Planet SolidWorks

March 24, 2017

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: I Will Kick This Melon

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There are those last few steps the closer you get to the edge. They are the steps where you have to summon all your power, the steps where time slows for a bit, the camera pans around you, sound expands and the glint of the sun catches the edge of your sunglasses just before you kick the melon out of these links.

Ha Ko – I’m a pushover for cool world map and game world visuals. Ha Ko seems to be starting out, but gives us a small taste of hopefully many, many more.

Waito – Carly Waito created these fabulous geology and geometry inspired oil painting–yes, oil paintings–that look more like incredibly detailed macro shots of semi-precious stones.

Winter – And on the topic of incredible, Xavier Casalta created this piece as part of his four seasons series. It contains approximately 8 million dots and took 400 hours to ink.

3D Projected Eyeballs – I’m glad 25-year old Norwegian artist Mats Skjævesland Vium has nothing better to do than creating this 3D installation in Oslo, Norway shop window.

Paperboyo – Rich McCor knows how to cut a piece of paper… cut it, then turn objects in a photograph into even more interesting objects.

Ghost in the Shell EC – First 5-minutes extended clip of Ghost in the Shell, out in theaters soon.

Squatty Potty – If you haven’t had the pleasure of seeing this yet. Best poop of your life.

Saturnz Barz – Gorillaz debut a new album with this cool 360 video. View it on mobile, watch in VR ir move around with your mouse.

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The post Friday Smackdown: I Will Kick This Melon appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 24, 2017 10:19 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Rose Tutorial – Part 2

Are you tired of getting the same old bouquet of roses for that special someone in your life? We suggest our fellow SOLIDWORKS users try something a little different by modeling this rose for that special someone. It will be a gift that shouts, “Hey, I care about you so much that I learned SOLIDWORKS Surface modeling just for you. And like my love for you, this version of the rose will last forever.”

Welcome to part 2 of our 4-part series where we are teaching you how to spread the love by modeling a rose using SOLIDWORKS surface tools. In part 1 of the series we modeled the first few layers of our rose bud. In this portion of the series, we will keep adding on using additional advanced modeling tools, such as the Bilateral Sweep, Delete Face, and we’ll run through a few options within the Circular Pattern tool.

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While real roses are beautiful, they don’t last forever. Fortunately for us, roses made in SOLIDWORKS will! Whether you’re looking for a gift that will stand the test of time or just want to improve your surface modeling skills, our Rose Tutorial Series is for you!

Can’t wait for the next video? View all of the tutorials on the playlist here.

Do you have a green thumb for growing SOLIDWORKS Roses? Share your creations with us in the comments below! As always, thanks for watching!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Rose Tutorial – Part 2 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at March 24, 2017 09:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Use the Shift Key to Collapse/Expand all Descendant Components in SOLIDWORKS Treehouse

SOLIDWORKS Treehouse is a standalone application that graphically shows the assembly tree using tiles.  Open Treehouse through Start > All Programs > SOLIDWORKS Tools > SOLIDWORKS Treehouse.

Treehouse can be used at the start of your design:

  • By dragging the Templates tiles onto the screen to setup up your assembly structure.
  • You can also drag existing components in from Windows Explorer.
SOLIDWORKS Treehouse Assembly Structure of Existing Assembly

SOLIDWORKS Treehouse Assembly Structure of Existing Assembly

However if you’ve already created your assembly, you can click on “Existing File” to open Windows Explorer and then just drag in your assembly file.  This will generate an assembly tree view of your model.  You can hover over a tile to see the full filename. You can also double-click on a tile to view its File Properties as shown in the screenshot below:

Double-click on a Tile to see File Properties

Double-click on a Tile to see File Properties

However for larger assemblies, the full tree can be very large and complex.  If you want to collapse any assembly (or subassembly) to only show its top level components, you can hold Shift and click the “-” symbol directly underneath the applicable assembly.  This will initially collapse everything to a “+” symbol.  But if you click the “+” symbol (without holding Shift) it will expand to only show the top level.

Hold SHIFT and click the "-" symbol under and assembly to collapse all subassemblies

Hold SHIFT and click the “-” symbol under and assembly to collapse all subassemblies

Fully Collapsed Assembly

Fully Collapsed Assembly

Click the "+" symbol (without holding SHIFT) to expand just the top level

Click the “+” symbol (without holding SHIFT) to expand just the top level

To return the assembly to its full expanded tree structure (including all subassemblies), collapse the assembly again and hold SHIFT and click the “+”.

Hold SHIFT and click the "+" symbol to expand all subcomponents

Hold SHIFT and click the “+” symbol to expand all subcomponents

The post Use the Shift Key to Collapse/Expand all Descendant Components in SOLIDWORKS Treehouse appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at March 24, 2017 12:00 PM

March 23, 2017

SolidSmack

Carbon’s New M2 3D Printer and the SpeedCell System

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Carbon introduced a couple of new items that should make their products far more interesting to those intending on production use.

The problem with almost all 3D printers when considering “production” is that they are not designed for production. They are designed for prototyping. They require human attention at frequent points during their operational cycle. They require post processing that often requires use of unusual equipment and is very often completely manual.

These are not the characteristics that would meld easily into an efficient production line.

Thus, Carbon – and multiple other leading 3D printer vendors – have introduced accessory systems that ease this production integration. Typically such systems are modular to allow for customization to the varying needs of customers, and that’s certainly the case for Carbon’s new SpeedCell.

What is it? They explain:

The SpeedCell™ is a system of connected manufacturing unit operations that enables repeatable production of end-use parts at any scale. The M Series printers and the automated Smart Part Washer are the first in a series of modular offerings that allow a wide range of industries to design, engineer, make and deliver end-use parts with one common manufacturing workflow.

The first element in the SpeedCell system appears to be the “Smart Part Washer”, which handles a critical post processing step for prints emerging from Carbon’s equipment. Here’s how they describe it, emphasis mine:

With OPTIMIZED wash protocols, every part is CONSISTENTLY cleaned with MINIMAL MANUAL LABOR, resulting in lower per part cost. Our next generation software delivers AUTOMATIC, part-specific wash protocols, process control data for PART TRACEABILITY, and regular software updates.The Smart Part Washer delivers SIMPLE, REPEATABLE part washing, enabling MANUFACTURING AT SCALE and environmental stewardship.

Get it? They want to make the life of production easy, and at least for this portion of post-processing, they apparently do.

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One interesting feature of the Smart Part Washer is its ability to use NFC technology to automatically select part washing protocols for consistency.

Like their other equipment, the washer is available by subscription only, at USD$10K per year.

i expect that they’ll shortly introduce several other modules to the SpeedCell system. Perhaps we’ll see an automatic material handling system, or perhaps a robotic system to unload completed prints and transfer them to the cleaning station. There are a number of possibilities, but only Carbon knows what they will do next, which will be driven by their client needs.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85711" style="width: 1100px;">Carbon's M2 3D printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Carbon’s M2 3D printer</figcaption></figure>

Carbon has also released a new 3D printer, the M2, which is considered to be part of the SpeedCell system. It appears to be very similar to their original M1 3D printer, except that the build volume is said to be double the size. The M2 offers a 190 x 118 x 326mm build volume (7.3L), whereas the M1 is smaller at 141 x 79 x 326mm (3.6L).

Like its predecessor, the M1, the M2 is also available only by subscription, a unique business model in the world of 3D printers. While the M1 is set at USD$40K per year, the M2 is priced only slightly more, USD$50K per year for near double the print volume, plus an ability to work with the SpeedCell modules in the future.

What I find interesting about this announcement is the reinforcement of a key transformation in the 3D printing industry towards production capabilities. For years, literally decades, 3D printers languished as “mere” prototyping machines in labs and were typically manually operated. But with the recognition that 3D metal and plastic printing can produce truly production-ready parts for many industries, 3D printer manufacturers have had to realize their equipment is only part of a much more complex manufacturing process.

What we’re seeing is the very beginning of a significant change in how things are made. In future years extremely complex and highly optimized products will be produced largely automatically with the descendants of today’s equipment.

Read more at Fabbaloo

The post Carbon’s New M2 3D Printer and the SpeedCell System appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at March 23, 2017 02:43 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

22-Minute Webinar: Don’t Waste Time Managing Data

You create innovative product designs…it’s just what you do day in and day out. If you are working without a product data management (PDM) system in place, however, you might be spending too much of your time either searching for design files or correcting mistakes due to incorrect, out-of-date files.

“Oh you know what I’m looking forward to today? Trying to find version 7 of this project I’ve been working on for months,” said no one ever. No one got into a creative profession excited to organize data, so stop letting data management stifle your creativity.

Why not attend the 22-minute webinar on Tuesday, March 28 to learn how a simple-to-use and easy-to-implement PDM tool, such as SOLIDWORKS PDM, can give you back that time you’ve been wasting so you can focus on designing that next great product.

In just 22-minutes, learn how SOLIDWORKS PDM can help you:

  • Find the right files quickly with comprehensive search
  • Keep track of & share your design concepts & revisions without Pack and Go
  • Freely rename and move files without breaking your designs
  • Easily maintain as-built in addition to latest model arrangements

Two sessions are available. Click here to register for the 11:00am or 2:00pm ET presentation. Leave file management to the squares. You’ve got cooler stuff to do!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post 22-Minute Webinar: Don’t Waste Time Managing Data appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at March 23, 2017 12:30 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Large Assemblies taking too long to load? Try SOLIDWORKS Large Design Review Mode

Are your SOLIDWORKS assemblies taking too long to load? There is a solution for you with the SOLIDWORKS Large Design Review Mode.

When you need to get into an assembly and would like to view all the components and maybe get some measurements you do not need to open up the assembly fully resolved. Instead you should use the Large Design Review Mode (LDR). Released with SOLIDWORKS 2012 this feature loads only a fraction of your assembly data, while still providing access to a lot of useful tools.

Throughout the past couple of years there have been enhancements making this great feature even greater! It is easier to view the structure of patterns and assembly features in the feature manager design tree and we have more control over assembly options for updating graphics!

How to access Large Design Review Mode:

To open an assembly in Large Design Review mode, click Open (Standard toolbar) or File > Open .

In the dialog box, select the assembly you want to open, and then, in the Mode drop down, select Large Design Review. Then pick Open.

Large Design Review Mode Open Dialog

Large Design Review Mode Open Dialog

Quick Tip: While in SOLIDWORKS if you press the “R” button on the keyboard it opens a recent documents dialog!

 

LDR mode will open the assembly in seconds saving you a lot of time, and with the mode active you can still carry out the following tasks:

  • Navigate the FeatureManager design tree
  • Selective Open Components
  • Measure distances
  • Create cross sections
  • Hide and show components
  • Create, edit, and play back walk-throughs
Large Design Review Features

Large Design Review Features

When the LDR mode is active you will notice a specific toolbar in the CommandManager and an eye icon is attached to the parts and sub-assembles in the FeatureManager design tree to denote LDR mode:

Large Design Review Mode Active

Large Design Review Mode Active

SOLIDWORKS Large Design Review allows you to become productive and more efficient as only a graphical representation of the model data has been loaded.

When you want to end the LDR Mode either close the assembly or pick Set all to Lightweight or Set all to Resolved from the CommandManager.

Large Assembly Assistance

If you require any assistance with large assemblies please ask about our Large Assembly Productivity Service and we will solve any assembly issues you may be having!

The post Large Assemblies taking too long to load? Try SOLIDWORKS Large Design Review Mode appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sam Sharkawi at March 23, 2017 12:00 PM

March 22, 2017

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: Sci-Fi Wall Tiles [Glue Them To Yo’ Face!]

Gheee! Are you seeing these? ARE. YOU. SEEING. THESE. This is not the exterior of the [insert name of random sci-fi ship or planet size weapon]. It’s a 3D printed array of sci-fi style diorama tiles that have more applications than Darth Vader’s cape.

The sci-fi diorama tiles by Roy Ang are 1/72 scale – each is 75mm x 75mm x 15mm (3″ x 3″ x 0.6″) and weigh approximately 80 grams. Given that it takes 1-2 hours to print, you could have a 10-foot section of wall covered in ONLY 1,280 hours. If you want a smaller area, say, YOUR FACE, you’re probably looking at 8-12 hours depending on resolution, the size of your mug and the complexity of your jowls. (I think I could model and machine a metal sci-fi mask in less time. Ahem.)

There are 14 different designs to choose from, but best of all, this provides the inspiration for so much more. Like making a sci-fi planting pot or a sci-fi beer can holder. HELLO! You can download these bad boys at MyMiniFactory. (Bonus: Check out Roy’s AT-AT Foot! 1/48 scale, which is perfect to embed in your wall to hang your jawa cosutume on. Utini!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

3d-printed-sci-fi-wall-tiles-01

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The post Model of the Week: Sci-Fi Wall Tiles [Glue Them To Yo’ Face!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 22, 2017 10:12 PM

Enduro Toy Car & Truck Set is Built Tough (Like They Use to Be)

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Tough, durable, long-lasting toys were almost nonexistent in my household when I was growing up. Transformers often lost their limbs after a month or so, G.I. Joes normally went to war without their weapons and “Have you seen the pieces to my new Lego set?” was a question routinely heard by my parents and siblings.

That’s not to say there weren’t any toys that could last a lifetime. That’s certainly so with the solid design behind toys from Tonka, Hot Wheels, and Fisher-Price (all of which are likely to be found intact during some archeological dig 1,000 years in the future). California-based ThoughtFull Toys wants to add their name to the roster with the introduction of their Enduro toy vehicles.

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Both the Enduro Truck and Racer were designed using sustainable and recyclable materials including aluminum, wood, natural rubber, Zamak (zinc, aluminum, magnesium, and copper), recycled plastic and leather remnants. They also feature the patented Modarri steering system–true steering capabilities using rack and tie rods for added maneuverability, combined with wheel bearings and bushings for a smooth ride. How do they stand up to play? Have a look:

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ThoughtFull also gave both vehicles a suspension system with the Truck outfitted with a heavy-duty leaf spring system with rubber center structure to handle shock while the Racer uses a spring-actuated platform to handle tighter turning radius. Both the steering and suspension systems were derived from ThoughtFull’s Modarri modular line of vehicles, which lets you swap-out parts to better suit the driving surface.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85686" style="width: 678px;">The design breakdown of the Enduro Truck, complete with leaf spring suspension system.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The design breakdown of the Enduro Truck, complete with leaf spring suspension system.</figcaption></figure>

The idea behind ThoughtFull’s Enduro line was to bring back the durable car toys from the past and give them a modern look while also being easy on planetary resources and environment. To get materials and manufacturing off the ground, ThoughtFull launched a Kickstarter campaign and met their funding goal shortly after launch meeting their $20K goal with little under two weeks left to go.

Judging from the reputation of the Modarri line being a high-quality product and the build quality of the new Enduro line, it’s a safe bet the vehicles could handle the rigors of being launched off stairs, dragged through mud tracks and repeated head-on collisions without suffering a total loss. Those looking to get their hands on both the Truck and Racer can pledge $60 or more, and at that tier, ThoughtFull Toys will donate one of their Modarri cars to charity, so it’s a win-win for everybody.

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<script src="http://z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>

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The post Enduro Toy Car & Truck Set is Built Tough (Like They Use to Be) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at March 22, 2017 08:46 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Explore How SOLIDWORKS Solutions Saved CoaX Helicopters Years in Development Time

How badly do you want to ride that helicopter right now?  To me, it looks like one of those old school video games where you’re saving the world, extinguishing one fire at a time. This is definitely not a video game. CoaX Helicopters is revolutionizing coaxial rotor helicopter technology and commercializing these safer, faster, and more cost effective helicopters.  Let’s take a deeper dive into their story.

CoaX Helicopters Ltd. is an Australian company that is commercializing the use of coaxial rotor helicopter technology for use in manned and unmanned applications.  Previously, Coaxial rotor helicopters were only used by the military, but now with CoaX expanding the technology into commercial industry the uses can range from fire safety to drone delivery.  CoaX Helicopters acquired the rights to the Gyrodyne technology and quickly started creating prototypes for commercial use, revolutionizing the helicopter industry by providing safer, more economical, and more powerful machines capable of carrying heavier loads.

When acquiring new companies or technologies, full implementation into your existing business model is always a challenge. CoaX Helicopters faced these same challenges when they acquired the new technology from Gyrodyne which included the original 2D drawings.  They knew they needed to find a design platform to optimize the existing technology for commercial use and transform these 2D designs into a 3D platform.  CoaX Helicopters chose to standardize on SOLIDWORKS Premium because it’s easy to use, supports fast, frequent design changes, and provides integrated simulation capabilities. They also chose SOLIDWORKS Composer technical communication software to easily demonstrate the technology to prospective customers and investors, as well as prepare its manned and unmanned helicopter designs for manufacturing and assembly.

According to Managing Director Peter Batten, “SOLIDWORKS saved our team of five engineers years in development time. Frankly, we couldn’t do what we’re doing with the body, and utilize the number of available parts this quickly, without SOLIDWORKS.”

To find out more about CoaX Helicopters and how they capitalized on this technology to create safer and faster helicopters, Click Here!

Author information

Josie Morales
Josie Morales
Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post Explore How SOLIDWORKS Solutions Saved CoaX Helicopters Years in Development Time appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Josie Morales at March 22, 2017 06:30 PM

SolidSmack

The Heatbuff Keyboard Heater Wants to Solve Icy Fingers Once and For All

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feature

It’s very much a first world problem, but a problem that plagues desktop workers all the same: cold hands.

While the problem is more prevalent for computer gamers, cold hands are a very real problem for those who sit at their workstations all day—in fact, it’s just plain science. As a result—whether the office thermostat is uncomfortably cold or not—we’re left with icy fingers that can make typing an email or powering through those keyboard shortcuts more of a pain than it needs to be.

Well, there’s a Kickstarter for that, folks.

The Heatbuff is a literal keyboard heater for keeping those icy fingers toasty. Billed as the ‘Future of gaming and workstations’, the infrared finger heating system is designed specifically to increase keyboard performance:

<iframe frameborder="0" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/momentplz/no-more-cold-hands-the-future-of-gaming-and-workst/widget/video.html" width="800"> </iframe>

With $33,253 raised of their original $10,885 goal, it looks as though these guys just might be on their way towards creating the best desktop accessory of all time. You can get yours for $71 (before it bumps up to $100) if you support the campaign before April 7, 2017.

The post The Heatbuff Keyboard Heater Wants to Solve Icy Fingers Once and For All appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at March 22, 2017 12:20 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Installing SOLIDWORKS 2017 Workgroup PDM Server

Installing SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM Server for the 2017 release is included in the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager. The Installation Manager can be launched from your SOLIDWORKS Installation DVD or from a downloaded service pack.

NOTE: SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard replaces SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM, which is set to be discontinued in the 2018 release. SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard is included with SOLIDWORKS 2016 and 2017 Professional and Premium licenses.

Once the Installation Manager starts, on the Welcome Screen, you can select SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM Server under Server Products.

Welcome screen for SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager

Welcome screen for SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager

Starting with SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM 2012, a Validation Code is required in order to install the server. In the Installation Summary, beside “Validation Code required for installation”, click on Change.

SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM Server validation code

SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM Server validation code

 

Enter you serial number and your e-mail and then click Get Code. If Validate Automatically fails, then try the e-mail option.

Get the validation code

Get the validation code

Your Validation code will appear at the bottom of the screen. If you used the e-mail option, you would then enter the validation code, sent to you, in the text box.

Validation code

Click on Back to Summary and continue with the installation by selecting Install Now.

The post Installing SOLIDWORKS 2017 Workgroup PDM Server appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at March 22, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

This Toy Engine is the Perfect Activity for the Young Grease Monkey in Your Family

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When you’re a kid, few things go better together than tools and a build-it-yourself project. Ok, maybe peanut butter and jelly. But for the young mechanic in the family, this engine repair set from Hammacher Schlemmer will take care of the former—and safely, too.

Featuring a somewhat detailed engine in the body of a fake car, the Car Lover’s Engine Repair Set comes complete with a dipstick, removable cowling, spark plugs, wing nuts, and other lifelike car components. Heck, there are enough car components in this thing to make your 4-year-old more excited to go to Autozone than Toys-R-Us.

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As for the best part, once a repair job is complete, the young grease monkey can get behind the wheel and turn the ignition key to hear how the engine sounds once it starts. The car even includes a working horn, headlights, a removable air filter, and brake sets that can be independently tested.

At $119, the Car Lover’s Engine Repair Set includes enough to keep Junior busy on a rainy Saturday while training him or her how to change their own oil further down the road. Not bad.

Find out more over at Hammacher Schlemmer.

The post This Toy Engine is the Perfect Activity for the Young Grease Monkey in Your Family appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at March 22, 2017 11:58 AM

March 21, 2017

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

3D PDF Sample: National Institute of standards and Technology (NIST) Test Assembly

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recently conducted their 2017 MBE PMI validation and conformance test for CAD vendors. They previously ran the test in 2012 and 2015. NIST created a “test system to measure the conformance of computer aided design software to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) standards for product manufacturing information (PMI), specifically geometric dimensioning and tolerancing” [1]. The test system includes a set of 11 models specifically designed to test the limits of Model-based definition software.

The test cases are designed to determine whether or not the CAD software correctly implements the PMI concepts of ASME Y 14.5-1994 and ASME Y 14.41-2003 [1]. “The most current versions of ASME Y14.5 (2009) and Y14.41 (2012) are not included as they have not yet been widely implemented in CAD software” [1]. Along with validating the implementation of standards, NIST’s key objective was to verify the semantic representation of PMI for downstream manufacturing purposes.

I personally was fortunate enough to manage and work very closely with the upcoming validation and conformance testing of SOLIDWORKS MBD 2017. I was in charge of upgrading the models and their product manufacturing information from SOLIDWORKS 2012 to SOLIDWORKS 2017. With all this being said, while we await the results I decided to assembly a few of the NIST test parts and create some 3D PDF’s using SOLIDWORKS MBD. Out of the 11 NIST test models 4 of the parts can be assembled together. The assembly consists of NIST test case models 7, 8, 9, and 10. The assembly can be seen below.

 

Figure 1: NIST Test case assembly

 

One of my goals in assembling and publishing a PDF with the NIST assembly was to ultimately learn about 3D PDF’s but also test its capabilities while doing so. To begin I created an assembly that contained fasteners, exploded views, multiple display states, and multiple configurations using the NIST parts.

After organizing my PMI and creating all the necessary 3D views it was time to build my custom PDF template. I created a template with the design in mind that I wanted to print my PDF with multiple sheets for clear and easy viewing. I created a single assembly PDF template that contained a primary viewport on one page and independent viewports on the following pages to display the multiple configurations of the assembly.


With this template I would be able to easily print the published PDF and view the multiple configurations side by side. I even created a PDF template for each individual part of the assembly. One template was built for a multiple configuration part and the other was a simple part template.

Once I had my templates all set and ready to go all that was left was to publish a 3D PDF of the NIST assembly using SOLIDWORKS MBD. It’s important to note the custom property placeholders and PDF text areas throughout my templates. With the use of these I can easily input information directly from my model into the PDF. I can even input my B.O.M tables. When publishing users are given the option to attach files directly to the PDF so I attached each individual part 3D PDF to the assembly 3D PDF. All the needed information was easily transferred in a matter of a few clicks from SOLIDWORKS into a single clean and easy to read PDF file. Once published, I filled in my notes directly within Adobe and the PDF was all set. I would say 3D PDF’s passed the test in my book!

Download the full interactive 3D PDF here.

Figure 6: Published 3D PDF of NIST assembly

 

Figure 7: Individual parts directly attached to assembly

Figure 8: Assembly Configuration A

Figure 9: Assembly Configuration B

Figure 10: Configuration comparison for NIST_07

Figure 11: Individual part 3D PDF

Reference:
[1]lipman, Lubell, Hedberg, Feeney, Frechette,2017, “MBE PMI Validation and Conformance Testing Project.” From https://www.nist.gov/el/systems-integration-division-73400/mbe-pmi-validation-and-conformance-testing

Author information

Chris Pagliarini
Chris Pagliarini
Chris is a Roles Portfolio Management Intern currently studying at Wentworth Institute of Technology

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by Chris Pagliarini at March 21, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Voodoo Manufacturing Unveils the First-Ever Robot Operated 3D Printer Cluster

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While 3D printing might have lost its magic in the mainstream, there’s no denying that those that are still in the thick of it are coming up with ever more impressive ways of extruding melted plastic into functional objects.

And for some, 3D printing is still a viable way for not just prototyping but also manufacturing at scale. The problem is, how do you speed the process up? How can you cost-compete with injection molding?

The folks over at Brooklyn-based Voodoo Manufacturing just might have one of the best solutions we’ve seen yet in the form of Project Skywalker.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GoNRTucoErE?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Using a Universal Robots UR10 robotic arm, the company has successfully been able to automate the ‘harvesting’ process (the manual process of removing a printer’s build plate) to pump out small production run batches with what is essentially the first-ever robot-operated 3D printer cluster (9 MakerBot Replicators).

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“Extrapolating from the 9-printer cluster, we now estimate that a single arm will be capable of tending to approximately 100 printers within our factory,” explains company co-founder Jonathan Schwartz. “Using a robot to automate purely the harvesting step of our process would increase the current 40 printers/employee ratio to approximately 400 printers/employee. We also estimate that all in, each deployed robot arm will have a payback period of 3 months. Project Skywalker was a massive success, and all of Voodoo is now excited for the day we deploy it within our factory at full scale.”

While 3D printing still has a long ways to go before it can be considered a viable and cost-effective manufacturing solution, it’s initiatives like this that are helping us get there that much faster.

Read Schwartz’s full breakdown of the project—including how he thinks robotic automation is going to change the US manufacturing industry—over at the Voodoo Manufacturing blog.

The post Voodoo Manufacturing Unveils the First-Ever Robot Operated 3D Printer Cluster appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at March 21, 2017 12:12 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Section View Jog Line Options

When adding Section Views to your SOLIDWORKS drawings, there is a pop-up toolbar allowing you to place jogs in the section line.  There are the options Arc Offset, Single Offset and Notch Offset.  Pay attention to the numbers shown in the icon as this is the order of selection.

Section View Jog Offsets

Section View Jog Offsets

SOLIDWORKS Section Jog Line

Section View Notch Offset

This generates a projected view of the jog that shows all of the horizontal cuts.

SOLIDWORKS Section View

SOLIDWORKS Section View

However in much older versions of SOLIDWORKS, these jog options were not available and you had to manually draw a sketch line of the jogged section.  You can still do this in the latest versions of SOLIDWORKS and it gives you additional options.  Draw the section line with the regular Line tool.

Manually drawn Section Line

Manually drawn Section Line

Now with the manually drawing lines selected, when you click on Section View it gives you two options:

Manually created Section Line options

Manually created Section Line options

The first option “Create legacy foreshortened section view” will created a projected view of only the horizontal cuts, just like did before.

However the second option “Create a standard section view” generates a section view that is unfolded along the cutting line showing all of the cut faces (horizontal and vertical in this case) so the view will appear to be longer.

Section View created using ‘Create a standard section view’ option

Learn more about drawing

Attend our SOLIDWORKS Drawings course either live online or in a Canadian classroom near you.

The post SOLIDWORKS Section View Jog Line Options appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at March 21, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The Mechanical Spectacular

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This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “Melted Rainbow” from Mr. Gnome and work our way through tracks from Nap Eyes, The Shivas, Yuno, Magic Potion, and others before wrapping up with “Chameleon World” from Jerry Paper.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:58ZgmN8mnshzSPHO5evbQI" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Mechanical Spectacular appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 21, 2017 10:35 AM

March 20, 2017

SolidSmack

Xometry Snags a Cool $23 Million from Investors

xometry-cnc-solidworks-01

Xometry, an advanced manufacturing/prototyping software platform, has recently acquired $23 Million in investment capital from GE Ventures, Highland Capital Partners and others to help accelerate development of its advanced manufacturing platform. Put another way, the company gained a ton of funds to ramp up development of their online quoting systems and software integration to dominate the space through a curated manufacturing partner network (over 100).

According to Xometry CEO, Randy Altschuler, “[Xometry] created a marketplace by creating price clarity where none existed. We thought if you can buy groceries and order a car off the internet, then why not custom parts? Xometry is now home to the fastest-growing software driven marketplace of manufacturers. We can now accelerate our investment to meet more of our customer’s needs.”

The additional funds will also allow them to go ahead and accelerate investment to meet the increasing needs of their customers. So what does Xometry do exactly and why should you use them instead of sourcing you’re own manufacturer online?

Xometry explains their price quoting system as the most capable on the market for getting parts in your hand faster. The online platform allows you to upload a 3D model and receive instant manufacturing quote from a myriad of manufacturers, along with feedback based on your input for material, finish and lead time. One stop shopping, as it were, and all of which is generated in real-time, even as you adjust the options.

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They go beyond 3D printing services, providing services for CNC machining, sheet metal fabrication, and urethane casting. What’s more, the company has a free SOLIDWORKS add-on (we’ve covered here) allowing you to access their quoting system from within SOLIDWORKS, making it easy to adjust parameters based on the pricing data.

It’s difficult to point to anyone else pushing the same level of capabilities. It will be interesting to see what Xometry accomplishes with their newly acquired gains and where they will go from here.

The post Xometry Snags a Cool $23 Million from Investors appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at March 20, 2017 10:32 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Ottawa SOLIDWORKS User Group Network (SWUGN) Meeting on March 30, 2017

If you missed the first Ottawa SOLIDWORKS User Group Network (SWUGN) Meeting in November 2016, or you really enjoyed it and can’t wait for the next meeting – you’re in luck! The next SOLIDWORKS User Group Network (SWUGN) Meeting is scheduled to take place on Thursday March 30th at Algonquin College. Javelin is a proud sponsor of the Ottawa SWUGN and our very own Alin Vargatu will be hosting two high-impact SOLIDWORKS sessions.

There will be several presentations at the Ottawa SOLIDWORKS User Group Network Meeting, as well as snacks provided, all free of charge!

SWUGN Meeting Attendee Badge

SWUGN Meeting Attendee Badge

What is SWUGN?

The mandate of the SOLIDWORKS User Group Network is to provide an independent forum for local SOLIDWORKS users to discuss the software and exchange information freely. You don’t have to be an expert to attend. The SWUGN is open to all SOLIDWORKS enthusiasts!

Date & Location

When: Thursday, March 30th, 2017

Time: 6:00 PM – 9:30 PM

Where: Room B170, Algonquin College, 1385 Woodroffe Ave, Ottawa, ON.

Meeting Agenda

  • 6:00 PM – 6:30 PM: Light Dinner and Networking
  • 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM: Opening/Welcome
    • Presenter: Scott Macdonald, Product and Process Manager, Xenopus Inc & Ottawa SWUGN Leader
    • Overview: Discussions will cover what users expect from the group and look for suggestions on presentations, dates, times, and locations for future meetings.
  • 7:30 PM – 8:00 PM: Interface in Your Face
    • Presenter: Alin Vargatu, CSWE, Elite AE, Javelin Technologies
    • Overview: Learn and master the most efficient workflow for “telling” SOLIDWORKS 2017 what to do. Your mouse movement will be reduced by 70%, but more importantly your eyes will stay focused on the model, allowing you to concentrate on design and not hunt for icons.
  • 8:00 PM – 9:00 PM: Multibodies and Boolean Operations Power-User Techniques
    • Presenter: Alin Vargatu, CSWE, Elite AE, Javelin Technologies
    • Overview: SOLIDWORKS has introduced new and very efficient tools for creating and managing multibody parts. We can even call them game changers. Once mastered, these Boolean techniques will open surprising possibilities for saving time, taking shortcuts and finding new solutions to old design problems.
  • 9:00 PM – 9:30 PM: Q & A, wrap up, next meeting date

Meet the Presenter: Alin Vargatu

Alin Vargatu is an Elite AE, Problem Hunter and an avid contributor to the SOLIDWORKS Community. He has presented at SOLIDWORKS World 17 times, as well as the Toronto SOLIDWORKS Technical Summits and many times at SWUGN meetings across Canada. Alin is also very active on the SOLIDWORKS Forum which includes best practices for the following SOLIDWORKS capabilities: Surfacing, Mold Design, Sheet Metal, Assembly Modeling and Weldments.

Event Registration

If you are interested in attending this SOLIDWORKS User Group Network, please RSVP for the March 30th meeting. We hope to see you there!

Ottawa SOLIDWORKS User Group Network Meeting - Nov 2016

Ottawa SOLIDWORKS User Group Network Meeting – Nov 2016

The post Ottawa SOLIDWORKS User Group Network (SWUGN) Meeting on March 30, 2017 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Erin Elliott at March 20, 2017 09:06 PM

Join Aras Community Members for ACE 2017 in Nashville, TN

Registration for ACE 2017 is open and it’s the perfect venue for product innovators and PLM leaders like yourself! ACE 2017 is being held in the country music capital of the world – Nashville, Tennessee on March 21 – 23.

ACE 2017 is the perfect place to meet others from the Aras Community, hear about next generation PLM strategies from PLM experts, see first-hand how leading manufacturers are transforming product development and find out what Aras has in store for the future!

Never been to ACE before? Not sure what to expect? ACE 2017 has something for everyone – whether you’re a business executive at a large enterprise, a manager at a midsize company, or the IT pro at a start-up, you’ll gain valuable information and the insight necessary to achieve success with Aras.

ace 2017

Considering Aras?

Find out the latest info on solutions and technology to power your business of engineering.

Just Getting Started?

Get the knowledge you need to formulate your strategy, realize your vision and make Aras solutions work for you.

Already Using Aras?

Learn how others in the industry are using our solutions to realize their business processes with PLM.

What You’ll Find on the Agenda:

  • Real-world scenarios showcasing how global leaders use PLM to transform product development
  • Networking breaks that give you the chance to talk with Aras users, PLM industry experts & Aras partners and employees
  • Systems Engineering and MBSE
  • Integrated Technical Publications
  • Manufacturing Process Planning and Quality
  • What’s new from Aras and the vision for the future of PLM

ace 2017
Event Details:

Date: March 21 – 23

Location: Nashville, TN

Details and Registration: www.aras.com/ACE2017

Learn More About Aras PLM:

Learn more about Aras PLM here, or contact us to discuss how Aras PLM can transform your product development.

The post Join Aras Community Members for ACE 2017 in Nashville, TN appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sarah Pew at March 20, 2017 08:20 PM

SolidSmack

The Lindlund Ruler Bridges the Analog and Digital Worlds

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The pull between the pen and the pixel has plagued designers since the early days of digital design software. While a finished product always ends up as data, it’s more logical to test out ideas on paper before committing to a digital plan of action.

Sure—hardware like the iPad Pro and Microsoft Surface have created a nice bridge for creating an analog-like experience in a digital package. But talk to any purist, and there’s nothing that compares to the warm feel of real paper and a well-balanced writing instrument—not to mention the speed.

Aiming to bridge the analog world with the digital, the new Lindlund ruler ingeniously makes this process at least somewhat easier with a four-in-one measurement system for translating analog sketches into pixels before you even crack open your design software.

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Made from airplane-grade anodized aluminum and featuring a rubber ‘no slip’ grip for precise straight lines, the ruler includes four measurements—12 inches, 30 centimeters, 72 picas, and 1800 pixels—organized along the four edges of the ruler. As a nice added bonus, a user can line up a straight line through the cut-out window in the spine of the ruler and achieve perfect 90-degree angles quickly with ease.

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Created by Swedish graphic designer Jens Marklund, the $25 ruler is currently seeking funding on Kickstarter through April 5, 2017. Whether you regularly use a ruler or not, it’s hard to deny that this is one sweet piece of desktop eye candy.

The post The Lindlund Ruler Bridges the Analog and Digital Worlds appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at March 20, 2017 05:26 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Flow Simulation – How to Handle a Vortex Across a Pressure Boundary

What is a “Vortex Across a Pressure Boundary?”

In Flow Simulation,  a vortex is a region in the fluid domain which causes a swirl in a region where there is asymmetric drag in the flow field. The vortex itself is an expected phenomenon and is not problematic. When that vortex is allowed to generate across a theoretical boundary, within a CFD analysis, this can cause the results to deviate from reality in the immediate vicinity of the boundary. It can also cause the solver to fail to produce results. For that reason, it is important to note where this is happening in an analysis and take steps to avoid it.

Figure 1: The Flow Simulation solver will show this warning when a vortex is occurring across a pressure boundary.

 

How can this be fixed?

The vortex itself is generating because of the local solid geometry near the pressure boundary of a CFD setup. If the flow through the boundary is not symmetric, a low-pressure region can generate in front of the boundary and allow fluid to pass the wrong direction through the boundary as intended. The fix for this is to “build out” the model geometry. This means that the solid model needs to have more of the real life geometry added to the setup so the flow field can be allowed to have the vortex and then transition into a unidirectional flow.

Solution 1: Add Geometry

An example of a vortex across a boundary would be directly from the first Flow Simulation tutorial in SOLIDWORKS (the tutorials can be found under ‘Help’, ‘SOLIDWORKS Simulation’, ‘Flow Simulation Online Tutorial’ once the Flow Simulation add-in is turned on). The ball valve, as it is setup in the tutorial, has two lids that are positioned closely to the ball of the valve. In situations where the ball valve is not set completely open the flow through the valve is forced to be asymmetric as it passes through the pressure outlet.

The asymmetric flow out the pressure boundary allows fluid to backflow through the theoretical pressure boundary and creates the vortex that is seen in below.

flow simulation

Figure 2: Asymmetric flow through a ball valve shows a vortex occurring on the pressure outlet boundary.

 

Since the issue only exists on the outlet side of the model; that is the only side that needs to be “built out”. In this example, a straight pipe is placed off the end of the valve extending the fluid region and moving the pressure boundary further away. In this way, the flow can have a vortex and then be allowed to transition into a unidirectional flow as it might in real life. Figure 3 below shows that the vortex downstream from the valve remains but is now allowed to fully form before leaving the fluid domain.

flow simulation

Figure 3: A straight pipe added to the end of the ball valve shows how the pressure boundary can be moved away from the vortex that is being formed.

 

Solution 2: Release to Pseudo-External Environment

Solution 1 is possible when it is reasonable to assume there is more piping after the valve that can be put into place. This is not always true. Solution 2 examines how to handle the valve’s behavior when releasing into a larger reservoir. An entire tank could be modeled to resolve this vortex across boundary warning or this could be modeled as an external analysis but that would make the Flow Project take prohibitively long to solve if the valve is the only thing being analyzed. In this case, it may be suitable to model only a portion of the tank where fluid plume flows into. This setup is shown in Figure 4.

Figure 4 shows a small modeled enclosure attached to the ball valve.

 

Only a part of the tank is modeled so on 5 of the 6 internal surfaces, a pressure boundary is defined that will represent the undefined fluid volume in the rest of the tank. The face immediately adjacent to the valve is not applied with pressure so as to represent the tank wall. The result is that the fluid plume generates in the now open region beyond the valve allowing, again, for the vortex as the valve to generate and then dissipate as shown in Figure 5. In this case, however, a warning for vortex crossing the pressure boundary will still likely generate but will impact the results at locations away from the valve exit and the fluid plume.

Figure 5: The fluid plume generates in the pseudo-external environment created attached to the valve

Conclusion

Where possible create a solid model where a vortex will not cross a pressure boundary or move the pressure boundary itself away from the region of interest in the fluid domain.

Author:  Ryan Dark
Ryan has been in the GoEngineer technical support team since February 2008 where he most notably provides support for all FEA and CFD software offered by SOLIDWORKS. His most recent accolade is the title of Elite Application Engineer awarded by SOLIDWORKS Corp.

 

 

Author information

GoEngineer
GoEngineer delivers software, technology and expertise that enable companies to unlock design innovation and deliver better products faster. With more than 30 years experience and thousands of customers in high tech, medical, machine design, energy and other industries, GoEngineer provides best-in-class design solutions from SOLIDWORKS, Stratasys, CAMWorks, Altium and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM). For more information, visit goengineer.com.

The post Flow Simulation – How to Handle a Vortex Across a Pressure Boundary appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GoEngineer at March 20, 2017 03:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2017 Installation

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional installation for the 2017 release is now carried out through the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager. The installation can be selected from the Installation Manager Welcome page, under Server products as shown in the figure below:

SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager

SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager

On the summary page click on Change to configure the PDM installation.

Change on Summary Page

Change on Summary Page

  • Choose the appropriate product. In this case PDM Professional.
  • Identify the installation location, or accept the default.
  • Choose which features to install. The archive and database  needs only to be installed once on a server(s), that can be accessed by the clients. The client feature needs to be installed on all clients. It can be helpful, to have a client installed on the server, for troubleshooting purposes relating to network permissions and connectivity.
  • For the SQL Server, choose whether to install a new instance, or use an existing instance. Please note, performance may be degraded if SQL is shared between multiple applications. A dedicated SQL instance should provide the best performance.
  • Enter the sa password that, will be used to access the SQL database.
  • Click on Back to Summary to continue with the installation
Server Options

Server Options

Click on Install Now to complete the installation.

Complete the installation

Complete the installation

Need SOLIDWORKS PDM Training?

Contact us about our SOLIDWORKS PDM training courses for users and administrators.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2017 Installation appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at March 20, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Monday List 12.17 | What We’re Reading This Week

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Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

The Invention of the AeroPress
Among coffee aficionados, the AeroPress is a revelation. A small, $30 plastic device that resembles a plunger makes what many consider to be the best cup of coffee in the world.

01

The Secret That Brings These Pancakes to Life
Any hot oven will do, but a cast-iron pan is ideal for even browning and crisp edges, and for maintaining, at the very center, a little spot of tenderness that’s almost closer to custard than pancake.

02

The Secret to Happiness? Simplify.
Mix one part nostalgia, one part engineered scarcity.

03

The Magician Who Wants to Break Magic
Derek DelGaudio takes illusionism to new conceptual heights.

05

Apple’s Next Big Thing: Augmented Reality
CEO Tim Cook is betting on augmented reality, a cousin of VR that he believes will keep his company on top and may even supplant the iPhone.

06

The post The Monday List 12.17 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 20, 2017 10:00 AM

March 19, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

The Flexible Spring Animation

“That looks ok, but can we see the spring compress?” It is the dreaded question that so many SOLIDWORKS animation users find themselves on the receiving end of. Creating in-context geometry modifications is not always the easiest task in an animation. A spring compressing or decompressing is the quintessential example of this. I have seen a multitude of different ways of creating this type of animation. Some of them I have found too complicated, some of them too slow. Recently however, I tried a variation of some other techniques I have used in the past. I’ve found this technique easy to create, quite stable, quick to solve and realistic looking! It has become my preferred method for creating fast, in-context spring animations like this one I’ve saved as a .gif:

The goal of all spring compression techniques is the same: sandwich a component in between two other components, and find a way to make the spring look like it is being compressed between them. This usually ends up being an in-context cut, mated rotating subsections, or adjusted helix parameters to make it look like it is compressing. However, there’s an old surfacing trick that has always been one of my favorite bits of SOLIDWORKS magic. The other day it occurred to me that it might also be applied nicely to solve this spring compression debacle. Here’s how my method goes:

1. Prep: Start with all of the components assembled which will contain your spring. In my case, I have this shock assembly (shown below) from a model I created of my radio controlled drift car. I have assigned a Width mate set to “Free” on these components to allow movement in and out to its limits. This is probably not necessary for the spring animation, but it is convenient for working with the model.

2. Create the Spring Part in the Assembly: Add a new component by using “Insert New Part.” This will be the spring component. Place the component on a convenient plane for orientation purposes. I chose the bottom face of my lower spring retainer. At this point I close the sketch that is auto-generated without creating any sketch geometry.

3. Create the Bounds: Now, I have a new part in the assembly that I am editing. From here, I create 2 new planes that each reference the top and bottom components. This is done by simply selecting “Plane” from Reference Geometry and using each mounting face as a coincident reference. Remember, these planes now exist in the new part.

4. Create the Diameter: While I’m here, I create a sketch on the bottom plane I have just created. Make this sketch aligned on center, and dimension to the center diameter of the spring. Or, if you’re feeling efficient, just use Offset Entities on one of the edges available in the assembly. Just be mindful of your external references throughout this process.

5. Build the Spring Shape: Now we’ve got enough info to build the spring. I open this new part in its own window for convenience. I exit “Edit Part” mode from the confirmation corner, then rename the part and open it from the tree. Here’s what that leaves us with:

We now have a convenient (and shifting) set of references for the height of the spring. Here’s where that old surfacing trick comes in to create a self-adjusting helix. To do this, I’ll take the spring diameter sketch and extrude it with a Surface Extrude. This allows me to use an “Up to Surface” end condition and extrude up to my top plane. That leaves us with a cylinder however, and we need a helix. The helix is created by exploiting an option of the sweep. I create two linear sketches as shown. Each sketch is tied to the cylindrical surface with auto-relations. Now the Surface Sweep is ready to do the rest for us. Sweep the yellow line along the red one and choose “Specify Twist Value” from the options. Enter the number of coils. Now for the magic, select Tools> Sketch Tools> Intersection Curve (or use search commands) and select the two surfaces and exit sketch. At this point, you are free to hide or delete the two surfaces. I use “Delete/Keep Bodies” to delete mine. Now we have a conveniently adjustable curve that is locked to our adjustable boundary!

6. Create the Wire Diameter: The rest is a piece of cake. Move back to the Features tab and use the standard Sweep command to create the wire diameter. Remember that newer versions of SOLIDWORKS only require a path sketch for circular cross section geometry.

7. Trim the Ends: I then use Cut with Surface from the Surfacing tab to trim off the remainder using the existing planes. Just select Cut with Surface, select the plane, and make sure you’re cutting in the right direction before accepting. Repeat for the opposite end.

We now have a spring that has been created within a set of boundaries that move with the necessary components. We also have spring geometry that is locked to, and trimmed by, that boundary. The rest is as easy as returning to the assembly and adding a mate to drive the distance. I then chose to animate the mate by using the mate controller and imported that motion into the motion study using the animation wizard.

The process sounds complicated on paper but I tested the idea on a whim. In less than 5 mins (I’m not exaggerating, I looked at the clock) I went from my spring-less shock model to a finished spring compression animation. I’ve had great success with the process and I hope you do as well! What do you think? Did I over-complicate the setup? Leave a comment below with what methods you have used to animate springs! I’ll leave you with one of my favorite benefits of using this method. It’s flexible (in every sense of the word)! With just a slight tweak, this method can even be adapted to animate more complex spring compression scenarios as you can see in the .gif below!

Author information

CADimensions
We are an authorized SOLIDWORKS and Stratasys reseller with certified training & support centers located in New York and Pennsylvania, USA. We are 100% focused on living a CADLIFE and have our vendor's unconditional endorsement in the sales and support of their products.

The post The Flexible Spring Animation appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CADimensions at March 19, 2017 03:00 PM

March 17, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Rose Tutorial – Part 1

Are you tired of getting the same old bouquet of roses for that special someone in your life? We suggest our fellow SOLIDWORKS users try something a little different by modeling this rose for that special someone. It will be a gift that shouts, “Hey, I care about you so much that I learned SOLIDWORKS Surface modeling just for you. And like my love for you, this version of the rose will last forever.”

Welcome to our 4-part series where we will be using several surface modeling techniques to build this highly organic form. In part 1 of this series we will begin modeling the rose bud using the Extrude Surface, Trim Surface, and Swept Surface tools. We’ll also run through an introduction to the 3D sketching environment.

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While real roses are beautiful, they don’t last forever. Fortunately for us, roses made in SOLIDWORKS will! Whether you’re looking for a gift that will stand the test of time or just want to improve your surface modeling skills, our Rose Tutorial Series is for you!

Can’t wait for the next video? View all of the tutorials on the playlist here.

Do you have a green thumb for growing SOLIDWORKS Roses? Share your creations with us in the comments below! As always, thanks for watching!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Rose Tutorial – Part 1 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at March 17, 2017 09:00 PM

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Jurbler McSlapsky

John-Wallin-Liberto-art

The old soul trundled topsy-turvy toward a hole in the air. The time bender should have seen that bear cub and butterfly when he first came through the portal. Now it may be his last time through. You see, a mama bear doesn’t think much of time travelers interrupting a family picnic. If only he had thought to bring these links.

John Wallin Liberto – John. That guy. He can draw some awesome concept ships, vehicles, mechs, suits and cars, but my fav is his space scenes.

Meet WalterAlien: Covenant comes out May 19th. Here you can meet Walter and, yes, reserve your very own customized, synthetic companion. Video in lower left.

Scratchbuilt – Artist Joshua Smith has the wonderful talent of creating ultra-realistic 1:20 scale models of old buildings, dumpsters, and shipping containers, and they are fabulous.

Coco – Trailer for the new animated film from Pixar, about a boy who wants to become a musician and ends up in the Land of the Dead.

Futuratcha Pro – An ingenious Open Type Font that changes as you type, inspired by Futura typeface and cockroaches. See the project launch here.

Memento mori – Strange and wonderful ceramic sculptures by artist Juliette Clovis. Basically busts with lots of shapes, flora or animals around them.

Most popular baby names 2017 – These are the most popular baby names this year for reason unknown, but also for obvious reasons. I mean, cmon, Megbert? [Various goat noises]?

Dis:play(bias) – “is a experimental trial to create devices dedicated to transmit not information, but expression.” What you see is only visible through the the moving cubes and plates in front of the screen.

Ultimate Advice for a 20 Year Old – Gary Vaynerchuk breaks it down hard in this episode of AskGaryVee with life/business advice to a 20 year old girl who wants it all. NSFW language.

Feels Like Summer – Weezer is back with a trippy new video for their single ‘Feels Like Summer’ out on their new album this summer.

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The post Friday Smackdown: Jurbler McSlapsky appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 17, 2017 08:59 PM

3D Printed Baby Model with Functional Organs May Help Doctors Save Infant Lives

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Performing surgery isn’t a perfect science, and even doctors need to practice their skills, especially when it comes to children. To hone those skills, doctors practice various techniques using anatomical models or mannequins. However, these are typically limiting regarding complexity and feel, which limits the training.

To overcome those limitations, Ph.D. grad student Mark Thielen (Eindhoven University of Technology) with the help of 3D Hubs, designed a shockingly detailed child mannequin that features a 3D printed skeleton with functional internal organs.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85600" style="width: 1100px;">Mark’s prototype mannequin was designed using an MRI scan of an actual child to get the most accurate details.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Mark’s prototype mannequin was designed using an MRI scan of an actual child to get the most accurate details.</figcaption></figure>

Mark began the design of the model prototype using MRI scans he garnered from an actual infant, which was ideal for the level of detail needed for the project. He then enlisted the help of 3D Hubs to transition those 3D scans into an anatomically correct model and began testing several materials to see what worked best for the medical application.

The model’s skeleton consists of two parts, the ribcage and spine, both 3D printed with an SLS 3D printer using thermoplastic elastomers, which house the functioning organs. Mark designed the heart and lungs to function similar to their organic counterparts. That is, the heart features working valves to pump fluid, and the lungs inflate/deflate to simulate breathing.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85601" style="width: 1100px;">The mannequin’s heart was 3D printed using thermoplastic elastomer rubber using the PolyJet printing process.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The mannequin’s heart was 3D printed using thermoplastic elastomer rubber using the PolyJet printing process.</figcaption></figure>

The model’s organs were 3D printed using the PolyJet printing process using thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) rubber, allowing them to expand and retract when pumping fluid or simulated breathing. What’s more, the organs are outfitted with embedded sensors, which detect/measure stress, pressure, and impact when undergoing medical testing. Tiny cameras are also housed inside, providing an internal view while undergoing prospective procedures.

That fluid also helps to provide feedback to trainees and can be used to determine if pressure is too high or low, simulating blood-flow under stress. While Mark’s medical mannequin model is still in the prototype stage and still under development, he hopes they will be utilized by medical professionals at some point in the near future.

He goes on to state, “I believe that developing and advancing what we started here can aid medical research in a broader scope. We could potentially create realistic patient models of other body parts to strengthen medical training for emergency procedures and pregnancies.”

The post 3D Printed Baby Model with Functional Organs May Help Doctors Save Infant Lives appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at March 17, 2017 06:05 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Javelin Technologies is a Proud Sponsor of TEDxStanleyPark – Inspiring Brave Actions

On Saturday March 4th at 8:30 AM, thousands of “TEDxStanleyParkers” flooded the lobby of the Queen Elizabeth Theatre in the heart of Vancouver British Columbia. We (JavSponsors) stood by our exhibit table that was quickly swarmed with professionals from a variety of industries, eagerly picking up the 3D Printed prototypes we had displayed. As the doors to the auditorium opened and we were ushered to our seats, the magic at TEDxStanleyPark was about to begin.

TEDxStanleyPark Welcome - Roger Killen, Producer

TEDxStanleyPark Welcome – Roger Killen, Producer

 

TEDxStanleyPark is one of the world’s largest TED conferences. It is held every March in Vancouver, British Columbia. High-impact talks address a diverse range of humanity’s tough challenges and offer practical and optimistic solutions. These talks inspire, stimulate and activate thoughtful optimists with open minds and big hearts to move the needle toward a better world (Source: www.tedxstanleypark.com).

TEDxStanleyPark Vision

“We want the ideas you hear to build awareness, power attitude shifts, trigger conversations that matter, lend support to worthy causes, provoke policy changes and launch movements. These actions give legs to dreams of what could be and move the needle toward a better world.” (Roger Killen, Producer – TEDxStanleyPark)

Proud Sponsor

At Javelin, our motto is to always ‘Aim High’, so the vision of TEDxStanleyPark really resonates with us. This is one of the many reasons why we were so excited to be an official sponsor this year. As a sponsor, we were able to have a display table in the lobby of the Queen Elizabeth Theatre that would give us the opportunity to meet many of the event attendees during several coffee breaks throughout the day. We displayed various 3D printed prototypes that were created with different types of materials so that people could pick them up and really understand the capabilities of the technology. Of course one of the most common questions about 3D printing is “how do you print something” and in our business, that begins with creating a design in SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD. The complete 3D design solution. 

Javelin Technologies TEDx Team

Javelin Technologies TEDx Team

As a bonus, our sponsorship allowed us to invite 42 guests to experience TEDx with us! We had a great time with everyone and had a section of seats reserved for our group to watch the 13 High-Impact talks together.

13 High-Impact Talks

 

View the trailer of each TEDxStanleyPark 2017 talk: www.tedxstanleypark.com

TEDxStanleyPark 2016 Talk – The Power of Zero Tolerance (Isabelle Mercier)

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3D Printing at TEDx

We’re not talking about the same 3D Printing technology that we are familiar with. Imagine the ability to 3D print replacement organs. You don’t have to be in the 3D Printing business to find this fascinating. Tamer Mohamed; President and CEO of Aspect Biosystems, explains that “instead of using plastics that are used in standard 3D printing, [they] use cells mixed with other biomaterials to print living things!”

Tamer Mohamed - President and CEO Aspect Biosystems

Tamer Mohamed – President and CEO Aspect Biosystems

Tamer’s talk at TEDxStanleyPark was not only fascinating, but also very eye-opening as he addressed several problems and concerns related to drug testing and clinical trials including the following facts:

  • “90% of new drugs fail in clinical trials.”
  • “Only 1 out of every 10 drugs that make it to clinical trials is successful.”
  • “It takes an average of 12 years and $2.6 billion to take a drug from the lab to the pharmacy.”

The future of the healthcare industry has a very positive outlook thanks to bioprinting technology. As Tamer explained “bioprinting will enable us to accurately determine the human response of drugs outside of the body and reduce the reliance on animal testing.” 

Lunch at Javelin Technologies

 

At 1:20 PM it was time for an hour lunch break. We invited our guests to join us for a nice catered lunch at our office located at 480 Smithe Street. This would allow everyone to have more time to network with each other including our special guest: Tamer Mohamed! Many attendees were professionals from a wide variety of industries in British Columbia. Our guests were also able to have a tour of our 3D printing lab to see firsthand how the process works.

TEDxStanleyPark Lunch at Javelin Technologies

TEDxStanleyPark Lunch at Javelin Technologies

That’s a Wrap!

TEDxStanleyPark was a huge success and we had a great experience as a sponsor and as a group of first time “TEDxStanleyParkers”. We left the event feeling motivated, ready to inspire brave actions and above all; continue to Aim High. 

The next TEDxStanleyPark is scheduled for Saturday March 3, 3018 in the Queen Elizabeth Theatre.

 

The post Javelin Technologies is a Proud Sponsor of TEDxStanleyPark – Inspiring Brave Actions appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Erin Elliott at March 17, 2017 02:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Error when Browsing to the Vault View through an Open or Save dialog

When a SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault View is created on a client computer, the view’s connection information is stored in the Windows Registry.  An additional entry is also created for 32 bit programs.   However, this registry entry can sometimes be flagged by some system cleanup utilities and deleted.

If this happens, you will encounter the SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Error: “No database connected to this view” when browsing into the Vault View through an Open or Save dialog in any 32 bit application (for instance Microsoft Office 32 bit programs):

SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Error

SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Error

To confirm if this is the cause of the issue, go to the Registry Editor and check:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\WOW6432Node\SolidWorks\Applications\PDMWorks Enterprise\Databases

There should be a key with a name matching the name of the local Vault View.  If the registry key for the Vault View is missing, or if the entire Database key is missing, they will need to be re-created.

Windows Registry

Windows Registry

Here is the procedure for repairing the registry:

WARNING: Please be very careful when editing or deleting any entries in the Windows Registry as changing the wrong entry can lead to major issues on your system.

Step 1:  Browse to the 64 bit Registry Key at:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\SolidWorks\Applications\PDMWorks Enterprise\Databases

Right-click on the key that is missing from the 32 bit section (either for a single vault view or the entire Databases section) and select “Export” to save the registry key information to a .reg file.

Export registry key

Export registry key

Step 2:  Open the .reg file in a text editor such as Notepad.  Modify the registry path by adding “WOW6432Node”, changing it to:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\WOW6432Node\SolidWorks\Applications\PDMWorks Enterprise\Databases
Change Registry Key

Change Registry Key

Step 3:  Once all paths have been updated, save the file, then right-click the file and select Merge (or double click the file) to merge the information into the registry.

Key successfully added

Key successfully added

 

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Error when Browsing to the Vault View through an Open or Save dialog appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at March 17, 2017 12:00 PM

March 16, 2017

SolidSmack

Levi’s & Google Set to Release $350 Smart Denim Jacket Later This Year

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As futuristic as it sounds, we all knew that the day would come when all of our ‘smart’ wearables are embedded into … well, the things that we’re already wearing.

While MIT students and various tinkerers have been experimenting with ‘smart’ fabrics for years now, few concepts have been viable enough to bubble up to the surface as a go-to-market product.

Thanks to a recent partnership between Levi’s and Google, however, the days of swiping our sleeves to change Spotify tracks or activate a bike signal are now here in the form of … yep, a denim jacket.

Built using ATAP’s Project Jacquard technology, the connected denim smart jacket uses conductive fabric to send signals to a connected phone or tablet – similar to a swipe or a tap.

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According to ATAP, the digital connectivity is provided through a smart tag (located at the wrist) that houses all the necessary electronics, and apart from this detachable tag, the whole interactive garment is washable and durable like regular denim.

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While the jacket has been in the works for months now, it’s finally going to go on sale later this year at a retail price of $350. Sure—that might be more than your typical run-of-the-mill denim jacket, but can yours change the track from “Enter Sandman” to “Bat Out of Hell” with a quick swipe of the sleeve?

Find out more about the jacket and the design process over at Project Jacquard.

The post Levi’s & Google Set to Release $350 Smart Denim Jacket Later This Year appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at March 16, 2017 03:51 PM

This Self-Balancing Headphone Concept is Kind of Amazing

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No matter how you spin it, headphones can be a nuisance when it comes to desktop organization. Despite the array of headphone storage options out there, it’s still all too common to just place them wherever is convenient on the desktop

But what if headphones could actually be a centerpiece of your desktop (after your workstation, that is)?

Designed by Korean industrial designer Kyumin Ha, the Gravity headphones are designed to stand upright without the support of a headphone stand when not in use. When worn by the user, their balance translates over to the user’s head for a comfortable and stylish music listening experience.

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Says Ha:

“The position of existing headphones is to always be lying down on a surface. In order to increase the strong presence of the headphone design, balance weight supports the headphone to stand alone. We no longer need to get annoyed while searching a unnoticeable headphone or to get it to stand up. Now you rather just notice it in a flash, and pick it up at once whilst you go out.”

…interesting approach to a common problem.

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While the headphones are still in a conceptual stage right now, executing the concept on a mass scale isn’t too far fetched of an idea.

In the meantime, if you’re looking for a headphone storage solution, consider this free 3D printable desktop headphone stand from industrial designer Jackson Seidenberg.

The post This Self-Balancing Headphone Concept is Kind of Amazing appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at March 16, 2017 03:35 PM

The Complete Raspberry Pi 3 Training Bundle (91% Off)

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We’ve said it time and time again, but the Raspberry Pi is just so dang cool and we think everybody should have one in their toolkit. While there is a bit of a slight learning curve, it’s nothing that today’s designers and engineers can’t handle on a leisurely Saturday.

To get things up and running with the latest Raspberry Pi 3, The Complete Raspberry Pi 3 Training Bundle has 21 hours of training content to get started creating your very own Amazon Echo or even a ‘vintage’ streaming internet radio. Really, the opportunities are limitless!

For a limited time, The Complete Raspberry Pi 3 Training Bundle is 91% off of the $214 retail price and can be purchased for a mere $19.

Courses Included in the Bundle:

  • Raspberry Pi Essentials & Extras
  • From 0 to 1: Raspberry Pi and the Internet of Things
  • Raspberry Pi: Full Stack
  • PiBot: Build Your Own Raspberry Pi Powered Robot
  • Wireless Penetration Testing with Kali Linux & Raspberry Pi
  • Cluster Pi: Build a Raspberry Pi Beowulf Cluster

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
StackSocial Amazon

The post The Complete Raspberry Pi 3 Training Bundle (91% Off) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 16, 2017 03:22 PM

3D Printer Material Chart Details 30 Types of Filament

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With the continual introduction of new 3D printer filament materials, it’s become hard to keep track of them all. Until you see this terrific chart.

The chart was produced by UK-based ThreeDotZero Studios, who provide “support service to fast-growing technology-based businesses.” Currently, they offer services in VR/AR, Home Automation, UAVs/Drones, Maker Market, Gaming Hardware, MVNO/MVNE and “Other Gadgetry”.

As a result of their work, they have no doubt become involved in 3D printing and have been exposed to the myriad of 3D printing materials. And their experience caused them to produce a very interesting chart that covers quite a bit of ground.

The materials covered include: ABS, ASA, Carbon Fiber, Cleaning, Color Changing, Conductive, Flexible, FPE, Glow-in-the-Dark, HIPS, Lignin, Magnetic, Metal, nGen, Nylon, PC, PC-ABS, PET, PET-G, PETT, PLA, PMMA, POM, PORO-LAY, PP, PVA, Sandstone, TPC, Wax and Wood. One material they should add would be PEEK.

But each item is cross-referenced to a number of factors, include extrusion and bed temperatures; strength, flexibility, and durability; ease of printing; shrinkage; solubility and in what substance; food safety; use of blue tape and/or glue stick.

I should caution you that even if a material is food safe, it is definitely not clear that an object printed in that material is food safe: the printer it passes through may expose it to toxic materials, such as lead in the nozzle, for example. Additionally, extruded objects tend to collect bacteria in their layer gaps making them impossible to properly clean and thus are not food safe.

But regardless, this is a wonderful chart for those wishing to explore new materials for their devices.

However, I fear that this type of chart is going to have to be updated regularly to ensure completeness with the burgeoning number of new materials that seem to appear weekly these days.

Nevertheless, thanks to ThreeDotZero Studios you can download this PDF at no charge.

Read more at Fabbaloo!

The post 3D Printer Material Chart Details 30 Types of Filament appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at March 16, 2017 02:54 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Hardware Startup Myomo Partners with SOLIDWORKS for Success

It’s hard to believe the relationship between SOLIDWORKS and Myomo began just one year ago…and what a busy year it has been.  OK, yes, the partnership between us has been in place for many years now and on many fronts. From Myomo’s deep roots in education and research at MIT, its commitment to mentoring programs like First Robotics teams at local high schools, to its commercial use of SOLIDWORKS products in the design process, Myomo has had numerous connections to the SOLIDWORKS community.
The next step in the relationship began March 2nd, 2016.

Andrew Harlan was invited to present at the SOLIDWORKS Q1 Company Meeting in Waltham and share the Myomo story. His presentation and product demonstration on the Myomo Orthosis device was both moving and compelling to the entire audience. Stories like these are an inspiration, the “emotional paycheck” that drives many SOLIDWORKS employees.

The SOLIDWORKS 2017 Launch was my first as Director of Product Introduction. For the 2017 Launch, our goal was to showcase a customer design that highlights ALL of the new functionality and workflows, while telling their story from design through manufacturing. The Myomo Orthosis was a perfect fit and gave the opportunity to showcase every product in the SOLIDWORKS Portfolio.

Working with Andrew to understand the design, engineering, manufacturing and use of the model, the Product Introduction Team had no problem removing proprietary details and data to protect Myomo’s IP and creating a version of the design that highlights the new SOLIDWORKS functionality. The team was also able to create a number of items to share with Myomo that helped its design and marketing teams.

What happened next is the magic that is SOLIDWORKS Product Introduction. SOLIDWORKS customers appreciate seeing new functionality shown in real-world production models and workflows. By digging through the Myomo model in detail, we can find places to showcase the new functionality and how it would be applied. Taking all these examples, the team produces videos, images, and product demonstrations to support the launch of SOLIDWORKS 2017. This year we took things a step further. Not only did we partner with Myomo to use its dataset for launch, we also used their story both in a case study and live at the SOLIDWORKS 2017 Launch Event.

To date, over 2,000 application engineers in the SOLIDWORKS Reseller Channel have learned about 2017 functionality through the Myomo dataset. Even better, over 50,000 SOLIDWORKS users around the world have seen SOLIDWORKS 2017 presented with the Myomo dataset and have been inspired by its story.

If you find yourself inspired by the Myomo story, learn more about how you can be involved.
If you’re inspired to create your own story, the SOLIDWORKS for Entrepreneurs Program is a proven way to get started.

If you simply want to share your story like Myomo, we would love to hear from you.

Author information

Kurt Anliker
Kurt Anliker
Kurt is the Director of Product Introduction at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post Hardware Startup Myomo Partners with SOLIDWORKS for Success appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Kurt Anliker at March 16, 2017 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Navigation Controls

SOLIDWORKS Visualize was a great addition to the tools available to SOLIDWORKS Professional and Premium users.  But the SOLIDWORKS Visualize navigation controls in the 2016 release were very different from SOLIDWORKS; which made switching back and forth between the programs a bit confusing for long time SOLIDWORKS users.

Starting with the 2017 release of Visualize though, the default navigation controls in Visualize now match those in SOLIDWORKS.

Users can still switch back to the Visualize style controls by going to Tools > Options and going to the User Interface tab and selecting “SOLIDWORKS Visualize” in the Viewpoint Navigation section:

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Options

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Options

Learn more about Visualize

Attend our new SOLIDWORKS Visualize training course either live online or in a Canadian classroom near you.

The post SOLIDWORKS Visualize Navigation Controls appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at March 16, 2017 12:00 PM

March 15, 2017

SolidSmack

App Smack 12.17: Handle, Copied, Rubek, Double Tap Pro and More…

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It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device, be it iPhone, Android or Windows!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Haiku Deck

Haiku Deck makes it a snap to create beautiful presentations that will wow your audience – whether you’re pitching an idea, teaching a lesson, telling a story, or igniting a movement.

HaikuDeck

Handle

Handle brings together your email, calendar, and to-dos so you know exactly what you need to accomplish today, tomorrow, and beyond.

Handle

Copied

Copied is a full featured clipboard manager. Save text, links, and images that you’ve copied to your clipboard from any app. Quickly copy your saved clippings from the Copied Today Widget or input them directly into any app using the Copied Keyboard.

Copied

Swiftly Switch Pro

Swiftly Switch is an edge app that improves your Android experience by allowing to use your phone with one hand and faster multitasking.

SwiftlySwitchPro

Rubek

Rubek is a minimalist color based puzzle game. Roll a cube to pick up and match correct colors on the floor, as you make your way to reach the end point while figuring out a way to solve the puzzles.

Rubek

Double Tap Pro

Double Tap the home screen to turn off the screen.

DoubleTapPro

The post App Smack 12.17: Handle, Copied, Rubek, Double Tap Pro and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 15, 2017 10:00 PM

Revival’s Confederate Hellcat Motorcycle Redesign Is Absolutely Badass

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When you drop $65K on a Confederate Hellcat X132 motorcycle, the last thing you want to do is crash it. If the unfortunate does happen, in the case of one individual, you can always turn to Austin-based Revival Cycles and have them redesign and rebuild the bike to make it even more badass. They did just that when creating the Revival 140.

Transforming the 2012 Hellcat X123 into the Revival 140 was no simple feat considering the amount of hand-formed alloy that was added to the original frame. In fact, most of the bike’s original parts were retained, including the 132ci, 56-degree X-Wedge V-twin engine, suspension and a majority of the electronics.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85512" style="width: 1100px;">Formfitting the upper section of the bike's backbone requires a lot of time and finesse to get it done right.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Formfitting the upper section of the bike’s backbone requires a lot of time and finesse to get it done right.</figcaption></figure>

The redesign began with gathering images, sketching shapes, shaping cardboard, and taping up line drawings, culminating in a team effort to arrive at the bike’s stealthy, futuristic look. It was then a matter of adapting the design to the bike while retaining most of its major component makeup. The hard part was hand shaping the alloy to the new design and fitting it to the bike itself, which involved attaching a CNC-machined subframe to the existing chassis.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85513" style="width: 1100px;">Along with an updated look, a newly designed exhaust was created to highlight the engine and provide a new aggressive sound to match the look.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Along with an updated look, a newly designed exhaust was created to highlight the engine and provide a new aggressive sound to match the look.</figcaption></figure>

All of the new alloy upgrades were hand-formed and fitted, including the gas tank, side air intake panels with laser-cut mesh screening and beaked front light housing, which houses an Audi S8 xenon projector. With the new look in place, the Revival team redesigned the seat with a bespoke replacement, hand-stitched to provide an upright riding position to make it easier on the rider during long road trips.

The team also took on the task of redesigning the bike’s exhaust, deeming it too unsightly wrapped around the that beautiful X-Wedge engine. The handmade stainless steel replacement is routed beneath the engine, angled towards the ground and equipped with a 2-to-1 silencer to give it more of chest-thumping growl over the original gas-passer.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85514" style="width: 1100px;">The form-fitted air intakes feature a laser-cut mesh that amplifies the futuristic look of the Revival 140.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The form-fitted air intakes feature a laser-cut mesh that amplifies the futuristic look of the Revival 140.</figcaption></figure>

Rounding out the new look, the team replaced the X123’s factory clip-on bars with a fully-machined, bespoke bar with push-button alloy housings for better ergonomics. The end-result of the redesign is a jaw-dropping, brushed-metal beauty of a machine with a sound to match that is truly one of a kind.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/203012108" title="THE REVIVAL 140 // in motion" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="500"></iframe>

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The post Revival’s Confederate Hellcat Motorcycle Redesign Is Absolutely Badass appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at March 15, 2017 09:04 PM

Model of the Week: Your Very Own Pangolin [It’s Like a Armored Anteater!]

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You can stop looking for the endangered animal you want to 3D print, because I found it for you. It’s a Pangolin. “A pango-what?” A pangolin. It’s a small, nocturnal mammal covered in protective scales and native to parts of Africa, China, India and Malaysia. Not only is this a 3D printed pangolin, it’s a 3D printed, papercraft-style pangolin, which makes it extra cute and not so creepy looking as a real pangolin.

What do you do with a 3D printed pangolin? Me? I want to print 50 of these, walk down a crowded street, fall on the ground and pretend they’re escaping from my stomach cavity. What? That’s not gross. “You’ll scare children!” Impossible. It’s a know fact that all children LOVE pangolins.

This model was made by Taiwanese designer and art creator, Chen Xuejian (Amao). He learned about 3D printing in 2015 and applied it to his interest in papercraft. Since then he has translated a few paper shape works over to 3D geometry to print them out. The pangolin is the most aggressive of his efforts, creating an articulating body which allows the model to stand, squat, raise its head and roll into a ball.

Amao used SketchUp to model the creature and an Up Plus 3D printer to print the model in ABS with a Z-resolutions of 0.2mm (0.25mm suggested for Cura users). All .stl files are provided.

A lot of people in the comments are raving about this print so really looking forward to this one. You can download the 3D model on Thingiverse or over on MyMiniFactory.

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

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The post Model of the Week: Your Very Own Pangolin [It’s Like a Armored Anteater!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 15, 2017 08:21 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Wired Wednesdays: The Best Day to Learn Electrical Design Solutions in SOLIDWORKS

Introducing: Wired Wednesdays. Once a month, Javelin’s Certified SOLIDWORKS Electrical & PCB Experts will host a 30 minute webcast demonstrating the capabilities of SOLIDWORKS Electrical and SOLIDWORKS PCB. You will learn technical tips, key features, and productivity benefits for your business.

Wired Wednesdays

Wired Wednesdays

Upcoming Wired Wednesdays

Schematic Design in 15 Minutes – Wednesday March 22

Learn some of the drafting options available to Electrical Designers. This session will also cover a basic schematic design using SOLIDWORKS Electrical, and how to complete a general assembly of components.

  • Basic Electrical drafting
  • 2D Panel Layouts
  • Managing your BOM and other reports
Hydraulics with SOLIDWORKS Electrical – Wednesday April 19

Learn how the Schematic tool can be used to create Hydraulic Designs. This session will also review the solution’s application in the 3D environment and how to complete the design with a BOM along with other reports.

  • Basic hydraulic drafting
  • Creating a hydraulic 3D route
  • Managing your BOM and other reports
How does SOLIDWORKS Electrical do it? – Wednesday May 17

Discover some of the key questions designers ask when looking at Intelligent schematic solutions. This session will also review planning configurations, design rule checks and handling design changes.

  • Customize Device tags and Wire numbers
  • Handle changes through a project
  • Complete a design check/review
Interfacing Electronic Design with SOLIDWORKS – Wednesday June 21

Discover the simplicity of the SOLIDWORKS solution that works bidirectionally for planning PCB layouts. This session will also focus on managing change between MCAD and ECAD to help reduce prototype costs.

  • Eliminate cost of lining up holes
  • Work bidirectionally with M-CAD
  • Managing your BOM and other reports
Electrical Design

Electrical Design

More than a catchy name 

  • Wired Wednesdays are complimentary and packed full of helpful design tips
  • Get skilled on the advanced tools and the latest features
  • The information is delivered to you live online, no need to travel
  • Gain insight into the industry-specific tools that address your unique needs
  • Ask a SOLIDWORKS Electrical Expert any questions you might have
  • Webcast attendees will have the chance to win 1 of 4 $50 Amazon.ca gift cards* (See below for contest details)

Plus, Wired Wednesday attendees will also receive a complimentary 1 hour session with a SOLIDWORKS Electrical & PCB Expert to review their current design processes.

Registration 

To register for a Wired Wednesday session please click on the “REGISTER” button below and complete the form with your contact information.

Topic Date Time (EDT)
Schematic Design in 15 Minutes March 22, 2017 2:00 PM — 2:30 PM REGISTER
Hydraulics with SOLIDWORKS Electrical April 19, 2017 2:00 PM — 2:30 PM REGISTER
How does SOLIDWORKS Electrical do it? May 17, 2017 2:00 PM — 2:30 PM REGISTER
Interfacing Electronic Design June 21, 2017 2:00 PM — 2:30 PM REGISTER

 

*Each Amazon.ca gift card has a $50.00 value (CDN). Gift cards will be delivered via email from Amazon.ca. Contest applicable to Canadian residents only. Winners will be selected on Friday June 30th, 2017 by 5:00pm EDT.

The post Wired Wednesdays: The Best Day to Learn Electrical Design Solutions in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Erin Elliott at March 15, 2017 06:52 PM

SolidSmack

Get Fusion 360 at 50% Off + 3 Months Pluralsight Training

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Deal of the day folks. Over March 15th and 16th, Fusion 360 is $150 (50% off) for an annual subscription. This offer also includes 3 free months of Pluralsight training.

If you’re not familiar with Pluralsight, you need to be. They have thousands of courses, not only for 3D design software, but for other software you (like us) are probably interested in. They have monthly and annual memberships, as well as team plans.

Make sure and read the terms though. The deal is good for March 15th and 16th only.

This promotion offers a 50% discount on a purchase of a new 1-year subscription to Fusion 360, made 3/15/17 through 3/16/17 from the online store.

This promotion also offers a 3-month trial subscription to Pluralsight with the purchase of a new 1-year subscription to Fusion 360. AUTODESK IS NOT THE MANUFACTURER OR DISTRIBUTOR OF PLURASIGHT, AND AUTODESK MAKES NO REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES WITH RESPECT TO PLURASIGHT.  PLURASIGHT IS PROVIDED “AS IS” AND AUTODESK IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR DELIVERY OF 3 MONTH SUBSCRIPTION TRIAL OFFER FROM PLURALSIGHT. On completion of qualified Fusion 360 purchase, further details for accessing the 3-month trial to Pluralsight will be emailed to the purchaser.

The post Get Fusion 360 at 50% Off + 3 Months Pluralsight Training appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 15, 2017 06:14 PM

Dragon Innovation Certifies Your Crowdfunding Campaign Before You Launch

dragon-innovation-kickstarter-project-certification-crowdfunding-00

We’ve all seen Kickstarter campaigns fail due to one issue or another–manufacturing problems, design issues, poor scheduling. Raise your hand if you’ve contributed to a failed campaign. Yes? I’m with you. It seemed like it couldn’t fail, right? More often than not, however, the issue all others stem from is a lack of planning–Planning that starts with those who have been there before and have knowledge of the many intricacies involved in getting a product to market.

Enter Dragon Innovation, a company whose purpose is to provide an engineering consulting and certification service to those who need help getting from garage to factory along with company scaling services once they get there.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85493" style="width: 1100px;">Dragon Innovation’s Certification provides a 6-factor review of your design to get your product to market.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Dragon Innovation’s Certification provides a 6-factor review of your design to get your product to market.</figcaption></figure>

The Certification process begins with three questions designed to see if your product meets or exceeds important requirements for a crowdfunding launch.

  1. Can it be manufactured?
  2. How much will it cost?
  3. When can it be delivered?

Once those questions are answered, the process moves onto a 6-factor review and detailed analysis of the product, showing you what’s necessary for success and ultimately, if the venture measures up.
These six factors include:

  1. DFM Analysis: Product breakdown to see if it can be manufactured reliably.
  2. BOM Review: Itemized material and component list, cost overview.
  3. Mechanical Teardown: Product disassembly for design integrity encompassing cost, quality, and reliability.
  4. Packaging Considerations: Determine suitability and cost of packaging design, offer redesign when necessary.
  5. Estimation of Manufacturing Costs: Both domestic and overseas cost optimization options.
  6. Pro-forma Manufacturing Schedule: Provides a manufacturing schedule and produce realistic shipping dates.
<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85495" style="width: 1100px;">The 6-factor review encompasses everything from mechanical teardown to packaging considerations; designed to get your product funded and manufactured.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The three questions begin the process and the 6-factor review encompasses everything from mechanical teardown to packaging considerations, designed to get your product funded and manufactured.</figcaption></figure>

The breakdown is straightforward and benefits both newcomers and seasoned crowdfunders alike. Considering Dragon has helped some of the more familiar brands, brands with successful crowdfunding campaigns (including Pebble, MakerBot, Sphero, IDEO, Formlabs and other), it’s a testament to their knowledge and ability to navigate the production lifecycle.

Dragon’s certification program also provides personalized feedback from engineers to help navigate any design and manufacturing issues that could arise. They also have an online Product Planner, currently in Beta, they say is “More powerful than spreadsheets, easier than PLM or ERP”. With their customer list and clear approach to making sure a product launch is feasible, Dragon Innovation may be exactly what’s needed to reduce the number of failed campaigns.

The post Dragon Innovation Certifies Your Crowdfunding Campaign Before You Launch appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at March 15, 2017 05:50 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Switching from Standalone SOLIDWORKS Licenses to a SOLIDWORKS Network License

So you’ve made (or are considering) the decision to use a SOLIDWORKS Network License.

There are many great reasons to switch to a network license setup:

  • Perhaps you have engineers/designers/drafters who do not use SOLIDWORKS 100% of the time.
  • Maybe they spend some time building their exciting products,
  • Or perhaps they aren’t so fortunate and find themselves sometimes having to use… another CAD package (shudder).

Whatever the reason, it might be that your company has 10 SOLIDWORKS users, but only 5 are ever using SOLIDWORKS at the same time. One option would be to have separate CAD workstations where users leave their cubicle (gasp) and work from a different computer. Another, simpler way is to make use of Network Licensing. With a network license, you can easily switch which computers are using SOLIDWORKS.

Step 1: Find a License Server

The system requirements for a License Server aren’t particularly strict. It just needs to have a certified O/S (see this page, and scroll down to SOLIDWORKS Network License Server). Nothing nearly as strict as the requirements to run SOLIDWORKS. Often times, people will ask whether or not you can install the SolidNetWork License Manager (or SNL Manager) on the same computer as SOLIDWORKS (so it could function as both a server and a client machine). The answer is yes, but do keep in mind that if that user’s computer turns off (either through crashing, rebooting, or being turned off while the user goes on a 2-week holiday), then the license server is down and no one will be able to use SOLIDWORKS.

Step 2: Check your Firewall settings

If you do not have internal firewalls, then this step is very easy. If there is a firewall between your server and the client machines, then you will need to open TCP/IP ports 25734 and 25735 for both inbound and outbound connections

Step 3: Install SolidNetWork License Manager

You do this by running Setup.exe as an Administrator. Select Server Products from the list then check the box for Install SolidNetWork License Manager.

SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager

SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager

Step 4: Activate the License Manager. You can do this by launching the SolidNetWork License Manager utility on the server. Then under the Server Administration tab, click the Modify button and choose the Activate/Reactivate. See screenshot below:

Activate SOLIDWORKS Network License

Activate SOLIDWORKS Network License

If you are on a computer that is doubling as a client machine, you may encounter a situation where your SolidNetWork License manager does not have a Server Administration tab. If that is the case, please refer to this blog article.

Step 5: Change the client workstations to use the SOLIDWORKS network license

On each of the client workstations, modify the installation and change the serial number. you will be prompted to identify the server. Simply type 25734@server (replace server with the name of your license server).

Step 6: Test the computer you just changed by launching SOLIDWORKS

If it does not launch, contact your VAR for assistance. If it does launch, then you are good to repeat the procedure on the other client workstations.

If you’d like to make the switch to network licenses, please contact your SOLIDWORKS sales rep for more information.

The post Switching from Standalone SOLIDWORKS Licenses to a SOLIDWORKS Network License appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Jim Peltier, CSWE at March 15, 2017 12:00 PM

March 14, 2017

SolidSmack

Behind the Design: Hypnogogic City by Mathew Borrett

Mathew-Borrett-Hypnogogic-City-00

The centerpiece of Mathew Borrett’s Hypnogogic City peers into a hazy and shifted existence of Toronto’s city hall. From our view, we see a hybrid destruction of Toronto’s city hall both by man and by nature. Each building seems to hold its own function and host its own colony. Everything else is grown over with trees or flooded with water.

Mathew-Borrett-Hypnogogic-City-00

Although there are no people visible, the elements included in the scene suggest that life goes on. Tiny worlds densely pack into every inch of Hypnogogic city, and the amount of work, effort, and imagination that has gone into it kind of makes your brain hurt. Mathew Borrett succeeds in making Toronto new again. It is inviting to look at because the city remains familiar, but its transformation makes it foreign and excitingly unexplored. Visit his show, and you will see people standing with their noses an inch from his images taking in the multitudes of intricate detail. 

The process of bringing Hypnogogic City to life was overwhelming, says Borrett. Scene management and balancing micro details versus macro composition were constant challenges. Mathew would spend many hours zoomed into a building sculpting a detail only to realize that his efforts only made a few millimeters of difference in the final composition.

Mathew uses Isotropix’s Clarisse to develop layout, materials, and lighting. This software came with a learning curve as it was relatively new him. Clarisse is a powerful software that is comparatively new to the scene, and its standout feature is its ability to handle a huge amount of assets. Mathew was able to smoothly navigate and interact with his scenes which had over 350 billion polygons. “I once tried pumping as much geo into a scene as I could. Got up to 20 or 30 trillion, at which point the point clouds exceeded my 64 gigs of ram. That’s some crazy voodoo!” he said. 

Mathew-Borrett-Hypnogogic-City-01

Mathew-Borrett-Hypnogogic-City-02

Mathew’s methodology involved a lot of building on top of building, revisiting and reshaping. Matt describes the development of his images as an organic growth. Fitting. Borrett built nearly all the assets in Modo, a fast and powerful polygonal modeling software, and then added them to his final composition in Clarisse. Erosion and other decay were sculpted in 3D-Coat, and fabric assets were created in Marvelous Designer.

He was able to acquire most of the city assets as SketchUp files. Mathew admits that getting his hands on these pieces gave him a false sense of the workload ahead of him. Most structures were too simple to use, forcing him to rebuild a lot from scratch. To accomplish this, Borrett says he amassed hundreds of reference photos, turning his project into a detailed independent study of Toronto’s City Hall.

Towards the end of his project, he hit a major snag; he could find no online render farms that supported Clarisse. The fan was nearly hit, but Borrett lucked out finding a refurbished, 16-core workstation that he could use to render out slices of his final images quickly enough to meet the deadline. No doubt a lot of love, hard work, anxiety, and bleary eyes went into this.

Mathew-Borrett-Hypnogogic-City-03

Mathew-Borrett-Hypnogogic-City-04

There are no overt political or environmental message hidden within his dream-like version of Toronto. Borrett says it’s up to the viewer to decide whether this Toronto is dystopian or utopian. Real life Toronto deals with constant transit issues, an out of control housing market, and many other obstacles that are making it unlivable for many Torontonians (myself included). There is an undeniable appeal to setting up shop on a distant rooftop in Hypnogogic City. 

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Mathew-Borrett-Hypnogogic-City-06

If you’re in Toronto, make sure you check out his show at The Red Head Gallery at 401 Richmond Street West. Prints are available for sale as well. 

The post Behind the Design: Hypnogogic City by Mathew Borrett appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Lauren Thomas at March 14, 2017 09:06 PM

Samsung Teams Up With STAEDTLER Pencils for Latest Galaxy Tab Stylus

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In the arena of tablet styluses, ranging from basic nubs to advanced pressure-sensitive offerings from Apple and Wacom, little consideration has been put into making the writing devices look at all analog. Instead, the majority of digital sketching styluses are futuristic interpretations of what a writing instrument could be.

With the launch of the Noris Digital, Samsung has quite literally turned that approach on its head.

With the announcement of their new Galaxy Tab S3 and accompanying S Pen stylus, Samsung announced that they have collaborated with iconic german pencil manufacturer STAEDTLER to create a stylus that mimics the natural feel and touch of a traditional wood pencil. Designed exclusively for Samsung Galaxy tablets, the STAEDTLER Noris digital pencil includes the same features as the company’s S Pen— just wrapped up in a new package.

Steadtler-Noris-Digital-For-Samsung

Featuring a similar black striped paint design as its analog siblings, the digital pen is nearly indistinguishable from a wooden STAEDTLER analog pencil if you had two laying side-by-side on your desk. Ergonomically speaking, well, it’s not too far off from the pencils many of us grew up learning how to sketch with.

While Samsung hasn’t disclosed pricing or availability details yet, we’re putting our bets on this one being a hit.

The post Samsung Teams Up With STAEDTLER Pencils for Latest Galaxy Tab Stylus appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at March 14, 2017 04:15 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

5 Habits Of Successful SOLIDWORKS Power Users

We all get busy and when you’re rushing to get a job completed, it’s easy to form some bad SOLIDWORKS habits along the way. We polled some of our SOLIDWORKS power users to see what helped them break the bad habits and increase their efficiency.

5 HABITS OF SUCCESSFUL SOLIDWORKS POWER USERS

1. Get Certified

Earning your SOLIDWORKS certification not only sharpens your skills, but it can help you stand out among the vast sea of SOLIDWORKS users. It can help you get a job, keep a job, or even earn a promotion. Plus, if you are on subscription, you can take the CSWP or the CSWA for free!

2. File Management

File management is likely your least favorite part of your job, but if you keep it clean and simple, you can focus your time on the fun stuff – designing! If you’ve ever opened an assembly and were greeted by an error message for missing part files, then you know the frustration of poor file management. Remember to use unique filenames, avoid duplicate files, and check if parts are used in an assembly before moving them. We recommend setting standards as a company. If you really want to eliminate the frustration and get your file management under control, consider purchasing SOLIDWORKS PDM.

3. S-Key

SOLIDWORKS is so robust it can be difficult to remember all the shortcuts at your fingertips. However, it is important to not forget the basics. The S-key is a two-fold feature and can be a huge timesaver. Use the S-key to pull up a menu of commonly used features that are context specific for your assemblies, sketches, or whatever you may be designing. These can also be fully customized.

The S-key is also great for searching for commands. A lot of power is available to you in the CommandManager, but since some of the features are tucked away in sub-menus, you can use the S-key to search for the feature you need. This shortcut will save an extra step because the search bar normally defaults to searching the helpdesk rather than commands. So, whether you are looking for a buried feature, or can’t remember where it is located, the S-key is a shortcut that should not be under-utilized.

Also, don’t forget the S-key can also be customized for even more time savings!

s-key

4. Mouse Gestures

Mouse gestures are great for customizing frequently used commands to each unique user. Simply right-click and drag to access your mouse gestures at your cursor location. You can choose four or eight commands that are context-specific, meaning you can choose different commands for assemblies, sketching, etc. The power of customization is a great time saver.

mouse-gestures

5. Breadcrumbs

SOLIDWORKS 2016 introduced a new user interface and a new tool called breadcrumbs. Breadcrumbs help to significantly decrease mouse movement across the screen, allowing you to access a hierarchy of entities and features without going back and forth to the feature tree and ComandManager. By using the D-key, you can bring the breadcrumbs right to your cursor location for additional time savings. As an added bonus, the D-key also brings the Confirmation Corner directly to your cursor.

Breadcrumbs

Author information

GSC
GSC fuels customer success with 3D engineering solutions for design, simulation, data management, technical documentation, and 3D printing, as well as the most comprehensive consulting, technical support, and training in the industry. As a leading provider of SOLIDWORKS solutions and Stratasys 3D printing technologies, GSC’s world-class team of dedicated professionals have helped numerous companies innovate and increase productivity by leveraging advanced technologies to drive 3D business success. Founded in 1989, GSC is headquartered in Germantown, WI. For more information about GSC, please visit www.gsc-3d.com.

The post 5 Habits Of Successful SOLIDWORKS Power Users appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GSC at March 14, 2017 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Felcana: The New Product that Revolutionises Pet Care

You’ve heard of activity trackers for humans. Now there’s one for animals too. It stands to revolutionise what we know about our furry friends’ habits, as well as the speed at which vets can diagnose our pets.

Until they develop opposable thumbs, it’s unlikely you’ll be having a WhatsApp powwow with your bow wow. The next best thing is Felcana – a series of connected devices that capture the comings and goings of moggies and doggies.

Think of it as a lifestyle tracker for your furry friend. You can monitor how often your pet sleeps, where they are in the house, how often they eat, how much activity they get and an awful lot more. All with the aim of better understanding your pet’s behaviour and habits.

Felcana can even detect whether your pet may be feeling anxious or unwell. Or, whether they are eating or drinking less than they should be. Or, if they are experiencing symptoms that suggest a trip to the vets is in order.

Invented by vets, Felcana is also an invaluable tool to help animal experts diagnose unwell cats and dogs and make sure they get the treatment they need faster. By gathering and interpreting data on your creature’s behaviour, Felcana connects owners, pets and vets like never before.

“As vets we can struggle to get the lowdown from our canine and feline friends. Even the most devoted owner can’t answer every single question we might have. Felcana sheds light on clinical blind spots, providing hard data for vets and peace of mind for owners. We don’t have to ask how much water a dog is drinking, we know. It means quicker, more certain treatment.” – Dr James Andrews, Vet and inventor of Felcana


How does it work?

Felcana is essentially a series of connected devices.

The first is a waterproof tracker that attaches to the collars of cats and dogs. This monitors activity and connects with beacons: small signal boxes that are spread around the owner’s home to track pet movements. Data is sent to a hub – also the tracker charging point – which connects to a mobile app that owners can access through their smartphone or tablet.

From the app, owners get a snapshot of their dog’s behaviour, habits, health, happiness and more. Felcana can even issue push alerts to user devices if your pet begins behaving unusually or displays early signs of illness.

How did SOLIDWORKS help?

As a start-up, the team behind Felcana were faced with the unenviable task of creating an innovative product on a shoestring budget. That’s where the SOLIDWORKS Entrepreneur Program came in, which granted Felcana a twelve-month license as well as 3D CAD training and marketing assistance.

“Some of the most creative products are coming from the early stage start-up community. Their inventiveness and ambition is great, but they often lack the capital to invest in industry leading software like SOLIDWORKS. The SOLIDWORKS team recognised in Felcana the potential to build a market-leading product in the pet sector and granted them an Entrepreneur license to see this project grow and develop.” Greg Smith, Director, Startup Advocacy & Community Applications, SOLIDWORKS

With SOLIDWORKS on their team, Felcana’s designers got to work on refining their product through intensive 3D modelling, exploring different options in terms of size, design and appearance. The result is a series of devices that are smart, unobtrusive, lightweight and tough enough to take whatever the most rambunctious cats and dogs can throw at them.

“Access to SOLIDWORKS through their Entrepreneur Program has been an invaluable element in designing Felcana. Allowing us to rapidly design, shape and test each component, miniaturising and integrating the form factor seamlessly with our proprietary technology. Collaboration with SOLIDWORKS through their Entrepreneur Program has ensured the team here at Felcana could move through to modelling stages at an accelerated pace with confidence.” Tom Blower, Head of Product, Felcana

 

What’s next for Felcana?
Having come second place in a recent Pitch@Palace contest, Felcana has just completed raising funds on Kickstarter raising over £26,000 with 250 backers from over 30 countries. A fantastic achievement! The team expect to beta test in early 2017 and are anticipating a 2017 retail launch.

You might also be interested in:
>> SOLIDWORKS on song for premium hi-fi manufacturer
>> 10 ways to reduce product development costs

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Felcana: The New Product that Revolutionises Pet Care appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS UK at March 14, 2017 01:33 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Installing SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard 2017 (and subsequent releases)

The SOLIDWORKS Visualize product was added to the SOLIDWORKS group of products in 2016 as a high-level rendering tool.  SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard is available to users of SOLIDWORKS Professional and Premium licenses with a valid SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service contract.  Initially, in the 2016 version, a separate installation file set was required to install SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard and the serial number of SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium license was used to activate it.

From version 2017 onward, SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard has a separate serial number and is installed using the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager.

Retrieving a Serial Number for SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard

Visualize serial number can be found in the SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal > My Products, under a SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium license.

SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal options

SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal options

 

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Serial Number

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Serial Number

SOLIDWORKS users without Customer Portal access can create one using the serial number of their SOLIDWORKS license:  https://customerportal.solidworks.com/.

The serial number of a SOLIDWORKS license is found in Help > About SOLIDWORKS.

 

Customer Portal option Register My Products can be used to unlock Customer Portal features if they appear locked.

SOLIDWORKS Value Added Resellers (VARs) can also provide SOLIDWORKS Visualize serial numbers.

Installing SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2017

Starting with the version 2017, Visualize products are installed using the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager, which can be downloaded from the SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal > Download > Downloads and Updates.

Whether creating an individual installation, administrative image, or downloading a complete installation file set, click Next to get to the dialog where serial numbers for various SOLIDWORKS products are entered.  Select SOLIDWORKS Visualize, enter its serial number and proceed with Next.  A separate field is provided for entering the Visualize Boost license.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize in the Installation Manager

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Serial Number in the Installation Manager

In the Product Selection dialog, enable SOLIDWORKS Visualize and proceed with the installation.

SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager Product Selection

SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager Product Selection

Launching SOLIDWORKS Visualize

SOLIDWORKS Visualize is launched as a standalone application, from the Start menu or clicking on the icon on the desktop.

How to learn SOLIDWORKS Visualize

If you are looking for a comprehensive live instructor-led course then you can take our SOLIDWORKS Visualize rendering course either live online or in a Canadian classroom near you.

If you need a quick self-paced course then you can try the SOLIDWORKS Visualize tutorials on MySolidWorks.

The post Installing SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard 2017 (and subsequent releases) appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sanja Srzic at March 14, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The Fastener Suitcase

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This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “Collectors” from Springtime Carnivore and work our way through tracks from Video Age, Spooky Mansion, Ezra Bell, Greyhounds, and others before wrapping up with “Friends” from Brijs, Dandelion.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:1QrJVTF2cQcGHby0Gy9BLZ" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Fastener Suitcase appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 14, 2017 11:35 AM

Take the First-Ever Look Inside Nike’s Air Manufacturing Innovation Facility

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It’s one of the most recognizable and versatile shoe designs ever created—yet how it’s manufactured has remained a mystery to many over the past 40 years.

The Nike Air (bag), which is used in everything from the company’s basketball shoes to even golf and skateboarding shoes, was a pioneering idea that helped establish Nike as one of the most innovative companies around.

Presented to Nike co-founder Phil Knight in 1977 by inventor Frank Rudy, the company has kept their US-based Nike Air Manufacturing Innovation facility under wraps for decades. In celebration of the release of the Nike Air VaporMax this month, however, the company has finally taken the curtain off to reveal just how those air bags get made:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8r2PDicM79U?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Air_Bag_1_original

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Air_Bag_Inflation_2_original

Air_Bag_Shelf_1_original

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Mold_1_original

The Beaverton, Oregon-based facility, as well as its counterpart in St. Charles, Missouri, have manufactured a combined 3.5 billion Nike Air units to date. To pull in those kinds of numbers, the company employs 1,300 highly skilled people to work around the clock at both facilities. That’s a lot of air!

The post Take the First-Ever Look Inside Nike’s Air Manufacturing Innovation Facility appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at March 14, 2017 01:46 AM

March 13, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How do I install and activate SOLIDWORKS MBD?

The question of installing SOLIDWORKS MBD is quite common after our customers have purchased a license.

Installing SOLIDWORKS MDB

SOLIDWORKS MBD license is not included in any of the three SOLIDWORKS license types (Standard, Professional or Premiun).  It is installed using the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager.  In the Serial Number dialog, shown below, select SOLIDWORKS MBD and enter your serial number.  This is the only entry required – SOLIDWORKS MBD is not listed in the next Product Selection dialog.

Installing SOLIDWORKS MBD

SOLIDWORKS MBD in the Installation Manager

Activating SOLIDWORKS MBD

SOLIDWORKS MBD is not listed in Tools > Add Ins like other SOLIDWORKS Add-ins.  However, when it is installed, the MBD toolbar should automatically become active.

If you don’t see the MBD menu listed then right-click on a CommandManager tab and select SOLIDWORKS MBD from the shortcut menu

SOLIDWORKS MBD CommandManager

SOLIDWORKS MBD CommandManager

Learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS MBD

Catch up on the latest release of SOLIDWORKS MBD in our blog post, and review other related SOLIDWORKS MBD tech tips.

The post How do I install and activate SOLIDWORKS MBD? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sanja Srzic at March 13, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Monday List 11.17 | What We’re Reading This Week

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Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

25 Songs That Tell Us Where the Future of Music is Going
A strange thing you learn about American popular music, if you look back far enough, is that for a long time it didn’t much have “genres” — it had ethnicities.

01

How to Become an International Gold Smuggler
Harold Vilches, a 23-year-old Chilean, exported $80 million in contraband gold. It all started with a Google search.

02

Stop Buying Gear and Build It Yourself Instead
Here are five places that can teach you how to build everything from a surfboard to a teardrop trailer.

03

Beowulf Is Back!
What’s behind the running pop-culture engagement with the epic poem?

04

In the Future, We’ll All Wear Spider Silk
Human exploitation of spider silk has lagged behind the arachnid’s own ingenuity.

05

The post The Monday List 11.17 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 13, 2017 10:00 AM

March 12, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Creating a Testing Vault for SOLIDWORKS PDM

SOLIDWORKS PDM Tech Tip

Written by: Michael Nolte, Application Engineer, DASI Solutions

From time to time, there is a need to create a test environment so that any potential changes to a SOLIDWORKS PDM vault can be tested away from the production vault or a vault that is actively being used. This way, change can be vetted out without causing delay or problems to a company’s normal activities in a production PDM vault. Some examples are: new workflow approval process, updating file and folder data cards, etc…

In this Tech Blog, we only copy the settings from the production vault and none of the CAD data. Some of the items that come over are: Workflows; File, search, folder cards; SOLIDWORKS PDM templates; variables; users; group; etc…

  1. To get started: Open the ‘Administration’ program, log into the production vault, right click over the vault name, select ‘Export’
    SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration PanelThis will open a window titled something like: ‘Administrative Export File1’. Go to the File menu, select ‘Save As..’. I recommend saving this (.cex) file to a location you can easily get to but also make a backup of this file just in case it’s needed in the future. I recommend naming these file something like: ‘VaultName Full Settings Backup 20170221’
  2. Next, we need to check to see what data format and what Database server the production vault is using. This way, when we make a test vault, it matches the existing production vault. Right click over the production vault while in the ‘Administration’ program, select properties. Write down a note or even screen capture the ‘Database server:’ and ‘Date format:’ fields
  3. To create a new vault requires the necessary credentials for SQL and for the PDM server(s). Collect these prior to moving onto the next step.
  4. Time to create the new vault. Right click over the server name in the ‘Administrator’ program, select ‘Create New Vault…’
    PDM - Create New Vault

    • This will open a wizard to create the new vault. If prompted for the ‘Type of Vault’ select ‘Professional Vault’ (formally called Enterprise PDM) or ‘Standard Vault’
    • Type in a name and description that clearly indicates that this is not the production vault. i.e. ‘Test Vault’, ‘For testing workflow changes’, etc…
    • On the ‘Select vault root’ in most cases the default selection is fine.
    • When presented with the ‘Choose database’ screen, please choose or type in the Database Server that was collected back in step 2. I recommend not changing the database name.
    • No changes are needed on the ‘License Server for Vault’ screen
    • Set the data format that was collected back in step 2 to be the same on this new test vault.
    • On the ‘create the admin user’ screen I recommend unchecking ‘using server default’ and typing a different ‘admin’ password. This way users that may have the ‘admin’ password for the production vault don’t accidentally go into the wrong vault. Be sure to write this down or share with only the users that will be testing in the new vault.
    • ‘Configure vault’ screen we will set the ‘Use a predefined configuration’ to ‘Empty”. We will go into why we did this a little later.
    • Click Finish for the test vault be created.
  5. Create a vault view. This can be done by either logging into the vault in the ‘Administration’ program or using the ‘View setup’ program.
  6. Now we can import the .cex setting file that was created back in step 1. The reason that we selected empty in step 4-h. and then created the vault view in step 5 is so that when we import the .cex settings file, it brings along the data cards and even possibly files that are part of PDM template(s).
    There are 2 ways of importing setting files into a new vault. The first is to right click over the vault name in the ‘Administrator’ program, select import. The second method is file, open, then when the settings file window is open, drag and drop the top of the tree in the settings window to the new test vault that was created.
    Settings for New Vault

At this point you can now start doing your testing without effecting the production vault. Make a copy of a project assembly to your desktop and then copy it into the new vault for testing, if needed. Some permissions may need a backup in the copied testing vault.

Note: If Dispatch scripts are used in the production vault and are needed for testing, they will need to be exported separately. To check to see if the production vault is using any dispatch scripts: Open the ‘Administration’ program, log into the production vault, expand, Add-ins, right click over Dispatch, select ‘Administrative Actions’. If the ‘Administrative Actions’ is empty or Dispatch isn’t listed, then you don’t have any Dispatch scripts.


Author information

DASI Solutions
DASI Solutions
DASI Solutions is dedicated to service and support. As one of a handful of original, charter value-added resellers (VAR) in the SolidWorks Community, DASI Solutions has built partnerships and success stories with many of our customers. We are very pleased to bring you SolidWorks 3D CAD design engineering software and 3D printing services.

The post Creating a Testing Vault for SOLIDWORKS PDM appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by DASI Solutions at March 12, 2017 03:00 PM

March 11, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Step-Up Series: Thermal Analysis

Welcome back to the SOLIDWORKS Simulation Step-Up series! Over the next few weeks, we’ll be discussing all things SOLIDWORKS Simulation. Today, the North America SOLIDWORKS Simulation experts will discuss thermal analysis.

Thermal simulation specialist, Joe Galliera, is often asked which SOLIDWORKS software tool is best to use for Thermal analysis.  After a detailed description about all of the three types of heat transfer, Conduction, Convection and Radiation, he uses an example model to explain the differences between Simulation Professional and Flow Simulation, and finally summarizes everything in answering this burning question.

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We’ll hear from the team every few weeks over the next couple of months – they’ll share their expert perspectives and experience on topics such as shell strategies, tools for productivity, and analyzing reports.

Like what you see and want to skip ahead? No problem! Check out the full SOLIDWORKS Simulation Step-up series here or, click the banner below to experience more simulation!

thermal analysis

Have another series suggestion? Please let us know in the comments down below and we’ll see about making it happen. As always, thanks for watching!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation Step-Up Series: Thermal Analysis appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at March 11, 2017 10:00 AM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 11.17

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Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top ten stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

Meet Perdix, a 3D Printed Drone Designed to Work in Swarms

The tiny 6.5-inch drone was impressive enough in its swarming capability that the DOD’s Special Capabilities Office took notice and adopted it for use in ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) operations.

3d-printed-drone-swarm-perdix-03

Rocker Jack White Opens New State-of-the-Art Record Manufacturing Facility in Detroit

With sales of vinyl records in 2016 reaching a 25-year high (3.2 million LPs sold), it comes as little surprise that more musical artists want their albums pressed for a growing base of fans that are treasuring physical music formats once again over streaming services.

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Watch How ASICS Developed Revolutionary GEL Cushioned Running Shoes in the 1980s

While Nike and Adidas consistently pull out all the stops when it comes to promoting their latest footwear innovations, other footwear manufacturers have taken a much quieter route in promoting their technologies—but that doesn’t necessarily mean that they don’t have them!

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Raspberry Pi Announces New $10 Pi Zero W Featuring Bluetooth and WiFi Connectivity

The all-new Pi Zero W, priced at just $10, keeps the same form factor as the original Pi Zero, but adds the same 802.11n and Bluetooth 4.0 wireless chip found in its older brother, the Pi 3 Model B.

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Fly Over Apple’s New Campus Set to Open Next Month With New 4K Drone Footage

It’s been years in the making and one of the last dreams of Steve Jobs before his passing in 2011, but the new Apple heaquarters—Apple Park—is finally set to open next month.

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The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 11.17 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 11, 2017 09:00 AM

March 10, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Gear Heart Tutorial – Part 4

Many of us SOLIDWORKS users would be considered “gear heads”, or high-tech enthusiasts, but some of us take our “gear headed-ness” to such a high level that our enthusiasm for all things mechanical just pours from our heart. This tutorial series is for you, the SOLIDWORKS user that says “Nay, I am not just a gear head, I’m a gear heart!” In this four-part series we’ll be building a functional geared heart pendant using mostly essential SOLIDWORKS features, with a few unique part and assembly features sprinkled in.

In the final video of our series, we are going to show you how to save each part as an individual part file using the Save Bodies feature. This will allow us to pull the individual parts into an assembly file to bring the heart to life using some standard and mechanical mates.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kfgFtJDkVh0?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

Whether you’re interested in all things mechanical or want to exercise your artistic side, the Gear Heart Tutorial Series will help you better understand and expand your Gearing and Mechanical Mate skills in SOLIDWORKS! Can’t wait for the next video? View all of the tutorials on the playlist here.

Download the full Gear Heart SOLIDWORKS assembly here.

Are you a gear head? Share your creations with us in the comments below! As always, thanks for watching!


Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Gear Heart Tutorial – Part 4 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at March 10, 2017 10:00 PM

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Deploy All Beasts

kisoo-lee-art

Sounds of the throngs bent the vapid air. Grey fur and red hues mixed among family upon the large beasts taking them to an unknown land. A horn would sound – you wait for the count. One, you continue moving. Two, you stop and dismount. Three, you attack to the right. Four, you deploy the full power of these links.

Kisoo Lee – Wonderful views of fantastical lands, castles and windmills, monuments old and ancient, and a peculiar rhythm across them all.

Beowulf Breaakdown – Behind the scenes in the incredible visual effects created and composited by milk vfx for the new Beowulf movie.

A Southerner’s Guide to Drinking – I don’t endorse drinking… unless you do it with class. See this guide on 15 libations every southern gentleman should know about.

Central Panik – I’m not completely certain what this surreal short is about, but it has very cool visuals… and there’s flying hamburgers in it. Making of included.

Carboard Airships – These amazing cardboard airships by Jeroen van Kesteren are my new favorite thing in the world. Ohhh, the detail.

Supernova 1987A – NASA has released new visuals of a star exploding with the power of 100 million suns. An interesting look into the before, during and after the death of a star.

B&W Children – Winners of the third annual B&W CHILD photo contest have just been announced. See children from around the world in everyday situations, but with lots of dramatic contrast. More sets in the Winner’s Gallery menu.

Vacuum Cannon – Project for the weekend, and a pretty simple one – a large, 10 foot long vacuum cannon with a 4 inch bore. BOOM.

GiTS Aoki Remix – Trailer for Ghost in the Shell featuring the Steve Aoki remix of the iconic theme of the 1995 anime version and how Weta Workshop made the Thermoptic suit.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/v4iduQkrMaY?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The post Friday Smackdown: Deploy All Beasts appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 10, 2017 06:19 PM

Fly Over Apple’s New Campus Set to Open Next Month With New 4K Drone Footage

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It’s been years in the making and one of the last dreams of Steve Jobs before his passing in 2011, but the new Apple heaquarters—Apple Park—is finally set to open next month.

As one of the most future-forward buildings in existence, the ring-shaped headquarters is a modern marvel in sustainable architecture and operations, with solar panels covering nearly every surface of the rooftops of the main building, satellite buildings, and even the parking garage. Of course, with Apple being Apple, every last detail of the design of the structure has been carefully thought through—all the way down to the doorknobs.

From a Reuters report last month:

“Tolerances, the distance materials may deviate from desired measurements, were a particular focus. On many projects, the standard is 1/8 of an inch at best; Apple often demanded far less, even for hidden surfaces. The company’s keen design sense enhanced the project, but its expectations sometimes clashed with construction realities, a former architect said.

‘With phones, you can build to very, very minute tolerances,’ he said. ‘You would never design to that level of tolerance on a building. Your doors would jam.’

One of the most vexing features was the doorways, which Apple wanted to be perfectly flat, with no threshold. The construction team pushed back, but Apple held firm.”

While there’s still some cosmetic work to be done before the 2017 opening, there’s no doubt that Steve would be proud to see his vision finally come to life — as seen in this 4K drone video shot just days ago:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QjiA4CTYnUA?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

And for nostalgic purposes, here’s Steve giving his proposal for Apple Park to the Cupertino City Council six years ago:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="375" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gtuz5OmOh_M?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The post Fly Over Apple’s New Campus Set to Open Next Month With New 4K Drone Footage appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at March 10, 2017 06:01 PM

3D Print This Sleek Headphone Stand from MakerBot’s Own Resident Industrial Designer

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Headphones. They’re a modern necessity for many of today’s workers and, in many cases, have become the universal sign for “don’t bother me right now.” But as convenient as they are, they can be kind of annoying when it comes to keeping your desk uncluttered.

Headphone stands usually tend to do the trick, but how often do you remember to put one on your shopping list? Thanks to industrial designer Jackson Seidenberg, you don’t have to.

Seidenberg, who worked at MakerBot Industries in Brooklyn for years as a senior industrial designer, recently shared his own headphone stand on Thingiverse that anybody with a 3D printer can fabricate for their own use. Of course, with this being created by a MakerBot employee, the dimensions of the support-free model have been optimized to perfectly match the build volume of the Replicator+, but can just as well be printed on another 3D printer, too.

MakerBot Headphones

While technically any headphones can be used, Seidenberg uses two stands for his Logitech G930 and Astro a50 headphones.

With spring cleaning season just around the corner, get a headstart on organizing your desk. Download the model here.

The post 3D Print This Sleek Headphone Stand from MakerBot’s Own Resident Industrial Designer appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at March 10, 2017 05:35 PM

Pay What You Want for This Complete Photography Skills Course Bundle

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Whether you’re a seasoned pro or a budding amateur looking for a new hobby, knowing how to take great photographs is a skill that will do you no wrong. And with the dizzying array of photography apps available on ever-more-powerful smartphones these days, taking quick snaps at a moment’s notice is becoming second nature.

Thankfully, learning the necessary skills for taking and editing great photographs isn’t too difficult — particularly when you have the right learning resources at the ready.

With nearly 27 hours of learning content and over 100 photography assets to get you started, this insane Pay What You Want Complete Photography Bundle is the perfect resource to add to your arsenal.

Featuring everything from mastering black and white photography to becoming an Instagram whiz with your food shots, the take-it-at-your-own-pace bundle will no doubt ensure that people take a second look when you post those vacation pics on your Facebook feed.

Assets/Courses Included:

  • 65 Stock Photos to Further Your Photography Education
  • 40 Stock Photos to Reference or to Further Your Creativity
  • Use Photoshop CC for Dramatic Black & White Prints
  • Create Beautiful Portraits for Family, Friends, or Clients
  • Remember Each Trip with Frame-Worthy Photos
  • 50 Tips to Try with Your DSLR or Mirrorless Camera
  • Master Your DSLR or Mirrorless Camera’s Advanced Features
  • If You’re Going to Instagram Your Food, You Might as Well Do It Right
  • Learn to Manipulate Light & Composition to Create More Complex Photos

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
StackSocial Amazon

The post Pay What You Want for This Complete Photography Skills Course Bundle appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 10, 2017 05:10 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

How to make SOLIDWORKS Smart Components even smarter with Autosize

Author: Sanja Srzic – Javelin Technologies

When SOLIDWORKS smart components with autosize option are inserted in an assembly and mated concentric, their configuration matches the diameter of the mating component based on predefined values.

In this example, the bushing is a smart component.  The goal is to insert the bushing into an assembly and match the size of the pin.

The bushing has the inside diameter configured.

SOLIDWORKS smart components Configure Dimension

Configure Dimension

In a defining assembly, a pin and bushing are mated concentric.  The pin does not require additional configurations.  Select the Bushing and select Tools > Make Smart Component.

Make Smart Component command

Make Smart Component command

In the Auto Size section of the Smart Component PropertyManager, enable the option Diameter.  Pick the inner cylinder of the smart component as the Concentric mate reference.  Click Configurator Table.  For each configuration of the smart component define the matching range of the pin diameter and click OK.

Create Configurations

Create Configurations

When a smart autosized component is mated to a pin, its configuration updates automatically to match the pin diameter as long as it is within the range specified in the Configurator table.

Use the Insert Component command for the smart component and create a concentric mate on the go.  Bushing configuration will adjust to the pin diameter.

Bushing size adjusts automatically when inserted

Bushing size adjusts automatically when inserted

Author information

Javelin Technologies
Javelin Technologies is a provider of technology solutions since 1997. We are experts in 3D design and have helped thousands of companies with solutions for mechanical design, electrical design and 3D printing. Large or small, we have the skills, experience, and services to propel your organization to new heights so you can aim high.

The post How to make SOLIDWORKS Smart Components even smarter with Autosize appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Javelin Technologies at March 10, 2017 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

An overview of the Print Selection option in SOLIDWORKS

SOLIDWORKS Print Selection is used in situations where only a portion of a SOLIDWORKS drawing needs to be printed.  This option is found in the Print dialog and becomes available when the radio button for ‘Current screen image’ is selected.  Click OK to select the scale and print area in the drawing.

SOLIDWORKS Print Selection

SOLIDWORKS Print Selection

On the drawing, two items will appear:

  1. Print Selection dialog
Print selection dialog

Print selection dialog

2. Selection frame

Print Selection Frame

Print Selection Frame

The Print Selection dialog and the selection frame typically appear in different locations on the screen.  Both can be moved.  The placement of the selection frame defines the content of the print.

When the print scale is changed, the selection frame is resized.

If a custom scale is specified, click the button Apply scale to get the frame size to adjust.

Custom Scale

Custom Scale

Position the frame as required.

Position Frame

Position Frame

Confirm OK in the Print Selection dialog to print.

OK to Print

OK to Print

The area inside the selection frame will now be printed.

The post An overview of the Print Selection option in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sanja Srzic at March 10, 2017 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Stump the Chump: Can a Sketch Profile Change as a Function of the Length of the Sweep Curve?

Welcome to the latest blog series from SOLIDWORKS. Each month, our new “Stump the Chump” post will delve into common questions and/or challenges that our users encounter on a regular basis and will present various ways to solve them. While we have a large team of seasoned CAD veterans at SOLIDWORKS who can answer user questions, we also have the most passionate and best CAD user community in the world. So in this blog series, we will share advice, tips and suggestions in response to real questions posted by YOU in the SOLIDWORKS User Forums.

We will scour the SOLIDWORKS User Forums for questions and challenges that are relatively common among our users. If after reading this “Stump the Chump” post, you have an alternative answer or simply have additional questions, feel free to add it to the comments section below. So without further ado, here’s the first question:

Question: Sweep along a curve. Can the sketch profile dimension change as a function of the length of the sweep curve?? Like the diameter of a sketch circle, which becomes bigger and bigger as the square root of the length of the path?

User Answer: Depending on how complex your profile and sweep path curve are, you may be able to use a guide curve (or curves) to drive the dimension of the profile. In this quick example the 0.5 radius circle is the profile sketch, and the end diameter is determined by the guide curve, the size of which is driven by an equation linked to the length of the sweep path.

In this example, I replaced the 3-point arc guide curve with a freeform spline.

If you need the profile to change a lot, a loft might be more appropriate.  Don’t forget, you can use guide curves to refine the shape of a loft too. If you can post more details, and/or an example of what sort of shape you’re trying to get, someone can probably give you some more detailed advice.

Follow-up question: Thanks so much for your help. I am 90% home…
If I try to have the length of the sweep curve in the sketch as one dimension, then I make your suggested equation to make the circle diameter driven by this length of the sweep curve. But, then I get only a constant diameter through the whole sweep – the last value. How do I get the parameter throughout the sweep, starting as zero and ending as the length of the sweep curve?

User Answer: You will need to use a loft, from a point to a circle. You can’t just reduce a circle profile to zero in diameter in SOLIDWORKS.  A mathematician might see a point and a zero diameter circle as the same thing, but SOLIDWORKS doesn’t. A circle has to have a diameter, even a really small one. So if you need a point at one end, you’ll need to make a loft with a centerline. 

Below: Sketch1 is the curve that is used for the center line, and to locate the end point. Sketch3 is just a sketch point, placed coincident to the end of the curve in Sketch1. Sketch2 is a circle, centered on the other end of the curve in Sketch1. We set the diameter of the circle equal to the length of the curve so it would be parametric. If you know the length of your curve, and you know it’s not going to change, you could just put the dimension on the circle and not bother with the equation. You don’t say if your curve is a simple arc like we’re using here, or something more complex. With the arc, as we have it set up here, you can’t go much beyond 113° without having the loft turning in on itself and failing. The shape of your curve and the end diameter will determine what you can get away with. Also note that the loft gets bigger uniformly as it follows the centerline.  If you want a more complex transition from point to end diameter, you will need to add guide curves, more profiles, play with the start and end constraints, or a combination of some, or all, of the above.

SOLIDWORKS Expert Weigh-In: Another way to approach this problem is to create the sweep using an equation-driven curve. The blue circular profile (shown below) is swept along the green sweep path and the diameter of the profile is controlled by the equation-driven curve.

Watch the video below to see how it’s done.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gGzzBtAbUUQ?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

 

Thank you to Mogan Fons for the question and to Logan Pegler and Erik Bilello for providing solutions in the SOLIDWORKS User Forum. If you have a question that you would like to pose to the greater SOLIDWORKS user community or to provide tips and tricks to your peers, our User Forums are a great resource. Access the SOLIDWORKS User Forums here.

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Stump the Chump: Can a Sketch Profile Change as a Function of the Length of the Sweep Curve? appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at March 10, 2017 01:00 PM

March 09, 2017

SolidSmack

Behind the Design: Weta Workshop’s Ghost in the Shell Geisha Mask

Weta’s detailed work on the Geisha masks involved 3D printing and milling numerous pieces mixed with plain, old-fashioned model work. (Image courtesy of Tested)

If you haven’t seen it, I would highly recommend watching the original animated movie Ghost in the Shell, which will give you an idea of the amount of technical detail prominently featured in the live action adaptation hitting theaters later this month (March 31).

To get an even better idea of the detail in question, Tested’s Adam Savage took a trip to Weta Workshop for a behind the scenes look at how the prominent New Zealand special effects/prop company designed the incredible Geisha masks featured in the movie.

Before I get into their prop-making process, take a look at the trailer to see the results and the design process and the amount of detail going into a project of this magnitude:

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As you can imagine, 3D printing plays a major role in bringing the concept into reality and, rightfully so, considering more than several masks are made for each version. For the Geisha mask build, the Weta team used Japanese actress Rila Fukushima (The Wolverine, Game of Thrones, Arrow) as a base for a digital model to create the masks.

Traditional modeling and techniques were used to create and shape some of the mask’s pieces while others, such as the hair were created using 3D printing and milling to make them look immaculate. What’s more, the inside was fitted with tiny fans to create airflow for the actors wearing them, which pulls air in through the nose and exits out of slats hidden within the tiny hair lines.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85400" style="width: 1100px;">Some of the masks feature animatronics that utilizes servomotors to open and close the face portion while the inside features actual rotating gears to give it a sort of steampunk look. Image: Tested<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Some of the masks feature animatronics that utilizes servomotors to open and close the face portion while the inside features actual rotating gears to give it a sort of steampunk look. Image: Tested</figcaption></figure>

The star of the various Geisha masks certainly goes to the animatronic version, which has an actuated sectioned face panel that opens and closes with a push of a button. The amount of detail going into the internals is astounding and features visible, working gears that rotate, giving it a sort of futuristic steampunk look. If that wasn’t enough, each separate facial section is held to the expanding latches using magnets which self-marry to the correct position when reattached, making it a breeze to work on the mask when necessary.

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It’s incredible to see the amount of work a team of nearly 150 people can accomplish when it comes to creating physical props and costumes that go into making a feature film and Weta is no stranger to the effort. Some of you have certainly seen their work on other blockbuster films, including The Lord of the Rings trilogy, Mad Max: Fury Road, Avatar and District 9 among a host of others dating back to 1987.

The post Behind the Design: Weta Workshop’s Ghost in the Shell Geisha Mask appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at March 09, 2017 11:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip: Move and Copy Dimensions Between Drawing Views

Creating dimensions in drawing views can often be a time consuming process. This is especially true when there’s a lot of views included in the drawing. To make it easier to add dimensions to views, SOLIDWORKS can move or copy dimensions from one view to another. All it takes is a single keystroke combined with a mouse drag on screen. Check out the video below to learn more!

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Want to see more SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips? Check out our playlist on YouTube to catch up on past videos or you can even jump ahead to the next video!

Do you have a suggestion for the next Tech Tip? Tell us in the comments; we’d love to hear your ideas!


Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip: Move and Copy Dimensions Between Drawing Views appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at March 09, 2017 10:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Hangprinter: A Frameless 3D Printer

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The Hangprinter is one of the most unusual 3D printer concepts yet seen, and it actually works.

The Hangprinter is a project by Torbjørn Ludvigsen, based in the city of Umeå in the northern end of Sweden. Ludvigsen, who goes by the handle “Tobben”. It’s a RepRap variant designed by Ludvigsen apparently in 2014, but is now something a lot more than just an idea.

The Hangprinter’s name isn’t just for fun: this machine indeed has no frame at all, unless you count floors, walls and ceilings as such. It operates by simply hanging by cables from the ceiling and three anchor points on the floor.

The central extrusion device is stabilizing in space by tight, controllable cable lengths on the three floor attachment points, as well as gravity pulling down along the z-axis hanger strings.

The extrusion unit can raise itself by pulling on the z-axis cable, and move laterally by appropriate manipulations of the three floor anchor cables. The installation of the anchor points is more or less arbitrary, and apparently you simply set their locations in firmware so that the system can compute the movements accurately.

In the video you can see how this interesting machine works.

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Needless to say, the accuracy of this setup is not nearly as precise as you’d find with a desktop 3D printer made from precision metal components and rigid frame, and Ludvigsen explains that the layer resolution is “less than a millimeter”. But remember that the Hangprinter, having no frame, means you can print very large objects that don’t require high resolution. In fact, high resolution would mean the larger prints take longer to complete.

The specifications for this printer are obviously variable; the build volume is as large as you can string the setup. However, there will certainly be practical constraints. One major constraint, for example, is that extruded plastic, PLA in this case, would warp at large scale. In the video the print surface appears to be unheated. But if it were, the prints could be somewhat larger.

The entire project is released as open source, and Ludvigsen hopes to deliver more function in the future as you’ll see below. However, you can attempt to build one yourself and it won’t cost very much, as the price estimate for the parts and supplies runs only about USD$250.

While this is clearly a developmental experiment, the concept is quite promising. I suspect this approach could be scaled up to enable printing of very large objects, and easily done on building sites where you need only find some anchor points.

I believe this to be a very promising concept that should be explored further. However, it seems that Ludvigsen is the only person on the case at the moment. He’s seeking assistance from the 3D printing community to permit him to continue development of the Hangprinter so that everyone can take advantage of it.

He’s currently accepting donations at his BountySource page, where you can help out with a number of options.

Read more at Fabbaloo

The post The Hangprinter: A Frameless 3D Printer appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at March 09, 2017 09:23 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Available Now: SOLIDWORKS Self-Paced eCourses

We all know that learning in a classroom is one of the best ways to learn SOLIDWORKS, but sometimes it’s not possible to attend a live class. You need the convenience to learn what you want, where you want. SOLIDWORKS is pleased to announce a library of self-paced, high quality, interactive eCourses that offer learning on your schedule.

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You might be wondering what separates a SOLIDWORKS eCourse from other eLearning options. SOLIDWORKS eCourses include:

  • Everything from the SOLIDWORKS instructor-led training manual in a self-paced eLearning format
  • Background information and key concepts
  • Subject-matter expert videos and demonstrations
  • Interactive simulations that allow you to make the picks and clicks yourself
  • Offline exercises that allow independent study and further practice

The initial launch of this program includes eight eCourses:

SOLIDWORKS eCourses are hosted on MySolidWorks and are available for purchase from your SOLIDWORKS reseller as a three-month subscription.

For more information about the SOLIDWORKS eCourses and other training options, visit http://my.solidworks.com/training. To sign up for a SOLIDWORKS eCourse, please contact your reseller.

Author information

Joe Rousseau
Joe Rousseau
Joe is a Senior Training Manager, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post Available Now: SOLIDWORKS Self-Paced eCourses appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Joe Rousseau at March 09, 2017 01:30 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Sign up for SOLIDWORKS Early Visibility (EV) Releases

Included in SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service, is the ability to download service packs from the SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal. The Early Visibility (EV) Program enables SOLIDWORKS users to participate in the last testing stage of a new service pack before it is fully released.  An EV release is usually available a couple of weeks before a full release and it appears in the Downloads and Updates section of the Customer Portal.

SOLIDWORKS EV Program

SOLIDWORKS EV Program

Anyone with a valid SOLIDWORKS Subscription can sign up for the Early Visibility Program.

A SOLIDWORKS EV release can be used to test known issues.  It is particularly helpful to customers affected by a software issue that is being corrected in an upcoming service pack. For the EV program:

  • You will receive an email, with instructions, when an EV is available.
  • The SOLIDWORKS Customer Experience Improvement Program System Option is turned on for all EV releases.
  • The EV release will be upgradable to the full release if there is a change.
  • All problems specific to EV releases are evaluated for fixing prior to general release.

We recommend that you update your installation from the Early Visibility release to a full release service pack when it becomes available.

Sign up for the program »

The post Sign up for SOLIDWORKS Early Visibility (EV) Releases appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sanja Srzic at March 09, 2017 01:00 PM

March 08, 2017

SolidSmack

Raspberry Pi Announces New $10 Pi Zero W Featuring Bluetooth and WiFi Connectivity

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For $5, the Raspberry Pi Zero has been a remarkably capable computer for all your hardware tinkering needs in a bite-sized package – assuming you haven’t needed Bluetooth or WiFi connectivity.

While a number of accessories have been available to provide additional connection options, they greatly sacrificed the small size of the Zero, which was, for many, its biggest selling point. But what if you could have all that connectivity and the same form factor as the Zero?

Well, the Raspberry Pi powers that be have been listening attentively.

The all-new Pi Zero W, priced at just $10, keeps the same form factor as the original Pi Zero, but adds the same 802.11n and Bluetooth 4.0 wireless chip found in its older brother, the Pi 3 Model B.

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“(The original Zero) found its way into everything from miniature arcade cabinets to electric skateboards,” says Eben Upton, Raspberry Pi founder in a blog post. “Many of these use cases need wireless connectivity.”

It’s important to note that for many, the applications of the Pi have been limited to the form factor – particularly wearables. With the introduction of the much smaller (and connected) model, expect yet another wave of ingenious DIY products to sweep in. The foundation has already teamed up with a couple of friends to create an official injection-molded case with three interchangeable covers to help usher in new ideas for form factors.

cases

The Pi Zero W is available for $10. Find out more over at Raspberry Pi.

The post Raspberry Pi Announces New $10 Pi Zero W Featuring Bluetooth and WiFi Connectivity appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at March 08, 2017 08:38 PM

Watch How ASICS Developed Revolutionary GEL Cushioned Running Shoes in the 1980s

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While Nike and Adidas consistently pull out all the stops when it comes to promoting their latest footwear innovations, other footwear manufacturers have taken a much quieter route in promoting their technologies—but that doesn’t necessarily mean that they don’t have them!

While it may have been 30 years in the making, this epic mini-documentary from ASICS more than makes up for it.

When the company launched their GEL cushioning back in the 1980s, it was completely different from anything that the running shoe market had ever seen. To help celebrate the 30th Anniversary of the GEL cushioning, which has gone through various iterations over the years as running shoe needs have changed, the company hired art director Yoshirotten to put together their ‘making of’ story:

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Find out more about the GEL cushioning used in ASICS shoes by heading over to Taica.

The post Watch How ASICS Developed Revolutionary GEL Cushioned Running Shoes in the 1980s appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at March 08, 2017 08:27 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Zeta Group Streamlines Automated Systems By Switching From 2D to SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Are you always looking for ways to speed up your processes and create better designs faster? Are you finding that your 2D solution is no longer providing you with the same productivity? Zeta Group LLC felt the same way and found success by switching over to SOLIDWORKS Solutions. Let’s take a look at their story.

Founded in 2010, Zeta Group LLC is a product design, engineering, and manufacturing consulting company that focuses on automating manufacturing systems development and production for its clients. The company strives to develop advanced automated manufacturing systems that are unmatched in terms of speed and quality.

While Zeta Group has used SOLIDWORKS from the start, the company’s designers still relied on AutoCAD to design the systems’ electrical subsystems. However, after hitting many roadblocks and wasting numerous hours manually updating and rechecking last-minute changes to schematics, they needed to find a better solution. Finding that their current 2D solution was slowing them down, they started to look for alternatives for their electrical needs.

Zeta Group implemented SOLIDWORKS Electrical 3D design and SOLIDWORKS Electrical Schematic software in 2013 because the software is easy to use, is integrated with SOLIDWORKS mechanical design tools, and makes design changes less costly and more efficient.

“Because we’ve replaced using 2D mechanical CAD with intelligent, parametric SOLIDWORKS Electrical software for creating schematics, we are saving time overall and are much more efficient at handling design changes,” stresses Kevin Marrick, president of Zeta Group LLC.

By implementing SOLIDWORKS Electrical design solutions, Zeta Group can incorporate design changes that affect electrical systems quickly and easily, eliminating the manual time sink that such changes would previously require and leading to overall design cycle reductions of 50 percent.

Read the entire story on Zeta Group Engineering and find out more about how its 2D to SOLIDWORKS Electrical switch allowed the company to make more efficient automated manufacturing systems in less time. Click here to read more!

 

Author information

Josie Morales
Josie Morales
Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post Zeta Group Streamlines Automated Systems By Switching From 2D to SOLIDWORKS Electrical appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Josie Morales at March 08, 2017 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to sort SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Components in your BOM table [VIDEO]

Have you ever wondered how you can sort your SOLIDWORKS Bill of Materials in a way that all of your SOLIDWORKS toolbox components are listed at the foot of the BOM table? That was the problem that one of our customers was facing.

If you look at the sorting options that are available for a BOM table, you will notice that it is not possible to sort the BOM based on component type. So we have to find another way to accomplish that. Fortunately, there is an easy trick that we used to overcome the problem. Watch this video if you want to know how:

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The post How to sort SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Components in your BOM table [VIDEO] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Saeed Mojarad (CSWE) at March 08, 2017 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – March 2017

Hello to all,

Welcome to this new edition of the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News, coauthored by members of the SOLIDWORKS Technical Support teams worldwide.

Breakout sessions done by your SOLIDWORKS Support team at SOLIDWORKS World 2017

SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News - March 2017

We all impatiently wait for the availability of the SOLIDWORKS World 2017 proceedings. Meanwhile, I thought I’d list all the breakout sessions, 25 in total, your SOLIDWORKS Support team offered during the event. Take it as an illustration of the team’s dedication to spread the knowledge, share our experience and tips, and ultimately help you become better at your job.

SOLIDWORKS PDM

  • Data Migration from Workgroup PDM to SOLIDWORKS PDM
  • Take SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2017 to the Next Level with Database Replication
  • Beyond the Button Press: Using Checklists to Manage Moves/Upgrades in SOLIDWORKS PDM
  • Managing SOLIDWORKS Electrical using EPDM
  • Advanced Troubleshooting Techniques for SOLIDWORKS PDM
  • Optimizing and Maintaining SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard Performance

SOLIDWORKS MBD

  • Model-based Definition (MBD) Learning Path – Panel Discussion
  • MBD Implementation: 10 Do’s and 10 Don’ts
  • What’s New in SOLIDWORKS MBD 2017

SOLIDWORKS PCB

  • Understanding PCB Design Processes and how SOLIDWORKS PCB Helps to Create High-quality PCB Designs
  • SOLIDWORKS PCB New Horizon on ECAD and MCAD Integration

SOLIDWORKS Simulation

  • Design Validation from Dynamic Motion Analysis to Structural Simulation
  • Best Practices: Bonded and No-Penetration Contacts in SOLIDWORKS Simulation

DraftSight

  • DraftSight – All About SOLIDWORKS PDM Integration and PDF Task Conversion

SOLIDWORKS Electrical

  • SOLIDWORKS Electrical Custom Report Creation
  • All about PLC’s

3DEXPERIENCE

  • Collaboration between SOLIDWORKS and the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform

 

When the SOLIDWORKS World 2017 proceedings are available, be sure to look up the above presentations and watch the videos. In addition to the above breakout sessions, your SOLIDWORKS Support team also gave out the following hands-on sessions. Those were not recorded, so they won’t appear in the proceedings.

  • SOLIDWORKS Inspection Hands-On
  • SOLIDWORKS Electrical: Working with PLCs
  • Streamline Quality Control, Save Time, and Eliminate Errors with SOLIDWORKS Inspection
  • SOLIDWORKS Industrial Designer Hands-On
  • Knowledge Pills
  • T-SQL Hands-On Part 1
  • T-SQL Hands-On Part 2
  • Introduction to SOLIDWORKS Composer Animations

SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM replaced with SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard

In the summer of 2015 SOLIDWORKS communicated its plans for the End of Life for SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM. Its last release comes as part of SOLIDWORKS 2017 Professional and Premium.  If you wish to use a Data Management product that is included with SOLIDWORKS Professional and Premium, consider SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard is a data management solution for smaller workgroup environments in a single location.  Included in SOLIDWORKS Professional and Premium packages, SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard eliminates the overhead of managing SOLIDWORKS and DraftSight data on local and shared network drives.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard is based on the same technology as SOLIDWORKS Enterprise PDM (renamed SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional). SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard provides a much simpler upgrade path to SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional as your company outgrows the functions of SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard.

Note:

There will not be an updated version of SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM available with the release of the 2018 products and that the future releases of SOLIDWORKS will not support running a version 2017 SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM installation with any 2018 or newer version.

Should you have any question, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller (VAR) for assistance. You may also watch the “Data Migration from Workgroup PDM to SOLIDWORKS PDM” presentation from the SOLIDWORKS World 2017 proceedings when they are available.

Simulation Step-Up Series

Last month, Reza discussed the topic of Meshing. This month, he comes back with a focus on Mixed Meshing.

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Next month, Reza will give us an engineering view of FEA.

Noteworthy Solutions from the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base

icon - SW What can cause the SOLIDWORKS® 2017 software to take a long time to start as compared to the SOLIDWORKS 2016 version?
If the SOLIDWORKS® 2017 ‘Loading Registry’ splash screen appears for 90 seconds while launching SOLIDWORKS 2017, and the SOLIDWORKS 2016 software or previous versions launch much more quickly, this  is likely the result of a conflict between an antivirus application such as such as AVG or Kaspersky® and the FlexNet Publisher version 11.13.1.1 (used by SOLIDWORKS® 2017).
This issue has been reported to the development team on SPR# 990482.
If you are experiencing this problem, please contact your VAR so that you can receive notification when the issue is addressed.
From Solution Id: S-072608.

icon - SW In the SOLIDWORKS® software, when I perform various actions such as edit features, change view orientations, edit parts-in-context, or use the View Selector, why does the display or graphics area flicker or flash?
This behavior occurs in the SOLIDWORKS® 2014 through 2017 SP 1.0 version software. It occurs if you maximize the SOLIDWORKS window, have other windows are open behind the SOLIDWORKS window, aned have installed the Microsoft® ‘December, 2016 Security Only Quality Update’ or the ‘December, 2016 Security Monthly Quality Rollup’.
For more information on how to resolve this problem, see Solution Id: S-072597.

Icon - EPDM Can both Windows® Active Directory® users and local computer users log in to the same SOLIDWORKS® PDM Professional and Standard version vault?
Yes, it is possible for both Windows® Active Directory® users and local computer users to log in to the same vault. However, in a replicated environment, the local computer users do not replicate to other archive servers. If you require that local computer users log on to the replicate archive servers, then you must create the users manually on each replicate archive server.
From Solution Id: S-072629.

icon - Simulation Where can I find information about best practices for nonlinear analysis in the SOLIDWORKS® Simulation software, including how to deal with initial interferences (other than Shrink Fit)?
For information about best practices for nonlinear analysis in the SOLIDWORKS® Simulation software, please download the attachments to Solution Id: S-072655. The attachments include a video of the SOLIDWORKS World 2014 presentation ‘Best Practices for Getting Quality Results from Nonlinear Analysis in SOLIDWORKS Simulation’ along with related slides in the PDF file format.

icon - Simulation When considering the purchase of a custom-built computer workstation for use with analysis software such as SOLIDWORKS® Simulation, what should I keep in mind?
If you purchase a custom-built system from your preferred supplier (who is not a SOLIDWORKS hardware partner) or if you build your own system, be aware that the risk of system-specific hardware problems increases. The risk increases because unlike prebuilt Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) workstation systems from one of our hardware partners, custom-built systems do not necessarily validate or optimize hardware for use with engineering applications.
For more information on how to resolve this problem, see Solution Id: S-072291.

– – – = = = o o O o o = = = – – –

That’s it for this month. Thanks for reading this edition of SOLIDWORKS Support News. If you need additional help with these issues or any others, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller.

Also, comments and suggestions are welcome. You can enter them below.

 

Author information

Julien Boissat
Sr. Technical Customer Support Engineer, SolidWorks, EMEA at DS SolidWorks Corp.
I have been a Tech Support engineer for Simulation products since 2002. I was previously a product manager at SRAC, the original makers of COSMOS for those who remember that time! ;-). I am currently in charge of the content of the certification exams for simulation products. I also initiated and still author the Simulation Knowledge Base and participate as much as possible in the expansion and evolution of the SolidWorks Knowledge Base. Finally, I handle the SolidWorks Support Monthly News blog.

The post SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – March 2017 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Julien Boissat at March 08, 2017 08:58 AM

March 07, 2017

SolidSmack

Rocker Jack White Opens New State-of-the-Art Record Manufacturing Facility in Detroit

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With sales of vinyl records in 2016 reaching a 25-year high (3.2 million LPs sold), it comes as little surprise that more musical artists want their albums pressed for a growing base of fans that are treasuring physical music formats once again over streaming services.

Yet, because of the downfall of vinyl in the age of cassette tapes, compact discs, and the early days of MP3, only a handful of functioning vinyl pressing factories capable of filling these new orders still exist. Thanks to ex-White Stripes frontman Jack White, however, there’s now one more place churning out copies of both vinyl classics and the sounds of tomorrow.

With the grand opening his Third Man Records pressing plant in Detroit, White is now employing 20 vinyl pressers in a 10,000 square foot facility capable of churning out 5,000 records per shift — with the capability to run 24/7 as production orders increase.

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Similar to Krispy Kreme Doughnuts, the facility offers a full transparent viewing window for audiophiles (or soon-to-be audiophiles) to watch each stage of the vinyl pressing process ahead of picking up their very own copy of whatever is being pressed that day.

The modern pressing plant features eight of the first newly built presses in 35 years capable of printing 5,000 records an hour.

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Says the company:

“Third Man Pressing brings upwards of 50 new living wage jobs with benefits into Detroit (on top of the 20 jobs already created by the Willy’s building Third Man Records location at large), and, in complement with Shinola’s recent start of production of high-end turntables, marks the triumphant return of the once-thought-lost record industry to one of the country’s great industrial AND musical cities.”

While streaming music services have no doubt made our lives infinitely easier to carry a warehouse worth of music in our pocket, it’s the tangible products of yesterday that still seal the listening experience for most.

If you’re in Detroit, you can find Third Man Records in the Cass Corridor neighborhood—coincidentally right next to where White went to high school and honed his chops on the axe.

The post Rocker Jack White Opens New State-of-the-Art Record Manufacturing Facility in Detroit appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at March 07, 2017 10:47 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Users in Japan Test Drive SOLIDWORKS 2017

The amazing SOLIDWORKS R&D team travels the world and scours the Web for user feedback. This exercise is especially critical during the annual SOLIDWORKS beta period. Prior to each release, the development team visits users and invites them to test out new features and enhancements. The thoughts users share during the yearly beta program are critical to providing you with the best possible product design and engineering ecosystem.

Before the SOLIDWORKS 2017 release, the team in Japan sat down with local users and members of the Global R&D team to discuss specific development areas and favorite new features. In this video, you’ll hear members of the SOLIDWORKS R&D team, including Marlon Banta, Wenzhong Zhao, and Kevin O’Neill, discuss key focus areas and features including quality and performance, 3D Interconnect, Facility Layout and Magnetic Mates. In addition, you’ll hear users explain their preferred updates on everything from the UI to Inspection.

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In this video, SOLIDWORKS users, Kumiko Yamaguchi and Yoshihiro Dobashi discuss additional updates and why they feel that the features will benefit their work moving forward. The R&D team also returns to discuss updates in quality, MBD and animation.

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Have you tried SOLIDWORKS 2017 yet? If not, you can actually TRY IT NOW! The new online trial offered through MySolidWorks is available anytime, anywhere, and on any device. CLICK HERE to get started.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Users in Japan Test Drive SOLIDWORKS 2017 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at March 07, 2017 02:21 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to lock the SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault

When performing maintenance on a SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault, for instance updating the software or moving the Database or Archive files to a different location; it is best to lock down access to the vault so that no changes can be made while the maintenance is being carried out. To lock SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault vault for maintenance, right-click on the Vault in the SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration console and select “Properties” from the short-cut menu.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault Properties

SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault Properties

Click the button to “Block Log-ins” to prevent users from logging into the vault.

Lock SOLIDWORKS PDM

Block Log-ins

When users next try to login, they will receive a warning that the vault is undergoing maintenance and they cannot login until it is completed.

Login Warning Message

Login Warning Message

During this time users will be able to “Work Offline” which will give them write access to any files that they have previously checked out and read access to any files that they have available in their local cache (these files can be cached before hand by performing a “Get Latest” on the files).

Work Offline Option

Work Offline Option

Once the maintenance is completed, right-click on the Vault again and select “Properties” then click “Permit Log-ins“.

Permit Logins

Permit Logins

The post How to lock the SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at March 07, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The Raw and the Wicked

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This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “In Dreams” from Tomemitsu and work our way through tracks from Dent May, Hotel Eden, Astronauts Etc, TV Girl, and others before wrapping up with “Looking Out For You” from Joy Again.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:2rHveYlZ5YuJMzEMSWbSv8" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Raw and the Wicked appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at March 07, 2017 12:35 PM

March 06, 2017

SolidSmack

Meet Perdix, a 3D Printed Drone Designed to Work in Swarms

3d-printed-drone-swarm-perdix-02

By itself, one isn’t all that impressive. But, bring enough of them together, and it’s certainly an impressive sight. Originally designed by researchers at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory, the Perdix drone (formally Project Perdix) was built for swarming operations and tasked with airborne environmental monitoring. The tiny 6.5-inch drone was impressive enough in its swarming capability that the DOD’s Special Capabilities Office took notice and adopted it for use in ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) operations.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85356" style="width: 1100px;">MIT researchers designed the Perdix drone using a 3D printed composite/Kevlar body with spring-loaded wings, custom pusher propeller, and lithium-polymer battery pack.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">MIT researchers designed the Perdix drone using a 3D printed composite/Kevlar body with spring-loaded wings, custom pusher propeller, and lithium-polymer battery pack.</figcaption></figure>

As you can surmise, the Perdix underwent some modifications to make it more suitable for its new role, however, the overall design remains relatively unchanged. What makes the Perdix an attractive UAV is its tiny footprint. Oh, and there’s being deployed from aircraft en masse and the fact that it can be 3D printed relatively quickly, making it easy to mass-produce and swap-out replacement parts when damaged.

The Perdix drones is designed using a 3D printed Kevlar/composite body and spring-loaded, carbon-fiber wings that snap into place when deployed. The drone maintains flight using a custom pusher propeller mounted on the tail of the drone and is powered by an internal lithium-polymer rechargeable battery. This allows it to stay aloft for around 20-minutes per charge and sustain speeds of 20 to 40 knots (depending on conditions).

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85357" style="width: 770px;">One of the hive. The Perdix drone is ony 6.5" long and weighs 290 grams. Photo: Naval Drones.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">One of the hive. The Perdix drone is ony 6.5″ long with an 11.8″ wingspan and weighs 290 grams. Photo: Naval Drones.</figcaption></figure>

The Perdix operates in swarms, relying on a pre-programmed set of instructions to coordinate with one another, taking its instructions from a centralized system providing target data. The drones then take the data to synchronize and collaborate with each other and even adapt to the number of drones that are used during the mission.

There have been three recorded test from 2014-2016, air-dropping Perdix drones in different conditions, the latest of which saw 103 Perdix drones deployed from three F/A-18 Super Hornets over China Lake, California. The demonstration was captured on video and shared by the U.S. Navy.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bsKbGc9TUHc?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Since the original design of the Perdix in 2013, the drone has undergone six revisions to both hardware and software and is set to a ‘Gen 7’ update later this year. As to what those updates are, we can only guess, but increased flight time and AI integration certainly wouldn’t be out of the question considering the drone acts autonomously in part to begin with. Imagine these with the capability to ‘think’ and adapt to mission changes on the fly. Couple that with stealth capabilities and it could go anywhere and grab images without being noticed.

The post Meet Perdix, a 3D Printed Drone Designed to Work in Swarms appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at March 06, 2017 10:17 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to disable SOLIDWORKS Resource Monitor Notifications

I’ve recently upgraded to Windows 10 and it is a definite improvement over previous OS versions. However it can be a bit over bearing when it comes to system notifications, especially with SOLIDWORKS Resource Monitor Notifications. When working with SOLIDWORKS, especially large assemblies, with your Windows system resources running low then you may be hit with a barrage of notifications and blaring sounds which in extreme cases can prevent you from actually getting your work done!

SOLIDWORKS Notification

SOLIDWORKS Windows Notification

Now there is probably some really good reasons why you are being notified and we have discussed common SOLIDWORKS system issues and how to deal with them in a previous article. But for this article I’m going to provide you the steps on how to disable the notifications so you can get back to work…

Access the Windows Notifications Settings

To quickly access Windows Notification settings you can enter ‘Notification‘ into the search box next to the Windows icon on the left of the task bar (if the Search Box is missing right-click on the task bar and select Cortana > Search Box).

Then select Notifications & action settings from best match list:

Access Windows Notifications

Access Windows Notifications

Choose which SOLIDWORKS Resource Monitor Notifications to receive

In the notifications and actions dialog scroll in the list until you find the SOLIDWORKS Resource Monitor (if it’s not listed then you likely do not have SOLIDWORKS running , just start the application and it should appear).

Pick on the item to access it’s settings — or you can just turn them all off by moving the slider to off.

Windows Notifications Settings

Windows Notifications Settings

In the SOLIDWORKS Resource Monitor settings dialog you can then pick and choose which notifications you want to receive and how you want to receive them. For instance you still might want to receive all notifications but you can do so without a sound by turning play the sound to off:

SOLIDWORKS Resource Monitor Notifications

SOLIDWORKS Resource Monitor Notifications

With your notification settings defined you can then carry on working without interruption from windows. And to help solve the issues that are causing the notifications you can read our previous system settings articles.

The post How to disable SOLIDWORKS Resource Monitor Notifications appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at March 06, 2017 05:37 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery

Unless you’ve been living under a rock (or maybe in your parent’s basement), you can’t help but notice the incredible boom within the North American craft brewing industry. I was curious so I performed a simple search using www.brewerymap.com, and found that there are 249 breweries within 100 miles of our SOLIDWORKS headquarters in Waltham, Massachusetts. That’s amazing!

To put it slightly more into perspective, there are so many breweries opening up in the United States, that there is actually a shortage of hops, but we’ll save that topic for another time.

So for a beer geek like myself who enjoys these flavorful and pungent beverages, my fridge is usually stocked with a wide variety of choices – from a chocolate-flavored stout, or a hopped-up IPA, or even a lip-puckering sour gose. The easiest way for me to get my hands on these brews is to simply peruse my local package store (aka beverage barn or liquor store for those not from New England) that offers a great selection of craft beers.

But sometimes, shopping at my local package store just isn’t enough, because some of the most sought-after beers can’t be found on any of the local distribution lists. So there’s only one solution to this problem – and that equals, a road trip.

In my role as a technical manager, I get to travel quite a bit, and I’ve been lucky enough to have visited quite a few breweries all across the United States, and lucky for me, many of the best (in my opinion) are right here in New England. When visiting these craft brew houses, you typically have to wait in line with giddy anticipation like a child waiting for Christmas morning. I definitely get excited about wrapping my fingers around a frosty can of some new concoction they’ve conjured up. But as an engineer, what I truly love checking out is the actual brewing process – even if it’s just a small glimpse into the heart and soul of these little shops.

Now granted, it’s not always possible due to the large volume of people who share this affinity for craft beer, but I try to stick around the shop and observe the brewers as they are hard at work creating a masterpiece we can all enjoy. Watching them dump huge bags of grain into a mash tun, or pour buckets of citra hops into a massive kettle, or even witnessing the automated seamless motion of the canning process. It all brings a twinkle to my eye.

Sometimes, when I get the chance to see a brewery in action, I give myself a sly smirk, pointing to things around the room with a slight nod of my head, and think, “look at all this awesome equipment,” and “that thing was designed in SOLIDWORKS, and that was designed in SOLIDWORKS, and that, and also that.” This tasty beer I’m holding in my hand wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for SOLIDWORKS.

So I came up with an idea. What’s the one thing all of these breweries have in common? It’s that they all started in someone’s kitchen, basement, or garage – just like I do when I break out my own home brew kit. So I decided to take my love for SOLIDWORKS and my interest in craft brewing and combine them to create a SOLIDWORKS Electrical project, as well as an entirely new SOLIDWORKS assembly. I call it – The SOLIDWORKS Brewery.


It’s a digital brewery that we can use to mock up new layouts for the home brewing floorplan. We use SOLIDWORKS Electrical to route the wires, cables, and hoses for the control cabinet and pumps, or render our assembly in SOLIDWORKS Visualize to create an extremely realistic view.

And down the road, I plan to use SOLIDWORKS Simulation to run scenarios on the kettles and heating elements, use SOLIDWORKS PCB to create a new circuit board for more intelligent automation, even use Weldments on our brewery tables, Sheet Metal on our exhaust duct, plus several other features as well. Sounds cool right?

I will also be conducting a 22-Minute Webinar talking about this home brewing system and how you can take advantage of the features built into SOLIDWORKS Electrical and apply them to your own projects. To register, use the link here. The webinar is scheduled for March 17th, 2017; 11:00AM and 2:00PM ET (Happy St. Patrick’s Day!). Click here and register today!

Still looking for more? Here’s the best part. In a few weeks’ time, my SOLIDWORKS teammates and I will be brewing an actual beer using the same electric brewing system you see here in our digital brewery. We will be producing a video mini-series that walks us through the various stages of the brewing process while we also cover several features, tips, and tricks related to SOLIDWORKS Electrical.

I am extremely excited about this interactive project we’re creating and we hope you will be too. So keep an eye out and your taste buds ready for more information about this awesome brewing adventure with The SOLIDWORKS Brewery. If you’re a fan of Twitter, you can follow me @SWECAD. Remember to sign up for the homebrewing with SOLIDWORKS webinar on March 17, 2017. Click here to register.

Author information

JP Emanuele
JP Emanuele
JP is a Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, North America.

The post Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by JP Emanuele at March 06, 2017 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to upgrade the SOLIDWORKS PDM Dispatch Add-In

When upgrading SOLIDWORKS PDM file vault to a new version, the add-ins in the vault will not automatically update.  You can view a step by step guide to upgrading the Task Add-in.  In this article we are going to look at upgrading the Dispatch Add-in.

It is recommended to run the same major and service pack version of the Dispatch add-in as the current major and service pack version of SOLIDWORKS PDM.

First step is to remove the existing SOLIDWORKS PDM Dispatch Add-in (don’t worry you won’t lose any existing scripts):

  • Administration Tool > Add-ins > Dispatch > Right-Click > Remove
Remove the SOLIDWORKS PDM Dispatch Add-in

Remove the SOLIDWORKS PDM Dispatch Add-in

  • Admininstration Tool > File > Open
    • Change the filter to show “.caf” files
    • Browse to the installation location for PDM and the “Default Data” folder (by default the path is “C:\Program Files\SOLIDWORKS PDM\Default Data”)
  • Click to Open Dispatch.caf
Open Dispatch File

Open Dispatch File

  • Drag-and-drop the Dispatch add-in into the Administration Tool Add-ins
Drag-and-drop the Dispatch add-in into the Administration Tool Add-ins

Drag-and-drop the Dispatch add-in into the Administration Tool Add-ins

  • Close the Admin Tool and Reboot the client workstation
Upgraded Dispatch Add-in

Upgraded Dispatch Add-in

The post How to upgrade the SOLIDWORKS PDM Dispatch Add-In appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Williams at March 06, 2017 01:00 PM

March 04, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS Education Edition 2016-2017 [VIDEO]

The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.

— Lao Tzu, Ancient Chinese philosopher and writer

The first step for any designer or engineer starts at the learning level. The first, best step, for anyone entering a design or engineering program is SOLIDWORKS. As the industry leader, SOLIDWORKS allows students to create and innovate to bring about the latest and greatest new idea.

SOLIDWORKS Education Edition 2017 has many new inclusions that allow for creating, among many disciplines, staff and faculty can also take advantage of the certifications and sharing services available in this software suite.

Take a look at What’s New and feel free to contact us to learn more:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/IUmWNn_e3tE?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

 

The post What’s New in SOLIDWORKS Education Edition 2016-2017 [VIDEO] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Neeta Sharma at March 04, 2017 01:00 PM

March 03, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Gear Heart Tutorial – Part 3

Many of us SOLIDWORKS users would be considered “gear heads”, or high-tech enthusiasts, but some of us take our “gear headed-ness” to such a high level that our enthusiasm for all things mechanical just pours from our heart. This tutorial series is for you, the SOLIDWORKS user that says “Nay, I am not just a gear head, I’m a gear heart!” In this four-part series we’ll be building a functional geared heart pendant using mostly essential SOLIDWORKS features, with a few unique part and assembly features sprinkled in.

In part 3 of our 4-part series on building this functional geared heart pendant in SOLIDWORKS. Up to this point we have built the gear functionality into the design and we’ve created a little window into the inner workings of our heart.  In this part of the series we will build some functionality into the back side of the parts to make this a unique reversible design. Along the way we will provide some best practices for pulling back on the history tree to make “last minute edits” to the design and we’ll walk through using the text sketch tool with a downloaded font.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XuQRxSmQGMw?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

Whether you’re interested in all things mechanical or want to exercise your artistic side, the Gear Heart Tutorial Series will help you better understand and expand your Gearing and Mechanical Mate skills in SOLIDWORKS! Can’t wait for the next video? View all of the tutorials on the playlist here.

Download the full Gear Heart SOLIDWORKS assembly here.

Are you a gear head? Share your creations with us in the comments below! As always, thanks for watching!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Gear Heart Tutorial – Part 3 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at March 03, 2017 10:00 PM

SolidSmack

Inside 3D Printing Hits 5th Year, Returns to New York City

inside-3d-printing-new-york-2016-00

It’s hard to believe it’s been five years since we went to the first Inside 3D Printing Conference in New York City. At the time, it was the first conference of its kind and covered all the aspects of the products, the services and business of 3D printing. Now, it’s even bigger and still remains a great reason to get out of the house, visit New York City and be gobsmacked with all that’s current and new in 3D printing.

This year at Inside 3D Printing New York, March 14-15 at the Javits Convention Center, they’ll have keynote addresses from the famed plastic surgeon, Dr. Oren Tapper, and Terry Wohlers, Principal Consultant at Wohlers Associates, will speak on “The Future of 3D Printing.” See the full agenda here.

They have the exhibit hall packed again with product and service companies, some you’ll know and some you’ll want to keep an eye on, including A-Team Ventures, Asimov Ventures, Aurora Labs, Chemcubed, Cimquest, DesignPoint, eSun, FlackTek, Flashforge, Formlabs, Igus, i.materialise, New Valence Robotics (NVBOTS), ProtoCAM, Recreus, Silver3D, Stardust, TechniPrint, Titan 3D, and Winrigo.

Once again they have The Frontier Tech Showdown, a must attend pitch event for seed-stage startups in 3D Printing, Virtual Reality and Robotics. Asimov Ventures will present this year’s winner with an uncapped SAFE for $15,000 following the event.

SolidSmack is an official media partner of Inside 3D Printing. You can use the code SOLIDSMACK when you register, for 15% off a two-day pass. Register Here.

The post Inside 3D Printing Hits 5th Year, Returns to New York City appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 03, 2017 06:59 PM

Friday Smackdown: Gears of Link Grinders

Rudy-Siswanto-art

The mirror’s depth was infinite, reflecting from the edge of the motored hand. A splinter? No. There were more in the gears, beneath the skin and oils, beneath the circuits. It looked as close as it could, prying, picking, to pluck out all these links.

Rudy Siswanto – I simply love Rudy’s style and the creatures are like none you’ve likely seen before. Creatures like catfish guards and phase kittens and a slew of baby mythological beasts.

La Fabrica – Over the last 40 years, Architect Ricardo Bofill has turned an abandoned 32,000 square foot cement factory into his home and studio. It looks amazing.

Stella – The kids and I have been interested in complex polygon forms of late, like this Great Rhombicosidodecahedron. Stella is a program to help visualize and make them.

To the Right – A compilation by Candice Drouet of some of the most famous movies and their camera dolly/pans to the right.

Faces in Things – Do you see them too? (You know that spot on the floor looks just like Aunt Trudy.) Normal everyday things that look like faces.

Hoffecker – Peter Hoffecker Mejia creates wall sculptures and installations from lots of found objects: wood, metal, bandanas, scouring pads, etc.

Fury Road – Studio shots by John Platt of the vehicles from Mad Max: Fury Road. Not as action packed as the movie, but shows the detail put into creating each vehicle.

FreeBiz Traveler – Compact backpack that fits up to an 18.4″ laptop, perfect for that mobile CAD Workstation + loads of pockets.

Onryō – video from denial of service using a series of monochromatic reaction-diffusion sequences

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/202063212" title="denial of service - Onryō" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="500"></iframe>

The post Friday Smackdown: Gears of Link Grinders appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 03, 2017 05:59 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Update Training that will help you become a SOLIDWORKS Power User!

SOLIDWORKS Power User

SOLIDWORKS Power User

When it comes to learning what’s new in SOLIDWORKS there are many resources available to you. There are literally 100s of what’s new videos on the internet, a multitude of reference books, and of course the What’s New PDF document included with each release of the software. These resources are great at providing you with an overview of the new SOLIDWORKS features and often include a step-by-step guide on how to use them.

However the what’s new style of learning doesn’t really provide you with new skills or improve the way in which you use SOLIDWORKS; what’s new lessons tend to focus on helping you understand the new features but do not teach you best practices or time-saving techniques. If you are looking to become a SOLIDWORKS Power User with the latest software release then you need to take our SOLIDWORKS Advanced Update training course. Here’s why…

Update training that will improve YOU

The training course is based on the experience of our certified SOLIDWORKS experts who have learned best practices and new techniques through countless hours of using the latest versions of SOLIDWORKS, we want to pass these skills onto you, so that you can become a SOLIDWORKS expert.

Mates & Virtual Parts

Mates & Virtual Parts

By taking the update course you will:

  • Become much faster at using SOLIDWORKS
    • Learn how to reduce your mouse travel, the number of mouse clicks, and keystrokes.
    • Adopt best practices for creating and managing sketch entities, relations and dimensions.
    • Discover various techniques for quickly creating mirrored components with or without an assembly.
    • Learn advanced patterning techniques for automating the modeling process and reduce model content.
    • Learn how to create configurations 5—10 times faster!
  • Be able to create more organized and effective SOLIDWORKS parts
    • Learn how to structure the feature tree correctly so that you and other users waste less time trying to understand the design intent of a given model.
    • Learn advanced equation management techniques; including how to apply equations to features.
    • Learn how to use boolean operations to solve difficult modeling problems.
    • Learn how to troubleshoot and fix part errors, users report saving 10—30 minutes a day after learning troubleshooting techniques.
  • Build and manage SOLIDWORKS assemblies like an expert
    • Learn in-context design and how to use virtual parts during the planning phase of your design.
    • Be able to create inter-part relationships with or without using an assembly.
    • Know how to solve common assembly problems such as broken mates or missing files.
    • Learn assembly mate management techniques so you can easily find, change, and configure mates. Plus learn how to copy components with mates between documents.
    • Learn how to organize equipment and space with new Magnetic Mates.
    • Create super lightweight model version or Speedpak configuration, including published references.
    • Learn large assembly and drawing management techniques to enable you to open and start editing a large assembly in seconds instead of minutes.

Learn Skills not just new Features

After taking the training course customers have gained new skills so that they are better SOLIDWORKS users. Here are three skills that you will acquire during the training:

  1. Become a better modeller: You will have a deeper understanding of SOLIDWORKS and be a more efficient modeller. Creating parts that have fewer features, are easier for others to understand, and load faster.
  2. Be able to solve problems faster: You will be able to better deal with problems that occur when you are using SOLIDWORKS. Resolving rebuild errors, mate errors, and missing components.
  3. Be a more efficient designer: You will know how to optimize your components and manage them more effectively. Including applying equations and configurations the right way in SOLIDWORKS.

Instructor was able to answer any questions we had. We learned a lot of ways to speed up our design process

— Paul Sabadus, Radix

Multiple ways to take the course

The 3 day training course is delivered by a Certified SOLIDWORKS Expert and can be taken either in a local classroom (there are training centres all over Canada), live over the web (shorter sessions, course duration is 5 days, 4 hours/day) with our tried and tested online training delivery method, or on-site at your location. When the training is delivered on-site we can customize the course to suit the needs of your team.

SOLIDWORKS Expert taking an Advanced Update Training Class

SOLIDWORKS User taking an Advanced Update Training Class

Also we realize that some customers are upgrading but not to the latest version and are moving up to a prior release. Again we can accommodate your training requirements and deliver training on the version that your team is updating to.

Contact Us to Get Pricing

So if you are planning on upgrading to SOLIDWORKS 2017 and would like to learn new skills while taking advantage of the latest features ask us about pricing; or inquire about a custom course specifically for the version you are upgrading to. ACT NOW as the course fills up quickly and our SOLIDWORKS experts are always busy with custom upgrade training.

Get a Quote

The post Update Training that will help you become a SOLIDWORKS Power User! appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at March 03, 2017 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

How to remove MOD-DIAM from your SOLIDWORKS design

The <MOD-DIAM> issue can occur if you’ve been running several versions of SOLIDWORKS alongside one another on the same machine. SOLIDWORKS routes its file locations for common items like templates and symbols to the same location for both versions of the software. The version which is installed first will be the source for these file locations.

If a user tries to uninstall an older version of SOLIDWORKS (which may be the source for file locations), the software will lose its link to things like templates or the symbols library and you end up with <MOD-DIAM> in place of the Diameter symbol as shown below:

 

 

 How to remove <MOD-DIAM>

  • Navigate to Tools > Options in SOLIDWORKS
  • Under ‘System Options’ you’ll find file locations. There is a dropdown list here, drop it down and find ‘Symbol Library File’

 

 

Have a look at the file location listed here. It will probably be something like: C:\ProgramData\SOLIDWORKS\SOLIDWORKS <YEAR>\lang\english. You may notice that the year number listed is for an old version which you may have previously uninstalled

  • Open Windows explorer and browse to C:\ProgramData. This is a hidden folder, so you can either type it directly into the address bar or show your hidden folders from the View menu in Explorer > Options > View tab

 

 

  • Now browse to the location listed in SOLIDWORKS that we found earlier – It may not exist, which could be your issue. To fix this, simply point SOLIDWORKS to the corresponding C:\ProgramData\SOLIDWORKS\SOLIDWORKS <YEAR>\lang\english location for your year version
  • If the folder does exist, it might be be missing a file called ‘gtol.sym’, which you can download here to unzip and place in that location

If you’re still having trouble, please get in touch with the Innova Systems Technical Support team (supported customers only).


We hope you found that useful!

Have you seen our blog archive where we have posted plenty of helpful articles? We also have a fantastic video library filled with easy-to-follow videos on a number of topics inspired by other SOLIDWORKS users – take a look. Also, don’t forget to follow Innova Systems on twitter for daily bite size SOLIDWORKS tips, tricks and videos.

Author information

Innova Systems Experts in SOLIDWORKS Training & Support
Innova Systems - Experts in SOLIDWORKS Training & Support specialise in the supply, consultancy and training of SOLIDWORKS software. We offer the skills and experience to help companies develop new products using SOLIDWORKS empowering smarter, faster and more cost effective design. We stand by our customers and believe our support service is second to none. Based in Cambridge we have a central location to service a UK wide customer base.

The post How to remove MOD-DIAM from your SOLIDWORKS design appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Innova Systems Experts in SOLIDWORKS Training &#38; Support at March 03, 2017 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to make SOLIDWORKS Smart Components even smarter with Autosize

When SOLIDWORKS smart components with autosize option are inserted in an assembly and mated concentric, their configuration matches the diameter of the mating component based on predefined values.

In this example, the bushing is a smart component.  The goal is to insert the bushing into an assembly and match the size of the pin.

The bushing has the inside diameter configured.

SOLIDWORKS smart components Configure Dimension

Configure Dimension

In a defining assembly, a pin and bushing are mated concentric.  The pin does not require additional configurations.  Select the Bushing and select Tools > Make Smart Component.

Make Smart Component command

Make Smart Component command

In the Auto Size section of the Smart Component PropertyManager, enable the option Diameter.  Pick the inner cylinder of the smart component as the Concentric mate reference.  Click Configurator Table.  For each configuration of the smart component define the matching range of the pin diameter and click OK.

Create Configurations

Create Configurations

When a smart autosized component is mated to a pin, its configuration updates automatically to match the pin diameter as long as it is within the range specified in the Configurator table.

Use the Insert Component command for the smart component and create a concentric mate on the go.  Bushing configuration will adjust to the pin diameter.

Bushing size adjusts automatically when inserted

Bushing size adjusts automatically when inserted

The post How to make SOLIDWORKS Smart Components even smarter with Autosize appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sanja Srzic at March 03, 2017 01:00 PM

March 02, 2017

SolidSmack

See How a Winsor & Newton Series 7 Brush is Made (and Win A Personalized One)

winsor-newton-series-7-brush-process-05

I bet you didn’t think paintbrushes were still hand-made, did you? (I didn’t.) If you’ve drawn, painted or stepped foot in an art supply shop, you’ll know the name Winsor & Newton. They make an array of paper and art tools, and paints but you may be surprised to find out they’ve been making brushed for over 150 years. A new video breaks down the process of how their most famous brush, the Series 7, is made, and they have a contest to win a personalized Series 7 brush.

The Series 7 brush is a hand-made Kolinsky sable-hair brush, which is made from the tail hairs of a male Siberian weasel. Needless to say, those hairs are a bit rare and very expensive. The brushes are most commonly used in watercolor painting for their ability to retain a point and hold the color.

The hair does most of the work, but the skill in constructing the brush makes it all possible. When they begin the video by saying, “We start by measuring every strand of the finest Kolinsky hair”, you have the image of each individual hair carefully checked. They’re measured together, but the process is no less impressive.

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They make holding and grooming a thousand weasel hairs between the fingertips look easy, don’t they? 50 people will have the chance to win a personalized Series 7 brush. All you have to do is watch the video and answer a really easy question.

Enter the Contest Here

Regardless, if you enter or not, I recommend these brushes. Visit their site to find out more or purchase a Winsor & Newton Series 7 or grab the bundle I snagged here.

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The post See How a Winsor & Newton Series 7 Brush is Made (and Win A Personalized One) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at March 02, 2017 08:46 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation – Intercooler

“Sure… my car is fast but is it really fast enough?”. A thought on the mind of petrol heads (admittedly, just like me) the world over. In truth, it probably is but it could always be a little faster, right?
A popular power boosting modification is to swap out your intercooler for a larger unit but how does this help? Well let’s use SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation to find out.

We’ll begin by adding lids to the inlet and outlet of the intercooler (highlighted in red) because we intend to run an internal analysis. Next we’ll use the intuitive Flow Simulation wizard interface to start building our study.

After being compressed to almost 2 bar by the turbo forced induction air can get hot! As the intercoolers job is to lower this temperature as rapidly as possible we’re definitely interested in heat conduction in this study.

Next, our general study setting. -3c (270k) ambient should simulate the Scottish summer nicely. We’ll also add a Velocity parameter in the z direction of 31 m/s (70mph) to simulate the car travelling along a typical motorway at speed.

For the boundary conditions we’ll keep it simple. 15m/s of 30c air at the inlet and static pressure on the outlet:

 

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation - intercooler inlet SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation - Intercooler outlet

The cut plot and flow trajectory results show a dramatic drop in outlet temperature, around 25c! This colder, denser air means a bigger combustion bang resulting in more power and, according to SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation, the bigger the better


Looks like the cost and skinned knuckles from fitting were worth it after all. Happy tuning fellow petrol heads!

***

Grant Davidson is a Senior Applications Engineer at TMS CADCentre, a SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller in Scotland.  You can read more from Grant on the TMS CADCentre blog


Author information

TMS CADCentre
TMS CADCentre - is a SOLIDWORKS Reseller based in Scotland providing 3D CAD Design Software, analysis software & product data management software. The company was formed in 1981 and now pleased to be celebrating 35 years in business. TMS CADCentre is the only UK SOLIDWORKS Reseller based and funded within Scotland and have been providing SOLIDWORKS software, training and support since 1996 when the product was first launched in the UK.

The post SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation – Intercooler appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by TMS CADCentre at March 02, 2017 04:00 PM

SolidSmack

Formlabs Shows How Full Color Could Be Applied to 3D Prints

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Formlabs has executed a very interesting experiment in hydrographics using their 3D printing equipment.

Hydrographics, if you’re not aware, is the process of applying a color texture to a surface of a non-flat 3D object. The idea is to have paint or a texture floating on the surface of a fluid. The object is carefully dipped in the fluid, where the texture adheres to the surface of the object. It all happens very quickly.

Typically this process is used to produce imprecise patterns on objects, such as a camouflage pattern on a helmet, for example. The problem is that it’s exceedingly difficult to align any specific textures on particular portions of the object’s surface because the adhesion process is non uniform: some texture areas are stretched, while others are compressed during immersion.

But in 2015, some ingenious folks invented a way to do exactly this. Essentially, they develop a texture map that matches the object surfaces to a given texture. It’s like simulating the “dip”. By producing the texture with an inkjet printer, they are able to imprint arbitrary color textures on surfaces of many non-complex 3D objects. You can see how it works in this video.

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Of course, there are certainly pathological 3D shapes where this wouldn’t work, but given the examples shown in the video, this could be a very useful process.

But that was almost two years ago. Wind the clock forward to today and we see Formlabs experimenting with this same process.

Why would they do so? Well, if you watched the video you would have seen the hydrographic system requires:

A tank to hold the water and floating texture
A mechanism to gradually lower the object into the tank
Wait a second, that’s EXACTLY what a resin 3D printer like Formlabs equipment uses! The Form 2, for example, has a Z-axis that gradually raises (and can lower) a 3D model. It also has a tank that normally holds resin from which emerges the completed 3D print.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85300" style="width: 1100px;"> Adapting a Formlabs 3D printer resin tank for hydrographic texture printing<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">
Adapting a Formlabs 3D printer resin tank for hydrographic texture printing</figcaption></figure>

But swap the tank with one filled with water (and a floating texture), turn off the laser, mount and lower an object and you have a hydrographic printing system.

There’s one catch: the software that produced the startling results in the video has not yet been released. If it had, then Formlabs’ setup would be able to do the same process on almost any object printed on their equipment – because it would by definition fit into the tank.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85301" style="width: 1100px;">A 3D printed "phone" printed with a hydrographic process on a Formlabs' 3D printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">A 3D printed “phone” printed with a hydrographic process on a Formlabs’ 3D printer</figcaption></figure>

Formlabs’ experiment involved “faking” the software by developing UV texture maps for a specific 3D shape as a result of the missing software, but the point is the same: this machine – and any similarly designed resin 3D printers – is relatively easily adaptable to become a hydrographic printing system.

Let’s take this idea a bit further with our imagination.

What if the hydrographic features were BUILT INTO the 3D printer? What if the hydrographic software was embedded in the printer’s control software?

Would it be possible to 3D print a high-resolution object (yes) and then print a texture on its surface IN THE SAME MACHINE?

Maybe.

I suspect this would require some engineering to accomplish, as you’d have to include a method of printing the texture sheet and inserting it onto the water surface provided by a tank you’d manually swap in. An intermediate stage would be to simply 2D print the texture map separately and put it in the tank before it’s loaded.

Another challenge would be to complete the 3D print within the machine, which normally requires washing in solution and sometimes a post-print UV bake for final solidification. That would certainly require additional hardware components, but it would not be impossibly difficult.

Such changes would make the machine more expensive, perhaps even double the price. But you’d end up with a machine that could literally 3D print full color, high resolution objects on demand.

Read more at Fabbaloo!

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by Fabbaloo at March 02, 2017 03:40 PM