Planet SolidWorks

October 17, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Connecting SOLIDWORKS Manage to a SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Vault

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional can be easily connected to SOLIDWORKS Manage. The close relationship between SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional and SOLIDWORKS Manage, is evident in the fact that SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional, is included with SOLIDWORKS Manage. In this article we will look at how to connect SOLIDWORKS Manage to a SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault.

First, there are prerequisites that need to be in place, before we create that connection.

  • SOLIDWORKS Manage Server is installed (same SQL Instance as PDM).
  • SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Server is installed (same SQL Instance as Manage).
  • SOLIDWORKS Manage is installed on the computer that will be used to create the connection.
  • SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional is installed on the computer that will be used to create the connection.
  • SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Local Vault View has been created.
  • The Manage add-in for be PDM has been added.
Manage Add-in for PDM Vault

Manage Add-in for PDM Vault

Once all the prerequisites  have been confirmed, launch SOLIDWORKS Manage and access Administration Options.

Administration Options

In System Administration, select the Structures Area and then the Documents & Records Section. Next select New PDM Object.

New PDM Object

This will launch the SOLIDWORKS PDM Configuration Wizard, which will guide you through the process of creating this Object.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Configuration Wizard

Pressing next will take you to the Connection Window. Here you provide a Name, a Numbering Scheme and a Revision Scheme (enter A for alpha 0 for numeric) for the Object,. In order to create the Connection, the SOLIDWORKS PDM SQL Server and Database must be identified.  Additional options include how User names will be configured and the amount of detail that is provided during Synchronization. As with Objects the PDM object can be Enabled or disabled

Connection

Synchronization between the PDM and Manage Databases

The next screen is where the Synchronization between the PDM and Manage Databases is initiated. Pressing Synchronize will start the process. Synchronizing of the databases ensures consistency of data between the two databases.

The option Rebuild Database Indexes, can be used to address Index fragmentation. If rebuilds are already scheduled in SQL Management Studio, this may not be required.  But, a Rebuild of the PDM database indexes, should be considered before creating the PDM Object, if the Indexes have never been rebuilt, or a rebuild has not been performed for a long time. New Databases, as is the case when installing PDM Professional for the first time, should not require a rebuild.

Synchronization Details

SOLIDWORKS PDM Configuration Fields

After closing the Synchronization Details panel, you will be presented with the SOLIDWORKS PDM Configuration Fields Window.  This Window provides a list of Properties that match PDM Card Variables and provides the following options:

  • Update PDM Variable, allows the Manage to update the Variable value in the PDM vault.
  • Visible on Lists, determines whether the Property Field will visible in a predefined list of values.
  • Unique, will specify whether a Field is Unique
  • Required, will specify whether a field needs to have a value
  • Type describes the Field. When connecting Manage to PDM Variables, the Type is read from PDM. The System Type are Fields contained within PDM. These Fields are ones that were defined at the beginning of creating the PDM Object. Being a System Field does not preclude pulling the variable from PDM . As can be seen, System and PDM Fields are given different icons for clarity. PDM Fields have the cylinder icon which is used for PDM vaults.
  • Groups will display differing information, depending on whether the Field is a System Filed or not.
  • Visibility displays the permissions for each Field.

Fields

Fields are used in all Manage Objects and contain information related to Records, as well as Manage reporting. Fields act similarly to Properties in SOLIDWORKS or Variables in PDM. Double clicking a Field allows you change the Field parameters such as Field Type (i.e. Display Name, Updates PDM Variables), Properties (i.e. Is Required), Options (i.e. Numbering Scheme) and Access Permissions

Field Properties

Along the top of the Fields panel, are options to create a new a Tab (contains groups of field and folders), create a new Folder within a selected Tab and create an new Field. Clicking on Field Groups, opens a Window where Field Groups can be administered. Field Groups allow the grouping of Fields, to simplify tasks such changing the visibility.

Fields Top Menu

Back in the Fields menu, there are several additional Field Options.

Field Options

 

This includes how Records are ordered and presented to the user. The Option Default Search

Order by Record

 

The Option Default Search Columns sets the default columns used in a Simple Search. Specifying columns will improve the performance of Simple Searches, by limiting the search to the specified fields.

Default Search Columns

SOLIDWORKS Options

Main Options controls many aspects on how SOLIDWORKS interacts with Manage. There are controls for Releasing documents, generating related files (i.e. PDF’s), naming SOLIDWORKS files, linking of Component and Drawing properties and the Numbering schemes that will be used by SOLIDWORKS Parts, Assemblies and Drawings. In General Table Options, a General Revision Table can be enabled and configured.

Main Options

 

SOLIDWORKS Custom Properties

The mapping of Fields to SOLIDWORKS Custom Properties is done by selecting Custom Props (SOLIDWORKS). The Fields can either be displayed Alphabetically or as they appear in the Property Card

Configuring SOLIDWORKS Custom Properties

Limiting lists are Lists that are driven by another Field or List. Conditions can be used can be used to control the visibility and requirements of Field, for different scenarios. Limiting lists will be covered in another article.

The Conditions option, for Fields, can be used to control requirements for field visibility as as a variety of other scenarios. Fields will covered more extensively, in a future article.

Bill of Materials

After the Fields menu, you can Enable/Disable BOMs. If required new BOMs can be created and existing BOMs can be edited. The Show BOM Configuration on Front Page option, is used to identify which BOM sill be displayed for a Field Group.

Bill of Materials

In Part Number, Description and Revision Mapping, the way these Fields are mapped is defined. Clicking on the pull-down for Part Number, Description and Revision will list the available Properties. There is also the ability to choose an Alternate option for Part Number and Description, if primary choice is not available.

Part Number, Description and Revision Mapping

Configuration Options

Configuration Options is where you define how Configurations are handled in Manage. Configurations of a file can be part of a single Record, or a Record can be created for each Configuration. If a Record is created for each configuration, the creation of Record can be controlled by a condition. In the below example Configurations containing Flat or DisplayConfig,  in their name, will not generate a Record.

The PDM Project Window is where PDM files are Promoted to the SOLIDWORKS Manage environment. Under File Promotion Settings, you can specify at what State of a selected Workflow, that a file will be Promoted. The Workflows for the PDM vault are available from the Workflow pull-down. Once a Workflow has been selected, each State can be identified, to create Record, for all files in that State. To further define which files will be promoted, there is the option to filter SOLIDWORKS files by extension(s).

File Promotion Settings

 

Selecting Same as Parent, applies to files in sub-folders. If unchecked, Promotion settings for files in a sub-folder, can be individuality changed. If Any State is checked, this will Promote every file of all Workflow States. Here too is the Option to Promote only certain file types.

Promoting Files in Any State

SOLIDWORKS Manage Process

When SOLIDWORKS Manage Record is created by the Promotion of a PDM file, the file can also be sent directly to a SOLIDWORKS Manage Process. This is done by choosing the Process under, the Default Process tab.. As with the File Promotions Settings tab, the sending of files to a Process, is done for each workflow. Also, as with the File Promotions Settings tab, there is an option use the same Process for files in a sub-folders

Default Process

By pressing the top-left Icon of the PDM Projects menu, the Properties of a sub-folder can be modified. This includes the Field Group Name, the Numbering scheme, Access Rights and the Life Cycle. By default a sub-folder will inherit the parent folders Properties.

Sub-folder Properties

Users and Groups

After the Promotion of Files has been defined, PDM Users and Groups can be Imported into Manage. Import Users will only Import PDM Users, Import SOLIDWORKS PDM Groups will Import PDM Groups. Auto Map will automatically Map PDM Users and Groups. As noted, all SOLIDWORKS PDM users need to be imported because of inherited permissions.

PDM – SOLIDWORKS Manage Users and Groups

The next menus is where Access permissions for Users and Groups, to interact with the PDM Object is defined. Along with setting Access and Visibility, Additional Rights can be given to the a User or Group. Partial Administrators can also be identified for this Object. Partial Administrators will be covered in another article.

Access Rights

Related Files

Related Files are files which are not controlled by SOLIDWORKS Manage, but are related to files in Manage. Referenced Files are internal links to other Records in SOLIDWORKS Manage.

In Related Files/References is where we specify how are these files are handled in Manage. For Related Files, we can specify the File Naming Convention, Enable a Full Text Search and under the Other tab, define what File Types can be added, to the Object Root Folder and whether Part Number or Part Number + Description will be Used as the Filename.

Related Files/ReferencesAdding or Editing a Related File Folder, allows us to define what File Types are not allowed into this folder and the Access Rights to this Folder. We can also define Report generation for this Folder.

Folder Properties

Clicking on References is where we define the Module and Module Object where the References will be found.

References Come From

Tab Properties

After defining Related Files/References we can next define Tab Properties. This will determine which Tabs Users and Groups will have access to.

Tab Properties

The remainder of the PDM Object options will be covered in other articles. These include Reports, Special Notifications and E-mails, Lifecycle, and Linked Record Objects.

Additional PDM Object Options

Now that all options have to be configured, we can complete creating the PDM Object.

Complete Creation of PDM Object

Complete Creation of PDM Object

Process Complete

Once completed another Synchronization is required and once that is done, the PDM Object will now show in Documents & records. At any time we can edit this object, to make any required changes.

PDM Object in Documents & Records

This was an overview of creating a PDM Object. There is more that can both be configured in the PDM Object and related to other areas of SOLIDWORKS Manage. To ensure that SOLIDWORKS Manage is configured correctly, a thorough understanding of SOLIDWORKS Manage is highly recommended. Contact us to perform your implementation, correctly and efficiently.

The post Connecting SOLIDWORKS Manage to a SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Vault appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at October 17, 2019 12:00 PM

October 16, 2019

SolidSmack

Denver Startup Week 2019 Highlights

Between September 16th-20th this year, Denver was overflowing with out-of-towners for Denver Startup Week. (Which was much to the dismay of native Denverite Uber passengers.) Here, you can read about the many physical product development related goings-on at this free conference. There were a lot.

See below for the video:

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The Venue

I try not to be needlessly negative but this should be said: wow, the venues were a serious pain to get to. Be advised if you attend next year! Initially, I didn’t look up the locations of all the events I earmarked before flying to Colorado. I assumed most of them would be in the same location with some stray venues here and there. That was absolutely incorrect.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Halp. Here were some of the venues I managed to get to. Did I mention this was my first time ever in Denver?<figcaption>Halp. Here were some of the venues I managed to get to. Did I mention this was my first time ever in Denver?</figcaption></figure>

I began to refer to Denver Startup Week (DSW) as the Denver Scavenger Hunt. It was all over the place with limited parking in most spots. Moreover, many of the events I wanted to attend had overlapping schedules. The advice from DSW to help ease this mess was to be greener and use the public buses or an Uber. Although, I think that would have just made the time constraints and expenses even worse. In the end, it was nice to see so many interesting bits of Denver. Wish I could have done that on my own time, though!

Physical Product Showcase

I was pleasantly surprised at how many cool products there were on display at the showcase. If you can only make one event from Denver Startup Week and want to get a taste for new tech developments in Colorado, go to this.

Robauto

This company is building a robot on a basic AI platform that even younger kiddos can get some programming and building experience with. The students they’ve worked with range from 3rd to 6th grade! I was told the googley eyes are often a must-have. Well, of course.

<figure class="wp-block-image">One of Robauto's cute, little googley-eyed AI robots.<figcaption>One of Robauto’s cute, little googley-eyed AI robots.</figcaption></figure>

Originally, founder Jalali Hartman wanted to build a low-cost but advanced AI robot to wander around. And so, he did! Kids build their own bots and end up contributing to the code that runs them all. After giving these to schools and libraries, he learned larger corporations had use for them, too. However, it’s more of a platform for other tech for the automotive, healthcare and aerospace companies Robauto serves.

Skip to minute marker 5:18 in the video above to see these bots in action.

Outdoor Element

There’s a new kind of Swiss Army Knife in town. This one can make fire!

<figure class="wp-block-image">This hunting survival knife has a flint wheel built into it and an inside storage space for tinder.<figcaption>This hunting survival knife has a flint wheel built into it and an inside storage space for tinder.</figcaption></figure>

Founder of Outdoor Element, Mike Mojica got his inspiration for many of the products he engineered from others. On one hand, he learned first-responders would find specific functionality in a neat multi-tool really useful in emergencies. In another case, he learned one of the versions made it too difficult for his young daughter to make fire with. So, he made it much easier. He insists this was a good decision.

Below is the first product in the line. It’s a survival bracelet made of jute which contains a spark-thrower at the clasp. The one-use fibers of the bracelet can be torn apart to be tinder for a fire in an emergency situation.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Here's the first product in the Outdoor Element's line: a survival bracelet made of flammable jute.<figcaption>Here’s the first product in the Outdoor Element’s line: a survival bracelet made of flammable jute.</figcaption></figure>

The bracelet made aiming the sparks difficult for Mojica’s 6-year-old, so he designed a new gadget. He thought it’s easier to control sparks that are made with wheels. Also, carabiners are really friggin handy. So, he decided to create a carabiner with a spark wheel and threw in some other functionality. That proved popular, so after some input from first responders, he created the 2nd version which just recently went live on Kickstarter. They’ve already surpassed their goal but you can still get in on the special pricing.

The Version 2 carabiner, called the “Fire Escape,” also includes a window breaker and a safety cutter to go through things like seat belts.

<figure class="wp-block-image">The Version 2 carabiner: the Fire Escape by Outdoor Element on Kickstarter now!<figcaption>The Version 2 carabiner: the Fire Escape by Outdoor Element on Kickstarter now!</figcaption></figure>

You can watch our interview with Mike Mojica in the video at the top starting at marker 20:57.

Cipher Skin

This company is making an absolutely wild wearable. Cipher Skin‘s booth had a demo with one poor engineer who was made to move his leg around all day long. He wore a stretchable sleeve around his knee and part of his leg. As he moved, the app could graphically recreate the motion of his leg based on sensors in the sleeve. No green screen required.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Cipher Skin in action: as the real leg moves, the blue dummy graphic on the tablet moves identically.<figcaption>Cipher Skin in action: as the real leg moves, the blue dummy graphic on the tablet moves identically.</figcaption></figure>

Co-founders Shaka Bahadu and Craig Weller taught me about the magic going on inside the sleeve. There’s a mesh of flexible ink printed on the inside diameter with customizable sensors affixed to nodes along the circuit.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Inside a Cipher Skin wearable device that can track your movements with legit, objective metrics!<figcaption>Inside a Cipher Skin wearable device that can track your movements with legit, objective metrics!</figcaption></figure>

As the leg moves, some of the lines of black conductive ink might stretch and that would change the dimensions of the “wire”. This, in turn, would change the electrical resistance. These electrical changes can be tracked and correlated precisely with movement. Alternatively, if this device is stuck on a pipe with different sensors, you could track things like leaks. For human applications, these are great additions for tracking progress in physical rehabilitation. They’re probably great for a slew of other aims, too!

You can watch video footage of the movement (and Bahadu and Weller) starting at marker 8:20.

Pupptech

As a dog and automobile lover, I delighted in seeing Pupptech‘s product which helps keep both safe. It’s for when you’d like to keep your pet in the car but worry about the climate becoming unsafe while you’re away. This device measures the weather of your car’s interior and connects to an app on your phone. Another key part of this system is a sticker you can affix to your car to tell do-gooders that it’s OK for them to put down their crowbars; Sparky is safe.

<figure class="wp-block-image">PuppTech sells a cellular device that monitors the environment inside your car to keep your puppy safe. Dog not included.<figcaption>PuppTech sells a cellular device that monitors the environment inside your car to keep your puppy safe. Dog not included.</figcaption></figure>

Founder, William Loopesko, showed us the many physical prototype iterations they developed before ever thinking about crowdfunding. These included a bunch of 3D printing and boards he hand-soldered.

<figure class="wp-block-image">The chronological display of PuppTech prototypes from first (left) through to the first version they crowdfunded on (where William Loopesko is pointing).<figcaption>The chronological display of PuppTech prototypes from first (left) through to the first version they crowdfunded on (where William Loopesko is pointing).</figcaption></figure>

You can watch the video starting at 12:47 to hear Loopesko talk about Pupptech’s development. Or, hop on their website to pre-order!

Karvtrak

Karvtrak is creating a brace to help older (and more battered) skiers last longer on the slopes and have more power. They’re kind of making a mechanical-only, more budget-friendly version of the ski exoskeleton by Roam Robotics we featured here. Karvtrak’s brace provides physical support to the skier in similar locations, however, it lacks that super turbo-boosting electric power or AI to learn how you ski. Although, if Roam’s device is out of your price range, Karvtrak is aiming for a retail price several thousands of dollars less.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Mark Stewart (left) and Jan Andersen (right) talk about this wild idea all the founders dreamed up together.<figcaption>Mark Stewart (left) and Jan Andersen (right) talk about this wild idea all the founders dreamed up together.</figcaption></figure>

If you want to play with these, get in touch with them on their website. There should be units available to demo starting this season and mass-produced units available next (2020-2021) ski season. To see Mark Stewart and Jan Andersen show how they work, watch the video at the top of this article from marker 6:18.

Beatrice Forms

You may think you’re bougie, but until you’ve had a mannequin custom-built to your body shape for the ultimate in tailored clothing, you’re missing out. Beatrice Forms can remotely create a form off of your dimensions using tech your tailor never had. I say dimensions because there is no tape-measuring involved. They use video, photogrammetry, 3D modeling, and CNC tools. There’s a whole lot of data points going on.

<figure class="wp-block-image">To the right is an example of the full-sized custom shape Beatrice Forms creates.<figcaption>To the right is an example of the full-sized custom shape Beatrice Forms creates.</figcaption></figure>

The husband-and-wife, engineer team, Alison Hughes and Nathan Barefield, were at the booth to explain their fascinating tech.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Alison Hughes and Nathan Barefield of Beatrice Forms kindly answering my endless questions about the modeling and form-making tech they developed.<figcaption>Alison Hughes and Nathan Barefield of Beatrice Forms kindly answering my endless questions about the modeling and form-making tech they developed.</figcaption></figure>

It works like this: a shipment is sent to the customer which includes clothing proven to work well for this application. The customer has a buddy take a video of them from a cell phone, making several passes around the body. The video is processed and between a dose of photogrammetry, a splash of 3D model smoothing, and other editing, a fine, polished 3D model is created.

Afterward, that model tells their custom-built CNC router how to sculpt a block of foam to create your torso in real life. Barefield told us the foam block spins around like a rotisserie chicken while the router goes in to cut the shape.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Nathan Barefield demonstrates the rotisserie chicken-style action of Beatrice Form's custom CNC router.<figcaption>Nathan Barefield demonstrates the rotisserie chicken-style action of Beatrice Form’s custom CNC router.</figcaption></figure>

If you’re interested in getting a form made for some high-quality tailoring, you can now! (Although you may need to wait for this form to tell you they’re in stock.) They’re already creating and shipping these to customers.

For more information directly from this pair, watch the video starting at 15:18.

GolfKicks

If you ever wanted to turn your Birkenstocks into a pair of golf shoes, you’re in luck! GolfKicks makes screw-in golf cleats. With these, you can add gripping power to most any shoe.

<figure class="wp-block-image">GolfKicks makes screw-in golf cleats so you can turn your favorite shoes into golf shoes.<figcaption>GolfKicks makes screw-in golf cleats so you can turn your favorite shoes into golf shoes.</figcaption></figure>

If nothing else, checking out the products at this showcase and learning about their development is a great learning lesson for new HW developers. Even these deceptively simple-looking designs have gone through (and are still going through) multiple iterations. Version 2 on display had a glass-filled nylon core overshot with TPE. Founder, Ty Stuart told us V3 would be out soon made with “top secret sauce”.

You can see these in the video from marker 26:12.

Archethought

Archethought considers itself a data company but relies on information gathered from its big, urban environment IoT sensors. These devices can be put up at music venues, on street corners, in retail shops or clubs to monitor all sorts of things.

<figure class="wp-block-image">3 of Archethought's data capturing and/or relaying devices.<figcaption>3 of Archethought’s data capturing and/or relaying devices.</figcaption></figure>

There’s a directional wind monitor that gives directional sound data as well as wind info. Another one can pick up radio signals which can do things like count the number of digital signals/devices in a crowd, roughly equating to occupancy. These can be used in concert to triangulate sound locations. Then if you combine that location with some AI, sounds such as a car crash can be recognized and classified, and the authorities can be told to come to an accident scene automatically.

There are many other applications possible like monitoring noise levels, or sending data to digital wrist bands on event-goers. Plus more that haven’t been developed or thought of yet! That’s why Archethought will share whatever data is permissible to be open to the public to developers. The hope is this “Innovation Platform” will be used to come up with new ways to mash the numbers for new applications.

For this interview, check out marker 26:51 in the video above.

Talks and Panels

Maybe it’s because I spend too much time visiting clients in Silicon Valley, but I was surprised at some of the very basic definitions heard in these panels. There were excellent tips for seasoned pros, too! However, often, I would see panelists and moderators taking the time to explain things like manufacturing or development acronyms. It seemed there were a lot more DIY-ers than I’m used to seeing in a tech audience compared with ex-Google or ex-Apple employees. So, if you’re jumping into physical product development for the first time, I’d highly recommend attending next year.

From Cocktail Napkin to Mass Production

The subheading of this talk was “How to Navigate the Design Process, Prototyping, and Prepare for Manufacturing.” Patrick Monahan was the speaker. He’s an Industrial Designer and cofounder at Design Elevation.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Patrick Monahan of Design Elevation teaches all the new-to-product-development makers what to expect during his talk.<figcaption>Patrick Monahan of Design Elevation teaches all the new-to-product-development makers what to expect during his talk.</figcaption></figure>

His talk was an excellent primer on what those new to product development should expect from the process. Monahan also included a few of what I’d assume are his pet peeves or at least frustrations (because they’re also mine). Here’s an example slide where he advises coming up with measurable (i.e. numerical) targets. Otherwise, you’re working in murky, subjective grey area!

<figure class="wp-block-image">Monahan's slide where he advises startups to come up with NUMBERS to define specs is fantastic. I see failure to do this often and it leads to confusion and frustration!<figcaption>Monahan’s slide where he advises startups to come up with NUMBERS to define specs is fantastic. I see failure to do this often and it leads to confusion and frustration!</figcaption></figure>

You can see a clip of this talk at 0:30 in the video.

Funding Your Physical Product

The 3 seasoned entrepreneurs on this panel had some great financial tips for other startups. You can listen to them starting at 30:13 in the video at the top of this article.

<figure class="wp-block-image">The "Funding Your Physical Product" panel at Denver Startup Week. From left to right: China Califf of Colorado Lending Source, Brandi Paik of CG Habitats, Hunter Wood of Elevated Seltzer, and Brett Payton of YOCISCO.<figcaption>The “Funding Your Physical Product” panel at Denver Startup Week. From left to right: China Califf of Colorado Lending Source, Brandi Paik of CG Habitats, Hunter Wood of Elevated Seltzer, and Brett Payton of YOCISCO.</figcaption></figure>

Brandi Paik, the co-founder and VP of CG Habitats, formerly CandyGrind, highly recommened checking out small business organizations like your local SBA. She originally balked at the idea they’d have anything useful to tell her, but in the end, found them extremely helpful. She also found using more than one foreign vendor to produce the same thing pushes all your prices way down. If you always stay with just one vendor, they essentially have a monopoly over your business.

Hunter Wood, founder and CEO of Elevated Seltzer, seconded Paik’s suggestion of using multiple vendors. However, Wood uses this tactic domestically.

Brett Payton, Strategy and Innovation Manager of YOCISCO, wanted all the entrepreneurs to “check yourself before you wreck yourself”. By that, he meant often and honest evaluations of your finances and progress. If you think taking a hard look every quarter is often enough, Payton disagrees. He recommends every 60 days, instead. Also, he urged the audience to be ready to pivot and make big changes to your strategy at any time.

Prototyping Vs. Production: When to Make the Leap

Jenney Loper from Zebulon Solutions moderated this other panel for beginner HW entrepreneurs. She thoughtfully made sure the audience didn’t get lost in acronyms.

<figure class="wp-block-image">This talk, called, "Prototyping Vs. Production: When to Make the Leap" happened inside the Denver Central Library.<figcaption>This talk, called, “Prototyping Vs. Production: When to Make the Leap” happened inside the Denver Central Library.</figcaption></figure>

The other HW development pros represented different potential links in a chain. To watch some clips from this panel, you can start the video at 1:51.

Plastic Prototyping

Jeffrey Jakubowski from iFuzion does a lot in the prototyping stage with plastics. There were questions to the panel about lead times and the level of devastation if changes needed to be made. Jakubowski said most 3D printed parts he creates can be ready in under a week, and changes at this stage are not too costly or difficult. Clearly, if you’re going to make mistakes (you will) or changes at any point (I hope you will), this is the stage where you want most of that to happen.

Production Plastics

Matt Saunders from PTA Plastics spoke on plastics when they get to production. At this point, changes can be very expensive. First shots can take 5-10 weeks on average to get, plus tooling might cost anywhere between $15,000 and $300,000. If you need to make a second mold (or heaven forbid more than that), you might financially sink yourself! He wanted the crowd to be especially aware of the fact that what geometries you can make with 3D printing isn’t always possible to get out of a mold. Saunders sees this mistake often.

Electronics Prototyping

Stuart McKeel from Slingshot Assembly shared insight on electronics prototyping. At his company, they might only be making a handful of boards and a large number of specific components wouldn’t likely be purchased yet. So, at this stage, a change can be more easily made without too much wasted cash or time.

Production Electronics

Covering the production end of electronics was Stan Haag of Premier Manufacturing. At this part, things like long-lead-time parts and stencils, are already ordered, programs have already started and any changes will be very painful. What you may consider a minor tweak at this point often requires starting over from the beginning.

Contract Manufacturing

Chuck Hodges from Zebulon Solutions works on the side of domestic and off-shore electronic contract manufacturing. He had a valuable caution for the crowd. Hardware entrepreneurs often neglect to account for how much design churn can drive the pricetag up once you get to the stage of working with foreign manufacturers. Lead times are greater at this stage and you’re involving a lot more engineering time every time a change is made. If your design isn’t very mature, going straight to Asian manufacturers can be a costly decision (not to mention a frustrating one).

How “DIY” Can F*&^ Up Your Product

This panel was a fun one to attend. However, it was admittedly at times painful to hear about some of these fails. The speakers shared anecdotes from their experience working with DIY-ers turned HW entrepreneurs. You can watch clips of these 3 starting at 31:48 in the video embedded above.

<figure class="wp-block-image">For the "How 'DIY' Can F*&^ Up Your Product" panel, we had (from left to right):  Jenney Loper of Zebulon Solutions, Schuyler Livingston of Link Product Development, and Dave Eyvazzadeh of VOZ Patents.<figcaption>For the “How ‘DIY’ Can F*&^ Up Your Product” panel, we had (from left to right): Jenney Loper of Zebulon Solutions, Schuyler Livingston of Link Product Development, and Dave Eyvazzadeh of VOZ Patents.</figcaption></figure>

Some of the same lessons kept surfacing from their tales. For one thing, if you’re working on a hardware concept, be sure to involve experts early and often. The mistakes you might otherwise make can be devastating! Also, be sure to get feedback from people who don’t love you. “No one will tell you your baby is ugly.” If your friends and family think your idea is great that means nothing. Solicit feedback from strangers in your target market, and then make changes!

Getting Attached to a Lousy Design

Schuyler Livingston of Link Product Development told us what happens when DIY-ers make that above mistake of only asking beloved family and friends what they think of their HW baby. They’ll take that design they’re in love with to Livingston and ask him to recreate their idea without changing a thing. This can lead to clinging to a design that is undesirable when compared to alternatives. Or perhaps, the greater application doesn’t have market feasibility to begin with. Then, Livingston and his team have to perform the difficult task of delivering the tough love these entrepreneurs didn’t get from their friends — or even other design firms!

Getting Hosed by Your Contract Manufacturers

Jenney Loper of Zebulon Solutions told us a sad story about a client of hers signing a contract with a manufacturer without having the document vetted by a pro. This client ended up losing all their tools because they signed away the ownership of them. Then, they almost made a similar mistake a second time! Luckily, at that point, Loper was there to step in an make some expert suggestions.

Unwittingly Giving Up Your Right to Seek a Patent

Dave Eyvazzadeh of VOZ Patents shared a story about a prospective client who wanted to get protection for his gizmo by beginning the patent application process. The maker pulled out a YouTube video of his device to explain the concept. That’s when Eyvazzadeh saw the date stamp and realized it was too late; this guy’s IP was actually part of the public domain now. Eyvazzadeh, a patent agent, explained that your first public disclosure starts a clock. Then, if you don’t file an application within 12 months, you forfeit your “patentable rights”. Ouch!

Pitch Competition

Because of aforementioned schedule conflicts, I didn’t get to watch the entire competition TiE Denver was hosting. However, I did happen to see the presentation by the company that won.

TiE Denver

TiE Denver was the organization sponsoring this particular battle, which featured a physical product. Denver is just one of the many chapter hosts of TiE (“The Indus Entrepreneurs”). You can also find these organizations supporting entrepreneurship around the globe, from Atlanta to Frankfurt to Bangalore.

The Winner: Vaporox

Vaporox is building a machine proven to speed the healing of diabetic foot ulcers. Regular treatments in their vapor bath medical device not only helps these types of wounds heal faster — they also increase the chances of these ulcers healing fully. Oftentimes, they don’t. These painful and debilitating effects of diabetes surely deserve some new tech developed to treat them. That said, woah, were the graphic images of these sores difficult to watch. Here’s an image of the machine instead:

<figure class="wp-block-image">Vaporox's machine was vaping-away at the Physical Product Showcase at Denver Startup Week.<figcaption>Vaporox’s machine was vaping-away at the Physical Product Showcase at Denver Startup Week.</figcaption></figure>

Denver Startup Week 2020 Slated for September 14-18

If you’re interested in attending next year, you can pencil September 14th-18th, 2020 into your calendar now. This is one conference I definitely intend to return to in the future!

The post Denver Startup Week 2019 Highlights appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at October 16, 2019 03:17 PM

The Javelin Blog

Body Compare Analysis in SOLIDWORKS 2020

SOLIDWORKS Body Compare is new for SOLIDWORKS 2020 and is used to compare two groups of bodies that are located in the same part or assembly to find their differences. This feature allows you to even compare your CAD models against a mesh file or a scan file.

Differences are colour coded so you can see where the two bodies don’t match. To compare two bodies, in the Feature Manager design tree, expand the Solid Bodies folder to see all the bodies. For example for the following part, there are two bodies under the solid bodies folder. Gear 1 has sharp edges and Gear 2 has these sharp edges filleted.

Gear 1 Solid Body

Gear 1 Solid Body

Gear 2 Solid Body

Gear 2 Solid Body

The Difference Between Gear 1 and Gear 2 Solid Bodies

The Difference Between Gear 1 and Gear 2 Solid Bodies

How to compare bodies

To compare the two bodies click View > Display > Body Compare. In the PropertyManager, our source body is Gear 1 and our compare body is Gear 2. In the graphics area, the red and yellow colors indicate where Gear 1 and Gear 2 do not match.

Body Compare Property Manager

Body Compare Property Manager

The Results of Body Compare

The Results of Body Compare

After you create a SOLIDWORKS Body Compare analysis, the analysis remains on display in the graphics area. To close the analysis, right-click in the graphics area and click Body Compare .

The post Body Compare Analysis in SOLIDWORKS 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at October 16, 2019 12:00 PM

October 15, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Auto-space Components in an Exploded View with SOLIDWORKS 2020

In SOLIDWORKS 2020, for Exploded Views you can turn on the option “Auto-space Components on Drag” even for existing explode steps. You can also select center, rear, or front of the bounding box for the order of auto-spaced components.

To create a new exploded view and explore these options, create a new exploded view from Insert > Exploded view. In the property manager for Explode Step Components, we are selecting 3 components for the following example.

The components for the explode step are selected

The components for the explode step are selected

Then the components are dragged along the Y axis while having the option “Auto-space components on drag” checked. There are three bounding box options for the order of the components: center, rear, or front of the bounding box can be selected.

Bounding Box Options for Auto-space Components on Drag

Bounding Box Options for Auto-space Components on Drag

If you have the “Use Center of Bounding Box to Order Components for Auto-Space” option on, the created step looks as the following image.

Use Center of Bounding Box to Order Components

Use Center of Bounding Box to Order Components

You can see how your exploded step would be different if you used the “Use Rear of Bounding Box to Order Components for Auto-Space” or “Use Front of Bounding Box to Order Components for Auto-Space” options on in the following images.

Use Rear of Bounding Box to Order Components for Auto-Space

Use Rear of Bounding Box to Order Components for Auto-Space

 

Use Front of Bounding Box to Order Components

Use Front of Bounding Box to Order Components

The post Auto-space Components in an Exploded View with SOLIDWORKS 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at October 15, 2019 12:00 PM

October 14, 2019

SolidSmack

Coca-Cola Introduces New Bottle Design Made From Ocean Plastic Waste

While extremely versatile for a wide range of applications, there’s no denying that poorly-disposed PET plastics are affecting our ocean systems. To help counteract their contribution, Coca-Cola committed to manufacturing all of their bottles with at least 50% recycled plastics by the year 2030.

So far, it looks like they’re on track.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QKbZOQX8Mkc?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

This month the company introduced a short run of its first bottle design created using recycled plastic waste from the ocean. In total, 300 bottles were produced from marine waste plastic collected by volunteers across 84 beach cleanups in Spain and Portugal.

In partnership with Dutch startup ioniq, the company uses a depolymerization process to break down the PET material into monomers—a process that makes the wasted material usable again in new applications.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9-dpv2xbFyk?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

While there are certainly logistical challenges that go along with scaling this process worldwide, Coca-Cola is on track to be the first fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) company that uses waste materials in their new packaging.

While it may not be the best solution—some might argue reusable packaging is more eco-friendly—there’s no denying this is a step in the right direction.

Learn more about the recycling process over at ioniqa.

The post Coca-Cola Introduces New Bottle Design Made From Ocean Plastic Waste appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at October 14, 2019 04:07 PM

This Epic Racing Drone Was Made Using Fusion 360 and Generative Design

Generative Design

It wasn’t too long ago when the concept of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and the capabilities of generative design seemed like some far off sci-fi future. Yet, both technologies are alive and kicking in 2019—and they came together recently to test the implementation of generative design and additive manufacturing capabilities in the field of UAVs.

The Helyx Drone, from Italian design and manufacturing company Sigma Ingegneria, focuses on the development of a First Person View (FPV) drone for racing and freestyle applications.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Msh9RykgAdY?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Created using Autodesk Fusion 360 (and seen here rendered in Keyshot), the design process took into account three key factors that are fundamental to the development of an FPV chassis: reduced air resistance, reduced weight, and capability of withstanding impacts.

<figure class="wp-block-image">helyx drone</figure>

While the primary purpose of the drone is to test the implementation of generative design and additive manufacturing in the field of UAVs, the Helyx isn’t a slouch when it comes to speed. It can go from 0-100 km/h in just 1.2 seconds and reach speeds of up to 208km/h, making it ideal as a racing and freestyle drone. These insane speeds can be achieved thanks to the drone’s unique geometry, which is meant to distribute the g-forces and weight of the drone evenly.

<figure class="wp-block-image">helyx drone</figure>

Much of Helyx’s uniqueness stems from its web-like cage design—which heavily utilizes the capabilities of generative design and additive manufacturing. Apart from evenly distributing 87.5 grams of weight, the cage also reduces air resistance and allows the drone to withstand strong impacts – something a drone needs when moving at such high speeds.

Three prototypes were made before settling on the final Helyx design. You can see it get more symmetrical as the design process goes on, with more emphasis being put on making the drone look more streamlined and sleek. The final design looks much more relaxed, with completely symmetrical sides made for individual features.

More details can be found on the Helyx drone on its official webpage, where you can view a full 360° orbit view of the drone and check out its many features.

The post This Epic Racing Drone Was Made Using Fusion 360 and Generative Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at October 14, 2019 03:40 PM

The SolidSmack Monday List 42.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

James-Dyson

As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

With Xi in Its Corner, the Nike of China Wants to Go Global

Anta is hoping the 2022 Olympic Games and NBA star Klay Thompson will help it best its bigger rivals.

<figure class="aligncenter">With Xi in Its Corner, the Nike of China Wants to Go Global</figure>

Backstage at the Modern

Behind the scenes of the Museum of Modern Art’s reinvention.

<figure class="aligncenter">Backstage at the Modern</figure>

Letter of Recommendation: Stock Trading

I didn’t necessarily want to be rich, or even affluent, so much as I wanted to behave and act like someone who could be or would be someday.

<figure class="aligncenter">Letter of Recommendation: Stock Trading</figure>

What Happens When a Vacuum Company Tries to Make an Electric Car

James Dyson has decided to pull the plug on what might have been a historic legacy.

<figure class="wp-block-image">What Happens When a Vacuum Company Tries to Make an Electric Car</figure>

How to Delegate Work So It Actually Gets Done

If you’ve ever found it difficult to get the results you want from other people, try this simple management technique.

<figure class="aligncenter">How to Delegate Work So It Actually Gets Done</figure>

How to price your freelance services (without getting screwed)

So when I first started as a freelance bookkeeper, I didn’t even know fixed contracts existed…

<figure class="aligncenter">How to price your freelance services (without getting screwed)</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 42.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 14, 2019 03:12 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Mixed Draft and High Quality Mesh

Draft Quality elements provide faster solve times as each tetrahedral element only contain 4 nodes, one at each vertex.  Switching over to High Quality mesh elements is required for accurate stress results, which adds midpoint nodes putting the node count for a tetrahedral element up to 10 nodes.  The increase in Degrees of Freedom causes longer solution times.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Draft Quality (1st Order) Element

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Draft Quality (1st Order) Element

SOLIDWORKS Simulation High Quality (2nd order) Element

SOLIDWORKS Simulation High Quality (2nd order) Element

Mixed Draft and High Quality Mesh

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 introduces a big time-saver for running Linear Static studies with all solid bodies.  Previously a study could only run with all Draft Quality or all High Quality elements.  We would run a study with Draft Quality elements to save time initially to check if the study was set up properly, prior to running the study again with High Quality elements for final results.  SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 can now run a study with a mixture of High Quality and Draft Quality elements.  Only the important components need to be meshed with High Quality elements for accurate stress results.  The components with small bending effects can be left as Draft elements.

Bodies defined as Draft Quality elements show a tetrahedral element icon with straight edges.  Bodies defined as High Quality elements show a tetrahedral element icon with curved edges. In the screenshot below, the orange arrows show Draft and the blue arrows show High.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Mixed Mesh

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Mixed Mesh

You can switch between element types by right-clicking on a body or multiple bodies in the study tree and ‘Apply Draft Quality Mesh’ or ‘Apply High Quality Mesh’ (depending on its current state).  You can also right-click on the top level ‘Parts’ folder and apply an element type to all bodies.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Apply Draft Quality Mesh

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Apply Draft Quality Mesh

When you go to mesh the model, there will be an additional ‘Mesh Quality’ tab.  This will show a split screen of High Quality and Draft Quality assignments.  You have the option to move items up or down, but it will remember as it was set in the study tree.

NOTE: The Definition tab will no longer show the ‘Draft Quality’ checkbox as this new tab hosts all of the information.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Mesh Quality Tab

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Mesh Quality Tab

Element Colours

Once meshed, the different elements will show as separate colours.  Orange outlines will be Draft elements and Blue will be High elements.  If all bodies are meshed as Draft, they will still all be shown as Orange which is a nice enhancement as a visual queue that you have meshed the model with Draft only.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Mesh Colours

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Mesh Colours

NOTE: Only studies with all Solid elements can take advantage of this functionality.  If some bodies are defined as Shell or Beam elements, you won’t have the ability of mixed mesh.  The option to define the overall mesh as Draft or High quality will still be available in the mesh PropertyManager. Results from Linear Static studies with hybrid meshes are valid as input for dependent study types such as Fatigue, Pressure Vessel, Design, and Submodeling studies.

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Mixed Draft and High Quality Mesh appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at October 14, 2019 12:00 PM

October 13, 2019

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Network License Selection

SOLIDWORKS Simulation is available with various levels of licensing, providing access to specific study types:

When using a SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License that includes a mixture of two or more of these license types, enabling the Simulation add-in would utilize whatever license was free at the time and based on the order selected in your SolidNetWork License Manager Client.  To choose which license to use, you needed to modify the order in the License Manager Client list in the License Order tab.  Then you could enable the Simulation add-in.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 adds the ability to select the license type when you enable the Simulation add-in.  This makes it easier to switch between license types.  Go to the Add-ins tab in the CommandManager and use the dropdown menu under Simulation.  Here you can select the license to use.  Below is an example showing how the SOLIDWORKS Premium license will be used when the add-in is enabled.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Network License Selection

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Network License Selection

You have the option to move to a higher level Simulation license while the add-in is still enabled.  This would then only utilize the upper level license and release the lower level (if applicable).  Once a higher level license is used, you cannot downgrade a license while the add-in is enabled.  You must disable the add-in, choose the license type and then re-enable the add-in.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Premium Network License

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Premium Network License

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Network License Selection appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at October 13, 2019 12:00 PM

October 12, 2019

CAD Graphics BlogWorks | 3D CAD

New Free Fusion 360 Subscription Types

Autodesk recently announced their Fusion 360 Hobbyist/Startup subscription has been replaced with Fusion 360 for personal use and Fusion 360 for startups . While both new subscriptions remain free, the details for eligibility and qualification have been clarified and should be encouraging to any who might be looking to tap into a this well-established yet burgeoning product.

Of course, eligibility for Fusion 360 for personal use includes any individuals doing home-based non-commercial manufacturing and fabrication, but eligibility might be especially interesting to those who engage in a “Hobby Business”. The qualification details state if you are generating less than $1,000 USD in annual revenue, then you are exempt from the non-commercial requirement. In other words, if you are making less than $1,000 USD a year in your hobby business, then you are eligible to use Fusion 360 for personal use. And if your public-facing web content generates more than $1,000 USD in annual revenue, then Autodesk would love to explore partnership opportunities with you.

Eligibility for Fusion 360 for startups is a bit more predictable, but again with greater clarity of definition. Businesses with 10 or fewer employees, and generating (including parent entities) less than $100,000 UDS in total annual revenue are the basics for eligibility. However it also requires your business to have venture-backed, angel-backed, or bootstrap startup status.

In the six years since its release in November 2012, these interesting adjustments to the Fusion 360 business model foster genuine opportunities for many more to use the product. Both the Fusion 360 for personal use and Fusion 360 for startups are available for a 1-year term, and approval is required for renewal. Also, with the Fusion 360 commercial subscription at $495 / year still being a very reasonable option, the other major CAD platforms should be taking notice.

by Unknown (noreply@blogger.com) at October 12, 2019 10:13 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Scale Paper Size in Print Task

New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 is an option to scale the paper size in Print Task.

When configuring the Print task, you can select “Scale to fit” or “Scale”. When you select “Scale”, you can select “Allow the user to change the scale” to let the users change the scale at the run time.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Default Scale Options

SOLIDWORKS PDM Default Scale Options

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Scale Paper Size in Print Task appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at October 12, 2019 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Quick Search Variable Lists

New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 File Explorer’s quick search can now be customized for searching for variables in SOLIDWORKS PDM. To do this, a custom quick search variable list must first be configured in the PDM Administration tool:

  1. Launch the Administration tool and log into your vault. Expand the Lists node
  2. Right click on Quick Search Variable Lists and select New List
SOLIDWORKS PDM Variable List

SOLIDWORKS PDM Variable List

The new list can then be customized as needed – permissions can be assigned, and the variables to be used in the quick search can also be added here.

To use this new search list, it is very simple. Simply log into the local vault view and find the Quick Search bar near the top right hand corner as shown:

New search list

New search list

This improvement to searching is strong as it changes the way searching is conducted in the vault. Using the quick search does not require a data card and hence it is easier to set up and maintain. Training users on effectively working with PDM can make the user more productive as less time is spent searching – leading to more productivity.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Training

Javelin offers various SOLIDWORKS PDM training courses which cover all the new additions and features such as searching within the vault. PDM Administrator training covers topics such as this in great detail and ample examples and exercises are provided for PDM administrators to familiarize themselves with new additions to SOLIDWORKS PDM.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Quick Search Variable Lists appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ish at October 12, 2019 12:00 PM

October 11, 2019

Surfacing Site Details

I’m getting a little excited about the release of the new surfacing site. It will be opened up for use in the month of October. While I’m ironing out some…

by matt at October 11, 2019 08:04 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2 Version Comment

New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2, we have the ability to view version comments in the data card of a file.

When a file is selected in the SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2, under Data Card, in the detail section of the data card, version comment of the file is included.

Version Comment

Version Comment

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2 Version Comment appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at October 11, 2019 12:22 PM

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Add-in Performance Improvements

In SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 the performance of the SOLIDWORKS PDM Add-in has improved significantly. Enhancements include the following:

  1. The SOLIDWORKS PDM task pane tree refreshes faster and the commands in the SOLIDWORKS PDM toolbar are correctly enabled in the task pane instantaneously when you select a file.
  2. The data in the task pane tree loads in the background when you select a file in the task pane tree. The calls to the database are eliminated.
  3. In the Feature Manager design tree or in the graphics area, when you right-click a file and select SOLIDWORKS PDM, the menus are correctly enabled.
  4. When you select a file in the graphics area or in the Feature Manager design tree, the file listed in the task pane tree is selected and all the available commands are enabled.
  5. The improved communication between client and the PDM Server delivers a faster experience over all in the CAD add-in similar to the File Explorer.

Watch the video below to learn more about these performance enhancements:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VT65wtwRO38?feature=oembed" title="What's New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 - Performance" width="500"></iframe>

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Add-in Performance Improvements appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at October 11, 2019 12:00 PM

Installing SQL Server Express and the Management Studio

The SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) is an integral component for administrating SOLIDWORKS PDM, as it allows us to maintain and capture backups of the database.  When installing a new instance of SQL Express for PDM Standard via the installation manager, the management studio is not included and requires a separate download and install.  In this article, we’re going to look at how to install a new instance of SQL and include the SSMS, ahead of installing PDM Standard.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Install options

SOLIDWORKS PDM Install options

How to download and install SQL Server Express with the Management Studio

Choose the download

Choose the download

  • Select New SQL Server stand-alone installation or add features to an existing installation
New SQL Server stand-alone installation

New SQL Server stand-alone installation

  • Read and accept the license terms, then select Next.
  • The installer checks for issues, if any are reported; these will need to be resolved before continuing.  If no problems are returned we can hit Next;
Installer checks for issues

Installer checks for issues

  • For Feature Selection, choose;
    • Database Engine Services
    • Client Tools Connectivity
    • Client Tools Backward Compatibility
    • Client Tools SDK
    • Management Tools – Basic
    • Management Tools – Complete
  • Then hit Next
Feature Selection

Feature Selection

  • For Instance Configuration;
    • If a new install we can choose Default Instance
    • If there’s an existing SQL install, we can choose Named instance
Instance Configuration

Instance Configuration

  • For Server Configuration, set the following;
    • SQL Server Database Engine:
      • Account Name: NT Service\MSSQL$[INSTANCENAME]
      • Startup Type: Automatic
    • SQL Server Browser:
      • Account Name: NT AUTHORITY\LOCAL SERVICE
      • Startup Type: Automatic
  • Hit Next;
Server Configuration

Server Configuration

  • For Database Engine Configuration, select the following;
    • Authentication Mode
      • Choose Mixed Mode
      • Enter a STRONG password for the sa (system administration) account
    • Specify SQL Server Administrators
      • Add the local administrator account
  • Hit Next
Database Engine Configuration

Database Engine Configuration

  • Installs will begin…..when complete, click Close;
When complete, click Close

When complete, click Close

and a new instance of SQL will be installed, complete with the management studio;

SQL Server Installed

SQL Server Installed

Now, when installing PDM standard we can choose the already created instance of SQL Express;

Installing SOLIDWORKS PDM standard

Installing SOLIDWORKS PDM standard

 

The post Installing SQL Server Express and the Management Studio appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at October 11, 2019 12:00 PM

October 10, 2019

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Update frequently asked questions

Get your SOLIDWORKS 2020 Update frequently asked questions answered below:


SOLIDWORKS 2020 Update General Information

Review our SOLIDWORKS 2020 update general topic questions:

How can I learn about the new features in SOLIDWORKS 2020?

What Windows Operating Systems will be supported by SOLIDWORKS 2020?

The following operating systems are supported by SOLIDWORKS 2020:

  • Windows 7 SP1, 64-bit
  • Windows 10, 64-bit
*SOLIDWORKS 2020 is not supported on Windows 8.1
*Windows Home Editions are not supported
*Only Microsoft Windows networking is supported
*Novell networks and non-Windows network storage devices are not supported
*IMPORTANT: Windows 7 support will end with SOLIDWORKS 2020 SP5

Please see the SOLIDWORKS System Requirements for additional information.

Are Virtual Environments Supported?

Only select Virtual Environments are supported.  Please see the SOLIDWORKS Virtual Environments support page.

NOTE – Virtual environments require a certified GPU for proper performance of SOLIDWORKS, eDrawings and Draftsight.

Certified GPU drivers for virtual environments can be found on the SOLIDWORKS Hardware Certification page.

(Choose “Virtual Desktop” from the Computer Vendor dropdown)

Will SOLIDWORKS 2020 files open in previous major releases (i.e. in SOLIDWORKS 2019)?

The Previous Release Interoperability functionality allows 2020 parts and assemblies to be opened in SOLIDWORKS 2019 SP5, with limited functionality.

Can I run any third party add-in or custom program with SOLIDWORKS 2020?

  • SOLIDWORKS Gold Partner companies have 30 days from the release of SOLIDWORKS 2020 to support the latest version. Check with the Gold Partner that their add-in product is compatible before upgrading. Click here for Gold Partner product details.  Select “Refine your Search with Criteria” and click the checkbox “Show Certified GOLD Partner Products Only”
  • Support Partner (Non-Gold) companies support the latest release on their own schedule. Check with the Solution Partner that their add-in product is compatible with SOLIDWORKS 2020 before upgrading. Click here for Solution Partner product details
  • Custom programs/add-ins should be checked to ensure they are compatible with the latest release.


SOLIDWORKS 2020 Installation

Review our SOLIDWORKS 2020 update installation frequently asked questions:

What is the SOLIDWORKS 2020 Installation Manager?

Each release of SOLIDWORKS has its own Installation Manager.  This is a standalone application that can download/update/upgrade/install/modify/repair all SOLIDWORKS products.  It can be used to create and manage administrative images and standalone installs all within the same user interface.  The Installation Manager can be downloaded from the SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal for each version/service pack.

How does the SOLIDWORKS 2020 Installation Manager work?

The SOLIDWORKS 2020 Installation Manager uses Windows Installer and installs all products silently passing the required parameters to the installations.  You can specify a folder location for the installation.  This location will be used as the root folder for the installation of all products.

The list of installed programs within the Windows Control Program will show a single line for SOLIDWORKS 2020.  This can be used to modify or uninstall any of the SOLIDWORKS Products within a single interface.

What should I do before I upgrade to SOLIDWORKS 2020?

Review our SOLIDWORKS Upgrade Checklist and PDM Upgrade Checklist articles prior to an upgrade.

What’s the recommended installation procedure, to upgrade or to perform a new installation?

Both installation methods are supported. Updating your existing SOLIDWORKS installation can be done if users no longer require the prior version still on their system.  A new installation will leave existing installations and install separately.

Can I have more than one version of SOLIDWORKS installed on my system at the same time?

Yes, it is possible to have multiple versions of SOLIDWORKS on the same system.  During install, choose the option for a new installation and specify separate paths for the install directory and the Toolbox directory.

Review the section “Installing SOLIDWORKS with Unique Install Directories” in our SOLIDWORKS Installation & Setup FAQs found on our Technical Support page.

Can I directly upgrade to SOLIDWORKS 2020 from SOLIDWORKS 2018 or prior?

You do have an option to perform a direct upgrade to SOLIDWORKS 2020 from a major version prior to SOLIDWORKS 2019.

If you are skipping several major versions (i.e. SOLIDWORKS 2016 to 2020), it’s typically best to uninstall your current version and install the latest version as a new installation.

To ensure a clean installation of SOLIDWORKS 2020, review our SOLIDWORKS Complete Uninstall Guide to remove all previous installations.

How do I upgrade a SOLIDWORKS Toolbox database in a shared environment?

When a SOLIDWORKS Toolbox directory is located on a shared server location, upgrading the local client SOLIDWORKS installation may not update the database.  Review our Toolbox Upgrade article for steps to upgrade the Toolbox.

Where can I find more information on SOLIDWORKS Installations?

Review our Installation Guides on our Support page:

For more detailed information on installations, review the SOLIDWORKS Administration Guides.


SOLIDWORKS 2020 Standalone Licensing – Node Locked

Review our SOLIDWORKS 2020 update frequently asked questions for standalone licensing:

Do I need a new serial number to install SOLIDWORKS 2020?

If your license includes Subscription Service, your existing serial number will automatically be upgraded for SOLIDWORKS 2020.  During the installation and activation, the serial number will be authenticated for its validity with the SOLIDWORKS 2020 release.

What is Product Activation?

Product activation is a secure, hassle-free process that authenticates licensed users during the installation process. For more information regarding product activation please refer to the SOLIDWORKS Activation FAQ.

If I do not have internet access on my SOLIDWORKS workstation, how will I activate my product?

Activation requires an internet connection or email access. After successful activation, you do not need to be online to use the products.

If you do not have internet access on the computer where SOLIDWORKS is installed, you can choose the Manual activation method to Save an activation request file.  This file can be transferred to another computer with internet access (i.e. via a USB key).  Email the file to activation@solidworks.com.  You will receive an email response within a few minutes with an activation response file.  Copy this file back to the SOLIDWORKS workstation and continue through the Manual activation method but select to Open the authorized activation file.


SOLIDWORKS 2020 SolidNetWork Licensing (SNL) – Floating

Review our SOLIDWORKS 2020 update frequently asked questions for SNL:

How is network (floating) licensing handled in SOLIDWORKS 2020?

SOLIDWORKS 2020 continues to use the same SolidNetWork License Manager to provide network licenses for all SOLIDWORKS products.  SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard and PDM Professional licenses use the same SolidNetWork License Manager in 2020.

  1. A server on your network hosts the SolidNetWork License Manager Server application for activation of all network licenses
  2. Clients connected to the same network obtain licenses from the server on opening SOLIDWORKS.  When SOLIDWORKS is closed, the license is returned to the server.
  3. License borrowing is available to lock licenses to a machine when disconnected from the network

What Operating Systems are supported for the SolidNetWork License Manager?

Review the section “SOLIDWORKS Network License Server” on the SOLIDWORKS System Requirements page.

Can SOLIDWORKS, Simulation, Composer, Electrical, PCB, Plastics, CAM, Visualize and PDM products run from one license manager tool?

Yes, users can manage all SOLIDWORKS product licenses using one utility.  During installation, you can enter multiple serial numbers separated by commas.  You will need to install the License Manager on a server, accessible by all clients.  Please review the “SOLIDWORKS Installation Guide Network License” on our Support page.

Why are the clients not able to obtain a SOLIDWORKS license from the server?

Firewalls may be preventing the communication between the client and server machines.  Review our SOLIDWORKS SolidNetwork License Manager Troubleshooting article for possible solutions.

Do clients have access to view licenses currently in use?

Yes, SOLIDWORKS client installations will include a SolidNetWork License Manager Client application.  This can be accessed through Windows Start > SOLIDWORKS 2020 Tools > SolidNetWork License Manager Client 2020.  Check the License Usage tab and select the required product from the dropdown.

Can the 2020 SolidNetWork License Manager support prior versions of SOLIDWORKS?

Yes, the License Manager is backwards compatible so the SOLIDWORKS 2020 License Manager will support all earlier versions of the software (since activation was introduced in 2008).

However the License Manager will always need to be on the same major version or newer.  For example, SOLIDWORKS 2020 will not work with the 2019 SolidNetWork License Manager.

Why do I see extra SOLIDWORKS Standard licenses on the “License Usage” tab in the SolidNetwork License Manager?

A SOLIDWORKS Standard license is always required to be checked out when opening SOLIDWORKS.  When an add-in that requires a higher license is enabled, the Professional or Premium license is checked out, but it keeps a Standard license checked out at the same time.

For example if you have purchased one (1) SOLIDWORKS Standard license and two (2) SOLIDWORKS Premium licenses, the License Manager will show a total of three (3) Standard licenses since two are required for the Premium version.

What is the “License Order” tab in the SolidNetwork License Manager?

The License Order tab allows you to change the order of product taken from the server if multiple levels of products are available on the network.  For example, Simulation products have various levels (SOLIDWORKS Premium, Simulation Standard, Simulation Professional, Simulation Premium).  This can also apply to other licenses such as SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard and Visualize Professional.

In SOLIDWORKS 2020, the Simulation add-in was enhanced for the ability to choose which license to use when enabling the add-in, rather than needing to use the License Order tab.

What is the “License Borrowing” tab in the Network License Manager?

If a computer will be disconnected from the network due to travel or working from home, you can borrow a license for a specified period.  This locks a SOLIDWORKS license on the computer and allow you to launch the program without being connected to your work network.

Borrowing a Professional or Premium license automatically borrows the pre-requisite SOLIDWORKS Standard license.

How do I upgrade to the 2020 SolidNetWork License Manager?

You can upgrade an existing SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager to a new version using the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager, rather than uninstalling the previous version.

IMPORTANT: Once the upgrade is complete, reactivate the License Manager to obtain the 2020 licenses.

Can I use a remote desktop application to install and activate the License Manager on a server?

Avoid using a remote desktop application as this can cause a change to the Computer Identifier of the server during activation. This may cause a mismatch of the hardware ID and an Activation Count Exceeded error may occur and the activation will fail.

Where can I find more information about SolidNetWork License installations?

Review our “SOLIDWORKS Installation Network License” document on our Support page


SOLIDWORKS 2020 Activation

Review our SOLIDWORKS 2020 update activation procedures for standalone and network licenses.

Standalone License:

To activate a standalone license:

  1. Start SOLIDWORKS and add-on required (i.e. Simulation).
  2. If you have not yet activated your license, the Product Activation dialog box appears.
  3. Choose the Automatic (recommended) or Manual option.
    Automatic – Submit the request automatically over the internet (requires internet connection)
    Manual – Click Save to create a file, and then send the file to activation@solidworks.com from another computer that has internet access. When you receive the response file, typically within minutes of the initial submission, copy to the client machine and run the activation procedure again and click Open to load the response file.
  4. The Activation/Reactivate Succeeded dialog box displays the products that have been activated.

To transfer a standalone license:

  1. Open SOLIDWORKS on the activated computer
  2. Go to Help > Licenses > Deactivate…
  3. Choose the license to transfer (or select all)
  4. Choose the Automatic or Manual option
  5. Once the transfer is successful, install and activate on the new computer

Network Licensing:

To activate a network license:

  1. Install the SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager from the Installation Manager, Server Products
  2. Open the SolidNetWork License Manager Server 2020 from Windows Start > SOLIDWORKS Tools 2020.
  3. Choose Yes when prompted “Would you like to activate now?”
  4. Choose the Automatic (recommended) or Manual option.
    Automatic – Submit the request automatically over the internet (requires internet connection)
    Manual – Click Save to create a file, and then send the file to activation@solidworks.com from another computer that has internet access. When you receive the response file, typically within minutes of the initial submission, copy to the client machine and run the activation procedure again and click Open to load the response file.
  5. The Activation/Reactivate Succeeded dialog box displays the products that have been activated.

To transfer a network license from a server:

  1. Open the SolidNetWork License Manager on the server
  2. On the ‘Server Administration’ tab, click Modify
  3. Select ‘Move your product license(s) to a new/upgraded computer
  4. Choose the Automatic or Manual method and follow the steps
  5. Install and activate the License Manager on a new server
  6. Point all client machines to the new server by opening the SolidNetWork License Manager Client on each machine and add the new server name in the Server List tab

For more information, please review our “SOLIDWORKS Installation Guide Network License” on our Support page


SOLIDWORKS 2020 Online Licensing

Review our SOLIDWORKS 2020 update activation procedures for online licenses.

What is Online Licensing?

Online licensing was introduced with SOLIDWORKS 2018 where you can simply log in on opening SOLIDWORKS to use your license.  Activation is not required so you can log in to SOLIDWORKS from different machines to have access.  Only one machine can have an active session at one time.  Closing SOLIDWORKS will end the session and allow another machine to be logged in.

Specific licenses are assigned to different users, so the proper license is obtained when logging in.  This is specified when setting up online licensing.  This will only apply to standalone licenses (not network/floating licenses).

Review our SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing articles for more information.

Can I use Online Licensing with SOLIDWORKS 2017 or earlier?

No, online licensing is only available for SOLIDWORKS 2018 and onward.  You will still need to use activation-based licensing for prior versions.

How do I enable Online Licensing?

By default, standalone licenses will be set to the original activation-based structure.  The license can be changed to Online by accessing the Admin Portal from a registered My.SolidWorks.com account.

Do I need an internet connection to use Online Licensing?

Yes, you require access to the internet while using the online license.  There are “heartbeats” to the SOLIDWORKS server to verify that you are still have an internet connection.  A warning will be given after 15 minutes of lost connection.  After 30 minutes you will be prompted to save all work and asks to shutdown SOLIDWORKS.

What if I need to go offline and still use SOLIDWORKS?

The license can be obtained when connected online and then set to offline mode.  This will lock the license to the machine for up to 30 days, so you can use SOLIDWORKS without an internet connection.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Update frequently asked questions appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at October 10, 2019 03:02 PM

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Hardware Recommendations

Here is an overview of our current recommended SOLIDWORKS 2020 hardware.  Browse through this FAQ for more detailed information.

  • Processor: 3 GHz or higher clock speed (preferably over 4GHz)
  • Operating System: Windows 10 64-bit
  • Memory: 32GB (16GB minimum)
  • Hard Drive: Solid State Drive (SSD), maintaining at least 20GB free space
  • Graphics Card:
    • Standard assemblies: NVIDIA Quadro P1000 or AMD Radeon Pro WX 4100
    • Large assemblies with simple parts: NVIDIA Quadro P2000 or AMD Radeon Pro WX 7100
    • Large assemblies with complex parts: NVIDIA Quadro P4000/5000 or AMD Radeon Pro WX 8200/9100
    • SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2020: NVIDIA Quadro P4000/5000 or AMD Radeon Pro WX 8200/9100
  • Internet Connection: High speed broadband connection for downloading service packs
  • File Storage: SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard or SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional

What are the minimum hardware requirements for SOLIDWORKS 2020?

The minimum requirements can be found on the SOLIDWORKS System Requirements page.

What Processor (CPU) is recommended for SOLIDWORKS 2020?

SOLIDWORKS supports both Intel and AMD processors.

The rebuild process in SOLIDWORKS is inherently linear (parent/child relationship of features) and therefore can only use a single core.  Rebuild performance can be increased by having a faster clock speed of the CPU.

Some functionality can leverage multi-thread technology and share the workload over multiple processor cores.  Products such as SOLIDWORKS Simulation and PhotoView 360 can take advantage of multi-threading, as can other areas like the user interface activities.  Having more processor cores can improve performance in these scenarios.

Keep in mind that the fastest machine is no substitute for good design practices.  Minimizing in-context references, utilizing large assembly modes and other performance tools will reduce the load on the processor.  Javelin’s Large Assembly Service can dramatically improve your productivity by improving performance of assemblies through different techniques.

You can test and compare performance of your hardware using the SOLIDWORKS Performance Test and PassMark benchmark tool.

What Operating System is recommended for SOLIDWORKS 2020?

SOLIDWORKS 2020 is officially supported on the following operating systems:

  • Windows 7 SP1, 64-bit
  • Windows 10, 64-bit
Note: Windows Home editions are not supported
Note: Windows 8.1 support ended with SOLIDWORKS 2018 SP5
*IMPORTANT: Windows 7 will end support with SOLIDWORKS 2020 SP5

eDrawings and eDrawings Professional 2020 are supported on all operating systems listed above as well as macOS 10.13 or higher.

Does SOLIDWORKS 2020 work in virtual environments?

Only specific virtual environments are supported.  Visit the SOLIDWORKS Virtual Environment Support page for more details.

Does SOLIDWORKS support Windows Home Editions?

No, SOLIDWORKS does NOT support Windows Home Editions.  You may not encounter any issues using a Windows Home Edition version, however SOLIDWORKS does not guarantee proper functionality using this unsupported operating system.

How much Memory (RAM) is recommended for SOLIDWORKS 2020?

The minimum requirement of RAM indicated on the SOLIDWORKS System Requirements page is at least 16GB.  However larger models and simulation studies may require more memory.  To avoid running out of memory for growing models, consider installing 32GB.  It’s best to split this between fewer memory chips to leave room for possible expansion in the future, for example install two 16 GB memory chips.

What type of Hard Drive is recommended for SOLIDWORKS 2020?

For best performance, a Solid-State Drive (SSD) can provide up to 10x faster performance for open/save tasks compared to a standard Hard Disk Drive (HDD).  SSDs have come down in price over the years and are worth the investment.

Also note that opening files from a local SSD drive compared to opening from a standard disk drive on a network server can be up to 100x faster.  Why do assemblies take longer to open over a network?

Be sure to maintain enough hard drive space after installing for Windows to run effectively.  Keep at least 20GB or 10% of your hard drive capacity as free space.

For even greater performance, you can consider using a PCIe connected hard drive instead of SATA.  These are physically connected to the motherboard, instead of using cables, but does come at a cost.  Also, you may wish to research into using RAID storage (Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks) to improve performance and security.

What type of Graphics Card is recommended for SOLIDWORKS 2020?

The NVIDIA Quadro, AMD FirePro or AMD Radeon Pro series are certified graphics cards for SOLIDWORKS.  A graphics card with hardware OpenGL acceleration will provide superior performance and stability, especially in 3D model viewing (refresh, rotate, zoom, pan).

The NVIDIA Quadro P, GP, GV and RTX series are the latest to be releases.

The AMD Radeon Pro WX series is the latest release.

While a high-end graphics card sounds like it will give much better performance, the amount of money involved won’t see a dramatic boost.  Investing in a faster CPU and SSD drive will provide much greater gain in performance.

For SOLIDWORKS Visualize users, renderings leverage the GPU directly so investing in a powerful graphics card is beneficial.  All past versions of SOLIDWORKS Visualize supported NVIDIA Quadro graphics cards.  However ONLY SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2020 supports AMD Radeon Pro graphics cards.

A full list of certified graphics cards and its associated certified driver for each SOLIDWORKS version can be found on the SOLIDWORKS Graphics Card Drivers page.  Certified drivers will only be provided for the latest three major releases of SOLIDWORKS.

Graphics cards designed for “gaming” or multi-media applications, such as NVIDIA GeForce or AMD Radeon cards (not Radeon Pro), do NOT offer maximum performance or stability for SOLIDWORKS. These cards are optimized for a low number of polygons displayed on the screen, but at a high frame rate. CAD applications have the opposite requirement, where polygon count is high (the detail in your design model) but the image does not change rapidly so high frame rates are not as critical.  Using a certified graphics card and driver combo will yield the most stable platform for running SOLIDWORKS.

The use of two physical graphics cards is not recommended for SOLIDWORKS.  SOLIDWORKS does not take advantage of the second card.

What versions of Microsoft Office are compatible with SOLIDWORKS 2020?

SOLIDWORKS has the capability of using Microsoft Excel to create BOMs, Design Tables, and more.  After a new Microsoft Office major version is released, SOLIDWORKS must perform tests and therefore will not be certified on the given service pack at the time.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 is compatible with Microsoft Office 2013, 2016 and 2019.  Check the Microsoft Products table on the SOLIDWORKS System Requirements page.

Should I store my files locally on my computer or on a network drive?

For maximum performance and stability, files should be worked on locally. Files opened and saved directly over a network connection will always be slower than a local drive and increases the chance of file corruption.  Data management products such as SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard or SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional automatically manage the movement of files from network servers to local disk drives to ensure maximum performance and stability. This is one of the many key benefits of a data management system. Learn more about SOLIDWORKS PDM.

What is the difference between SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard and Professional?

SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard is included with licenses of SOLIDWORKS Professional and SOLIDWORKS Premium.  This provides easy access to standard data management and revision control functionality.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional adds more functionality such as multi-site replication and automation.

Read our SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard and Professional Comparison article for further detail.

What are the hardware recommendations for SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020?

Javelin recommends using a dedicated server for running the SOLIDWORKS PDM vault. Besides allowing for maximum performance for the CAD users, using a dedicated server provides version/revision control, workflow process management and custom property management.  Check the server requirements on the SOLIDWORKS System Requirements page.

Javelin provides PDM Implementation and Upgrade Services to have you setup quickly and efficiently.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Hardware Recommendations appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at October 10, 2019 01:50 PM

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Child Reference State Conditions

In SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 we have the ability to define child reference state conditions, to prevent parent files from being transitioned before all the requirements are met.  In the example we’re going to use in this article, we’ve got the parent assembly; Light.SLDASM and we want to ensure that the assembly doesn’t get transitioned through Submit for Approval ahead of all it’s child reference parts and sub-assemblies being approved…this way the assembly and drawing can be rebuilt and updated ahead of being approved.

How to define Child Reference State Conditions

In this example, let’s use the Default vault setup.  The corresponding CAD workflow is Default Workflow, and we want all child files to be in the Approved state ahead of the parent being able to transition through Submit for Approval.

  • Administration Tool > Workflows > Default Workflow
Default Workflow

Default Workflow

We would like to prevent the parent assembly from transitioning through Submit for Approval so we’ll modify the properties of the transition and add a condition

  • Default Wokflow > Submit for Approval
    • Conditions
Submit for Approval

Submit for Approval

  • Conditions > <Click here to add a condition>
    • Variable = Child Reference Current State
    • Comparison = Text Equal To
    • Value = Default Workflow.Approved
Default Workflow.Approved

Default Workflow.Approved

Under Configuration / Path we could use wildcards and specify a file name or pattern etc, for example “%.sldprt” to limit this condition to just part files, but for this example we’ll leave it blank to apply to all child reference files.

  • Hit OK, then Save and close the workflow

Success!  The result is; we cannot transition the Light assembly until all it’s corresponding child references are in the Approved state.

cannot transition the Light assembly until all it's corresponding child references are in the Approved state

Cannot transition the Light assembly until all it’s corresponding child references are in the Approved state

This just blew my mind!  Where can I learn more about customizing the workflow to increase efficiency?

Thanks for asking, here at Javelin we offer an Administering SOLIDWORKS PDM Course where Workflow creation and features like creating an automatic revision numbering system and much more are covered in detail, helping you to customize the vault to your company’s specific needs, and getting the vault to do the work so you don’t have to.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Child Reference State Conditions appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at October 10, 2019 12:00 PM

October 09, 2019

SolidSmack

The Best Apps of the Week — iPadOS Edition (Fall 2019)

iPad

There’s no denying that the iPad is still the best tablet design out there—whether you go with the standard entry-level model or leverage the power of an iPad Pro. And with the release of iPadOS in late September, professionals can get even more of a desktop-like experience out of it. For this week’s roundup of our favorite apps, we’re picking six of our favorite apps to use on the all-new operating system.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it to tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Shapr 3D CAD modeling (iPadOS — Free)

Shapr3D is the only truly mobile 3D design app. It offers a quick but precise way to create 3D models. World-class Siemens technologies (Parasolid™, D-Cubed™) provide speed and reliability. All running locally on iPad Pro, putting incredible power in your hands.

<figure class="aligncenter">Shapr 3D</figure>

Adobe Fresco  (iPadOS — Free)

Fresco is a drawing and painting app built especially for iPad Pro and Apple Pencil and designed for artists who draw professionally or paint for passion. Fresco combines the power of your favorite Photoshop brushes with the precision of vector brushes and the revolutionary technology of Live Brushes, for unlimited expression.

<figure class="aligncenter">Adobe Fresco</figure>

Darkroom – Photo Editor (iPadOS — Free)

Save yourself from the multi-app workflow and discover the most well-designed, integrated, and powerful editing app for iOS. iPad support, RAW support, Portrait editing, hashtag manager, custom filter, content-aware frames, and so, so much more.

<figure class="aligncenter">Darkroom – Photo Editor</figure>

Bear (iPadOS — Free)

Bear is a focused, flexible notes app used by writers, lawyers, chefs, teachers, engineers, students, parents and more! Bear has quick organisation, editing tools, and export options to help you write quickly and share anywhere and preserve your privacy with encryption.

<figure class="aligncenter">Bear</figure>

Post-it®  (iPadOS — Free)

The Post-it® App brings the simplicity of the Post-it® Note to your smartphone and tablet. Whether you use Post-it® Notes for collaboration or for personal note taking, the Post-it® App helps you keep that momentum going.

<figure class="aligncenter">Post-it®</figure>

Agenda. (iPadOS — Free)

Agenda is a date-focused note taking app for iOS, iPadOS, and macOS, which helps you plan and document your projects. Agenda gives you a complete picture of past, present and future, driving your projects forward.

<figure class="aligncenter">Agenda.</figure>

The post The Best Apps of the Week — iPadOS Edition (Fall 2019) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 09, 2019 06:47 PM

New Robotic Needling Process Enables Additive Manufacturing with Wool

3d printing textiles

As mankind’s ever-growing desire to make his own stuff increases, so does the amount of materials he can use to 3D print with. Wood, metal, carbon fiber, and now… wool?

Researchers at the University of Michigan’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning developed a new felting process—dubbed Hard + Soft—that allows for different kinds of wool and polyester to be interwoven together in three dimensions:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rx4DLA0ecYc?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Creating different tools and workflows, the team used their new robotic needle felting technique to make a number of prototype panels and a single footstool. These showcase a number of different felting techniques such as shingling, shiplap (overlapping layers of felt over each other), and quilting.

<figure class="wp-block-image">robotic needle felting process</figure>

According to the team, they came up with the idea due to the relatively sparse use of additive manufacturing in the textile industry. While 3D knitting and weaving exist, the materials used in the processes are limited due to their fiber density and thickness.

<figure class="wp-block-image">robotic needle felting process</figure>

Since the innate properties of felt allow it to be combined with different materials, this makes it a more flexible material to work with. This new process felts the material in three dimensions, allowing for more properties (such as stiffness and density) to be added and more shapes to be created.

<figure class="wp-block-image">robotic needle felting process</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">robotic needle felting process</figure>

Felt is most commonly used for soundproofing acoustic panels, but it can also be found in sound dampers for musical instruments and guns, and mixed in with clothes and furniture. With this new felting technique, the team hopes it will be useful in soundproofing more complexly designed open-plan offices.

Learn more over at the Taubman College blog.

The post New Robotic Needling Process Enables Additive Manufacturing with Wool appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at October 09, 2019 05:53 PM

3D Hubs Adds Sheet Metal Fabrication to On-Demand Parts Service

Sheet Metal bending

While they started as a simple peer-to-peer 3D printing network for locating desktop 3D printers in your area, Amsterdam-based 3D Hubs has since expanded into a full online custom part service. Now, the company offers industrial 3D printing, CNC machining, and injection molding. 

With the addition of sheet metal fabrication, announced at EMO Hannover last month, engineers now have one more reason to turn to 3D Hubs for all their custom part sourcing needs.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Used to produce thin metal parts in a range of different industries ranging from aerospace to packaging, sheet metal fabrication is well-suited for both prototypes and end-use parts. The range of materials offered by 3D Hubs for sheet metal fabrication includes aluminum, stainless steel, mild steel, and copper. The Sheet Metal can be processed via either laser cutting or bending.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

“We want to be a one-stop-shop for manufacturing,” said CEO Bram de Zwart. “And that means making sure engineers have what they need when they need it. Adding sheet metal fabrication is all part of our mission to provide the easiest and most efficient way to source high-quality parts.”

Materials offered

  • Aluminum 6061-T6
  • Aluminum 5754
  • Aluminum 5052
  • Mild Steel 1018
  • Stainless Steel 304
  • Stainless Steel 316L
  • Copper C110

Available processes

  • Laser cutting – o.5 – 10 mm thick
  • Bending – 0.5 – 6 mm thick

Learn more over at 3D Hubs.

The post 3D Hubs Adds Sheet Metal Fabrication to On-Demand Parts Service appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 09, 2019 05:41 PM

How to Source Impossible to Find Things Using AliExpress and Google Image Search

You are working on a new design and want to incorporate a new component or need a unique part; A part requiring outside design and fabrication expertise, a keystone part, a part that can break a design log jam. 

You need THE THING!

How to find ‘The Thing’? You have looked everywhere. You scoured the internet, you looked in your junk drawer, you dug a hole in the ground… And quickly filled it back in when your neighbor started dialing the police. Nothing.

As a last-ditch effort, you make an unholy bargain with a clever imp creature* to turn straw into ‘The Thing’. Suddenly he wants your first patent, all royalties, and a 83% stake in the company and, unless you can name what ‘The Thing’ is, you are in a real bind. You better find the name of ‘The Thing’ quick so you can get your ‘The Thing’ and keep your IP and income intact.

Step 1. Determine the Industry Standard Name(s) / Defeat The Imp

When it comes to mechanical components, there is a lot of jargon. As you get into specific sub-genres, they each have even more of their own jargon. Levels upon levels of jargon. And a lot of jargon is not logical, it is derived from the slang of occupational trades and languages.

It’s like when you’re hanging out with an imp and it’s all like, “I’ll splinter your skindles and shear your sheep silly, should you not guess the name!” and you’re all like, what the heck are you even talking about? The benefit of jargon is specificity, when there is a one-word (or string of words) to describe a thing then there is no ambiguity about the thing in question. 

So, to find ‘The Thing’, you need to find the industry jargon name. Start straightforwardly, by thinking of a generic name you think best describes the item. This could be a description of what it looks like or what it does. “It’s like a this but this.”  Then begin testing your hypothesis. 

Perform a test by doing a Google image search using your first guess description/name.  If almost all the images are of the thing you are looking for, JACKPOT, you just hit pay dirt.  However, If only a smattering of the images is of the thing, then you found an incorrect term that happens to be a good enough incorrect term that others also thought of it. 

When you find an image that matches the thing you are looking for, follow the image link to its page. This may lead to forums, resellers and personal pages using an incorrect layman’s term and not the industry-standard term. 

The intermediate goal is to find a manufacturer’s webpage for the thing. Manufacturers are entrenched in their specific industry and therefore use the appropriate terminology.

There are a couple of paths to get here.

Path one is using part numbers. Manufacturer’s part numbers can often be found listed on resellers’ pages which can then be used as a bread crumb trail back to the manufacturer. 

Path two is through branding. It can be as simple as seeing the manufacturer’s name printed directly on the item, documentation, or marketing material or more indirect like trying to link a logo to the company.

Going through this exercise may have you feeling like a lead MI5 agent – zooming in on high-res images, cross-referencing terminology, using search and site filters like no one has used them… at least, in the last 15 minutes.

Some retailers, like McMaster-Carr, purposefully hide the manufacturer’s identifying information to limit circumvention. They couldn’t have you going direct to the source now, could they? However, we’ll get you there and, once you’re on the manufacturer’s website, it will be evident – the thing’s name should be easily associated with the thing on a retailer’s listing or associated product categories.  Do a final check, plug that name back into a Google image search, and see the results – you should see a wider variety of images, retailers and possibly other manufacturers.

Quick recap: product name guess –> product pictures –> retailer listing –> product clues –> manufacturers

Step 2: Getting Your Thing / Living the Fairytale

Congratulations, you beat the imp! You found the industry standard name for ‘The Thing’.  Is the name anything like what you expected? Are you wondering what kind of spoiled seafood someone had eaten to think that was an even remotely reasonable name (Answer: squid)?

Now that you found the key, it’s time to start opening doors and acquiring the specific version/subset of your thing. Plug your thing’s name into a generic search engine, like Google.  Sometimes, with the right term in your back pocket, the thing is now ripe for the plucking and that’s the end of your journey. Other times, finding the source is the first of your trials and getting the thing is another saga.

The more specialized the industry and application, the trickier it can be to get the version of the thing you need for the intended application. For that matter, it can be hard to get any version whatsoever.  There may be only a few small companies that make it to order or in the production-sized quantities you need. I have resorted to everything from requesting a loaner to buying a used version on eBay.

Be prepared to modify and hack current offerings to get them to a state to integrate and validate in your design. Then ride proudly into town pulling wagon carts weighed down with the vanquished prize and treasure chests full of your shimmering thing! Queue the trumpets and live happily ever after.

Let’s Do a Test

I have recently wanted to get a super cool hat that will let me fly around. My first guess for a name is, “colorful flying hat”.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

You can see from the google images search that I found some ok results for what I am looking for but mostly they aren’t matches.  “Colorful flying hat” isn’t the name of what I’m after. The first link to propellerheadhats.com looks promising. I’ll go there to see what I can find.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Okay. I found a website that sells the item I am looking for. This looks like a good spot to do some digging and see what information I can find.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Scrolling and reading down the page I come across some information that looks promising. Bingo! I’ll do another image search for “propeller hat” to confirm what I found. BOOM. All the images are exactly what I was looking for.  I found my thing! Now, I can expand my search from there to zero in on the style, quantity, and price I need.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

The Secret: AliExpress

But wait, there’s more! Let’s try searching on AliExpress to see what kind of pricing is available. You’ll notice a lot of search options and filters – I recommend checking ‘Free Shipping’, ‘Free Return’, ‘4 star and up’, sorted by most ‘Orders’ and then your preferred ‘Ship from’ (United States, China, etc). Note: that search criteria is pretty tight but you can start loosening up the requirements from there.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Quite a range! All the way down to $1.91 a pop. Wow! Our energy and transportation problems are solved. We now have a bunch of options. We can start optimizing for price and shipping, or contact the manufacturer about customization, quanitites or whatever we may need.

With my new hat, I’ll now be able to stroll around more proud and confident.  And, with my foolproof system, you can too!

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

* Yeah, yeah, yeah. This ‘imp creature’ sounds a lot like Rumpelstiltskin. Well, ok, it may have served as a wee amount of inspriation.

The post How to Source Impossible to Find Things Using AliExpress and Google Image Search appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Dan Slaski at October 09, 2019 04:12 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PCB 2020 Duplicate Designators from ECAD to MCAD

In SOLIDWORKS PCB 2020, duplicate pad designators can now be pushed through the PCB connector from ECAD to MCAD.

Duplicate pad designators are created:

SOLIDWORKS PCB 2020 Duplicate Designators

SOLIDWORKS PCB 2020 Duplicate Designators

When pushed through the PCB connector, previously this would have returned an error and cancelled the operation. However, here it does not

No error reported from Connector

No error reported from Connector

As shown, the Push operation is completed and the pads are now available on the mechanical side.

Pads are now available on the mechanical side

Pads are now available on the mechanical side

The post SOLIDWORKS PCB 2020 Duplicate Designators from ECAD to MCAD appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ish at October 09, 2019 12:00 PM

October 08, 2019

SolidSmack

Protolabs Adds Carbon 3D Printing to On-Demand Parts Service

While in-house 3D printing is commonly used for early concept work, many professionals and businesses still outsource their parts to industrial services when more complicated materials are required.

Among others, Protolabs has been a leader of custom 3D printing services over the past decade—with more than 100,000 parts printed every month across six different additive manufacturing technologies.

And now, they’re adding Carbon technology to that list for engineers to get parts created through Carbon Digital Light Synthesis without the headache of ownership.

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</figure>

“We recognize that market demand for additive manufacturing has moved beyond prototyping and is being leveraged to create fully functional parts at a much larger scale,” said Greg Thompson, Protolabs’ global product manager for 3D printing. “We are committed to supporting that demand in a technology-agnostic manner so that our customers get the best possible parts from the best possible 3D printing technology.”

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hDdZiOBHuNk?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Carbon DLS technology uses light to set the 3D shape of printed parts before the parts undergo a thermal-curing process that brings them to their final material properties. Engineers use it for intricate designs that are challenging to mold and end-use applications. It is comparable to stereolithography; however, Carbon DLS images entire layers at a time—thus speeding up the build time.

Find out more over at Protolabs.

The post Protolabs Adds Carbon 3D Printing to On-Demand Parts Service appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 08, 2019 04:49 PM

After Decades, Braun Speakers Are Coming Back with Smart Technologies

Braun Audio

From the 1950s to the 1980s, Braun, under the guidance of German industrial design icon Dieter Rams, helmed a ton of firsts for the audio industry. They made the first all-wave receiver, first portable music player, first stackable Hi-Fi system, and the first wall mounded sound system, among many others. Fast forward to 2019 where Braun Audio has announced its return to the industry that helped put it on the map.

Taking inspiration from Rams’ previous designs, the new Braun Audio LE speakers retain the classic blocky look of past Braun speakers with a modern 21st-century technology update including—you guessed it, voice control.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OWeU9_3PmXk?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Much like any smart speaker you see today, the Audio LE speakers feature a clean, minimalist design. The components are encased in an aluminum frame with rounded edges (as opposed to the original Braun speakers’ sharp edges, if you’ll recall) and have a small LED indicator on their top right corners. As you would expect, you can mount these babies on stands and place them either horizontally or vertically.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Braun Audio </figure>

While the speakers aren’t exactly portable, they are wireless. You can connect them via the onboard WiFi and Bluetooth 4.2 with AAC, letting you connect to apps like Spotify. The WiFi connectivity even allows you to control the speakers using either the built-in software or the Google Home app. If you aren’t in the mood to press buttons, the Braun Audio LE speakers come with four beam-forming microphones with voice control, letting you shout your music requests from across the house.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Braun Audio</figure>

The speakers also come with physical controls for those who can’t grasp their heads around modern technology or who are just feeling nostalgic. You can pause, play, skip, mute, and connect to your Bluetooth devices using the buttons on the speakers using these controls. In case you’re in the mood for some private listening, you can also connect your headphones using the 3.5mm jack found on the speakers.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Braun Audio</figure>

Three speakers make up the Braun Audio LE system:

<figure class="wp-block-image">Braun Audio</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Braun Audio</figure>

The LE01 is the biggest of the trio, featuring two 5.25-inch woofers with three 2.5-inch radiator drive units and two quadratic 8 x 4.5-inch bass radiators and three class-D amplifiers. This one is set to cost around $1,199.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Braun Audio</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Braun Audio</figure>

The LE02 is the middle child with one 5.5-inch woofer, two 2.25-inch radiator drive units, two quadratic 6 x 3.5-inch bass radiators, and two class-D amplifiers costs $799.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Braun Audio</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Braun Audio</figure>

Lastly, the LE03 has one 3.5-inch woofer, one 1.5-inch radiator drive, one Race-track 5 x 3-inch bass radiator, and one class-D amplifier. Even though this is the smallest speaker, the LE03 will still hold you back $379.

Combined, the entire sound system will cost about $2,377. All three speakers will be available in either black or white and will be released this month of October. You can find out more on each individual speaker on the Braun Audio webpage.

The post After Decades, Braun Speakers Are Coming Back with Smart Technologies appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at October 08, 2019 04:24 PM

SolidSmack Radio | The Penny Groove Curvature (Powered by Spotify)

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’re getting things rolling with “Galleon Ship” from the all-new Nick Cave album, Ghosteen, before rolling into a tasty set with tracks from Lou Hayter, Pixies, Beck, Ariel Pink, and others before wrapping up with “Little Dark Age” from MGMT. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<figure><iframe allow="encrypted-media" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/playlist/5Ubr4lPKnS2v1Es0oZVjOO" width="100%"></iframe></figure>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Penny Groove Curvature (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 08, 2019 04:19 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Resize dialog boxes

New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 dialog boxes for the following nodes are customizable and can be resized:

  • Edit Variable
  • Serial Number
  • Indexing Settings
  • Cold Storage Schema
  • Data Import/Export
  • File Type Properties
  • Customizable Columns
  • BOM
  • Dispatch
  • Edit Template

To resize the dialog boxes, the process is very similar to that of Windows Explorer — hover the cursor over one of the corners of the dialog box to be resized, and simply click, hold, and drag the cursor to resize to the desired size.

 

Resize dialog box

Resize dialog box

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Resize dialog boxes appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ish at October 08, 2019 12:00 PM

October 07, 2019

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Monday List 41.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Goal-Setting Doesn’t Have To Be Complicated

10 Tips to set better goals in your company.

<figure class="aligncenter">Goal-Setting Doesn’t Have To Be Complicated</figure>

Addicted to Screens? That’s Really a You Problem

Nir Eyal, who wrote the industry manual for hooking people on tech, now has a recipe to free you — even though it was your fault to begin with.

<figure class="aligncenter">Addicted to Screens? That’s Really a You Problem</figure>

Don’t Trust China to Make Our Subway Cars, Warns Industry

They’re built in two U.S. factories by a company that’s taking over the rail car industry worldwide.

<figure class="aligncenter">Don’t Trust China to Make Our Subway Cars, Warns Industry</figure>

Tech’s Most Controversial Startup Now Makes Drone-Killing Robots

Founded by Palmer Luckey and backed by Peter Thiel, Anduril is rekindling the connection between the American military and Silicon Valley.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Tech’s Most Controversial Startup Now Makes Drone-Killing Robots</figure>

The Young and the Reckless

A gang of teen hackers snatched the keys to Microsoft’s videogame empire. Then they went too far.

<figure class="aligncenter">The Young and the Reckless</figure>

The power of doing nothing at all

“I’ve heard from many that you’re the fiercest hunter in all of the river bottoms. Please, teach me your ways.”

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 41.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 07, 2019 05:04 PM

How to Automate Hole Recognition in Fusion 360 for CNC

CNC Machining

While drilling a hole is something every CNC machine user can do easily, programming the locations of several holes takes a bit more time and effort. Instead of going through the arduous process of setting the locations of numerous holes, Autodesk recently shared how to use their new hole recognition software in Fusion 360 to streamline the entire process using a mold core block as an example.:

<figure class="wp-block-image">hole recognition software</figure>

Holes in material don’t always have the same size, shape, or make—so the trick is to create an operation for each section of a hole. Hole recognition allows you to create hole templates in your design, which you can then use to segregate your individual holes.

<figure class="wp-block-image">hole recognition software</figure>

Once each hole is fitted with its own template, you can now choose what operation each requires. Actions can be set to holes such as “Simple Drill”, “Countersink Drill”, and the easy-to-understand “Ignore”. All the actions you set to the holes are saved in an action library that gets filled the more you use it—effectively making assigning future actions easier for similar job types.

<figure class="wp-block-image">hole recognition software</figure>

With the holes set to their specific actions, you can now choose which cutting tools to use. Selecting “Tool Libraries” brings up a list of recommended tools based on what it thinks is the best tool for the job. Just like the Actions list, you can set also these tools based on your preferences and Fusion 360 will remember them for future projects.

<figure class="wp-block-image">hole recognition software</figure>

There are a couple more advanced options, such as the ability to ignore specific holes and use only a few select drilling tools, but for the most part once you’ve tuned in your specifics, pressing “OK” starts the drilling process. Fusion 360 programs the CNC machine to drill the holes automatically according to the actions and tools set for each hole as it goes along. This saves you from having to manually adjust the tools for all the holes every single time.

For a more in-depth guide to Fusion 360’s hole recognition capabilities, read the entire tutorial over at Autodesk.

The post How to Automate Hole Recognition in Fusion 360 for CNC appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at October 07, 2019 04:46 PM

The Javelin Blog

Why is my SOLIDWORKS Macro not Running?

Have you ever ran into a situation where your SOLIDWORKS Macro is not running? Or it looks like it runs but nothing happens and it doesn’t give you an error message?

The most common reason for this is that you’ve recently performed an upgrade on your SOLIDWORKS systems and the macro was created in an older version of SOLIDWORKS.

Use Case:

  • User Created the macro in SOLIDWORKS 2016
  • Performed an upgrade to SOLIDWORKS 2019
  • Macro does not run anymore and doesn’t give any errors

Approach:

  • Launch up the Macro in Edit mode. Ensure that you have access to the code (some code may be password protected – Check with the developer of the Macro)
    • Open SOLIDWORKS > Tools > Macro > Edit > Browse to the Macro Location
  • In the VBA Editor Window, Navigate to Tools > References and update the references seen below to the 2019 version.
    • SldWorks 2016 Type Library TO 2019
    • SOLIDWORKS 2016 Constants Type Library TO 2019
    • SOLIDWORKS 2016 Commands Type Library TO 2019

SOLIDWORKS Macro 2016 References

SOLIDWORKS Macro Not Running

SOLIDWORKS Macro 2019 References

Run the Macro and it should run as expected.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Macros/API

Javelin provides SOLIDWORKS VB for Applications and SOLIDWORKS API training courses, which you can take live online, or in one of our Canadian classrooms. Check our schedule to learn more.

The post Why is my SOLIDWORKS Macro not Running? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Samony Riyaz at October 07, 2019 12:00 PM

October 06, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Design to Manufacture of a Custom Gauge Holder (Part 3 of 3)

In the final post of my three part series on creating a custom oil pressure gauge holder for my car, I cover the finishing touches to my SOLIDWORKS model file, and 3D printing a physical end-use part.

If you haven’t read my previous two posts, they cover scanning the dash vent area around a gauge, and beginning the process of creating a gauge mount 3D model from the scanned data.

Partially complete SOLIDWORKS Model

Partially complete SOLIDWORKS Model

Finishing the SOLIDWORKS Design

I left off with a mostly completed SOLIDWORKS Model that just needed some refinement. Adding in some slots to allow air to pass through will keeping the vent functionality of this piece.

Vents added to the model

Vents added to the model

Finally, I need to add in some retention clips to the model to make sure the vent stays in place once installed. A simple snap clip should work well for latching onto the back side of the interior panel.

Retention clips added

Retention clips added

Manufacturing the Design

With the design completed, it is now time to 3D print the part on the Stratasys F170 3D printer here in my office!

Stratasys F170 3D Printer

Stratasys F170 3D Printer

Taking the completed design into GrabCAD Print is as simple as browsing to the SOLIDWORKS file and opening. GrabCAD loads the model, and allows me to easily set up the 3D print. I selected automatic orientation, chose a solid fill, and sliced the model prior to clicking “print”. The file is automatically transferred via the WiFi network to the 3D printer and in the seconds it takes to walk over to the printer, it is loaded up and ready to go. Simply confirming the design on the touch screen starts the 3D printing process.

GrabCAD Print

GrabCAD Print

3D Printing Part Completed

With the print completed, I’ll pop it off the build tray and the soluble support means that I don’t have to remove any support material manually, I just place it in the dissolving tank, and retrieve it once finished. The end result is a gauge holder that looks nice in the car and allows for airflow.

Gauge holder installed in my car

Gauge holder installed in my car

Need help with your Design to Manufacture process?

The ability to take an idea all the way from concept, through design and end with a fully functional finished part is a major advantage of the knowledge and technical capabilities found at Javelin, including:

Everyone is passionate about the solutions we provide which help solve problems you may be experiencing throughout your entire product lifecycle. Get in touch with Javelin today to find out how we can help your company!

The post Design to Manufacture of a Custom Gauge Holder (Part 3 of 3) appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Bryan Sprange, CSWE at October 06, 2019 12:00 PM

October 05, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Microsoft Visual Basic: Run-time Error ’91’

Ever encountered the Microsoft Visual Basic error “Run-time Error ’91’: Object variable or With block variable not set” when opening a SOLIDWORKS file? Or if you’re creating a new SOLIDWORKS Macro, and while running it you see this pop up?

Microsoft VB Run-time Error '91'

Microsoft VB Run-time Error ’91’

Lucky for you, this is a very common VB error that’s encountered and it’s not too difficult to determine where the issue lies.

Lets look at the steps that one needs to take to resolve this VB error.

  1. Ensure that you have access to the Macro file that is being run within SOLIDWORKS
  2. Launch up the .swp file in Edit mode. This can be done via Tools > Macro > Edit > Browse to the macro location OR through your macro toolbar > Edit > Browse to the macro location
  3. You will see a VBA Editor window, seen in the screenshot below:

    Sample Macro Code

    Sample Macro Code

  4. To identify where the error lies, you would need to STEP through the code. This can be done by placing BREAKPOINTS in the code by selecting the grey section next to the line as seen below.

    Add a breakpoint to the code

    Add a break point to the code

  5. Now press the key ‘F8’ on your keyboard to STEP through the code until a line fails and gives you the Run-time Error.
    • Make note of the line number resulting in that error.
  6. The line should begin with a “Set OBJECT = ___________” Statement
    • This indicates that a variable was used without being declared.
  7. To address this issue, declare the OBJECT variable above the Set line using the “Dim OBJECT As SldWorks.OBJECT”
    • Example: the Statement that errors out could be “Set Part = swApp.NewDocument….”
    • The correct declaration for that would be “Dim Part As SldWorks.ModelDoc2”

To ensure that you have the correct object type, reference the SOLIDWORKS API Web Help for detailed information on the various commands and enumerations available.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Macros/API

Javelin provides SOLIDWORKS VB for Applications and SOLIDWORKS API training courses, which you can take live online, or in one of our Canadian classrooms. Check our schedule to learn more.

The post Microsoft Visual Basic: Run-time Error ’91’ appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Samony Riyaz at October 05, 2019 12:00 PM

October 04, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Installing Microsoft SQL Server 2014 Standard for SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional

In this article we will look at installing Microsoft SQL Server 2014 Standard, which ships with the SOLIDWORKS installation media disks (not the downloadable installation file set).

SQL Server 2014 Standard must be installed before SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional can be installed. SQL Server 2014 should be installed on a compatible server. The recommendations made in the preceding link, should be considered as minimal recommendations. Also, before the installation of SQL or PDM, some important items should be considered.

  • Will the Database (SQL) and the vaulted files (Archive) be on one or two separate servers. Better performance can be obtained by having separate severs, for each component.
    • For large implementations, having separate servers for SQL components should be considered.
    • Regardless of how the SQL and PDM components are divided among servers, those components should be the only applications running on these servers.
  • Having capable servers may not be sufficient, if the network bandwidth is limited.
    • . Ensure that your network can handle the extra traffic that PDM will add.
    • VPN (virtual private networks) can be slow. If you have remote locations, consider SOLIDWORKS PDM Replication.
  • Develop good back-up procedures.
    • SQL Management Studio installs with Microsoft SQL Server 2014 Standard and can be used to schedule back-ups.
    • Some third part software can back-up SQL databases, but it is wise to recommend and test this.
    • Consider where the back-ups are being stored. If they’re stored onsite, they may be at risk to the same catastrophes, as the PDM servers. If the back-ups are on the same network, they may be compromised along with the PDM servers. An example of this would be a ransomware attack, that locks the PDM servers and the back-up systems.
    • Don’t forget to check the back-ups regularly. Never rely on an automated process, as things can go wrong. A simple test would be be to check the time stamp on the back-up. Restoring the back-up to a test environment, would be a more thorough test. Remember that both the Database and archive from the same time period, needs to be restored
  • Organize and develop a strong team that will develop, maintain and administrate SQL, PDM, the PDM Servers and your Network. Also, ensure you have redundancy in your team, so that if one person is not available to complete a task,another can.

The above is a shot-list of what to consider, when implementing PDM. To be sure your implementation is done correctly, contact your SOLIDWORKS value added re-seller (VAR). Your VAR should have the expertise, in SOLIDWORKS PDM implementations.

With the above considerations satisfied,let’s begin the installation. From the SQL 2014 installation folder right click on setup.exe and select Run As Administrator.

Run SQL Setup as Administrator

From the SQL Server Installation Center, select the Installation tab and select New SQL Server stand-alone…

New Server Installation

On the next screen you will asked to enter the Product Key. If the installation was launched from the SQL server media, that ships with the SOLIDWORKS, the key will be filled in for you. If it is a separately purchased license of SQL Server, you will enter your own key.

Enter Product Key

 

After accepting the End User License Agreement, select SQL Feature Installation, in the Setup Role Screen.

Setup Role

In Feature Selection, check the options shown below and identify the installation location.

Installing Microsoft SQL Server Feature Selection

Feature Selection

For Instance Configuration, choose Default Instance unless another instance of SQL is already on the server (not recommended)

Instance Configuration

 

Set the Server Configuration as shown below. The Collation tab is use to change the Collation designator, to one that matches your locale.

Server Configuration

For Database Engine Configuration, select Mixed Mode and enter a password. This will be the ‘sa’ password that will be used when working in SQL Management Studio, as well as when working with PDM. After defining and confirming the password, identify the SQL administrator(s)

Installing Microsoft SQL Server Configuration

Database Engine Configuration

 

Lastly, review the installation perimeters and if correct, click on install.

Ready to Install

 

Once the installation has complete you will be presented with a screen, that will show the result of the installation. Any failures may result in SQL not performing correctly and should be addressed.

Installing Microsoft SQL Server Complete

Installation Results

The post Installing Microsoft SQL Server 2014 Standard for SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at October 04, 2019 12:00 PM

October 03, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Maintain SOLIDWORKS Standards Compliance with SOLIDWORKS Design Checker

Many companies that have a drafting department often also have a checking or quality department to maintain SOLIDWORKS standard compliance. The design checker in this department usually have to review each drawing to ensure they conform to company standards. This can involve checking fonts, decimal spaces, title block information and much more.

This process can be very tedious, prone to error, manual, and details can easily be overlooked.

If you are an owner of SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium software, you may not be aware of the SOLIDWORKS Design Checker included with your license. It is a hidden gem that can save you hours of mundane work.

The standards compliance tool is integrated into the SOLIDWORKS software interface, making it easy for you to spot and fix potential errors before releasing your designs.

SOLIDWORKS Design Checker 2019

SOLIDWORKS Design Checker for Standards Compliance

Standards Compliance Options

The SOLIDWORKS Design Checker ensures accuracy, completeness, and standards compliance for design elements such as:

  • Title blocks
  • Custom properties
  • Layers
  • Annotation and dimension fonts
  • Standard units
  • Materials
  • Overridden dimensions

You can set up and maintain compliance standards efficiently within a single file. If desired, you can also generate HTML-based reports to track results of each design check.

Watch this video to see how to enable and take advantage of this great tool!

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AF-IXTt4kIQ?feature=oembed" title="Automate file checking with Design Checker in SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium" width="500"></iframe>

Benefits

The SOLIDWORKS Design Checker provides:

  • The ability to define and save standard checks
  • The ability to ‘learn’ standard checks from an existing document
  • The ability to ‘autocorrect’ errors identified when running a check
  • The ability to run standard checks in batch mode

You can set up and maintain compliance standards easily and efficiently. If desired, you can also generate HTML-based reports to track results of each design check.

The post Maintain SOLIDWORKS Standards Compliance with SOLIDWORKS Design Checker appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vicky Guignard at October 03, 2019 05:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Assembly Performance Improvements for Older Version Files

SOLIDWORKS 2020 assembly performance has been improved when working with older version files.  Previously, components not upgraded to the latest release caused longer open and save times.

SOLIDWORKS Performance Evaluation

SOLIDWORKS Performance Evaluation

This was more noticeable when referenced components had multiple configurations.  In SOLIDWORKS 2019 and earlier, only the “master” configuration of a previous version component would load on open and then other configurations were dynamically rebuilt as needed.  This was the faster method in the past.  With today’s computer hardware (faster CPUs and SSDs), loading file data is fast.  In SOLIDWORKS 2020, provided the previous version file configurations were rebuilt and saved properly, it will load all referenced configurations preventing the rebuild process.  This method is now faster.

As an example, saving a SOLIDWORKS 2018 assembly in SOLIDWORKS 2019, it would force all the referenced components to upgrade to the current version.  The Save As dialog would show a list of the components with green highlighting.  You couldn’t deselect the referenced component check boxes.

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Save As to Current Version

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Save As to Current Version

In SOLIDWORKS 2020, there is a new option under System Options > External References called ‘Force referenced document to save to current major version‘.  By default this is enabled so it acts like previous versions.  However if you deselect the option, the referenced documents will no longer save to the the current version.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Force Referenced Documents to Current Major Release

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Force Referenced Documents to Current Major Release

Now saving the same assembly in SOLIDWORKS 2020 will no longer save all the referenced files.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Save Assembly without Referenced Files

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Save Assembly without Referenced Files

This allows you to keep referenced components in an earlier version and can eliminate the need to bulk upgrade files to a newer version for best performance using the PDM File Version Upgrade Utility or Task Scheduler Convert Files task.

NOTE: If a referenced part or sub-assembly requires a rebuild on opening the assembly (i.e. in-context relations that are updated), it will require saving which will upgrade to the newer version.  These components will show up in the Save dialog.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Assembly Performance Improvements for Older Version Files appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at October 03, 2019 12:00 PM

October 02, 2019

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2 Check In File Structure Dialog Box

New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2, when you drag a folder or file to the file list, the Check in File Structure dialog box opens automatically.

Check in File Structure Dialog Box

Check in File Structure Dialog Box

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 enhancements in the video below:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/knglqsvvYr4?feature=oembed" title="What's New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 - Web2" width="500"></iframe>

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2 Check In File Structure Dialog Box appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at October 02, 2019 08:04 PM

SolidSmack

Behind the Design: Roam Robotics – Maker of Ski Exoskeletons [Tour]

Roam Robotics is doing some awesome stuff in San Francisco, California, and here we get an exclusive, inside look! Their first commercial product is a robotic ski exoskeleton which you can try out this upcoming season. Read on to learn more about how it works and see inside Roam’s office.

Or, you can watch the video below for the tour plus seeing these things in action:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NicZTg8ZDGg?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
<figcaption>Watch the video to see inside Roam Robotics’ San Francisco office and see their exoskeletons in motion.</figcaption></figure>

How did Development for these Ski Exoskeletons Begin?

If you were thinking it’s kind of a strange leap to decide to create exoskeletons for snowsports as a company’s first endeavor, you’d be right. It turns out the original application for this exoskeleton had nothing to do with skiing.

Like some other robotics startups out there (e.g. iRobot), the first influx of cash and the first development effort was for military applications. COO of Roam Robotics, Nikhil Dhongade, told me the first successful project was for the Navy SEALs.

Before Roam

Even before that military project, however, the foundation for the skills and technology to bring Roam to life was being put together. The CEO and Founder, Tim Swift, is probably one of the leading experts in exoskeleton technology in the world. I’m told this is in part because he’s ridiculously intelligent. The other part comes from working in this very specific niche for a long time.

His research began as a student. Swift holds a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from UC Berkeley. There, he began building some of the foundational work for his latest creations. Later, he was also 1 of the original 3 people at Ekso Bionics, another successful exoskeleton company. In 2013, he jumped over to Otherlab. That company’s founder, Saul Griffith, had a vision for developing cutting-edge robotics and renewable energy tech. Otherlab would be a niche and independent Skunk Works for spinning out profitable companies in these areas. The following year, in late 2014, Swift spun out Roam Robotics from Otherlab.

Proof of Concept

The technology that was the key advancement to turn Roam Robotics into fledgling company had to do with the weight of traditional (ha!) exoskeletons. Other designs use a lot of heavy-weight metal. Of course, the heavier the robotics, the harder they are for humans to use and the less efficient they tend to be. Swift and his team wondered if they could still build powerful exoskeletons but instead make them mostly with lighter-weight plastics and fabrics.

<figure class="wp-block-image">On Roam Robotics' website, this is about all the information you'll find on military applications.<figcaption>On Roam Robotics’ website, this is about all the information you’ll find on military applications.</figcaption></figure>

With that Navy SEALs project, they found that yes, they could build robotic exoskeletons with mostly plastic and fabric. Yes, they were also much lighter in weight! And yes, these exoskeletons were still really powerful. These things could enable people to run faster and increase their endurance. Now, how to build a profitable company that brings this tech to consumers?

Why Not Focus on Applications for Disabled Persons?

Dhongade told me they’re often asked why the first consumer endeavor wasn’t for, say, paraplegics. While there’s no telling all the markets they’ll bring this tech to in the future, it wasn’t the smartest move for the first application.

Why not? Unfortunately for a lot of altruistic ideas, economics is a thing. Roam Robotics needed to find a niche application that had a bunch of prospective customers who could afford this expensive tech. There needed to be a very successful first product if there would ever be additional applications.

The Value Proposition: Increased Mobility

In their search, they kept in mind the key benefit Roam’s tech: increasing mobility of the user. So which industry has a bunch of customers with disposable income who would enjoy increased mobility? Why, skiing!

<figure class="wp-block-image">Roam Robotics' ski exoskeletons put to use on a skier! Would you believe this athlete is 95-years-old?! Well, you shouldn't, because that's not true. But he's not 18 anymore, either.<figcaption>Roam Robotics’ ski exoskeletons put to use on a skier! Would you believe this athlete is 95-years-old?! Well, you shouldn’t, because that’s not true. But he’s not 18 anymore, either.</figcaption></figure>

Once you hit middle age, you start to experience a noticeable decline in what you can do on the slopes. But what if you could increase your endurance and add some artificial muscle power? Well, then you could potentially ski like you did when you were younger: coming out of turns with more ease and getting more hours out of your legs (and that lift ticket you paid for).

How Does It Work?

For all my technical questions, I was handed over to Ashley Swartz, technical team lead at Roam Robotics. Swartz also happens to be my fellow Kettering University alumna. It was great to see that our impossibly arduous engineering education is paying off there where she’s continuing to do the impossible!

<figure class="wp-block-image">Ashley Swartz, technical team lead at Roam Robotics, engineer, athlete, and all-around amazing. <figcaption> Ashley Swartz, technical team lead at Roam Robotics, engineer, athlete, and all-around amazing. </figcaption></figure>

A 2-Part System: Exoskeleton and Power Pack

Swartz shows us in the video the 2 main parts of the system on their first release of this product. There’s the exoskeleton brace-like part you strap on each leg, and there’s the “power pack” you wear on your back.

The brace part contains a pneumatic actuator located by the knee.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Swartz demonstrates strapping on one of these exoskeleton braces from Roam Robotics.<figcaption>Swartz demonstrates strapping on one of these exoskeleton braces.</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">This is the "power pack" the user wears like a backpack.<figcaption>This is the “power pack” the user wears like a backpack.</figcaption></figure>

The power pack feeds power to the exoskeleton through a retractable cord feeding through the bottom.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Here, Swartz shows us a retractable cord that plugs into the brace, powering the exoskeleton.<figcaption>Here, Swartz shows us a retractable cord that plugs into the brace, powering the exoskeleton.</figcaption></figure>

To control the system, you push buttons on a controller located on a shoulder strap of the power pack. You can turn it on or off and can change how powerful of a “boost” the exoskeleton gives you.

<figure class="wp-block-image">This is the controller for Roam Robotics' ski exoskeleton to turn the system on/off, or turn the power up or down.<figcaption>This is the controller for Roam Robotics’ ski exoskeleton to turn the system on/off, or turn the power up or down.</figcaption></figure>

What’s Physically Happening with the Exoskeleton?

I wanted to know more exactly about how forces are applied with this thing, so Swartz explained the motion of the pneumatic actuator.

She tells us the pneumatic actuator is like an air spring. When you’re bending your knees, the actuator deflates. When you straighten your legs, the actuator inflates contributing to the power your muscles need for that action.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Here's the actuator up close, shown fully extended/inflated. This is how it would look when you're in a standing position.<figcaption>Here’s the actuator up close, shown fully extended/inflated. This is how it would look when you’re in a standing position.</figcaption></figure>

Even when the actuator is deflated, though, you’re getting support. Below, Swartz demonstrates sitting into the brace with the actuator deflated. The brace is anchored by the feet, and a strap wraps around the back of the thigh. So, the top strap can take some of that load from your body, just like if you were sitting into a chair.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Swartz demonstrates sitting into the top strap of the brace with the actuator deflated.<figcaption>Swartz demonstrates sitting into the top strap of the brace with the actuator deflated.</figcaption></figure>

Then, when the leg begins to extend, the smart actuator begins to expand. This contributes to the force needed to pull your body up as your knee straightens.

<figure class="wp-block-image">With Swartz standing, the actuator by her knee is now fully inflated.<figcaption>With Swartz standing, the actuator by her knee is now fully inflated.</figcaption></figure>

The technical terms for all this wizardry is “extension assist” (the extra power to push your leg straight, normally done mostly by your quadriceps) and “flexion damping” (helping your quads ease into that sitting position).

But Wait, There’s More: AI!

Plans are to incorporate AI into these devices so it will learn how you ski! Over time, it could self-adjust the way it functions to accommodate an individual’s skiing style.

Other plans keep an eye on making the core technology a platform they can use for different, future applications. That way, when they expand into other industries, they’ll minimize new engineering of redundant functionality.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Running is one of the other potential new applications Roam eludes to in its advertising.<figcaption>Running is one of the other potential new applications Roam eludes to in its advertising.</figcaption></figure>

Inside Roam Robotics’ Offices

<figure class="wp-block-image">Walking into Roam's huge office and lab combo space.<figcaption>Walking into Roam’s huge office and lab combo space.</figcaption></figure>

I had to laugh when there was talk of “rooms” being reserved for our meetings at Roam. The main space is completely open with no dividing walls.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Inside the main office space of Roam Robotics.<figcaption>Inside the main office space of Roam Robotics.</figcaption></figure>

Some of the in-house testing uses this gigantic Woodway treadmill. Normally you’d see this guy in a hospital with a therapist sitting on its massive frame assisting a patient.

<figure class="wp-block-image">This Woodward monster is the biggest treadmill I've ever seen in person. Ashley Swartz tells us it's typically used in hospitals for rehab or in training labs.<figcaption>This monster is the biggest treadmill I’ve ever seen in person. Ashley Swartz tells us it’s typically used in hospitals for rehab or in training labs.</figcaption></figure>

Assembly is done right there down the hall from their main office, although many of the components are manufactured elsewhere (as with approximately 99.99% of all manufactured things anywhere today).

<figure class="wp-block-image">Here's the room where the assembly happens for these robots.<figcaption>Here’s the room where the assembly happens for these robots.</figcaption></figure>

They’re Hiring!

While at the time of this interview there were a lot more positions open, as of publishing, there’s at least 1 senior mechanical engineering role still up for grabs.

By the way, it helps if you’re a skier or other athlete. While not a requirement, it sure would make your job easier to do effectively. Ashley Swartz, an athlete herself, told us one of the best perks of working at Roam Robotics is she gets to paid to play on the slopes. If an engineer can understand the user’s needs from a first-person perspective, that helps tremendously in development. And there will always be needs for real-world testing!

<figure class="wp-block-image">Pretty sure Roam Robotics gets their engineers to be free photo models, too.<figcaption>Pretty sure Roam Robotics gets their engineers to be free photo models, too.</figcaption></figure>

The catch: Tim Swift told me they do have a no *&%hole policy. While that’s bad news for *&%holes, that’s great news for everyone else.

If you’re interested in applying, check out their careers page here.

Try Them Out Yourself in Tahoe This Year!

Are you one of those early adopters and want to be one of the first to try these ski exoskeletons out? Well, you can!

The latest version is slated to be available for rent this upcoming ski season. At the time of the interview, it looked like the new version under development right now will be in Tahoe by around “Thanksgiving-ish”. (And also some other resort locations which Swartz wasn’t 100% sure on at the time.)

<figure class="wp-block-image">This could be you crushing powder with your fancy robotic ski exoskeleton.<figcaption>This could be you crushing powder with your fancy robotic ski exoskeleton.</figcaption></figure>

On this page, you can make reservations to rent the ski exoskeleton they’ve branded Elevate Ski for several resorts.

If a nearby resort isn’t listed, you can also add your name to this waitlist to be notified when Elevate Ski comes to your preferred location.

See you on the slopes!

The post Behind the Design: Roam Robotics – Maker of Ski Exoskeletons [Tour] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at October 02, 2019 04:01 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to use SOLIDWORKS PDM Export Rules for Bill of Materials (BOM)

Is there a way to export specific BOM (Computed BOM or CAD BOM) using SOLIDWORKS PDM export rules?

An ability to only export activated BOMs is presented. You should activate specific BOM in Bill of materials Tab in SOLIDWORKS PDM Explorer and turn the flag ‘Only export activated BOMs’ in Export Rule.

  1. Activate only one of the CAD BOMs

    Activate BOM

    Activate BOM

  2. Create export rule and set it for exporting Computed BOM or CAD BOM, turn the flag ‘Only export activated BOMs’ on. Indicate output folder for XML files.

    SOLIDWORKS PDM Export Rules

    BOM Export Rules

  3. Edit workflow and add new transition action with type ‘Export data to XML’.
    • Run it for required files (for example for drawings only).
    • Select export corresponding export rule created before.
Transition Action - Export data to XML

Transition Action – Export data to XML

The post How to use SOLIDWORKS PDM Export Rules for Bill of Materials (BOM) appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at October 02, 2019 12:00 PM

October 01, 2019

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The Form Factors (Powered by Spotify)

Spotify Playlist

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’re getting things rolling with “Right Here” from Tricky before rolling into a tasty Trip Hop-inspired set from Portishead, PJ Harvey, Zero 7, and others before wrapping up with “Colomb” from Nicolas Jaar. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<figure><iframe allow="encrypted-media" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/playlist/0Ohqz2sT1XKYwSJd8173Zy" width="100%"></iframe></figure>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Form Factors (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 01, 2019 09:21 PM

Oculus Quest Will Introduce Hand Tracking Early Next Year

oculus quest hand tracking

Though VR technology has come a long way since its inception in the late 19th century *ahem* 20th century, the methods of interacting with a virtual world have remained largely the same. Through the use of buttons and controllers, using a VR headset still feels very cumbersome despite its ability to add real actions into a virtual space.

But what if you didn’t need a controller? What if you could control everything seamlessly through the use of your own two hands?

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2VkO-Kc3vks?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

This is exactly what Oculus has been working on. Early next 2020, the Oculus Quest VR headset will allow for true hand-based inputs straight from your hands into the virtual space, turning your actual hands into the VR controllers.

<figure class="wp-block-image">oculus quest hand tracking</figure>

Created in collaboration with Facebook Reality Labs, the system relies on the Oculus Quest’s four monochrome cameras to track your hand movements and reflect them in virtual space. Using deep learning techniques and model-based tracking, the headset can process your actions (such as pointing, pinching, and widening your fingers) and take them as ques for interaction.

<figure class="wp-block-image">oculus quest hand tracking</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">oculus quest hand tracking</figure>

Once you turn on the Oculus Quest, deep neural networks predict the location of your hands and construct a 3D space for your hands and fingers. It is in this space where you can wave your hands willy-nilly and the Quest will create a 3D model of your hands’ positions and surface geometry. This allows the headset to precisely track all your hand movements and translate them into the virtual world without any lag.

<figure class="wp-block-image">oculus quest hand tracking</figure>

This new interface won’t just make it easier for current VR users to use their headsets, but it will reduce the entry barrier for new folks to get into the technology as well. Since more people know how to use their hands than a controller, interacting with the Oculus Quest becomes more intuitive with the new hand tracking tech. Imagine being able to pause, play, and rewind videos with just a few simple hand gestures, or allowing deaf and mute people to interact with others online using sign language.

Combine this with developers’ abilities to craft apps using the technology, and Oculus has itself a brand new, controller-free playground to work with. We’ll be sure to post more information as it nears release, but for now you can check out Facebook’s in-depth blog post on the collaboration as well as Oculus’ announcement on their blog.

The post Oculus Quest Will Introduce Hand Tracking Early Next Year appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at October 01, 2019 09:03 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Data Management What’s New Top 10

SOLIDWORKS 2020 introduces many new enhancements to data management with SOLIDWORKS PDM and SOLIDWORKS Manage providing new features and workflow improvements, you can check out what we think are the SOLIDWORKS 2020 Data Management Top 10 Features below:

01. Enhanced SOLIDWORKS PDM Browsing Experience

From generic file browsing to looking up references and accessing details, the improved performance of SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 makes your day-to-day experience more efficient. When you access files and folders, data is now loaded asynchronously. This means you do not have to wait for the file contents to load before you can browse into a sub-folder.

This also means that you can toggle between the Bill of Materials, Contains and Where Used tabs without delay. Details continue to load in the background and are cached until you move on to another file.

Not only do you have more browsing flexibility, but the improved communication between you and the PDM server delivers a faster experience overall. This is also seen with the SOLIDWORKS CAD Add-in.

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Browsing

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Browsing

Benefits: Browse through the PDM Vault more quickly as you no longer need to wait for all data to be loaded.

02. Enhanced Search Interface With Advanced Features

Searching for files in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 is made simple using the new Quick Search functionality. Easily access the new search field in the top right corner of File Explorer or hit CTRL F on your keyboard and start typing. Predictive search is enabled based on your search history and you can use your arrow and enter keys to easily select and repeat a common search.

Quick Search is also configurable where you can choose to search from one or many variables in addition to location and version details. You can now use operators like AND, OR, NOT, EQUAL TO, LESS THAN and GREATER THAN so you can find exactly what looking for without filling out multiple fields or manually sorting through various search results.

Traditional search cards can utilize the new multiple-variable fields as well so you can improve their usability and efficiency. In both search environments, columns can now be easily moved with a drag and drop so you and every other user can organize  search results as you please. Searching with SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 enables you to find the correct data fast with a simple experience.

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Search

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Search

Benefits: Refine your search and find the right product data more quickly and easily.

03. Child Reference State Conditions

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 introduces a new workflow condition to validate the state of referenced files. For example, you may want a part and its drawing to travel together through their lifecycle or at the very least, ensure the part is released before OR during the release of its drawing. Use the new Child Reference State condition to enforce this behavior:

  • Define conditions based on the state of immediate child references to control the parent file transition in SOLIDWORKS® PDM Professional.
  • Prevent a parent file from moving through a workflow if the child references don’t match the specified condition. For example, you cannot move a PDF to the “approved” state if its child drawing is still “under development.”
SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Child Reference

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Child Reference

Benefits: Create more-precise product workflows based on the relationship between parent status and child status.

04. Bill of Materials Tab in SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2

New for SOLIDWORKS 2020 you can now access Computed bill of materials, Weldment bill of materials, Weldment Cut Lists, and SOLIDWORKS bill of materials in read-only view in SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Web2.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Web2 BOM

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Web2 BOM

Benefits: View bill of materials from any device with any screen layout by using responsive design technology.

05 List of Files to Download in SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2

When you want to download any PDM Web2 data, a new Download with References page provides options to help ensure you’re downloading exactly what you want. Choose the associated versions, drawings, simulation data and more from a simple, responsive user interface.

  • Review the list of files to download in SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Web2 when “download with references” has been used.
  • View the list of files in a table where columns can be customized in the “download with references” user interface.
SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2 Download with references

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2 Download with references

Benefits: Save time by examining your files to see if they contain the right data before you start a massive download.

06. SOLIDWORKS Manage Plenary Web Client

Keeping yourself and others current with constantly changing information in your company is a challenge. SOLIDWORKS Manage 2020 introduces new ways to access and share this information and alleviate the burden. When you want more in-depth access remotely, use the enhanced Plenary Web Client from your internet browser, allowing you to view and interact with file data in SOLIDWORKS PDM. With SOLIDWORKS Manage 2020, the Home and Projects modules in addition to expanded capabilities with SOLIDWORKS PDM are now available.

SOLIDWORKS Manage Plenary Web Client

SOLIDWORKS Manage 2020 Plenary Web Client

Benefits: Use the full capabilities of the SOLIDWORKS PDM desktop client remotely and enjoy a better user experience.

07. SOLIDWORKS Manage Outlook Integration

Information is everywhere and aggregating it manually can take more time than its worth. SOLIDWORKS Manage 2020 makes this effort easier by introducing Microsoft Outlook integration and expanded integration with SOLIDWORKS PDM. Emails in Microsoft Outlook can now be saved directly in SOLIDWORKS Manage.

For situations where you have an existing process or case, click Save emails into existing record in Outlook and search for the record of interest. When you need to access the email in the future, go to the Emails tab on the record to view it.

With this integration, you don’t have to remember additional steps to associate emails with records. Simply link the email to a record directly from Outlook. Accessing emails like this and ALL of the additional information available in Manage are now accessible directly in SOLIDWORKS PDM. Just navigate to the desired area in the SOLIDWORKS Manage tab.

With the integration with Outlook and PDM, SOLIDWORKS Manage streamlines your experience capturing and accessing important information.

SOLIDWORKS Manage Outlook Integration

SOLIDWORKS Manage Outlook Integration

Benefits: Easily incorporate important email data directly into SOLIDWORKS Manage.

08. SOLIDWORKS Manage Sub-process

Process standardization leads to improved quality, productivity and morale. To aid this effort, SOLIDWORKS Manage provides powerful process management capabilities to automate simple and complex workflows. With the 2020 release, these capabilities have expanded, making it easier to incorporate unique details and data from various sources.

When you start a process in Manage like an Engineering Change, you can simply add affected items AND their related references. This is easily accomplished by right clicking on the primary record and choosing to add related records. With SOLIDWORKS Manage 2020, multiple related records can be added at once even if they are stored in different objects like libraries, bill of materials, PDM, and beyond. This greatly reduces the time to accurately capture the necessary records when  starting a process.

SOLIDWORKS Manage 2020 also supports new scenarios for processes. Special Objects, like risks, projects issues and product
requirements can now be added to a process so you can automate their disposition. If process items need to be split so that they go to different stages, you can use the new sub process capability:

  • When sending multiple records through a process, move some of the affected items into another connected sub-process for greater flexibility.
  • The sub-process retains the history of the parent process.
SOLIDWORKS Manage 2020 Sub-process

SOLIDWORKS Manage 2020 Sub-process

Benefits: Streamline your workflows and increase flexibility when working with multiple affected items in a process.

09. SOLIDWORKS Manage Project Management

Managing a project is no simple feat. Project management with SOLIDWORKS Manage however, enables you to tightly integrate with resources and deliverables throughout your organization. With the 2020 release, it is easier to get started by importing current and upcoming projects, visualize the life of your projects and plan the capacity of your resources.

If you have projects in other tools like Microsoft Project, you can now import them as XML. Start, finish, duration, predecessors and registered users are automatically recognized so you can start connecting tasks and deliverables right away. Load charts, PERT charts and network diagrams are now available so you can visualize your project how you want and communicate your projects in a variety of formats.

Often, you may have multiple active projects with common resources. With the new Capacity Planning in Manage, you can automatically calculate available time from your resources as well as the demand from your projects. Holidays and Absences may be included as well so you can easily take control of your operational efforts and costs. Improve the effectiveness of your project management with SOLIDWORKS Manage 2020.

SOLIDWORKS Project Management

SOLIDWORKS Project Management

Benefits: Manage your projects and user workload more effectively.

10. SOLIDWORKS Manage Dashboard Viewer

With the new dedicated Dashboard Viewer installed on community monitors, you can display relevant information to keep everyone up to date with your company activities. These dashboards are displayed in real-time by using the automatic refresh setting. With this, you never have to manually publish updates again:

  • Continuously display key dashboards on community monitors with the new Dashboard Viewer application.
  • View dashboards in full screen mode for greater visibility. Dashboards update periodically
SOLIDWORKS Manage Dashboard Viewer

SOLIDWORKS Manage Dashboard Viewer

Benefits: Provide relevant information to all stakeholders in an easily accessible and up-to-date format.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Data Management What’s New Top 10 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at October 01, 2019 12:00 PM

September 30, 2019

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Monday List 40.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

McDonald’s CEO Wants Big Macs to Keep Up With Big Tech

Steve Easterbrook is giving the Golden Arches a data makeover, but franchisees are balking at the cost.

<figure class="aligncenter">McDonald’s CEO Wants Big Macs to Keep Up With Big Tech</figure>

There’s Finally a Way to Recycle the Plastic in Shampoo and Yogurt Packaging

P&G’s technology solves polypropylene’s smell problem.

<figure class="aligncenter">There’s Finally a Way to Recycle the Plastic in Shampoo and Yogurt Packaging</figure>

How to Make the Most of Apple’s New Privacy Tools in iOS 13

We tested the new suite of privacy tools in Apple’s latest mobile software, from minimizing location sharing to silencing robocalls.

<figure class="aligncenter">How to Make the Most of Apple’s New Privacy Tools in iOS 13</figure>

A Scrum Master’s Strategy for Focusing a Scattered Mind

If you’re feeling overwhelmed, this powerful exercise shows you where to spend your energy.

<figure class="wp-block-image">A Scrum Master’s Strategy for Focusing a Scattered Mind</figure>

The Case for Being a Multi-Hyphenate

Throughout history, and today, the most successful people are good at more than just one thing.

<figure class="aligncenter">The Case for Being a Multi-Hyphenate</figure>

Why Strava Is Getting More Social Than Ever

The company is growing fast, adding roughly a million users a month, and it has lofty goals to expand far beyond its old identity as a platform for logging rides and runs. Can it succeed?

<figure class="aligncenter">Why Strava Is Getting More Social Than Ever</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 40.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 30, 2019 10:04 PM

Cool CAD Tips: How to Easily Thread Parts in Autodesk Fusion 360

Bolts

If you ever wanted to create threaded fasteners for screws, nuts, bolts and the like on the fly using good old Fusion 360, Autodesk has a simple method to easily implement them using the Thread command:

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Under the ‘Create’ menu, choose the ‘Thread’ command and select a cylindrical shape you want the thread to be applied on to.

<figure class="aligncenter">Autodesk Fusion 360 Threading Parts</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter">Autodesk Fusion 360 Threading Parts</figure>

You can then set the specifications of the thread, such as the size, type, class, and direction the thread is rotating towards. If you aren’t sure what specs to give your thread, Fusion 360 automatically finds the standard closest to your particular selection. You can also refer to McMaster-Carr or another part manufacturer to look at their specifications.

<figure class="aligncenter">Autodesk Fusion 360 Threading Parts</figure>

Once your threads are set, they will show up on Fusion 360 as decals rather than fully-fledged 3D models. This is simply to create a reference point and won’t add any of the extra edges and curves the new designs create.

<figure class="aligncenter">Autodesk Fusion 360 Threading Parts</figure>

Should you want all your threads to be converted to 3D models, you can simply click on ‘Threads” and switch the ‘Cosmetic’ option to ‘Modeled’.

All semi-translucent threads will now become opaque in Fusion 360 and will be fully modelled, allowing you to mess around as well as accidentally click on them while trying to model something else.

<figure class="aligncenter">Autodesk Fusion 360 Threading Parts</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter">Autodesk Fusion 360 Threading Parts</figure>

Be sure to check out Autodesk’s Fusion 360 YouTube channel if you’re looking for more quick tips to speed up your workflow.

Have a tubular CAD tech tip you’d like to share? Send it on in to tips@solidsmack.com!

The post Cool CAD Tips: How to Easily Thread Parts in Autodesk Fusion 360 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 30, 2019 09:40 PM

MillRight: Derek Roberts and the ‘Mega V’ CNC Router and Plasma System [Interview]

I sat down with Derek Roberts, the man behind the MillRight CNC company. Derek is an entrepreneur, tinkerer, designer, visionary and guy with a cool southern accent. He goes over everything, from how he got started, to MillRight’s first product, starting a business, running a business, manufacturing challenges and, oh yes, their new desktop CNC product, the Mega V Router and Plasma system.

Dan Slaski:What does MillRight make and what are you all about?

Derek Roberts: MillRight is a developer and manufacturer of CNC machines. Our mission is to deliver the best value in CNC.

DS: How did you get started down this path?

DR: I’ve always been into tinkering with mechanical and electrical stuff. I ended up in a financial career and realized that I missed my calling. I had an invention idea for a product unrelated to CNC machines and started trying to figure out how I could develop it on a budget. I got into 3D printing with the RepRap community and started printing some of my prototypes. I quickly realized that I needed a CNC router. I shopped a long time for affordable CNC machines, but I couldn’t find one that I could afford! I figured I could take my years as a DIY’er and combine it with some 3D printing skills and ingenuity and make something that would do the job. I spent a while working in CAD and ended up using a hack saw, a hand drill, and a 3D printer to make my first CNC router. It worked! The newfound capability to cut signs and other nifty things for money spawned a side business that I hadn’t planned on. I eventually realized that if I could make a CNC machine that was affordable that was making me money, other people would be interested in one too. I realized that the “real” business would be in an affordable CNC machine.

I spent months designing what would eventually be the MillRight CNC M3. I was addicted to the project. I still had a demanding full-time job at the time, but I couldn’t sleep for wanting to work on it. I’d stay up almost all night refining and testing the M3. I’d go into work dead tired and do it all over again when I got off. I ended up with the final design and coordinated a very small production run after beating the bushes to find someone willing to work with me. I told myself I just hoped to sell 10 or so a year. I posted it for sale and a guy named Zack bought the first one in July of 2016.. Zack still uses his M3 in his business by the way, which is a real point of pride for me. That first sale started the snowball rolling and before I knew it, I had to make a choice between the good financial career I had and seeing what heights I could reach with MillRight. On April 1, 2017 I took the leap into doing MillRight full time and I haven’t looked back.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>What started it all – the M3 Desktop CNC from MillRight</figcaption></figure>

DS: Anyone that has worked with startups knows that new and difficult challenges are a daily and endless part of the job. What drives you? To be clear, I don’t mean belts, chains or lead screws.

DR: Coffee. Lots of Coffee. Seriously though, you are right that it’s tough starting a business and keeping it moving forward. There were times in the early days where I literally worked 30 or 35hour shifts to try to get it all done. I still work a lot, but thankfully I have a great team now that carries a lot of the load. To the point though: I’m driven to make sure MillRight is better than the competition, but more than that I’m driven to make sure we are better than we were yesterday. I guess I have this visceral need to create new things and to help us improve as a company.

DS: What software tools do you use to design your products?

DR: I used FreeCAD in the very early days. I have a lot of respect for FreeCAD, but we’ve been using Fusion 360 from Autodesk for quite a while. It makes it easy to share projects with team members or outside engineers and has all the tools we need and then some. I also like their policy of offering free licenses to hobbyist users. I think by offering pro-level CAD/CAM to qualifying hobbyists for free, Autodesk has really helped the maker movement grow.

DS: What is your philosophy around design, prototyping, and testing?

DR: I’m a pragmatist, and I think that comes through in our products. Function is given precedence over form. Any aspect of the end product will have a cost, and then that cost, of course, has to be recovered from the customer with a markup. I let that guide the design process. I want the end product to function and perform better than anything else for the same price. I see design elements in certain machines that are purely aesthetic and I know the customer ends up paying for that one way or another. Sure, the product has to present well and be polished, but I design the product like I’m going to be the end-user that has to make things with the machine, and not like I’m going to try to sell it.

When it comes to prototyping and testing, I think you have to fail fast and make the correction quickly. What I mean is that we like to put the prototype through the extreme use case as soon as possible. There’s no reason to tinker around and lose time with a prototype that only accomplishes 90% of what it is supposed to do. When it fails, and many will fail along the way, I like to be able to get the correction from the drawing board to physical part quickly. We have built out a lot of capability over the last few years. We can turn, mill, laser-cutwater jet cut, print, all in house. That keeps the process rolling and the creative juices flowing.

DS: In certain spheres of the 3D printing space, Chinese manufacturers have lowered prices to rock bottom. How does the landscape in the CNC milling space compare and what is your competitive strategy?

DR: The consumer level 3D printing is certainly more competitive than the CNC milling space. The Chinese have flooded the market with 3D printers that are produced and sold like commodities. I think there is somewhat of a natural barrier to this in the milling and routing space though. Those processes are just a little more involved than additive manufacturing, and I think customers are going to want and need a support infrastructure and community behind these products. I think the Chinese approach is incompatible with that.

MillRight’s strategy on the other hand is not to be the very cheapest on the market, but to offer the best value. Competing purely on price is a race to the bottom. Instead, we want to make the best overall value proposition to the customer. Customers want a good price to performance ratio, good support, and quick delivery, among other things. We’re seeking to strike that “best balance”. I think the successful execution of that goal starts with the design philosophy I talked about earlier, but it’s brought full circle by relating to the community and helping people succeed with your product.

DS: What are some of the most unusual things that people have built with your machines?

DR: One customer who is an engineer and pilot built an experimental aircraft with parts he cut on his Power Route. Another guy took his Carve King took to a construction site and engraved 20foot long decorative cedar boards with scriptures by carving some, then indexing it down over and over. Some of the most unusual things I never hear about though. We have a lot of machines in use at premier research facilities. We even shipped one to a nuclear particle collider research facility. I have no idea what they are making with it there, but I can only assume it is awesome.

DS: CNC routing seems to be the sweet spot between 3D printing and laser cutting. Compared to laser cutting, CNC milling doesn’t require special ventilation, can have much lower up front cost and can work with materials that lasering can’t cut through or would create dangerous gasses. Compared to 3D printing, CNC milling can create large parts, structural parts and only requires 2D sketching. That being said, I don’t see as much adoption in makerspaces and engineering offices. Is it simple matter of noise and space? Are the machine more intimidating?

DR: I’ve recognized that too. I think it is a mixture of a few things. The work flow for a CNC mill is a little more involved than with those other technologies. There is just a little more to preparing the tool paths and selecting the right machining strategies than using default settings on a 3D printing slicer. The noise and debris factor in too. I think it’s becoming more accepted though, and there are ways to reduce those with enclosures that we see a lot of our customers build.

The popularity of laser cutting and 3D printing will help grow the CNC milling industry though. For the reasons you identified, people are realizing the limitations of those technologies. They have their place and are great at what they do, but a CNC router is much more versatile. There are a ton more resources for learning the different concepts of machining than there used to be. I think that helps get people comfortable with approaching the technology and will grow this industry. I expect that CNC mills and routers will be as common as 3D printers in classrooms and makerspaces in the next few years.

DS: What are your thoughts on the good, fast, cheap conundrum?

DR: No one has ever made the perfect product because it would take an eternity of R&D and infinite investment to bring it to market. Everyone in product development and management wrestles with this conundrum. We do it by trying to be honest about what our capabilities and capacities are, what attributes of the product are essential, and what financial resources are needed to achieve those. This still leaves us bound by all these constraints, but having that plan and understanding in the beginning helps guide things and let’s us know if we’re off course. I think there is this draw to be fast and cheap though, because punctuality and dollars are more objectively measurable than quality in most cases. In every decision there is a trade-off among these, but you can’t as a manager or a company get sucked into those two.

DS: What is your favorite soul food?

DR: Pickled pig’s feet! Just kidding. I’ve never been that adventurous. I do love some fried okra though. Fried stuff is a culinary theme in the South. Bad for your health. Good for your taste buds.

DS: What is your favorite soul food for your maker soul?

DR: Seeing customer made projects. I love to see how a person’s creativity manifests itself when the right tool is in his or her hand. It validates what we do here. We talk about it at work whenever we see a cool customer project. It’s exciting for us to think that in a small way we helped enable that project.

DS: What are you working on now?

DR: Our primary focus right now is the Mega V. It is our new machine that we have launched on Kickstarter. This is the first major release from us in a couple of years and we couldn’t be more excited. It is available as a CNC router or a CNC plasma cutter and boasts some specs that, I think, blow away anything else in the class. The machine can literally cut through material faster than most competing machines can rapid traverse and has options like a rotary axis that is uncommon at this end of the market. Our brand has grown in popularity over the last few years, but I think the Mega V is poised to make us the most recognized name in this market.

<figure class="aligncenter"><figcaption>The new Mega V Desktop CNC from MillRight</figcaption></figure>

DS: What do you see for the future of Millright?

DR: I think you’ll see MillRight CNC enter some new competitive spaces over the next 5 or so years. We have our eye on some niches in the machine tool market that are dominated by one or two companies that appear to be asleep at the wheel. I think MillRight has brought a lot of value for consumers in the $500 to $5,000 machine market and there are a lot of ideas bouncing around here about the kinds of capabilities and industrial level features we could design into machines that retail for $10,000 to $25,000. I intend for us to stay true to our roots by always offering affordable machines that bring new people into the CNC community that could never justify a high dollar machine. There’s a market that is being under-served at that next level though, and in the years to come I think we’ll be there to fill the void.

Learn more about MillRight CNC at millrightcnc.com, visit their store here, and join in their latest, FUNDED, kickstarter campaign here.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The post MillRight: Derek Roberts and the ‘Mega V’ CNC Router and Plasma System [Interview] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Dan Slaski at September 30, 2019 09:04 PM

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Comin’ Atcha With a Quickness (Plus More on 3DEXPERIENCE)

It’s fall y’all, and that means football, hot wing juice on your keyboard, and a new version of SOLIDWORKS comin’ atcha fast. This month, SOLIDWORKS held their SOLIDWORKS 2020 launch event/sportscast online. And, let me tell ya, SOLIDWORKS 2020 is a shift. Maybe they don’t want you to see it like that, maybe they do, but along with a lot of great features like Large Assembly Drawing acceleration, Assembly Defeature, Faster Sketching and Simulation, there’s a shift in how you will access new features and gain more capabilities. But more on that in a moment. What about SOLIDWORKS 2020?

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2020

Just prior to the launch event (If you didn’t catch it, you can watch it here), SOLIDWORKS CEO, Gian Paolo Bassi, reiterated request received from SOLIDWORKS users. He said you want, “full, digital continuity – a seamless process that takes you from design to manufacturing faster, you want the freedom to innovate more, and you want to work with increasingly precise simulation.” For SOLIDWORKS 2020, he says, “it’s all about digitalization and integration, through a connected 3DEXPERIENCE platform.”

I always appreciate how SOLIDWORKS splits the features into specific areas of focus. Without looking over each individual new feature, it sums up the broader development effort and provides some insight into the direction for the software. There are three areas of focus, or themes, for SOLIDWORKS 2020:

  1. Improved Performance (watch video recap)
  2. Streamlined Workflows (watch video recap)
  3. Connected Design Ecosystem in the Cloud (watch video recap)
<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/q8JLe1RNik4?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

At only 0:44 seconds, that video is all teaser but at the same time provides a concise look how they address performance, workflow and desire to illustrate the connected ecosystem idea for SOLIDWORKS 2020 and the greater 3DEXPERIENCE platform. Along with the teaser, there are 42 new videos about What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2020 (YouTube) that break down each feature (with the same videos sorted and searchable with more detail at solidworks.com/whats-new/). During SOLIDWORKS World 2019, the top ten features were broken out into a one-sheeter – you can snag that here (pdf).

So, you can work your way through those videos, but here are my top 3 feature picks from each theme I’d like to draw your attention to:

Performance

  • Large Assembly Drawing Detailing Mode (video)
  • Envelope Publisher (video)
  • Distributed Coupling for Simulation (video)

Workflow

Connected Ecosystem

  • SOLIDWORKS Manage – Dashboard & Web Client (video)
  • SOLIDWORKS PDM – Web2 (video)
  • 3D Printing/Marketplace Make (video)

The teaser video gave a better round-about view of the connected ecosystem bit. There wasn’t anything specifically (that I saw) on the new 3DEXPERIENCE.WORKS platform as a whole or platform apps like, xShape and xDesign, but Suchit Jain, VP of Strategy and Biz Dev at SOLIDWORKS provided some insight about this at SOLIDWORKS World 2019, saying, “the future of SOLIDWORKS is in the platform,” and that we’re, “Going to see much better connection. SOLIDWORKS is starting to get more connections to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform [with] over 2000 apps that are currently connected,” and that they, “Need to figure out the workflows that need that connection.”

Coming back to the SOLIDWORKS 2020 product launch, the panel went into details on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform when Jeremy Regnerus, Senior Product Introduction Manager at SOLIDWORKS asked the question, “I’m a SOLIDWORKS desktop user. How can I take advantage of the 3DEXPERIENCE platform today?” That conversation picks up at the 31:00 mark in the following video:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CZQyRXTO8t0?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

3DEXPERIENCE Platform – The Shift

Maybe that gives you a better idea of the transition to a wider array of capabilities, but I think it shows more succinctly the shift taking place within SOLIDWORKS for how you will access those new features and capabilities. You’ll still get new features in SOLIDWORKS, of course, but there will be (and are) other products that offer more, much more. “A gateway to a massive amount of tools,” as Jeremy says in the video.

It makes me think back of features we’ve asked for over the years – we’ve seen them added as tools, add-ons, or new products — And the complaints when we didn’t get something that seemed so simple. As you know, Dassault Systemes (DS) has complementary products to SOLIDWORKS but, since acquiring SolidWorks Corp, they operated somewhat independently of each other. By the way… just to provide some context, for all you youngins, DS acquired SolidWorks in 1997 – 22 years ago. (At the time, I had switched the R&D group I worked with from 2D to 3D using SolidWorks, wondering if the acquisition would force a software change. As far as I know, they’re still using SOLIDWORKS.) Over the past year, however, it seems like they finally have a unified strategy for their product line and, if you look at it carefully, it’s easy to see the long-term result of a fully, interconnected product portfolio that delivers capabilities in the blink of an eye, anticipated outcomes and results as quickly as they can be finalized.

Back to the past to trace it out. We all wondered if we’d see some features of other DS software in SOLIDWORKS, whether it would be replaced completely, or turned into a lite version of *ahem* less-friendly software. Then the cloud-based DS 3DEXPERIENCE platform was announced (in Feb 2012). Cloud-based SOLIDWORKS products we’re teased and fears of SOLIDWORKS death came up again. Well, that’s been years ago now, some products have gone away, some are still being teased, there was a weird innovation platform that popped up in there… but somewhere in that time frame, something happened. However, and as we’ve seen, it shows that, for nearly a decade, SOLIDWORKS has been developing programs and thinking about developing programs and capabilities that take advantage of the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

It’s hard to ascertain what changed recently – I have a few guesses – but at SOLIDWORKS WORLD 2019, the realization hit me when Manish Kumar, SOLIDWORKS R&D VP, described the consolidation of the separate R&D teams into one. He broke down the numbers thusly: “12 brands – 11 industries – 1 Global R&D – comprised of 6700 Employees – 41% of DS headcount – 64 locations – 21 nations – $0.6 Billion spent… in 2017.” Whatever it was, many R&D teams across many product groups discussing new and existing features were turned into a single R&D team discussing new and existing features in the context of their brands.

That’s quite a change. So now, DS has a consolidated R&D team working on products that work together on a unified platform — an approach that up until now catered to and grew revenue on the Enterprise business side with the idea that a similar approach could be taken for the small and medium-sized business (SMB). And with that, (you would think) there is more clarity about capabilities that exist across brands and their products, including those that have already been developed for the products on the DS cloud-based 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

There’s the refreshing appearance that DS and SOLIDWORKS, together, are looking at what SOLIDWORKS users want (and more broadly, what SMBs need). They’re answering:

  • What capabilities do SOLIDWORKS users want/SMBs need?
  • Do those capabilities already exist in the DS portfolio?
  • How can we provide those capabilities?

So, if that capability has existed for years in a mature DS product, how can we provide it to our SOLIDWORKS users quickly? If SOLIDWORKS users can get their models onto the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, what possibilities exist? What would their workflow look like?

You got a little taste of that in the video above, but this transformation is described in further detail by Devine Malone, Senior Director Sales, 3DEXPERIENCE-Professional Solutions, in this video from this August highlighting apps, workflow, and reseller/customer strategy. (Devine Malone’s part picks up in 29:30.):

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</figure>

To recap: “Our sole purpose is to support our partners as they begin to transform themeselves to have the skillset to extend the value of our entire DS portfolio to the traditional SOLIDWORKS customer base.

What does he mean by the entire portfolio? “So, Dassault Systemes as most people sh-would know, is over 17,000 people, most, or a large portion of those are involved in product R&D. In fact, at its core, Dassault is really an R&D company… What we’re trying to do is to help support their efforts as they acquire, develop, and integrate all different type of groundbreaking technology — We kind of take the pieces of that technology that we feel will best serve our customer base and get our partners prepared to integrate that into their solution to their customers.”

And is it a select set of tools? “Yeah, there’s so much more to Dassault – there’s the SIMULIA brand, the ENOVIA brand — Being able to take the different types of their pieces of the technology to extend the value above and beyond what we have traditionally allowed our partners, or supported our partners in, is our undertaking and it’s a very exciting transformation that we’ve done.”

They cover 3DEXPERIENCE at a high-level. But, you’ll be interested to know how products will be delivered. If you’re familiar with other DS 3DEXPERINCE products, this will be familiar to you. If not, it’s simple…

Dassault has 12 brands (CATIA, 3DVIA, ENOVIA, SOLIDWORKS, etc.). Each brand contains products, and each product contains roles. For example, CATIA contains over 50 roles. (Think of a role, like a role you have at work – and, oh yeah, you probably have multiple roles regardless of your job title.) Now, each of those roles may have one or multiple apps that provide a specific capability for that role. For example, perhaps you’ve heard of 3D Creator – a role that contains the xDesign App – or 3D Sculptor – a role that contains the xShape app.

There was some confusion, even among resellers, when SOLIDWORKS announced these roles in June since the concept of products, roles, and apps hadn’t been explained and SOLIDWORKS had never outwardly used the concept of roles and apps. Suddenly, you go from one product family you use to design to potentially many product families with multiple roles and apps without any detail describing how to try these new capabilities or their associated pricing. And this is on top of new product announcements with no product availability for years and product/platform name changes. Confusion, understandable. So, in September, SOLIDWORKS published two blog posts on their blog describing, What Happened to xDesign and What Happened to xShape.

Finally some explanation, but still questions on trials, pricing and, coming back to SOLIDWORKS 2020, connectedness. At most, you get that it “complements the parametric workflows of desktop-based SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD” which is nice, but how? Where? What is the extent of the interoperability between SOLIDWORKS and 3DEXPERIENCE roles/apps? Why can’t I connect to 3DEXPERIENCE right now and fire up the ‘plethora of other solutions’?

Interoperability is something I imagine is going to become more apparent as 3DEXPERIENCE becomes more of SOLIDWORKS becomes more of 3DEXPERIENCE. I’m not sure if the pricing will ever be transparent, but the idea is that you purchase the role(s) you need and get access to all the apps within it. Currently, these roles exist for SOLIDWORKS users as 3DEXPERIENCE Design Solutions which I suspect, if plans revealed at SOLIDWORKS World 2019 are correct, will transform into the 3DEXPERIENCE.WORKS sub-platform, or rather, the SMB layer of the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, that will support SOLIDWORKS, DELMIAWORKS, ENOVIAWORKS SIMULIAWORKS, and others.

If it doesn’t make sense why the 3DEXPERIENCE platform would be segmented as a business model or a system into a sub-platform of SOLIDWORKS compatible 3DEXPERIENCE roles and apps, it 1) neatly organizes what products/services are developed for the .WORKS platform and 2) helps show you what 3DEXPERIENCE apps you’ll have access to (and what you won’t). With everything focused around 3DEXPERIENCE, will .WORKS remain or is it simply transitional? We’ll see. For now, the full-cap, letter-rich 3DEXPERIENCE.WORKS platform remains, with the latest details in the September 18th SOLIDWORKS 2020 press release.

With SOLIDWORKS 2020, and the 3DEXPERIENCE.WORKS portfolio of solutions, the 3DEXPERIENCE platform provides a growing set of cloud-based solutions that work together to help manage every aspect of developing concepts, designing products, and manufacturing and delivering them. Solutions like 3D Sculptor, which includes the xShape (sub division modeling) application, 3D Creator featuring the xDesign (parametric modeling) application, 3D Component Designer (data management), Project Planner, and Structural Professional Engineer (advanced simulation), enable users to reduce friction in their design to manufacturing process.

As announced at SOLIDWORKS World 2019 earlier this year, all these cloud-based solutions will be part of the 3DEXPERIENCE.WORKS portfolio, bringing the power and breadth of the 3DEXPERIENCE platform together with the simplicity and ease-of-use of SOLIDWORKS.

We might get upset that they’re not slapping certain capability inside SOLIDWORKS straight away, but delivering mature features is a venerable approach — not that I wouldn’t like to see the capabilities united within the software, but united across a platform is a great first step.

Aye yi yi. I’ve gone on quite too much. It seemed warranted given we’re upon a pivotal release for SOLIDWORKS and betwixt what was SOLIDWORKS World and what will be 3DEXPERIENCE World. To Dassault and SOLIDWORKS I would just say, you’ve introduced a new platform to SOLIDWORKS users. To introduce that new platform, a new way of thinking about how products are purchased and used, the explanation needs to be clear and concise. I don’t think it is or has been as clear as it could be. The videos are great. The workflow/process videos are great. With any new software, a user — especially those entrenched in deep methodology and processes — is going to ask, how is this going to fit into my existing workflow so it doesn’t jack everything up. Show more of that. Make it more transparent.

On the Dassault website, they describe the 3DEXPERIENCE platform as, “a BUSINESS EXPERIENCE platform [that] provides software solutions for every organization in your company – from marketing to sales to engineering – that help you, in your value creation process, to create differentiating consumer experiences.” SOLIDWORKS drops the word count saying, “The 3DEXPERIENCE platform is a cloud-based environment that connects your product development process from design through manufacturing and delivery.

That’s it in a sentence. There’s a lot more to it, of course, and both the Dassault and SOLIDWORKS websites have an entire section dedicated to explaining it in detail.

3DEXPERIENCE Platform – Dassault Systèmes
The 3DEXPERIENC Platform | SOLIDWORKS

Those and the videos above will have you understanding the path forward a little better. But don’t worry, there’s more to come on 3DEXPERIENCE. A live broadcast is scheduled for December 2019 and, have you heard? 3DEXPERIENCE World with “0 percent more training sessions” is right around the corner, February 9-12, 2020, in Nashville, TN.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Comin’ Atcha With a Quickness (Plus More on 3DEXPERIENCE) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 30, 2019 07:32 PM

The Javelin Blog

Distributed Coupling for Bolts and Pins in SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020

Getting simulation results quickly, while maintaining accuracy, is always a top priority for any analyst. Replacing modeled fasteners with bolt or pin connectors in SOLIDWORKS Simulation is a great way to simplify your model, thus significantly reducing your solution time, without compromising on accuracy. The primary limitation of this simplification, is that stresses and deformations near connector interfaces were often artificially high, due to the rigid coupling SOLIDWORKS Simulation used to formulate the connectors. SOLIDWORKS 2020 brings improved accuracy to your simulations, with the new distributed coupling option for bolts and pins. Watch the demo below to learn more:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QlteLtFpDvY?feature=oembed" title="What's New in SOLIDWORKS SIMULATION 2020 - Distributed Coupling" width="500"></iframe>

How does SOLIDWORKS Distributed Loading work?

Before we get to the “why?”, let’s first nerd out a bit over the specifics of what this distributed loading does. When you create a bolt or pin connector in SOLIDWORKS Simulation, it is represented by a very stiff beam with rigid bars attached to the nodes contacting the head/nut (in the case of a lose bolt), and/or rigid elements attached to the nodes on the cylindrical faces (for tight fit bolts or pins). The rigid coupling option in SOLIDWORKS 2020 (the only option available in earlier releases) requires all the nodes on the part geometry to maintain their position relative to each other, introducing a significant amount of stiffness to the coupled regions.

Bolt and Pin connectors are formulated as stiff beams with rigid bars connected to the interfacing nodes

Bolt and Pin connectors are formulated as stiff beams with rigid bars connected to the interfacing nodes

Distributed coupling was introduced for remote loads and masses in 2019, allowing the coupled nodes to move independently.

What can Distributed Coupling do for you?

The addition of distributed coupling for bolts and pins allows the head, nut, or shaft contacting nodes to deform independently, better simulating the actual behavior of your assemblies. This means more realistic stresses and displacements near connectors, and fewer artificial stress hot spots.

The rigid connection type (top) produces artificial stress concentrations in the bolt head region. The distributed option (bottom) produces a more realistic stress field.

The rigid connection type (top) produces artificial stress concentrations in the bolt head region. The distributed option (bottom) produces a more realistic stress field.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Distributed Coupling Connection Type

In SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020, the Connector property manager now includes the Distributed option as the default connection type for all new pin or bolt connections. Legacy connectors will remain as rigid connections but can be updated to the new option simply by editing the connection.

Distributed is the default in the new Connection Type section of the Connectors Property Manager

Distributed is the default in the new Connection Type section of the Connectors Property Manager

With distributed coupling for bolts and pins, SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 increases the accuracy of your simulations, without requiring any additional complexity. This is just one of the many methods available to SOLIDWORKS Simulation users to decrease solution time without compromising accuracy. Javelin’s professional SOLIDWORKS Simulation training enables users to take full advantage of these features, getting their products to market faster than the competition.

The post Distributed Coupling for Bolts and Pins in SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Angus Hudson, CSWP at September 30, 2019 05:00 PM

Installing the SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS)

The SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) is an integral component for administrating SOLIDWORKS PDM, as it allows us to maintain and capture backups of the database.  When installing a new instance of SQL Express via the installation manager for SOLIDWORKS PDM 2019 and later versions, a separate download and install is required to include SSMS.

Download Server Management Studio

SQL Server Option in SOLIDWORKS PDM Installation

For SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 and earlier versions, please see our guide here on how to install this from the included install media

How to download and install the SQL Server Management Studio

Download Link

Download Link

  • Confirm the installation location, and hit Install
Install

Install SSMS

  • Progress….
Progress dialog

Progress dialog

  • Complete with a reboot;
Restart your machine after installation is complete

Restart your machine after installation is complete

  • Then SSMS should be available via:
    • Start > Programs > Microsoft SQL Server Tools xx
SSMS

SSMS

Now we can capture manual backups, or schedule backups using Windows Task Scheduler and other database administrative tasks.

The post Installing the SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at September 30, 2019 12:00 PM

September 29, 2019

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PCB 2020 Flex / Rigid-flex Boards

With SOLIDWORKS PCB 2020, flex and rigid-flex board design is now available.

With flex and rigid-flex PCB design, the design process can be very difficult at times as the 3 dimensional shape of the board is more complex than a typical rigid PCB being fitted into an enclosure. As flex/rigid-flex boards are designed to bend, fitting the PCB inside its enclosure can sometimes be time consuming as the old paper “dolls” methods/cutouts can take extra time to make and test — and yet there is still guess work that can lead to errors in the design.

With SOLIDWORKS PCB, all the above issues can be eliminated as the design, verification, and conformity of the flex/rigid-flex PCB inside its enclosure can all be verified within SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS PCB without any guess work.

This is a great solution especially when combined with the power of 3D printing as the full product (PCB and enclosure) can be designed and verified in SOLIDWORKS prior to being built, reducing costs – as prototypes can be 3D printed in house, and in lesser quantities.

To create a rigid/rigid-flex PCB in SOLIDWORKS PCB:

  1. Design the shape of the board, and note the rigid and flexible segments of the design (this is done as normal in SOLIDWORKS PCB).

 

Rigid and flexible segments

Rigid and flexible segments

  1. Launch the Layer Stack Manager, and select the Advanced tab.
Layer Stack Manager

Layer Stack Manager

  1. Next, choose the layer stack desired, add stacks as needed for the rigid and flex (or just flex). Ensure to check the “Flex” checkbox for the flex segment.
Choose the layer stack desired

Choose the layer stack desired

  1. Once that is completed, we can go ahead and start defining the different stacks on our board. Navigate to Board > Board Shape > Edit Board Shape.
Edit Board Shape

Edit Board Shape

  1. Edit the board shape as needed, define split lines to split the different stacks up.
Define split line

Define split line

  1. Once the board is split, double click each region and use the drop down menu to assign it the correct stack.
Assign to the correct stack

Assign to the correct stack

  1. Ensure to select the 3D Locked option for the region that the flex board will be “flexing” or bending around. The 3D locked region is the main region of the PCB.
3D Locked option

3D Locked option

  1. Next place the bend lines where the board is intended to bend, this will be used to model the PCB bending when viewed in 3D
Define Bending Line

Define Bending Line

Bend Line applied

Bend Line applied

When the board is now viewed in 3D (by clicking the shortcut keyboard key ‘3’), the board appears as normal.

3D View

3D View

However, when it number ‘5’ shortcut is clicked, the board will animate and bend as defined

Animate and bend

Animate and bend

This board can then be pushed over through the SOLIDWORKS PCB Connector to SOLIDWORKS where the mechanical designer can ensure it will fit and bend perfectly inside its enclosure. This addition to SOLIDWORKS PCB will save time and effort when it comes to designing flex or rigid-flex PCBs.

The post SOLIDWORKS PCB 2020 Flex / Rigid-flex Boards appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ish at September 29, 2019 12:00 PM

September 28, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Walkthrough your Assembly with SOLIDWORKS 2020 eDrawings VR

Have you ever thought, I wish I could be inside my computer and interact with my assembly? I know I have!

Virtual Reality (VR) in eDrawings Professional enables users to explore their designs at a one-to-one scale using a VR headset like the HTC Vive. Originally introduced in SOLIDWORKS eDrawings 2019 as a beta feature, eDrawings Professional 2020 now fully supports Virtual Reality and delivers several enhancements including transparency, Full Scene Anti-aliasing and Ambient Occlusion, which gives your model a more realistic appearance.

Just open a native SOLIDWORKS model in VR, put on a headset, and jump into your design. It’s that easy.

See eDrawings VR in action

Watch the video below to learn more:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5zg5ZvJb3RU?feature=oembed" title="What's New in SOLIDWORKS 2020 - eDrawings VR" width="500"></iframe>

New eDrawings Visual Enhancements

Visual quality is greatly improved in eDrawings 2020, with support for transparency, Full Scene Anti-aliasing and Ambient Occlusion, which gives your model a more realistic appearance. There are more options to control the Sky and Floor, including the option to add your own custom environment images. There is an option to Fade the horizon to remove the hard line between the floor and sky.

With the new transparency support, you can see through clear objects, such as the glass doors, and Ambient Occlusion enhances shadowing, providing a more natural, realistic look.

For companies seeking an immersive experience for their designs, eDrawings Professional 2020 provides a seamless path to Virtual Reality, allowing you to simulate physical presence with your design, in a virtual environment.

The post Walkthrough your Assembly with SOLIDWORKS 2020 eDrawings VR appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vicky Guignard at September 28, 2019 12:00 PM

September 27, 2019

SolidSmack

Apple’s New Mac Pro Will Be Manufactured Exclusively on U.S. Shores

Apple Manufacturing Robot

Since Apple’s new cheese grater-looking Mac Pro was announced last June, the company has released a statement that the new PCs will be made in the U.S.A., specifically in Austin, Texas – the same place where Mac Pros have been made since 2013.

<figure class="wp-block-image">apple U.S. manufacturers</figure>

This new Mac Pro will include parts sourced from 36 states; including areas in Arizona, Maine, New York, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Vermont, and of course, Texas. According to Apple, the company is able to manufacture in the U.S. thanks to a “federal product exclusion” for some of the computer’s components. With this, this upcoming Mac Pro is said to have American-made components which are worth 2.5 times more than the previous version.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wl4Hg23RQHQ?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

While the announcement may not be surprising to most, the move feels like a response to the potential increase in tariffs on computer manufacturing. U.S. President Trump has called out Apple’s outsourcing of labor and manufacturing in China in the past, so designing and engineering the Mac Pro on American shores puts the company on the administration’s good side.

<figure class="wp-block-image">apple U.S. manufacturers</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">apple U.S. manufacturers</figure>

With manufacturing on the new Mac Pro being done locally in America, Apple says they are supporting 450,000 jobs with U.S. suppliers and are dead set on increasing their growth. The company is currently on track to reach its $350 billion investment goal in the U.S. economy by 2023, so the Mac Pro definitely won’t be the last computer they make exclusively on U.S. soil.

The Apple Mac Pro will be out later this fall 2019.

The post Apple’s New Mac Pro Will Be Manufactured Exclusively on U.S. Shores appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 27, 2019 07:19 PM

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 39.19

LEGO’s New Technic Land Rover Defender Features a Crazy-Sophisticated Gearbox

Huddle around the computer a little bit, your digital detox is a farce! How can you stay away from great stuff that you can read and chew on … mentally that is! We got you covered, while you were away, busy with your digital detox diet. Don’t be shy, take a look at the week that was, right here on SolidSmack.

Cause we are ROCKIN!

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

The Future of Work: Telepresence Robots Finally Get Interesting

Though a remotely-controlled telepresence robot on wheels with your face on it may help assert one’s presence in a meeting room on the other side of the world, there’s no denying that the people on the other end doing the whole “interacting” thing with said robot might find it a bit off-putting—creepy, even.

<figure class="wp-block-image">LEGO’s New Technic Land Rover Defender Features a Crazy-Sophisticated Gearbox</figure>

LEGO’s New Technic Land Rover Defender Features a Crazy-Sophisticated Gearbox

LEGO tie-ins with upcoming vehicles are nothing new, and the Jaguar 2020 Land Rover Defender is no exception. While the real thing will be out sometime next Spring (and it looks to be awesome), you can get the LEGO version as soon as next week.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Mamma Mia! This Functional PC is Made of Pasta!</figure>

Mamma Mia! This Functional PC is Made of Pasta!

Save for the gluten-free militia, just about everybody loves pasta. It’s filling, reasonably easy to cook, and you can still eat it long after your teeth have fallen out from old age. 

<figure class="wp-block-image">This Insane 3D Art Series Shines a Modern Light on Retro Technologies</figure>

This Insane 3D Art Series Shines a Modern Light on Retro Technologies

If you’re ever on Twitter or Instagram, chances are you’ve come across your fair share of smooth animations and design photos. You know the ones: 3D rendered clips and images that look and flow so well they have to be computer-generated.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Simone Giertz Takes Matters Into Her Own Hands And Makes Her Own Tesla Pickup Truck</figure>

Simone Giertz Takes Matters Into Her Own Hands And Makes Her Own Tesla Pickup Truck

Ever since Elon Musk took to Twitter to ask his followers what they would like from a Tesla pickup truck, the world has waited with bated breath. Of course, this was back in 2018, and as we all know, he never really followed up on his promise—yet.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Adam Savage’s Tested VR Takes You on Immersive Tours of Incredible Workshops</figure>

Adam Savage’s Tested VR Takes You on Immersive Tours of Incredible Workshops

Do you know what’s cooler than watching a YouTube video of a person build something? Being there yourself as the artist makes their creation, that’s what.

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 39.19 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 27, 2019 07:19 PM

Adam Savage’s Tested VR Takes You on Immersive Tours of Incredible Workshops

Adam Savage

Do you know what’s cooler than watching a YouTube video of a person build something? Being there yourself as the artist makes their creation, that’s what.

Thanks to a collaboration with Oculus and Tested (a website run by Adam Savage dedicated to showing off his works as well as those of other creators), owners of Oculus Quest and Oculus Go headsets can get a front-row seat to their favorite creators as they work on their latest projects in Tested VR.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UdJs-0ZU8FI?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Upon starting the app, you choose from among several episodes; each featuring a different workshop and creator. The creator then gives you an intimate step-by-step guide on their work ethic and process as the video goes on.

<figure class="wp-block-image">tested vr</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">tested vr</figure>

Aside from the starting room, the VR app features an on-rails camera which moves around as the video plays. The camera provides you with the best view of the making process, and while you can move your head around, this only affects the direction sounds are coming from relative to what the video is currently playing.

<figure class="wp-block-image">tested vr</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">tested vr</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">tested vr</figure>

But this doesn’t mean to say Tested VR will be a boring virtual roller coaster; far from it. In each 15-minute episode, you’ll be able to see sparks fly from welding tools, sawdust blow from chainsaws, and even… puppets getting puppeted? Makers including sculptor Griffon Ramsey, puppet designer Rick Lyon, and Adam Savage himself already have their own episodes, with more creators soon to be featured.

According to Savage, the idea to implement VR came about from his wish to allow people to get a closer look at the creative process that goes on in these often tucked-away spaces. Naturally, when something is done in front of you, it becomes easier to understand as opposed to reading it in a book or viewing it from a fixed perspective. With Tested VR, he hopes to reduce the barrier between creators and the folks watching them.

Tested VR currently has a total of eight episodes and is totally free to download for the Oculus Quest and Oculus Go.

The post Adam Savage’s Tested VR Takes You on Immersive Tours of Incredible Workshops appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 27, 2019 07:01 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2 File History Tab

New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2 we have the history tab available to view the history of files. Web2 lets you see a read-only view of a file’s history.

When a file is selected for details, the History tab is available as shown below:

SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 History Tab

SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 History Tab

Web2 displays the table view that includes the Event column and customizable columns for:

  • Version
  • User
  • Date
  • Comment

Click the settings icon to select or clear the columns to display for the SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 File History.

History Tab Settings

History Tab Settings

SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 Demo

Learn more about the latest enhancements in SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 2020 in the video below:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/knglqsvvYr4?feature=oembed" title="What's New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 - Web2" width="500"></iframe>

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2 File History Tab appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at September 27, 2019 05:00 PM

How to install the SOLIDWORKS PCB Viewer 2020

The SOLIDWORKS PCB Viewer is a free viewer application that can be used to view native SOLIDWORKS PCB files, allowing for better review and collaboration with all the members of your electronics design team. You install SOLIDWORKS PCB Viewer through the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager.

Please note: the SOLIDWORKS PCB Viewer cannot be installed on a machine containing an existing SOLIDWORKS PCB installation.

To begin the install, launch the SOLIDWORKS 2020 installation manager and select Modify your installation.

Modify your installation

Modify your installation

Click Next and proceed to the Product Selection page.

Next proceed with the install

Next proceed with the install

Select the SOLIDWORKS PCB Viewer as shown below to install.

Select the SOLIDWORKS PCB Viewer

Select the SOLIDWORKS PCB Viewer

Click Next to begin the installation.

Once the installation is complete, you can launch the Viewer and sign in to SOLIDWORKS PCB Services to access your projects.

Connect to SOLIDWORKS PCB Services

Connect to SOLIDWORKS PCB Services

The user interface for the SOLIDWORKS PCB Viewer is very similar to that of a standard SOLIDWORKS PCB environment, with the exception of the modifications tools being grayed out and non-functional (for both schematic and PCB editing).

SOLIDWORKS PCB Viewer

SOLIDWORKS PCB Viewer

The Viewer is a strong addition to SOLIDWORKS PCB as it further eases collaboration not only between ECAD and MCAD, but also between designers, managers, and approvers.

The post How to install the SOLIDWORKS PCB Viewer 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ish at September 27, 2019 12:00 PM

September 26, 2019

SolidSmack

Cool Tools: Copic Design Sketching Markers

industrial design sketching

When it comes to sketching and communicating your ideas well, nothing beats a good old-fashioned pencil and a keen sense of perspective. That said, adding simple depth to your form sketches with light and shadow is a natural next step in taking your sketches to the next level.

And when it comes time to cranking ideas out fast, our favorite go-to is a fistful of 2-3 Sketching Grays from Copic that give us great contrast. These ultra-blendable, low odor, alcohol-based inks deliver rich and smooth strokes that are ideal for quickly communicating product concepts. And unlike water-based inks, which tend to pill and oversoak paper while blending, Copics mix on the surface fast and easy-like.

While there are plenty of Copic marker sets out there, we recommend sticking to this compact six-pack of Sketching Grays for maximum versatility. If you want to get extra-fancy, try adding a single bright ‘pop’ color for your arrows, callouts, and anytime you want a callout to really stand out. And don’t forget that marker paper pad, too!

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

Copic Sketch Set of 5 Markers and 1 Multiliner Pen – Sketching Grays $33.01

Features:

  • Packaged in a clear plastic case, a sketch set is the ideal way to begin or add to a marker collection
  • Refillable markers and replaceable nibs, compatible with Copic air brush system
  • Alcohol-based ink is permanent and non-toxic, dries acid free

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

Feature image via leManoosh

The post Cool Tools: Copic Design Sketching Markers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 26, 2019 09:45 PM

Simone Giertz Takes Matters Into Her Own Hands And Makes Her Own Tesla Pickup Truck

Simone Giertz Tesla

Ever since Elon Musk took to Twitter to ask his followers what they would like from a Tesla pickup truck, the world has waited with bated breath. Of course, this was back in 2018, and as we all know, he never really followed up on his promise—yet.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-twitter wp-block-embed is-type-rich is-provider-twitter">
<script async="async" charset="utf-8" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js"></script>
</figure>

This left a lot of Tesla fans hungry for the infamous ‘model P’; so much so that some of them have actually started making their own designs for the pickup truck.

While most of these are high-level concept proposals—such as Istanbul designer Emre Husmen’s CAD design concepts—maker and robotics enthusiast Simone Giertz (along with some friends) made a fully-functioning Tesla truck:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jKv_N0IDS2A?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Cleverly dubbed the Truckla, this modified Tesla was made by taking a brand new Tesla Model 3, cutting out the top of the backside, and adding a truck bed to the chassis.

So—how did they do it?

<figure class="wp-block-image">truckla</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">truckla</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">truckla</figure>

After weighing in the car, they stripped the interiors and took a heat gun and some wire to remove the rear top window. This freed up a ton of space so the team could make the big cut and remove the top rear portion of the vehicle.

<figure class="wp-block-image">truckla</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">truckla</figure>

Upon making the initial cut, the team finds out the metal folds into itself without proper support. To remedy this, they prop up the car on a couple of jack stands so it won’t shift around while they’re tearing apart this brand new vehicle.

<figure class="wp-block-image">truckla</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">truckla</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">truckla</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

They continue cutting through the top rear portion of the Tesla Model 3 until it has a wonderful rear sunroof. Once it’s gone, they start taking measurements to fit a truck bed onto the rear of the car.

<figure class="wp-block-image">truckla</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">truckla</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">truckla</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">truckla</figure>

Now it’s a matter of fitting in a number of metal structures to fit the large structure of the vehicle. To make room for the truck bed, they also cut out the top portion of the trunk. They took an old truck bed from a real pickup truck and a rear window from another truck and fitted both of them onto the Truckla.

<figure class="wp-block-image">truckla</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">truckla</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">truckla</figure>

It wouldn’t be a true utility pickup truck without a roof rack, and considering the Truckla only has 3 feet and 11 inches of space by the wheel wells, Simone took an old Chrysler pickup roof rack and cut it to fit her creation.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/R35gWBtLCYg?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

There’s a bit of a time skip between the attachment of the roof deck and the finished Truckla, but to commemorate the truck’s completion, Simone and her friends decided to shoot a fake commercial for the Truckla, complete with outdoor scenery and a cowboy motif. Elon, are you watching?

<figure class="wp-block-image">truckla</figure>

It’s a bit of a long watch, but you should definitely check out the entire video on Simone’s YouTube channel, Simone Giertz. It’s there where you’ll find her other projects, vlogs, and other weird but awesome shenanigans.

The post Simone Giertz Takes Matters Into Her Own Hands And Makes Her Own Tesla Pickup Truck appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 26, 2019 09:38 PM

The Javelin Blog

Get peace of mind with the SOLIDWORKS 2020 Simulation Evaluator

Few things grind an analyst’s gears like setting up a long study to run overnight, and then returning the following morning only to find that the study failed after 25 minutes due to storage limitations in the results folder. Luckily, this will be another one of those “when I was your age…” kinds of problems, thanks to the new Simulation Evaluator tool available in SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020. This tool provides peace of mind that you aren’t starting a lengthy simulation only to have it fail due to a common, and easily avoidable, source of error. The SOLIDWORKS Simulation Evaluator focuses on the assigned results folder, the assigned materials, and the mesh validity.

Access the SOLIDWORKS Simulation Evaluator

Access the Simulation Evaluator directly from the Simulation Tree

The first section of the Simulation Evaluator indicates the paths of the model and results folder, as well as the capacity of the drive. A hyperlink to the Study Properties is included, making it easy to change the results folder if needed. This section of the tool is also helpful for troubleshooting if the link between study and results is lost.

The Simulation Evaluator provides a detailed summary of the storage conditions related to the study

The Simulation Evaluator provides a detailed summary of the storage conditions related to the study

The SOLIDWORKS Simulation Evaluator also provides an easy to skim overview of which materials are assigned to which parts. Reviewing this information in a dedicated table is significantly easier than digging through a narrow Simulation Tree, allowing users to quickly verify that all materials are assigned correctly. Hovering over the material cells brings up a callout with the relevant mechanical properties, such as Elastic modulus, density, and Tensile strength. Again, having all this information in one place is much more streamlined than opening the material editor for several bodies in order to check yield strengths.

Quickly verify tQuickly verify that all bodies have the correct materials applied, and even check their properties from the fly-outhat all bodies have the correct materials applied, and even check their properties from the flyout

Quickly verify that all bodies have the correct materials applied, and even check their properties from the fly-out

The third facet of the Simulation Evaluator is its mesh volume comparison. This section tabulates the mesh volume, body volume, and percent difference for each body in the analysis. Significant discrepancies between mesh and body volume will have a significant impact on the accuracy of an analysis, and being able to identify this prior to waiting for results can save designers from time-intensive re-runs.

The Simulation Evaluator's tabular comparison of the body and mesh volumes makes it easy to spot areas needing mesh refinement

The Simulation Evaluator’s tabular comparison of the body and mesh volumes makes it easy to spot areas needing mesh refinement

With the new SOLIDWORKS Simulation Evaluator tool, you can quickly double check your study setup to assist with getting accurate results on your first run.

See a Demo

The SOLIDWORKS Simulation Evaluator provides you with a single location to verify and update or re-attach simulation results, check simulation study setup, verify materials and mesh.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1qrBFM5paMg?feature=oembed" title="What's New in SOLIDWORKS SIMULATION 2020 - SIMULATION Evaluator" width="500"></iframe>

This tool functions as a great sanity check, but it is no substitute for having an expert between the keyboard and chair. Luckily, Javelin’s SOLIDWORKS Simulation training classes will help both novices and seasoned analysts get the most out of SOLIDWORKS Simulation.

The post Get peace of mind with the SOLIDWORKS 2020 Simulation Evaluator appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Angus Hudson, CSWP at September 26, 2019 05:00 PM

New Log Out Option in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 is more convenient

New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020, we have an additional more convenient method to log out of and verify who we’re logged in as:

New log out icon

New log out icon

We can access the icon from anywhere within the vault view, and log out via clicking and selecting ‘log out’;

Log Out

Log Out

We can also verify who we’re logged in as by hovering over the icon (useful for anyone who switches between an administrative and regular user account);

Logged in as

Logged in as

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS PDM

Attend a SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Administration training course either in a classroom near you or live online.

The post New Log Out Option in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 is more convenient appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at September 26, 2019 12:00 PM

Repair All Missing References for Fillets with SOLIDWORKS 2020

Have you ever had a Fillet Error? When was the last time that you made a minor change to your model which caused a fillets to have a “missing edge reference” even though the edges are exactly where they used to be? Did it happen yet this week? Making changes to a 3D model seems to be the only constant when figuring out a prototype, and continually having to re-select edges for fillets can no doubt be frustrating. SOLIDWORKS 2020 has a solution to this frustration though! The Fillet Repair tool now has the ability to “Repair All Missing References” which results in any new edges getting filleted if they replace an old filleted edge.

The Fillet tool Missing Edge References after a change

The Fillet tool Missing Edge References after a change

A new way to fix Missing Edges!

The command works by editing the fillet feature with an error, and right clicking in the selection window of the property manager.

Right clicking on a Missing Edge now reveals a New Menu

The option to ‘Repair All Missing References’ will search for new edges that are close to the missing edges, and if found will replace the existing edges removing the need to re-select the edges required for fillets. This saves time by not needing to re-select all the missing edges and keeps you focused on your design.

Edges Automatically identified and selected using "Repair All Missing References" tool

Edges Automatically identified and selected using “Repair All Missing References” tool

Enhancements such as “Repair All Missing References” for fillets are my favourite as they take an otherwise manual and sometimes frustrating task, and get SOLIDWORKS to do it in the background while maintaining full control over what is actually happening.

Watch a SOLIDWORKS Fillet Repair demo

See the new streamlined workflow in SOLIDWORKS 2020 that can automatically repair these missing references for you, saving you time in re-selecting the references or re-creating the feature.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/b2HutndnzB8?feature=oembed" title="What's New in SOLIDWORKS 2020 - Fillet Repair" width="500"></iframe>

How do I learn about other enhancements?!

These slightly hidden features are a fantastic reason to investigate enrolling in professional training offered by Javelin. While the essential skills will of course be covered, little tips such as getting SOLIDWORKS to repair your fillets can add up to hours of saved time and the SOLIDWORKS Advanced Update course is chocked full of these type of efficiency tools.

If it has been more than a few years since you have learned about new features found in SOLIDWORKS, or new ways of modelling, get in touch with Javelin and we can help you speed up your design process by finding the ideal training path for you!

The post Repair All Missing References for Fillets with SOLIDWORKS 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Bryan Sprange, CSWE at September 26, 2019 12:00 PM

September 25, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Modify a Mesh BREP body directly with SOLIDWORKS 2020

The new SOLIDWORKS 2020 release has some exciting capabilities built in for working directly on a Mesh BREP body.

Previously only simple features such as add and subtract could be performed, and to do these, a regular solid body first had to be made and then converted into Mesh.

Now even advanced features like Drafts and Shells can be created directly on the Mesh body.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tvu_L8jxQZk?feature=oembed" title="What's New in SOLIDWORKS 2020 - Direct Mesh Editing" width="500"></iframe>

What are the new Mesh Editing tools?

Many commands like fillets can now be completed on the mesh body. The really cool thing is that these commands aren’t special ‘Mesh body’ commands, you just use the regular tools you’re used to, and they work!

Filleting the corner of an Imported Mesh File!

The full list of commands which can now be used on a mesh body are:

  • Shell
  • Fillet
  • Draft
  • Chamfer
  • Delete Face
  • Fill Face
  • Mutual Trim
  • Surface Knit
  • Delete Hole

Mesh Specific Tools

For commands that are Mesh BREP body specific, new or updated tools were created. These tools are:

  • Convert to Mesh Body
  • Segment Imported MeshBody
  • Surface from Mesh
  • 3D Texture
  • Decimate Mesh

Most of the mesh specific tools already existed in the 2019 release, however Decimate Mesh is an interesting new tool which I wrote a whole separate article about.

Tools such as Delete Face, and Delete Hole are great to have when working making a quick update to an existing STL file which may be damaged before manufacturing it with either SOLIDWORKS CAM, or on a 3D printer.

The ‘Delete Hole’ Command Working on a Mesh Body

Use the new Mesh BREP capable features in SOLIDWORKS 2020 to work on your files as if they were native SOLIDWORKS geometry, saving you time from having to use special workflows based on the type of file you are trying to edit.

3D Scan and 3D Printing Data

This is also fantastic news for anyone who uses 3D scanned data, or works with 3D printers and the tessellated information which they require.

The post Modify a Mesh BREP body directly with SOLIDWORKS 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Bryan Sprange, CSWE at September 25, 2019 12:00 PM

September 24, 2019

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2 Bill of Materials

New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2 you now have the ability to see a read-only view of the Bill of Materials.

The large screen layout – BOMs:

In the large screen layout, the Bill of Materials tab is available in the file detail view. It displays the bill of materials of SOLIDWORKS PDM items or of a SOLIDWORKS assembly, drawing, part or weldment part.

The supported BOM types are:

  • Computed BOMs
  • Weldment BOMs
  • Weldment cut lists
  • SOLIDWORKS BOMs

To display the Bill of Materials click on the file name and select Bill of Materials tab.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 BOM Layout

Bill of Materials – Large Screen Layout

The small screen layout – BOMs:

In the small screen layout, the Bill of Materials tab is available from the ellipsis menu. The tab contains two customizable columns.

To display the Bill of Materials tab, in the file detail view, click the ellipsis, and click Bill of Materials.

Bill of Materials - Small Screen Layout

Bill of Materials – Small Screen Layout

Watch a demo video

Learn more about the enhancements to SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2 in the video below:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/knglqsvvYr4?feature=oembed" title="What's New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 - Web2" width="500"></iframe>

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2 Bill of Materials appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at September 24, 2019 05:00 PM

SolidSmack

LEGO’s New Technic Land Rover Defender Features a Crazy-Sophisticated Gearbox

lego technic land rover defender

LEGO tie-ins with upcoming vehicles are nothing new, and the Jaguar 2020 Land Rover Defender is no exception. While the real thing will be out sometime next Spring (and it looks to be awesome), you can get the LEGO version as soon as next week.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/smampJ2MIhU?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Made in partnership with Jaguar/Land Rover, the LEGO Technic Land Rover Defender is everything you would expect a miniature block version of the vehicle to be:

<figure class="aligncenter">lego technic land rover defender</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter">lego technic land rover defender</figure>

The jaw-dropping scale model features an incredibly detailed exterior featuring authentic rims, tires, body panels and a removable roof rack with extra accessories, but the interior is where it’s really at. As with all LEGO Technic vehicles, you can open the doors to access the inner cabin, but you can also turn the rear-mounted spare tire to open the tail door. Inside you’ll find a working steering wheel, an impressively detailed dashboard, and folding rear seats which give you access to the gearbox.

<figure class="aligncenter">lego technic land rover defender</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter">lego technic land rover defender</figure>

One of the most impressive features has to be the new Technic gearbox, which includes a transmission which lets you switch between high and low gear ratios as well as a selector for changing gears. You can even see the gears in action by popping the hood to view the six-cylinder engine underneath.

Apart from the gearbox, the Technic Land Rover Defender also has a working All-Wheel Drive with three differentials, independent wheel suspension, and a working winch for when it gets buried under your other LEGO sets.

<figure class="aligncenter">lego technic land rover defender</figure>

The completed 2,573-piece set measures 8-inches (22cm) high, 16-inches (41cm) long, and 7-inches (20cm) wide. It’s nowhere near as big or hefty as the real deal, but you might want to gauge the measurements before adding it to your shelf.

You can find all the details for the LEGO Technic Land Rover Defender (and maybe pre-order one for yourself) on the official LEGO webpage.

The post LEGO’s New Technic Land Rover Defender Features a Crazy-Sophisticated Gearbox appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 24, 2019 04:26 PM

SolidSmack Radio | Titanium Tricks (Powered by Spotify)

Spotify Playlist

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’re getting things rolling with the classic “Windowlicker” from Aphex Twin. From there, we’ll follow up with a grab bag of chilled out tracks including those from Four Tet, Massive Attack, YACHT, and others before wrapping up with “You Wish” from Nightmares on Wax. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<figure><iframe allow="encrypted-media" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/playlist/4rhPTaLwgTtnYGvgXDysA5" width="100%"></iframe></figure>

The post SolidSmack Radio | Titanium Tricks (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 24, 2019 04:19 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Collapse Tree Folders

SOLIDWORKS Simulation study trees can become long and harder to navigate when you start into more complex studies.  While adding new contacts/loads/fixtures and defining materials/shells/etc, the folders and sub-folders are expanded.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Study Tree Expanded

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Study Tree Expanded

In previous versions, collapsing the tree required clicking the arrows beside each sub-folder.

"SOLIDWORKS

New in SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 is the ability to right-click on or beside a folder or sub-folder (i.e. Parts) and select ‘Collapse Tree Items’.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Collapse Tree Items

Now the entire tree will collapse to its smallest size making it easier to access the required features.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Study Tree Collapsed

TIP: Press Shift+C while in the Simulation study tree as a shortcut to collapse all folders.  This shortcut has been available in the SOLIDWORKS FeatureManager Tree for quite some time.

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 Collapse Tree Folders appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at September 24, 2019 12:00 PM

September 23, 2019

SolidSmack

The Future of Work: Telepresence Robots Finally Get Interesting

Double Robotics

Though a remotely-controlled telepresence robot on wheels with your face on it may help assert one’s presence in a meeting room on the other side of the world, there’s no denying that the people on the other end doing the whole “interacting” thing with said robot might find it a bit off-putting—creepy, even.

Double Robotics, one of the first companies to develop the earliest iterations of this tech, has come up with the newest iteration of their flagship Double series of telepresence robots.

<figure class="wp-block-image">double 3 </figure>

The Double 3 still works very much like its predecessors but with a couple of new changes:

<figure class="wp-block-image">double 3</figure>

While both the original Double and Double 2 required a separate iPad to display your face to strangers around the world, the third version now comes with its own screen with two 13-megapixel cameras, a speaker, and six microphones.

The two cameras tilt up and down and allow you to pan, tilt, and zoom in on different areas using the Double web browser or mobile app, while the speaker and microphones make sure you can hear—and be heard—by everyone in the immediate vicinity.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-4-3 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ACUfUE7YMJY?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

One of the most prominent features has to be the 3D sensors which allow the Double 3 to navigate different types of terrain easily. You won’t be driving the robot up an outdoor slope or through a muddy path; but with the sensors in place, it can identify obstacles in its way (such as heaps of paperwork and co-workers) and determine the safest route to its destination. There’s no word yet how fast the sensors can react to sudden changes in its path, so it would be wise to not to jump in front of the Double 3 while it’s in motion.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-4-3 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zSDL9pR0A6I?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The sensors work in tandem with the new Click-to-Drive technology. By clicking any area in front of the robot, you can set a course towards the destination and the Double 3 will make its way there while avoiding any obstacles. To make things easier, the two cameras also highlight important icons with 3D objects, such as driveable areas, objects, and the robot’s charging dock.

The Double 3 will cost $3,999 when it launches this September (or $1,999 to update the Double 2). That said, if you really want to freak your overseas co-workers by following them around with your floating robotic head, no price is too high.

You can check out the full details on the Double 3 on the Double Robotics webpage.

The post The Future of Work: Telepresence Robots Finally Get Interesting appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 23, 2019 09:57 PM

The SolidSmack Monday List 39.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

Car Manufacturing

As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Older Americans Are Starting More Businesses Than Ever

Retire, reboot, become an entrepreneur.

<figure class="aligncenter">Older Americans Are Starting More Businesses Than Ever</figure>

Shade

It’s a civic resource, an index of inequality, and a requirement for public health. Shade should be a mandate for urban designers.

<figure class="aligncenter">Shade</figure>

Apple Keeps Making Computer in Texas After Tariff Waivers

Apple’s high-end Mac Pro will continue to be made in Texas, after the company received a tariff waiver on some Chinese-made parts.

<figure class="aligncenter">Apple Keeps Making Computer in Texas After Tariff Waivers</figure>

GM’s Mary Barra Bets Big on an Electric, Self-Driving Future

The American automaker has challenges like dealing with strikes, developing tech that works, and finding a market.

<figure class="wp-block-image">GM’s Mary Barra Bets Big on an Electric, Self-Driving Future</figure>

10 Life-Changing Habits You Can Form in 66 Days

Trust me — even you have time for a daily walk.

<figure class="aligncenter">10 Life-Changing Habits You Can Form in 66 Days</figure>

We Tried to Do Vanlife Right. It Broke Us Down.

What happened when one writer looked beyond the open road, the staged snapshots, and the hashtag.

<figure class="aligncenter">We Tried to Do Vanlife Right. It Broke Us Down.</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 39.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 23, 2019 09:25 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2020 Project Manager and Viewer

The Project Viewer is a new feature for SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2020, allowing read-only access to electrical projects. The Project Viewer can be accessed through the Projects Manager

Access the Project Manager

Access the Projects Manager

Select the project and click on Preview

Select the Project

Select the Project

Once in the Project Viewer, the user interface looks like a stripped down version of the user interface in SOLIDWORKS Electrical

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Project Viewer UI

Project Viewer User Interface

This allows the user read-only access to projects and reports. Certain functions are also available through the Project Viewer such as exporting drawings to PDFs or DWGs

Export Options

Export Options

The post SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2020 Project Manager and Viewer appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ish at September 23, 2019 03:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS CAM vs. CAMWorks

SOLIDWORKS CAM is powered by CAMWorks. But what is included with SOLIDWORKS CAM and CAMWorks? Compare the features in the table below:

Product SOLIDWORKS CAM CAMWorks
CNC Programming Capability Standard Professional Standard Milling
Professional
Turning
Professional
Premium
2.5 Axis & limited 3 3 Axis Milling x x x x x x
Feature-based machining with feature recognition x x x x x x
Area clear roughing, Flat area, and Z level finishing x x x x x x
Standard Features x x x x x x
NC Editor with Backplotting – powered by CIMCO x x x x x x
Integrated Tolerance Base Machining (iTBM) x x x x x x
Part Document Machining x x x x x x
Assembly CAM Configurations x x x x x
Multiple CAM Configuration x x x x x
4 & 5 Axis Positioning x x x x x
VoluMill 2.5 Axis Roughing x x x x x
Turning for CNC Lathes x x x x x
Sub – Spindle Programming x x x x
Two Turret Support x x x x
Rotary Milling x x x x
3 Axis Milling – Advanced x x
Advanced 3 Axis Roughing and Finishing Capabilities x x
3 Axis Undercutting with Standard and Custom Tools x x
Mill – Turn x x x
Sync Manager for Sychronized Machining x x
CamWorks Virtual machin Standard x x
4 & 5 Axis Simultaneous Milling x

What if I need more 3 axis tool paths?

Area Clearance

Area Clearance is the 3-axis roughing operation. This cycle removes the material between the stock or contain area and the selected feature at decreasing Z depth levels by making a series of parallel cuts across the stock, or by pocketing out toward the stock. Depths of cut can be constant or variable.

Included in: SOLIDWORKS CAM, CAMWorks

Area Clearance

Area Clearance

Z-Level

The Z-Level cycle is a finish contouring cycle that removes material by making a series of horizontal, planar cuts. The cuts follow the contour of the feature at decreasing Z levels based on the Surface Finish specified. Cutting starts from the highest location of the model and works downward.

Included in: SOLIDWORKS CAM, CAMWorks

Z-Level

Z-Level

Flat Area

The Flat Area cycle uses a pocket out pattern to remove material from feature faces that are flat and parallel to the XY machining plane. Toolpaths are only generated on completely flat areas. If a face/surface has even a small gradient, toolpath will not be generated. This cycle can be used for finishing where excess material has already been cleared and supports single or multiple depths of cut.

Included in: SOLIDWORKS CAM, CAMWorks

Flat Area

Flat Area

Pattern Project

The Pattern Project operation is a multi-surface finishing cycle that removes material based on the selected pattern: Slice, Flowline, Radial, and Spiral. These patterns have unique characteristics that make them appropriate for semi-finishing and finishing selected areas or across the entire model.

Included in: CAMWorks

Pattern Project

Pattern Project

Constant Stepover

The Constant Stepover operation removes material by maintaining a constant user-defined stepover relative to the surface. The 3D stepover method generates a toolpath with a true constant stepover regardless of the slope of the feature faces. This method produces the most consistent surface finish on features whose faces have both shallow and steep slope angles.

Included in: CAMWorks

Constant Stepover

Constant Stepover

Pencil Mill

The Pencil Mill cycle generates toolpaths to finish machine corner areas using a single pass or multiple constant passes. Corner areas are defined where the radius of curvature of the feature is less than the radius of the tool.

Included in: CAMWorks

Pencil Mill

Pencil Mill

Curve Project

The Curve Project cycle removes material by projecting selected 2.5-axis Engrave or Curve features onto the faces/surfaces of a Multi-Surface feature and generating toolpaths along the projected entities. This cycle ensures consistent depth of cut along the surface, and can be accomplished in single or multiple passes.

Included in: CAMWorks

Curve Project

Curve Project

Multiaxis Mill

The Multiaxis Mill cycle is the primary cycle for 4- and 5-axis simultaneous milling. It can be reduced to 3-axis and used similarly to Pattern Project. Multiaxis Mill has the unique ability to create undercutting toolpaths, guide the tool based off complex gouge checking, and has more advanced linking, roughing, and finish options available than standard 3-axis cycles.

Included in: CAMWorks (Undercutting Module)

Multiaxis Mill

Multiaxis Mill

Need SOLIDWORKS CAM Training?

Take a SOLIDWORKS CAM Training course either live online or in a Canadian classroom near you.

The post SOLIDWORKS CAM vs. CAMWorks appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Shawn McEachern at September 23, 2019 12:00 PM

September 22, 2019

The Javelin Blog

What is the function of the activated option in the SOLIDWORKS PDM BOM tab?

The function of the checkbox in the SOLIDWORKS PDM BOM tab is to activate a computed bill of materials (BOM) in order to show it in the bill of materials view (Explorer > PDM menu > Display > Show Bill of Materials).

Activated BOM

Activated BOM

This flag is also useful in export XML rules, where possibility to only export activated BOMs is presented (Export Rule / Only export activated BOMs).

Show Bills of Materials

Show Bills of Materials

 

The post What is the function of the activated option in the SOLIDWORKS PDM BOM tab? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at September 22, 2019 12:00 PM

September 21, 2019

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard Milling Setup 9/9: Post Processing NC Code

Once we are happy with our set-up, we need to export a text file that contains the program of G and M codes for the CNC machine to cut the part.

To generate toolpaths, click Post Process in the CAM command manager or right-mouse on Mill Part Setup1 and select Post Process.

First you will be prompted for a save location for the text file that will be the program. Next, in the Post Process feature manager hit the play button to generate the program. In the option tab, check Open G-code file in SOLIDWORKS CAM NC Editor.

SOLIDWORKS CAM Post Process

SOLIDWORKS CAM Post Process

Now our program will be opened in the SOLIDWORKS CAM NC Editor. We may use the functions in this program to manually alter our program. The SOLIDWORKS CAM NC Editor features will be covered in future articles.

SOLIDWORKS CAM NC Editor

SOLIDWORKS CAM NC Code Editor

Our program is ready to upload to our CNC Mill.

The post SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard Milling Setup 9/9: Post Processing NC Code appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Shawn McEachern at September 21, 2019 12:00 PM

September 20, 2019

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2 Download with References

The need to access data online continues to increase. The Web2 client of SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020 delivers expanded capabilities to answer this growing need. When you want to download any PDM data, a new Download with References page provides options to help ensure you’re downloading exactly what you need.

Choose the associated versions, drawings, simulation data and more from a simple, responsive user interface.

In the large screen layout, the Download with References dialog box displays the collapsible Settings option and the list of files to download.

Download with References

Download with References

Download Options

The file list displays the files bases on these settings:

  • Version
    • Latest
    • Referenced
  • Preserve relative paths
  • Include sub-folders
  • Include drawing
  • Include simulation
Customizable Columns

Customizable Columns

Customizable Columns

The file list includes customizable columns such as State, Version, Size and Path.

In the small screen layout, the Download with References dialog box displays the list of files to download in one column.

Small Screen Layout - List of Files to Download

Small Screen Layout – List of Files to Download

Click Settings to select appropriate options. Click Cancel to access the file list.

Watch a demo video

Learn more about the latest enhancements with SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 in the demo video below, and watch other SOLIDWORKS 2020 What’s New videos on our website.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/knglqsvvYr4?feature=oembed" title="What's New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 - Web2" width="500"></iframe>

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Web2 Download with References appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at September 20, 2019 08:17 PM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 38.19

Mind Blown: These Cameras Were Sliced and Reassembled in Resin

Huddle around the computer a little bit, your digital detox is a farce! How can you stay away from great stuff that you can read and chew on … mentally that is! We got you covered, while you were away, busy with your digital detox diet. Don’t be shy, take a look at the week that was, right here on SolidSmack.

Cause we are ROCKIN!

<figure class="wp-block-image">This Full-Cycle Orange Juice Kiosk Turns Orange Peels Into Cups</figure>

This Full-Cycle Orange Juice Kiosk Turns Orange Peels Into Cups

We can all (mostly) agree that being environment-friendly and leaning towards sustainable manufacturing methods is a good thing. So is eating well and being healthy. So by the unspoken rules of the universe, doing both at the same time is doubly good and an all-around best-case scenario.

<figure class="wp-block-image">The Modern Milk Man: Loop Ships Your Favorite Brands in Durable, Reusable Packaging</figure>

The Modern Milk Man: Loop Ships Your Favorite Brands in Durable, Reusable Packaging

From food manufacturers to e-commerce giants, the pressure is on to have at least some form of sustainable business practice as more consumers align with environmentally-friendly businesses.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Mind Blown: These Cameras Were Sliced and Reassembled in Resin</figure>

Mind Blown: These Cameras Were Sliced and Reassembled in Resin

Expanding on the success of his Disintegrating series of exploding car photos, Swiss artist and photographer Fabian Oefner has decided to try something similar with one of his close interests: cameras.

<figure class="wp-block-image">This Insane 3D Art Series Shines a Modern Light on Retro Technologies</figure>

This Insane 3D Art Series Shines a Modern Light on Retro Technologies

If you’re ever on Twitter or Instagram, chances are you’ve come across your fair share of smooth animations and design photos. You know the ones: 3D rendered clips and images that look and flow so well they have to be computer-generated.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Mamma Mia! This Functional PC is Made of Pasta!</figure>

Mamma Mia! This Functional PC is Made of Pasta!

Save for the gluten-free militia, just about everybody loves pasta. It’s filling, reasonably easy to cook, and you can still eat it long after your teeth have fallen out from old age. 

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 38.19 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 20, 2019 08:11 PM

Mamma Mia! This Functional PC is Made of Pasta!

Save for the gluten-free militia, just about everybody loves pasta. It’s filling, reasonably easy to cook, and you can still eat it long after your teeth have fallen out from old age. 

But would your obsession for the Italian dish run so deep that you’d make a working PC out of it?

If not, then you clearly don’t love pasta as much as Micah Laplante, the sole owner, and creator of Laplanet Arts. What started as a joke made by his wife eventually drove Micah to try his hand at making a working computer out of a variety of pasta:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/h0TgLg0rThE?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

To be clear, only the outer parts of the PC are made from pasta. As good as it may taste, there hasn’t been a food concocted which can power or operate an entire computer on the power of sauce and wheat alone.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Pasta PC</figure>

To start, Micah takes the insides of an old Asus Transformer tablet and repurposes them for his pasta project. After making sure it still works, he removes the motherboard, battery, and the other extra parts which run the computer.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Pasta PC</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Pasta PC</figure>

With the parts out of the old computer, he can now start building his PC case. He sets a couple of uncooked lasagna strips on his desk and tries to arrange the parts he just removed onto the base. To keep the lasagna pieces together, he applies some hot glue onto the edges of the strips.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Pasta PC</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Pasta PC</figure>

He arranges the USB ports, circuit board, and battery onto the base before following up with the power button, the volume buttons, and antenna. Since you can’t close off the PC without gluing it shut, Micah will not be able to open his creation once the glue sets in.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Pasta PC</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Pasta PC</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Pasta PC</figure>

He seals the entire build with a glue gun, making sure to add layers and different types of pasta in between the empty space. To give the laptop a more lasagna-like look, he colors the glue red and adds some yellow acrylic paint on top of the PC.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Pasta PC</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Pasta PC</figure>

If you were expecting him to put it in the oven once he was finished, then you’ll be sorely disappointed. Since electronics tend to explode when exposed to high temperatures, Micah is more than happy to have a working, uncooked lasagna computer than a cooked, non-working one.

So how does it work?

<figure class="wp-block-image">Pasta PC</figure>

Pretty much how you’d expect a dated laptop to work, actually. Since the original Asus Transformer’s only problem was the LCD screen, the computer itself still works fine. It can open your basic Microsoft applications, run streaming services and your basic games, though at times it struggles to run video game emulators for old consoles.

The full video is worth watching, as Micah inserts a ton of humor while making and using the lasagna laptop. To see more of his computer creations, check out the Laplanet Arts webpage and Youtube channel.

The post Mamma Mia! This Functional PC is Made of Pasta! appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 20, 2019 07:57 PM

The Javelin Blog

Reduce Mesh Body Complexity with the SOLIDWORKS 2020 Decimate Mesh Tool

New in the 2020 release of SOLIDWORKS comes even more capability to work with imported mesh files!

As is often the case with scanned geometry, the number of graphics triangles (facets) can be overwhelming for many SOLIDWORKS users’ hardware. It usually is also excessive for an accurate representation of the model. Now the number of facets can be reduced using a tool directly in SOLIDWORKS which will dramatically improve performance.

How the Decimate Mesh Body tool works

The Decimate Mesh Body tool is easy to use, simply select the body and then choose what definition to reduce the model by.

Either percentage reduction in number of facets (in this case 50%), or using Maximum error tolerance which will compare the resulting mesh to the original body. With percentage reduction set, let SOLIDWORKS do the rest.

Decimate Mesh Body property manager

The resulting Mesh Body is much easier to work with due to having fewer facets while still retaining the required accuracy. This will make leveraging new tools such as extracting reference geometry and adding features to a mesh body faster!

Before and After using the Decimate Mesh Body tool

If only a selected area of the graphics body needs simplification, multiple options for selecting facets can be used to ensure only areas requiring it are decimated.

Watch a demo video to see the tool in action:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6mWKul4qoSE?feature=oembed" title="What's New in SOLIDWORKS 2020 - Decimation and Body Compare" width="500"></iframe>

When to use it

Having tools such as the new Decimate Mesh Body command available in every level of SOLIDWORKS makes working with mesh files a breeze, and removes the need for 3rd party software which can slow down the workflow due to importing and exporting. This means directly bringing 3D scan data into SOLIDWORKS for any possible adjustments or additions, and the ability to rapidly process models for 3D printing.

Check out the SOLIDWORKS What’s New demonstrations to learn more,

The post Reduce Mesh Body Complexity with the SOLIDWORKS 2020 Decimate Mesh Tool appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Bryan Sprange, CSWE at September 20, 2019 12:00 PM

September 19, 2019

SolidSmack

How Are 3D Prints Used For Design?

ultimaker-3d-printing-design-buildings-00

There are plenty of uses of 3D printing, and one of them is for design feedback.

The most frequent use of 3D printing is prototyping, in which a proposed model of the final design is produced and tested. The testing can take many forms, from mechanical to aesthetic, and this approach has been very successful for many product companies.

Today you’ll typically see desktop 3D printers in product design companies for this exact purpose. It’s faster, cheaper and allows for more iterations.

Design Feedback With 3D Printing

<figure class="wp-block-image">Killa Design 3D prints building models for design feedback [Source: Ultimaker]<figcaption>Killa Design 3D prints building models for design feedback [Source: Ultimaker]</figcaption></figure>

But another use that I suspect will begin to take on more prominence is design feedback. This is the idea that you’re not producing a proposed final product, but instead a representation of the design. This item can then be used for obtaining feedback.

It’s subtly different from prototyping where you’re trying to make the actual item. Here we’re simply reviewing the shape and design of something that will be made in a very different way.

Architectural 3D Print Case Study

There’s a wonderful case study of this approach just published by Ultimaker. They partnered with a Dubai-based architectural firm that produces designs for the most incredible buildings and structures. Actually, I sometimes cannot distinguish some of their designs as buildings or structures due to their highly unusual and complex nature.

<figure class="wp-block-image">The Dubai Museum of the Future, the world’s most complex building? [Source: Ultimaker]<figcaption>The Dubai Museum of the Future, the world’s most complex building? [Source: Ultimaker]</figcaption></figure>

Killa Design is the firm in question, and one of their designs was the incredibly complex Museum of the Future. Apparently this building was voted as the “most complex building in the world”.

I don’t doubt that, after looking at the design. It does not look like a building in the slightest. It seems to be a kind of oval shape, somehow lying on a street. The design is so unusual that you cannot register its actual size. At first it appears to be a small sculpture, but then you learn that it is actually 85m tall and 140m in length!

Unusual Designs Require Unusual Methods

This highly radical design requires special attention by those creating its shape, and Killa Design has decided to use desktop 3D printers to accomplish this feedback. They have been iteratively 3D printing design models and handling them for feedback.

To understand this, consider that a “normal” building has straight and flat sides. We assume this is the case naturally and don’t need to think about that much, as we would be concerned with other matters like the overall shape.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Killa Design marking up a 3D print to provide design feedback [Source: Ultimaker]<figcaption>Killa Design marking up a 3D print to provide design feedback [Source: Ultimaker]</figcaption></figure>

But in such a strange non-flat design one must be concerned with the shape of the surfaces. They’re not flat, but are they what they should be? This is only truly knowable by visually — and tactically — inspecting a representative 3D print of the design.

Design Feedback Video

That’s exactly what Killa Design is doing in their work on the Dubai Museum of the Future. Here Ultimaker has posted a video of their process:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/L3Y50S8WCbc?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

It’s quite fascinating to see exactly how designers go about obtaining this type of design feedback using 3D prints. They touch, feel and observe the models. They physically annotate the models to help make adjustments and corrections.

In a world where the unusual is rapidly becoming the routine, it is highly likely we will see much more of this design practice unfold in studios around the world.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post How Are 3D Prints Used For Design? appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at September 19, 2019 09:49 PM

This Insane 3D Art Series Shines a Modern Light on Retro Technologies

If you’re ever on Twitter or Instagram, chances are you’ve come across your fair share of smooth animations and design photos. You know the ones: 3D rendered clips and images that look and flow so well they have to be computer-generated.

One such person who works on these designs is Julien Rivorie – a 3D artist and graphic designer based in France. Using a mixture of softwares including Cinema 4D, Marvelous Desinger, Substance Designer, Autodesk Fusion 360, Adobe After Effects, and everyone’s favorite: Photoshop, Julien specializes in making CAD designs of retro tech.

<figure class="wp-block-embed"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-embed">
View this post on Instagram

Feeling Retro – #gameboy #gameboycolor #nintendo #3drender #redshift #mdcommunity #c4d #art #beauty #color #90s #photography #illustration #productdesign #stilllife #zelda #graphic #shapes #render #julienrivoire

A post shared by Julien Rivoire (@julienrivoire) on <time datetime="2019-03-25T19:12:50+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Mar 25, 2019 at 12:12pm PDT</time>

</figure> <figure class="wp-block-embed">
View this post on Instagram

Do you ever miss those long nights playing Tony Hawk Pro Skater 2 with your mates? #sony #playstation #3drender #redshift #stilllife #mdcommunity #c4d #maxon #dailyrender #90svintage

A post shared by Julien Rivoire (@julienrivoire) on <time datetime="2019-03-21T17:34:14+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Mar 21, 2019 at 10:34am PDT</time>

</figure>

While his works include ancient fossils like a Nokia 3310 phone, a Nintendo Game Boy, and a number of video game console controllers, he has also made concept designs mixing both modern day and past tech:

<figure class="wp-block-embed"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-embed"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-embed"></figure>

You’ve got a retro portable gaming console which plays Netflix-themed games, a portable WinAmp player, and a reimagined Game Boy design for the 21st century.

<figure class="wp-block-embed"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-embed"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-embed">
View this post on Instagram

Someone left this here – #nintendo #simcity #art #contemporaryart #3drender #cinema4d #redshift #c4d #instaart #museum #julienrivoire #photography #beauty #cartridge #design #cg #mdcommunity #visualfodder #snes #90s #aesthetic #wood

A post shared by Julien Rivoire (@julienrivoire) on <time datetime="2019-03-27T19:12:53+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Mar 27, 2019 at 12:12pm PDT</time>

</figure> <figure class="wp-block-embed"></figure>

Apart from making CAD projects for brands like Louis Vuitton, Nike, and Fool’s Gold Records, Julien also takes the time to work on some personal projects. These don’t fall under any category per se, but you can definitely get a feel for his style.

They all have a certain smooth, milky look and feel to them which makes some of his designs look good enough to eat. Considering he’s a self-taught artist who learned through YouTube videos and trial-and-error, that’s a pretty amazing feat.

All of his works can be found on his Instagram page, but you should also definitely check out his personal webpage for a closer look at his CAD projects.

The post This Insane 3D Art Series Shines a Modern Light on Retro Technologies appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 19, 2019 08:25 PM

Mind Blown: These Cameras Were Sliced and Reassembled in Resin

CutUp

Expanding on the success of his Disintegrating series of exploding car photos, Swiss artist and photographer Fabian Oefner has decided to try something similar with one of his close interests: cameras.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-vimeo wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-vimeo wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/354927033" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

CutUp, his newest project, involves a series of cameras which are casted in resin before being cut up and rearranged to produce works of art.

<figure class="wp-block-image">CutUp</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">CutUp</figure>

Before any actual cutting can begin, vacuum and pressure chambers are used to regulate the pressure and temperature around the resin-casted camera as it cures.

<figure class="wp-block-image">CutUp</figure>

Once encased in hard resin, Oefner uses a good, old-fashioned band saw to cut the material into the desired slices.

<figure class="wp-block-image">CutUp</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">CutUp</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">CutUp</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">CutUp</figure>

After that, it’s just a matter of rearranging and hand polishing the individual slices before casting them in another batch of resin to create the finalized sculpture.

<figure class="wp-block-image">CutUp</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">CutUp</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">CutUp</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">CutUp</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">CutUp</figure>

Whether it be the camera, the way the slices are individually cut, or the reassembly process, each sculpture is definitely unique. According to Oefner, CutUp allows him to bring the process of disassembly he previously showed in Disintegrating and bring it into the 3D realm. Instead of photographing something alien, with the camera being the tool to capture a work of art, CutUp allows him to turn the tool into the art itself.

Six cameras currently make up the CutUp series, but Oefner will definitely expand it in the future. You can find CutUp, Disintegrating, and all his other works on his webpage.

The post Mind Blown: These Cameras Were Sliced and Reassembled in Resin appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 19, 2019 08:16 PM

The Best Apps of the Week (38.19): Thrive Goals, Lumy, Calzy, and More…

SolidSmack App Smack

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved smart device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional. This week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it to tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Thrive – Goals Ideas Decisions (iOS — $1.99)

Get your life together.

<figure class="aligncenter">Thrive - Goals Ideas Decisions</figure>

Just Press Record  (iOS – $4.99)

Record. Transcribe. Sync.

<figure class="aligncenter">Just Press Record</figure>

Lumy (iOS — $2.99)

Track Photographic Times.

<figure class="aligncenter">Lumy</figure>

Calzy (iOS — $2.99)

The Smart Calculator.

<figure class="aligncenter">Calzy App</figure>

Smarter – Brain training & Mind games  (Android — Free)

Give your memory and mind a boost and get smarter by improving your abilities with this fun logical memory game. 

<figure class="aligncenter">Give your memory and mind a boost and get smarter by improving your abilities with this fun logical memory game. </figure>

Programming Hero (Android — Free)

Welcome to the best programming app to learn programming. 

<figure class="aligncenter">Programming Hero</figure>

The post The Best Apps of the Week (38.19): Thrive Goals, Lumy, Calzy, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 19, 2019 08:12 PM

The Javelin Blog

New Touch Mode Enhancements for SOLIDWORKS 2020

With the release of SOLIDWORKS 2020, there are a couple of changes that have been made to Touch mode to enhance your experience. In addition to the features that have been highlighted in the previous article Utilize Touch Mode in SOLIDWORKS for Touchscreen Computers, there are a couple of changes that have been added to improve functionality.

New Undo Button Added to Touch Mode Toolbar

In addition to the current Touch mode options, the ability to undo has been added to the Touch Mode Toolbar to enhance your experience. The Undo button has been added to the bottom of the Touch Mode Toolbar that has been placed beside the Feature Manager Tree by default as seen in the image below.

Undo Option in the Touch Mode ToolBar

Undo Option in the Touch Mode Toolbar

After inputting your first feature, the Undo button switches from being greyed out to active, and all subsequent changes can be undone until the Undo feature is greyed out again. This is very useful because it saves a couple of clicks per undo which can add up, and it reduces the dependency on the keyboard shortcuts.

Esc Icon Change

To make the Escape Function (Esc) less ambiguous, the Touch Mode icon has been changed in SOLIDWORKS 2020. The figure below shows the icon that was used in SOLIDWORKS 2019 juxtaposed to the new icon in SOLIDWORKS 2020.

Esc Icon Change

With more computers coming with touch screen capability as standard, as well as increased use of tablets being used on the manufacturing floor, touch screen capability for software is becoming more prevalent. SOLIDWORKS is always trying to improve the user interface to work alongside with touch capability. With the added undo button along with the Icon change for the Esc button, SOLIDWORKS in making the Touch Mode experience better for all SOLIDWORKS users. It will be exciting to see what they come up with for the next iteration!

Demo Video

Learn more about the touch mode enhancements in the video below:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Lla__GHyxwM?feature=oembed" title="What's New in SOLIDWORKS 2020 - Markup" width="500"></iframe>

The post New Touch Mode Enhancements for SOLIDWORKS 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at September 19, 2019 11:43 AM

September 18, 2019

SolidWorks Surfacing Subscription Site Coming

Many people have asked me when I was going to publish an update for the 2008 Surfacing Bible. That book was my favorite of all the books I’ve written, but…

by matt at September 18, 2019 06:55 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 What’s New Top 10 Features

SOLIDWORKS 2020 provides hundreds of new features to help you design your products faster than ever. You can learn what’s new by attending our LIVE Launch Broadcast on Tuesday October 1, 2019, either at 9:00 AM ET or at 2:00 PM ET. In the meantime you can check out what we think are the SOLIDWORKS 2020 Top 10 Features:

01. Large Assembly Drawings for Working Faster

With the new Drawing Detailing Mode you can open drawings in a matter of seconds while maintaining the ability to add and edit annotations. Detailing Mode is perfect for quickly opening drawings for minor edits or design reviews.  Individual sheets load in an instant and the drawing can also be printed.  Some editing capabilities are available as well, such as making changes to annotations or dimensions.

Plus the new Graphics Acceleration for Drawings improves frame rates when panning and zooming within drawings with hardware-accelerated rendering.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Large Assembly Drawings

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Large Assembly Drawings

BENEFITS: Work faster on drawings with many sheets, configurations, and resource-intensive views.

02. Faster Assembly Design

With the updated Envelope Publisher in SOLIDWORKS 2020, envelopes are no longer limited to components in the same assembly. Now, you can simply select the components needed for reference and a destination assembly.

Large Design Review Mode now allows you to create mates to the reference geometry of components, create and edit linear and circular component patterns, edit pattern-driven and sketch-driven component patterns. While editing an assembly in Large Design Review mode, you can use shortcuts to copy and paste components, hide or show components, and zoom to components.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Assembly Defeature

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Assembly Defeature

BENEFITS: Speed up assembly design and reduce visual clutter

03. Flexible Components

With Make Part Flexible you can display the same part in different conditions in the same assembly. For example, show a spring compressed and at full length in the same assembly. You can make a part flexible without creating unique configurations or separate part files. This optimizes your data management and efficiency when bringing parts to life. Whether it be living hinges, bellows, springs, cables and beyond, use Make Part Flexible with SOLIDWORKS 2020 to improve how you visualize and validate your next assembly.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Flexible Components

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Flexible Components

BENEFITS: Create assembly designs faster while maintaining an accurate bill of materials.

04. Faster Sketching

With new Silhouette Entities you can create multiple sketch entities by projecting the outline of component bodies onto a parallel sketch plane.

Torsion Continuity Relation will help you to achieve G3 curvature between sketched curves, thereby allowing a seamless transition.

Making mistakes is part of the design process but using the undo button too liberally may result in lost work. SOLIDWORKS 2020
makes significant improvements to the redo function so that, even if you accidentally undo out of a sketch, your changes aren’t lost.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Sketching

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Sketching

BENEFITS: Create robust sketches faster

05. Faster Calculations and Improved Accuracy for Simulation

Speed and accuracy of SOLIDWORKS Simulation has been improved by combining linear and quadratic elements in the same simulation study.

Pin and Bolt Connectors can deform faces attached to Pin and Bolt connectors.

Beam Models can now Import temperatures to perform a stress analysis after running a thermal analysis on a model with beams.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Faster Calculations

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Faster Calculations

BENEFITS: Run faster calculations and better simulation of real-world behavior

06. Improved Design Experience

Checking that your part or assembly fits inside the 3D print area is the first step to successful 3D printing. SOLIDWORKS 2020 includes a comprehensive list of 3D printers with up-to-date envelope information. With SOLIDWORKS 2020 you can now generate slices based on precise 3D geometry rather than having to first export to a tessellated geometry format like STL.

This information can be saved in the 3MF format; an open source, XML based format designed specifically for modern additive manufacturing. It not only stores the 3D geometric data but also stores material, colour, textures, 2D slice data and more.

If you don’t have fabrication resources available in-house, try 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace where you can get quotes from hundreds of qualified service providers (including us) and several different manufacturing processes at the click of a button. You simply upload your design, optimize it live, choose your manufacturer, and receive your custom parts.

With all of these new 3D printing enhancements, SOLIDWORKS 2020 is making it even easier to go from design to prototype to manufacture.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 3D Printing

SOLIDWORKS 2020 3D Printing

BENEFITS: Save time and simplify design tasks

07. Expanded Interoperability with 3D Interconnect

SOLIDWORKS 2020 simplifies the interconnect workflow using native and neutral CAD files by allowing you to now drag and drop non-native exported files from Windows Explorer into your assemblies like any other SOLIDWORKS component.

Additionally 3D Interconnect in SOLIDWORKS 2020 adds support new formats, including 3D DWG™ and DXF™ as well as IFC, enabling you to work directly with more files without the need for translation.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 3D Interconnect

SOLIDWORKS 2020 3D Interconnect

BENEFITS: Collaborate with more data sources easily.

08. More Flexibility for Surfacing

SOLIDWORKS has always been a powerful tool for working with imported surface data and offsetting existing geometry.  Sometimes all the desired surfaces can’t be offset as needed.  SOLIDWORKS 2020 introduces new functionality that shows you the surfaces that can’t be offset.  Each surface can be easily identified and the you have the choice to change the offset or simply remove the failing surfaces.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 introduces a new option to thicken surfaces equally in both directions. SOLIDWORKS 2020 makes complex surface modelling simple and easier than ever!

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Surface Offset

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Surface Offset

BENEFITS: Simplify and speed up your design with more robust, flexible surface options.

09. Direct Mesh Editing

The need to directly edit mesh geometry, like STL files, is becoming more common. SOLIDWORKS 2020 continues to expand on its already rich mesh editing feature set. Filleting edges is now possible using the same workflow as a native SOLIDWORKS file. You can even change the fillet to a chamfer and vice versa.

It’s not uncommon for STL files to be damaged you can now delete these holes by right-clicking and choosing Delete Hole from the context menu or by simply selecting the edge and pressing delete. SOLIDWORKS 2019 introduced Delete Face. SOLIDWORKS 2020 expands the capability to support Delete and Fill which makes removing these features on the part a trivial operation.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Direct Mesh Editing

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Direct Mesh Editing

BENEFITS: Work with Mesh and STL files more easily

10. Connected Design-to-Manufacturing Ecosystem in the Cloud

Easily connect SOLIDWORKS 2020 with key tools through the cloud-based 3DEXPERIENCE® platform.

Data Sharing and Collaboration makes it easier to share models back and forth between SOLIDWORKS and 3DEXPERIENCE tools. Collaborate in real time from anywhere and on any device.

Extended Workflows allows you to easily extend your design ecosystem with new capabilities such as sub-divisional modeling, conceptual design, and product lifecycle and project management in the cloud.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 3DEXPERIENCE Platform

SOLIDWORKS 2020 3DEXPERIENCE Platform

BENEFITS: Enable seamless product development workflows and easily extend them with new tools as your business needs evolve

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 What’s New Top 10 Features appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at September 18, 2019 12:00 PM

September 17, 2019

SolidSmack

The Modern Milk Man: Loop Ships Your Favorite Brands in Durable, Reusable Packaging

From food manufacturers to e-commerce giants, the pressure is on to have at least some form of sustainable business practice as more consumers align with environmentally-friendly businesses.

Loop is one way some larger brands are starting to dabble in becoming greener without resorting to completely uproot their existing supply chains. Created by recycling company TerraCycle, the online platform allows customers to shop from their favorite brands in a cleaner, more environment-friendly manner using reusable containers.

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After filling out your online shopping bag via the Loop online shopping platform, the products are stored in several sturdy, reusable containers before sending the bulk of them to you. Users simply just have to pay a small deposit for the durable, multi-use package designs—not unlike glass milk bottles from the days of milkmen.

Rather than using discardable containers that usually end up in the trash, food items like your favorite Häagen-Dazs ice cream are stored in containers designed specifically for the product (in this case, the ice cream is stored in a stainless steel container). Not only is it greener, but the reusable container keeps the ice cream frozen for much longer—proving that functional upgrade considerations also went into the design of the new containers.

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Says the company:

“Most products today are “linear” – thrown away after they’re used (typically once). This one-way model sends valuable resources to the trash. In a “circular” system, that line is bent into a circle that keeps resources in use and cycling through the system for as long as possible. The goal of the circular economy is to make those circles as tight as possible by reducing the number of steps (and the resulting energy, transportation and resources needed) to get our products from useless to useful again.”

This call towards reusable packaging is inspiring brands to think about how they design their products. Toothpaste, for instance, doesn’t fit well in a reusable container; so Unilever has created several chewable toothpaste tablets which are stored in a tin (think of it as chewing gum which cleans your mouth).

Participating Brands and Updated Package Design Details (via Packaging World):

  • Pantene is introducing a unique bottle made with lightweight, durable aluminum for its shampoo and conditioner.
  • Tide is participating in Loop with its Tide purclean plant-based laundry detergent in a new durable bottle made from stainless steel with a simple twist-cap and easy-pour spout.
  • Cascade, continually looking for ways to make the dish cleaning experience better and environmentally friendly, has developed a new ultra-durable packaging for Cascade ActionPacs, which enable consumers to skip the prewash.
  • Crest is introducing new Crest Platinum mouthwash, a unique formula that delivers fresh breath and stain prevention in a sustainable, refillable glass bottle.
  • Ariel and Febreze are participating with durable, refillable packaging that is also available in stores, testing a new direct-to-consumer refill-and-reuse model.

Once you’re done with the containers, all you have to do is store the containers back in the provided tote bag (no cleaning needed) and call Loop to pick it up. You’ll get your deposit back and have free space to store new shopping items.

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Meanwhile, the empty containers taken by Loop are cleaned and sanitized before being returned to the manufacturers for a refill. According to TerraCycle co-founder and CEO Tom Szaky, Loop encourages companies to use their containers at least a hundred times before considering to make new ones.

Could this be the future of food packaging? Only time will tell.

The post The Modern Milk Man: Loop Ships Your Favorite Brands in Durable, Reusable Packaging appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 17, 2019 02:41 PM

SolidSmack Radio | The Precision Bits (Powered by Spotify)

Spotify Playlist

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’re getting things rolling on a groovy, laidback note with “House 70” from Groove Armada. From there, we’ll follow up with a grab bag of chilled out tracks including those from The Vanish, Brian Eno, Desire, and others before wrapping up with “Lady” from Chromatics. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<figure><iframe allow="encrypted-media" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/playlist/37i9dQZEVXcHWRxtj9vIio" width="100%"></iframe></figure>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Precision Bits (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 17, 2019 02:38 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard Milling Setup 8/9: Simulate Toolpaths

The integrated simulator in SOLIDWORKS CAM is a great way to preview your set-up and trouble shoot issues. Click Simulate Toolpath in the CAM command manager or right-mouse on Mill Part Setup1 and select Simulate Toolpath.

Simulate Toolpath

Simulate Toolpath

  1. Play and jog buttons for controlling the simulation.
  2. Display options for items visible during the simulation. Here we may change the display style of the model, hide or show tool holders, cut section views and compare the operations to the original model using the Difference option.
  3. Collision options for handling crash warnings during the simulation. Can be set to stop, cut or ignore for tool, tool holder and tool shank collisions.
  4. Export options for saving JPG images and work in progress STL files for future set-ups.

In the simulator options we can alter the speed and accuracy of the simulation.

Toolpath Options

Toolpath Options

Next, we will post process our NC code.

The post SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard Milling Setup 8/9: Simulate Toolpaths appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Shawn McEachern at September 17, 2019 12:00 PM

September 16, 2019

SolidSmack

This Full-Cycle Orange Juice Kiosk Turns Orange Peels Into Cups

feel the peel

We can all (mostly) agree that being environment-friendly and leaning towards sustainable manufacturing methods is a good thing. So is eating well and being healthy. So by the unspoken rules of the universe, doing both at the same time is doubly good and an all-around best-case scenario.

Design firm Carly Ratti Associati (CRA) and multinational oil and gas company Eni recently turned their efforts on something a little sweeter: an experimental juice bar capable of taking discarded orange peels from their juicer and turning them into 3D printed disposable cups.

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Feel the Peel, as the hybrid juicer/cup-maker prototype is called, is a 3.10-meter (9-foot) tall machine capable of holding up to 1.500 oranges in its overhanging dome. When a customer orders a cup of juice, the machine rolls oranges into a compressor where the juice is extracted and freshly-squeed into the customer’s cup.  

The discarded orange peel from the drained orange is then dried, milled, and combined with Polylactic Acid (PLA) to from bioplastic. This bioplastic is then melted down and used as a filament in an onboard 3D printer to print more cups for dispensing orange juice to future customers.

<figure class="wp-block-image">feel the peel</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">feel the peel</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">feel the peel</figure>

Ultimately, the machine ensures that every part of the orange gets used and reused with a zero-waste system. And in staying true to its sustainable ethos, the 3D printed cups can also be easily recycled or composted to grow yet even more oranges. According to founder Carlo Ratti, the project was made with circularity in mind and illustrates what a cradle-to-cradle design solution might look like for food and food packaging—oranges or otherwise.

The post This Full-Cycle Orange Juice Kiosk Turns Orange Peels Into Cups appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 16, 2019 07:52 PM

The SolidSmack Monday List 38.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

The Decline and Fall of the Modern Nerd

The sad saga of how fandom transformed from being about love into hate and intolerance.

<figure class="aligncenter">The Decline and Fall of the Modern Nerd</figure>

How to Find Fossils

Look for fossils in sedimentary rock, including sandstone, limestone and shale, preferably where the earth has been cleaved by road cuts, construction sites, rivers or streams. 

<figure class="aligncenter">How to Find Fossils</figure>

Your Company Should Let You Work From Anywhere

Today there are about 44 million unpaid caregivers in the U.S., about the same number of people who watched the final Game of Thrones season.

<figure class="aligncenter">Your Company Should Let You Work From Anywhere</figure>

This Pizza Pays a Living Wage

Fast-casual chain &Pizza wants to become the most progressive fast-food employer in the U.S.

<figure class="wp-block-image">This Pizza Pays a Living Wage</figure>

A.I. and the Future of Cheating

What happens when universities can’t tell whether an essay is written by a human or an algorithm?

<figure class="aligncenter">A.I. and the Future of Cheating</figure>

Is It O.K. if College Students Hire Me to Revise Their Papers?

I am a freelance editor and have been offered a position “copy-editing and organizing” college students’ research papers and essays. The work sounds interesting, but I’m not sure that it’s ethical.

<figure class="aligncenter">Is It O.K. if College Students Hire Me to Revise Their Papers?</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 38.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 16, 2019 07:41 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to Label SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Etch Marks

I previously showed you how to create etch marks using existing geometry from Hole Wizard holes. Having redundancies can prevent mistakes and help out manufacturing. This is sort of like the carpentry saying of “measure twice, cut once”. Having a callout of the Hole Wizards holes on the physical part and drawing will reduce the errors.

Name feature on creation

Name feature on creation

When making a complex part I’m a huge advocate for naming the features as you create them. This helps the next person who needs to look, edit or revise the part. There’s an option you can turn on that can help with naming a feature upon creation. In the Options –> System Options –> Feature Manager –> and second from the top Name Feature on Creation. If you don’t like the option you can always slow double click on the feature text and rename.

Note added to sketch

Note added to sketch

One of the only features I don’t usually rename is the Hole Wizard feature. This tends to have most of the information you actually need, minus the quantity of holes in the command. What I want to do is have a callout etch mark on the physical part. When I create the sketch and start adding notes, I can see that the text isn’t exactly what I want. The default and most font types are double line characters. This means that when your laser or HD plasma is etching it’s actually doing double the work.

Sketch Text

Sketch Text

You may want to change this to single line text. This will reduce the time it takes to etch by at least 50%. Although, you can make or download other fonts. SOLIDWORKS does have 1 single line font (commonly known as stick font). It is OLF SimpleSansOC. To change the font of the specific text you must uncheck the Use Document Font box and click on the Font button.

Notes Document Properties

Notes Document Properties

The alternate to changing the font each time is to change this in the options. Travel to Options –> Document Properties –> Annotations –> Notes and in the text box you can change all the notes you bring to the part to be this OLF stick text. If you create a bunch of etch marks each time I would consider updating the template so you don’t have to do this every time.

The post How to Label SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Etch Marks appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at September 16, 2019 12:00 PM

September 13, 2019

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 37.19

Forget Cubes: LG’s Latest Refrigerator Makes Round Craft Cocktail Ice On-Demand

Huddle around the computer a little bit, your digital detox is a farce! How can you stay away from great stuff that you can read and chew on … mentally that is! We got you covered, while you were away, busy with your digital detox diet. Don’t be shy, take a look at the week that was, right here on SolidSmack.

Cause we are ROCKIN!

<figure class="wp-block-image">The Pino Multi-Use Kitchen Appliance Concept Runs on Zero Electricity</figure>

The Pino Multi-Use Kitchen Appliance Concept Runs on Zero Electricity

Washing machines, blenders, stoves; just about every household appliance is associated with some form of electrical power. But what would household appliances look like if you removed the power cord and need for energy standards altogether?

<figure class="wp-block-image">Apple’s Latest iPhone Ad Campaign Focuses on ASMR Woodshop Sounds</figure>

Apple’s Latest iPhone Ad Campaign Focuses on ASMR Woodshop Sounds

These days, Apple can do just about anything with any of their iPhone cameras and turn it into in ad—be it amateur photographs on a billboard or entire video ad campaigns created under the direction of celebrity photographers. But their latest might be their most fascinating iPhone ad campaign to date.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Sony Celebrates 40 Years of Walkman Design</figure>

Sony Celebrates 40 Years of Walkman Design

Before Spotify, MP3 sound files, and CDs, people listened to music through cassette tapes. These little blocks of plastic with rolls of film in them played tunes when played through a cassette player, and no cassette player was more famous than the Sony Walkman.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Industrial Designer Qiang Huang Recycles Old Bike Parts Into Useable Products</figure>

Industrial Designer Qiang Huang Recycles Old Bike Parts Into Useable Products

Over the past couple of years, China has had a major boom in the bike-sharing industry. By renting bicycles out to the public for a fee, companies earn money from cyclists who use the same docking system.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Why SOLIDWORKS World Was Changed to 3DEXPERIENCE World</figure>

Why SOLIDWORKS World Was Changed to 3DEXPERIENCE World

I know all y’all SOLIDWORKS users have been losing sleep over one thing and one thing only since February 2019. Why, in the pit of Elroy’s belly, did Dassault Systemes go and fiddle with the name of the beloved SOLIDWORKS World brand, changing it to 3DEXPERIENCE World?

<figure class="wp-block-image">Forget Cubes: LG’s Latest Refrigerator Makes Round Craft Cocktail Ice On-Demand</figure>

Forget Cubes: LG’s Latest Refrigerator Makes Round Craft Cocktail Ice On-Demand

These days, refrigerator manufacturers are adding just about anything—from touch displays to kid-friendly storage drawers—to appeal to today’s modern consumers with discerning tastes.

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 37.19 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 13, 2019 08:15 PM

Airbow’s Latest Nailguns Are Cordless Beasts Thanks to Onboard Air Compressors

Nailguns are like man’s own gift to himself. With the pull of a trigger, you can drive a number of metal nails into whatever you want connected together. In a perfect world, all nailguns would be easy to carry and store, but sadly majority either use lithium-ion batteries or are fitted with a heavy air compressor to power them.

<figure class="wp-block-image">airbow<figcaption>The Airbow Framer</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">airbow<figcaption>The Airbow Concrete</figcaption></figure>

This isn’t the case with Airbow’s two newest nailguns. Using what the New Zealand company calls “Hammerforce technology”, the Airbow Framer and Airbow Concrete use an onboard mechanism which is charged using a separate air compressor. Using the stored air, a valve inside the mechanism directs a gram of air onto a nailhead to hammer it onto a surface.

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Firing nails using compressed air may not seem very powerful compared to direct electricity, but the high-pressure air really gets the job done. And since the nailguns are air-powered, they are lighter, quieter, and best of all, weatherproof due to their lack of electronics.

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If you want to get a sense of just how strong the compressed air mechanism is, both the Airbow Framer and Airbow Concrete use the same technology. But while the Framer is built for driving nails into wood and similar surfaces, the Concrete pumps nails into… well… concrete.

It takes about 10 seconds to charge an Airbow nailgun using the air compressor, letting you get back to work without having to wait. Sadly, Airbow’s line of nailguns can only be purchased in New Zealand. The company is also working on future tools which use the same technology, so here’s to hoping they make them purchasable worldwide soon!

The post Airbow’s Latest Nailguns Are Cordless Beasts Thanks to Onboard Air Compressors appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 13, 2019 08:02 PM