Planet SolidWorks

July 28, 2017

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Tumbletroddle Splinterod

It rolled under one, two, three of them. Shocked it broke their defense they waited. Just as they began to put their hands back on their swords, it popped up – a furious little beastie with a small sword of its own, sharpened to the hilt with these links.

Thomas Scholes – There’s something about his loose, blocky style and composite process that I just adore.

Accidental Wes Anderson – One of my favorite subreddits in forever. Real places that should be in Wes Anderson movies. As you can images, lots of odd symmetry and characters.

Sketch Swap – One designer does a line sketch, another colors it up. Ships, planes, mechs and more. Brilliant work from John Frye and friends.

Gummy Gas Crisis – Space gasman Ed must save the world. Reminiscent of a retro video game with the music and sound fx, but with a modern graphic approach.

The Codex Arundel – The notebook of Leonardo da Vinci, dating 1478 – 1518 is now online thanks to the British Library. Flip through the 500+ pages here.

Power Lines – Ever just look up at power lines and want to capture their beauty? Christopher does and he does it quite well.

Ottoman Bird Houses – If you put the time into building the structures the Ottoman empire did, you might as well through some bird houses into the mix.

Vintage Patterns – Remember going to the fabric shop and looking at pattern books with mom? This Wikia page now has thousands of pattern, 1992 and prior.

<script type="text/javascript"> amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "solid0a-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Deals We're Watching"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "78689efddeec3afe869dd37801f0797c"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B073GJ59QM,B01G8JO5F2,B01N0WVU0E,B01IUTIUEA"; </script>
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Deadcrush – Pulls you in, then gets your head bobbin’ with the hard beats and pitchy vox. New video from alt-J by Young Replicant, director Alex Takács.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="360" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/226827121" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="640"></iframe>

The post Friday Smackdown: Tumbletroddle Splinterod appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 28, 2017 04:47 PM

Bitonti Technology Plans New Generative Design API + 3D CAD Framework

There are 3D print fashion designers, and there are fashion designers who go a bit farther. One of them is Francis Bitonti.

Bitonti has been working in the 3D print field of fashion design for many years, and we’ve seen his works at multiple exhibitions. In fact, our records show that he’s been awarded Fabbaloo’s Design of the Week selection not just once, or twice, but THREE times!

Bitonti has also developed countless other intricate 3D printed fashion items, including an astonishing collection of flatware and the incredible “Dita’s Gown”.

There’s one thing in common among all these amazing 3D objects: they are generated mathematically through brilliant use of software by Bitonti and team. With many years of experience using mathematical systems to generate astonishing designs, is there something more Bitonti could do?

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_88412" style="width: 720px">bitonti technology 3d cad generative design<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Incredible 3D printed shoes by Bitonti Studio</figcaption></figure>

Indeed there is. According to a report on Forbes, the designer is about to launch Bitonti Technology, a spin off that will focus on making that powerful 3D model generation capability available to more people. They explain:

Bitonti Technology will be launching their GENYSIS API program which will use generative algorithm programs that create lattice patterns, topology, optimization and machine learning capability combined with a CAD framework. The new company will be focusing exclusively on generative algorithms.

In other words, designers can work with a synthesis of information and design parameters and turn it into design. Think of it like the way Netflix gathers information as you browse.  What if you could turn those browsing patterns into design?

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_88414" style="width: 670px">bitonti technology 3d cad generative design<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">A 3D printed flatware collection designed by Bitonti Studio</figcaption></figure>

I’d say that this development could be quite important for the future of 3D printing and design, as the use of such sophisticated systems is likely beyond a great many designers of today. But by packaging it up into a system that can be made into apps, one could easily imagine a torrent of incredible designs being unleashed.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_88415" style="width: 853px">bitonti technology 3d cad generative design<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The 3D printed Bristle Dress by Bitonti Studio</figcaption></figure>

There are few details on this project aside from the report on Forbes, but it appears that the venture will launch later this year and at that time we’ll find out what this service really means.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Bitonti Technology Plans New Generative Design API + 3D CAD Framework appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at July 28, 2017 12:24 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to use an Object Type Condition in SOLIDWORKS PDM Workflows and Categories

SOLIDWORKS PDM Conditions are powerful tools for controlling document flow, through a Workflow Transition. In a previous article titled, SOLIDWORKS PDM Transition Conditions, I looked at the general use of Conditions. Most of the available Conditions, such as Category, File Path, Revision and Variables are self explanatory, but a SOLIDWORKS PDM Object Type condition can be a little confusing.

Condition Variables

Condition Variables

With Object Type, PDM is filtering data passing through a Transition, by type of Object it is. The Object can be one of three entities:

  • File: With this filter, only physical files are allowed to pass through a transition. The File Object Type should not be confused with Filepath. Filepath filters by file name, extension, or path.
  • BOM: Named BOM’s are saved from a Computed BOM’s. These BOM’s can be checked in and out, as well as being “revisioned”. This Filter will only allow named BOM’s to pass through a Transition.
  • Item: An Item consists entirely of metadata, that can be used to collect the entire “product definition” of a project. This can include CAD data, documentation and other supporting documents. Items don’t themselves contain files, but they can be linked to files. With this filter, only items pass through a Transition.
SOLIDWORKS PDM Object Type Condition

SOLIDWORKS PDM Object Type Condition

The post How to use an Object Type Condition in SOLIDWORKS PDM Workflows and Categories appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at July 28, 2017 12:00 PM

July 27, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Motor Manufacturer Eliminates Repetitive Engineering Tasks with DriveWorks

WEG Energia are one of the world’s largest manufacturers of Electric Motors and they are using DriveWorks Pro to eliminate repetitive engineering tasks.

eliminate repetitive solidworks tasks

Custom Products

Typically each contract means a new and often complex product needs to be custom designed, complete with detailed manufacturing data and drawings. The complexities of a power generator project for an oil platform are huge. As well as meeting the customer specifications, it must also meet a wide range of standards, such as ISO, engineering and manufacturing rules. The designers also have to consider specific rules relating to oxidation if the power generator will be based at sea.

Even with SOLIDWORKS, some customized WEG Energia projects took longer than desired to complete. Moreover, these projects were liable to non-conformities and often did not include updates requested by manufacturing or the engineering department.

WEG and Design Automation

“We were looking for a way to automate our projects. Our first experiences were with algorithms and automated routines using the SOLIDWORKS API. We did achieve some good results but it still used to take a long time and involved many people from other areas such as IT. We thought about developing our own product configurator but our local SOLIDWORKS reseller introduced us to DriveWorks. Developed for designers it is easy to set up and doesn’t require any specific programming knowledge,” says Roberto Vieira, WEG Energia designer.

eliminate repetitive solidworks tasks

DriveWorks

With DriveWorks we can create all drawings and manufacturing data within one day. Using SOLIDWORKS alone this process used to take three to four days. Now the designer analyses and verifies rather than doing the modelling,” says Carlos Jose Bastos Grillo, Engineering Manager. With DriveWorks, calculations, databases, engineering procedures and standards are set up by key-users, allowing designers to reuse this captured knowledge every time they need to specify a new custom product.

Designers using DriveWorks can enter values into an interface that is easy to use and understand, and incorporate product improvements from across different departments. They are applied only once to the master product, ensuring that all future products respect the best existing practices.

Return on Investment

WEG Energia achieved a Return on Investment in just six months on the generator carcass product, the first to be automated. Savings came from reducing rework, errors and development time. Currently 59 designers are DriveWorks users and around 14 automated products are available. Each product can generate several different variations of the same product family.

DriveWorks is a very useful tool which facilitates the application of established criteria to our projects, the continuous improvement of our products and the maintenance of details. New designers without much experience are able to create new products with ease and quality, meeting the most rigorous standards and rules of WEG.

The post Motor Manufacturer Eliminates Repetitive Engineering Tasks with DriveWorks appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sarah Pew at July 27, 2017 06:20 PM

SolidSmack

Letter Desk – ID Student’s vision to make learning easier for India’s Street Kids

HaYoung Lee a student at Hongik University, Soul Korea had no idea how an encounter roughly two years ago with a rouge cow in the bustling streets of India would inspire and alter his life pursuit. HaYoung’s epithony? Ultimately, the birth of a dream to become a product designer and a passion for what’s known as Design for Social Impact (DSI). His first foray into DSI is his Letter Desk. HaYoung recently posted his design on Behance as open source in hopes the design and manufacturing communities might get inspired to help him fully realise the product. It’s Lee’s vision to be able to send a batch of Letter Desks to India, with the first one going to his little friend Raju .

<figure class="wp-caption alignleft" id="attachment_88274" style="width: 400px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Source</figcaption></figure>

But what’s this about a rough cow? Well, perhaps you’ve heard about the annual Running of the Bulls event in Pamplona Spain where bulls are worked up into a frenzy then let loose in the streets! Thrill seekers the world over flock to Pamplona for a taste of exhilaration mixed with terror. The scene is chaotic as runners scurry to elude being hurled into oblivion by the raging bulls!

 

<figure class="wp-caption alignright" id="attachment_88275" style="width: 400px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Varanasi India</figcaption></figure>

Now hop across the globe to most any major city in India where its commonplace for people and cattle to mill about together in the streets. No big deal right? Not if you are HaYoung Lee sporting a bright red shirt! Stirred to agitation by this flash of red, a bull started to charge! HaYoung took to flight and began weaving his way through the narrow streets. Finding it difficult to elude the massive creature, he ducked in an alleyway.

When he popped out he suddenly found himself in a world beyond tourism. A place where children played, worked and studied in the streets. HaYoung was enamoured with what he saw and it struck a cord deep within. He especially took note of the children doing their best to study however and wherever they could find a spot. Lee saw a dramatic contrast between the abundant resources available to students back home and those of the children squatting before his very eyes.

“I saw a lot of children sitting and squatting down on the dirt road and narrow stair writing something. They seemed to be studying or doing some school homework.”

 

HaYoung made an effort to connect with the youth then and has worked to keep in touch even after returning home. After finding his way into the industrial design program at Hongik University he made good on his promise to find a way to help improve the learning experience for India’s street children. Enter the Letter Desk project. Below is a sampling of HaYoung’s development process.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_87894" style="width: 1100px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The design solution is a compact portable package that aesthetically resembles a postal letter.</figcaption></figure>

Click to view slideshow.

 

It’s exciting to see the passion and effort HaYoung has put into his Letter Desk project. Currently his project is getting a fair amount of media buzz. I’ve sought to support HaYoung’s vision through this post. Perhaps you, our creative community may be inspire to lend a hand in whatever way you can!

The post Letter Desk – ID Student’s vision to make learning easier for India’s Street Kids appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at July 27, 2017 06:12 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Four FeatureManager Features Everyone Should Know

Every SOLIDWORKS user spends an inordinate amount of time touching, playing, and maybe even arguing with the FeatureManager for parts, assemblies, and drawings. It may be one of those areas in SOLIDWORKS that we all take for granted and muddle our way through its use. Today, I’d like to show my top 4 features of the FeatureManager (FM) that I believe everyone should know.

1. FeatureManager Filter

This little gem has been around since SOLIDWORKS 2008 and is probably my favorite FM feature. It allows me to search names of files, features, sketches, materials and many details like custom properties, center of mass etc. in every configuration. Even if you have a great PDM setup and can find what you need, sometimes you open an assembly and just can’t manage to sort through the part number names in the FM.

Once you put a value in the filter, not only does it remove all of the extra fluff from the FM, but it also removes the fluff from the graphics area as well. What a great time saver!

 2. Tree Display – Do not show Configuration/Display State Names if only one exists

That sure is a mouth full and new to 2017, but it does so much to help clean up the FM from excessive word clutter and that all too familiar eye strain at the end of the day.

Make a quick trip to the top of your FM and RMB on the file name to find the Tree Display options. There, just turn on the “Do not show….” option and your tree will magically clean itself up.

3. SHIFT + C – Collapse all FM items

You’re navigating around your model touching this part and that part in the graphics area – even though you were told in elementary school that touching was not socially acceptable. As you touch components in the graphics area, the FM begins to expand, and expand, and expand… After even just a few minutes of investigating an assembly your FM is longer than…well you can insert whatever you feel comfortable to imagine.

This indispensable keyboard shortcut replaces the RMB in the FM dead space area and selecting “Collapse Items”.

Internet pages aren’t long enough to display this image so feel free to click here to see it in its full glory.

4. Freeze Bar

Even though we might actually see Freeze Bars show up in trendy downtown areas, especially here in the hot south, this refers to Freezing features in part models and not sitting on ice cube benches as a form of therapy.

4 FeatureManager Features in SOLIDWORKS Everyone Should Know

That’s 419.29 seconds, or 6.988 minutes, or the amount of time it takes to remove a monitor from your desk and chuck it out the nearest window.

The Freeze Bar is that thick yellow line under the file name at the top of the FM (if you don’t see it look in the Tools > Options > System Options > General area to enable it)

Grab that yellow-bellied feature and drag it on down the road. Everything ABOVE the line is removed from rebuilds –thus freezing them in time. Think of taking a Rollback bar and turning it upside down. Great tool to use when you approve a part’s design and don’t need to make any more changes to it. Your rebuild times will thank you for this. Might even want to consider applying it to all of your library parts that are non-revision managed.

 

So there you have it, 4 features of the FeatureManager that every SOLIDWORKS user should know. Make them part of toolbox and watch your SOLIDWORKS efficiency spike.


By: Steve Ostrovsky • Technical Services Manager • TPM

Author information

TPM
TPM, Inc. is the Carolina’s largest 3D CAD provider and a leading technology company proud of its reputation of providing cutting-edge solutions to the engineering and design community for the past 40 years. Founded in 1973, TPM Inc. serves more than 3,000 customers across the Southeast each year. Inspired by our founder, Jerry Cooper, we are committed to offering our clients the best: 3D Design Software, 3D Printing and Scanning Options, Data and Document Management Solutions, Large-Format Graphics, Wide-Format Plotters and Office Equipment, and Reprographics.

The post Four FeatureManager Features Everyone Should Know appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by TPM at July 27, 2017 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: The 10-Course Learn to Code 2017 Bundle

Code. You don’t have to be a computer science hotshot to take the deep dive—heck, some people are up and running with their first project in a matter of weeks. But knowing where and how to enter can be half of the battle.

The recently-launched Learn How to Code 2017 Bundle is the perfect entry point and includes over 156 Hours of premium coding instruction, from Python to Ruby & everything in between.

Consisting of ten courses in total, the ‘Pay What You Want’ bundle covers not just specific code languages, but also how and why you may decide to choose one over another depending on the project at hand.

Pay What You Want: Learn to Code 2017 Bundle

A Price You Pick Gets You 156 Hours of Premium Coding Instruction, From Python to Ruby & Everything In Between

Included Courses:

  • Learn How To Code: Google’s Go Programming Language ($249 Value)
  • The Complete Python Course: Beginner to Advanced! ($195 Value)
  • Learn By Example: Scala ($50 Value)
  • Projects in Programming Languages: Ruby, Python, Java ($150 Value)
  • Learn Angular 2 from Beginner to Advanced ($195 Value)
  • How to Make a Freaking iPhone App: iOS 10 and Swift 3 ($200 Value)
  • The Complete Web Developer Masterclass: Beginner To Advanced ($195 Value)
  • Git Complete Mastery With GitHub: 100% Hands-on Git Guide ($200 Value)
  • Professional Rails Code Along ($40 Value)
  • JavaScript Programming Complete ($99 Value)

PURCHASE HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale!

Find more deals here:
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by SolidSmack at July 27, 2017 12:19 PM

App Smack 30.17: Trove, Audm, Inky, Spinner Boost and More…

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@www.solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Trove – AI for Email (iOS — Free)

Trove is the best way to improve how you use email to communicate. It learns from your behavior to make your most important emails stand out. The rest are grouped together for fast clean up.

Audm (iOS – Free)

Audm presents the world’s best long-form journalism, read aloud word-for-word by celebrated audiobook narrators.

Inky (iOS — Free)

Inky automatically cryptographically signs all your outgoing email so recipients know it was really sent by you and only you.

Spinner Boost (Android — Free)

Spinner Boost is a clean a master, download this optimization & security app that’s intuitively designed to enhance your phone’s speed and performance in just ONE tap, making devices run smoothly like they’re brand new all the time!

Night Mode-Blue Light Blocker (Android — Free)

Night Mode-Blue Light Blocker app makes your screen adapt to the time and usage scenarios of the day. Multiple modes and eye protection training are provided.

Motion Stills (Android — Free)

Motion Stills is an app from Google Research that lets you capture short videos and transform them into beautiful cinemagraphs or sweeping cinematic pans using our advanced stabilization and rendering technology.

The post App Smack 30.17: Trove, Audm, Inky, Spinner Boost and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 27, 2017 12:09 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

The Benefits of SOLIDWORKS Visualize Boost

So what is SOLIDWORKS Visualize Boost, you ask? What can it do for me and why should I be using it every day? I know you ask yourself these questions in the shower each morning, so let’s finally give you the answers you seek.

Let me paint you a picture, that happens all too often at design and engineering firms each day. Say you’re working on a project and your boss or someone from marketing comes over and says, “hey, I need a few rendered images of the project you just completed ASAP.” But you still have a ton work on another project they just assigned to you earlier that week?? Or what about your design manager needs this complex animation rendered out by the end of the day to show important clients and the hardware on your laptop alone just won’t cut it and would take days to render this animation?

Enter SOLIDWORKS Visualize Boost to the rescue. Visualize Boost is our network rendering technology allowing you to send render jobs to a dedicated cluster of machine(s) to instantly boost render spend and content productivity. Similar to a printer queue in your office, Visualize Boost allows any number of Visualize Professional users to send render jobs to other machine(s), freeing up your main machine to keep using Visualize, CAD, or other demanding applications.

 

Visualize Boost is a separate installation and a product add-on to Visualize Professional only. It should be installed on a separate computer and can be set up as a single node, or as a cluster so that you can scale your productivity efficiently as demand increases. Once installed and ready to render, Visualize Pro will scan your network for any connected Visualize Boost machines; there is no limit of machines you can connect!

Simply put, Visualize Boost helps you complete renders in a fraction of the time. And as we all know, time = money.

Whoa, Visualize Boost at no cost?!? How awesome is that! This is 1:1, meaning if you have five seats of Visualize Pro all on active Subs, then you receive five complimentary seats of Visualize Boost!*

Need to buy more seats of Visualize Boost but need some help convincing your boss? Download the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Boost Justification Sheet to help make your case. Visualize Boost will not only accelerate your renders, but it will also allow you to render loads more content in the same amount of time! Basically, Visualize Boost makes you look like a rockstar in front of your boss.

To show you a real-world example of Visualize Boost’s benefits, take this exploded view animation below, courtesy of the folks at Myomo:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DyJ09_GSP5A?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

On my laptop, this would have taken about four hours to render. BUT using Visualize Boost and powerful NVIDIA graphics cards, check out the insanely fast render times!

To give you an idea of render performance on your projects with Visualize Boost, check out these two charts below. Moral of the story is, put all your budget towards buying NVIDIA GPUs and your render jobs will finish in a fraction of the time! Just think of the render speed if you had 10 NVIDIA graphics cards across multiple Visualize Boost machines! Whoa.

1x NVIDIA M4000 = 60 minutes
2x NVIDIA M4000 = 40 minutes
4x NVIDIA M4000 = 20 minutes
2X NVIDIA M6000 = 15 minutes
1x NVIDIA VCA = less than 5 minutes!

Here are some of the benefits of using Visualize Boost in your pipeline:

  • Instantly boost your design productivity by stacking up multiple jobs in your Render Queue, send to Visualize Boost machines and offload your local machine to work on other tasks.
  • Iterate at breakneck speeds which shortens design cycles and saves cost. Faster content production means accelerated design process, which means faster iterative cycles.
  • Squash your competition and beat them to the market, ultimately making more money.
  • Render more content faster than ever before!
  • Create product animations, camera flys and interactive web content, rather than only still images…in the same amount of time!
  • You can even install Visualize Boost on existing CPU or GPU render farms, since it’s hardware agnostic! Obviously GPUs are way faster than CPUs, but Visualize Boost doesn’t care what kind of hardware; it just works.
  • Dramatically increase ROI on each product cycle

To give you an idea of render performance on your projects with Visualize Boost, check out these two charts below. And just think of the render speed if you had 10 graphics cards across multiple Visualize Boost machines! Whoa.

This one is comparing the latest NVIDIA Pascal-series cards:

And this one is comparing the previous NVIDIA Maxwell-series cards:

 

Get out there and start using Visualize Boost today! For more information and detailed step-by-step to configuring your Visualize Boost cluster, check out the Visualize Online Help here.

Don’t forget to follow SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager @bhillner on twitter for product news and updates, and share your SOLIDWORKS Visualize creations on social media with #swvisualize and #gettinvizzy!

More Resources to get started with SOLIDWORKS Visualize:

DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE SEAT OF SOLIDWORKS VISUALIZE right now to bring your products to market faster than ever before.

WATCH TWO WEBINARS on SOLIDWORKS Visualize and its many benefits to up your render game to a whole new level.

WATCH THE TUTORIALS to master SOLIDWORKS Visualize in no time and impress your boss with photo-quality content.

UPGRADE TO SOLIDWORKS VISUALIZE PROFESSIONAL for an enhanced 3D visualization experience. Contact your Reseller now!

*Falling off Subscription on Visualize Professional will remove your complimentary license of Visualize Boost.

 

 

Author information

Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner is the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager.

The post The Benefits of SOLIDWORKS Visualize Boost appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Brian Hillner at July 27, 2017 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Creating a Report Query with SOLIDWORKS PDM

SOLIDWORKS PDM Reports are useful for extracting information from an SQL database, without the need to run a SQL query. While SQL queries will return the information requested, running these queries requires knowledge of the syntax, used to compile them. Most SOLIDWORKS PDM users do not possess this knowledge. Also, it is not wise to allow users direct access to the SQL databases, as they could unintentionally, damage them.

In order to allow PDM users to query the SQL database, while preventing direct access, you can define a SOLIDWORKS PDM Report Query from a PDM Local Vault View.

A couple of sample Reports are installed with PDM and more can be downloaded from the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge base. While these existing reports are useful, they may not provide the information that you need to access. In this article, will look at the basics of creating a Report, so that users, can access this information. FORMATTING THESE REPORTS, REQUIRES UNDERSTANDING OF HOW TO GENERATE THE REQUIRED SQL QUERY.

In order to generate a PDM report, we first need to create and test an SQL query that will return the information we require. This is carried out in the SQL Management Studio.

New Query

New Query

Once you create and test your SQL query, you can now use the query to generate a PDM Report. The first step is to start a Text editor, such as Notepad and enter the below elements.

@[SQL query name]
 §Name [Report name]

§Company [Company name]

§Description
 [Description of Report]

§Version [1.0]

§Arguments
 [
 ]

§Sql
 [
 SQL query syntax
 ]

Next copy the SQL query into

§Sql
 [
 ]

The SQL query goes between the square brackets of the text string:

§Sql
 [
 ]

Below is a an example of a report that will non-delete files in the vault

@[AllFilesInTheVailt]
 §Name [Shows All Files In The Vault]

§Company [SolidWorks]

§Description
 [This query will show all non-deleted files in the vault.]

§Version [1.0]

§Arguments
 [
 ]

§Sql
 [
 SELECT (P.Path + D.Filename) AS All_nondeleted_FilesInTheVault
 FROM DocumentsInProjects AS DIP
 JOIN Projects AS P
 ON P.ProjectID = DIP.ProjectID
 JOIN Documents AS D
 ON D.DocumentID = DIP.DocumentID
 WHERE D.Deleted = 0
 ORDER BY Path, Filename ASC
 ]

Once all the syntax has been entered, save the file with the extension ‘crp’.

Please refer to my Using the Report Generator article for instructions on running reports.

The post Creating a Report Query with SOLIDWORKS PDM appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at July 27, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

This Guy Just Won the “Father of The Year” Award With This Working D.Va MEKA Cosplay

For those of you don’t play video games, Overwatch is a highly addictive first person shooter that pits two teams composed of six characters each against each other. From a mild-mannered robot to a talking gorilla, the game took the world by storm with its unique character roster and cartoony art style which anybody with a love for Pixar films can appreciate.

It comes as no surprise then why a lot of fans love to cosplay as their favorite heroes. Mike Carambat doesn’t have a physical medal, but he definitely just became his daughter’s favorite person in the world when he created this walking, talking D.Va MEKA for her.

Presently the youngest playable hero of the game, D.Va, is one of the harder characters to cosplay. While her skintight pilot suit isn’t difficult to recreate, it’s her iconic pink MEKA which sets the part-time cosplayers apart from the hardcore fans.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DG5W5-UJxbs?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Mike starts by constructing a wooden skeleton on top of an old electric wheelchair and builds everything from there. As the MEKA moves, a simple bicycle pedal connected to the motor rotates the legs, giving the illusion that the person inside is actually walking and isn’t uncomfortably squatted forward. He completes the legs by crafting some hydraulic heels out of a tripod shaft.

The torso provides the steering and houses some pretty neat features. Disco lighting helps show the interior of the MEKA and comes in handy just in case the 80s ever decide to come back. A 120watt stereo system plays D.Va’s voice lines and helps drown out the noise from the thrusters at the back. There’s even a built-in cooling system that keeps the pilot comfortable during those sweaty cosplay conventions!

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But the best part of the MEKA has got to be its arms. Not only do they rotate and light up when fired, they can also be controlled via the two pilot sticks the user operates. Now this may not be such a big feat in terms of robotics, but in the world of cosplay, this is definitely a step up from wearing fancy makeup and holding a gigantic cardboard sword.

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All that’s left is to add the iconic pink paint job and it’s ready to go! His daughter recently used the MEKA at Mecha Con and will feature it again at the upcoming Dragon Con this September in Atlanta. You can see the design process for the MEKA over at Mike’s YouTubechannel or on Instagram

The post This Guy Just Won the “Father of The Year” Award With This Working D.Va MEKA Cosplay appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 27, 2017 02:07 AM

July 26, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Javelin’s 20th Anniversary Celebrations Across Canada

July 3rd, 2017 marked the official 20th Anniversary of Javelin Technologies Inc. To celebrate this milestone in true Javelin style, we hosted fun parties in 11 cities across Canada with our customers, colleagues and friends! We want to thank you for celebrating with us. We truly appreciate the well wishes from all who attended. Our customers are the reason we continue to aim high, and we are thankful for your continued support.

Javelin's 20th Anniversary

Javelin’s 20th Anniversary

Great Food, Fun, and Prizes!

There were many prizes to be won at each event including; Josh Donaldson (#20) Blue Jays Jersey, Complimentary Javelin Training, Gift Cards, and the Grand Prize: Napoleon ROGUE 425 Grill!

Grand Prize Winner: We are pleased to announce that the winner of the Napoleon ROGUE 425 Grill is: Khaled Aboughanum of JNE Automation! Congratulations!

Javelin20 Celebration Highlights

Fun Games and Prizes

Fun Games and Prizes

Cheers from Javelin Founders; Ted Lee and John Carlan

Cheers from Javelin Founders; Ted Lee and John Carlan

Networking with SOLIDWORKS users

Networking with SOLIDWORKS users

Yummy Cake

Yummy Cake

What’s next for Javelin?

We will take over the World! (Just Kidding). Now that the official 20th Anniversary parties have been wrapped up, the cake has been eaten and the prizes have been awarded, it’s time to keep moving forward and aiming high!

Here are some of the highlights that you can expect in the near future:

  • SOLIDWORKS 2018 Release: This October, we will be hosting SOLIDWORKS 2018 launch events both online and in a few cities across Canada. We will reach out to you with details as soon as the registration information is available (August – September).
  • NEW Website: Coming soon! Get the latest 3D technology tips, news and industry insights that are suited to your business needs – available at your fingertips!
  • Better, Bigger, Faster 3D Printers: The Stratasys line of commercial 3D Printers is always evolving! Most recently, the F123 series of 3D Printers allow you to produce fast, effective prototypes for concept development, as well as highly accurate and robust parts for design validation and functional performance.
  • Education Programs: As part of Javelin’s 20th Anniversary, we will be donating some licenses of SOLIDWORKS Education software to select schools across Canada. More and more teachers and students at the high school level consider access to SOLIDWORKS and 3D printing to be essential in preparing students for further education and the workforce.
  • Athlete Sponsorships: In 2016, Javelin began sponsoring two Canadian Olympic Athletes; Liz Gleadle and Pam LeJean. We quickly became great friends with these amazing women and will continue to “aim high” together.
  • Staying Green: Javelin’s company wide goal is to become a zero carbon footprint organization. We are committed to helping reduce waste within our facilities and our communities by implementing more efficient recycling programs, reducing emissions by encouraging carpooling and use of public transit, as well as limiting our use of lights when rooms are not in use.

We look foward to the next 20 years, as your trusted Canadian 3D technology partner!

The Javelin Team

Javelin Team

The post Javelin’s 20th Anniversary Celebrations Across Canada appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Erin Elliott at July 26, 2017 07:53 PM

SolidSmack

Simplify3D Points Extruders to the Sky, Releases Version 4.0 of Their Professional 3D Printing Software

Simplify3D has been building up steam over the past few years with their professional 3D printing software. With loads of 3D printer support and the cleanest UI this side of manufacturing revolution, they’re not showing any sign of letting up.

The team just had a round of head-butts and high-fives with the release of the latest version of their acclaimed 3D printer software. The platform and printer support is enough to leave other options in the dust, but the features in Simplify3D 4.0 are another step in sealing their fate.

Simplify3D 4.0 3D Printing Software

There’s a lot in this release with a lot of the focus on just making the 3D printing process more enjoyable instead of a constant exercise in trial-and-error. Here’s a breakdown of some of our favorite new features:

Variable Print Settings
The new Variable Settings Wizard gives you the power to customize any setting that you want for different regions of your model. You can customize the print quality for different features, or even change the mechanical properties of the part.

simplify3D 4 3d printing software

Variable Extrusion Sizing
New functionality in Simplify3D will automatically adjust the amount of plastic that is extruded from the nozzle to create smaller or larger extrusions depending on the shapes you are trying to print.

simplify3D 4 3d printing software

Improved Sequential Printing
The sequential printing mode in Simplify3D allows you to finish printing a complete part before starting the next one. This greatly reduces the number of travel movements between parts, improving print quality. This mode now also supports multiple processes for the same model.

Improved Model Foundation
Several new features have been added to improve the adhesion between the bottom of your supports and the build platform. This can be particularly helpful for tall prints, where the supports need to be securely anchored to the bed to ensure they stay attached for the entire print.

simplify3D 4 3d printing software

Preview Your Process
The interactive print preview has now been updated to include more information about which exact process was used to create different parts of your model.

Seamless Process Transitions
As you change settings for different regions of your model, Simplify3D will automatically create a seamless transition between these settings. Whether you’re changing the layer height, infill, or anything else, the software ensures a smooth transition without extra solid layers or Z-scars.

You can see What’s New in Simplify3D 4.0 and purchase the software for $149 USD here. If you already have a previous version, the upgrade to 4.0 is absolutely free.

The post Simplify3D Points Extruders to the Sky, Releases Version 4.0 of Their Professional 3D Printing Software appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 26, 2017 05:10 PM

Two Beautiful, Wooden Marble Run Kits For Your Home

If you like to watch things roll, and build things to make them roll, these beautiful, modular marble runs were made just for you.

Invented by entrepreneur Walter Mason, these wooden marble runs work similarly to many a Rube Goldberg machine–you’ll recall the one in the OK Go music video, yes?–albeit not as complex and much less of a whatever-is-laying-in-the-garage approach. Walter’s kickstarted another marble run project six years ago, but now he is launching (and has successfully funded) two wooden kits you can assemble in the confines of your own home.

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The “boa” set is the smaller of the two and uses everyday ping pong balls as its ammunition, while the “anaconda” set is far wider and requires 4-inch hollow steel balls (or anything similarly-sized) to be put on its tracks. Both sets come in lengths of 20 and 40 meters, so it really comes down to how much free space you have in your house or backyard.

The sets are made for easy assembly, crafted on Mason’s CNC machine. The runs don’t require any heavy duty tools to put together, either. You simply pop on the tracks, suspend them with the included steel wire, and watch gravity do its job.

In our wonderfully digital world, we’re so easily distracted–when we aren’t online, we’re fiddling with a fidget spinner, when we’re not doing that, we’re back watching cat videos. I think we all would prefer the distraction of building a massive marble run though.

Like a wooden train track set, there isn’t a specific way in to set the tracks; you can adjust the tracks to the surroundings and your own creative needs. All the sets are designed to build a run 20 meters (65 feet) in length, with the Large Anaconda Kickstarter Gold edition built for a 40 meter (131 foot) installation.

The Kickstarter Gold project for the two marble sets has already reached its €10,000 ($11,633 USD) goal, and the two sizes are available at various price points starting at €120 ($140 USD),  but if you just want to see more videos of slow rolling ping-pong and steel ball set to soothing music, head over to Walter Mason’s YouTube channel.

The post Two Beautiful, Wooden Marble Run Kits For Your Home appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 26, 2017 03:29 PM

3D Design & 3D Printing Blog | All Things SOLIDWORKS, Markforged & HP 3D Printing

7 Reasons Why Best-In-Class Companies Provide Virtual Prototyping to Their Designers

Thursday, 27 July 2017

Are your designers and engineers surrounded by whirlwind of activity caused by the need to differentiate your product all the while trying to beat competitors to market?  There is a lot of stress that goes along with shortened cycles and high stakes which is why designers and engineers are finding themselves in complex environments; attempting to predict product behavior and meet deadlines. To add to this stress, many find themselves in the unenviable position of waiting for physical prototypes and relying on hand calculations only to find they are met with costly setbacks and rework, putting their design right back at the starting line.

Virtual Prototyping to Your Designers

What if I told you there is a way around all of this? Aberdeen Research recently conducted a study, “Virtual Prototyping vs. Traditional Product Development Methods" that shows how best-in-class companies are using virtual prototyping during the design process so they can understand how their designs will work in the real world. That’s right – companies can test early and identify problems BEFORE the late stages of the product development process. They are saving themselves time, money and even avoiding a few extra gray hairs. Thanks to Aberdeen, we can share with you a very helpful guide of "Seven Reasons You Should Provide Virtual Prototyping to Your Designers".

Your 7 Reasons You Should Provide Virtual Prototyping to Your Designers:

1. Complexity keeps growing and manual calculations cannot keep pace.

Complexity within products and their operating environments are the top two challenges identified by developers. Hand calculations are only effective on the most basic of products.

2. Design resources are limited; virtual prototyping greatly improves engineering efficiency.

67% of Best-in-Class companies rely on virtual prototyping for validation and verification.

3. A design can only be fully optimized in a virtual environment.

Virtual prototyping software makes it possible to evaluate the performance of multiple variables at a rapid pace. Hand calculations and physical prototypes only provide a singular answer.

4. Virtual prototyping greatly reduces the dependency on physical prototypes.

Since designs can be tested virtually, users of virtual simulation saw a 10% decrease in complete porotypes.

5. Products are designed correctly the first time.

Virtual prototyping allows for the entire system to be analyzed, which means more accurate results. This is back up by a 6% decrease in ECOs for users of virtual prototyping software.

6. The storage and management of manual calculations bring unique challenges.

Calculations done through in-house Excel files are hard to collaborate through and introduce risk if a designer is working on an outdated version.

7. It all comes back to costs.

Optimized designs, less rework, and fewer physical prototypes all combine to greatly reduced costs. 71% of Best-in-Class users, who favor virtual prototyping, meet their product cost target, versus only 63% of all others.

In the FULL REPORT, Aberdeen summarized the experiences of over 550 respondents from companies who have turned to virtual simulation and found that:

  • Best-in-Class companies are 53% more likely than their peers to conduct their simulations in this virtual environment.
  • Virtual Simulation users saw a 16% decrease in overall development time.
  • Virtual Simulation users saw a 13% decrease in overall product cost for new products.
  • Highest performing companies are 10% more likely to meet product revenue targets
  • Best-in-Class companies are 17% more likely to meet product launch targets.
  • For the product targets used to define Best-in-Class companies, virtual simulation easily outperformed hand calculations and physical prototypes.
  • Virtual Simulations users reduced the number of physical prototypes by 48%.

Are you ready to put an end to bad product behavior? Contact us today for a FREE SIMULATION DEMO.

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Author

Tim Newton, Senior Elite Application Engineer

July 26, 2017 03:29 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery Part 7: The Clean Up

It’s been a long day, but it looks like our brew day has been a complete success! There’s just one more step we need to complete before we can drink some celebratory beer… and that’s clean everything up.

Clean up is a vital piece of the process. All of our gaskets, fittings, hoses, and kettles were taken apart and washed down, because it ensures our equipment remains functional and efficient for the next time we decide to conduct a brew day.

This same mentality applies to our SOLIDWORKS Electrical projects. When we’re just about done with the design process, we need to add the finishing touches by generating our wire numbers, bill of materials, and our to-from wire list – just to name a few.

In the past, we would typically generate this information separately from the actual schematic – usually in some type of spreadsheet. Even though this method might fit into our comfort zone, it is extremely prone to errors. If things are changing within our design, we now have multiple places we need to account for those changes.

Why not generate all that peripheral information and reports right in the schematic design software? You’re already adding all this information up front in your schematic – so why not pull that information out on the backend so you don’t have to sit in front of Excel for a week straight making sure you captured all the parts. We can even capture all the part information for the auxiliary components we forgot to order last time!

We can take it a step further and generate our to-from wire list and make it even more intelligent by routing our wires in the 3D space, which will also give us a length for each individual wire in our project. This can be extremely useful logistically, because now we can figure out how much wire we will need before we start manufacturing and assembling our project. This is also useful in communicating our design to the shop floor or to a contractor who is building wire assemblies for us.

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All in all, SOLIDWORKS Electrical helps us to make our design process more intelligent, more efficient, and even more effective. I strongly recommend checking it out for yourself.

For a hands-on demonstration of the software, contact your local reseller, or visit www.solidworks.com

If you’ve enjoyed this mini-series, keep an eye out for additional brewing videos that include the rest of the SOLIDWORKS portfolio – Simulation, Composer, Visualize – just to name a few!

If you are still looking for more great information on SOLIDWORKS Electrical, including topics such as “Understanding Project Macros,” check out our videos on these more detailed topics at my.solidworks.com – simply search for Electric Brewery.

If you’re a fan of twitter, you can follow me @SWECAD

Author information

JP Emanuele
JP Emanuele
JP is a Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, North America.

The post Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery Part 7: The Clean Up appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by JP Emanuele at July 26, 2017 12:47 PM

SolidSmack

This $8 Disposable Cardboard and Bamboo Grill Actually Works

In most cases, picking a product that is ‘built to last’ should be high up on a consumer’s priority checklist, but with recent advances in sustainable materials, that hasn’t always proven to be the case. In fact, ‘leaving no trace’ can actually be a selling point for some disposable products.

But a one-time use grill that can be safely tossed in the campfire after cooking that freshly-caught trout?

Made from FSC-certified cardboard lined with naturally occurring lava stone, the CasusGrill—which recently won the Danish Design Award—features a grill rack made of bamboo and a pre-packed array of bamboo charcoal that can heat up in just under five minutes and stay hot for up to an hour.

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While the use of 100% natural materials and its flatpack-friendly design already makes it a sustainable design champion, the CasusGrill goes one step deeper by using around 50% less CO2 than traditional disposable grills.

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If you’ve got end-of-summer camping and want to pack light, the CasusGrill is available on pre-order now for just $8 a pop.

The post This $8 Disposable Cardboard and Bamboo Grill Actually Works appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at July 26, 2017 12:16 PM

SolidSmack Radio | The Split Assemblies

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll kick it off with “Eliot St.” from Quilt before cranking it up Rostam, Korey Dane, Miracle Legion, Mute Swan, Naps, and others before finishing off with “Georgia Dust” from Sun Seeker. Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

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The post SolidSmack Radio | The Split Assemblies appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 26, 2017 11:42 AM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to modify a SOLIDWORKS Drawing View Scale on the Fly

One of the inconvenient truths of drawings, is that one sheet scale doesn’t necessarily fit every drawing view. While your sheet scale may be perfect for orthographic, auxiliary, and section views, it may leave you reaching for your reading glasses when it comes to detail views. Not to worry, with SOLIDWORKS it’s simple to set a custom scale for any drawing view. This can be done by first selecting the drawing view and then selecting “Use custom scale” in the Property Manager.  Note that any changes to the scale of a drawing view will also affect the scale of any views projected from it.

SOLIDWORKS Drawing View Scale

A Custom Scale can be Set for Any Drawing View in the PropertyManager

How do we inform a reader of a custom defined scale? See our post from February 2017, Automatically add Scale Labels to all SOLIDWORKS Drawing Views that are not set to Sheet Scale, for more information on adding labels to drawing views.

Is the property manager the only way to set a different custom scale? While it is certainly a viable option, there is an even easier way to apply a custom view scale on the fly if they are already called out in a label.

Changing a SOLIDWORKS Drawing View Scale

Double clicking the drawing label allows us to edit the information contained in the label and opens the relevant section in the PropertyManager. Close inspection of the text box shows that SOLIDWORKS automatically populates drawing labels with tags of the relevant information. For example, the drawing label shown below is actually made up of four distinct tags which evaluate to the following text:

  1. Name: "SECTION"
  2. Label: "B-B"
  3. Scale: "SCALE"
  4. Delimiter "1:3"
Double Click the Drawing View Label to Edit

Double Click the Drawing View Label to Edit

We can easily change the scale of this drawing view simply by replacing the delimiter portion of the tag with another scale in the form of X:X. Provided that we replace the existing delimiter with a new, properly formatted delimiter, the drawing view will update automatically. As was mentioned in the February 2017 article, the Scale and Delimiter tags will not be shown if the scale is the same as the sheet scale. These tags will be removed from the label if the delimiter is modified to the sheet scale, requiring any custom scale modifications to be made via the PropertyManager.

Changes to the Delimiter are Automatically Updated in the Drawing View

Changes to the Delimiter are Automatically Updated in the Drawing View

Modifying a SOLIDWORKS Drawing View Scale via the delimiter tag is just one way to cut down your mouse travel and clicks while creating or editing drawings. To learn more about creating drawings easily and efficiently, check out our Instructor Led SOLIDWORKS Drawing Course.

The post How to modify a SOLIDWORKS Drawing View Scale on the Fly appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Angus Hudson at July 26, 2017 10:45 AM

Quickly and Easily Changing the SOLIDWORKS Drawing Scale

I often feel that the best tricks and functionality in SOLIDWORKS, or any software package for that matter, are the subtle ones. The subtle tricks that aren’t covered in user guides or tutorials. Of course, if you watch how your colleagues use SOLIDWORKS or attend a User Group meeting or take a SOLIDWORKS Training course, you are going to pick up a lot of these tricks. Here is one of my favorites that eluded me for many years:

You are probably aware of the unit selection pop-up menu that appears in the status bar when editing a part? It allows you to easily switch between inches and millimeters on your model with just two simple clicks. Would you believe there is another one for SOLIDWORKS Drawing Scale?

1:2 Scale

1:2 Scale

Being on the Status Bar, you could be forgiven for thinking this is just showing you the status. You can also change SOLIDWORKS Drawing Scale. Behold:

SOLIDWORKS Drawing Scale

1:1 Scale

You will notice that my drawing views have changed scale between the two screenshots. This requires that the drawing views are set to “Use Sheet Scale.” If I have opted to use a custom scale for my drawing views, this will not change the size of my drawing views, obviously.

The post Quickly and Easily Changing the SOLIDWORKS Drawing Scale appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Jim Peltier, CSWE at July 26, 2017 10:32 AM

Why you should avoid SOLIDWORKS In-Context Relations when not needed

SOLIDWORKS In-context relations and editing is a powerful tool. Driving features from one component allows features in other components to update automatically.

Yet with great power comes great responsibility (apologies for the movie reference).  In some cases you may accidentally add an external reference that was not intended.  This is most prevalent when the same component will be used elsewhere.  You don’t want the copied component to randomly change size when the original component is updated.

For example I have a component I’m editing in the assembly just so I can quickly change the size of the original Boss-Extrude.  I have the option ‘Use specified colors when editing parts in assemblies’ enabled under System Options > Colors as it’s easier to visualize.

SOLIDWORKS Editing Component

FIGURE 1: SOLIDWORKS Editing Component

After I modified the original sketch for Boss-Extrude1, I noticed it now has the ‘->’ SOLIDWORKS In-context relations symbol beside the features.

SOLIDWORKS In-context relations

FIGURE 2: SOLIDWORKS External References

Using Display/Delete Relations within the sketch, we can see that there is an in-context relation to the arc of the lower component that should not have been added.

SOLIDWORKS In-context relations

FIGURE 3: SOLIDWORKS In-Context Relation

When you are making quick edits to components in the assembly environment and you don’t want to accidentally add in-context relations, simply enable the option ‘No External References’ in the CommandManager Sketch tab.  Notice when I select the sketch circle and a reference from another component, there are no available relations to add.  Same goes for attempts to add a dimension to another assembly component.

SOLIDWORKS No External References

FIGURE 4: SOLIDWORKS No External References

The post Why you should avoid SOLIDWORKS In-Context Relations when not needed appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at July 26, 2017 10:22 AM

SOLIDWORKS Weldment is not just for Weldments!

You’ve likely heard about the great SOLIDWORKS Weldment functionality. It can quickly and efficiently generate welded frame multi-body parts, create gussets and end caps, and export this information to a drawing cut list. We love being able to complete these outputs so easily, but why stop there?

SOLIDWORKS Weldment functions just as well for any part where you need to assign specific profiles to either 2D or 3D sketches; welded or not! Perhaps for creation of slats and support posts as part of a metal fence, or maybe for planning/construction of a wooden deck, all component lengths, materials, cut angles, and quantities can be exported to a cut list quickly and easily. To show this in action, below is a picture of an octagonal picnic table, designed entirely in a single SOLIDWORKS part environment using Weldments.

SOLIDWORKS Weldment

SOLIDWORKS Weldment

SOLIDWORKS Weldment Cut List Table

SOLIDWORKS Weldment Cut List Table

Learn more about Weldments

Attend our SOLIDWORKS Weldments course either online or in a Canadian city near you.

The post SOLIDWORKS Weldment is not just for Weldments! appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Colin Murphy, CSWE at July 26, 2017 10:14 AM

July 25, 2017

SolidSmack

Indian Scout Bobber Motorcycle is Slammed Style in a Sleek Design

Indian Motorcycle, one of the world’s oldest motorcycle companies, has heard the complaints about motorcycles taking up too much space on the road. Their answer? The Indian Scout Bobber.

To the untrained eye, this two-wheeled vehicle looks just like any other bike ridden by hooligans. But upon closer inspection, you’ll see all of its features have been stripped down in  a design that’s squashed together to bring riders closer to the asphalt.

It’s a beautiful design. Simple in the execution and appearance.  With its shorter fenders, gentle curve, prominent exhaust lines and even more prominent V-Twin engine, it’s a sight to behold, especially the blacked-out version. With everything about the design so tightly integrated, it has the look of a heavily customized bicycle.

But why should the motorcycle lower the driver in the first place?

Apart from reducing the distance between a rider’s face and the ground, the Scout Bobber is aimed at giving riders a more controlled driving experience. It angles your body forward, which keeps you balanced while making you look more menacing than a person who doesn’t mind being pelted by bugs at 90 mph. Couple this with a leather riding jacket and a skull helmet, and you’re one badass bike rider.

While they’re pushing “no frills, all attitude” they don’t scrimp on the essentials. The Scout Bobber is equipped with street tracker handlebars to point the vehicle where you want it to go, bar-end side mirrors which show where you have been, LED lighting at the back to go along with the side-mounted license plate, and knobby tires that keeps you glued to the road (hopefully).

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While almost every part of this motorcycle has been reduced and reshaped better than Michael Jackson’s face, the engine is the one thing that hasn’t been tampered with. The Scout Bobber runs on a 69 cubic inch, 100 horsepower V-Twin engine. The built-in liquid cooling system keeps the engine from overheating and ensures your butt stays safe from major burns.

The Bobber is priced to start at $11,499. To see more details about the Indian Scout Bobber (as well as the additional add-ons) check out the slick 360 view of the motorcycle on the Indian Motorcycle webpage.

The post Indian Scout Bobber Motorcycle is Slammed Style in a Sleek Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 25, 2017 05:44 PM

Model of the Week: RevoFrame Chassis System [Giant Robot Building Time!]

There’s one question I often ponder. What could I stick on a rabbit to make it look more like a robot? You too? Oh, I agree, a bear… yeah, a bear could be robotically accessorized really well, granted he’s not eating you instead.

Maybe you don’t have an animal to stick robot part on, so here’s another option. The 3D printable RevoFrame chassis system. Xian Brock, aka WuLong Toys, has developed a wonderful articulating 11″ robot frame with attach points for all sorts of armour, weapons, gear, jets, blasters, blades and whatever other robot accessory you can churn out of your 3D printer.

The RevoFrame Chassis system provides you with a collection of parts and joints to build a skeletal frame for your giant robot. The parts can be configured in a wide variety of ways to create many different body types and include ports for attaching armor and equipment.”

There’s even a little cutout in the front, to add a pilot for your mech, compatible with WuLong’s MechCity People models. Since there’s a lot of clipping and snapping, Gizmo Dorks ABS is recommended for the prints with a layer height of 0.18mm, a 2mm shell thickness, and 20% fill. There are 21 pieces altogether. Check out just a few of the options below.

You can download the model files. There are accessories on WuLong’s profile and also quite a few on the website.

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

The post Model of the Week: RevoFrame Chassis System [Giant Robot Building Time!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 25, 2017 04:50 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Learn How to Get Started with SOLIDWORKS Composer

We’re excited to announce a new video series called The SOLIDWORKS Composer Quick Start Guide. SOLIDWORKS Composer is a technical communication software that uses your existing CAD models to create intuitive and informative deliverables such as animations, interactive PDFs, high-resolution images, and more. This series of videos is intended to orient new users in Composer and teach them how to use its basic functions. Videos in the series will include:

1.      Importing Assemblies and Creating Views

One of the major benefits of Composer is the ability to use pre-existing CAD models. In this video, we will show you how to import them into Composer and how to create views to position your model in different ways. Views are the backbone of Composer, and are used in the creation of most deliverables.

2.      The Translate and Exploded View Tools

Another benefit of Composer is the ability to manipulate your CAD models within the software without changing the model itself. The Translate and Exploded view tools are two of the most useful tools for doing so, and this video will walk through how they work and how to use them to create new insightful views of your assemblies.

3.      The Digger Tool

The Digger is an easy way to add additional detail to you deliverables. This video will explain all its various functions and how to use them to supplement your existing views.

4.      Creating and Using Styles

Styles are a way to keep track of the various property changes you have made to your annotations, labels, images, and other actors. This video will break down the process of creating and applying styles to make a uniform look for your deliverables.

5.      Making a Bill of Materials (BOM)

A Bill of Materials is a useful document for both manufacturers and customers to keep track of the various parts that compose an assembly. Making one in Composer is a surprisingly simple process, and this video will walk you through how to create your own.

6.      Generating Technical Illustrations

Technical illustrations are an incredibly useful tool for breaking down the geometry of an assembly. In this video, we’ll cover how to use the technical illustration workshop to create deliverables that provide new insight into your CAD assemblies.

7.      Creating High-Resolution Photos

Sometimes, you don’t need to create detailed, technical documentation, but simply some marketing materials that make your product look good. Here, we’ll walk you through a series of tools that will allow you to create detailed and fantastic looking images of your product.

8.       Animations

One of the clearest ways to show how your product is assembled, or how it functions, is through the use of animation. Creating insightful animations in Composer is an easy and intuitive process that can pay big dividends for your company.

9.      Publishing Composer Files

What good are these deliverables if you can’t export them in a meaningful fashion? In this video, we’ll walk you through how to output your creations to a variety of common file formats, so that your deliverables are easily accessible and understood by those who need to see them.

Watch and learn

The SOLIDWORKS Composer Quick Start Guide video series is helpful in orienting new users in Composer and familiarize them with some of its basic functionality. For a breakdown and description of the future videos in the series, check out the video below on the SOLIDWORKS Blog. Remember to subscribe to our channel to stay up to date with the newest episodes in this series and other great SOLIDWORKS content!

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Be sure to subscribe to the SOLIDWORKS YouTube channel to stay up to date with the newest videos in the series, not to mention other fantastic Composer content. We’re excited to have you with us, and we hope you enjoy the new videos!

 

Author information

Mohit Daga
Mohit Daga
Mohit is a Senior Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS Composer. Tables Tennis Champion, Vegetarian foodie and avid kickballer!

The post Learn How to Get Started with SOLIDWORKS Composer appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mohit Daga at July 25, 2017 03:57 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Drift Trike – Saddle Design

Drift Trike Saddle Design in SOLIDWORKS

The third installment of our series on how to design and build your own Drift Trike in SOLIDWORKS, we model the saddle. Stuart will be modelling this part using a mirror technique so in effect he only has to model one side of the saddle, saving time and effort. The saddle is the part of the trike which you are always in contact with, so it is important that it is ergonomic and comfortable. Including high fillets and draft is a great way to prevent sharp edges. You will also be shown a handy trick known as the double shell technique.

Previous Parts:

The CAD modelling topics covered here will be:

  • Drafting
  • Splines
  • Plastic Molding
  • Half Mirrored Modelling
  • Modelling method known as the “Double Shell Technique”
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See Cadtek’s original article here. Look out for the final part of this series in the coming weeks covering the design of the Rear Wheels. This will go into Circular Patterning, Reference Surfaces, Combine and working with Multibodies. All design skills that every SOLIDWORKS user can benefit from. For more hints, tips and content head over to our Twitter page or our YouTube channel.


Cadtek Designer Profile – Stuart Wortley

Cadtek Application Engineer

Stuart has been with Cadtek Systems for 18 years and is key part of our application team. His passion for the outdoors, his VW Camper-van and SolidWorks is clear. It has seen him produce some great, easy to follow SOLIDWORKS tutorials around Paddle Boarding, Cabinet Design and now Drift Trikes! This year saw Stuart achieve the accolade of Elite Application Engineer at SOLIDWORKS World 2017 in LA, the highest level achievable.

Author information

Cadtek Systems UK - Elite SOLIDWORKS Training & Support
Cadtek has been established for over 27 years. Based in the UK, we have unrivalled experience in providing design solutions for designers and engineers. We work across all disciplines and multiple industries. An award winning Elite Reseller we can help you understand and choose the right 3D CAD solution. Call 0800 804 7766 to speak to an account manager. For more information, visit cadtek.com.

The post SOLIDWORKS Drift Trike – Saddle Design appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Cadtek Systems UK - Elite SOLIDWORKS Training &#38; Support at July 25, 2017 03:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Projection Type to Show Multiple SOLIDWORKS Viewports in Parts and Assemblies

Showing multiple SOLIDWORKS Viewports in the part and assembly environment is helpful for advanced part modeling and also drawing 3D sketches. To examine how an advanced Sweep or Loft command has worked out, showing four different views of the part in the graphics area at the same time would be beneficial. The following image demonstrates how multiple SOLIDWORKS viewports appear in a Part document.

Multiple SOLIDWORKS Viewports

Multiple SOLIDWORKS Viewports

Now that we can show orthogonal views in part environment, the projection type becomes important the same as the drawing environment. Therefore, we need to see how we can set the projection type. Whether the projection is set to first angle or third angle, the views may look different in the graphics area. Read my recent article to learn more about projection types.

How to define the projection type

The following image demonstrates where the projection type setting can be found. Under Tools > Options > System Options > Display, there is a drop down menu which allows you to select the preferred projection view. Setting this up results in showing orthogonal views in your preferred projection type in the part or assembly environment.

Projection Type to Show Multiple Viewports

Projection Type to Show Multiple Viewports

The post Projection Type to Show Multiple SOLIDWORKS Viewports in Parts and Assemblies appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWE at July 25, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Monday List 30.17 | What We’re Reading This Week

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Letter of Recommendation: Cold Showers
People like to promote the physiological benefits of icy showers, but what they really improve is your mind.

San Francisco Wants to Eliminate the Pay Gap for Women in This Generation. But Will It Work?
Employers in San Francisco soon won’t be allowed to ask job applicants about their salary history.

I do whatever I want at work and I haven’t been fired yet
If you can make a decision and you don’t think it’s going to get you fired, just do it.

Turn Off Your Push Notifications. All of Them.
Push notifications are ruining my life. Yours too, I bet. Download more than a few apps and the notifications become a non-stop, cacophonous waterfall of nonsense.

RIP, Microsoft Paint
Microsoft lists the 32-year-old app under “deprecated features” in Windows 10’s next autumn update, a little X marking the end of an era.

Will the Orvis H3 Be the One Fly Rod to Rule Them All?
With the all-new rod, Orvis hopes to change the game for anglers at all skill levels.

The post The Monday List 30.17 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 25, 2017 11:37 AM

July 24, 2017

SolidSmack

This Shocking Wearable Design Keeps You Awake on the Road

That’s not wordplay. This thing REALLY shocks you.

STEER, a wearable armband designed by Creative Mode now on Kickstarter, aims to save countless lives by waking drowsy drivers on the road. The bracelet isn’t meant to shock drivers into submission, but rather monitor their vitals and deliver a gentle reminder that sleeping should be done in bed, not while barreling down the highway wrapped in a metal box.

According to some pretty convincing stats, a whopping 25% of vehicle accidents are caused by drivers getting unsolicited shut eye. This isn’t due to their car being comfier than a La-Z-Boy on a rainy day. Nope, they’re just tired. Whether at night or in morning traffic, driving tired can be just as bad as driving drunk.

This is what STEER wants to address. With this rather large armband design with what looks like a fancy box of breath mints attached to it, STEER monitors your normal heart rate and skin conductance with 16 different sensors–they type used in polygraph test machines–to make sure you aren’t sleeping on the most important job of all: staying alive.

You start off by taking a minute to let STEER adjust to your normal body conditions. Green means go. Then the bracelet monitors your vitals continuously every two seconds to make sure you haven’t died yet.

Steer switches to a yellow light and delivers a strong vibration whenever your heart rate drops by 10 units. But if your body registers it as nothing more than a massage and drops your heart rate down by another 3 units, you’ll get a nice, little electric shock to go with a blinding red light. Apart from mild skin irritation and a possible paranoia of being electrocuted, STEER doesn’t harm your body any more than coffee, smoking, ear-deafening music or having a passenger jab your neck with a cattle prodder.

The design isn’t going to win any fashion awards, but its single purpose to keep you alive doesn’t require much in the way of aesthetics. However, they considered certain aspects to make it more effective. Along with the wide array of sensors, STEER is made from hypoallergenic plastic, so it doesn’t cause any weird rash with your daily shock therapy. It has a charge time of one hour and can be used for two weeks before the next charge via the included Micro USB charging cable.

STEER broke their $5,800 goal, nearly tripling it with a week left to go. One device runs €99 ($115 USD) with a twin pack running €198 ($230 USD) with an expected deliver in November 2017. To learn more, head on over to the Kickstarter page.

The post This Shocking Wearable Design Keeps You Awake on the Road appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 24, 2017 03:49 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Desktop Metal and its Mission to Make Metal 3D Printing Accessible

Additive manufacturing, probably better known by the masses as 3D printing, is a technology that’s been around for a long time but more recently has generated a lot of buzz, and not just among the technophiles and early adopters. Students, home hobbyists, makers, and yes, certainly product designers and engineers are seeing manufacturing from a fresh, new perspective. Imagine a technology that enables you to quite literally make anything, any shape of any complexity. No more minimum production runs. You need just one?  It’s now doable.

One company that’s certainly garnered its fair share of that buzz is Desktop Metal. Yes, there are other companies that do metal 3D printing so I was curious as to what makes this company different. I spoke with Rick Chin, Co-founder and VP of Software Development at Desktop Metal and a former Director of Product Innovation here at SOLIDWORKS. Besides Chin the company is stacked with tech talent from industry and academia (MIT) with specialties in materials science, manufacturing, engineering and software development and at the helm is Ric Fulop, the company’s CEO and Co-founder.

The company was founded on the idea that there was a real need to make metal 3D printing more accessible. Current metal 3D printing is too expensive, for prototyping and not fast enough or cost-effective enough for mass production.  With that in mind, there were three requirements to make that possible: to create a system that reduced the costs associated with metal printing, removed the infrastructure requirements and was easier to use—from both the hardware and software sides.

Bringing metal printing to the office

In April the company unveiled the fruits of its labor: the first office-friendly metal 3D printing system for rapid prototyping called the Studio System, which includes a printer, debinder and furnace is $120,000. The Studio System is up to 10 times less expensive than comparable products on the market. What also sets it apart from its competitors is the fact that it doesn’t require any hazardous powders, lasers or cutting tools to operate.

The system uses a proprietary process called bound metal deposition (BMD), which is the union of metal injection molding (MIM) and the widely used process for 3D printing plastics, Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM).  No need for specialized technicians; the DM uses cloud-based software that engineers can use to 3D print their models directly from their CAD programs. The system reads in native CAD formats of most CAD software and specific CAD plug-ins are in development.

What’s more, the system has access to hundreds of different metal alloys, with seven core materials available when the system ships, including several stainless steels, 4140 low-alloy steel, copper, invar Kovar, Inconel, and H-13 tool steel, plus more than 30 additional materials in development .

“For the first time, you can have a metal 3D printer in an office or studio, one that fits within the context of a regular design environment so you can easily access form, fit and function of metal parts quickly,” says Chin. “Doing functional testing with a 3D printed part is something you can’t do with plastic parts.”

Printing metal parts at scale

The company also announced a 3D printing system for mass production of metal parts called the Production System, which uses a new, proprietary technology called Single Pass Jetting (SPJ), which is said to be 100 times faster than today’s laser-based additive manufacturing systems. The Production System cuts the costs of each part significantly over the laser-based systems, making it competitive—for the first time—with mass production techniques like casting.

Desktop Metal’s printers use a technology called “microwave enhanced sintering” that puts down layers of metal and ceramic powders that are mixed in a soft polymer.

A sweet spot for this new product will be in mass customization of products, something traditional manufacturers have struggled to do and maintain profit margins. The Production System fits the bill here because it is able to produce parts very quickly, uses relatively inexpensive materials and can bring innovation from extremely low-run applications like aerospace and specialty automotive to the mainstream at costs competitive to casting up to 100,000 units for parts with complex geometries such as the impeller in this video.

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Chin says the company’s solutions are designed to produce complex, high performance metal parts for industries including automotive, manufacturing and consumer products.  BMW and Lowe’s are both among the company’s long list of investors.  Certainly many other industries could benefit, however, and Chin believes that the unique production capabilities of the system might spur entirely new industries and product categories.

Author information

Barbara Schmitz
Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks
Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post Desktop Metal and its Mission to Make Metal 3D Printing Accessible appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Barbara Schmitz at July 24, 2017 01:09 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to insert an Image into a SOLIDWORKS Drawing

Images are typically inserted into a SOLIDWORKS drawing or sheet format using the commands:

  • Insert > Object > Create from File
  • Tools > Sketch Tools > Sketch Picture

If the image does not get inserted or the image resolution is not good, I usually suggest trying to insert the image using Windows copy and paste commands.

Insert Image SOLIDWORKS

Insert Object

In the example seen here, the first attempt to insert an image as an object created from a .png file did not work; instead of a logo, only its file name was inserted.

As a workaround, the logo was copied directly from the image editor (Ctrl-C) and pasted into the SOLIDWORKS drawing (Ctrl-V).

OLE Object Properties

OLE Object Properties

The border around the logo was removed by right-clicking on it and selecting Properties > Sharpen Zoomed State.

 

The post How to insert an Image into a SOLIDWORKS Drawing appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sanja Srzic at July 24, 2017 12:00 PM

July 23, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Save time by using a SOLIDWORKS Hole Series in your assemblies!

If you have an assembly where you would like to create a counter-bored hole in one part, a clearance hole in another, and end it all off with a threaded hole, a SOLIDWORKS Hole Series is a quick and easy way to accomplish all of these holes in one task! As an added bonus SOLIDWORKS will even place a fastener, and any combination of washers or nuts for you while keeping everything linked and organised so that any changes can be simply completed easily within one feature.

How will a SOLIDWORKS Hole Series save time?

SOLIDWORKS Hole Series allows you to create a new hole, or take an existing hole from a part, and push it through any parts which intersect the axis of the hole. This can save time as you are editing multiple parts while staying in the assembly.

This is great if there is a part in your assembly with the hole pattern already defined, such as the cover in this assembly.

Select sldprt features while in the assembly

Select Hole Wizard, Pattern, and Sketch features from the SOLIDWORKS part

Automatically install your hardware

Not only will a Hole Series propagate holes to other parts simply by selecting them from the graphics window, you can easily include all of the hardware required.

Choose fasteners for your requirements

Choose which parts to propagate the hole through and clearances required.

Keep it Clean

Hole Series adds all of the features and toolbox components it creates to folders to keep your FeatureManager clean.

Hole Series has 12 Fastener stacks and through holes created in one feature!

One Editable feature placed in assembly tree below mates, and one folder containing all hardware for the feature.

Simple to Change

When you use Hole Series, there is no need to go back and change multiple features. Simply edit one feature to modify the parameters.

SOLIDWORKS Hole Series make it easy to change fastener size or type

Edit the definition of all linked hole by updating one feature

Learn more

Learn more about the Hole Series feature and many more with our SOLIDWORKS Assembly Modeling class.

The post Save time by using a SOLIDWORKS Hole Series in your assemblies! appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Bryan Sprange, CSWP at July 23, 2017 10:54 AM

July 22, 2017

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Chilled Funk

The curtains opened. If it wasn’t for the flames, the only light would have been 50,000 watts of hamster-powered light waves hitting our retinas off the strange ball of mirrors. The sounds were a warm, slow roasted lamb shanks of rhythm and funkadelic chord progressions sizzled in the oniony juices of these links.

Lorenzo Lanfranconi – Simply superb set of colorful environments of waterfalls, mountaintops, steams and sea, some peaceful, some foreboding, all incredible.

Card Slicin’ – I’ve seen trick card throwing, but nothing ever like this. Pin point accuracy by magician Rick Smith Jr. on Dude Perfect. Wow.

Nunchuck Larry – My new favorite TV series action drama.

Honor Freeman – Instagram follow of the week. Those look like used sponges, used plastic buckets and old bars of soap, but they’re actually Porcelain.

Tulle – Not sure if you’ve ever thought about creating anything artistic with fabric, but ironing tulle is an option ans Benjamin Shine reveals in The Dance, made from 1.2 miles of tulle.

Art of the Poster 1880-1918 – The Minneapolis College of Art and Design (MCAD) has published over 200 turn-of-the-century lithograph prints that capture the design aesthetic of the time.

Playful Pallete – Is a demonstration from Adobe Research for SIGGRAPH 2017 demonstrating an interactive, parametric color palette for artists.
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Without Love – The Descendents with the new video from their latest album Hypercaffium Spazzinate.

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by Josh Mings at July 22, 2017 03:08 AM

July 21, 2017

SolidSmack

The Gigantic Wheel on Onewheel+ Makes the World Your Skate Park

If you thought that skateboarding with a board made of LEGO bricks or a smart A.I. was weird, then you clearly have no idea of how crazy the human race can get.

One look at the Onewheel+ and you’ll know where it gets its way-to-obvious name. Held together and powered by A GIGANTIC WHEEL, this upgrade to Future Motion Inc.’s 2014 invention is a marvel of simple design.

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With a built-in Hypercore motor inside the tire, the board can reach a speed of up to 19MPH without having to slow down–even if you’re launching a rocky crevasse (which you really shouldn’t be doing), the motor doesn’t scrimp out no matter the surface.

“But it runs on one wheel! I have no idea how to ride a skateboard or unicycle, or skateboard, unicycle, wheel thingy!” you might say.

I hear you, and while I agree you shouldn’t touch a unicycle unless you’re an adept juggler or a clown, the Onewheel+ always makes you look cool with its dynamic stabilization, lights and GIGANTIC WHEEL. The intuitive controls let you move forward or slow down by applying pressure to the desired direction, ensuring that it won’t suddenly go downhill unless you want it to. The newest version of the Onewheel also includes a “Surestance” design that elevates the edges of the board to make sure your feet stay firmly planted and in control of your ride.

It can go on all sorts of terrain too. From your normal everyday asphalt to offbeat dirt paths, the board delivers a smooth ride all throughout. You can even tailor your experience by using a shaping app for iOS or Android phones. Be it a floaty or stiff ride, the Onewheel+ has something for every offroad boarding aficionado.

So what does it run on?

Lithium batteries. Though traditional boards rely on the power of gravity and inertia to propel them forward, none of them can go uphill like the Onewheel+. Even with its built-in LED headlights and taillights, you can head out to a distance of up to 5-7 miles before having to look for a socket. The charging time clocks in at about 20 minutes, so you won’t need to wait long before you head out and cause more mayhem for pedestrians with you GIGANTIC WHEEL.

If you want to learn more about the Onewheel+ (or pre-order one for the crazy expensive price of $1,499), head on over to the Onewheel+ official webpage.

The post The Gigantic Wheel on Onewheel+ Makes the World Your Skate Park appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 21, 2017 10:12 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Locking a SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate

Author: Scott Durksen, CSWE, Javelin Technologies

Starting in SOLIDWORKS 2014, you have the ability to lock rotation of concentric mates. This can help avoid additional mates required if you didn’t want the components to rotate.

How to quickly tell if a concentric mate rotation has been locked

In order to see if a concentric mate rotation has been locked, simply review the mate icon for the component.  A regular concentric icon will show two concentric circles.  The locked rotation icon will have a solid circle on the inside.  The following images use Breadcrumbs and D-key for easier viewing.

SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate Unlocked Rotation

FIGURE 1: SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate Unlocked Rotation

 

SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate Locked Rotation

FIGURE 2: SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate Locked Rotation

 

What if a component is already fully defined?

If a component is already fully defined, trying to lock one of its concentric mates will fail and provide a message that rotation is already locked for all concentric mates.  As you can see in FIGURE 3, the three concentric mates are actually not locked (based on the icon) but it still gives the message.  Due to the concentric mates fully defining the component, locking the rotation will no longer apply.

SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate Rotation is Already Locked

FIGURE 3: SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate Rotation is Already Locked

 

Lock all free concentric mates in an entire assembly

You also have the ability to lock all free concentric mates in an entire assembly.  Right-click on the overall Mates folder and select ‘Lock Concentric Rotation’.  But again, it will only lock those that are applied to under defined components that can spin freely.

SOLIDWORKS Lock All Concentric Mates

FIGURE 4: SOLIDWORKS Lock All Concentric Mates

 

SOLIDWORKS Locks only Free Concentric Mates

FIGURE 5: SOLIDWORKS Locks only Free Concentric Mates

 

Author information

Javelin Technologies
Javelin Technologies is a provider of technology solutions since 1997. We are experts in 3D design and have helped thousands of companies with solutions for mechanical design, electrical design and 3D printing. Large or small, we have the skills, experience, and services to propel your organization to new heights so you can aim high.

The post Locking a SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Javelin Technologies at July 21, 2017 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

To Globe or to Quadball, that is the Question

SOLIDWORKS Industrial Designer (SWID) comes with a library of freeform subD primitives that can be shaped like digital putty. Two of the most popular primitives are the “globe” and the “quadball”. Both these primitives are spherical in shape. Why then does SWID have two similar shaped primitives and when does a designer use one over the other?

Globe: The globe is the closest thing in SWID to a true sphere. If your design has anything that is spherical, such as a dome, use the globe primitive.

Pole of the globe primitive

The downside of using the globe is that you need to be careful about deforming the shape at the poles.  The poles of the globe primitive comprise triangular faces where many edges come together at a single vertex. An apt analogy is the lines of longitudes on a model of the earth meeting at the poles and the Arctic Circle cutting them to make triangular faces.

A vertex where more than four edges meet is called a “high valence vertex”. When such high valence vertices are pulled to deform the shape, the surface around it starts to ripple.

These triangular faces can be deleted using the Delete command and they can be filled back using Fill command. In this case, SWID use quads instead of triangles to fill the gap (see figure above). The catch is that now the shape is no longer spherical.  So if you wanted a true “dome” shape you’d lose it if you used this technique.

Quadball:  A Quadball is a rounded out cube; it only appears to be spherical. The quadball is one of the most versatile primitives in SWID.  It works great for most design scenarios. The only downside to using the quadball is the fact it appears spherical when it really is not, and is therefore visually misleading to some users.  All the faces on the quadball are four sided, so it is a true quad mesh all around. Consequently this puts out the highest surface quality.  That being said, you can still get into high valence situations if you start sub-dividing.

High valence vertex created by sub-dividing quad surfaces

My thanks to Rob Jost, SOLIDWORKS Product Definition Senior Manager, for his insights on this topic. Also, check out these fantastic models that Rob created using quadballs.

Author information

Shyam Venugopal
Shyam Venugopal
Shyam is a Product Portfolio Manager at SOLIDWORKS. He has a Master's degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Texas and an MBA from Boston University. He has worked as an applications engineer for the microelectronics/semiconductor industry and has been with SOLIDWORKS since 2012.

The post To Globe or to Quadball, that is the Question appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Shyam Venugopal at July 21, 2017 01:26 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Rebuild Commands

When you are working with SOLIDWORKS you may see the rebuild icon next to some of the features every once in a while. This means that SOLIDWORKS needs to rebuild the model in order for the dimensional changes to take effect.

Rebuild traffic light on the Fillet1 feature

Rebuild traffic light on the Fillet1 feature

The SOLIDWORKS Rebuild Command

To ask SOLIDWORKS to rebuild a model one can click on the rebuild icon from the standard toolbar, or click on rebuild under the Edit menu, or press Ctrl + B. This command rebuilds the features that have changed since the last save.

SOLIDWORKS Rebuild

SOLIDWORKS Rebuild

Force Rebuild Command

But sometimes that is not enough. For example, imagine some of data in your model has been corrupted (and that could happen due to numerous reasons). In that case rebuilding your model will not fix the issue as the rebuild command only rebuild the features that have been changed. In this case you need to use the other SOLIDWORKS rebuild command called Force Rebuild.

Force Rebuild command rebuilds every single feature in the design tree and as a result refresh the entire database of geometry. Unfortunately, there is no icon nor menu choice in SOLIDWORKS to execute that command. The only way that you can run Force Rebuild is by using Ctrl + Q shortcut key.

Verification on Rebuild setting

While we are on this topic it is worth mentioning a setting that helps identify problems when making a model. It is called Verification on Rebuild and you can find more information about it in this post.

The post SOLIDWORKS Rebuild Commands appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Saeed Mojarad (CSWE) at July 21, 2017 12:00 PM

July 20, 2017

SolidSmack

You Can Get A Degree In Additive Manufacturing

From something quite obscure a few years ago, 3D printing is now at the point where you can obtain a degree focused on the technology.

3D printing, or Additive Manufacturing, as it is sometimes known, has long been a single-course subject in engineering schools, or as a tool one might learn as part of lab work. But that’s changing.

Today it is possible to obtain a degree specifically for additive manufacturing. Two that I know of are from Penn State and the University of Maryland.

Penn State’s new program, to be offered this fall, includes the Master of Science in Additive Manufacturing (MSAMD) for onsite students, and a Master of Engineering in Additive Manufacturing (MEngAMD) that’s delivered online. They explain:

The MSAMD and MEngAMD programs will provide unique, hands-on experiences in all aspects of the additive-manufacturing process. All students enrolled in the program, whether resident at University Park campus or online, will be required to spend time on site, working in Penn State’s state-of-the-art additive manufacturing laboratory, the Center for Innovative Materials Processing through Direct Digital Deposition (CIMP-3D) as well as the Material Characterization Laboratory in the Millennium Sciences Complex and the Factory for Advanced Manufacturing Education in Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering. Students will gain experience working with polymer as well as metallic additive manufacturing systems.

The MS/MEng programs in AMD will prepare students to:

  • Apply foundational knowledge, critical thinking, problem solving, and creativity in the uses of additive manufacturing and associated design tools and methods.
  • Grow as leaders in manufacturing while maintaining the highest ethical standards in applying additive manufacturing to industry-relevant problems and design challenges.
  • Strive for the advancement of the state-of-art in additive manufacturing and design.
  • Develop innovative solutions through new design paradigms in their respective industries.

The University of Maryland’s program is called the Professional Master of Engineering in Additive Manufacturing Program, which includes these core courses:

  • Engineering Design Methods
  • Engineering Decision Making
  • Engineering Optimization
  • Applied Machine Learning for Engineering and Design
  • Additive Manufacturing
  • Advanced Mechanics of Materials

And they offer a number of interesting electives to accompany the core material, including:

  • Manufacturing with Polymers
  • Composite Materials
  • Life Cycle Cost and System Sustainment Analysis
  • Additive Manufacturing for Aerospace, Energy and Water Applications
  • Applied Topology Optimization

And there are certainly other programs at other institutions worldwide.

The reason for these programs is simply that performing professional 3D printing is in fact a complex business. While it is relatively easy to teach someone to operate a 3D printer, it is not so easy to do so efficiently and effectively. That’s where the professional disciplines take over and apply time-tested learnings based on over twenty years of 3D printing activity in the industry.

To me, these programs are a sign that 3D printing has truly taken hold in society, as the graduates from these programs will no doubt venture forward into business situations where they will leverage 3D printing technology of today – and tomorrow — to create a new world for everyone.

Read more about 3D Printing at Fabbaloo!

The post You Can Get A Degree In Additive Manufacturing appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at July 20, 2017 09:38 PM

3D Modeling with Google Blocks VR App (and How It’s Used With Tilt Brush)

3D Modeling is usually done on a 2D plain with a mouse, keyboard, gallon of coffee and a really big, FLAT screen, but that dissonance in dimensions is a user experience we’ve come to accept as normal. It’s just not right.

Fortunately, More applications that get 3D models off the screen and into our environment are being found upon the reemergence of virtual reality. First there was Quill and Medium for the Oculus Rift, then we saw Google’s Tilt Brush. Then along came Gravity Sketch VR. Now, we have Blocks, Google’s very own 3D modeling VR app that turns your Oculus Rift or HTC Vive into a 3D model creator within your 3D world. Simple tools let you shape, paint, and change your creations without ever having to touch a mouse or keyboard.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1TX81cRqfUU?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Perhaps, the best thing about the software is that it gives you the ability to craft your wonderful abominations the way they were meant to be created–in 3D space.

From something as simple as a potted plant to a massive mech unit, everything you create can be viewed intuitively as you would in the real world. The 3D modelling software removes the need for sketches, parametrics and dimensioning–all of that is combined together in a way so you can focus on the creating instead of tweaking sketch constraints.

Blocks has more uses than what you might think and more application beyond pure novelty. How would you like to create quick concepts and export it for animation? Create 3D graphics? Models for your 3D printer? Blocks is set up with all of this in mind. The interface itself has six basic tools-Shape, Stroke, Paint, Modify, Grab, Erase-to design models you can share via link, .obj export, or as an animated gif. The Block Gallery also allows you to download and re-purpose the creations of others. Additionally, it can be used alongside other VR apps like Google Tilt Brush.

In fact, here’s an example of Blocks and Tilt Brush being used together by artist and YouTuber Anna Zhilyaeva.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4X3Kv26k470?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Blocks is currently free for both the HTC Vive (via Steam) and the Oculus Rift. There are a few Block tutorials available on the Google VR YouTube channel. So if you have either of these VR headsets and want to stretch your creative muscles, check it out and let us know what you think.

The post 3D Modeling with Google Blocks VR App (and How It’s Used With Tilt Brush) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 20, 2017 04:42 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Reduce Product Weight with SOLIDWORKS Simulation Optimization

Reducing product weight and improving performance are key goals in most design projects to minimize costs and differentiate your products. SOLIDWORKS design optimization allows you to quickly size your design to meet performance needs without using excessive amounts of material.

Let’s take a look at this cantilevered platform below. In this example, our goal is to find the optimum beam sizes to minimize weight, yet not deflect excessively.

How to Minimize Weight with SOLIDWORKS Simulation Optimization Analysis

SOLIDWORKS Simulation allows you to vary design aspects such as the geometry, as well as the simulation parameters, to quickly evaluate different variations that still meet your design goals. While optimizing for different aspects such as weight, you can use sensors to monitor and ensure performance goals, such as deflection or factor of safety, are met.

As seen below, the optimum result is determined after evaluating the performance of all the bounding variations.

How to Minimize Weight with SOLIDWORKS Simulation Optimization Analysis

The results are very easy to interact with and understand. The optimum simulation configuration is highlighted in green. Any iteration that did not meet the performance goals is highlighted in red.

Simulation_Optimization_Highlighted_Red_and_Green_4sec.GIF.gif

The computed goals and performance requirements are summarized at the bottom of the table, so that you can clearly understand the effects of each iteration.

 

How to Minimize Weight with SOLIDWORKS Simulation Optimization Analysis

You can even review the simulation results for any of the design iterations to see changes in the response of the structure. Design optimization in SOLIDWORKS Simulation takes the leg work out of trying to minimize product weight and shows you how to quickly find the best design to meet your needs.

As you can see, the SOLIDWORKS Simulation optimization tool gives you real time data to help you find the optimum weight settings for a design, minimizing production costs without sacrificing quality.

Interested in learning more? Learn how new functionality in SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 brings improved usability and flexible access to users. Also don’t forget to subscribe to the Alignex Blog to stay up to date on the world of SOLIDWORKS.

Author information

Alignex, Inc.
Alignex, Inc. is the premier provider of SOLIDWORKS software and partner products to the mechanical engineering industry in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, Colorado and Wyoming. With more than 25 years of technical experience, Alignex offers consulting services, training and support for SOLIDWORKS as well as support for partner products. For more information, visit alignex.com.

The post Reduce Product Weight with SOLIDWORKS Simulation Optimization appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Alignex, Inc. at July 20, 2017 03:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Javelin sponsors students dedicated to changing the future of transportation

University of Waterloo Hyperloop team will unveil their latest prototype on July 21, at the University of Waterloo. Register for the event »

Toronto Waterloop

Toronto Hyperloop Rendering

Imagine working in Toronto and deciding to zip to Montreal for poutine on your lunch break. Sound crazy? Not to some forward-thinking students at the University of Waterloo.

In 2013, Elon Musk released a white paper outlining his concept of high-speed ground transportation, calling it the Hyperloop. In 2015, to move toward the creation of a functional prototype and encourage creative design among students, SpaceX announced a Hyperloop Pod Competition to design and build a half-scale Hyperloop pod.

California dreaming

Teams from around the world took up the challenge, including students from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. Since the first round of competition in California – Design Weekend in January 2016 – the Waterloo team (called Waterloop of course!) advanced through another round – Competition Weekend in January 2017 – to earn a chance to compete in Competition II, from August 25 to 27, 2017.

Waterloop Team

Waterloop Team

Competition 1 saw the team’s pod pitted against internationally respected teams at SpaceX’s headquarters. In the first event of its kind anywhere in the world, teams put their pods through a litany of tests. This August, the pods will be judged solely on speed.

Help from sponsors

Nicholas Jelich is a science and business student who looks after liaising with Team Waterloop sponsors, including Javelin Technologies. He says sponsors are the lifeline of the project.

“Without sponsor support, none of this would be possible. Every day we wake up and come to work, we know that.”

Javelin’s sponsorship includes providing 3D printing experience and services, using Stratasys 3D printers.

“The fact that Javelin is collaborating with us just proves how forward-thinking they are,” Nicholas says.  “And the magnetic wheel system Javelin is 3D printing for us is a game changer. The system changes the way the pod accelerates – it’s a critical component.”

Javelin helped by printing the outer band of the magnetic wheel (shown below). Inside each wheel is a ring of magnets arranged in a particular combination. As they spin, they generate forces to keep the pod centered on the test track, as well as propel the pod forward. High-speed, brushless DC motors allow for control over the pod, even at high speeds.

Hyperloop Magwheel

Hyperloop Magwheel

Benefits of SOLIDWORKS

The team also relies on SOLIDWORKS 3D design software tools, according to Jimmy Zhou, who is team lead for the pod’s pneumatic levitation system.

“Using SOLIDWORKS allows us to solve engineering challenges, either through designing structural components or mechanical assemblies. We produce solutions quickly and communicate to the rest of the team efficiently, ensuring that everyone understands the concept of the component without having to extensively document it.”

Jimmy says the team also uses Simulation, which allows them to identify multifaceted forms of analysis, such as finding stress concentrations in the frame or finding resonant frequencies for the suspension assembly.

Hyperloop Test Track

Hyperloop Test Track

Secrets to success

Just as you’d find with any self-driven start-up, energy is high and dedication runs deep. Students work long hours while attending classes full-time, or working day jobs on co-op terms. Even when on work terms in other cities, they stay connected remotely.

Nicholas attributes their success to an individual, team, and university-wide commitment to the U of W philosophy “ideas start here,” as well as the diversity of the team. Six different faculties are represented on the team, from arts, to math, to engineering.

“We’re a melting pot of different points of view,” he says. “We’re always getting new members with different backgrounds and finding new ways to innovate.”

Team size varies, depending on the time of year; it has reached as many as 150, and 15 to 20 students will be at the competition in California this summer.

Hyperloop Prototype

Hyperloop Prototype

Changing the way the world moves

If you ask Nicholas why a student would want to get involved in the Waterloop project, he jumps straight to the big picture. It’s about using green energy to bring people (and products) closer together. He says they all want the same thing – to be part of the next big disruption in transportation. It’s the same reason that students from all over the world were happy to share ideas and experiences when they all met at Competition I – everyone is focused on the end game – changing the way the world moves.

This gave the Waterloo students the best possible learning experience and the chance to come home and make improvements to their design. It’s what they’ve been up to since January, and now they’re ready to show you their work.

On Thursday, July 21, they’re hosting a launch event for Goose II, the latest and greatest prototype pod, and the one they’ll be taking to California. Expect a dramatic unveiling, along with a chance to meet the team.

Ready for launch

Team members have a little extra zip these days as the admin team plans final details for their launch event and trip to California and the tech team refines the final design.

“We’re excited to unveil this technology we’ve been working so hard on,” Nicholas says. “Everyone is welcome to join us on the 21st to see what we’ve been up to. We welcome any and all kinds of support.”

Team Waterloop is online at teamwaterloop.ca and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/waterloohyperloop.

The post Javelin sponsors students dedicated to changing the future of transportation appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Karen Majerly at July 20, 2017 01:46 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Aberdeen Research: Seven Reasons to Provide Virtual Prototyping to Your Designers

Like most companies, you’re probably fighting to differentiate your products and beat competitors to market. This means shortened cycles, intense stress, and even higher stakes. Surrounded by a whirlwind of activity, designers and engineers are finding themselves in a complex environment; both working to balance deadlines, while endeavoring to accurately predict product behavior.

Those who’ve experienced this unenviable position will tell you, waiting for physical prototypes and relying on hand calculations can lead to bad product behavior. And unlike dealing with mischievous children, real-world design fails can’t be fixed with a five-minute trip to time out. Late failure means you’re met with costly setbacks and rework that put you right back on the starting line.

Yes, this does sound a bit deflating, but now that we’ve got a feeling of being knocked down it’s time to get back up. Aberdeen Research recently conducted a study, “Virtual Prototyping vs. Traditional Product Development Methods” that shows how best-in-class companies are turning to virtual prototyping during the design process to understand exactly how designs will behave in the real world. So instead of ripping their hair out in the late stages of the product development process, companies are testing early and often while they design to optimize products and identify potential problems before they become actual issues.

As a result of the report, Aberdeen has created a handy guide of Seven Reasons You Should Provide Virtual Prototyping to Your Designers. The list speaks for itself:

In the full report (click here to read), Aberdeen found that best-in-class companies are turning to virtual testing while they design and are experiencing major benefits in terms of speed of development, cost and quality. The study found that the highest performing companies are:

  • 17 percent more likely to meet product launch targets
  • Seeing a 13 percent decrease in overall development time for new products
  • 10 percent more likely to meet product revenue targets
  • 4 percent more likely to meet product quality targets
  • Experiencing a 6x greater decrease in length of development cycle over the last two years

Click here to read the full report and put an end to bad product behavior before the threat of sitting in time out ever crosses your mind.

Author information

Mike Fearon
Mike Fearon
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post Aberdeen Research: Seven Reasons to Provide Virtual Prototyping to Your Designers appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mike Fearon at July 20, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: The Pinty LED Digital Wall Clock

Your Casio F91W-1 days may be behind you, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that you have to give up that classic LED digital time display. Heck, why not put it front and center?

Measuring in at over 17″ long, the Pinty LED Digital Wall Clock may not fit onto your wrist, but it will most certainly make a nice addition to your desktop or office.

Made from aluminum alloy and acrylic, this super light and easy-to-hang wall clock includes 8 light intensity levels to accommodate different daytime or evening preferences and needs—all via an included remote control. Nice!

And just like your good old Casio F91W-1, this bad boy carries all the time functions you need to stay ahead of the game. These include a countdown timer, a stopwatch, a snooze alarm, time, date, temperature, and a night light. Boom!

Pinty LED Digital Wall Clock — $85.99

Features:

  • Adjustable Brightness: high brightness with 8 intensity levels to accommodate different needs
  • Multiple Functions: countdown, stopwatch, snooze alarm, thermometer & night light all in one to save you money and space
  • Convenience: controllable within 50 ft. of distance with the redesigned remote control
  • Premium Materials: made of aluminum alloy with coating for durability, comes with 2 pre-drilled holes for simple installation
  • Energy-Saving: ultra-low power consumption to cut back your bills

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The Pinty LED Digital Wall Clock appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 20, 2017 12:02 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to disable the SOLIDWORKS SpeedPak Graphics Circle

SOLIDWORKS SpeedPak allows us to create a much lighter configuration from an assembly or sub-assembly so that we can handle large assemblies quicker. SpeedPak has been available in SOLIDWORKS since version 2009. Over the years SOLIDWORKS has added more functionality to this tool allowing us to focus more on the design itself rather than the tools. Review these articles for SpeedPak advances in 2013 and 2017.

When a SpeedPak is activated, only the selected items such as faces and reference geometries can be seen when moving your mouse cursor over the model in the graphics area, everything inside a graphics circle is hidden. See the following image.

SpeedPak Graphics Circle

SpeedPak Graphics Circle

There are some instances when you know exactly what items are included in the SpeedPak configuration and the graphics circle is more of an annoyance than a help.

There is a quick way to remove the graphics circle temporarily and then bring it back. The shortcut key is Alt+S. This shortcut key allows you to quickly show or remove the graphics circle. Another way of turning the graphics circle on and off is through the Options window. Select the menu: Tools > Options > System Options > Display

In the dialog you can uncheck the “Display SpeedPak Graphics Circle”.

Display SpeedPak Graphics Circle

The post How to disable the SOLIDWORKS SpeedPak Graphics Circle appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWE at July 20, 2017 12:00 PM

July 19, 2017

SolidSmack

The ClayXYZ 3D Printer Prints Clay, Works With Other FDM Printers

Before you ask, the 3D printer itself isn’t made of clay. That would be silly. And I’m not talking about printer that extrudes layers of clay–wait, yes I am. I’m talking exactly about a 3D printer printing beautiful art with layers of clay.

Dabbling in pottery is no easy task. You have to put on an apron–even though you aren’t cooking–what? Sit on a very uncomfortable chair, and hope to the heavens your creation doesn’t come out looking like someone took a shovel to wedding cake. Apart from this, you’re literally getting your hands dirty by with the dirtiest material on Earth: dirt.

But what if you could hit a button and watch that clay sculpture form right before your eyes?

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The result is ClayXYZ, a 3D printer that does most of the dirty work for you. By simply loading your clay and your design, the printer brings your creation to life.

You can create all sorts of things–Lamps for your dingy living quarters, Cups so you can give the impression people come over for tea. Cup holders (which are essential to said cups) so you don’t ruin your fine particle wood countertop. If you’re worried the finished design might not be to your liking, you can finsih, carve, glaze and fire the clay once it finishes printing. Altogether cutting down the crafting time considerably.

clay 3d printer

Even if you don’t have the experience to design a cup that doesn’t leak (who doesn’t really), you can still download one of many models from the printer’s official website or on sites like Thingiverse. The aim of the printer is to make both 3D printing and clay design accessible for everyone.

Apart from being accessible, the ClayXYZ is also affordable. If you already own a FDM 3D printer and don’t want to spend the initial $849 for the entire shebang, you can simply buy the extrusion device for $349, connect it to your printer, and you’re ready to go. That alone is pretty ingenious. The material made for printing is clay (if you didn’t guess it), which is really cheap and can be mixed with other additives like gypsum powder to add strength and a different feel to your designs.

Clay 3D Printer

And guess what? If you have no plans of firing up your finished designs in a kiln and just want to admire the printing process, you can simply dump your unwanted creation in a vat of water and reuse the clay all over again.

With a wide variety of nozzles and a high-precision stepper motor drive, print precision of your clay creation comes down to a very detailed 0.2mm. You can check out the printing process over at the ClayXYZ’s official YouTube channel and find more details on its Kickstarter page where it was fully funding with over $87,000 USD. Pre-orders are available on their website for $849 before it goes up to $960.

The post The ClayXYZ 3D Printer Prints Clay, Works With Other FDM Printers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 19, 2017 09:51 PM

Tech to Replace Low-Skilled Jobs. STEM Included?

tech and robots killing jobs

Well, the future is looking bleak folks. BLEAK. A word that’s sure to become more familiar and hit the Top 10 baby names for 2024. According to a study by Ball State University Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER), the United States is highly vulnerable to the effects of technological advancement, namely automation, trade and urbanization.

But there’s a twist. As reported by CBS News:

According to the study, these include so-called STEM, or science, technology, engineering and math, jobs, such as computer programming, data entry, electrical and electronic drafting, and computer and information research. Among the occupations most likely to be disrupted by automation in the years ahead are some people in the mathematical sciences, such as math technicians, who typically work on engineering projects or are involved in scientific research.”

So, it’s not just low-skilled jobs. It’s also STEM jobs. Or are STEM jobs really low-skilled jobs? Meh, semantics. One questions. Who’s creating the tech that replaces the “low-skilled” STEM jobs? And who’s manufacturing the tech? Cleaning? Repairing? Or creating interesting, technologically advanced storage cases for the tech that’s replacing these tech jobs?

The report has some valid concerns with offshoring and urbanization, but does not seem to consider the effects of global workforce changes and the trend toward larger economic woes in the US. There are all sorts of giggles in the article though, from saying the, “nation has largely recovered from the 2008 recession” to the idea of when, “people lose their ability to make a living, they lose their resilience to bounce back, get retrained and transition to other careers.”

If I wan’t laughing so hard, I’d be crying. We’re all doomed.

The post Tech to Replace Low-Skilled Jobs. STEM Included? appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 19, 2017 09:27 PM

3D Design & 3D Printing Blog | All Things SOLIDWORKS, Markforged & HP 3D Printing

List of SOLIDWORKS Keyboard Shortcuts & Advice

Thursday, 20 July 2017

If you got here looking for a list of SOLIDWORKS keyboard shortcuts, I’m by no means surprised, it’s a common request. I will oblige and give you the default SOLIDWORKS keyboard shortcuts at the bottom of this blog. The more you use SOLIDWORKS the more you will customize it and that includes your keyboard shortcuts. Your shortcuts will deviate from the default, they’re going to deviate from mine, and will likely deviate from your own co-workers. Because of this, do not rely on the default keyboard shortcuts list too much. I advise you to print out, save or otherwise display your own keyboard shortcuts.

SOLIDWORKS keyboard shortcuts

This is how you customize and save out your own SOLIDWORKS keyboard shortcuts.

  1. Have SOLIDWORKS open and have a file open.
  2. Tools > Customize
  3. Go to the Keyboard Tab at the top.
  4. Select from the Show drop-down, Commands with Keyboard Shortcuts
  5. If you want it printed, select Print List… in the upper right corner. If you want it in Excel, select Copy List in the upper right corner.
  6. If you selected Copy List, open Excel and paste it (Ctrl + V or Edit > Paste).

SOLIDWORKS Keyboard Shortcuts

Author

Neil Lantto, Application Engineer

July 19, 2017 09:13 PM

SolidSmack

A Bluetooth Keyboard That Pairs Perfectly with a Wacom Tablet

You bought that Wacom but didn’t think about using a keyboard with it, did ya? If it’s not on your lap, it’s hanging off the edge of your desk or wedged between your wall and the Wacom. There’s a better way and it comes in the form of a bluetooth keyboard.

Arteck Bluetooth Keyboard

The Arteck HB030B Universal Slim Portable Wireless Bluetooth 3.0 7-Colors Backlit Keyboard may have a name as long as a fully-formed sentence, but that’s the only big thing about it. This keyboard is slim, compact, and totally wireless, allotting more space to fit in your ginormous pen display, perhaps one of the new Wacom Cintiq’s just announced.

Cliff Walters gave us the tip on the keyboard and told us why he prefers using this keyboard with his Wacom tablet setup:

“I’m a designer who uses a Wacom Cintiq pen display. I always struggled with where to put my keyboard so I could access it for quick keys and shortcuts in programs like Photoshop or Sketchbook Pro. This keyboard fits perfectly in-between the stand legs and is so easy to access while drawing now.”

bluetooth keyboard

Coming in at a wee 9.3 X 5.3 X 0.24 inches and a weight of 0.37 lb, the keyboard is lighter than your average newspaper and can be stored in the smallest of spaces. As Cliff mentions, it can store between the stand legs of larger Wacom tablets, out of the way when you don’t need it and accessible when you do.

As its namesake implies, the Arteck HB030B supports all Bluetooth compliant devices, meaning iOS, Android, Mac OS, and Windows users will all be able to take it wherever they go. Apparently, it runs for 6 months on a single charge of its Lithium battery, provided you have the mental fortitude to use it for only two hours a day without its built-in backlight.

Speaking of which, the keyboard features seven unique LED backlight colors for those who like to work in their basement with the lights out. It also comes with two brightness levels and an automatic sleep mode to save on battery power–working in solace has never been easier (or more colorful).

At a price of $20, completing an integral component of your design lifestyle just got a whole lot cheaper. If you want to find out more about the Arteck HB030B (or purchase one yourself), head over to Amazon.

The post A Bluetooth Keyboard That Pairs Perfectly with a Wacom Tablet appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 19, 2017 08:27 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Aperia Technology: Transform an Industry Problem Into a Business Solution

Some of the best designs come from problems we see every day while we’re working.  Many SOLIDWORKS users find it their mission to solve these everyday problems and create better designs to not only improve their workflows, but industry workflows as a whole. One example of our customers creating an innovative design based on an industry common issue is Aperia Technologies.  Let’s take a look at their story.

Aperia Technologies was founded by Chief Executive Officer Josh Carter and Chief Technology Officer Brandon Richardson, who met at Stanford University while pursuing master’s degrees in mechanical engineering design methodology and energy systems.  While in school, they were looking for an interesting project and focused on a common issue faced by commercial trucking fleets, which is tire underinflation. Once they realized the significant impact on the industry, they jumped at the opportunity to start a business to improve these setbacks.

Aperia Technologies, which the pair launched in 2010, intends to eliminate trucking costs related to tire underinflation, including unnecessary energy consumption and creation of preventable tire waste, through the development of its Halo® Tire Inflator system. The prototype for the Halo, which installs over an existing wheel hub, utilizes the wheel’s rotational motion to maintain optimal tire pressure. By automatically maintaining the correct tire pressure, the Halo increases fuel efficiency; extends tire life; reduces blowouts; reduces tire maintenance; and cuts oil consumption, emissions, and waste.

In order to develop its Halo prototype, Aperia knew it needed a more versatile CAD package to allow them to increase their efficiency and speed and it wasn’t long before they standardized on multiple SOLIDWORKS Solutions like SOLIDWORKS Premium, SOLIDWORKS Simulation Premium, SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation, SOLIDWORKS Plastics Professional, and SOLIDWORKS Composer.

According to Richardson, “Moving to SOLIDWORKS enabled us to ramp up development, which allowed us to get product on the road more quickly.”  After switching to SOLIDWORKS, Aperia continued to see vast improvements like, increased design efficiency and physical prototyping cut in half.

To read more on Aperia Technologies and how with the help of SOLIDWORKS solutions it created a product and business out of an industry problem, click here.

Author information

Josie Morales
Josie Morales
Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post Aperia Technology: Transform an Industry Problem Into a Business Solution appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Josie Morales at July 19, 2017 02:09 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Warning – A Journal File Could not Be Created. Another SOLIDWORKS Session Running

Do you receive a warning message every time you open SOLIDWORKS? The warning states there is another SOLIDWORKS session running. You probably have made sure that there is no other sessions of SOLIDWORKS running on your machine; or have performed a Windows reboot. To check that, we need to go to the Windows Task Manager and select End Task to any SOLIDWORKS sessions that might be running. Learn how to open the Windows Task Manager.

Another SOLIDWORKS session running

Warning – Another SOLIDWORKS session running

How to solve the issue

However, if you have checked the task manager and there is no other session of SOLIDWORKS running, you can solve this issue by going to the windows registry and make a simple change:

  1. Open up the Registry Editor window by clicking on WIndows Start button and typing “regedit”
  2. Navigate to HKEY_CURRENT_USER > software > SolidWorks > SolidWorks 20xx > ExtReferences
  3. Rename the “ExtReferences” folder by adding a suffix to the end of it such as “ExtReferences_old”
  4. Close Registry Editor and run SolidWorks

You will notice that the error message will no longer show. Note in the Registry Editor window there is a new folder created for “ExtReferences”. If the error message does not show and the problem is solved, you can delete the old “ExtReferences” folder that was renamed.

The post Warning – A Journal File Could not Be Created. Another SOLIDWORKS Session Running appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWE at July 19, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: X-ACTO 3 Knife + 13 Blade Set (35% Off)

When it comes to the design engineer’s toolkit, few tools are as indispensable as a good old fashioned X-ACTO blade. From slicin’ and dicin’ foam core to ever-so-delicately removing imperfections on a rough model, the replaceable blades have rightfully earned their permanent place on the desktop and workbench.

Built with carbon and steel, the sharpened blades produce a reliable cut every time and have been praised for more than 50 years as the standard for cutting and trimming precision by graphics artists, designers, hobbyists and others.

And if you’ve been meaning to add a new X-ACTO knife to your arsenal, you’re in luck. Right now, you can get a 3 Knife + 13 Blade X-ACTO set for just $14.40 — that’s 35% off the original retail price of $21.99.

Xacto 3 Knife + 13 Blade Set — $14.40 (35% Off)

Features:

  • Xacto basic knife set for lightweight precision cutting
  • Ideal for cutting wood, cardboard, paper, plastic, cloth and foam board
  • Comes with a variety of blade types including straight edge, general purpose, fine point, and scoring blades
  • Housed in wooden chest
  • 6.5-by-5.5-by-1.5-inches ; 10.1-ounces

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

Cool Tools of Doom: Prismacolor Premier Verithin Colored Pencils 24-Pack (28% Off)

The post Cool Tools of Doom: X-ACTO 3 Knife + 13 Blade Set (35% Off) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 19, 2017 11:44 AM

App Smack 29.17: Wave X, Detour, Astro, Cloak and More…

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@www.solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

dapulse (iOS — Free)

The best tool is the one your team actually uses and dapulse comes with built-in addiction.

Wave X (iOS – Free)

Send photos, videos and audios in only one gesture.

Detour (iOS — Free)

Immersive audio walks that guide you through the world’s most interesting places with the people that know them best. Whether exploring solo or with friends, Detour will change the way you experience places. Available in 17 cities around the world.

Astro (Android — Free)

Intelligent, modern email app for Gmail and Office 365 with a chatbot that helps you declutter your inbox and focus on important messages.

Cloak (Android — Free)

Cloak keeps you safe on Public Wi-Fi with no fiddling or fuss.

EyeEm (Android — Free)

The leading app to get rewarded for your photos. Sell your best photos, gain exposure and take your photography to the next level.

The post App Smack 29.17: Wave X, Detour, Astro, Cloak and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 19, 2017 11:19 AM

Rocketbook’s Everlast is a Reusable Notebook with Scannable Pages

everlast notebook

The one notebook you’ll ever need- Rocketbook’s Everlast. At least that’s the claim from the makers of the highly successful Wave: Cloud Connected Microwavable Notebook and The One, a single-use cloud-connected paper tablet. What do all three have in common? The ability to write on paper, using pen and upload those writings and doodles digitally to your cloud service of choice almost instantly by taking a photo using the Rocketbook app.

The differences end there, of course. In The One’s case, it’s a one-use smart notebook you can write/doodle on using your writing implement of choice. It features dot-grid paper for making drawing easier and a printed QR code for automatic image upload to the cloud. Several printed icons allow you to select your service of choice (by marking them), whether it be Dropbox, Google Drive, Evernote, Box OneNote, Slack, iCloud or email. Rockebook’s Wave offers the same features, but the pages can be erased by heating the notebook in a microwave. This version can only be used with Pilot FriXion pens loaded with ‘thermochromic’ ink, which turns invisible when heat is applied.

everlast notebook

Building on the Wave, the Everlast notebook features the same functionality as its predecessors, including QR codes and the ability to send your images to the cloud app of your choice, however instead of microwaving the notebook to erase images and text; you simply wipe it down with a damp towel. Instead of the acid-free fine-grain paper found in the others, the Everlast uses a waterproof ‘synthetic poly blend’ parchment, making it easy to wipe away the ink from FriXion pens- yes you still need to pair this notebook with Pilot’s thermochromic pens.

everlast notebook

Using the Rocketbook app is simple and easy to use, after capturing your image, the app processes the image, crops it to (specified size) and enhances it for a clean and clear reproduction. The image is then automatically filed and organized in the cloud, making it easy to find and share with others in the social section of the app.

While the Everlast is a great smart notebook and is certainly affordable ($34), it isn’t without its drawbacks. Left-handed people might find they smudge their writing as the FriXion ink takes several seconds to bond and dry on the paper and it tends to leave ghost images if you leave the ink on for more than several months without erasing. Regardless, it’s an affordable alternative to other more expensive smart-books on the market such Moleskin’s NoteBook and SmartTech’s NoteBook Express.

The post Rocketbook’s Everlast is a Reusable Notebook with Scannable Pages appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at July 19, 2017 03:35 AM

July 18, 2017

SolidSmack

Obsidian is a Sleek, New 3D Printer Starting at $99

For all the things it can create in its bosom, your average 3D printer is a lot of work.

The best 3D printers are huge, expensive, and require more space than a young professional’s apartment can afford. On the flip side, cheaper printers are usually unreliable and are about as appealing to the eye as the carcass of a dead rat.

It’s a problem that not many people recognize, but one that San Francisco-based company Kodama wishes to address. They have been solving all sorts of issues in the 3D printing world with their unique designs (such as their Trinus 3D printer that doubles as a laser engraver), and now they’re upping the ante by creating a printer that is reliable, elegant, and most importantly, cheaper than a dad who works at a coupon shop.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="360" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/223109141" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="640"></iframe>

Obsidian is a series of 3D printers that seeks to eliminate the notion that more money equals better printing. Featuring a design like a portable ice cube, the project has already been funded on Kickstarter, cracking the $1 Million USD mark, and is turning out to be one of the more accessible printers on the market.

It comes in 3 flavors:

The Obsidian is $99 and is a pretty solid 3D printer in its own right.

The Obsidian Plus is $149 and comes with 400g roll of Obsidian filament for printing, an LCD touchscreen for easy programming and control, and a USB/SD card slot to manually input your designs.

The Obsidian Deluxe is $249 and comes with all Obsidian Plus features but replaces the LCD screen with a SMART LCD touchscreen. It even adds a heated bed for higher quality printing, is compatible with an iOS/ Android app that lets you remotely control your prints, and a camera to watch the process while on your commute home. The camera also allows you to record the whole thing and share it on social media for friends and complete strangers to enjoy.

obsidian cheap high quality 3d printer

Despite the different features introduced in each version, the 3D printing process stays the same. Each Obsidian prints at a minimum XY resolution of 50 microns, a printing speed of 70 mm/s, and can build objects in a space of 4.72×4.72×5.72 inches (120x120x120 mm). In addition to standard PLA, it can even print using complex materials such as Nylon, ABS, PETG, and more. It supports the major slicers and has an open firmware based on Marlin.

obsidian cheap high quality 3d printer

But if you think it’s still too basic, worry not! The Obsidian designed for a quick start: just plug in the printer, feed in your filament, and print… you know, after you find an incredible 3D model to print. The Obsidian Plus and Obsidian Deluxe also come with a power outage recovery feature that allows you to resume printing even if you accidentally forgot to pay your electric bill (again).

obsidian cheap high quality 3d printer

With all these features, a compact design, AND an affordable price, the Obsidian might just be what the world needs to get 3D printing to a wider audience. The Kickstarter project end soon though with all versions still available and an expected ship date of December 2017. Sample print below. Once these ship, let us know about the experience and how the prints turn out for you.

obsidian cheap high quality 3d printer

obsidian cheap high quality 3d printer

obsidian cheap high quality 3d printer

obsidian cheap high quality 3d printer

The post Obsidian is a Sleek, New 3D Printer Starting at $99 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 18, 2017 09:20 PM

Model of the Week: Hand-Screw Clamp [Crush it!]

Ask anyone with a wood shop or a giant bowl of grapes and they’ll tell you, you just can’t have too many clamps. It’s not possible. You could have ten clamps–not enough. A thousand clamps–nope. A million clamps–WEAK, you need more.

Jacob Stanton, aka jakejake, the gentleman who gave us the Squishy Turtle model, has been busy CRUSHING IT. Crushing it with a 3D printed clamp design that can hold, squish, and squeeze your parts together or look dangerously painful hanging from your earlobe.

Jacob’s hand-screw clamp is a proof-of-concept in an exploration to make the most superior 3D printed clamp IN THE UNIVERSE… or at least one that’s both strong and made of 100% 3D printed parts. He modeled his design in SolidWorks and printed the 16 pieces using MatterHackers PRO PLA on his Ultimaker 2 3D printer.

3d printed hand-screw clamp 3d printed hand-screw clamp 3d printed hand-screw clamp 3d printed hand-screw clamp

Wondering how to assemble it? Mr. Jacob has a video that shows you how:
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MIiluSksuhI?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

The sliding hinge pieces attach the lower jaw while capturing the two knobs that adjust the two threaded shafts. The top jaw is pinned to the threaded pieces and the two pads are then pinned to the jaws. Boom. 100% 3D printed.

Cool little design, huh? And one that will add some color to your shop, granted you have all the wonderful filament colors jakejake does. You may be wondering, Does it CRUSH STUFF? You bet it does.

You can download the model files on Thingiverse and get a look at the assembly video for the build. (Bonus! Check out Jacob’s website for other cool projects and experiments!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

The post Model of the Week: Hand-Screw Clamp [Crush it!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 18, 2017 03:39 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Composer: Preparing Your Models for Asset Generation – Viewport Properties & Property Pane Controls

In today’s blog, we’ll be going further in depth to prepare your model for asset generation by diving into Viewport Properties in SOLIDWORKS Composer. With Viewport Properties, we’ll go through how certain Lighting properties affect your actors. In addition, we’ll see what some of the Property Pane Controls do, which will help when trying to either Copy an Appearance to another actor, or Setting a Neutral Property!

Before diving into Viewport Properties, there’s one Document Property we want to keep in mind: Paper Space

  • This can be found by clicking File > Properties > Document Properties > Paper Space to modify the Page Size
  • You want to set the format to how you want it to export. In addition, we can define the Orientation with either Portrait or Landscape
SOLIDWORKS Composer: Preparing Your Models for Asset Generation – Viewport Properties & Property Pane Controls - Image 1

Now, let’s look at Viewport Properties! Here are a few you want to set up before creating your views:

  • Publication Aspect
    • Free: Publication Aspect will adjust to the Viewport Size
    • Typically, the 16/9 publication aspect will be best if you want to do animations
    • It’s better to set this now, as opposed to later and have the publication aspect modify all your views!
  • Ground
    • The ground can be turned on/off through the Collaboration tab on the Left Pane
      • A keyboard shortcut to turn the ground on/off is CTRL+G
      • In addition, an image can be inserted as the Background Image Path by clicking on the background in the Viewport, going to the Properties pane, and clicking the ‘…’ to the right of the Background Image Path
SOLIDWORKS Composer: Preparing Your Models for Asset Generation – Viewport Properties & Property Pane Controls - Image 2
SOLIDWORKS Composer: Preparing Your Models for Asset Generation – Viewport Properties & Property Pane Controls - Image 3
  • Decide if you want Camera perspective on/off, which can be found in the lower right-hand corner of your Viewport. Perspective will make it seem as though the actors closer to you are larger than the actors farther away.
    • Perspective Angle can be changed through the Preferences > Camera > Default Perspective
SOLIDWORKS Composer: Preparing Your Models for Asset Generation – Viewport Properties & Property Pane Controls - Image 4
  • Per Pixel Lighting gives us more of a realistic result. It’s the lighting per pixel, as opposed to grouping when we have it off. It’s also known as Phong shading. Per Pixel Lighting can also improve the lighting of models that have poor tessellation.
  • Ambient Occlusion will display more shadowing. It displays shaded surfaces by considering light attenuation from nearby actors. Intensity controls how dark the shading is. Radius controls the coverage. Here are two images, the first one with Ambient Occlusion off, and the second image with Ambient Occlusion
SOLIDWORKS Composer: Preparing Your Models for Asset Generation – Viewport Properties & Property Pane Controls - Image 5 SOLIDWORKS Composer: Preparing Your Models for Asset Generation – Viewport Properties & Property Pane Controls - Image 6

What about the Property Pane Controls?

Sort controls

  • By default, the properties are Sorted by Category, such as General, Publication Aspect, and Lights, but if easier, there is also a Sort Alphabetically, which will list all the properties from A – Z
SOLIDWORKS Composer: Preparing Your Models for Asset Generation – Viewport Properties & Property Pane Controls - Image 7
SOLIDWORKS Composer: Preparing Your Models for Asset Generation – Viewport Properties & Property Pane Controls - Image 8

Set as Neutral Properties

SOLIDWORKS Composer: Preparing Your Models for Asset Generation – Viewport Properties & Property Pane Controls - Image 9
  • Set as Neutral Properties will set the values of selected properties as the new neutral values. If there are no properties selected, the command will set all current property values as neutral.

Restore Neutral Properties

  • Restore Neutral Properties will restore the neutral properties for all selected properties. If there are no properties selected, the command will restore all properties to the neutral property values.

Repeat Last Property Change

SOLIDWORKS Composer: Preparing Your Models for Asset Generation – Viewport Properties & Property Pane Controls - Image 10
  • Repeat Last Property Change will apply the last property change to the current selection. Clicking F4 will also do the same. For example, if we apply red to multiple actors, then select a different actor and click this command – this will then propagate the red color (in this case) to the actor.

Copy Appearance

SOLIDWORKS Composer: Preparing Your Models for Asset Generation – Viewport Properties & Property Pane Controls - Image 11
  • Copy Appearance, as you can probably guess, copies the following properties between actors:
    • For All actors: the color, opacity, and texture will get copied
    • For Geometry Actors: the Shininess and Emission will get copied
    • For Collaborative Actors: All appearance Properties will get copied

Manage Meta-Properties

SOLIDWORKS Composer: Preparing Your Models for Asset Generation – Viewport Properties & Property Pane Controls - Image 12
  • Manage Meta-Properties will add or remove CAD meta-data or user-defined properties to whatever is selected. You can also apply meta-properties to parts or assemblies.

In conclusion, I hope you’ve got a bit more insight on some of the Viewport Properties, such as controlling the shadowing using the Ambient Occlusion Intensity and Radius controls, or including your own image for the ground in your Viewport (or just turning it off with a Ctrl+G!). We saw how we can Sort Controls by either Category or Alphabetically in the Property Pane, allowing us to find the exact property we’re looking for, as well as how to set or restore a neutral property, repeat the last property change, copy an appearance, or manage the custom properties and metadata brought in from SOLIDWORKS!

For more information, check out our YouTube channel, get a SOLIDWORKS Composer quote or contact us at Hawk Ridge Systems today. Thanks for reading!

Author information

Hawk Ridge Systems
From design to production, Hawk Ridge Systems delivers best-in-class solutions in 3D design, CAM software, and 3D printing.

The post SOLIDWORKS Composer: Preparing Your Models for Asset Generation – Viewport Properties & Property Pane Controls appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Hawk Ridge Systems at July 18, 2017 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

The 3DExperience Lab: How Interns Are Becoming the Experts

(From left to right) Alessandra Paolucci, Patrick Schulper, and Rachael Naoum are interns who work primarily in the 3DExperience Lab

Interns usually have a certain reputation of being undermined by their company’s full-time employees and bosses. The stereotypical intern seems to do menial work such as, get coffee and doughnuts for the rest of the company, go down the hallway to collect reports from the printer, or even clean up messes that they didn’t make. You get the gist; interns have a lot of tasks that are completely unrelated to what their job originally entailed when they were first hired. Here at DASSAULT SYSTEMES three interns are working in our brand new 3DExperience Lab and paving the way for what future interns should aspire to be; building blocks for a company’s next generation of innovative ideas.

The 3DExperience Lab, most commonly known as the Fab Lab among DASSAULT SYSTEMES’s employees, opened on May 30th of this summer, in Waltham Massachusetts. The concept of the 3DExperience Lab started in Paris, two years ago, and is now connected to over one thousand other maker spaces through the Fab Foundation Network. With the help of MIT’s Center for Bits and Atoms, the 3,100 square foot lab is made for startups, entrepreneurs, engineers, and students to collaborate together and innovate products for future sustainability. With fourteen different work stations/facilities that range from wood-working to virtual reality, there is no shortage of physical or cybernetic products that one can produce.

As MIT helped build the platform for the 3DExperience Lab, they also offered mentor training sessions in April. The training sessions were held for those who would mainly be working in the lab, so that they could become mentors and then train others who were interested in participating. This was the case for one mechanical engineering student, Patrick Schluper, who decided to become an intern at DASSAULT SYSTEMES as a part of his Northeastern University CO-OP program.

After talking with Patrick about his experiences in the 3DExperience Lab, he made it seem prevalent that MIT’s training helped him become more familiar with the machines, but his real progression came from collaborating with others and working hands-on with the facilities. “… No one got everything from the training, obviously, but everyone got part of it, so then later you [could] go back and talk to other people [and] try to figure out what you might have missed… [I’ve] spent a lot of time just [working] on different machines, and through that [I’ve] just kind of figured out, you know, how stuff works.”

Patrick continued to tell me how his development working in the lab has given him the ability to teach other full-time employees about its facilities. “Yesterday even… I trained [around] twenty people. There was vinyl cutter and laser cutter training [that I did] and showed them how to use everything.” Patrick is now a very skillful instructor in the 3DExperience Lab, but he isn’t the only intern who is capable of teaching other employees.

Patrick Schluper, putting in work during the Fab Lab tours

Shawna Hansen, a Corporate Paralegal at DASSAULT SYSTEMES, was looking for the perfect, sentimental Father’s Day gift for her husband. She knew her husband loved anime, but wanted something that was not just an ordinary gift; so, she came up with the idea of creating a custom-made anime shirt for him. This idea spawned from her knowledge of the embroidery machine that was held in the 3DExperience Lab.

Since Shawna was set on the idea of making her husband a shirt, she first needed to learn how to use the sewing machine; so, she asked the User Experience Senior Manager, Chin-Loo Lama, to mentor her in the Lab while she would attempt to sew. However, Chin-Loo Lama knew someone else who could assist Shawna better than she could with the project, another mechanical engineering intern, Rachael Naoum. I bet you are wondering how an intern became the go-to expert for an embroidery machine that had just opened. As you can tell, that is sort of the norm around the 3DExperience Lab.

Rachael, a senior at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), started interning for DASSAULT SYSTEMES a little over one year ago; however, when she started working this summer, there was a different twist to her job. She had to learn how to operate the Fab Lab’s embroidery machine without any mentor training. In an interview with her, she told me, “I’m the exception because I just showed up and Marie (her boss) said, ‘You’re the mentor for the sewing station. Go figure it out.’ [And I said], ‘Okay.’” Rachael mastered the embroidery machine in the fifteen days between her start date and the grand opening of the lab, while it took most other mentors as long as twenty weeks to master their respective machines. Luckily, she had some prior experience. “I’ve been sewing since I was four… so once you know one machine, it’s not that hard to figure out a new one.” Rachael acknowledged the fact that she works with the embroidery machine more than any other facility in the 3DExperience Lab.

“Rachael is an accomplished instructor,” Shawna explained to me, “… so from the start, she showed me what to do and then guided me until I could do it fairly decently myself.” After 5 hours of Rachael and Shawna working together to embroider the design onto the t-shirt, it finally came out beautifully.

Shawna Hansen, holding up the, “Proud Anime Dad,” shirt that Rachael helped her create

Even though sewing might be Rachael’s specialty, the embroidery machine is not the only tool she is proficient in. “… I’ve known how to use the Sindoh (3D) printers for about a year, probably over a year now… The laser cutter I’ve definitely done a few things on. Also with the vinyl cutter, we’ve started doing screen printing. That’s actually something I’m in the middle of working on right now.” After asking her how she is able to learn the functions of these machines in such a short time span, she exclaimed, “… I just sort of go for it. There are other interns who have been here longer than I have, who know how to use almost all the machines. [I ask them], ‘Hey, how does this work?’ Five minutes later, ‘Okay, got it!’”

One of those other interns that Rachael is referring to is her fellow partner in crime, Alessandra Paolucci. Alessandra is also a mechanical engineering student from WPI, who joined the DASSAULT SYSTEMES team along with Rachael last year. This summer, she is working with Patrick on the laser and vinyl cutters, as well as teaching other employees how to utilize those machines. “It’s really nice to have two other people in the lab my age, with the same, sort of, experiences. We definitely get to learn everything together, since we are all at the same level.” In essence, the three of them are constantly collaborating as a team.

Rachael (left) and Alessandra (right) working together on the embroidery machine

Since it seemed to me as if they were working without any supervision, I went to their supervisor (who is also the 3DExperience Lab Manager), Abhishek Bali, to ask him about the level of trust he has with his interns. “We have given them total freedom to formulate problems, run experiments, make calculated mistakes and learn from them. That is the spirit behind the maker movement. [The] 3DExperience Lab is all about fostering a culture of makership and entrepreneurship… From learning new skills around these machines, steering projects in the lab, to handling large groups during Fab Lab tours, Rachael, Alessandra, and Patrick have been amazing. ”

That’s right, they even give tours of the Fab Lab as interns. Before the lab’s grand opening, the three were informing higher up executives of DASSAULT SYSTEMES and other interested partners about what the Fab Lab had to offer. After hearing about these tours I asked Alessandra and Rachael if they could take me on my own personal tour, and they were more than happy to do so.

During the tour, they explained in great detail the functions and purposes of each work station and machine, as if they lived in the lab. When I first entered the lab, Alessandra and Rachael were the only two people working in it. Halfway through the tour, no one other than Patrick walked in to continue his ongoing work. “Given that [they] have spent the most amount of time in the 3DExperience Lab, they are quite proficient in using most of the machines,” Abhishek stated.

Alessandra displaying the molding and casting station

Although Alessandra, Patrick, and Rachael were all tremendous tour guides, that was not the extent of their preparation for working in the lab. “They proactively designed the 3DExperience Lab Playbook that is like a User Manual for an incoming fabber in the lab. It contains a detailed starter-kit with step-by-step procedures for fabbers to follow as they go along using various machines in the Fab Lab,” says Abhishek. Just when you thought these interns could not do much more, they continue to work.

The playbook that Abhishek was talking about is formally known as, “The 3DExperience Lab Startup Kit.” Alessandra, Patrick, and Rachael created this kit for new fabbers to work on individual or group projects, which range from simple to complex. The kit was designed for new fabbers to improve their skill set with each machine so they could eventually become experts, or possibly even mentors in the Fab Lab. When talking with Rachael about the projects that the kit contained, she responded, “We weren’t given them. We found them on the internet, and then some of them we wrote up ourselves.”

Alessandra and Rachael are also training summer high school intern, Pranavi Boyalakuntla. “It’s been really interesting,” Alessandra stated. “… It’s not even just passing on the information we’ve learned in the Fab Lab because we’ve only been here, for what, a month and a half?… I’m trying to tell her things that [I would’ve wanted to know in high school] before getting into the field.”

“Obviously, we are teaching her how to use SOLIDWORKS [as well as the machines], but my favorite part is telling her things that she shouldn’t be afraid to do. I was afraid to pursue robotics engineering and computer science because I thought, ‘Oh you need to know those things from when you were a child…’ So, I’m telling her now… that she can do whatever she wants to do, and she shouldn’t be afraid.” Aside from training Pranavi, they are also training another high school intern, Nirali Jain, along with two new Northeastern CO-OP’s, Erica Traini and Sean Yeatts. These two CO-OP’s will eventually replace Alessandra’s and Rachael’s positions, for when they depart back to school at the end of the summer.

In the meantime, Alessandra and Rachael are currently working on creating a prosthetic arm for their senior project at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. After one week of working on the project, they already have two models for the finger, a laser-cut and a 3D printed model. “We want to see a couple different things,” Rachael said. “Which manufacturing technique is stronger, [which one is] easier to assemble, [which one] requires fewer pieces, [which one is] easier for someone to make, say, in the Fab Lab in Rwanda?” The project is still in the works, but the two engineers plan to have the arm finished by spring time.

“The plan right now is to do as much prototyping as we can while we’re here in the summer, and then if we have something during the school year, we send our files to [Erica and Sean]. One of them will make it, [then] they will give it to [us].”

Rachael and Alessandra holding up their prosthetic finger

Interns with the capability to teach full-time employees about the company’s assets, are not something that you see with every business. Alessandra, Patrick, and Rachael are paving the way for a different style of interns; a style where employees and executives can learn from students, and gain a different perspective from them on certain matters. Corporations can add so much insight from bright young minds, as the generational gap with most other full-time employees can be of value. With the variety of technology that is presented to interns at such a young age, their mindsets, along with executives’ and other employees’ experiences, should be able to create long-lasting platforms for businesses all around the world.

Author information

Connor Burke
Connor Burke
Brand and User Advocacy Intern at Solidworks Corporation
I am a Brand and User Advocacy Intern for SOLIDWORKS Corporation. I currently reside in Westford, Massachusetts and also attend Syracuse University. I aspire to receive my Communication & Rhetorical Studies degree by May of 2019.

The post The 3DExperience Lab: How Interns Are Becoming the Experts appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Connor Burke at July 18, 2017 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Changing the SOLIDWORKS Standard View Orientation

Have you ever imported a model from a vendor, customer, etc. and the part orientation just doesn’t make sense? Well it just so happens you can change the default view to any rotation that you’d like! We are going to focus on the Update Standard Views command to change the SOLIDWORKS standard view orientation of our model.

SOLIDWORKS Standard View Orientation

View Orientation pop-up

This command will change the view to your desired orientation. This is extremely handy when you are bringing your part into the drawing environment and the views just don’t make sense.

I will use this flashlight to demonstrate this tool.

Bad orientation of model

As you can see, this flashlight’s “front” view is at an odd angle.

If I click on the face that I want to be the “front” view. Then press the spacebar to open the Orientation window. Then click “Normal To”. The flashlight will rotate so the face you clicked is parallel with the screen. Now press the spacebar once again and click the update standard view command. This will prompt you to select the Standard View you would like to assign the current view to.

Assigning a Standard View Orientation to the Front Plane

 

Select the standard view you would like associated with the current screen view, in our case the Front Plane. You will then get a warning pop-up: click Yes.

SOLIDWORKS Standard View Orientation warning message

You now have successfully changed the views on your part. If you do not like what you have done you can always use the Reset Standard Views to go back to the default view the part came with.

Reset Standard Views command

The post Changing the SOLIDWORKS Standard View Orientation appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Jamie Hill, CSWP at July 18, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The New Process

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll kick it off with “Sears Roebuck M&Ms” from Ava Luna before cranking it up Animal Collective, Antwon, Wampire, Beach Fossils, and others before finishing off with “Playing with Fire” from Nick Leng. Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/79rVqKxq45eanFe6iZeBbt" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The New Process appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 18, 2017 11:57 AM

Launch Your Product Idea in a Weekend With This Entrepreneur Training Bundle (95% Off)

When it comes to side projects, hours become days, days become weeks, and weeks can often become months or years. But what if getting a minimum viable product created could happen on a Saturday…assuming you aren’t building a flying car?

Many successful entrepreneurs have been touting the benefits of the 1-Day MVP—a one-day, all-out sprint to go from fresh idea to app or hardware prototype. Sure, some projects may take a little more energy and time than others, but having the process and infrastructure in place to successfully glide ideas along is what counts the most.

Which is exactly the premise behind the 1-Day MVP 2.0 online training course; one of seven courses bundled in Evan Kimbrell’s Business Launching Bundle.

From validating ideas to outsourcing menial tasks leading up to launch, the bundle covers just about everything you need to get that side project up and out the door. And for just the next 3 days, SolidSmack readers can save 95% off the retail price of $1,213 — that’s just $49 for the entire bundle.

Evan Kimbrell’s Business Launching Bundle

From Concept to Launch: Score an Amazing Mentor in This Silicon Valley Exec & Get 104 Hours of Guidance for Launching Your Business

Included Courses:

  • Intro to Entrepreneurship
  • Outsource Your Idea
  • Idea Validation
  • How to Come Up With Killer Business Ideas
  • 1-Day MVP 2.0: Go From Idea to Minimum Viable Product in One Day
  • Master Outsourcing
  • The Complete Guide to Running a Mobile App Development Biz

PURCHASE HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale!

Find more deals here:
StackSocial Amazon

The post Launch Your Product Idea in a Weekend With This Entrepreneur Training Bundle (95% Off) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 18, 2017 11:44 AM

How to Make A Cosplay Spider-Man Costume On A Budget

Spider-Man, Spider-Man, does the things his costume can. Why else would he wear red-and-blue tights out in public? The Spider-Man costume is the most iconic ever.

Ever since his first appearance in 1962, Peter Parker and his other incarnations have donned countless suits to hide their identities from their enemies. But even with the changes to the classic costume, certain distinguishing characteristics have remained. The wide eyes. The webbing pattern. The iconic webshooters. At least one of these things manages to make its way in some form or another into a Spider-Man costume.

In lieu of his new high-tech suit in Spider-Man: Homecoming (a movie which you should totally watch), Sony Pictures and Goodwill teamed up to give six YouTubers a chance at making their own Spider-Man costume. The Spidey suits were featured in a contest to promote the film and the designs were a mix of all sorts of ideas and materials.

Let’s take a look at our fav, the one created by Elizabeth Rage, a crafter and cosplayer at AWE.me‘s DIY Cosplay Shop.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Oyn1S3ium8Q?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Taking inspiration from Spider-Women Gwen Stacey’s costume and incorporating it into the traditional red-and-blue color scheme, Elizabeth plans out the makings of a costume that is both modern while harkening back to Spider-Man’s roots.

cosplay spider-man costume

After drawing the initial vertical webbing on red cloth, she then fits the rest of the costume with blue stretch velvet turned on the opposite side and covers it in hexagonal mesh. The hexagonal mesh comes in handy, creating its own shadows to make any material look like it belongs on a superhero costume.

spider-man costume

But in case you don’t have any mesh on hand, or want to keep with the whole “hero on a budget” feel, you can also stamp hexagons onto your costume by using a silicone pot holder and acrylic paint. The paint should be a darker shade of the cloth you want to print it on, to give the illusion your costume is way cooler than it actually is.

spider-man costume

Now for something completely different: a hoodie! Like the Spider-Gwen costume, Elizabeth decides to add a hood into her cosplay by cutting a midriff in a red hoodie and sketching one of countless spider logos onto the front.

spider-man costume

Now all she needs to do is add a pair of fingerless gloves and complete the horizontal webbing on her costume!

Possibly the most difficult thing about cosplaying or drawing Spider-Man is the amount of webbing covering him. It may have been easier back in the day, but Stan Lee obviously never had the foresight to see that his dime-store comic book hero would one day be the face of an entire company. Needless to say, Elizabeth makes quick work of the rainbow-shaped webbing by working from the bottom with a Sharpie and spreading it throughout the entire costume.

Though she doesn’t show it on camera, Elizabeth adds more texture to the webbing by applying a mixture of puff paint and liquid latex. The latex serves to make the paint more stretchable so that it won’t flake off after hours of swinging around the city.

spider-man costume

Don’t forget to wear a pair of classic red Chuck Taylors and voila, you are now ready to save New York… or look like you can save New York. The finished costumes were featured by Sony and judged by none other than the newest Spider-Man, Tom Holland, himself.

You can see what he thought about the costumes here, and if you want to see more of Elizabeth and her cosplays, check out the rest of AWE.me’s DIY Cosplay Shop’s videos.

The post How to Make A Cosplay Spider-Man Costume On A Budget appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 18, 2017 11:30 AM

July 17, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Did Your Cut List Folder in Your Design Tree Go Missing?

Where is Your Cut List Folder?

Here in tech support, we were in communication with a worried customer that thought his master weldment model (which accounted for most of his business) had become corrupted. His highly valued cut list went missing from the Design Tree. The good news is that this list wasn’t missing, it was actually just hidden from the Design Tree.

In the image below, you can clearly see that we are working in a weldment part environment because of the weldment feature in the Design Tree. Hence, we should have a cut list folder:

cut listIf you go to System Options > FeatureManager > in the Hide/Show Tree Items section, you can hide, show and set tree items to show automatically. To get your folder back, you need to set the Solid Bodies folder to Automatic. The Solid Bodies folder converts to a cut list folder when working in a weldment/sheet metal part environment.

There you have it, folks. Another happy customer and another saved business, all thanks to SOLIDWORKS.

Author: Erick Vega, Technical Support at GoEngineer

Author information

GoEngineer
GoEngineer delivers software, technology and expertise that enable companies to unlock design innovation and deliver better products faster. With more than 30 years experience and thousands of customers in high tech, medical, machine design, energy and other industries, GoEngineer provides best-in-class design solutions from SOLIDWORKS, Stratasys, CAMWorks, Altium and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM). For more information, visit goengineer.com.

The post Did Your Cut List Folder in Your Design Tree Go Missing? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GoEngineer at July 17, 2017 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

Wacom Announces New Additions to Their Popular Cintiq Pro Lineup

Despite constant updates to the iPad Pro and Microsoft Surface tablets to make them more appealing to professionals, Wacom has managed to remain the tool of choice for serious concept designers that need to tap into the power of more robust laptops and workstations.

But out of the entire family of Wacom tablets, it’s the company’s Cintiq Pro family of tablet displays that have consistently remained the gold standard. And with the announcement of an update to their Cintiq Pro collection, the company is aiming to break through the noise yet again with new levels of performance and precision.

Set to launch in early 2018, the Cintiq Pro 24 and Cintiq Pro 32 models (which measure in at 24 inches and 32 inches, respectively) are a hefty step up from their existing 13-inch and 16-inch Pro models and will both feature 4K edge-to-edge displays with ‘maximum color accuracy’ and a billion colors.

Like the current lineup of Wacom Pro tablets, the displays will incorporate the company’s Pro Pen 2 technology for virtually zero lag time and pressure-sensitive accuracy. Here, Wacom Cintiq Senior Director, Michael Thompson, discusses the similar Cintiq Pro 13 & 16 models when they launched last fall:

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1_OTns2gFRg?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

With the Pro 24 coming in at $2,000 and the larger Pro 32 at $3,300 when they launch next year, the displays are certainly marketed towards actual professionals that invest in high-quality tools. Thankfully, this is a market that Wacom should feel perfectly comfortable in.

Stay updated over at Wacom.

The post Wacom Announces New Additions to Their Popular Cintiq Pro Lineup appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at July 17, 2017 12:02 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

My SOLIDWORKS ProgramData Folder is not Visible?

Many of the SOLIDWORKS File Locations point to folders in C:\ProgramData\SOLIDWORKS.  This includes default items like Templates, Custom Material Databases, Weldment Profiles, Design Libraries, etc. You may have noticed that browsing to this folder is not always visible.  By default, Windows keeps SOLIDWORKS ProgramData (C:\ProgramData) hidden.  There are two ways to browse to this location.

Browse directly to C:\ProgramData in the Address Bar

When you have Windows Explorer open for browsing, type C:\ProgramData directly into the address bar.

FIGURE 1: SOLIDWORKS Browse to ProgramData

Change Windows Folder Options to Show Hidden Folders

You can also show all hidden files and folders.  This will now show the ProgramData folder in a lighter grey colour (indicating it is a hidden folder).

In Windows 7, hold the Alt key to see the file menus.  Then select Tools > Folder Options.

FIGURE 2: Windows 7 Folder Options

In Windows 10, select View > Options > Change folder and search options.

FIGURE 3: Windows 10 Folder Options

Once in the Folder Options dialog, select the View tab then enable ‘Show hidden files, folder, and drives’.

FIGURE 4: Windows Folder Options

SOLIDWORKS ProgramData

FIGURE 5: ProgramData folder now visible

The post My SOLIDWORKS ProgramData Folder is not Visible? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at July 17, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Monday List 29.17 | What We’re Reading This Week

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

What to Remember Before Watching the ‘Game of Thrones’ Season 7 Premiere
To prepare for Season 7, we’re reviewing and reassessing the first six seasons of the show, with the benefit of hindsight.

Arks of the Apocalypse
All around the world, scientists are building repositories of everything from seeds to ice to mammal milk — racing cto preserve a natural order that is fast disappearing.

Power Trip
Drugs and the pharmacology of control.

Why Amazon is eating the world
Amazon’s lead will only grow over the coming decade, and I don’t think there is much that any other retailer can do to stop it.

What really defines a sparkle as “Glitter”?
We’ll delve into the mysterious topic of Glitter particle sizes and what really defines a sparkle as “Glitter.”

Cold as Ice: How Downtown Chicago Keeps Cool
Chicago has ice in its veins.

The post The Monday List 29.17 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 17, 2017 11:36 AM

July 16, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Registering a DLL in SOLIDWORKS

Have you ever tried to perform an action in SOLIDWORKS and suddenly receive an error similar to this one?

DLL error message in SOLIDWORKS

Have no fear! This error message likely appeared because the DLL dependency has either been broken, overwritten, or upgraded to a newer version.

A DLL is a dynamic link library file format, and is responsible for much of the functionality in SOLIDWORKS. These files contain specific codes for different modules in SOLIDWORKS and are necessary to complete certain tasks.

All that you will need to do is manually register the DLL file by using the Command Prompt. This is a quick and easy fix, which will get you back up and running in SOLIDWORKS in no time!

To manually register a DLL, follow these steps:

  1. Hit the Windows Start button
  2. Search your programs and files for “cmd”
  3. Right-click on “cmd” (Command Prompt) and select “Run as administrator”
  4. Open Windows Explorer and browse for the location of the DLL file that you are looking to register
  5. In the Command Prompt, type in regsvr32, hit space once, and then drag the DLL file from Windows Explorer into the Command Prompt window

An example of registering the DLL from the error window above will look like this:

The text from the above Command Prompt window is as follows:

regsvr32 “C:\Program Files\Common Files\SOLIDWORKS Shared\SLDSHELLUTILS11u.dll”

And that’s all there is to it! The previously unregistered DLL file will now be registered and you can move on with your design work.

Author information

CADimensions
We are an authorized SOLIDWORKS and Stratasys reseller with certified training & support centers located in New York and Pennsylvania, USA. We are 100% focused on living a CADLIFE and have our vendor's unconditional endorsement in the sales and support of their products.

The post Registering a DLL in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CADimensions at July 16, 2017 03:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS PDM STANDARD: Configuring the Vault

In this article, we will review the main components, of the SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration tool. Understanding the use of this tool is important, in order to manage and Configure SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard Vault effectively.

Before configuring a SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault, the SOLIDWORKS PDM Server and at least one Client, must first be installed. Installing one client on the PDM server, can be useful, when troubleshooting communication issues, as this removes the network as a possible source.

The SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration tool is installed on every client computer. This article assumes that you have already created a Vault and know how access the PDM Admin tool. If you do not, please first refer to my article titled, SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard: Creating a New Vault.

Local Settings is located at the bottom of PDM Admin window can be accessed without logging into a Vault. Local Settings contains three components

  • Microsoft Group Policies editor, can be launched from Local Settings. The SOLIDWORKS PDM Installation Guide, provides  information about the available policies.
  • The Log File, is useful in determining issues with the the client computer, such as communication issues to the server.
  • Settings, determine if Automatic Login will be used, the Zip Program to be used by PDM and search paths for External References.

The remainder of what will discussing in this article, requires that a user with the appropriate permissions, logs into a Vault. When PDM is installed, a default Admin user is created.

The Vault consists of a number of components, that is referred to as Nodes. In this article, we will focus the core Nodes that are required for a properly operating Vault.

 

The first Node that I will look at, is the Variables Node. Variables are the containers for information, that is stored within a Vault database. Variables are used extensively in PDM, so understanding their use is important. Some variables, are generated internally, for example Revisions or Users, while other are created manually by a PDM administrator. Variables can be linked to file, so that information can be shared between the Vault database and a file.

The next Node I will at is the Card Node. To use this Node, a Local Vault View must first be created. This can be done by right-clicking on the Vault and selecting ‘Create local view…’.

Please refer to my article titled, SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard: Creating the Local Vault View for further instructions on how to create a Local Vault View.

Cards are used to input information to the Vault’s Database. There are cards for Files, Folders and for conducting Searches.

  • File Cards, define what file specific input is required form a user, what information is being read from PDM (revision) and what information is being extracted from a file (SOLIDWORKS Properties). The data card can also push information into a file. This information is stored within Variables, which are linked to a Card.
  • Folder Cards contain information that is generic to all files, within that folder. Information in the Folder Card, can be pushed to the File Card. Folder cards also use Variables.
  • Search Cards allow a user to search for information, input through File Cards as well as system information such as File Name. Searches can use variables as a search criteria.

The next Node is Revisions. In this Node we define what are Revision scheme will look like. The layout of the Revision scheme ca be manually enter and/or created from pull-downs. Revisions are normally  assigned and incremented, through a Workflow.

The Workflow Node is where define the progress of a file, from its inception to its terminus. In a Workflow we define the stages of a design cycle. These stages are referred to as States. The State controls who can access a file, what level of access they have (Read or Read/Write), as well as number of other actions, such as writing to Variable.

States are connected by Transition actions. Progress through a Transaction, is controlled by the PDM Administrator. Actions, such as Incrementing the Revision of a File, Send Mail and writing to a Variable, can also be performed by the Transition

The User’s Node is where we add our users to the Vault and where we can assign passwords, permissions and assign Users to Groups.

Groups allow you to to control how users interact with the Vault, as a Group, instead of individual Users. Grouping users can simplify creating a vault when there are many users.  As with the User’s Node, you can assign permissions to the Group.

This article was intended as an overview of the main functions, of the SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard Administration tool. To be effective in creating and managing a vault, I would strongly recommend taking training, from your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM STANDARD: Configuring the Vault appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at July 16, 2017 12:00 PM

July 15, 2017

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 28.17

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee, and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top ten stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

TAC.TILES is a DJ-like Physical Interface for 3D Modeling

The 15-module physical control set is an experiment is creating 3D models using different knobs, sliders and even a depth sensing theremin-like module.

Thngs.co is A Beautiful Library of Awesome Things

Be still my beating heart. This site is beautiful. Thngs.co is a website dedicated to preserving a memory of every imaginable thing we have produced thus far. I don’t believe I’ve ever liked THINGS so much. It’s a feast for the eyes you and future generations are sure to appreciate.

This Wide-Format Sketchbook Fits Nicely Under Your Keyboard

Designed specifically as a notebook that can be used comfortably for digital designers and engineers, the Panobook is designed to be used easily either to the top, bottom, or side of a standard keyboard. While the wide landscape format is ideal for everything from UX workflows to Gantt Charts, the tall orientation creates an ideal setup for breaking down modeling steps or creating lists.

The World’s Largest Super Soaker Will Win Any Squirt Gun Fight

For his latest YouTube stunt, Rober, who has a Master’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering and spent 7 of his 9 years at NASA working on the Curiosity Rover, created what can only be described as the ultimate squirt gun to end all squirt gun fights: The World’s Largest Super Soaker.

Assemble and Play This Lasercut Wood Hurdy-Gurdy Like a Fancy, Medieval Prince

While most of the models are cool in their own right, it’s that Hurdy-Gurdy in particular that really catches your eye.

A Smart Electric Skateboard with Built-in A.I. and ABS Braking

There’s something to be said for ditching your problems in the persistence skatebaording imbues and the sense of safety a helmet doesn’t provide.

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 28.17 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 15, 2017 03:17 PM

World’s Smallest EDC Multi-Tool – So Small You Could Fit It in Your Nostril

Don’t you just hate it when your keys jangle in your pocket? Jingle-jangle-jingle, here comes Bob. I don’t know about you, but I don’t want to let complete strangers know I have more keys than a night-shift janitor. Jingle… jangle.

Who knew that after years of restless jangling, the simple solution is a spring to keep your keys in place? CopperMill apparently did, and the San Francisco based design company is bringing thier brilliantly small, yet simply innovative EDC design to Kickstarter.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="360" id="video-87990-1" preload="metadata" width="640"><source src="https://www.solidsmack.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/keyanchor-multi-tool.mp4?_=1" type="video/mp4">https://www.solidsmack.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/keyanchor-multi-tool.mp4</video>

Called the Keyanchor, this one gram, grade-5, titanium multi-tool features no moving parts whatsoever. Composed of a keyring, a spring, and a wee anchor-shaped tool, it’s a multi-tool that could be a choking hazard for small children, but something MacGyver would want on his person at all times.

EDC multi-tool

The Keyanchor traps your keys using a removable spring design, restricting movement and any noise they produce. While this may make your keys feel like they’re silently being suffocated against each other, having a quiet step and organized pocket more than makes up for the death of a few inanimate objects.

But if you thought that’s all there is to the Keyanchor, think again. To add to its repertoire of skill-solving with simple solutions, the little anchor you thought was just a nifty, little keychain serves as a multi-purpose tool for a variety of situations.

EDC multi-tool

It opens bottles. It opens boxes. It doubles as a screwdriver and can even unearth those lovely bits of grime stuck beneath your fingernails – a win for hygiene, yay. While is doesn’t have features found in your everyday pocket knife, the Keyanchor is much smaller and far less conspicuous.

EDC multi-tool

There are two versions–four or eight key. The project was recently announced on Kickstarter and has until the 10th of August 2017 to be fully funded. It starts at $24 USD, but they have a $10 option for those who would prefer to have the design file to make or customize themselves. So if you want to reserve the jangling for the Christmas season and don’t want to leave your beers unopened (who does?), then head on over to the Keyanchor’s Kickstarter page to find out more.

The post World’s Smallest EDC Multi-Tool – So Small You Could Fit It in Your Nostril appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 15, 2017 12:38 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard: Creating a New Vault

After installing SOLIDWORKS PDM server and Client, you can now create your SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard Vault, through the SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration tool. The method I find fastest, to access the PDM Administration tool, is to type Admin, in the Windows Start menu and then clicking on the resulting link.

Once in the SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration tool, you first need to identify the server where SQL Express was installed. This is done by right-clicking on SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration and selecting Add Server.

You will then be prompted to enter the server name and TCP port, that will be used to allow the PDM components to communicate. The default value is 3030, but you can a specify different port.

You should ensure that whichever port you use, is open on both the Server, and Client.

 

Many of the issues encountered when setting up a vault, are a result of blocked ports. Firewalls, as well as other security software, are often responsible for these ports being blocked.

Once the connection has bee established, you will be prompted to enter the user name and password for the PDM Server.

Once the server has been identified, you can create the PDM vault. This is done by right clicking on the Server and selecting Create New Vault.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard Vault

After clicking on Next, to proceed past the Welcome screen, you will be prompted to provide a Name for your new vault and and optionally, a Description of the vault.

Next, specify the location of the PDM Archive Server. 

On the next Screen, you identify the SQL Database Server.

After identifying the database, you may need to enter the database’s Username and Password

You will next need to point to the License Server, that will be attached your SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard license. This should have installed when you installed the PDM Server. If not you will need to install this first. There is a separate serial number, for SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard. If you do not have this, contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller (VAR). Your VAR may also need to activate your SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard serial number.

Once the License Server has been connected, you will be asked to identify the Language to be used by the Vault and the Date Format.

When creating a new Vault, you can choose to use the same Admin password, you chose when you installed PDM Standard, or you can choose a new password.

The next screen allows you to configure the new Vault. You can import a previous Vault, Vaults that are pre-configured by SOLIDWORKS or an EMPTY Vault. Pre-configured Vaults can be useful when you first start using PDM Standard. The Empty Vault is for more experienced users, that want to create a customized vault.

The final screen allows you to Review your choices and complete the creation of the vault.

You will now see the newly created Vault, in SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard: Creating a New Vault appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at July 15, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Jump Jet Ruckus

You had to press the pedals at the same time to enable the jump jets. No, not the ones by your hand. The ones by your knees. If you grew up doing hip flexors you had an advantage. That, combined with any firepower you could scavenge would get you closer to these links.

Stuart Lippincott – He’s a graphic artist and sound designer. These are his everyday projects filled with surreal bits of space, scene and odd structure. Best listening to his music whilst perusing.

Guggenheim museums online – They’ve put their collection online for all to view. Not quite the Google Arts & Culture site with hi-res zoom, but nonetheless impressive.

Time Paintings – Artist Fong Qi Wei does some interesting photography. These are layers of the day, single location shot and layered atop the other. And here it is in motion.

Nima – Ross Tran of Ross Draws is finally putting out his first book focused around his Nima character developed over the past four years. Funded on Kickstarter now.

Sculpting Link – SculptuerrGeek Chris Vierra shows you the process of sculpting Legend of Zelda’s Link in this 10 minute video, with Majora’s Mask, Song of Healing- Koji Kondo of course.

Avocado Stone Faces – This has me captivated. Sculpting the seed of an avocado. The amazing work of Jan Campbell carved in the tiny pit of the delicious fruit.

Bellbottoms – Just saw Baby Driver this week. Good flick. One of the best soundtracks I’ve heard in a long while. This is the first song in the movie.

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The post Friday Smackdown: Jump Jet Ruckus appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 15, 2017 03:54 AM

July 14, 2017

SolidSmack

Yes, Mix Pool Chlorine and Brake Fluid For a Plume of Fire

The unspoken law of the universe dictates that if an activity is dangerous, someone will try it. Human nature, right? When someone puts boundaries on what you can or cannot do, curiosity says, “question that, fool!” From ‘Do not feed the animals’ to igniting hairspray with a lighter, nothing is too frightening (or too outlandish) to defy.

Grant Thompson, better known as “The King of Random”, conducts weekly experiments on his YouTube channel that do the exact opposite of the warnings on the back of the box. With a passion for science and blowing things up, Grant manages to create content that is informative, forehead slapping and absolutely entertaining.

Pool Chlorine + Brake Fluid = FIRE

As usual, Grant picks a random request from the comments section of his past YouTube videos and turns it into a 5-10 minute feature. In this particular video, he explores the reaction made by mixing everyday pool chlorine with car brake fluid.

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To start, Grant buys a 73% concentrate of pool chlorine and some DOT 3 brake fluid. The fluid contains a mix of glycol ethers which, when combined with calcium hypochlorite (or chlorine), can lead to some interesting results.

That’s what I’m talking about. After filling the bottom of a glass with half an inch of chlorine, he mixes it with the brake fluid. While there seems to be nothing going on for the first minute or so, the mixture suddenly combusts with an audible “POP!” and sends a pillar of flame sky high. Good for celebrating the Fourth of July, a birthday, a new haircut or your cat getting rid of that hairball.

Upon closer inspection, Grant explains the glycol ethers present in the brake fluid are flammable but are separated by oxygen molecules, making them harder to ignite and safe to use on your brakes.

This changes once the fluid is mixed with chlorine. By breaking down the glycol ethers into smaller aldehydes, they start to react with the oxygen and the pool chlorine and combust due to the heat produced. It takes some time for the ethers to break down (which explains the lack of an immediate flame), but soon the area is set ablaze and littered with bits of solidified brake fluid ash.

Whereas some people would be fumbling for a fire extinguisher, Grant instead devises two more experiments: one mixture of chlorine and brake fluid in open air, and another in a plastic bottle.

After throwing caution to the wind and mixing the volatile components with his finger, the mixture goes up in flame at a faster time of 54 seconds. Grant fails to explain this, but the abundance of oxygen in the air could possibly be the cause of this preemptive combustion.

But this pales in comparison to the mixture in the plastic bottle. Though it takes the same amount of time as the glass experiment, the flame that sprouts out from the nozzle is far more violent and rockets up to roof height. Most likely due to the small opening, the flame becomes more concentrated and ends up melting its container.

These components may be common, but the reaction they produce is just out of this world! Even though Grant does this at home, you should definitely take the necessary precaution and, yeah, have a few fire extinguishers nearby. While I don’t condone any act that leads to bodily harm, you can find Grant Thompson’s project PDFs, as well as more of his videos, over on his webpage.

The post Yes, Mix Pool Chlorine and Brake Fluid For a Plume of Fire appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 14, 2017 09:43 PM

App Smack 28.17: Enlight Photofox, TextGrabber, Verst Mobile, Knots 3D and More…

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@www.solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Enlight Photofox (iOS — Free)

With Photofox photo editor, you’ll turn the ideas in your head into brilliant art from your phone, without the price tag of complicated desktop software. Unleash your creativity and start transforming photos into artistic masterpieces

TextGrabber (iOS – $4.99)

ABBYY TextGrabber easily and quickly digitizes fragments of printed text, reads QR codes and turnes the recognized result into actions: call, write, translate into 100+ languages, search in the Internet or on maps, create events on the calendar, edit, voice and share in any convenient way.

Verst Mobile (iOS — Free)

Verst is the powerful website and blog platform with everything you need to build an incredible brand. Design a beautiful site, publish compelling content, earn subscription revenue, and grow your email list with built-in optimization and analytics tools.

Any.do Calendar (Android — Free)

Over 15 Million people rely on Any.do to keep life under control and get things done. With to do list, calendar, reminders, lists and notes in one app, you’d be able to accomplish more than ever before.

Knots 3D (Android — $1.99)

Used by arborists, fishermen, firefighters, climbers, military and boy scouts the world over, Knots 3D will quickly teach you how to tie even the most difficult knot. With more than 120 knots, Knots 3D will be your go-to reference! Grab some rope and have fun!

Telegram (Android — Free)

Built to deliver your messages in the minimum bytes possible, Telegram is the most reliable messaging system ever made. It works even on the weakest mobile connections.

The post App Smack 28.17: Enlight Photofox, TextGrabber, Verst Mobile, Knots 3D and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 14, 2017 12:50 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Skeleton Part [VIDEO]

Do your sub-assemblies need to know where the other sub-assemblies are? Do they need to know where they fit in to the greater plan? Well, there is a process by which you can know these things without the need to open your top-level assembly every time. This process involves the use of A SOLIDWORKS Skeleton Part.

No, not femurs and skulls. I’m talking about a quick reference part modeled up in SOLIDWORKS used in each sub-assembly. Let me show you an example. Let’s say I start out with a simple design for an assembly line:

A SOLIDWORKS Skeleton Part Layout

A Simple 3-Station Assembly Line

In terms of an assembly structure, I would likely have a top-level assembly for the entire line, then a sub-assembly for Station 1, another for Station 2, and another for station 3. Perhaps another for the conveyor. If I open just Station 1’s sub-assembly, I typically have no idea where Station 2 is, so I don’t know if that access panel on the right side of Station 1 is going to do any good with Station 2 in my way unless I open the top-level assembly. It can be quite easy to lose sight of the bigger picture sometimes.

A solution to this is to create a part that has this plan view in it as a sketch. Also, having Reference Geometry such as planes can aid in applying mates. This SOLIDWORKS Skeleton Part is inserted as the first component into each assembly (top-level and each station’s sub-assembly). This allows me to see where the other stations are without loading the top-level assembly. Allow me to demonstrate in this video:

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In the video, I demonstrate a simple use of the Skeleton Part. I do not demonstrate that you can have in-context relations applied to the Skeleton Part so that you can drive things such as the size of your table using the Skeleton Part. Doing so is only recommended with caution as it can be quite easy to inadvertently setup circular references.

The post SOLIDWORKS Skeleton Part [VIDEO] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Jim Peltier, CSWE at July 14, 2017 12:00 PM

July 13, 2017

SolidSmack

Top 3 Onshape Updates: Fill, Enclose, Loft Guides + End Conditions

This month, Onshape has a few more features to whet your appetite than last month. And, it looks like were back to seeing incremental additions to create favorable conditions for surfacing. It was hard to pick the top three this time with surface updates, hole feature updates, section and drawing improvements, and a new FeatureScript addition that’s sure to excite those who want more control.

You can see the past update history and catch the latest on the Onshape What’s New page.

Here, we pick our ‘Top 3 Onshape Updates’ and provide a quick overview of each. To see our previous picks, visit our New Onshape Features page. Tell us which one you like the best, which need work, or if we picked the completely wrong features!

The Stats:
Total Updates: 10
Total Updates YTD: 79

Top 3 Onshape Updates (07.10.17)

Fill – You can now create a surface defined by a boundary of edges or curves.

Enclose – Create a solid part from an enclosed selection of surfaces or planes.

Loft Guides + End Conditions – You can now use a combination of guides and end conditions in the Loft command. In the past, you had to choose one or the other.

Other updates

Save Section Views and Named Views – With this update comes the ability to save section views as named views in your model. This can be useful if you find yourself consistently creating the same section view.

Hole Feature Improvements – There were many improvements to the Hole feature with this update. Including new standard hole sizes, and the ability to create holes in sheet metal parts.

Section View Improvements – You’ll find a new “Angular” section view type in Onshape Drawings. This option allows you to create section views at an angle. Also added with this update is the ability to change a view’s label.

Copy/Paste in Drawing Context Menu – You can now right-click “Copy” and right-click “Paste” entities in Onshape Drawings. In this past this was limited to keyboard shortcuts.

Weld Symbol Improvements – A few important improvements to Weld symbols were added with this release. This includes live updates to the Weld symbol preview, as well as support for staggered welds.

Ordered Array of FeatureScript Parameters – The foundation has been laid to allow you to make per selection changes to parameters in Onshape while creating a feature. This means you can have different settings for each selection within a dialog.

Performance Improvements – Performance has been improved in several areas including assemblies, drawings, holes and more.

You can see videos that breakdown each new features here. We’ll be keeping a closer eye on what Onshape is releasing with each update, so let us know what features you’re watching for or want to see the most!

Ask questions and talk about Onshape on SmackTalk!  Our new community site!

The post Top 3 Onshape Updates: Fill, Enclose, Loft Guides + End Conditions appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 13, 2017 08:37 PM

A Smart Electric Skateboard with Built-in A.I. and ABS Braking

Spectra Electric Skateboard

As a polite, never rebellious teenager, you probably never wanted to get away from the rest of your family… but when did, you put your angst-ridden, hormonal-imbalanced body to good use by participating in an edifying hobby of your choice, right? Seeking solace through painting or songwriting. Others (like myself) found it through skateboarding.

With the wind in your hair as you go downhill and nothing but gravity to keep you strapped to your board, the adrenaline rush skateboarding provides is an escape and also a challenge, as you repeatedly attempt that fakie 360 flip body varial. There’s something to be said for ditching your problems in the persistence skatebaording imbues and the sense of safety a helmet doesn’t provide.

But… times are changing. Kids just don’t want to indulge in a sport that could easily paralyze them for life. That’s why the people at WALNUTT and Arrow Electronics are looking for a safer alternative.

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SPECTRA, the fruit of all their hard work, is a series of smart electric skateboards allowing you to experience the wonderful world of skateboarding with a lower risk of breaking your neck. How do they do it? Artificial Intelligence.

That’s right. Artificial Intelligence is coming to the skateboard. Controlled by a 3D Posture Control System, the board doesn’t move in any direction you don’t want it to. By applying pressure in your desired direction, SPECTRA adjusts itself to any incline or turn you put it through. According to WALNUTT, the board even learns your body movements and adjusts itself to your riding style, giving you a personalized experience unlike any other rider.

To add to its control system, the SPECTRA boasts some of the safest features you would ever find in a 17-inch length of rolling plastic. Its MagBrakes can shorten your braking distance by 47% and kick in whenever the board detects you’re off-balance or when you hop off. Instead of abruptly stopping and ejecting you like a sentient smart car, the SPECTRA starts slowing down to prevent your face from kissing asphalt.

Even nighttime skating is made easier, thanks to the built-in LED indicators on the front and back. Apart from ensuring you don’t become roadkill, the lights also serve to show how much charge is left in your battery, which can run up to 90 minutes on a single charge at 15.5 miles per hour. That’s not really fast considering a traditional skateboard can outrun a car, but keep in mind that this is a skateboard made for the occasional skater who wants an easier commute–the SPECTRA isn’t made for the likes of Tony Hawk.

That doesn’t mean to say you can’t meet like-minded boarders. With the WALNUTT eBoard Go App, you can share your everyday routes, find shortcuts other people have stumbled onto, and even control your own SPECTRA remotely with your Android phone. God only knows why you would prefer this over operating the board with your own two feet, but if you want to have some fun with your friends while they’re riding it, then the option is there.

There are four models available, but no matter which version you choose, each SPECTRA board is compact, intuitive, and sure to get you home after a long day of school or work, even if the battery runs out. (You’ll want to use it often too, considering the cheapest board starts at $319 USD).

People seem attracted to the idea though. The product has already exceeded its IndieGoGo goal by 1044% with pre-purchase pledges available for each model and a commuter backpack of skateboarding accessories with a delivery of January 2018. If you’re having second thoughts about the future of electric skateboards, head over to WALNUTT’s official webpage and see it for yourself.

The post A Smart Electric Skateboard with Built-in A.I. and ABS Braking appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 13, 2017 03:42 PM

Seven 3D Printing Jobs on the Rise in 2017

3d printing jobs

Though 3D printing was slow to catch on when equipment was expensive and resources were hard to come by, we’re living in a different world now. 3D printing jobs are in demand.

3D Printing Jobs on the Rise

Many companies and private individuals are embracing the convenience and practicality that come with 3D printing. As the demand for services rises, so do the amount of 3D printing jobs in the industry.

1. GENERATING SCIENTIFIC AND MEDICAL MODELS

The medical industry was perhaps one of the first passionate adopters of 3D printing technology. While the primary focus of 3D printing was mostly to create functional models that allowed surgeons to plan strategies for complicated procedures, 3D printing is now becoming just as prevalent for things like custom casts, braces, and prosthetics. We’re still a long way from entirely replacing conventional methods with 3D printed alternatives, but interest in doing so is continuing to rise.

2. PATENT LAW

If your interest in 3D printing overlaps with your interest in law, you can prove to be a valuable asset in court. Since many businesses and startups are utilizing 3D printing to generate products, patent concerns are popping up more frequently. Legal teams need individuals who are familiar with 3D printing technology to determine patent eligibility, as well as whether or not existing 3D printing related patents have been violated.

3. CUSTOM 3D PRINTING SOLUTIONS

Since 3D printing has had a significant impact on new business, a lot of startups are looking to have product mockups or demonstrations made via 3D printing. They use these early first versions to make their pitch to investors. It’s easy to find these entrepreneurs on places like Gumtree, where they’re seeking out people who can help them fully conceptualize their ideas. These are essentially freelance jobs that have the potential to lead to long term work if the startup should receive the necessary funding to expand.

4. CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECTURE

3D printing significantly drives down the costs of the drafting process for many contractors in the construction and architecture industries. When creating designs, these individuals are more likely to turn to 3D printing experts to create models that reflect their visions. They’re able to toy with more concepts before they decide on a final plan. In many instances, 3D printing models are replacing the traditional models, much like model building kits, used by these professionals in the past.

5. ARTISTIC DESIGN

Many entrepreneurs are looking to create 3D printed products, such as wearable tech, that are both stylish and functional. They know what they want a product to do, but not necessarily how they want that product to look. This requires a hefty amount of research and development. Individuals who are great at bringing form to function will easily be able to find positions helping both of those worlds meet.

6. VENDING AT HOBBY CONVENTIONS

Convention culture among hobbyists is strong. Many 3D printing companies are offering their services at anime conventions and video game expos. People often arrive in costume, and they’re looking to commemorate that occasion. Many hobbyists already collect figurines of their favorite characters, and the option to have themselves created as one of those figurines is often too great to pass up. 3D scans and printing to create these figurines has become lucrative in recent times.

These same people are often looking to have props and costume pieces 3D printed to replicate the ones worn by their source character. 3D printers who offer these services rarely run out of work – the commitment of cosplayers can be astounding.

7. 3D PRINTING EDUCATION

Since the industry is expanding, it needs more professionals. More people are interested in learning how to work in different aspects of the 3D printing field, which requires expert level educators. There aren’t a lot of 3D printers with a wealth of experience in the world, as the technology is still relatively new. This has created a significant demand for existing experts to become teachers.

It’s a great time to start or expand a career in 3D printing. There are likely other 3D printing jobs beyond the seven above. Interest is on the rise, and the modern consumer is beginning to realize the full potential 3D printing has to revolutionize the future.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo.

The post Seven 3D Printing Jobs on the Rise in 2017 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at July 13, 2017 02:09 PM

Learn to Code This Summer With This Pay-What-You-Want Bundle

Code. You don’t have to be a computer science hotshot to take the deep dive—heck, some people are up and running with their first project in a matter of weeks. But knowing where and how to enter can be half of the battle.

The recently-launched Learn How to Code 2017 Bundle is the perfect entry point and includes over 156 Hours of premium coding instruction, from Python to Ruby & everything in between.

Consisting of ten courses in total, the ‘Pay What You Want’ bundle covers not just specific code languages, but also how and why you may decide to choose one over another depending on the project at hand.

Pay What You Want: Learn to Code 2017 Bundle

A Price You Pick Gets You 156 Hours of Premium Coding Instruction, From Python to Ruby & Everything In Between

Included Courses:

  • Learn How To Code: Google’s Go Programming Language ($249 Value)
  • The Complete Python Course: Beginner to Advanced! ($195 Value)
  • Learn By Example: Scala ($50 Value)
  • Projects in Programming Languages: Ruby, Python, Java ($150 Value)
  • Learn Angular 2 from Beginner to Advanced ($195 Value)
  • How to Make a Freaking iPhone App: iOS 10 and Swift 3 ($200 Value)
  • The Complete Web Developer Masterclass: Beginner To Advanced ($195 Value)
  • Git Complete Mastery With GitHub: 100% Hands-on Git Guide ($200 Value)
  • Professional Rails Code Along ($40 Value)
  • JavaScript Programming Complete ($99 Value)

PURCHASE HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale!

Find more deals here:
StackSocial Amazon

The post Learn to Code This Summer With This Pay-What-You-Want Bundle appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 13, 2017 12:22 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Locking a SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate

Starting in SOLIDWORKS 2014, you have the ability to lock rotation of concentric mates.  This can help avoid additional mates required if you didn’t want the components to rotate.  Review Chris’ blog post for a quick tutorial of this functionality.

How to quickly tell if a concentric mate rotation has been locked

In order to see if a concentric mate rotation has been locked, simply review the mate icon for the component.  A regular concentric icon will show two concentric circles.  The locked rotation icon will have a solid circle on the inside.  The following images use Breadcrumbs and D-key for easier viewing.

SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate Unlocked Rotation

FIGURE 1: SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate Unlocked Rotation

SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate Locked Rotation

FIGURE 2: SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate Locked Rotation

What if a component is already fully defined?

If a component is already fully defined, trying to lock one of its concentric mates will fail and provide a message that rotation is already locked for all concentric mates.  As you can see in FIGURE 3, the three concentric mates are actually not locked (based on the icon) but it still gives the message.  Due to the concentric mates fully defining the component, locking the rotation will no longer apply.

SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate Rotation is Already Locked

FIGURE 3: SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate Rotation is Already Locked

Lock all free concentric mates in an entire assembly

You also have the ability to lock all free concentric mates in an entire assembly.  Right-click on the overall Mates folder and select ‘Lock Concentric Rotation’.  But again, it will only lock those that are applied to under defined components that can spin freely.

SOLIDWORKS Lock All Concentric Mates

FIGURE 4: SOLIDWORKS Lock All Concentric Mates

SOLIDWORKS Locks only Free Concentric Mates

FIGURE 5: SOLIDWORKS Locks only Free Concentric Mates

The post Locking a SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at July 13, 2017 12:00 PM

July 12, 2017

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: 3D Printed LED Ring Lamp [Ring O’ Fire!]

I know if you could–if you had two rings of light that fit under each arm–you would run down the hall screaming, “I will bake all the muffins with my light orbs!” And when someone points out they’re rings and not orbs, you will raise your arms and blast them with magnificent halos of bright LED light.

If you just want to sit those rings of light on your desk though, Duncan Smith has you covered. Ducan has a beautiful LED Ring Lamp design that is just the perfect project if you’ve ever wanted to dive into light design or use those nifty flexible LED light strips.

He suggests 3D printing the base and ring on its side with a 15-20% infill and 0.2mm layer height (filament not too important). He finished the prints with 120 and 320 grit sandpaper, primed, painted and applied a clear-coat before banding the outside of the ring with wood veneer. He used the economically priced Tingkam Flexible LED Lights which come with a power connector and remote control, adhering it to the inside of the ring. About the only thing I would add is a cloudy Plexiglas cover for the light, just to give it a more finished appearance.

Altogether a fun and easy build you could be assembling by the weekend. You can download the model files on MyMiniFactory and view the assembly instructions on his website. (Bonus! Check out Duncan’s Teardrop lamp with an awesome concrete base!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

The post Model of the Week: 3D Printed LED Ring Lamp [Ring O’ Fire!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 12, 2017 09:47 PM

Assemble and Play This Lasercut Wood Hurdy-Gurdy Like a Fancy, Medieval Prince

Don’t you love the feeling of creating something? A digital model, a sculpture, starting the engine on that project car, drawing on the wall with your child… ahhh. Crafting objects with our bare hands rewards us with the satisfaction that we’ve contributed something unique to the world.

But for those with less than the creative capabilities of Picasso left ear lobe, there are pre-made models. All you have to do is follow the instructions on the ol’ box!

To add to its ever-increasing number of wooden models, UGEARS is Kickstarting new additions to its Mechanical Town series. New models feature a tram line, rail manipulator, and a robot factory, a couple of smaller miniature models for adults called U-Fidgets-Tribiks, child-friendly UGEARS coloring 3D models,  a Date Navigator, and, the campaign feature, an actual working Hurdy-Gurdy.

While most of the models are cool in their own right, it’s that Hurdy-Gurdy in particular that really catches your eye.

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So what is a Hurdy-Gurdy?

It is a stringed instrument that produces that beautiful noise people call “music” when its keys are pressed and its hand crank is turned. With its pre-Renaissance origins, the Hurdy-Gurdy plays much like a violin if the bow was replaced with a more mechanical component. You can also slap it to produce a nice beat, as seen in the video above.

By assembling the smaller components to make the larger body, hand crank, and tuning pegs, you add more of your personality into this Hurdy-Gurdy than any guitar you could buy at a store. Without the use of glue or any adhesive, UGEARS has managed to incorporate its laser cut plywood joints into a modern design of an instrument older than your grandfather’s musical tastes.

This modern design doesn’t deter the musical quality of the instrument one bit. Though it might take more time to make than your average jigsaw puzzle (it does say that the assembly is supposed to provide “hours of pleasure and fun”), UGEARS’ Hurdy-Gurdy plays just like your everyday medieval festival instrument.

The tuning pegs and crank feature a gear reduction mechanism that allows for finer sound tuning, while the six keys are outfitted with rubber bands and smaller cranks in the keybox for more responsive and comfortable play. Even the strings can be adjusted on the bridge, just like a normal stringed instrument!

As for sound production, this particular Hurdy-Gurdy comes with six keys corresponding to six notes, with a seventh note being produced when none of the keys are pressed. But even if you have the musical chops of a deaf man (which isn’t an excuse, since, you know, BEETHOVEN), a handy note tablature comes with the model to teach you the basics of the Hurdy-Gurdy.

So if you have the money, time, and patience to both craft and play your own musical instrument, then head on over to Kickstarter where you can find out more about the Hurdy-Gurdy as well as the other upcoming products by UGEARS. Among all the other models available, you can snag a Hurdy-Gurdy for $59 and options abound for multiple models with delivery on all expected for October 2017.

The post Assemble and Play This Lasercut Wood Hurdy-Gurdy Like a Fancy, Medieval Prince appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 12, 2017 08:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Use Your Own Materials in SOLIDWORKS Simulation

Virtually testing designs is an integral part of the design and innovation process. With a 3D model in SOLIDWORKS it’s easy to find out how strong or durable your design is using Simulation. But for a Simulation to be accurate, the  virtual test needs to reflect its real world, physical counter part. This is why the material properties is the foundation of a Simulation’s accuracy. When setting up a Simulation it’s crucial to use the right material properties to ensure the results are as accurate as possible. However, when  scrolling through the predefined library of 260 materials you might not find what you’re looking for. Here’s how to use your own, custom material in SOLIDWORKS Simulation.

The biggest difference between the material library in SOLIDWORKS CAD and in SOLIDWORKS Simulation is the color code. In the side by side comparison below you’ll notice that they are identical except for properties highlighted in red and blue in Simulation. This is your way of knowing which properties you’ll need to know. Red is absolutely required, blue might be required.


The example shown here is for a linear static simulation. The colors, or required material properties, is unique to each study type.

So how do you go about modifying the default material properties or even add your own completely custom material? You need to make sure you are in the custom material database at the very bottom of the material library. If you are going to be creating your own material that is similar to one already defined in the default library it’s a good idea to start by copying and pasting one from the default library to your custom library. If you wanted to start from scratch just right click on the folder and click new material. Remember to make sure to follow the format of red is required when adding your own materials.

Author information

Stephen Petrock
Since 1998, TriMech has helped our clients design better products by partnering with them and offering, not only CAD, CAE, PDM, FEA, CAM software products, but also by engineering solutions involving full-time and temporary staffing, contract design, analysis and drafting services, rapid prototyping, custom programming and implementation services. TriMech is a value-added reseller of SOLIDWORKS and Stratasys 3D Printers in the Mid-Atlantic and South-East including New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana.

The post Use Your Own Materials in SOLIDWORKS Simulation appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Stephen Petrock at July 12, 2017 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

How To Improve Your Performance for Large Assembly Design

Sponsored By
Siemens PLM

“Large Assemblies” can be difficult to define. For some it’s a 100 part assembly, for others it’s 1000 parts, and still others it can be 10,000 parts and gigabytes of data. No matter the number of parts or complexity, at some point we need to address large assembly design performance, whether it’s through the software, the hardware or both.

Focusing on the software side, we can make quick changes to help improve the performance of your large assembly design. How do you put it into action? There are five techniques that will have you seeing results right away.

1. Simplify Your Components

It’s easy to say, but perhaps more difficult to consider how to approach this idea. You’ve probably had some ideas about how to simplify a model either out of interest or necessity. There are a few things to consider whether it’s the amount of detail, what’s needed for analysis, or simply what your computer system can handle. A few ways to prepare for these types of scenarios is identifying where hardware can be patterned and culled from top-level assemblies, creating simplified representations of some components where high level of details are not needed or reducing the amount of patterned features, which reduce the number of edges and curves requiring more compute power to process.

2. Optimize Your Display

We’re not talking about your computer monitor here. We’re talking about the display of parts and using display configurations to control and optimize your assemblies. Think of it as having an on/off switch for different parts of your assembly. Maybe you just want to display the external surfaces. Maybe you just want to show the internal components. Maybe you just need to work on one area of a large assembly. Configurations can help you show exactly what you want to show. Along with this, you can control the visual state of your model viewport and increase performance by turning off reflections, shadows, and view transitions or adjusting sharpness and using culling or a shaded (without edges) view to speed up the assembly display.

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3. Improve Your Model

Well, that sounds pretty obvious, doesn’t it. Improve your model – just improve it. So, what does that mean really? It sounds so broad because there are a lot of thing you can do to improve your model from the sketches to the modeling. Some things are going to use more computer resources than others – assembly features, interpart relations, large multibody parts – these can all affect the performance of the model. Approach this technique by insuring there are no broken links between parts, use synchronous part relations instead of interpart relations and reduce the use of multibodies to smaller assemblies or purchase parts where only the detail of multiple parts may be required.

4. Take Advantage of PDM

This is an area where, many times, we don’t have a choice. We have a product data management (PDM) system or we don’t. The bottom line is however that they can be much more cost-effective than many realize. The PDM system not only helps protect the data, but protect unknown changes from going through, duplication or changes being overwritten – all things that can add more time to correct. A PDM system automates all of this and keeps the file management in front of you so everyone working on the project knows who is working on what and the state, progress and revision of everything in the assembly.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_88001" style="width: 800px">Smart model improvements and use of configurations can improve large assembly performance.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Smart model improvements and use of configurations can improve large assembly performance.</figcaption></figure>

5. Pay Attention to Your Drawings

We often think of drawings last, but may save a lot of time and change request if we start thinking of them along the way. Large assembly drawings can be massive and when all the details need to be within one drawing there are different strategies you can use. Reducing cutaway, detail and exploded views can help in performance, but large multi-sheet drawings can also be split into multiple files, based on the components you’ve simplified, the configurations you’ve set up, the model improvements you’ve made and how your team is organized and utilizes the PDM system.

All of these work together to bring huge performance improvements in the process of working with large assembly, but also when you consider the process of working with any size assembly.

You’re sure to have your own ideas and techniques about improving large assembly performance. We would love to know how you approach it. In the meantime, you can learn more and get the in-depth detail about how to apply each of these techniques in your assemblies with our free guide.

The post How To Improve Your Performance for Large Assembly Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 12, 2017 01:56 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery Part 6: Pitching the Yeast

At this point during the brew process, a bready yet malty aroma is filling the kitchen and is slightly offset by the distinct hoppy fragrance all us beer drinkers truly enjoy.  And as the boil phase winds down, we prepare for the next stage during which our wort will actually start becoming beer.

Our last main ingredient is added at this point – yeast. Remember all that sugar we tried to capture when we were lautering? Well, let the fermentation process begin!

Before we can simply add the yeast, however, we need to bring the temperature of our wort down to approximately sixty-eight degrees (Fahrenheit), which is ideal for the yeast to start consuming all those sugars and produce alcohol.

One nice little touch Earl has rigged up within his electrical cabinet is the ability to automatically shut down the heating element inside the boil kettle as soon as the timer reaches zero. When we take a peek inside the cabinet, we probably wouldn’t even notice the small circuit that has been added – so what better way to show the design intent than by routing these wires in 3D – making our design really come to life.

In my experience as an electrical engineer, most of us stick to the old 2D side of the house, leaving the 3D space to the mechanical team. But why should they have all the fun, glitz, and glamour? Well, we can use it too – and it’s not that hard!

If the mechanical team has built our assembly, with just two clicks of the mouse we can simply “associate” components from our schematic to parts within our 3D assembly. Besides associating our electrical parts to 3D parts, we also need to make our 3D parts “electrically intelligent.” This tells the wires in our schematic exactly where they need to route. Next we need to draw a 3D sketch, which acts as a guide for our wires when we are ready to route. And lastly, we simply select the “Route Wires” option and let the software do everything for us.

It’s amazing how routing the wires in 3D opens up the communication between not only the mechanical and electrical teams, but also management, logistics, marketing, sales, field services, and not to mention customers. Your design intent is captured in a clear and precise image for all to see. That open communication helps alleviate errors and streamline your development, which in turn helps get your product to market faster.

So be sure to check out Episode 6 in our “Brewing with Electricity” mini-series where we finally turn our wort into beer.

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If you are still looking for more great information on SOLIDWORKS Electrical, including topics such as “Understanding Project Macros,” check out our videos on these more detailed topics at my.solidworks.com – simply search for Electric Brewery.

If you’re a fan of twitter, you can follow me @SWECAD

Author information

JP Emanuele
JP Emanuele
JP is a Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, North America.

The post Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery Part 6: Pitching the Yeast appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by JP Emanuele at July 12, 2017 01:15 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to use the SOLIDWORKS Hole Series Wizard

The SOLIDWORKS Hole Series is an assembly feature that creates hole features in the individual components of the assembly. A SOLIDWORKS Hole Series extends through each unsuppressed component in the assembly that intersects the axis of the hole (the components do not have to touch). Unlike other assembly features, the holes exist in the individual parts as externally referenced features (in-context). If you edit a Hole Series within the assembly, the individual parts are modified.

Some specifics about SOLIDWORKS Hole Series holes are:

  • Hole Series holes exist at the assembly level and part level.
  • The sketch used by the Hole Series can be sketched on any plane or face in the assembly.
  • Hole Series uses a limited set of end conditions: Through All, Up To Next, Up to Surface, and Offset from Surface are available.
  • A Hole Series can not be created by using the standard Hole Wizard.
  • The resulting hole(s) can be edited using Edit Feature, but only at the assembly level. This propagates changes to all of the parts in the hole series.
  • An existing Hole Wizard hole may be used as the seed for a Hole Series.
  • Different hole sizes can be set for the first part, the last part, and all parts that are cut between them.

The SOLIDWORKS Hole Series wizard (Assembly > Assembly Features > Hole Series) is made up of five tabs that define the location, shape and behavior of the holes.

SOLIDWORKS Hole Series Wizard Tabs

Hole Series Wizard Tabs

Hole Wizard Tabs

  1. Positions – Place points to locate hole centers.
  2. First Part – Define the parameters of the start hole.
  3. Middle Parts – Define the parameters of the hole between the first and last parts.
  4. Last Part – Define the parameters of the end hole.
  5. Smart Fasteners – Insert Smart Fasteners into the hole series. This tab is available only if you install and activate SOLIDWORKS Toolbox.
SOLIDWORKS Hole Series

SOLIDWORKS Hole Series

The post How to use the SOLIDWORKS Hole Series Wizard appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Jamie Hill, CSWP at July 12, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

The World’s Largest Super Soaker Will Win Any Squirt Gun Fight

The last time we checked in with former NASA engineer Mark Rober, he was demonstrating the World’s Largest Nerf Blaster; a scaled-up version of the $29.95 Nerf N-Strike Maverick that shoots massive foam darts made from pool noodles and toilet plungers at an impressive 40 mph thanks to an onboard 3,000 PSI air tank.

For his latest YouTube stunt, Rober, who has a Master’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering and spent 7 of his 9 years at NASA working on the Curiosity Rover, created what can only be described as the ultimate squirt gun to end all squirt gun fights: The World’s Largest Super Soaker:

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/T1KRQ3RcvXA?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Capable of blasting massive jets of water at 240 PSI—approximately 272 miles per hour—we’re not really sure if there would be much left of your opponent once you catch them hiding behind that bush.

Other than using pressurized tanks of nitrogen, the scaled-up version of the classic Super Soaker—originally invented by Lonnie Johnson in 1982—functions nearly identical to that of the original design.

While he doesn’t particularly recommend it for squirt gun noobs, Rober has generously supplied a build list of parts and CAD files for those who want to terrorize their neighborhood this summer.

The post The World’s Largest Super Soaker Will Win Any Squirt Gun Fight appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at July 12, 2017 11:59 AM

This Wide-Format Sketchbook Fits Nicely Under Your Keyboard

Since they came on the scene back in 2010 with the Glif iPhone 4 Tripod Mount & Stand, Studio Neat collaborators Dan Provost and Tom Gerhardt have become one of the few success stories to rise out of the Kingdom of Kickstarter.

Starting with that smartphone tripod, which, at the time, was an entirely new product category, the two have successfully launched everything from a wide-grip stylus for touch screens to a cocktail ice cube kit.

But it’s their latest project that just might prove to be the most successful—and useful—of all.

“It all started with an insight about how we use notebooks,” explain Gerhardt and Provost. “Even though we spend 8 hours a day doing digital work on a computer, notebooks are an essential analog tool. We noticed, while sitting at a computer, it would be great to have a notebook directly in front of us. But that would require a different type of notebook, one with more of a panoramic ratio. So that’s what we made.”

Designed specifically as a notebook that can be used comfortably for digital designers and engineers, the Panobook is designed to be used easily either to the top, bottom, or side of a standard keyboard. While the wide landscape format is ideal for everything from UX workflows to Gantt Charts, the tall orientation creates an ideal setup for breaking down modeling steps or creating lists.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/danprovost/panobook-a-notebook-for-your-desk/widget/video.html" width="800"> </iframe>

“We’ve wanted to make a notebook for a while now,” they explain. “We went in several different directions, but the ‘ah-ha’ moment came when we started to consider how a notebook could be uniquely designed for desk use. We spent way too long fussing over materials and details of the notebook. Every last detail was considered, and we think you will be pleased with the end result.”

Each gridded page measures in at 160 mm x 288 mm (6.3 in by 11.34 in) and the dots on the grid are spaced 5 mm apart. In total, the book contains 50 sheets / 100 pages. Finally, each book comes with its own slipcase for easy storage on your desk or bookshelf after its been used.

Through Saturday, July 29, 2017, you can get your own Panobook over at Kickstarter for just 20 bucks.

The post This Wide-Format Sketchbook Fits Nicely Under Your Keyboard appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at July 12, 2017 11:36 AM

SolidSmack Radio | The Hard Wire

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll kick it off with “Waterfalls” from Los Porcos before smoothing things out with some fresh tracks from Column, St. Vincent, Juan de Fuca, and Whitney before rounding off on a summery note with “Surfer Girl (Take 6)” from the one and only The Beach Boys. Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

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by SolidSmack at July 12, 2017 11:10 AM

July 11, 2017

SolidSmack

Thngs.co is A Beautiful Library of Awesome Things

Be still my beating heart. This site is beautiful. Thngs.co is a website dedicated to preserving a memory of every imaginable thing we have produced thus far. I don’t believe I’ve ever liked THINGS so much. It’s a feast for the eyes you and future generations are sure to appreciate.

As they put it Thngs is a simple tool for the preservation and structuring of data about physical things, a Noah’s ark for the tangible world. But beyond the scope of historical value, this site can be a useful tool for many research disciplines, from design to sociology. Me? I think I’m just going to spend a couple hours looking at Korean soda cans and mid-century electronics. Here are a few examples…

Gorgeous. ALL. OF. IT.

Along with a vast searchable library of things, they also organizes thematic exhibitions regularly, with current collections including Russia makes its own, Cosmos: Birth of a New Age, Meganom Forms.

They have an astonishing variety of the items, from sewing machine to Fuji packaging, spacesuit gloves to condiment wrappers, film, servers, PENS, calculators, chairs, tools, as so, so, so much more.

Every item has its own page categorized with detailed description and facts, photos and reference. Like Wikipedia, everyone can join in the collecting and preserving process. That’s right, you can add things too. Sign up for their Beta in the upper right at Thngs.co. Here’s more…

The post Thngs.co is A Beautiful Library of Awesome Things appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 11, 2017 09:24 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Who Needs Mesh Controls Anyway?

The quality of your mesh is critical to obtaining accurate results from your analyses. You’ll often hear the term “convergence analysis” tossed around in the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) world. “Convergence analysis” means we want to ensure the mesh in critical areas is fine enough that the analysis results are independent of the mesh size.

Most often, high stress appears in corner areas and fillets are generally added in these locations to help distribute stress better. When analyzing these filleted areas, it’s important the mesh is fine enough to capture the distribution of stress.

For efficiency sake, we don’t want to refine the mesh over the entire geometry just to achieve a fine enough mesh in the filleted areas. To get around this, most often users add mesh controls on these fillets to refine the mesh just in the localized area.

A More Efficient Way to Add Mesh Controls to Every Fillet

Did you know you’re just creating extra work for yourself by adding mesh controls to every single fillet? SOLIDWORKS Simulation has multiple meshing algorithms to do this for you. However, in most cases, we recommend using the curvature-based mesher.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Curvature-based mesh

The curvature-based mesher has multiple settings most people gloss over. While many users understand the technical power behind each field, it’s easy to overlook how the settings can be used to your full advantage.

These are the settings:

  • Maximum Element Size
  • Minimum Element Size
  • Min Number of Element in a Circle
  • Element Size Growth Ratio

Maximum and Minimum Element Size

The Max and Min Element Size is pretty straight forward. It tells the mesher how much freedom it has to fluctuate the element sizes to adequately mesh the geometry.

Min Number of Elements in a Circle

This is a powerful setting when used correctly. The field forces any circular feature to have a minimum of the specified number of elements around it. It includes a true circular feature, such as a hole, and also applies to arcs, which includes fillets. With this in mind, the Min Number of Element in a Circle field can be leveraged for better control of mesh in high-stress areas.

Element Size Growth Ratio

In addition to the Min Number of Elements in a Circle, the Element Size Growth Ratio can give your mesh a good transition away from high-stress areas.

To make this work, ensure there is enough of an interval between your max and min element size. This allows the mesher to meet the requirement of the min number of elements in a circle. In addition, the Element Size Growth Ratio field can be set as large as possible. However, if the elements aren’t allowed to get small enough to achieve that, then it won’t do anything. A good way to determine the size of small features in your model is to use Geometry Analysis.

General Rule for Fillets

A general rule for fillets is to have 3-4 elements through the radius. Consequently, the minimum element size is the smallest fillet size divided by however many elements you want over the filleted face.
SOLIDWORKS Simulation Mesh Control Example
With just a few numbers inputted into the global mesh settings, I can adequately mesh all the filleted regions of this model without using a signal mesh control. Now that’s what I call efficiency!

Author information

GSC
GSC fuels customer success with 3D engineering solutions for design, simulation, data management, technical documentation, and 3D printing, as well as the most comprehensive consulting, technical support, and training in the industry. As a leading provider of SOLIDWORKS solutions and Stratasys 3D printing technologies, GSC’s world-class team of dedicated professionals have helped numerous companies innovate and increase productivity by leveraging advanced technologies to drive 3D business success. Founded in 1989, GSC is headquartered in Germantown, WI. For more information about GSC, please visit www.gsc-3d.com.

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by GSC at July 11, 2017 03:00 PM