, an exiting new study type that utilizes goals and constraints to optimize geometry for its design requirements. This optimization often produces complex, organic shapes, that are ideally suited to take advantage of the additive manufacturing.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2019 built on the success of Topology study, adding new types of constraints, and enabling the optimized geometry to be exported as a mesh solid. Additive manufacturing frequently depends on the use of plastic materials, which necessitates the use of a nonlinear analysis in order to accurately validate product performance.

Video Demonstration

Check out the following video, which details how SOLIDWORKS Simulation Premium’s powerful capabilities, and industry-leading integration with  your CAD data, will enable you to save time and money when utilizing additive manufacturing.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0FA92vi2OTg?feature=oembed" title="(Part 3/3) Design Validation Series: Design Optimization for Additive Manufacturing" width="500"></iframe>

Contact Us

Contact us today, and start putting these technologies to work for you. Need to take things one step at a time? Javelin’s 3D Printing Service can handle the manufacturing, while you focus on your new design and analysis capabilities.

The post Design for Additive Manufacturing with SOLIDWORKS Simulation Topology Study appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Angus Hudson, CSWP at July 25, 2019 12:00 PM

July 24, 2019

SolidSmack

Tour: MADE Makerspace in Barcelona, Spain

This tour of MADE Makerspace in Barcelona, Spain was my last stop of jet setting through Europe to learn about HW startup culture there. Watch the video below to take the tour with me, or read on for details! I’d like to give a big thank-you to Oriol Fernandez of “MAking props” for taking the time to be our excellent guide.

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</figure>

If you missed the articles on the other stops of this European adventure, you can see the one about Berlin here, one on Warsaw, Poland here, and the piece on Kiev, Ukraine here.

MADE’s Facility

This makerspace was one of the bigger ones I’ve toured. They boast 600 sq. meters of space (which is almost 6,500 sq. ft. of space if you speak American). Inside this endless maze, you’ll find all the basic tools, fascinating projects and HW nerds you’d expect.

The Toys/Tools

One of the first things you see when you enter is a menagerie of 3D printers on display:

<figure class="wp-block-image">Bunches of 3D printers at MADE, just as you would hope to find in a makerspace.<figcaption>Bunches of 3D printers at MADE, just as you would hope to find in a makerspace.</figcaption></figure>

There was also a rack of 3D printers in the process of being modified for who knows what!

<figure class="wp-block-image">Other 3D printers about to go under the knife...or rather... the wire snips (?) for modification.<figcaption>Other 3D printers about to go under the knife…or rather…the wire snips (?) for modification.</figcaption></figure>

This electronics workbench is available in the front of the makerspace.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Electronics workbench complete with poster of Bruce Lee telling you to clean up after yourself.<figcaption>Electronics workbench complete with poster of Bruce Lee telling you to clean up after yourself.</figcaption></figure>

There is a separate laser room with 2 laser machines inside.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Laser machine number 1 at MADE Makerspace Barcelona.<figcaption>Laser machine number 1.</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Laser machine number 2 at MADE Makerspace Barcelona.<figcaption>Laser machine number 2 at MADE Makerspace Barcelona.</figcaption></figure>

Power tools like a CNC, drills, saw, etc. were all tucked away in the dungeon-looking bit of the makerspace. This is one of the sections that will be reformed due to the very low ceilings.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

The Space

There were several construction projects about to take place when I visited. Some of them aim to better utilize the massive amount of space available. Others were to reduce the inconvenience of strange architecture such as spots with super-low ceilings or sloping floors.

<figure class="wp-block-image">"Community table" for open to anyone who needs space for assembling or finishing their projects.<figcaption>“Community table” for open to anyone who needs space for assembling or finishing their projects.</figcaption></figure>

However, even after the renovations are finished, there will be plenty of room available. That includes private workspaces available for rent where you can leave your projects and supplies.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Example of a privately-rented area within the makerspace.<figcaption>Example of a privately-rented area within the makerspace.</figcaption></figure>

There was so much space, a startup could even camp-out there. Say, for example, PunchLab. This company is building an app to measure the duration and power delivered per punch to a punching bag.

<figure class="wp-block-image">PunchLab at MADE Makerspace building an app to measure the strength and duration of punches.<figcaption>PunchLab at MADE Makerspace building an app to measure the strength and duration of punches.</figcaption></figure>

I was surprised when we came upon this quiet computer work area. It almost looked like it could be the office space of a high tech startup. There are huge ceilings, lots of light with comfy chairs and desk space. There are even plants! And they’re alive! I’m amazed.

<figure class="wp-block-image">A peek into the quiet work area inside MADE Makerspace Barcelona.<figcaption>A peek into the quiet work area inside MADE Makerspace Barcelona.</figcaption></figure>

The Community

I got the feeling the community was very welcoming, friendly and helpful here. There were a lot of opportunities for people from the community to dip a toe into making with event invites, classes, and the weekly open-door tour. Plus, it looked like a lot of the current members already do a fair amount of collaboration with each other. On the MADE Makerspace Barcelona website, you can find This Link to member projects for more examples of what members are up to there.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Examples of member projects are on display as you walk into MADE Makerspace Barcelona.<figcaption>Examples of member projects are on display as you walk into MADE Makerspace Barcelona.</figcaption></figure>

Classes

The typical training classes you’d expect are available for power tools to ensure members don’t lose appendages. Members can also run their own workshops to teach skills or with a specific project in mind. Those can be free or for-profit. The for-profit workshops just require leaders to donate a small sum to the makerspace for each person in attendance.

One fun workshop example described here is called “Demolition Zone”. In this one, attendees rip apart old machines to scavenge for parts and simultaneously learn about how they work. Sign me up!

Events

Below are the events advertised on MADE’s calendar on the homepage as of the writing of this article. These are subject to change. So, of course, if you’re interested in scoping any out, check the latest calendar before you go.

Mondays: Open Tour of MADE, aka “Puertas Abiertas

This was the tour I took for the video above, and I was the only lucky visitor taking it. I took the term “open door” literally, and got a little freaked out when I couldn’t actually open the door. So then I walked around for a silly amount of time to see if there was a different main entrance. For reference: no, there’s not. This is the door you need to enter. Just hit the buzzer if it’s locked.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Outside of MADE Makerspace in Barcelona. Enter here for the tour!<figcaption>Outside of MADE Makerspace in Barcelona. Enter here for the tour!</figcaption></figure>

Tuesdays: Arduino Playground

This one is not a formal class; it’s advertised more like loosely-guided playtime with Arduinos. There’s also a variety of sensors to choose from to connect up with your Arduino.

Wednesdays: Digital Luthiers

When I originally asked to shoot a video of this space for SolidSmack, I was told I needed to check out this event, in particular. Sadly, I was flying out before a Wednesday that week and missed it. Multiple people told me it’s a fun, lively event with a lot of MADE makers in attendance. There’s also beer, so, yes.

It’s basically a weekly party with maker-made, electronic musical instruments plus old-fashioned regular instruments. I’m sure it’s fine just to show up for the beer and frivolity, but if you wanted help making your own instrument, there are lots of friends available for brainstorming, too.

Fridays: Cosplay Playground

Our tour guide, Oriol Fernandez, is one of the cosplay prop making experts regularly on-hand at this gathering. Another is Anam of Family of 4 Cosplay. These makers are available to help attendees figure out how to bring their own cosplay creations to life.

Oriol showed off some of his sweet sword props for us, some of which light up. He creates these commissioned pieces at MAking Props. However, there was one example on display that was just his: this wondrous prop filled with dancing LED lights.

<figure class="wp-block-image"> Oriol "Menteausente" Fernandez's LED-filled sword prop creation. An example of the props made at "MAking props".<figcaption> Oriol “Menteausente” Fernandez’s LED-filled sword prop creation. An example of the props made at “MAking props”.</figcaption></figure>

Do You Know What I Missed in Barcelona?

I was a bit disappointed in myself for not conducting a better survey of HW startup culture in Barcelona, as I had with the other European cities I visited. On the other hand, I was only there for a few days, half of which I spent being held hostage waiting for the luggage the airline lost to arrive. *Shakes fist at invisible airplane in the sky.* I guess all things considered, I did pretty OK. Still, I’m sure I missed a lot of good events, spaces, organizations, HW VC’s, etc.

<figure class="wp-block-image">WAIT. Before you say "tapas and sangria," don't worry. I already done did that one. Barcelona, Spain.<figcaption>WAIT. Before you say “tapas and sangria,” don’t worry; I already done did that one.</figcaption></figure>

Do you know of any? If so, please drop a comment below to tell me what I missed. I’d love a good (tax deductable) excuse to come back to Barcelona!

The post Tour: MADE Makerspace in Barcelona, Spain appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at July 24, 2019 02:58 PM

The Javelin Blog

Which SOLIDWORKS Simulation Package is best for me?

Why spend money on features you don’t need? Similar to SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD, SOLIDWORKS Simulation is offered in Standard, Professional, and Premium packages, giving you a choice of analysis modules, allowing you to get the best value for your software investment.

“Which Simulation Package is best for me?”

This is one of the most common questions we get from customers, and the answer is entirely dependent on your current and future needs. The following diagram shows which modules are available with the three packages:

SOLIDWORKS Simulation is offered in Standard, Professional, and Premium packages

SOLIDWORKS Simulation is offered in Standard, Professional, and Premium packages.

Video Overview

Check out this video to learn more about the capabilities of SOLIDWORKS Simulation solutions:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CY8VecnQGTI?feature=oembed" title="(Part 2/3) Design Validation Series: Which simulation package is best for you?" width="500"></iframe>

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Package Comparison

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Standard and Professional both contain the essential linear-static analysis capabilities, allowing you to easily perform and iterate your design validation. The two primary differences between simulation Standard and Professional is the addition of numerous study types and efficiency tools that are included with SOLIDWORKS Simulation Professional. These additions will help you to better predict failure due to many common failure modes, and will streamline the process of analyzing larger or more complex problems.

In addition to all the capabilities of the Standard and Professional simulation packages, SOLIDWORKS Simulation Premium will enable you to solve nonlinear and/or dynamic problems. These analysis types allow you to better represent the materials and conditions of your design, and make it possible to consider the many conditions your products will be subjected to during their life-cycle.

Capability SOLIDWORKS Simulation
Premium
SOLIDWORKS
Simulation Professional
SOLIDWORKS
Simulation Standard
Ease of Use/Intuitiveness Included Included Included
Linear Static Simulation for Part & Assembly Included Included Included
Time Based Mechanism Motion Simulation Included Included Included
Finite Element Analysis Included Included Included
Contacts and Connectors Included Included Included
Post Processing Included Included Included
Communication Included Included Included
Design Comparison Studies Included Included Included
Trend Tracker Included Included Included
Fatigue Simulation Included Included Included
Detecting Unconstrained Bodies Included Included Included
Equation Driven Results Included Included Included
Design Optimization (based on Simulation data) Included Included
Advanced Contacts & Connectors Included Included
Event-Based Motion Simulation Included Included
Frequency Simulation Included Included
Buckling or Collapse Simulation Included Included
Structural Thermal Simulation Included Included
Drop Test Simulation Included Included
Pressure Vessel Design Simulation Included Included
Submodeling Simulation Included Included
2D Simplification Included Included
Load Case Manager Included Included
Non Linear Simulation Included
Dynamic Simulation Included
Composites Components Simulation Included
Offloaded Simulation Included

Contact Us

Determining the best value for your company’s unique situation isn’t necessarily easy; but luckily, you’re not alone. Reach out to us today, and let’s talk about using SOLIDWORKS Simulation to meet your design validation goals.

Contact Us Now

The post Which SOLIDWORKS Simulation Package is best for me? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Angus Hudson, CSWP at July 24, 2019 12:00 PM

Why might a Video Card Driver not install, causing an incompatibility warning?

Microsoft has announced a new video card driver structure for all hardware manufacturers: “DCHU (Declarative, Componentized, Hardware Support Apps, Universal API compliance) “.

What does this mean for SOLIDWORKS?

Towards the end of 2018, hardware manufacturers began shipping new systems with the new video card driver structure. Systems older than 2018 (or systems shipped with legacy driver models) may continue to use the legacy driver model moving forward with no changes required. Older hardware is able to use the DCHU driver version ONLY if a “clean” Windows installation occurs.

The OS cannot use both versions interchangeably. Whatever type was installed first will be the driver type going forward:

  • You cannot install a DCHU driver on a legacy driver system.
  • You cannot install a legacy driver on a DCHU driver system.

There are no advantages in performance or features to either driver structure. Customers should use the same type that their systems are supplied with and should not try to change it. This issue has been documented on our Knowledge Base as Solution S-076466 (requires a SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service Portal account login for access).

Video card driver

The post Why might a Video Card Driver not install, causing an incompatibility warning? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Adam Harte-Maxwell, CSWE at July 24, 2019 11:23 AM

July 23, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Are you using the SOLIDWORKS Mate Pop-up Toolbar?

Mating components together in a SOLIDWORKS assembly?  Frequent use of the SOLIDWORKS mate pop-up toolbar can often save you much time and mousing!

The mate pop-up toolbar is not quite as intelligent as the mate manager.  For example, the mate manager will usually predict when a Parallel mate is appropriate instead of a Coincident mate, when clearance is required between the selected entities.  As of the time this article was written, the mate pop-up toolbar is not as intuitive as the mate manager, and may suggest a Coincident mate anyway, even though that may cause an over-constraint in the assembly.  However, that often doesn’t matter if, as the designer, we are aware of the assembly constraints and design intent, and would know to use a Parallel mate instead.

How to use the mate pop-up toolbar:

  1. Select the entities for which you want to create a mate, from among multiple components.
  2. The mate pop-up toolbar will now appear, but it is critical to keep your mouse pointer in the same general area as your last selection, otherwise if you mouse away then the toolbar will quickly fade out of existence like Marty McFly almost does in the guitar-playing scene in that movie, Back To The Future.
  3. Pick the desired mate from the toolbar.  All done!
The mate pop-up toolbar

The mate pop-up toolbar, not quite solid. If I mouse much further away, it will vanish! Here it is suggesting a concentric mate.

The mate pop-up toolbar really shines when we need a Width mate!  Simply pre-select all four faces while holding down Ctrl, and look for the toolbar.  It offers us a width mate, as the only available option based on what we selected.

Width mate

A width mate is the only option, based on these selected faces

We can compare the speed and ease of the mate pop-up toolbar against the Mate Manager which is more intelligent but also more cumbersome to use.  Try setting up the same Width mate using the Mate Manager and it becomes apparent how much more work is involved.

The Mate Manager

The Mate Manager

The post Are you using the SOLIDWORKS Mate Pop-up Toolbar? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at July 23, 2019 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Watch: Electrical Sparks Created This Insane Portrait of Nikola Tesla

Nikola Tesla Portrait

What better way to commemorate one of the fathers of modern electricity than by burning his portrait using it?

Using live wires from a car battery, multimedia artist and YouTube creator Phil Hansen recently took on the arduous task of burning a portrait of Serbian-American inventor, engineer, and electrical aficionado Nikola Tesla using the resulting electrical sparks:

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</figure>

In total, two days were spent zapping the two DC wires together against the white canvas, with Phil taking periodic breaks to cut the wires to prevent them from melting together. If you’ve ever seen two electrical wires spark when they make contact, chances are you’ve also been in the proximity of the disgusting smell they make.

<figure class="wp-block-image">tesla electricity art</figure>

By increasing the number of burns in a specific area, he can adjust the darkness levels. Tesla’s hair and mustache, for example, are made of massive clumps of dark burns, while regions like the shading encompassing his eyes are spaced out wider and thus result in lighter levels. With his apparent knack for portraiture, Phil repeats this process until the full face of Tesla reveals itself through intricate shading. To add a bit of humor to the portrait, Phil uses a direct current (DC) as opposed to Tesla’s alternating current (AC), to spite the electrical engineer.

<figure class="wp-block-image">tesla electricity art</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">tesla electricity art</figure>

To cap off the portrait, he adds on the top of a sharp suit just below Tesla’s chin and sears his signature on the lower left side. Phil has a ton of other interesting art pieces that somehow connect the medium to the subject he’s working on—all of which are over on his YouTube channel.

The post Watch: Electrical Sparks Created This Insane Portrait of Nikola Tesla appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 23, 2019 11:33 AM

July 22, 2019

SolidSmack

Here’s What Happens When You Sand Aluminum to A Mirror Finish

aluminum sheet mirror finish

If you’ve ever happened upon a raw sheet of aluminum in your workplace, you may not think anything unusual… or that perhaps a piece of scrap escaped from the machine shop. What you may not consider is how the surface can be finished to a near reflective material finish with an array of sanding pads and a little elbow grease.

This is exactly what YouTube channel Skills and Trade has done. Taking various grits of sandpaper, they’ve taken an ordinary sheet of aluminum and polished it to a mirror finish. Have a look:

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</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">aluminum sheet mirror finish</figure>

After spraying the aluminum with Alumicut lubricant, they waste no time sanding down the aluminum sheet. Starting off with a 220-grit sandpaper, the team works slowly but surely over the aluminum sheet. They don’t spend too much time sanding one portion of the metal to avoid producing divots, while at the same time making sure all the areas of the aluminum get an even sanding.

<figure class="wp-block-image">aluminum sheet mirror finish</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">aluminum sheet mirror finish</figure>

They move on to 400-grit sandpaper before making another pass with the same 400-grit paper, this time with an air face pad to smooth out the lines produced from all the sanding. This sanding process with an air face pad continues with the 800-grit and 1,500-grit sandpaper, coupled with a few more sprays of Alumicut lubricant.

<figure class="wp-block-image">aluminum sheet mirror finish</figure>

Once the aluminum gets a taste of the 3,000-grit sandpaper, the metal’s appearance becomes more like a reflective mirror than a material you use for soda cans. As always, spraying Alumicut while sanding the metal makes it easier to work with and helps make it more reflective (you can even see the reflection of a wire off of the aluminum now).

<figure class="wp-block-image">aluminum sheet mirror finish</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">aluminum sheet mirror finish</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">aluminum sheet mirror finish</figure>

Sanding with 5,000-grit sandpaper finalizes the mirror finish on the aluminum sheet. To clean it and make it shine, they apply a generous amount of aluminum polish, polishing the metal until it’s as shiny as a bald eagle’s scalp.  They polish the metal with two coats of aluminum polish before applying a sealant to protect the surface.

<figure class="wp-block-image">aluminum sheet mirror finish</figure>

If you would rather make your own reflective surface than buy a mirror, this is definitely one way to go about it. The aluminum sheet is far sturdier than a plate of glass and the sealant ensures you’ll be looking at yourself through this metal for years to come.

Skills and Trade has tons more DIY and how-to videos on their YouTube channel. They’re definitely one to subscribe to.

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This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

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by Carlos Zotomayor at July 22, 2019 10:21 PM

The Javelin Blog

Using thermal resistance to model thermal condition of touching faces

If you have been using SOLIDWORKS Simulation Professional or Premium for your thermal analysis, you probably have asked yourself, what is the best way to model the thermal resistance condition between two touching faces? SOLIDWORKS allows you to specify resistance to touching faces to simulate imperfect thermal conduction between parts.

In reality two parts coming in contact with each other will not have a perfect contact due to factors such as surface roughness and tolerances and therefore, there will be air pockets trapped between the part which will affect the overall thermal coefficient. Even if these effects are negligible, most of the time, the parts are bonded together with a thermal adhesive or thermal glue which has a different conductance coefficient that is not negligible.

The effects of this middle layer, can be inserted into your model with defining a local contact set of “Thermal resistance”. The thermal resistance coefficient can be found either experimentally or from the properties of the glue used based on factors such as its thickness or working temperature.

Thermal resistance example

In the example below, we are defining a contact set of thermal resistance between the two touching faces. The resistance can be specified either using the total conductance or a distributed conductance per unit area. For the example below, we are using a special layer of Arctic Silver to bond the two parts with a thickness of 25 micrometer, which has a conductance of 350,000 W/m^2K. Therefore, the thermal resistance will be the inverse of this number which is 2.857e-6 m^2K/W.

"Defining

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by Mersedeh Zandvakili at July 22, 2019 12:00 PM

July 20, 2019

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 29.19

Huddle around the computer a little bit, your digital detox is a farce! How can you stay away from great stuff that you can read and chew on … mentally that is! We got you covered, while you were away, busy with your digital detox diet. Don’t be shy, take a look at the week that was, right here on SolidSmack.

Cause we are ROCKIN!

Proof: Apple’s New Mac Pro Will NOT Grate Cheese

When the newest Mac Pro was announced by Apple in June, people were ecstatic. Not because of the computer’s maximum CPU capacity of 28 cores/56 threads and 2933MHz memory, but because the hardware was a return to Apple’s tower design after years of a thermally limited, although quite compact, ‘trash can’ style design. Featuring a new grille/grate design, the computer transfers heat faster than Tim Cook shedding his shirt on a hot summer’s day.

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</figure>

Let’s Stop Saying “Think Outside the Box”

First, let’s agree, here and now, to no longer use the phrase, “think outside the box”. Henceforth condensed to “it”.  “It” is a cliché, a tired trope, a worn-out platitude that should have never made it this far riding on the backs of cheap suits. It is a sad piece of strip mall management seminar jargon akin to “synergism”.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Who Needs a Knife? How to Make a Food Slicer from Wood

In the age of online shopping and near-instant gratification, it’s not very often we see people creating their kitchen appliances from scratch. Let alone—kitchen appliances made from popsicle sticks and razor blades. Just check out this DIY food slicer from YouTuber Delta Hack. Using popsicle sticks, wood, razor blades, and a simple rotating mechanism, he creates a machine that can surprisingly slice some simple foods into clean cuts:

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</figure>

HW Startup Tourism in Kiev, Ukraine: Concepter, Fabricator FabLab, DIY Lab, and IoT Hub

On the 3rd installment of “How to Network with HW enginerds in Europe,” we fly to Kiev, Ukraine! (AKA Kyiv, Ukraine.) I only had two days in this city but managed to tour three facilities and pack in four meetings, proving Ukrainians are awesome. In this short visit, I learned a lot of interesting facts about the challenges and perks of hardware development in Ukraine, which I’ll share here.

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</figure>

Incredible 3D Animation of How A Glock 19 Works

If you’ve ever wondered how a semi-automatic pistol works without having to get anywhere within firing distance of one… then you’re in luck. 3D generalist and motion designer Matt Rittman has taken the liberty of animating a totally safe, digital recreation of the iconic Glock 19.

<figure class="wp-block-image">glock 3d animation</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 29.19 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 20, 2019 03:13 AM

July 19, 2019

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Vineling Tar Char

The oil-charred smell of the tar post pile flared the nostril of ever horse and rider that passed by. The wind was thick with the odor with the sand whipping the brows of the watchers on the hill who the vinelings kept control over with these links.

Su Jian – So many new pieces since our last look at the Bejing-based Concept artist, killing it with bots, ships, and animal/humanoid characters.

Big Walls – Peeta (aka Manuel Di Rita) creates mind-bending 3D optical illusion mural, canvas, and sculpture, captivate you for hours on end.

ISS Passing Across the Sun: Catch a glimpse of the International Space Station as it orbits the Earth and as it sails past the sun.

owl__kitty – Instagram follow of the week. This kitty is the next big hero in film with supporting actor roles along with Keanu, Tom, Leonardo, and the rest of Hollywood.

Animated Map of the Earth – One frame per month from NASA’s many Earth datasets animated to show the fluctuating seasons, focused on Arctic sea ice and vegetation.

AI Portraits Ars: the team has trained Generative Adversarial Network (GAN) models to reproduce human portraits, with different styles and levels of abstraction. Then portraits are painted in real-time at 4k resolution.

Antioch Mosaic – The World’s largest intact mosac will open to the public this year in Antakya, Turkey created over 1300 years ago.

Frank Tjepkema: The designer took a popular mass-produced chair and started sanding it to its bare minimum. Reverse generative design.

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Legendary – New video for new single from, you guessed it, new album, dropping August 2nd.

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by Josh Mings at July 19, 2019 09:57 PM

The Javelin Blog

Retain PMI and Design Intent when you translate CAD Models into SOLIDWORKS with ELYSIUM

Got a lot of CAD models and drawings to translate into SOLIDWORKS format?  Don’t want to lose your design intent in the process?  If so, keep reading!

At SOLIDWORKS World 2018, a Dassault Systèmes team [who brought us SOLIDWORKS as we know it] out of Germany presented an impressively powerful CAD translation solution called ELYSIUM!  This is, without a doubt, the Cadillac of CAD translators.

ELYSIUM CAD Translator

ELYSIUM CAD Translator

From the original Greek “Elysion” (meaning “abode of the blessed”, as in the afterlife), ELYSIUM is aptly named as it uses native API to translate other CAD formats (such as Catia®, PTC Creo®, Autodesk Inventor®, neutral formats, etc.) into SOLIDWORKS (and other formats) while also preserving any original design intent and PMI (product and manufacturing information), such as would be used for MBD (model-based definition), CNC machining, automated inspection, etc.

It sounds like ELYSIUM literally rebuilds the original model or drawing, from the ground up, in the chosen CAD format!

Checks translation accuracy against the original file

From what we’ve heard, ELYSIUM does so much more than just translate.  For example, it also verifies the translation’s accuracy as compared to the original.  This is so much more than a simple conversion import!  If you are translating into SOLIDWORKS from another native CAD platform format, then your SOLIDWORKS feature tree won’t be merely a collection of imported body icons, as if you had done a File > Open from SOLIDWORKS on a neutral format file such as STEP, IGES, Parasolid, etc.  Neither is this in the same league as the Feature Recognition import option in SOLIDWORKS.  Quite the contrary; ELYSIUM is in a league of its own!

ELYSIUM translates the features, along with the design intent of the original model.  For example, if the original Autodesk Inventor model design intent was such that dimensions are all based off of the back face of the part, then so too will the SOLIDWORKS model maintain the same design intent, once ELYSIUM has translated it!

And yes, it includes functionality to automate the translation process.  As in, multiple files processed automatically in a batch.

Also translates drawings

The Dassault Systèmes team added that ELYSIUM also works with drawings!  However, it does not translate the original drawing per se, rather it analyzes it and builds a new drawing from scratch in SOLIDWORKS.  Every dimension is located as in the original.  In 2018, there were a few dimension types that it reportedly struggled with, which would then be easily identified for manual re-creation.  ELYSIUM includes quality assurance tools to compare the SOLIDWORKS drawing with the original, so that you can ensure that detailing is done to your satisfaction.

Watch a demonstration

If you are intrigued by what you’ve read so far, check out this hour-long webinar that will hopefully address your questions or, if you prefer a much quicker overview, then watch this demo on YouTube.

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License Options & Pricing

It can be well worth the investment if you have a large number of files to translate, as it would save you from having to do all this translation work manually.  As of 2018, ELYSIUM could be rented for just a few weeks, or purchased outright.  You can download the products specs, start a trial, or get get pricing from the ELYSIUM website.  The saying “you get what you pay for” rings true here, as you are getting a very high-quality and powerful solution.

Are you currently using SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional, Aras Innovator PLM, or the 3DEXPERIENCE PlatformHere’s an ELYSIUM development that you’ll want to keep tabs on!

ELYSIUM has come a very long way over many years.  If you have a lot of translation work to do, then ELYSIUM might be exactly the tool you need.

Learn More

The post Retain PMI and Design Intent when you translate CAD Models into SOLIDWORKS with ELYSIUM appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at July 19, 2019 12:00 PM

July 18, 2019

SolidSmack

HW Startup Tourism in Kiev, Ukraine: Concepter, Fabricator FabLab, DIY Lab, and IoT Hub

On the 3rd installment of “How to Network with HW enginerds in Europe,” we fly to Kiev, Ukraine! (AKA Kyiv, Ukraine.) I only had two days in this city but managed to tour three facilities and pack in four meetings, proving Ukrainians are awesome. In this short visit, I learned a lot of interesting facts about the challenges and perks of hardware development in Ukraine, which I’ll share here.

How To Find HW Nerds Abroad

Like my visit to Berlin and Warsaw, this trip was another Master’s Class in networking. Thank you again to Hardware Massive, who made the fantastic introduction for me to the HW accelerator, Concepter! Plus, their other introduction to Marta Proska, COO of Arkley in Warsaw, in turn, led to another kind intro: to Roman Kravchenko of DIY Lab and IoT Hub. Thanks, Marta!

I’d also like to thank all the HW pros in Kiev who fit me in their busy schedulesome with little to no notice! Like the meetings in Poland, I was astonished by how willing these important and busy people were to find a way to meet. Have I mentioned how awesome Ukrainians are?

Video with Fabricator Fablab, Concepter, DIY Lab, and IoT Hub

To see some of the highlights from this trip, watch the video below. Included is a tour of the fablab called Fabricator inside UNIT.City.

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</figure>

Getting Around – Holy Crap It’s So Cheap

In my surprise, whirlwind tour of Europe, I didn’t have all my travel and accommodations planned out beforehand. In fact, it was only the day before I arrived in Kiev that I took a serious look at how to get from the airport to the bed I booked.

Usually, I go for public transportation whenever possible. I sat down with good old Google Maps and tried to decipher all the jibberish letters before my eyes. Eventually, I found some possible bus-and-train combinations that would get me close enough after an hour+ of hopping around. Then, I looked up the exchange rate to calculate the cost.

At the time, the exchange rate was 26 whatsits (Ukraine Hryvnia) to 1 USD. TWENTY-SIX?!

Uber for the Win

Wait a minute, do they have Uber in Kiev?

Me, to myself, a day before arriving in Kiev

OH YES, THEY DO. Then I pulled up Uber to figure out the cost of a ride from the airport. It was something like 4 bucks. “HAHAHA. Ok, this task is done,” I said to myself. It was a load-off knowing I wouldn’t need to meticulously plan the rest of my transportation, either.

This exchange rate wildly in favor of the US dollar made a big impact on how much I was able to fit in on my little trip. Of course, it also turned out to be a big factor influencing how HW startups there interact with the rest of the world…and future potentials for industries there.

Visiting the HW Accelerator: Concepter

My first not-Borscht stop was Concepter, a hardware accelerator inside UNIT.City, an innovation park.

UNIT.City

This campus is touted as Ukraine’s first innovation park and one of the largest innovation centers in Eastern Europe. It was once the abandoned Kyiv Motorcycle Factory but then was refurbished to become a mini tech hub 3 years ago. There’s a lot going on here now! There’s a kind of vocational school for IT, plus research labs, startup offices, and the fablab called, “Fabricator,” which we toured in the video.

How to Get In — The Magic Word

Finding Concepter in this maze of close to 60 acres, was not an easy task! My not-English speaking Uber driver pulled up to the uniformed guard at the start of the labyrinth. The guard shouted some stuff. The driver pointed to me. The guard bent over to make some serious, squinty eye contact with me. I smiled, shrugged my shoulders and asked, “uhh…English?”

Then the guard laughed, stood upright and waved us through. The driver laughed. I laughed. We all had a good laugh. Pro tip: if you’re trying to get into a secured area in Ukraine, the magic word is, “English”. You’re welcome.

Google Maps narrowed down my destination to one of a cluster of 4 buildings. Then, after several wrong turns, pestering a few strangers and a couple of WhatsApp phone calls, I finally got to my destination. Turns out Ukraine, like Poland, is not so big on signage and directions.

Inside Concepter

Once I made it, I was fortunate to chat with a few Concepter employees, including 2 engineers. This hardware accelerator provides startups with both a cash boost of seed funding and can bring a lot of the heavy lifting of product development and scaling manufacturing. They also invent and build their own gadgets! Luckily, right below them is a fablab they have access to, which makes development a lot easier and less expensive.

Tour of the FabLab Fabricator

<figure class="wp-block-image">Fabricator fablab at UNIT.City in Kiev, Ukraine.<figcaption>Fabricator fablab at UNIT.City in Kiev, Ukraine.</figcaption></figure>

Andrii Prepiialo, senior mechanical design engineer at Concepter, was our extraordinary tour guide in the video. He spends a lot of time there making things for Concepter, so he knew his way around.

Here’s the video again if you missed it above:

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This wasn’t the most gigantic fablab I’ve ever walked through, but it still managed to have an impressive spread of tools. It also ranks high as being one of the cleanest I’ve seen. Plus it has at least one surprising feature: a ceramic 3D printer they made themselves.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Andrii Prepiialo shows us an example of a ceramic 3D print in the FabLab Fabricator.<figcaption>Andrii Prepiialo shows us an example of a ceramic 3D print in the FabLab Fabricator.</figcaption></figure>

As with traditional ceramic parts, these are left to dry after forming and then baked.

Here’s that ceramic 3D printer in action:

<figure class="wp-block-image">Ceramic 3D printer at Fabricator in Kiev, Ukraine, dispensing layers of wet ceramic slurry.<figcaption>Ceramic 3D printer at Fabricator in Kiev, Ukraine, dispensing layers of wet ceramic slurry.</figcaption></figure>

Concepter Products on Display in Fabricator

Prepiialo showed us some projects Concepter helped with which were on display at the fablab. One was a wearable, non-invasive EKG by Cardiomo that measures heart activity through electrodes embedded in the device below.

<figure class="wp-block-image">This wearable EKG by Cardiomo was a projected the engineers at Concepter helped with.<figcaption>This wearable EKG by Cardiomo was a design the engineers at Concepter helped with.</figcaption></figure>

Another example of Concepter engineering in the showcase was Petcube. There are a few versions of this available now and they all let you mess with your pet when you’re not at home. Some have a laser to play with your cat, or a camera, mic and speaker combo to talk to your dog. We’re told a newer version even gives treats! These are available to purchase on Amazon now.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Petcube is one of the projects worked on at Concepter in Kiev, which lets you freak out your pets with robotics when you're not at home!<figcaption>Petcube is one of the projects worked on at Concepter in Kiev, which lets you freak out your pets with robotics when you’re not at home!</figcaption></figure>

Coffee Talk with Sergei Shcherbakov

Up until earlier this year, Sergei Shcherbakov was CTO of Concepter, and he is now Product Manager at Ring Ukraine. The fellas at Concepter knew I was interested in learning about the HW startup culture in Ukraine and they arranged for me to meet Shcherbakov as “THE MAN you need to talk to about that”.

Sending Sergei a “Telegram”

Shcherbakov agreed to a last-minute meeting with me, and I was to meet him near Ring in downtown Kiev. I was honored such an important, busy dude would squeeze in time for “random American engineer” into his packed schedule. Our Concepter friend, Andrii Prepiialo, wanted to make sure Shcherbakov got the message about when exactly I’d be arriving to up my chances of meeting The Man.

I’ll send him a Telegram.

– a not joking Andrii Prepiialo

My face must have said, “you’ll what, excuse me?” Prepiialo smiled and explained that Telegram was the name of a popular communication app there. It’s more common than WhatsApp.

Did you think I meant an actual telelgram?”

– a laughing Andrii Prepiialo

“Yeah, man, I really did. I have zero expectations about this country. Have you seen your elevators?” For reference, this is the elevator where I stayed:

<figure class="wp-block-image">Kiev's Tower of Terror, aka, the elevator where I was staying.<figcaption>Kiev’s Tower of Terror, aka, the elevator where I was staying.</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Inside the coffin-sized Tower of Terror in Kiev, Ukraine.<figcaption>Inside the coffin-sized Tower of Terror in Kiev, Ukraine. “So this is how we die.”</figcaption></figure>

In addition to Telegram, Ukrainians use Facebook for business, like the Polish do (as mentioned in the article on Warsaw, Poland). The guys I met here were the final straws to break down my Facebook fortress of privacy settings. After this country, I caved and let the Ukrainians in, and the Poles, too. FINE, you all win.

The Journey to Ring

When I heard back from Sergei Shcherbakov, he directed me to have the driver drop me some blocks from Ring’s HQ because the streets were blocked off because of protestors. You know, as happens.

My visit was shortly before the presidential election which was sparking fiercely passionate debates — both between the candidates and citizens. That’s what all the hubbub was about that I needed to navigate around.

Learning from “The Man”: Sergei

Shcherbakov made it clear that he would not be allowed to speak at all about Ring. While I would have gladly listened, that was OK, because I was trying to learn generally about how building a HW startup worked in Ukraine. This worldly guy really was the right person to speak to on this.

He’d overseen the development of a lot of HW projects at Concepter. He understood startup culture in the US. He’d worked closely with plenty of Asian manufacturers. (We shared some epic battle wound stories from working with Chinese manufacturers, as all HW veterans have). He had experience, but more importantly, he had valuable perspective.

So what are Ukraine’s advantages and disadvantages in the HW startup world which Shcherbakov and I bounced around in our convo? (These aren’t solely Sergei’s opinions, they’re the points that gelled in my head when we spoke months back. So if anything is objectionable here, I’m sure it’s totally my fault and from my brain, and I’m sorry.)

Advantages to Developing HW in Ukraine

  • HAVE YOU SEEN HOW CHEAP IT IS? (“Yeah, Sergei, I’ve been taking an Uber Everywhere, like I’m friggin royalty!”) aka US dollars/Euros/Pounds Sterling go ridiculously far there.
  • Educated, talented workforce whose English is pretty great comparatively speaking
  • So, so cheap. Did I mention that?
  • Lots of infrastructure and manufacturing talent remaining from industrial glory days
  • So much potential!
  • The disadvantages of Other countries (i.e. if/when Chinese manufacturing becomes undesirable or obstructed, or when Poland develops to the point it’s no longer cheap enough to manufacture there, Ukraine will be there to Make The Things.)
  • Woah, Ukrainians are so amazingly friendly and willing to collaborate (this one was all my observation and is, perhaps, skewed).

Obstacles to Work Around

  • Walking past the noise of protestors and sirens, it was hard to deny there is still some political instability
  • Compared to the US, there isn’t such a high percentage of rabidly entrepreneurial spirits born into the Ukrainian population (but really, where else is there?)
  • While Ukraine is a developed nation, there isn’t high tech machinery at all corners of the country (ahem, like the elevator where I stayed)

DIY Lab and IoT Hub

After my short meeting with Shcherbakov ended, I decided to make the trek to the other side of town to visit DIY Lab. I’d been trying to set up a last-minute meeting with Roman Kravchenko, a founder of IoT Hub, but didn’t have a time arranged. I decided just to show up at the affiliated DIY Lab and cross my fingers because it was my last day in Ukraine.

Venturing East to the Left Bank

My new Concepter friends gasped when they heard I was crossing the river. “Are you sure?”

That freaked me out at first but then they explained that it’s just known for being more residential than commercial on the East Side. East of the river is kind of like the Oakland part of the SF Bay area. I guess like Oakland, rent is probably cheaper there.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Crossing the river to the Oakland of Kiev.<figcaption>Bravely (?) crossing the river to the Oakland of Kiev.</figcaption></figure>

As with Concepter, I wasn’t precisely sure where the heck I was going when looking for the DIY Lab. I wandered around this creepy-looking industrial park until I spotted a gathering of cool Euro-hipsters.

<figure class="wp-block-image">If you come in the back way to get to DIY Labs, you'll be creeped out by this view. PRESS ONWARD!<figcaption>If you come in the back way to get to DIY Lab, you’ll be creeped out by this view. PRESS ONWARD!</figcaption></figure>

Luckily, the hipsters were indeed marking the spot I needed to find, and I was saved!

I stumbled into the lobby and asked reception about DIY Lab. Luckily, a founder of DIY Lab, Євгеній Лютак, happened to be walking by. He overheard me and kindly invited me up to check out the facility. (I told you these Ukrainians are beyond awesome, didn’t I?!)

Євгеній Лютак, Evgeny Gnatyuk, and Станіслав Джеріхов graciously made time for my intrusive visit and explained their organizations and some of the projects they ushered through.

Two Orgs, One Master Plan

DIY Lab and IoT Hub are affiliated with each other in a very clever way. DIY Lab is set up as a non-profit community where members are expected to actively work on HW projects themselves as the “DIY” part implies.

Their first focus is to build a cohesive community. Members are encouraged to socialize through the parties DIY Lab holds (brilliant), and find others to fill in their talent gaps. This nonprofit serves as a low-risk playground to watch both projects and teams develop. With this model, my hosts are given an up-close look at the progress of the hardware, the team members as a unit, and the technical and soft skills of individuals. All that info can aid in some serious vetting! Or, at the very least, it can help identify weak points which the org leaders can patch up before they become deal-breakers.

One potential result of being a part of DIY Lab is to pitch your project and be accepted into IoT Hub‘s accelerator. Ahh, and now it all makes sense.

Aside from the sheer cleverness of the master plan, I was in awe of what I’ll call their “HW Startup cultural awareness”. They are keenly aware of the importance of a strong HW nerd community in building successful startups. They are also aware Kiev doesn’t come with a ready-made one of those like San Francisco does. So they’re…engineering one. Wow.

The Results – Projects!

These guys showed off some of the projects in their portfolio. One of the most awesome ones is FeelVR, which makes realistic game controllers for driving simulations. Right now, they have a steering wheel and set of pedals available to order on Indiegogo. I’m told it ratchets-up the sensation of being in a car during the game exponentially.

<figure class="wp-block-image">FeelVR's realistic steering wheel controller for driving simulations.<figcaption>FeelVR’s realistic steering wheel controller for driving simulations.</figcaption></figure>

Another favorite project they showed off is on DIYLab’s site: Wow Ads. The idea is like when you see airplanes or blimps with streamers or displays advertising stuff or saying, “Ramona will you marry me,” or whatever, except with DRONES! I was like, “guys this has drones AND photonics stuff, why didn’t you show me this first!?” I was told this was one of Євгеній Лютак’s own babies.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Wow Ads using drones to write messages with LEDs! Yesss.<figcaption>Wow Ads using drones to write messages with LEDs! Yesss.</figcaption></figure>

Before I left, the gentlemen at DIY Lab helped me get in touch with the elusive Roman Kravchenko. Roman offered to meet me downtown late in the evening when he was finished with his 800th other meeting that day.

Me: “What, for real?! You would do that? OK!” Gosh, these Ukrainians. So amazing!

When I met Kravchenko, he suggested we walk around the area to give me a chance to see more of Kiev before I left. How thoughtful! As we walked and talked, military vehicles and the occasional siren blared past. The protests were still going on.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Twilight falling on this pretty block in Kiev not far from where protesters gathered.<figcaption>Twilight falling on this pretty block in Kiev not far from where protesters gathered.</figcaption></figure>

Earlier in his career, Kravchenko stayed for a spell in Silicon Valley, so he had a good idea of the culture there. He was also well aware of the cultural component to successful HW startups. Kravchenko shared some of the many experiments they tried to foster community, entrepreneurial mindsets, and network growth. I won’t share those here, because I’m not sure which are cool to publicize, but I will say I was seriously impressed. Their ideas were pretty wild and creative, and they followed through with them.

Startups within Startups

Above all, I was impressed that Roman Kravchenko and his colleagues view their DIY Lab and IoT Hub organizations as kinds of startups themselves. These guys are aware of the advantages and weaknesses of HW dev in Ukraine versus USA and the rest of Europe. They also continually birth new, creative ideas based on that awareness and try them out. Ideation, execution, tweak, pivot, expand, rinse, repeat…

Keep Your Eyes Out

I’m excited to see what tech will come from Ukraine in the future! There’s a mountain of potential there and a lot of clever, motivated engineers finding ways to mine it. And also…they’re awesome.

The post HW Startup Tourism in Kiev, Ukraine: Concepter, Fabricator FabLab, DIY Lab, and IoT Hub appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at July 18, 2019 02:18 PM

U.S. Army Research Lab Picks 3D Systems for World’s Largest, Fastest Metal Powder 3D Printer

United States government invests $15 million towards the development of the next generation of metal 3D printing technology and 3D Systems is joining forces for the ambitious metal 3D printing project.

Largest Metal 3D Printer

This remarkable $15 million contract is officially targeted at work “to create the world’s largest, fastest, most precise metal 3D printer.” Do we hear thunderous applause in the background?

Many large-format 3D printers aren’t especially precise, as they’re built for speed — which ticks two boxes — more than accuracy. Still, most of the time when we are thinking large-format, we are thinking of extrusion-based systems, where larger-diameter nozzles lay down thicker layers, leading to that less-precise print result. That won’t be the technology at play with this new system, as it will be a powder bed process, with any further process specifics not yet detailed.

What has been announced is the anticipated build volume, which at 1000 x 1000 x 600 mm is large indeed — easily at least among the largest on the market now. The plan also calls for a minimum wall thickness of 100µm and layer thickness of 30µm.

The work springs from a contract between the Combat Capabilities Development Command Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and 3D Systems, which together with the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) signed the contract with ARL and the Advanced Manufacturing, Materials, and Processes (AMMP) Program. Well, that certainly sounds governmental: AM with 3DS, the ARL, NCMS, and AMMP.

3D Printing In The Military

The US Army has been working with 3D printing for more than 20 years, and has only been upping its investment in recent years.

Many think first of weaponry — which does sound like it’s in sight to at least some extent in this project — when thinking of military applications, but coffee cups, vehicles, spare parts made on-site, and even life-saving medical tools have seen use for 3D printing to great effect in the field. Particular interesting for the armed forces is the prospect of shortening the supply chain, especially with in-the-field deployment of machines that can print replacement parts or specialty tools as needed when troops are far from convenient restocking depots.

And that’s what is in focus here: supply chains for long-range munitions, combat vehicles, helicopters, and air and missile defense.

The goal for the new system is to get usable, durable parts into the field more efficiently and quickly, and with less material usage, than current manufacturing options.

3D Systems In Defense

For its part, 3D Systems also has an established history with the military, including work with the US Marine Corps. The contract with ARL is building on any earlier work, though, as it leverages not only 3D Systems’ existing portfolio but the expertise upon which it was built in order to develop this new metal 3D printer.

Initial use will be in the Army’s depots and labs, and is then planned to expand to “leading aerospace and defense suppliers,” keeping wider availability in sight for what could be a very advanced system.

Based on the existing 3D Systems portfolio and a comment from the announcement, it seems clear the large new system will be a powder bed laser process.

“Up until now, powder bed laser 3D printers have been too small, too slow, and too imprecise to produce major ground combat subsystems at scale,” said Dr. Joseph South, ARL’s program manager for Science of Additive Manufacturing for Next Generation Munitions.

The company’s existing DMP (Direct Metal Printing) offerings have built a foundation of expertise in this process; the current largest offering in the line, the DMP Factory 500, has a build volume of 500 x 500 x 500 mm, highlighting that indeed the new target is a substantial increase.

More For 3D Systems

We’ll have to wait to see what news will be revealed as this project progresses; as it’s for the Army, there’s every possibility we won’t hear too much about specific parameters, capabilities, and especially projects.

But there’s also the possibility we will hear more about the system; the release also notes:

“In addition to bringing a new metal AM solution to the Army, 3D Systems will also evaluate the feasibility of integrating the new technologies and processes into its existing portfolio of 3D printer technologies.”

So perhaps there’s the potential that in addition to release to aerospace and defense suppliers, the system (or some derivation thereof) will make its way into 3D Systems’ commercially available portfolio.

Comments from 3D Systems Co-Founder and CTO (and father of SLA) Chuck Hull also indicate that the development efforts expand beyond a 3D printer, as he remarked:

“Through this project, we’re looking forward to delivering a working manufacturing system like no other… ARL has already realized the power of AM to transform its operations. We look forward to collaborating with them to scale and expand these capabilities by delivering first-to-market processes, materials, and technologies.”

Will it be the largest, fastest, most precise? We’ll see!

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post U.S. Army Research Lab Picks 3D Systems for World’s Largest, Fastest Metal Powder 3D Printer appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at July 18, 2019 12:20 PM

Who Needs a Knife? How to Make a Food Slicer from Wood

diy food slicer

In the age of online shopping and near-instant gratification, it’s not very often we see people creating their kitchen appliances from scratch. Let alone—kitchen appliances made from popsicle sticks and razor blades.

Just check out this DIY food slicer from YouTuber Delta Hack. Using popsicle sticks, wood, razor blades, and a simple rotating mechanism, he creates a machine that can surprisingly slice some simple foods into clean cuts:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1rAStG9gifc?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">diy food slicer</figure>

After gluing four razor blades to a circular piece of wood, he affixes the blades of death onto the rotating mechanism, which is electrically powered by a small battery and a switch. When turned on, these rotating blades are the heart of the machine and will bring an untimely end to all meats, fruits, and vegetables who cross its path.

<figure class="wp-block-image">diy food slicer</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">diy food slicer</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">diy food slicer</figure>

He then crafts a small enclosure using pieces of wood to prop up the rotating mechanism. He glues the device onto the center platform, giving the blade wheel enough space to rotate. To hide the wires and the battery, he makes a half-circle enclosure around the mechanism using two pieces of wood. This enclosure is then surrounded by popsicle sticks, leaving a small gap for accessing the power switch. While this could make it harder to replace the battery in the future, removing a few popsicle sticks doesn’t seem that hard to do.

<figure class="wp-block-image">diy food slicer</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">diy food slicer</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">diy food slicer</figure>

To more easily push the sliced foods through, he crafts a small slope in the center using slanted pieces of wood. This slope is where a small triangular food pusher makes its home. Whenever something needs an extra nudge into the blades, all the user has to do is move the food pusher and the machine will do the rest.

<figure class="wp-block-image">diy food slicer</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">diy food slicer</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">diy food slicer</figure>

The food slicer makes short work of many fruits and vegetables, though it does leave a bit of a mess the smaller the cuts get. Once you’re done cutting, you can remove the blades in order to clean or replace them if they start getting dull.

<figure class="wp-block-image">diy food slicer</figure>

You can find more build inspiration and DIY goodness over on Delta Hack’s YouTube channel.

The post Who Needs a Knife? How to Make a Food Slicer from Wood appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 18, 2019 12:11 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to display the SOLIDWORKS File Version in Windows Explorer

When a file is saved in SOLIDWORKS, the major version that it was last saved in is recorded as a custom property, as shown in the image below:

File version custom property

File version custom property

Display SOLIDWORKS File Version

This custom property can be displayed directly in the Windows Explorer detail view so that you can have it at a glance without having to select each file. Follow the two step process below:

Step 1:  In a Windows Explorer folder set to a Details view, right click on the column header bar and select “More

More properties

More properties

Step 2:  In the Choose Details dialog, select the box for “SW Last saved with” and click “Ok“.

SW Last saved with

SW Last saved with

The last major version that the file was saved with will now display directly in the detail view, as shown below:

File version displayed

File version displayed

The post How to display the SOLIDWORKS File Version in Windows Explorer appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at July 18, 2019 12:00 PM

July 17, 2019

SolidSmack

Let’s Stop Saying “Think Outside the Box”

First, let’s agree, here and now, to no longer use the phrase, “think outside the box”. Henceforth condensed to “it”.  “It” is a cliché, a tired trope, a worn-out platitude that should have never made it this far riding on the backs of cheap suits. It is a sad piece of strip mall management seminar jargon akin to “synergism”.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

There is one exception. If you just materialized in front of me, in a time-traveling Buick LeSabre from 1999 with the license plate “TIME SBR” (#TimeSabre).  Then roll down your window, finish your Surge energy drink, turn down Third Eye Blind and rightfully say, “I think outside the box”

Don’t Tell, Show

You wouldn’t go on a date and say, “I’m funny” and then look across the table with a blank, unblinking stare.  If you want people to know you are funny, make up some good jokes. Similarly, don’t say I’m an “it” thinker. Don’t tell, show.  You want to communicate your ability to solve wicked problems using your individualistic problem-solving prowess. You don’t follow the beaten path, you don’t even blaze your own trail, you realize this trail stuff is wildly inefficient and are working on a personal transportation drone. So, create an awesome portfolio and share it.  Create a pug-shaped, fire-spewing fighting robot or a sound-distorting nunchuck musical instrument, or anything outlandish that catches people off guard. And use corrugated fiberboard if you want, it is a good prototyping material.

Stop Think Managing

When an impromptu meeting is called so someone can boldly proclaim, “we are going to need to think outside the box on this one,” my inner fire permanently dims a few lumens. Unorthodox problem solving is not a ripcord to be pulled in dire situations! Get ready for it, you should always be thinking this way! Let me repeat this, it should be your working norm… always!  Why wouldn’t it be? It is available, it is free, it is game-changing, and it is a part of the new rules of engagement. If you are proposing “it” as novel, in any way, you are comically behind the curve. Even if you work for a company that exclusively makes boxes, you shouldn’t even jokingly say “it”. The crushing wave of a company that makes matterless, formless, energy containers is going to ruthlessly eat your lunch.

If the goal really is to start a shake-it-up revolution, there are good questions to ask to facilitate reframing.  For instance:

  • “What would this look like if it was easy?”
  • “What foundational assumptions can we challenge?”
  • “What would the opposite look like?”
<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Work Your Think Muscle

Original and paradigm smashing thinking is a spectrum, on which we all fall. A few visionaries fall at the upper limit. The rest of us mortals, in reality, fall somewhere in the middle. The good news is that training and reframing the problem-solving mindset is largely a developable growth area.  The more the muscle gets worked, the stronger it gets. The more the muscle gets flexed, the more mind-blowing designs get body slammed on the competition.

Next step thinking produces next step results. Great for getting up a flight of steps or producing underwhelming and anti-climactic releases.

Don’t Fear Results

I am not opposed to tackling problems in seemingly preposterous, radical, and unorthodox ways. Very much the opposite. I am opposed to management masquerading as agents of change when the opposite is true. They view real change as a threat and are secretly hoping and conspiring for predictably small progress. The kind of “progress” that leads to a slow death. The risk they fear is that trying something bold will flop or if they somehow manage to catch lightning in a bottle, they will never be able to repeat it. So, they opt for the slow death, buying time to plan an exit strategy.

The kicker is, saying “it” allows them to shirk responsibility, and to pass the buck to folks that actually want progress. They can claim they tried. Saying “it” doesn’t accomplish “it”. If it did, everyone would say it – Which is the problem. But it doesn’t, so just don’t. It is not a light switch.  You have to actually mean “it”. You can’t just suggest “it” or even just promote “it”, you have to force yourself and others to do things differently than they have been done in the past and reward the onslaught of primarily useless results and dig for the rare gem.

Say The Pledge (Daily)

I am asking all of you to take the, I’m Not Saying “Think Outside the Box” pledge:

I’m Not Saying “Think Outside the Box

Dan is a nice, optimistic, and pleasant person and when I say “Think Outside the Box”, I am slowly and systematically draining his lifeforce, that of my own, and that of anyone who hears me. I pledge to take time every day to 1) shift focus 2) consider other people’s perspective and 3) look at problems from radically different vantage points.  I will not fight for marginal gains towards commoditization in an overcrowded marketplace. Instead, I will champion the blue ocean solution. I will think like a renegade, prototype like a madman, party like it’s 1999, and design solutions like my life depends on it.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

The post Let’s Stop Saying “Think Outside the Box” appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Dan Slaski at July 17, 2019 03:52 PM

SolidSmack Radio | Carbon Topology (Powered by Spotify)

Spotify Playlist

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’re kicking things off with Toro y Moi and Blood Orange’s “Dark & Handsome” from the new album Angel’s Pulse before diving into atmospheric tracks from Ben Harper, Surfer Blood, Son Lux, and others before wrapping up with “Sister Say” from Tre Gruber. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<figure><iframe height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/69erjOSqWsDIDXHq7aBPVg" width="100%"></iframe></figure>

The post SolidSmack Radio | Carbon Topology (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 17, 2019 12:38 PM

The SolidSmack Monday List 29.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

Neuralink

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

How to Build a Sand Castle

“Use your architect mind,” says Sudarsan Pattnaik, an award-winning sand sculptor from Puri, a seaside city in India.

<figure class="aligncenter">How to Build a Sand Castle</figure>

The Great Race to Rule Streaming TV

In their rush to match Netflix, competitors like HBO, Hulu and Amazon are ordering a slew of content — ushering out the age of “prestige TV” and ushering in an age of anything goes.

<figure class="aligncenter">The Great Race to Rule Streaming TV</figure>

At the World Taxidermy and Fish Carving Competition

Every two years, the world’s taxidermists gather to show off their best work.

<figure class="aligncenter">At the World Taxidermy and Fish Carving Competition</figure>

Elon Musk’s Neuralink Takes Baby Steps to Wiring Brains to the Internet

Researchers hope the Neuralink system, shown here in an artist’s rendering, would be unobtrusive. A small computer behind the ear would be attached via small wires to threads that extend into the brain.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Elon Musk’s Neuralink Takes Baby Steps to Wiring Brains to the Internet</figure>

The Rise of the Professional Dungeon Master

Nerd culture, Stranger Things, and the gig economy have created a world where Dungeons & Dragons enthusiasts host games for $500.

<figure class="aligncenter">The Rise of the Professional Dungeon Master</figure>

The Death of Advertising

And what will rise from its ashes.

<figure class="aligncenter">The Death of Advertising</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 29.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 17, 2019 12:28 PM

Proof: Apple’s New Mac Pro Will NOT Grate Cheese

Apple Mac Pro cheese grater

When the newest Mac Pro was announced by Apple in June, people were ecstatic. Not because of the computer’s maximum CPU capacity of 28 cores/56 threads and 2933MHz memory, but because the hardware was a return to Apple’s tower design after years of a thermally limited, although quite compact, ‘trash can’ style design. Featuring a new grille/grate design, the computer transfers heat faster than Tim Cook shedding his shirt on a hot summer’s day.

While tech reviewers and computer savants are itching to see what this new computer can do, maker, adventurer, and space enthusiast Winston Moy has a bigger, more important question in mind: Does Apple’s new design work as a cheese grater?

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/s29YZqe9Cso?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Finally, proof that it completely stinks as cheese grater, although it’s still likely doomed to forever be referred to as a cheese grater. How did he replicate the design? Well, for us, that’s the more interesting aspect. Here’s how he did it.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Apple Mac Pro cheese grater</figure>

Since the Mac Pro won’t be out until later this year, Winston re-created the odd hemispherical cutout pattern. By repeating and offsetting their positioning on top of one another onto a small, single block of geometry using Fusion 360, Winston was able to get the initial design pretty close to what Apple unveiled to the public.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

After an error in the initial CNC machining results with the holes cut in the wrong areas, Winston goes back to his design and decides to split his second model into two parts: one with the top cutouts and one with the bottom cutouts.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Apple Mac Pro cheese grater</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Apple Mac Pro cheese grater</figure>

He runs a rounded file through the prototype to smooth the rough edges before giving the whole thing a satin finish and anodizing it to give it the look and feel of an official Apple product.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Apple Mac Pro cheese grater</figure>

Does the Mac Pro Grille Grate Cheese?

Now for the moment of truth: the actual cheese grating experiment. Unsurprisingly, the grille does a pretty poor job when used as a kitchen utensil. While it does grate off large chunks of hard cheese when you apply lots of pressure to it, you can say the say the same for just about anything with ridges on it. Still, the amount of effort you have to exert isn’t proportional to the few slices of poorly grated cheese you get in return.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Apple Mac Pro cheese grater</figure>

Instead of using the Apple Mac Pro grille in the kitchen, Winston finds a better use for the tool as a soap dish. It allows excess water to pass through and keeps your bar of soap stationary while you take a bath.

To see more of Winston Moy’s DIY nonsense, be sure to check out his YouTube channel.

The post Proof: Apple’s New Mac Pro Will NOT Grate Cheese appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 17, 2019 12:24 PM

The Javelin Blog

Reduce Costs with Optimization Studies in SOLIDWORKS Simulation

When completing structural designs, it is common practice to “over-design” our materials. That is, use a size or thickness of material that we know works despite the potential for additional weight.

This practice can have a hidden cost though. Why are we designing with heavier, more robust materials than we need to? Perhaps we can reduce our material costs without any impact on the performance or structural integrity of our design.

With SOLIDWORKS Simulation Professional, designers and engineers can take advantage of Simulation Optimization Design Studies, which allow us to use the results of linear-static studies to parametrically optimize specific dimensions of our choosing. Neither material nor weight come for free when manufacturing our designs, so why not let SOLIDWORKS Simulation find the ideal design to save you money, without sacrificing confidence.

Check out the video below to learn more about SOLIDWORKS Simulation Professional Optimization studies:

 

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<noscript> <iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="1000" src="https://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2013-02-05/yc7vm" style="border: 0" type="text/html" width="100%"></iframe> </noscript> <script type="text/javascript"> var form = 'https://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2013-02-05/yc7vm'; var params = window.location.search; var thisScript = document.scripts[document.scripts.length - 1]; var iframe = document.createElement('iframe'); iframe.setAttribute('src', form + params); iframe.setAttribute('width', '100%'); iframe.setAttribute('type', 'text/html'); iframe.setAttribute('frameborder', 0); iframe.setAttribute('allowTransparency', 'true'); iframe.setAttribute('scrolling', 'no'); iframe.setAttribute('id', 'sizetracker'); iframe.style.border = '0'; thisScript.parentElement.replaceChild(iframe, thisScript); </script> <script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/iframe-resizer/3.5.3/iframeResizer.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> // Create browser compatible event handler. var eventMethod = window.addEventListener ? "addEventListener" : "attachEvent"; var eventer = window[eventMethod]; var messageEvent = eventMethod == "attachEvent" ? "onmessage" : "message"; // Listen for a message from the iframe. eventer(messageEvent, function(e) { if (isNaN(e.data)) return; // replace #sizetracker with what ever what ever iframe id you need document.getElementById('sizetracker').style.height = e.data + 'px'; }, false); </script>

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by Colin Murphy, CSWE at July 17, 2019 12:00 PM

July 16, 2019

SolidSmack

Incredible 3D Animation of How A Glock 19 Works

how-works-glock-19-animation

If you’ve ever wondered how a semi-automatic pistol works without having to get anywhere within firing distance of one… then you’re in luck. 3D generalist and motion designer Matt Rittman has taken the liberty of animating a totally safe, digital recreation of the iconic Glock 19.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/V2RDitgCaD0?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">glock 3d animation</figure>

After doing a fair bit of research to learn how the real thing works and about the details of each part, Matt bought a pre-made Glock 19 model from Turbosquid as a point of reference. He completely modeled all 50 internal parts using Cinema 4D along with the gun’s frame and slide. Here’s a shot of the model geoemtry along with the UVs.

<figure class="wp-block-image">glock 3d animation</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">glock 3d animation</figure>

Once the pieces were fully modelled and in place, he created a rig using Xpresso within Cinema 4D and UV unwrapped the frame, magazine, slide, and barrel so he could properly texture them.

<figure class="wp-block-image">glock 3d animation</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">glock 3d animation</figure>

To finalize the models, he textures them using Substance Painter and Corona.

<figure class="wp-block-image">glock 3d animation</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">glock 3d animation</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter">glock 3d animation</figure>

With the models finished, Matt starts working on the video storyboard and how the animations will play out. Using the Take System in Cinema 4D, he plans out the animations in each of his shots and organizes them into an easy to read timeline.

<figure class="wp-block-image">glock 3d animation</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">glock 3d animation</figure>

Making use of Pixel Plow, Matt renders the 3-minute animation on a MacBook Pro before composing the entire video using After Effects. All that’s left to do now is add some special effects for the gunshots, a narrator to explain what’s happening, and some music so the video doesn’t sound so dull.

Matt Rittman makes LOADS more how-it-works animations, all of which can be found on his YouTube channel or on his webpage. Be sure to check them out and subscribe.

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by Carlos Zotomayor at July 16, 2019 08:23 PM

Model of the Week: Minimal Travel Tripod [Say, ‘AWESOME’!]

We recently spied the Travel Tripod by Peak Design, and one reason why it’s doing so well – has raised over $9,900,000 already! – is that they’ve addressed the key issue of travel tripods – They’re DANG BULKY.

I agree. Travel tripods should be easy to carry, lightweight and, if you can’t tuck two away in each cheek pouch like a wild chipmunk, you should at least be able to transport them in your pocket. Eliminating the critical flaw of “tons of wasted space”, Peak Design inspired me to scrounge for a tripod that YOU could print yourself.

10 minutes later… BOOM! Wouldn’t you know it, Valera Perinski has just what we’re looking for – his Tripod GIANT uses a masked SLA 3D Printing technique and is all kinds of minimal and lightweight. Here’s the mezmerizing video of the desktop manufacturing process:

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</figure>

As you can see, the Tripod GIANT isn’t so giant in size but is absolutely giant in capability and a great little project to explore if you’re not interested in popping for a full-size tripod. While the build process is more involved and uses a larger array of desktop machinery than simply a 3D printer, it’s a great project that brings all the processes together on a smaller scale.

Perinski uses a $400 ANYCUBIC Photo UV LCD 3D Printer along with their beautiful Green Rapid Resin. You can download the files, which include the machined part details (pdf) and the six 3D printed files (stl) for the project, from Thingiverse.

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

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by Josh Mings at July 16, 2019 07:51 PM

Keto Lovers: Best Dairy-Free, GMO-Free Protein Powder

best dairy free protein powder

We will leave the merits of being Keto, dairy-free(!) diet ninja aside, but whether you’re all-out Keto or doing a dairy-free variation, and want a protein BOOST, then you should know Active Stacks has the perfect option for you to enjoy all the grass-fed beef protein ya need.

We know a lot of you are at a desk all day, work out regular (or think about it), and want a way to rebuild muscle and help your joints. Well, outside of the regular soy and whey options, this 100% GMO-free mix is the best protein powder we’ve found. And, it’s completely lactose and dairy-free! We’ve had our share of powders and mixes, but this chocolate mix is at the top our the list.

And, we’ve snagged a sweet deal for SolidSmack readers! Get 40% OFF through July 20th using code: 40SOLIDSMACK

Quick look at the benefits:

  • Naturally occurring collagen
  • BCAAs included plus a boost of glycine (an amino acid recommended by nutrition experts for maximum full-body recovery and support)
  • Mix one scoop with 8 – 10 ounces of your favorite milk alternative
  • Dark-chocolate taste from rich cocoa
  • Touch of zero-carb stevia extract for sweetness
  • 21 grams of protein per serving
  • Keto and paleo friendly
  • Ultra-low-carb

40% OFF code is: 40SOLIDSMACK [ Valid through 7/20 ]

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

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by SolidSmack at July 16, 2019 07:14 PM

The 11 Best Amazon Prime Day 2019 Deals for Engineers and Designers

Delta 3D Printer

While it may not be up there with Christmas, Easter, and your wedding anniversary, Amazon’s Prime Day is slowly but surely making it’s way into a more significant event each passing year.

For two days and two days only beginning today (from 12 a.m. PT Monday, July 15 and concluding at 11:59 p.m. PT on Tuesday, July 16) Amazon celebrates its version of Black Friday where Prime members can catch up on some products they’ve been holding out on for a steep discount. If you’re not an Amazon Prime member yet, you’re still in luck—set up your free Amazon Prime trial membership here.

We’ve got our eyes on a few designer and engineer-friendly items ourselves—so have at it!

Sugru Moldable Glue 8-Pack ($15.73 – 20% Off)

Out of the pack, Sugru Mouldable Glues are designed to feel soft and malleable like play-dough. Roll the material in your fingers. Press it where you need it, and mould it by hand into any shape. From an ultra-thin patch to a shock-absorbing bumper, you have 30 minutes to shape it, smooth it, and reposition it as required.

<figure class="aligncenter">Sugru moldable glue</figure>

Amazon Echo Dot ($22.00 – 56% Off)

With a new speaker and design, Echo Dot is a voice-controlled smart speaker with Alexa, perfect for any room. Just ask for music, news, information, and more. You can also call almost anyone and control compatible smart home devices with your voice.

<figure class="aligncenter">Amazon Echo Alexa</figure>

Prismacolor Cool Grey Markers 12-Pack ($27.94 – 16% Off)

Incredibly versatile, these double-ended drawing markers feature a fine tip on one end for sharp, detailed lines and a smooth chisel on the other for multiple line widths. This handy design lets you quickly and easily switch between precise work and full coverage.

<figure class="aligncenter">Prismacolor Markers</figure>

Hudson Durable Goods – Heavy Duty Waxed Canvas Work Apron ($23.99 – 20% Off)

Build quality that imitators can’t match! Handcrafted from water resistant & rugged 16 oz waxed canvas. Reinforced with heavy-weight gun-metal grommets and rivets. Double stitched tool pockets and thick top and bottom hems for strength and structure.

<figure class="aligncenter">Durable Work Apron</figure>

SainSmart Ender-3 3D Printer ($169.00 – 29% Off)

The Ender-3 is designed specifically for hobbyists on a limited budget. Our most affordable 3D printer, the Ender-3 boasts the same outstanding performance as the CR-10, but is even more compact and affordable.

<figure class="aligncenter">3D printer</figure>

Monoprice Delta PRO 3D Printer ($949.99 – 21% Off)

The Delta PRO 3D Printer is simple, elegant, powerful, and robust. It was created for the enthusiast and professional alike. It is easy to use with auto bed leveling, heated glass build plate , and ships fully assembled, ready to print.

<figure class="aligncenter">3D Printer</figure>

BLACK+DECKER LDX120C 20V Power Drill ($35.20 – 20% Off)

Lightweight and ideal for drilling into wood, metal plastic and all screw driving tasks. Provides precise control for drilling into wood, metal, plastic, and all screwdriving tasks.

<figure class="aligncenter">Power Drill</figure>

Wera 7 in 1 Screwdriver ($32.47 – 39% Off)

The handle/interchangeable blade system in a compact design with various blade tips in the smallest of spaces makes the user more mobile and flexible. Suitable for bits with 1/4″ hexagon head drive as per DIN ISO 1173-C 6.3 and E 6.3 and Wera connecting series 1 and 4. Comes with an adaptor, bayonet and Rapidaptor technology.

<figure class="aligncenter">Multi tool screwdriver</figure>

Kershaw Barricade 3.5 Inch Pocket Knife ($25.11 – 37% Off)

SpeedSafe Assisted Opening allows quick access to blade with one-handed safe release; the modified clip-point blade opens one-handed with the flipper.

<figure class="aligncenter">Pocket Knife</figure>

General Tools Angel-Izer Template Tool ($8.49 – 30% Off)

The ultimate template tool perfect for builders, craftsmen, weekend warriors, and DIY-ers alike, it’s an essential tool for any toolbox!

<figure class="aligncenter">Template Tool</figure>

Dremel Stylo+ Versatile Craft Tool ($42.14 – 14% Off)

The Dremel Stylo+ is a sleek, lightweight rotary tool, specifically designed for arts & crafts projects. Its comfortable ergonomics of a pen, narrow profile and soft grip allow you to etch, engrave, polish and sand with ease and to create beautiful handmade projects.

<figure class="aligncenter">Dremel Tool</figure>

*Note: Inventory based on availability and some prices subject to change per Amazon’s Prime Day policies.

The post The 11 Best Amazon Prime Day 2019 Deals for Engineers and Designers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 16, 2019 07:11 PM

The Javelin Blog

Learn how to Future Proof your CAD System for the 2020s

Learn the five technologies your CAD system must support to stay ahead of the curve in the 2020s.

In today’s competitive landscape, companies must innovate to stay ahead of competitors and bring winning products to the market faster than ever. Fortunately there are many new technologies that have created opportunities to increase innovation; however, companies need the right design processes and tools in place to best take advantage of the latest technology.

Future proof product design

Future proof product design

Download Tech-Clarity’s “How to Future-Proof Your Product Design” white paper to learn what five technologies your CAD system should support to best enable your company to be ready for the product development challenges that lie ahead.

Download the paper to learn:

  • The top five technologies top-performing companies plan to implement
  • The software capabilities that can help manage increased design complexities
  • How to maximize the effectiveness of your current engineering teams
  • The software tools that can facilitate cross-disciplinary collaboration
Future Proof CAD System White Paper

Future Proof CAD System White Paper

As you look to stay relevant in the 2020s, you may ask yourself which technologies will have the most impact on the competitiveness of your products? What are your competitors doing and what might they do in the near future? What should you look for in a CAD system to make it easier to incorporate new technology into your products? What other capabilities should your company have to ensure it stays competitive through the 2020s? Tech-Clarity research shows that in the next decade companies will frequently rely on new technology to increase innovation. To support new technology, an overwhelming 99% of companies agree that future-proof product design tools will help, but which ones will have the most impact?

Tech-Clarity is an independent research firm that believes the value of technology is often overshadowed by the technology itself. Companies invest in software technology for one reason — to achieve better business results. Tech-Clarity’s mission is to make the business value of technology clear and help manufacturers educate themselves on how they can improve their performance through the intelligent use of enterprise and social software.

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by Rod Mackay at July 16, 2019 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS angle dimension between 3 points

What if we need an angle dimension in a sketch, but one of the entities is not a line (perhaps it is a spline or arc instead)?  The answer, we can take the angle between 3 endpoints!

In this sketch on the right plane (which bisects the part), the horizontal entity is a line, but what appears to be a vertical line happens to actually be a spline created automatically by an intersection curve (due to how the swept geometry was created, giving it a draft angle which varies everywhere on its face), so it cannot be selected to get the angle dimension.

However, if we first select the vertex, and then click the endpoints of the line and the spline, then we get that angle dimension shown in the picture below:

Angle dimension between 3 points

Angle dimension between 3 points

Learn more modeling tricks

This trick is taught in our Advanced Part Modeling class, where we explore how to modify that swept geometry so that the vertical entity, which intersects that face of the swept geometry, would be a line rather than a spline.  And the swept geometry would have a uniform draft angle everywhere.  Register for our Advanced Part Modeling class to learn many more tricks for getting your SOLIDWORKS model to do what you want, such as the do’s and don’ts of Sweeps and Lofts.

Learn More

The post SOLIDWORKS angle dimension between 3 points appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at July 16, 2019 12:00 PM

July 15, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Save Time with SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2019

What would you do with more time? The sky is the limit: you could become the next Carlos Santana, create an industry disrupting technology, or have more chances to perfect your designs before your deadlines. SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2019 can’t create more time (I wish), but it will save you a ton of time on repetitive tasks and simulations!

Multiple Load Cases in a single run

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2019 is a powerful computational analysis tool capable of optimizing the design of products used in extreme and rugged environments. In these cases, multiple scenarios are typically needed to determine how designs will perform in harsh, real-world conditions.

New performance and usability features make solving these problems a snap. The process for setting up multiple load cases has been simplified and now all possible scenarios can be solved in a single run.

In addition, previous setups can be adapted to create a new study. For example, static load studies can be repurposed to create dynamic studies with no additional setup. Designers simply add the element of time for the dynamic effect of the load and it’s problem solved.

Drag and drop studies

The “get everything working in a linear study and then transition to nonlinear” methodology is considered best practice when performing virtual analysis, and this process is now as easy as dragging and dropping the features from one study to another. This process supports a wide range of features, including SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 time-saving enhancements to pin connectors.

Reduced Solve Times

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2019 also has some powerful, under-the-hood, enhancements that will help reduce how much time you spend waiting for your results (you may need to start preordering your coffee). In addition to general solver performance improvements, SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2019 offers dramatically reduced solve times for multiple load cases. Factorization of the stiffness matrix is now reused for different load cases, resulting in significant time savings for up to 25 load cases.

Enhancements Demo

Check out this video for more information about these enhancements, or contact us to learn more about reducing your time to market with SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2019.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jkaXcBsFfdo?start=41&amp;feature=oembed" title="(Part 1/3) Design Validation Series - New Features in 2019" width="500"></iframe>

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2019

Discover more new enhancements and features in SOLIDWORKS 2019 with our demo videos »

The post Save Time with SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2019 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Angus Hudson, CSWP at July 15, 2019 12:00 PM

July 13, 2019

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 28.19

musical fire table

Now that the Jony Ive dust has settled, we are back to routine. No one is hurt, the show must go on. And so must the endless cups of coffee. Before you turn your attention to the next chapter on your book. Do take a look at the week that was.

Great stuff, we loved it. So will you. Get reading now …

This Flaming Pyrotable Moves to the Sounds of the Beat

If you’ve ever had the chance to see one in physics class, you may have come across a Ruben’s Tube when learning about acoustic standing waves. For those who haven’t (or need a quick brush-up), a Ruben’s Tube is a hole-riddled hollow tube filled with flammable gas; it shows how normally invisible sound waves and pressure interact in the physical world (and also allows for some spectacular on-the-spot cooking shows).

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</figure>

Cool Tools: Magnetic Fidget Pens that Make You Go Ooooo

With all the stress and grind of being a designer, pondering over the next brief, your hands need something to play with– to fidget, move and make you snap and doodle, all at one go. Possible? Yes, with the MAGNETIPS Magnetic Gel Pens, all of this is possible.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

I Made a Sweet Multi-Material Ninja Star With One Machine [Snapmaker 3-in-1 Review]

It’s no secret I love 3D printinglaser cutting, and CNC routing.  What I don’t love is all the maintenance and calibration of my own machines or questionable reliability and transit times to other people’s machines. And soooo many software programs — Talk about workflow woes. Hence my piqued interest in the upswell of 3-in-1 desktop fabrication machines. Molten hot plastic, sharp spinny things, and lasers. Oh my! The trifecta of safety glass-requiring, safety-oriented mom-hated, melded machinery. 

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Watch the Empire State Building Get Recreated with 20,000 Magnetic Balls

Famous for his mesmerizing magnet build videos, aptly-named YouTube creator Magnetic Games is back with yet another giant magnetic project. This time around, he’s set his sights on one of New York’s most prominent skyline structures: the Empire State Building.

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</figure>

IKEA Introduces SOFFA Sans Font for Sofa Sectional Design by Keyboard

Hold onto your Swedish meatballs and lingonberry jam—the marketing team at IKEA is at it again. And no, they didn’t create self-assembling furniture…yet. If you’re a fan of the GRÖNLID, the LIDHULT, or the SÖDERHAMN sofas, designing your next setup can now be done sans CAD via your trusty laptop keyboard. Yes—the same keyboard you used to order that 2-pound jug of Cheese Balls from Amazon.

<figure class="aligncenter">IKEA Font</figure>

Will It Work? Dune Buggy Tires Fabricated From Saran Wrap

You’ve likely seen your fair share of wacky car ideas on the internet, but have you ever seen tires made out of…saran wrap? The guys over at the Novice Garage let their curiosity get the best of them and recently wrapped the clear-clingin‘ stuff around the rear wheels of a dune buggy to see if it just might actually work. So how does one even begin to create…saran wrap wheels?

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</figure>

Tour of “Next Big Thing”, German IoT Incubator, at Factory Berlin

We head to Berlin, Germany in the 2nd installment of my Euro tour learning about HW tech development across the pond. Here, I interview the CTO of Next Big Thing, Jasmin Skenderi. There’s also a video of their facilities at Factory Berlin, and an interview with a portfolio company, Sensry.

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</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 28.19 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 13, 2019 03:51 AM

July 12, 2019

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Weeds of the Dorsal Sea

Fins 10 feet tall shot from the placid surface. Upon their edges hung the weeds of the Dorsal Sea, thousands hitting the wind with speeds that sliced our skin with salt and light shooting from every stipe and blade between the rays of these links.

Marc Simonetti – Currently working for MPC, the very talented Marc is two moons and dragons, and then some. Vast scenes, concept ships and oh so much more.

STEM Role Models Posters – STEM Role Models created by four female illustrators from South America, Africa, the Middle East, and China. 

Home – Series by Gohar Dashti inspired by what happens when people have to abandon their homes and human displacement occurs.

Gong Master – Sven knows his away around a Paiste Gong. Listen to the unsettling timbre that seems to resonate with an air of ominous mystery.

Matchbox Dog Lover – Ravi Amar Zupa is an amazing self-taught artist who has a new set of vintage-style matchboxes dedicated to dog lovers.

Bentley EXP 100 GT – British motoring company Bentley has unveiled the luxurious EXP 100 GT that looks to the features of 2035.

The Problem Solving of Filmmaking – A short video expanding on something the filmmaker talks about on the Shazam commentary track.

Editors Keys – Mac and Windows keyboards premarked with shortcuts for content creation and editing applications like Photoshop and Ableton Live.

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Sawzall – Not the tool. The new single from BANKS.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ynbxNLnazds?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
<figcaption>BANKS – Sawzall </figcaption></figure>

The post Friday Smackdown: Weeds of the Dorsal Sea appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 12, 2019 11:20 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to define a Thermostat in a SOLIDWORKS Simulation Study

Did you know you can set up a thermostat directly in your SOLIDWORKS Simulation Transient Study which will turn the heat power on/off based on the temperature?

The thermostat (transient) feature monitors the temperature of a specified vertex or point on your model to turn the heat power on/off. It basically includes a point temperature sensor and a on/off feedback control like most of thermostats.

Defining a thermostat

  1. To access this function, from your simulation tree, right click on thermal loads in the simulation study tree and click Heat Power. You can also access this command from the menu bar Simulation > Loads/Fixtures > Heat Power.
  2. After completing heat power specifications, check the option of thermostat (transient) at the bottom of the Heat Power property manager.
  3. The first selection in the transient section, is a point on the model when the thermostat is being installed.
  4. Then minimum and maximum cut off temperatures are specified to turn the thermostat on or off if the sensor location reaches these temperatures.

In our example below, the whole microchip part acts as a the heat power source but its on/off status of this heat source is defined based on a thermostat installed on a vertex of the middle connector. The heat source will turn off if the sensor location reaches a temperature of 120 degrees of Celsius and it will the turn back on if the temperature of 100 degrees of Celsius.

Defining a thermostat in the heat power command

Defining a thermostat in the heat power command

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Training

To learn more about SOLIDWORKS Simulation you can take a training course with one of our certified experts either live online or in a Canadian city near you.

The post How to define a Thermostat in a SOLIDWORKS Simulation Study appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at July 12, 2019 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager Troubleshooting (SNL)

A SOLIDWORKS network license requires a network connection between the server and client machines.  The server runs the SolidNetwork License Manager service and client machines must verify a connection and available licenses from the server before SOLIDWORKS will open.  Communication errors are commonly found on first setting up a network license or if there are changes to the network.

Here are a few possible error messages that may be seen on a client machine when trying to open SOLIDWORKS.

Server

The SolidNetwork License Manager needs to be installed, activated and started on the server.  The major version needs to be the same or newer than SOLIDWORKS running on the client machines.  It is backwards compatible so you should always upgrade the License Manager before SOLIDWORKS.  For example you can use a 2019 License Manager while running SOLIDWORKS 2018.

After any upgrade to the License Manager, you must reactivate to obtain the latest license version.
https://www.javelin-tech.com/blog/2012/01/update-solidworks-solidnetwork-license-server/

Service Started

Verify that the SolidNetwork License Manager service is running.  Open the License Manager and click ‘Start’ if applicable.  You can also check Windows Services to verify the service has been started and set to Automatic startup.

SOLIDWORKS SolidNetwork License Manager Start

SOLIDWORKS SolidNetwork License Manager Service

Firewall Settings

The most common source of communication errors are due to firewalls blocking the required ports.  If you do have firewalls setup on your network, you will need to select the option that ‘A firewall is in use on this server‘ while activating.  This switches the License Manager to use a static vendor daemon port in order to specify the specific port in the firewall.  By default the License Manager uses TCP ports 25734 and 25735.  These can be changed if required.

To access these options again, you can go through the same reactivation process.

SOLIDWORKS Network License Manager Ports

Both ports 25734 and 25735 must be opened through the firewall for both Inbound and Outbound communication.  For general Windows firewalls, the follow process can be taken.

  1. Go to Windows Control Panel > Windows Firewall
  2. Select Advanced settings in the left panel
  3. Select Inbound Rules in the left pane and choose New Rule
  4. Choose Port and specify TCP ports 25734 and 25735
  5. This needs to be set to Allow the connection
  6. Choose the appropriate profiles of Domain, Private, Public (Public is most likely not desired)
  7. Give a descriptive name for the rule such as “SolidNetwork License Manager Ports” and Finish
  8. Select Outbound Rules in the left pane and choose New Rule
  9. Follow the same steps 4-7 to allow outbound connection for ports 25734 and 25735

Windows Firewall Rules

 

Though not typically required with the default Windows Firewall, you may need to apply a rule to allow connection for programs lmgrd.exe and sw_d.exe.  By default these programs are located under C:\Program Files (x86)\SolidWorks SolidNetWork License Manager.

Client

As mentioned, client machines must be able to communicate with the server before a SOLIDWORKS license can be obtained.  The firewall ports will need to opened in the same manner as the server.

Firewall Settings
  1. Go to Windows Control Panel > Windows Firewall
  2. Select Advanced settings in the left panel
  3. Select Inbound Rules in the left pane and choose New Rule
  4. Choose Port and specify TCP ports 25734 and 25735
  5. This needs to be set to Allow the connection
  6. Choose the appropriate profiles of Domain, Private, Public (Public is most likely not desired)
  7. Give a descriptive name for the rule such as “SolidNetwork License Manager Ports” and Finish
  8. Select Outbound Rules in the left pane and choose New Rule
  9. Follow the same steps 4-7 to allow outbound connection for ports 25734 and 25735

 

Server Location

Verify the SolidNetwork License Manager Client application is pointing to the correct server.  This application is found under Start > SOLIDWORKS Tools > SolidNetwork License Manager Client.  On the Server List tab, add the appropriate port and server name.  Ensure only one server is listed unless you have multiple servers hosting separate licenses.

NOTE: When you add a new server name to the list, click OK and go back into the License Manager to verify the new server name is still listed.  If it doesn’t stick, you may need to run the License Manager Client application as an administrator.  Right-click on the application in the Start menu on click Run as Administrator

SOLIDWORKS SolidNetwork License Manager Client

You can also test entering the server IP address instead of the server name to see if there is an issue with name resolution.

 

If you still receive errors on opening SOLIDWORKS, there are several tests you can perform to verify the connection is valid.

Ping Test

The Ping test verifies that you have access to the server over the network.  This will also give you an indication of the speed of connection from the response time (latency).  If the test fails, you will need to check your network connection on both machines.

  1. Open the Windows Command Prompt (click Start and type CMD)
  2. Type in ping server_name (where “server_name” is the name of your server or the IP address)
  3. It should give a response that 4 packets were sent and 4 were received with 0% loss to verify you have a connection

Windows Ping Test

The speed in milliseconds will be given to determine the latency.  This should be a low as possible.  If it shows more than 100ms, this indicates a very slow connection and may fail to obtain a license due to a default timeout.  Have your IT troubleshoot the slow performance of the network.

Telnet Test

The Telnet test allows you to verify that ports 25734 and 25735 have been opened properly.  Follow the steps outlined in our article How To Perform a Telnet Test

Connectivity Tool

Although typically used to troubleshoot SOLIDWORKS PDM connections, the Connectivity Test Tool can be used to test for the SNL Server connection only.  To find out where the tool can be downloaded, read our blog article SOLIDWORKS PDM Connectivity Test Tool

SOLIDWORKS Connectivity Test Tool

 

The post SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager Troubleshooting (SNL) appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at July 12, 2019 11:00 AM

July 11, 2019

SolidSmack

Cool Tools: Magnetic Fidget Pens that Make You Go Ooooo

With all the stress and grind of being a designer, pondering over the next brief, your hands need something to play with– to fidget, move and make you snap and doodle, all at one go. Possible? Yes, with the MAGNETIPS Magnetic Gel Pens, all of this is possible.

<figure class="aligncenter"><figcaption>….Very satisfying </figcaption></figure>

Designed as gel pens – 20 shades of colors (nope, not 50 shades of…), this pen set comes with magnetic properties. The gel pens have been combined with super strong Neodymium Magnets and the pens just attract each other like crazy lovers. Stack them neatly in a row, or create artistic picture frames, or even pen holders. The possibilities with these magnetic pens are endless.

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So get this straight – you doddle with fantastic hues of 20, use the pens to fidget – because they stick together like magnets, AND you can even create handicraft work with it – think pen stand, picture holder, book end, clip holder, card holder, etc.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Transform the way your desktop looks and add functionality to the creative process, as each pen comes fitted with two super strong Axially Magnetized Rare-Earth Neodymium Magnets – one of the strongest and most permanent types in existence.

<figure class="aligncenter"><figcaption>Just Showing Off!</figcaption></figure>

Neodymium magnets lose less than 1% of their strength over a decade and they will not lose their strength if held in repelling or attracting positions with other magnets over long periods of time, so your pens will keep their unique properties for a very long time.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

MAGNETIPS Magnetic Gel Pens Features:

  • Fast-dry water based Gel inks
  • The 0.7 mm stainless steel Rollerball tip provides a smooth writing experience
  • The gel ink has a great flow which allows for fast, easy and accurate coloring
  • The refill tip is carefully made to the highest precision
  • The new pens can be left open for over a week without drying out – we don’t want you to do that tho!
  • Made from durable ABS plastic 
  • Twenty vibrant tones
  • Easily refillable by simply unscrewing the pen body and inserting a new refill
<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

To make this a crazy must-have proposition, the team has designed metallic chrome balls that work with these magnetic pens and provide endless possibilities for creative play and fidget that will help you concentrate.

The product is fully funded via Kickstarter and has crossed the $100,000 mark and has 1926 backers. Sets start at $36 USD for MAGNETIPS Magnetic Gel Pens. Only 15 hours to go! Delivery is estimated for October 2019.

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Cool Tools: Magnetic Fidget Pens that Make You Go Ooooo appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 11, 2019 08:37 PM

The Javelin Blog

Slicing imported Mesh or Scanned Geometry into SOLIDWORKS Sketches

In a world that is moving more and more towards additive manufacturing as a primary method of creating our designs, working with mesh geometry is becoming ever more important. Whether this is a file that we’ve received from a customer, a supplier, or even geometry we’ve captured ourselves with a 3D scanner, using and manipulating this data inside SOLIDWORKS is crucial.

SOLIDWORKS 2019 introduces an amazing new Slicing tool that allows us to generate sketches directly from our mesh geometry. These sketches can then be used to generate a solid body just like our traditional SOLIDWORKS parts.

SOLIDWORKS Slicing tool Step-by-step Guide

To use the SOLIDWORKS Slicing tool on mesh geometry (like .stl, .ply, .obj, or .3mf for instance), just follow the steps below:

  1. Inside of SOLIDWORKS, click File  > Open, and directly open your mesh model.
  2. Activate the Slicing tool by selecting Insert  > Slicing.
  3. At this point, we need to select where we want our mesh sliced. We select a reference plane to offset our slicing planes from, specify the number of slicing plans, and the distance between them (basically the same as we would for a linear pattern!).

    SOLIDWORKS Slicing Tool

    Definition of Slicing Planes

  4. Automatically, SOLIDWORKS creates a folder that contains reference planes, and sketches that outline the mesh body we initially imported. These planes aren’t restricted to being every 0.8 inches like we initially input though! Using Instant3D we can drag the planes to make sure that they cover areas of interest on our model.

    Slicing Plane Adjustments

    Slicing Plane Adjustments

  5. The final step is converting these sketches into 3D geometry. We could do this using a solid-body loft between all the sketches, or loft a surface through them and convert to a solid later. The final result can be seen below!
Mesh to Surface, Just That Easy

Mesh to Surface, Just That Easy

With this amazing new feature, we can now extract more information from our mesh geometry than every before! Just another fantastic enhancement in SOLIDWORKS 2019.

SOLIDWORKS Slicing Tool Demonstration

Watch the demo video below to see the SOLIDWORKS Slicing Tool in action along with other new features in SOLIDWORKS 2019:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UdxJu0hSW6o?feature=oembed" title="Create Designs Faster with SOLIDWORKS 2019" width="500"></iframe>

The post Slicing imported Mesh or Scanned Geometry into SOLIDWORKS Sketches appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Colin Murphy, CSWE at July 11, 2019 12:00 PM

July 10, 2019

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Design Intent: what is it, and why should I care?

Ever hear of the term “design intent” and wonder what it means, or how it pertains to design?

In SOLIDWORKS, we refer to design intent as your plan as to how the model should behave when it is changed.

This really begs for a demonstration, so here it is!  Take these four simple parts, for example.

Four different design intents

They are geometrically identical.  But imagine if they were all resized from the original 50mm length to some new length.  Some of these parts would then no longer be geometrically identical, since the holes would relocate differently for some of the parts.  Now, if this were your design, ask yourself where you really want the new hole locations to be, and then ensure that your dimensioning scheme supports the correct hole locations for both the original 50mm length and the new length.  If it does, then that will be the correct design intent!  Eureka!  🙂

You want to take a moment to consider your design intent before charging into the actual modeling.  It will most likely pay off, down the road.  Here at Javelin, we introduce and reinforce this concept in our SOLIDWORKS Essentials class, as it serves our students well in their design tasks.

Once you set up your design intent, you can always change it later.

The post SOLIDWORKS Design Intent: what is it, and why should I care? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at July 10, 2019 12:00 PM

July 09, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Reduce Costly Manufacturing Errors with a SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Service

Common Sheet Metal Issues

When I visit clients, I am surprised that SOLIDWORKS users are not aware of the sheet metal bend tables included with the software and quite often I find there is a disconnect between design/engineering and manufacturing departments. Typically this means:

  • Engineering/design may not be providing the right information to manufacturing.
  • The as built part can often be different to the design drawing.
  • Costs are incurred as the wrong material is ordered for inventory.
  • Wasted time defining sheet metal characteristics, and sometimes use tooling that does not exist in store!
  • Wasted time with rework, and purchasing unnecessary tooling and material.
  • Using a generic K-factor of 0.5 (or similar value) to calculate sheet metal part flat patterns means that when working with thicker gauges, and multiple bend parts; the inaccuracy of using a generic value results in parts that are off by as much as a 1/4 inch!
Sheet Metal Part Production

Sheet Metal Part Production

Solving your sheet metal issues

Our new Sheet Metal Service is customized to solve your unique SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal issues. A certified SOLIDWORKS expert will analyze your current sheet metal design and manufacturing process, including your Material, Tooling, Bending Process, Material Thickness and Bend Angles — to define your sheet metal standards and best practices. Then train your team to adopt the new best practices and become proficient with SOLIDWORKS sheet metal.

  • We determine what your manufacturing standards are, and implement a process and set-up to ensure your departments design and manufacture consistently to those standards.
  • We will help you to set-up your sheet metal design environment so that your team uses a comprehensive set of templates, tables, and library of forming tools.
  • We can provide you with a more accurate design process and facilitate better communications between your design/engineering department and the shop floor.
SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Service

SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Service

How the sheet metal service works

Here is a detailed breakdown of our new service:

Phase 1: ANALYZE your Process

We will analyze your current sheet metal design to manufacturing process and determine where your problems occur. This involves learning and understanding how your design team use SOLIDWORKS sheet metal tools and create production drawings.

If you fabricate sheet metal on site then this phase will also include gathering information from your CNC Programmer or Manufacturing Engineer to understand what are the most popular types of material you use, along with the gaugesdies, and forming tools used for fabrication.

Phase 2: OPTIMIZE System & MENTORING

Work with your CAD Administrator or Power-user to set-up an optimized Sheet Metal environment. So that your entire team use a consistent set of SOLIDWORKS sheet metal templates, tables, and settings.

Optimization tasks can include:

  • Defining folders on the server for your sheet metal environment.
  • Defining Gauge, Bend and Punch Tables.
  • Creating the most used Forming Tools.
  • Creating Cut-list Table templates.
  • Installation and instruction on the use of #TASK sheet metal productivity tools for creating DXFs, flat pattern drawings, and more.

Phase 3: Implement Process and TRAIN your Team

We will implement your optimized process and train your team on the best practices and techniques for creating sheet metal parts and drawings. The custom training will be delivered at your office on your models.

Implementation and training is tailored to your needs but can include the following:

  • Create a typical part using the created gauge table
  • Apply forming tools that the CAD Admin created
  • Create a drawing using the templates and tables the CAD Admin created.
  • Customize the SOLIDWORKS user interface to streamline the tasks and optimize performance
  • Discuss with the SOLIDWORKS users about common issues and review some of their work. Show them best practices and provide solutions to their issues.
  • Deliver SOLIDWORKS sheet metal training.

Interested in improving your sheet metal design process?

With our sheet metal service you will be able to:

  • Optimize your process: Create standards that better connect your engineering/design with manufacturing.
  • Save material costs: Ensure that the right gauges of material are used in your engineering/design stage.
  • Reduce rework: Ensure that your sheet metal drawings are accurate, and as built parts will match perfectly.

Get Started

The post Reduce Costly Manufacturing Errors with a SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Service appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vicky Guignard at July 09, 2019 04:28 PM

Image Considerations when using SOLIDWORKS AutoTrace to Create Sketches

Adding a logo to your design is an excellent way to creating brand awareness and reaping the benefits of product placement, whether laser cutting it into a Muskoka chair, or punching it into a piece of sheet metal. The SOLIDWORKS AutoTrace feature can be used to detect the shapes in an image and creates sketch lines out of it that you can use to cut & extrude material.  The SOLIDWORKS AutoTrace Add-In article provides an excellent guide to getting started, so I will be supplementing that with additional options to consider when creating a vector and a few added features since the article’s publication.

Using Vector Images

Before starting SOLIDWORKS, you need a picture. Ideally, this would be a vector image because you would be able to play around with the size of the image when saving out to an image format. In this case, the graphics are designed in Adobe Illustrator, so when saving out, I could define the size of the image in pixels. In other words, the ability to determine the dots per inch (DPI) allows for a more successful trace. The following are a few points to consider.

  • When adding a picture to SOLIDWORKS, 1 pixel = 1mm, regardless of the units you use for the document.
  • A picture with high DPI provides a better AutoTrace output.
  • Work with images with few colours, and stay away from photos.

The images that will be used are the logos for my cousin’s birthday. This year we made custom baseball jerseys and wanted to create a commemorative picture frame with the logo on it. The image on the left is ideal for AutoTrace while the one on the right is can be a bit tricky as we will see down the line.

Vector Image Logos made in Adobe Illustrator

Vector Image Logos made in Adobe Illustrator

When using the AutoTrace tool, it is possible to run it several times to capture the lines that you want. Below is the result of running the tool four times to capture all the relevant regions in the image. Keep in mind that there may be overlapping & open lines so there is a bit of line trimming & extending to get the sketch working.

Resultant sketches from 4 AutoTrace passes

From here I was able to use the regions to create an engraved logo in a piece of wood.

Resultant Model from sketch

AutoTrace Limitations

Regardless of how good your image is, there are limitations. When I was trying to get the palm trees from the second logo, the best I could come up with after toggling the settings can be seen below.

Original Image vs. Line output using LiveTrace

I am sure that there is a way to import the vector data into SOLIDWORKS but that is a blog post for another time.

The AutoTrace tool is a great way to add decals to your design. Having a better understanding of how images are inserted into a part can better improve your workflow, and will help graphic designers make considerations when developing graphics that will be used in SOLIDWORKS.

The post Image Considerations when using SOLIDWORKS AutoTrace to Create Sketches appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at July 09, 2019 12:00 PM