Planet SolidWorks

September 27, 2016

SolidSmack

Makercase is the Browser-based Tool for Making Crates and Cases

makercase-browser-web-app-lowpowerlab-00

There’s no greater feeling than building and finishing your own project. The work is done. The project was a success. Now you need an enclosure. Depending on the design, it can protect or ruin your build. The typical of-the-shelf project boxes can be so… cheap, uninspiring, boring. What’s the solution? Make one yourself.

Jon Hollander found himself in this exact situation. After finishing an electronics project as a gift he wanted a nice case to go with it. Instead of searching the internet for one, he came up with a simple web application to create one himself. He called it Makercase.

Makercase is a simple web-based application that allows you to create laser-cut project cases. The program runs in your browser and pulls up a blueprint for laser cutting based on the specifications you put in. The program was written in Javacript and uses jquery, three.js, and Jcanvas for the client while the serve uses node.js. All you need to do is put in the dimensions and material thickness of your case and Makercase generates a 3D model of the case that can be rotated and manipulated on the screen.

makercase-browser-web-app-01

The web tool also lets you add edge joints, like finger edge joints and t-slot edges, with the click of a single button. This makes it easy to create connecting joints for your desired case. Holes and engraved text labels can also be added to any side of the box. Once the case is done, the 3D model is then flattened into a blueprint and turns it into an SVG file. It can then be sent to a laser cutter or CNC router. The application also offers advanced features to make the process easier, like taking into account the thickness of the laser beam to make easier snap-fit panels.

Makercase is a free tool and meant to be simple to use. Since it’s been up, various users have been posting their creations online, showing the wide range of what the tool can do. It’s a great idea and something different creators can use for whatever project they need. For example, LowPowerLab has a great overview of a very slick Raspberry Pi case they created. And, if you need some help writing web apps for digital fabrication, Hollander has an awesome guide available on his website.

Images: LowPowerLab

makercase-browser-web-app-lowpowerlab-00

makercase-browser-web-app-lowpowerlab-01

makercase-browser-web-app-lowpowerlab-02

The post Makercase is the Browser-based Tool for Making Crates and Cases appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at September 27, 2016 08:05 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

A Preview of the SOLIDWORKS 2017 Canadian Launch and What’s New Training Broadcast

The SOLIDWORKS 2017 Canadian Launch Broadcasts begin next week! There has been a lot of anticipation with regards to the new enhancements and features of your favourite 3D CAD software. If you are planning to attend one of our four live SOLIDWORKS 2017 Broadcast sessions here is a sneak peek at what you can expect to see:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/M38y1hTQ_gQ?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Register now four one of the four live broadcast events below:

BROADCAST DATE TIME REGISTER
Eastern Canada
Morning Broadcast
Tuesday, October 4, 2016 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM (EDT) REGISTER
Eastern Canada
Afternoon Broadcast
Tuesday, October 4, 2016 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM (EDT) REGISTER
Western Canada
Morning Broadcast
Thursday, October 13, 2016 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM (PDT) REGISTER
Western Canada
Afternoon Broadcast
Thursday, October 13, 2016 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM (PDT) REGISTER

What’s New Demos

During the broadcast you will see live demonstrations of the new SOLIDWORKS features used to design the Myomo MyoPro Orthotic Brace. By experiencing the integrated 3D solutions that were used to design this product, you will gain a better understanding of how SOLIDWORKS 2017 features can help make your product design process more productive. Demos include:

  • 3D DESIGN — Faster with improved technology
  • ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS — New capabilities of emerging technologies 
  • TEST & VALIDATION — Solve your design problems faster
  • COLLABORATION — Work with any 3D model in SOLIDWORKS
  • DATA MANAGEMENT — Full data integration for all departments
  • DOCUMENT CREATION — Simplify your document creation
  • 3D PRINTING — Easily create physical models

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Broadcast Prizes

Attend one of our broadcast events and you could win one of the following prizes:

  • A MakerBot Mini 3D Printer
  • A $500 Apple Gift Card
  • An NVIDIA Quadro M4000
  • A 3DConnexion SpaceMouse Pro Wireless
  • A SOLIDWORKS Advanced Update Training Course (Javelin Online Live Training)
SOLIDWORKS 2017 Broadcast Prizes

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Broadcast Prizes

Social Media

There will be incentives to participate on Twitter during each broadcast session by using this hashtag: #SW2017Canada

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017, including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post A Preview of the SOLIDWORKS 2017 Canadian Launch and What’s New Training Broadcast appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Erin Elliott at September 27, 2016 06:06 PM

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: Archimedes Screw [Hellenist-astic!]

archimedes-screw-makerbot-learning-01

You know how it goes. You make one Archimedes screw and it goes missing. You make another Archimedes screw, it goes missing and you discover a small band of pygmy gopher people have been stealing them for their underground rhubarb growing racket. You want to deal with it, but… THEY’RE JUST SO DANG CUTE and those rhubarb pies are to die for.

Fortunately, the Makerbot Learning crew has put together an awesome physics + engineering + history lesson to give you and others the ability to 3D print as many miniature Archimedes screw devices as you need. It’s a fantastic (Helenist-astic, HA!) project for anyone interested in building simple machines or bringing an understanding of engineering principles and 3D design to younger minds. As they describe it:

The Archimedes screw is a device believed to be invented by Archimedes, one of the world’s greatest scientists, in the 3rd century B.C. It was most often used to transport water from lower ground to higher ground for purposes of irrigation, flood prevention, and more.

We’re pretty sure Archimedes used it to transport piles of grapes from the floor to his mouth though… Oh wait, that’s what I use it for. The project is much like other Makerbot Learning lessons. They provide the complete overview and detail behind the design, the lesson plan and activities, and the 3D print files, of course. This model was created using Onshape and is a perfect model for learning and understanding more about 3D modeling.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dqR61dKTcHE?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

You can download the files from Thingiverse. Or from Thingiverse! (BOnus! They’ve also made the Onshape file public. You can view and use the model here!)

 
Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

archimedes-screw-makerbot-learning-02

archimedes-screw-makerbot-learning-03

The post Model of the Week: Archimedes Screw [Hellenist-astic!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 27, 2016 03:25 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

What’s New for SOLIDWORKS 2017 Add-in The Steel Detailer [WEBINAR]

To take advantage of the enhancements in SOLIDWORKS 2017; there is a new 2017 release of The Steel Detailer (TSD) gold partner add-in software. TSD has been updated to give you better performance and reduce your workload. We will be hosting a live What’s New webinar for The Steel Detailer 2017 on Thursday, October 20, 2016, at 11:30 AM (EDT).

What’s New Webinar Preview

Here is a sneak peak of two of my personal favorite new features in the Steel Detailer 2017.

1. Delay Connection Build

TSD realizes that sometimes sitting there waiting for a connection to complete can get a little boring, so they have created a new feature under settings in the PropertyManager on Insert and Copy Connection, where you can delay the build.

So instead of inserting a connection and waiting for the automated processes of making the dummy components match the selected sections, coping, cutting, drilling, adjusting the bolt quantities, the bolt grip, the bolt length and the plate to match the position for EVERY connection, we can now delay that process so it takes 10 seconds to put in a connection automatically and rotated into position ready for a later build.

Delay Connection Build SOLIDWORKS Steel Detailer

Delay Connection Build

When you are completed your work and are ready to rebuild your whole assembly, you can select and batch build all of the connections that have been set to be batch built all in one go.

I am very excited about this new feature, because it means that you no longer need to wait for EVERY connection you insert. You can now work on other projects or go for lunch while TSD batch builds all your delayed connections. Its wonderful!

Batch Build Delayed Connections

Batch Build Delayed Connections

2. New Connection Creation

Even though TSD has over 75 different connections in it’s library; there will always be a need to create your own connections.

TSD has improved the new connection process with automation by removing most of the repetitive manual processes required to build a connection. Such as adding configurations to the connection, adding dummy components, cuts, copes, plates, hole cavity, and fasteners.

New Connection dialog

New Connection dialog

TSD have also added some very comprehensive and intuitive interfaces and dialog boxes for automating your dimension control.

You can upload connections to the library for those repetitive processes such as rebuilding dummy components; making the fasteners excluded from the BOM in all configurations; and setting the last configuration to default ready for insertion from the library into your project.

Get your software update

If you own a licence and are a registered TSD customer you can download the latest release now ».

<iframe frameborder="0" height="900" scrolling="no" src="http://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2016-09-27/7gy889" style="border: 0;" width="100%"></iframe>

The post What’s New for SOLIDWORKS 2017 Add-in The Steel Detailer [WEBINAR] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Vicky Guignard at September 27, 2016 01:17 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

How Do You Use 3D Printing?

At SOLIDWORKS, we understand the value 3D printing has brought to the product development process throughout the last couple of decades. 3D printed prototypes or mock-ups are the quickest way to get close to a true appreciation for how products will look and feel, or even function. However, the workflow associated with it has not really changed very much throughout that period, and there is definitely room for improvement.

Standard Tessellation Language (STL) or Stereolithography files have been the interface between CAD and 3D printer. Although SOLIDWORKS has been able to create STL files for as long as I can remember, the format is not without some pitfalls. Triangles in the format can become inverted or small gaps can be present meaning they are not watertight, and some inside faces are on the outside of a model. This ambiguity makes life tricky for 3D printers, which need a closed contour for each slice to work. There are a number of inbuilt checks that SOLIDWORKS runs before exporting STLs so files are the best possible quality, but inevitably, time-consuming repairs in specialist software can still be required before 3D printing.

Ultimaker 2 Extended modelled by Spiros Georgakas on GRABCAD.com

Ultimaker 2 Extended modelled by Spiros Georgakas on GRABCAD.com

 

Evident from the latest developments in SOLIDWORKS 2015, 2016 and with more to come in 2017, we have been working on making 3D printing from SOLIDWORKS as easy as possible. We have added checks to highlight which areas on the model require supports; visualization tools so you can see how the layers of the printed output will look based on print settings; tools to make sure you don’t have walls too thin to be printed; and also with Windows 8.1 and 10, a direct connection to compatible desktop printers, removing the need for build preparation software in those cases.

3D printing your CAD models with SOLIDWORKS is now much easier with new Print3D tools for previewing and evaluating print jobs. Image courtesy of Javelin Technologies.

3D printing your CAD models with SOLIDWORKS is now much easier with new Print3D tools for previewing and evaluating print jobs. Image courtesy of Javelin Technologies.

 

However, we want to do a lot more to help you exploit the maximum value from 3D printing or additive manufacturing as possible. In order to do so, just like we have always done at SOLIDWORKS, we are talking to customers like you to understand exactly how you are using 3D printing and make sure we continue to fit your needs in future versions.

If you would like to host a visit from SOLIDWORKS Product Management to help influence the future of SOLIDWORKS in the area of 3D printing and additive manufacturing, please let us know. We want to visit anyone using 3D printing on a regular basis whether it is for prototypes, tooling and fixtures, production parts or even customization of parts. Don’t have time for a visit? We would still like to speak to you. We can arrange a call and GotoMeeting and 45 minutes is all we need. If this is you, please get in touch by emailing me at please get in touch by emailing me here.

Author information

Mark Rushton
Mark Rushton
Mark is a Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS.

The post How Do You Use 3D Printing? appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mark Rushton at September 27, 2016 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

This Furniture Collection is Made From Bricks Made From Recycled Newspapers

feature

As one of the most heavily produced and discarded materials in the world, it’s a dang good thing that paper is also so good at being reused, too.

While it’s fairly common for discarded paper to be recycled into yet more reams of paper, New Zealand designer Woojai Lee just might have one of the best applications for recycled paper yet in the form of PaperBricks.

Having started out as an exploration into how recycled paper can be used in nontraditional applications, PaperBricks provides an end—of—life solution for when the quality of recycled paper downgrades due to the individual fibers growing smaller with each cycle. The result is a compressed and weighty brick made from the simple recipe of discarded newspapers and wood glue.

000

paperbricks-solidsmack-5

More recently, Lee demonstrated the use of the PaperBricks in his PaperBricks Pallet series to show how the bricks could be used constructively:

paperbricks-solidsmack-1

paperbricks-solidsmack-2

paperbricks-solidsmack-3

Check out more over at Woojai.com

The post This Furniture Collection is Made From Bricks Made From Recycled Newspapers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at September 27, 2016 11:40 AM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

The Impact of SOLIDWORKS Image Quality on File Size

One of the many interesting things I’ve learned at Javelin is the effect that the SOLIDWORKS Image Quality setting has on file size. I had always assumed that it would have an impact on overall performance; but I never would have thought it would have such an impact on the file size. Of course, the effect it can have varies wildly across files, so I decided to look at 4 basic shapes: A cube, a cylinder, a sphere, and a torus.

Cylinder, Torus, Sphere, and Cube

Cylinder, Torus, Sphere, and Cube

To adjust the image quality I selected ToolsOptions, then click the Document Properties tab, selected Image Quality from the list on the left. Then I saved all 4 files with the Image Quality slider in the nominal position taking note of the file sizes.

Adjusting SOLIDWORKS Image Quality image quality in Document Properties

Adjusting SOLIDWORKS image quality in Document Properties

Then I adjusted the slider all the way to the left (the lowest setting), rebuilt and saved again and took note of the file sizes.

Image Quality Low

Image Quality Low

Then I adjusted the slider all the way into the red on the right (Highest) and rebuilt, saved, and recorded the file sizes.

Image Quality High

Image Quality High

These are the SOLIDWORKS file size results:

Model Normal Low High
Cube 54kb 54kb 54kb
Cylinder 49kb 49kb 59kb
Sphere 83kb 70kb 1131kb
Torus 110kb 88kb 2198kb

 

I noticed that on the cube, which has only flat surfaces, the file size was completely unaffected by the SOLIDWORKS Image Quality setting. I also noticed that more curved shapes, such as the torus or sphere, there was a significant impact to file size (13-20x). This is due to the number of triangles required to create the surfaces. The cube requires 12 triangles (2 per face), regardless of the image quality.

If you were making a sphere from triangles, the quality setting makes a big difference between low (where you might have 20 triangles and have an icosahedron), or a higher setting (with thousands of triangles forming a near perfect sphere). This Triangle Count is what is causing the file size to be so large, but there is a way to bypass this effect on file size:

Save Tessellation

Save Tessellation

If you clear the checkbox for “Save tessellation with part document” then the image quality slider will have no impact on file size. Here are the results:

Model Normal Low High No Tess
Cube 54kb 54kb 54kb 51kb
Cylinder 49kb 49kb 59kb 46kb
Sphere 83kb 70kb 1131kb 62kb
Torus 110kb 88kb 2198kb 79kb

 

Keep in mind that this is a Document Property, meaning it is file-specific. This also means that I can set it up correctly in a part template.

Also of note, this setting can be accessed by the SOLIDWORKS API. Which means that you could create a macro that would run through archived files; and adjust this slider to the lowest setting.

The post The Impact of SOLIDWORKS Image Quality on File Size appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Jim Peltier, CSWE at September 27, 2016 11:00 AM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The Slits

feature

This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “Pacific Theme–Instrumental” from Broken Social Scene and work our way through tracks from Elder Island, Madlib, Chassol, Quantic, and others before wrapping up with “Quand Vas Tu Rentrer” from Melody’s Echo Chamber.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:5nvfAIJXC8rRXlLDi7xcAX" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Slits appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 27, 2016 05:01 AM

September 26, 2016

SolidSmack

Backyard Scientist Creates Flaming Sword, Plays Fruit Ninja in Real Life

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-19

Kevin Kohler, aka The Backyard Scientist, is widely known for his unique experiments and projects that often result in something exploding, melting or being burned, which applies for one of his more recent projects–the Flame Sword. As the title suggests, the sword is literally ENGULFED IN FLAMES as Kevin uses it to mutilate a perfectly delicious looking watermelon.

Kevin begins the build by using a toy foam sword as a mold to cast into aluminum, which he does by first inserting a steel pipe into the sword (for rigidity) and then encasing it in plaster. Once dry, he then puts it into a bucket of sand to keep it level (and reducing the chance setting his surroundings on fire). Afterwards, he pours molten aluminum into the hollow end of the foam sword, which burns away the foam leaving only the cast aluminum with steel rod inside.

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-18

Kevin then goes to town drilling holes (34 of them) along both sides of the blade to allow the propane gas to escape and lit on fire. He sanded and polished the blade to clean it up and give it a more authentic flame sword appearance. Once cleaned up, a tube connected to a propane tank is inserted into the end of the sword with a snug little fit, preventing the gas from escaping.

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-20

If you’re following along at home, you’re ready to IGNITE THE SWORD. No special chant or summoning here, Just crank on the propane and light it up. Kevin did so, demonstrating the sword’s magnificent flame imbued power ot slice and dice a large watermelon and its innocent tree trunk friend. Suffice it to say, he couldn’t hold onto the pure metal flaming sword for very long, as aluminum tends to heat up when exposed to flame after only a few minutes. Yep.

Follow the video and steps below to make your own, just remember to add a heat-resistant grip. Flame on!

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/r3RGO4KyvT0?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-01

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-02

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-03

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-04

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-05

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-06

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-07

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-08

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-09

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-10

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-11

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-12

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-13

backyard-scientist-flaming-sword-14

The post Backyard Scientist Creates Flaming Sword, Plays Fruit Ninja in Real Life appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at September 26, 2016 07:19 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

How to Work with Non-SOLIDWORKS 3D Designs

Among the hundreds of new features and enhancements packed into SOLIDWORKS 2017 is 3D Interconnect, which enables users to collaborate on all major proprietary CAD formats in a way similar to native SOLIDWORKS files.

Do you need to insert a valve in Autodesk Inventor™ format from a supplier into your SOLIDWORKS design? Do you need to use SOLIDWORKS to design molds, tooling and fixtures around your client’s Creo® or CATIA data? Does another department of your company at a different location send you Solid Edge® files and you need to complete the entire design in SOLIDWORKS? Or do you need to resume a legacy design in UG NX™ format now that your company has switched to the SOLIDWORKS platform?

If yes, you are not alone. However, there have been many CAD interoperability challenges: unreadable files, lost features, misaligned geometries and duplicated files, which could result in massive remodeling time, crippling design discrepancies, messy data management and delayed productions. A report by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the United States estimated that “imperfect interoperability imposes at least $1 billion dollars per year on the members of the U.S. automotive supply chain. These costs are primarily due to supporting multiple computer-aided design (CAD)/computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) systems and correcting errors in product data exchange.” (Source: Interoperability Cost Analysis of the U.S. Automotive Supply Chain).

Wouldn’t it be nice if we could collaborate on all major proprietary CAD formats similar to native SOLIDWORKS files? Wouldn’t it be nice if we could focus on design and forget about CAD formats? Wouldn’t it be nice when source CAD files were updated, those updates could be reflected in SOLIDWORKS automatically?

Now this dream has come true, thanks to SOLIDWORKS 3D Interconnect in the SOLIDWORKS 2017 release. 3D Interconnect is a new functionality that allows users to read all major 3D proprietary CAD files into SOLIDWORKS and use them in the same way they would use native SOLIDWORKS files. It bypasses the entire data translation process, opens 3D CAD files directly as if they were created in SOLIDWORKS, and updates the 3D references along with surrounding SOLIDWORKS designs upon external changes.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MqF8RYkTcH0?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

 

Let’s walk through a quick workflow to illustrate. The pulley in Figure 1 was designed in Creo. We can now open it in SOLIDWORKS 2017 just like a native file. It’s inserted as a virtual component in the feature tree. Its node icon showed a green arrow pointing to the left indicating it’s referencing an external CAD file. Furthermore, we can directly work on this model, rather than on any duplicate copies. For example, drag-and-drop SOLIDWORKS library features such as a keyway and a curved slot onto this model and constrain them to the edges on this Creo part.

base_part_oboe.png

Figure 1. A Creo pulley part was opened and edited in SOLIDWORKS.

You may have noticed the interference between the curved slot and its stop at lower right corner in Figure 1. This issue had to be fixed in a new revision as shown in Figure 2.

fig2_creo_oboe.png

Figure 2. An updated Creo design.

fig3_treenode_oboe.png

Figure 3. The tree node icon with a refresh circle indicating a design revision is available.

3D Interconnect not only recognizes the prt.2 file, a unique Creo revision format, but also tells us an update is available using the tree node icon with a refresh circle in Figure 3.

All we need to do now is to right click on this tree note and select Update Model in its context menu.
Figure 4. Update the model to a new Creo revision.

Figure 4. Update the model to a new Creo revision.

Figure 4. Update the model to a new Creo revision.

This new revision will be automatically reflected in both the part and assemblies using this part as shown in Figure 5.

fig5_oboe_featuredimage.png

Figure 5. A new revision is reflected in both the part and assembly.Before you ask, here is a detailed breakdown of the formats and versions supported in 3D Interconnect 2017:

Before you ask, here is a detailed breakdown of the formats and versions supported by 3D Interconnect 2017:

  • PTC
    o .prt, .asm for Pro/E 16 – Creo 3.0
  • Autodesk Inventor
    o .ipt for V6 – 2016
    o .iam for V11 – 2016
  • Solid Edge
    o .par, .asm, .psm for V18 – ST8
  • Siemens NX
    o .prt for UG 11 – NX 10
  • CATIA V5
    o CATPart, .CATProduct for V5R8 – V5R2016

I hope you find this enhancement relevant and exciting. For more details, please check out the SOLIDWORKS 2017 Launch website or contact your local reseller.

SW_2017_Collaborate_Banner_961x250_FINAL

Author information

Oboe Wu
Oboe Wu
Product portfolio manager of SOLIDWORKS MBD, passionate about smart manufacturing opportunities, Keen listener to customer challenges, Sharp problem solver with 20 years of experiences in engineering, Sleepless father trying best to take care of a baby daughter.

The post How to Work with Non-SOLIDWORKS 3D Designs appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Oboe Wu at September 26, 2016 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 Locate Singularities by Detecting Hot Spots

Stress singularities are inherent in all FEA calculations.  Sharp re-entrant corners, point loads and fixtures on edges cause singularities to develop.  Due to inability to mathematically calculate these locations, the stress values increase to a theoretical infinite value as the mesh is refined smaller and smaller.  Only the elements close to the singularity are affected so there is a significant difference in the stress between elements in these regions.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 helps to locate singularities by adding a Stress Hot Spot Diagnostics tool.  This compares the Von Mises stress between adjacent elements to determine probable locations. Here is an overview of how to use the new SOLIDWORKS Simulation Stress Hot Spots tool:

Running Stress Hot Spot Diagnostics

After your study has finished solving, right-click on the Results folder and choose Stress Hot Spot Diagnostics.

Stress Hot Spot Diagnostics

Stress Hot Spot Diagnostics

Set the sensitivity factor

The Stress Hot Spot options allow you to adjust the sensitivity factor. Increasing the Sensitivity will be slower but will identify more locations.  Increasing all the way to High will pick up more locations but not necessarily singularities.  It may find regions with too coarse of a mesh that causes a difference in stresses between adjacent elements.  However these regions may require further mesh refinement if accurate stress results are required.

The diagnostics tool automatically uses Element Values to locate the hot spots, but you can also include Node Values to review.

Stress Hot Spot Options

Stress Hot Spot Options

After clicking Run Stress Hot Spot Diagnosis, a dialog box will pop up indicated if Stress Hot Spots are detected or not.  Click OK to review the results.

Hot Spots Detected

Hot Spots Detected

Stress Hot Spots Results

A stress plot is generated and you can review Stress Hot Spots by seeing the location of grey elements.  Here we have singularities at the sharp inside corner, as well as the top as I fixed the edges instead of the face.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Stress Hot Spots

Hot Spot Results

To assist in pinpointing the exact location, choose the option Isolate Stress Hot Spots to only show the location of hot spots.

Isolate Hot Spots

Isolate Hot Spots

After accepting, a new Stress Plot is generated so you have access to review the Hot Spots and to include it in your Simulation Report.

Hot Spot Results

Hot Spot Results

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017, including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 Locate Singularities by Detecting Hot Spots appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at September 26, 2016 11:00 AM

SolidSmack

The Monday List 39.16 | What We’re Reading This Week

feature

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

These Are the Most Extreme Scuba Dives in the World
Consider it your underwater bucket list.

01

How Chase Made the Perfect High for Credit Card Junkies
The $450-a-year Sapphire Reserve card has points-and-miles-obsessed millennials fired up.

02

How Much Is Your Sleep Worth?
Why mattresses are the new iPhones.

03

Life is a Classroom. Here’s How to Master *YOUR* Curriculum
What if life was a classroom, but you didn’t know it?

05

Why has time forsaken Home Improvement?
The nostalgia beast is a ravenous one, and with each passing day, it chews our pop-culture memories into an increasingly formless web-slurry.

06

What We See When We Look at Travel Photography
On the visual — and psychological — contradictions of pictures from the road.

07

The post The Monday List 39.16 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 26, 2016 05:01 AM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Economics 101: SOLIDWORKS & MakerBot Desktop 3D Printing [WHITE PAPER]

This month we are running a great promotion for SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD software. When you buy a SOLIDWORKS Bundle which includes training and technical support, you will receive a FREE MakerBot desktop 3D printer to create your prototypes. There are only a few days left to take advantage of this promotion.

To help you research the benefits of a MakerBot 3D Printer you can download the following white paper…Economics 101: Desktop 3D Printing. The paper includes:

  • The advantages of MakerBot desktop 3D Printing
  • Typical return on investment (ROI)
  • Why you should choose a MakerBot
  • Example case studies

Download White Paper

MakerBot Desktop 3D Printing 101 White Paper

MakerBot 101 White Paper

SOLIDWORKS MakerBot 3D Bundle

A SOLIDWORKS MakerBot 3D bundle provides the tools you need to design your products and build a plastic prototype. We will provide you with the essential knowledge you need to get started with 3D CAD and 3D printing. Plus the technical support to solve your tough design problems.

SOLIDWORKS MakerBot Bundle

SOLIDWORKS Bundle

Our SOLIDWORKS bundles include:
  1. SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD Software
    • Choose from SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional or Premium software.
    • Includes 3D design tools and application specific add-ins.
  2. SOLIDWORKS training
    • Includes our 4 day SOLIDWORKS Essentials course.
    • Your choice of a 3 day SOLIDWORKS Advanced course (e.g. SOLIDWORKS Surfacing).
  3. SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service for 1 year
    • Technical support from Javelin’s SOLIDWORKS experts.
    • Software updates and new releases.
    • Access to MySolidWorks online training and resources.
  4. A FREE MakerBot 3D Printer and Training
    • Receive either a MakerBot Mini Replicator or a MakerBot Replicator desktop 3D printer, depending on which bundle you choose.
    • Includes our exclusive 3D Printing Essentials course to learn the fundamentals.

Act Now. This special offer ends September 30, 2016.

CHOOSE A BUNDLE

The post Economics 101: SOLIDWORKS & MakerBot Desktop 3D Printing [WHITE PAPER] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at September 26, 2016 04:04 AM

September 25, 2016

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to prevent users from changing their SOLIDWORKS System Options

In my previous article I mentioned that while creating an Administrative Image with SOLIDWORKS 2017, you now have the ability to manage and lock SOLIDWORKS System Options. Below are the detailed steps that will allow you to exert control over which SOLIDWORKS system options can be modified by users in your organization.

Prerequisites to lock SOLIDWORKS System Options:

In order to successfully access the SOLIDWORKS Setting Administrator you will need to have a machine that provides:

  1. Access to an administrative image, which had been previously created.
  2. A standalone version of SOLIDWORKS, which is used to access the SOLIDWORKS options for modification.

Accessing the Admin Image and the Options Editor:

Once you have located the Admin Image that you wish to modify, open the Administrative Option Editor by finding the “sldAdminOptionEditor.exe” file stored within the Administrative images top level folder.

  • After the administrative option editor is open, choose the desired group upon which to modify the settings.
  • Choose the “Edit” button (Pencil Icon)
  • Expand the Client Installation Options area of the dialog.
Setup the Administrative Image

Setup the Administrative Image

How do you want to apply SOLIDWORKS Settings?

Navigate down the list of various settings you will find the section that asks:

  • Find the section titled: How do you want to apply SOLIDWORKS Settings?”
  • Choose the radio button that states “Use a settings file exported from the SOLIDWORKS Settings Administrator.
  • If this option is “Greyed Out’ is is likely that there is not an installation of SOLIDWORKS on the local system.
Launch Settings Administrator

Launch Settings Administrator

Choose your Settings Source:

A new window should open and present you with the welcome screen for the SOLIDWORKS Settings Administrator dialog. From this dialog you can choose your own adventure (so to speak).

  • Start using a default set of options
  • Import SOLIDWORKS 2017 from the current standalone installation
  • Browse to an existing SLDREG file
  • Browse to an existing SLDSETTINGS file
SOLIDWORKS Settings Administrator Welcome Screen

SOLIDWORKS Settings Administrator Welcome Screen

In order to start with a shiny new set of Options, choose the “Default set of Options” and click “Next”

You will then be able to apply and lock SOLIDWORKS System Options that are available within the Options dialog.

Choose your Settings, and Lock them down!

The difference between this dialog, and a normal SOLIDWORKS options dialog, is that there are two extra checkboxes beside each setting.

  1. The first checkbox will permit you to “Apply” the settings that you specify in the next steps.
  2. The Second checkbox will Lock SOLIDWORKS System Options and prevent users from modifying the settings through their options dialog.

(Hey now… locking down access to the registry is the responsibility of a concerned IT Professional)

Lock SOLIDWORKS System Options

Locking Settings

Please be aware that every single file path under the “File Locations” area of the dialog has it’s own checkbox available within the dropdown menu. This checkbox governs whether the specific file path is controlled by the “Apply” or “Lock” checkboxes.

Lock file locations

Lock file locations

When you have configured all of the desired options (and everyone has agreed on which options should be locked down) click “Next” at the bottom of the dialog.

Finishing Up:

The next stop on the “Lock Settings Odyssey”  is to specify when and how to apply the Locked Options.

It is good practice for the CAD administrator to add in their contact information, so that angry co-workers can contact them directly.

You also have the opportunity to allow users to override the settings and options you have chosen by entering a password.

Setting a password

Setting a password

Saving the “SLDSETTINGS” FILE:

Select “Next” then save a *.SLDSETTINGS file that will store all of the applied and locked settings for use in the full deployment with the Administrative Image.

Saving the Admin file settings

Saving the Admin file settings

Save the SLDSETTINGS file in a network location that everyone can access, then move onto the selection of the remaining options within the Administrative Options Editor.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017, including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post How to prevent users from changing their SOLIDWORKS System Options appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at September 25, 2016 01:20 PM

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 Windows Explorer Document Preview Enhancements

There are new enhancements for the SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 Preview Tab in the Windows Explorer Vault view. If eDrawings is being used as the viewer and Display > Options, in the local Vault view, is set to ‘Show Full UI in SOLIDWORKS preview‘…

SOLIDWORKS PDM Display Options

SOLIDWORKS PDM Display Options

…you can now display an exploded view of an assembly.

Explode command in the Preview tab

Explode command in the Preview tab

In addition, the Preview Panel Card view , can now be turned off.

Card Preview Enabled

Card Preview Enabled

Which allows you to display a larger eDrawings view of your SOLIDWORKS document.

Card Preview Disabled

Card Preview Disabled

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017, including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 Windows Explorer Document Preview Enhancements appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at September 25, 2016 11:00 AM

September 24, 2016

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

A bit of “Nitty-Gritty” on SOLIDWORKS 2017 3D Interconnect

One of the key enhancements within SOLIDWORKS 2017 is how it handles CAD files from other Vendors. The 3D Interconnect module will allow you do more with CAD data from other systems like CATIA V5, Autodesk Inventor, Pro/Engineer and a host of other formats.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nUckD-_xq_U?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Having migrated from the Dark Side of things a decade ago, I still have old Autodesk Inventor data kicking around that I’d like to move into SOLIDWORKS every now and then. The advantage in SOLIDWORKS 2017 is that the assembly structure stays intact and there is a referenced link back to the original Inventor file.  If I were still working in a Multi-CAD environment, any changes to the inventor assembly would update and be reflected within SOLIDWORKS.

Working with data from other CAD Systems

The changes when opening files from other CAD Systems, introduced by 3D Interconnect, are subtle but powerful. Which means that there is no real change when opening up an Inventor Part or Assembly directly. If you have an assembly open and then “Insert” a part or assembly; here is where the enhanced functionality begins. We now have the ability to choose any of the typical Third-Party Native CAD formats upon inserting a component into a SOLIDWORKS Assembly!

Opening Inventor Files

Opening Inventor Files

3D Interconnect in the FeatureManager

Changes to the feature tree structure once you have imported files are easy to miss — until you focus your attention toward the SOLIDWORKS FeatureManager Design Tree.

The image below shows an imported assembly from inventor. The items of note in the image are the subtle changes in the Icons for the imported files. If you expand the feature tree for the individual components you will find a “reference” arrow. Which we all know is SOLIDWORKS informing us that there is a live link to a file referenced outside of our assembly.

3D Interconnect Reference Tree

3D Interconnect Reference Tree

 

If you do not see anything like this with your imported assembly; it is likely because the 3D interconnect functionality is not yet enabled.

Oh yes, I’d forgotten to mention; this can all be done WITHOUT the presence of a Third-Party CAD application on the system at all. I can import my Inventor files, make modifications to them as needed, and mate with and to the geometry.  Any changes made by the Third-Party CAD application will update and be reflected in my now Multi-CAD design!

We have always known that SOLIDWORKS was a great translator of other file formats; whether neutral files or Third-Party CAD files were involved. 3D interconnect in SOLIDWORKS 2017 has definitely taken translation abilities up a notch.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017, including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post A bit of “Nitty-Gritty” on SOLIDWORKS 2017 3D Interconnect appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at September 24, 2016 05:33 PM

Use the SOLIDWORKS Mate Controller to create mate-based motion and animation

It can be time consuming to create animations inside of SOLIDWORKS to represent motion of an assembly. There are different ways to get this done, either by creating an animation or configurations representing different positions of components.

In 2016, SOLIDWORKS launched a new feature called the SOLIDWORKS Mate Controller. Using the controller you can specify positions of your assembly components using mate values and degrees of freedom without having to use configurations for each position. SOLIDWORKS can then generate an animation for each movement between those specific positions and save the animations as an .AVI file.

The SOLIDWORKS Mate Controller is also integrated with Motion Studies, so you can create animations based on the positions you define with the Mate Controller; thus making the process of animating movement much easier.

Supported mate types include:

  • Angle
  • Distance
  • LimitAngle
  • LimitDistance
  • Slot (Distance Along Slot, Percent Along Slot)
  • Width (Dimension, Percent)

Where is the SOLIDWORKS Mate Controller tool?

You can find the Mate Controller in the Insert menu as shown in the figure below:

Location of the Mate Controller

Location of the Mate Controller

When the tool is launched, click on the Collect all supported mates icon, shown in the figure below, to capture only the supported mate types; i.e : Angle, Distance, LimitAngle, LimitDistance, Slot (Distance Along Slot, Percent Along Slot), Width (Dimension, Percent). You can reorder the mates if you need to.

Collect Supported Mates

Collect Supported Mates

Create Positions

The next thing you would want to do is create positions. The ‘Position 1’ is usually (always) your default position and therefore shouldn’t have any motion.

So then, you create your next position (position 2) by clicking here:

Create new position

Create new position

Whenever creating new positions you can tweak the mate types to new values and continue doing this for each position. Once you have completed all of your positions, you go down to the lowest part of the PropertyManager and click on the Calculate Animation button. The current animations will be highlighted in the table as the animation plays.

Here is a video showing you how to work with the tool

Note the video below has no audio.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4hEbjHbhihc?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Completing the animation

Click OK to finish using the mate controller.

You now have a SOLIDWORKS Mate Controller feature in the FeatureManager Design Tree which you can go back to and edit just like any other SOLIDWORKS feature.

Mate Controller Completed Feature

Mate Controller Completed Feature

The post Use the SOLIDWORKS Mate Controller to create mate-based motion and animation appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Vicky Guignard at September 24, 2016 11:00 AM

September 23, 2016

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 38.16

feature-19

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top ten stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

The World’s First Desktop Waterjet Cutting Machine Has Already Raised Nearly $1 Million on Kickstarter

If we had a quarter for every 3D printing-related Kickstarter project that’s swept in over the past four or five years, we’d likely be on our way towards buying our own desktop machine by now with heavy pockets. But frankly, we’re more interested in a different type of desktop fabrication machine at the moment: the world’s first desktop waterjet cutter from new hardware startup WAZER.

feature-17

TechShop Makes Adam Weep Happy Tears

TechShop first popped up in SF circa 2011. Think gym membership, but sub a CNC mill for the Stairmaster. Our own Dan Slaski swears by it. Adam takes a field trip to see what he’s been missing.

techshop-dc-metro-makerspace-solidsmack

Model of the Week: Shellmo Robot Centipede [With 32 Legs!]

Why aren’t there more excessively long, undulating-legged centipede style robots?! That’s the question I always ask a packed room at the local retirement village. Sure, they throw mashed potatoes and teeth at me, but late at night, they wonder the same thing as they fall asleep to the sound of sci-fi battle sounds on that mixtape I gave out to everyone.

shellmo-robo-micropede-00

Watching Manufactured Plastic Objects Melt Up-Close is Strangely Fascinating

While Gallagher might have pioneered the act of destroying things for the amusement of a late night TV audience, YouTube has certainly helped reinvent it.

feature-19

This Insane Glass Vase Collection Was Made From Molds Created with Fireproof Textiles

Having been in existence since the 1st century AD, there is nothing necessarily revolutionary about mold-blowing –– an alternate form of the glassblowing method that came shortly after free–blowing. However, designer Fabio Vogel just might have brought one of the more refreshing updates to the glass manufacturing method that we’ve seen in quite a long time.

feature-21

This Stunning Full-Sized Nissan Sedan Wireframe Sculpture Was Made Using a 3D Printing Pen

Despite raising nearly $4 million across two Kickstarter campaigns, the 3Doodler 3D printing pen never really took off as a tool for professional designers and architects to hash out 3D sketches quickly (note: they are trying to change this). Instead, the hot plastic–extruding handheld device became more popular with artists and sculptors who praised the ability to quickly develop more abstract forms.

feature-23

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 38.16 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 23, 2016 07:30 PM

Friday Smackdown: Pinky Skull Knuckles

dualyst-art

His face was bone, chiseled and knobby as a bald cypress root. The rain ran between the creases, with the eerie appearance it was pouring forth from his face itself, down onto the trench coat and pistols, all caught and painted in the flashes of light from these links.

The Dualyst – The artwork for the new digital tactical battlefield card game from Counterplay Games is simply magnificent. Game here.

Macro melt – Marco Room does what it does best, this time providing a satisfying look at objects melting.

Kosmosphaera – Giant glass marbles. Beautiful giant glass marbles. Works by Jodoc Elmiger and Valérie Jacquemet with glasswork done by Matteo Gonet.

Sprinter – How do you celebrate the 20th anniversary of a Mercedes van? With an incredible visualization workflow stitched into a commercial, of course.

Liquidity – Explosion of resin from Italian artist Annaluigia Boeretto, some with the appearance of water, others of flowers, all exceptional.

Shards – Another amazing sculptor, Israeli artist Zemer Peled, creates intricate botanical sculptures and other-worldly creations using ceramic shards.

Fav Deals This Week!
Deals to good to pass up for this week! –- A beautiful vintage style leather messenger bag, a top selling WiFi router and a great deal on Prismacolor pencils!
Leather Messenger Bag (78% Off)
TP-Link High Performance Router (40% Off)
Prismacolor Scholar Colored Pencils (49% Off)

Massive Fraud – Stoked to see the latest work from an old friend. Directed/Edited by the Justin Wilson for the Denton, Texas based Riverboat Gamblers for their 7″/digital single series on End Sound.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rLkgMIK0xhI?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

The post Friday Smackdown: Pinky Skull Knuckles appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 23, 2016 02:39 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Using DriveWorks and 3D Printers to Create Custom Mobile Phone Cases

Moogue use DriveWorks as a Sales Configurator to allow anyone to configure custom 3D printed phone cases quickly and easily from the comfort of their own home. They are based in the Netherlands and create their customizable phone cases using a 3D printer.

Using DriveWorks Pro as a Sales Configurator enables Moogue to offer custom designed phone cases online, to exact specifications.

DriveWorks 3D Printed Phone Cases

DriveWorks 3D Printed Phone Cases

DriveWorks spoke to Moogue Co-Founder Thijs Vernooij to find out more…

How Did Moogue begin?

“We experienced in our own lives that everyone wants the freedom of choice of the products we use every day. The people don’t want the standard or mainstream products anymore. Just by coincidence, we were talking about this and decided to roll the idea out for creating customized products.”

Moogue’s Customers

Who is your target audience?
“Our target are unique people with a strong character, old and young and those who know what they like. On top of that, we’re also facing companies who would have their logo, or company profile on our products – just like DriveWorks.”

How do you give your customers exactly what they want?
“We believe that consumers really know what they want and what they don`t want. That’s why we’ve created a platform where you can design your own products. The first result of this is www.3dphonecase.com.“

matt1 phonecase2

Technologies

How long did it take you to develop the Moogue business and website?
“The whole idea and project has been running for about 3 years now. Starting the business and creating the website took about 12 months developing time.”

How easy is it to add a case to the Moogue range when a new phone is released to the market?
“It’s still quite a lot of work because we want to have a perfect fit and protection of our cases, so every phone needs a bit of developing time. We are improving our projects to decrease the time to market.”

What technologies are you using?
“Basically SolidWorks, DriveWorks with web shop and Microsoft techniques.”

Why did you choose these technologies?
“The software we chose gave us the opportunity to create and develop our plans. It covered 3D-design, automated creation of models, and the web-based view for our customers.”

phonecase1 phonecase3 phonecase4

3D Printing

Customers can design the phone cases online from the comfort of their own home but where do you print them?
“We are printing at a location in the Netherlands”

Do you expect to have multiple Moogue printing facilities across the world?
“To decrease the delivery time, we might print on different locations in the world. We will only do this though if we are sure that the quality will be the same or better. This is very important for us.”

What 3D printers are you using?
“The accuracy we need for our products is very high. We can’t just use the home desktop printers for our product so we are using professional 3D Printers.”

How long does it take to print each phone case?
“Normally it takes about 24 hours to print a full batch, cooling down time included.

DriveWorks 3D PrintersMoogue’s Future

What challenges do you face?
“We are still looking for smart and creative people who would like to work together with us. Not only for creating cool designs, but also have software and website talents.”

What are Moogue’s plans for the future?
“Our plan is to launch many more products and sites where people can create their own product. We are facing a future where everyone wants to personalize and design their own products. We are looking for the next product to add to the Moogue brand, while also adding more designs and other brands to the phone cases website.”

See DriveWorks Pro in action

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hxRz7tQXzhw?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

<iframe frameborder="0" height="600" scrolling="no" src="http://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2016-02-18/5nmsqz" style="border: 0;" width="100%"></iframe>

The post Using DriveWorks and 3D Printers to Create Custom Mobile Phone Cases appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sarah Pew at September 23, 2016 02:30 PM

CAD Administrators Rejoice! With SOLIDWORKS 2017 you now have ultimate power in your SOLIDWORKS Universe!

The new SOLIDWORKS Setting Administration tool will give SOLIDWORKS 2017 CAD Administrators the ability to prevent users from changing their system options.

FAIR WARNING: this is going to be the most inflammatory article that I will write this year…

UPON READING THIS ARTICLE:

YOU MAY NOT:
  • Chase your CAD Administrator around the building
  • Throw things at your CAD Administrator
  • Threaten or mamie your CAD Administrator
YOU MAY:
  • Buy your CAD Administrator a Tim’s or a Starbucks!
  • Ensure your CAD Administrator gets a Holiday Card!
  • Have a proper discussion with your CAD Administrator, regarding how to implement the new options to everyone’s benefit.
Password Protecting the changes to User Options

Password Protecting the changes to User Options

The SOLIDWORKS Setting Administration FINE PRINT:

Before your CAD administrator starts rubbing their hands together and laughing maniacally, let’s go through some of the finer points…

  1. The “Locking” of user options can only be employed via an administrative image that has been modified by the Launch Settings Administrator.
  2. To use the Launch Settings Administrator one has to use the Admin Options Editor and access the administrative image from a system that has a standalone seat of SOLIDWORKS 2017 already installed.
  3. You will need to store the locked options within  a *.sldsettings file to push out along with the Administrative Image.
Launch the Settings Administrator

Launching the Settings Administrator

This is where I will once again mention the importance of a frank discussion with your users about what settings would be most beneficial to have “Locked”. (Users reading this article… Insert Starbucks here…)

In the realm of best practices to apply here, would likely be file paths to custom SOLIDWORKS files that may be stored on your network – Items such as a Network Toolbox location or the location of your company’s standard templates.

Read my “How To Guide” on applying this new “Locking” ability to your SOLIDWORKS options!

SOLIDWORKS Setting Administration

SOLIDWORKS Setting Administration

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017, including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post CAD Administrators Rejoice! With SOLIDWORKS 2017 you now have ultimate power in your SOLIDWORKS Universe! appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at September 23, 2016 01:12 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Sometimes Design Gives and Sometimes it Taketh Away

Months before Apple officially unveiled the highly anticipated iPhone 7, the latest of its insanely popular smartphones, there was a lot of chatter on social media—most of which was not positive—about the rumored phone’s lack of a headphone jack. What? I myself just plopped down a sizable chuck of change on a pair of Bose headphones that I absolutely love, so I’ll count myself among those grumbling over Apple’s decision to go all-Bluetooth with audio choices on the iPhone 7.

iphone7.jpg

Speculation ahead of the company’s splashy media debut of the new iPhone that took place in early September was widely varied: some believed Apple would only remove the headphone jack if it had a superior alternative, while others thought that Apple was merely paving the way to a wireless world for all. None of that speculation proved true.

During the event, Apple executive Phil Schiller said that Apple’s decision came down to one word: “courage.” Say what? “The courage to move on and do something better for all of us.” Let’s not forget that this is the same company that took away other beloved technologies, such as the FireWire and the optical disc drive. It gives and it taketh away. And, in some cases, there are some benefits to users. When the company previously took technology away, such as the CD drive and the Ethernet port on laptops, there were downstream benefits to users: namely thinner, lighter laptops.

Why is technology taken away?

People don’t like the idea of product developers taking away functionality. Certainly, engineers and product designers must carefully weigh the implications of removing features and only do so after they understand the implications of any changes to the product and the customer. It does happen however, and sometimes for the better. Let’s look back at some of the things that were taken away from us—in terms of design—and how in the long run, we are better off.

Loser: Phone buttons. Remember those things? No? Well, mobile phones before 2007, the year Apple first released its first iPhone, had them. If you ever owned a flip-phone, you remember.

Winner: Multi-touch technology, though not developed originally by Apple, was first implemented on the iPhone and the rest is history. Today, all smartphones feature multi-touch technology.

Loser: VCRs, DVD Players. These machines became a fixture in most households across the world as a way of watching movies with terrible resolution, viewing recorded grainy memories in forced family sit-downs and recording your favorite TV programs. It was pretty revolutionary at the time, and I for one was pretty devastated when it became clear that their demise was on the horizon.

Winner: DVRs and streaming service providers. Netflix and Chill > Be Kind Rewind.

gettyimages-51775153.0.jpg

Loser: Fax machines. Perhaps made most famous by being bashed to smithereens by baseball bats in the cult classic Office Space, these machines were first popularized in Japan back in the mid-to-late 1980s. Today, if you find one, it’s most likely gathering dust in the office store room.

Winner: Today, we have built-in scanners in our printers that have put these electronic dinosaurs on the brink of extinction.

Loser: Vinyl records, cassette tapes, CDs. Confession: I still have a box of treasured mixed tapes from my high school years, though I now have no way of listening to them now. I still burn CDs, though I get a lot of eye rolls when I mention it. Are we better off now that music is 100 percent digital? I think the jury is still out on this, and perhaps the recent resurgence in vinyl popularity is indicative that I’m not alone. After all, one can argue that the vinyl does have better sound quality.

Winner: Digital music providers and streaming services.

Loser: USB flash drives. Are you amazed at how cheap these high-capacity flash drives have become? Well, it’s not because manufacturers are becoming more charitable. The reality is that the USB market is quickly drying up as these USB flash drives are quickly becoming obsolete.

Winner: Cloud storage companies (Google, Apple, and Dropbox) that are offering more storage for less money.

Now let’s circle back to Apple’s decision to take away the headphone jack. While it’s true that the headphone jack is century-old technology, will end users benefit from this decision? Perhaps the jury is still out on that one as well. Got a favorite obsolete technology you still love? We’d love to hear your opinion in the comment section below. In the meantime, I’ll still be rocking out with my Bose headphones and my now-ancient iPhone 5S.

Author information

Barbara Schmitz
Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks
Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post Sometimes Design Gives and Sometimes it Taketh Away appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Barbara Schmitz at September 23, 2016 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 Connector Symbol Improvements

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 has enhanced the SOLIDWORKS Simulation Connector Symbol for Pin and Bolt connections.  Pin Connectors will now show symbols if they have the With retaining ring or With key enabled.  Bolt Connectors will show a symbol indicating a Torque or Axial preload applied.

Pin Connector Symbols

The symbol for ‘With retaining ring (no translation)’ in a Pin connector will show the pin head on one side and a retaining ring on the opposite side.

 

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Connector Symbol

Retaining Ring Symbol

The symbol for ‘With key (no rotation)’ will have a red bar indicating the keyed pin.

 

With Key Symbol

With Key Symbol

Changing the components transparency will provide a better visual of the symbols.

Both Retaining Ring and Key enabled

Both Retaining Ring and Key enabled

Bolt Connector Symbols

Bolt Connectors with preload applied with have small indicators.  An applied Axial preload force will have a small double-arrow through the length of the bolt.  An applied Torque preload with have a curved arrow around the nut.

Bolt Preload Symbol

Bolt Preload Symbol

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017, including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 Connector Symbol Improvements appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at September 23, 2016 11:00 AM

September 22, 2016

SolidSmack

BREAKTHROUGH: World’s Darkest Material, Vantablack, Successfully Applied to a 3D Print

vantablack-darkest-material-3d-printing-00

Surrey Nanosystems, producers of the amazing Vantablack dark material informed Fabbaloo they have successfully coated a 3D printed object with the world’s darkest material.

But first a catchup: Vantablack is a very unusual material composed of extremely long nanofibres, all aligned in a single direction.

These fibers tend to trap photons when projected toward a Vantablack surface. Well, the photons are absorbed at a rate of 99.965%, making Vantablack the darkest substance produced by humans.

vantablack-darkest-material-3d-printing-01

It’s a very eerie experience to see a Vantablack object, as there is literally no reflected light. The object is effectively invisible as you can see here. No, this image is NOT altered. The object on the left is the same as the item on the right, except that it’s coated with Vantablack.

It’s like there’s a hole in 3D space in front of your eyes.

Some months ago I wrote a piece speculating on the use of the amazing Vantablack as a specialized coating for 3D prints, which had not been done to my knowledge.

Well, we received a message from Surrey Nanosystems, producers of Vantablack, indicating this has now been done!

At top you can see an image of a 3D printed polymer/ceramic composite that’s been coated with Vantablack S-VIS material. The ceramic print was produced by Graphite Additive Manufacturing in the UK, and is a simple test object. We’re told the image was taken under “Bright Flash”, but even so you can see there is no light reflected.

Ben Jensen of Surrey Nanosystems explained that their company has been receiving many requests to coat 3D printed objects, but had not attempted to do so until now. He explains:

We ran this as a simple internal test to see if it was possible as we have had many requests from designers wanting to coat 3D printed parts. We weren’t sure if it would be effective, but it came out within spec on the first attempt.

So it seems that Surrey Nanosystems may indeed offer a Vantablack coating service for 3D printed objects in the future.

However, some caveats:

Surrey Nanosystems more than likely has some significant constraints on the type of materials usable in this process. Plastic parts may not be suitable, for example.

The price of Vantablack is extremely high, said to be higher than its weight in gold. In other words, you’d better have a really good reason for requesting this material.

Read more at Fabbaloo

The post BREAKTHROUGH: World’s Darkest Material, Vantablack, Successfully Applied to a 3D Print appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at September 22, 2016 07:49 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

A Unified Approach to Data Management with Aras PLM

Yanmar Energy Systems is a leading Japanese manufacturer of air conditioning and power generation systems. The company has product lifecycles that can extend to 20 – or even 30 years! With such lengthy product lifecycles, having an efficient and long-lived information management system is crucial to the success of the company.

Before Aras PLM, Yanmar stored much of their information in a combination of different data management systems – a PDM system, a sales logistics solution and many standalone spreadsheets. Because of the legacy document management system and the use of the standalone spreadsheets, critical customer information was very difficult to find.

Data Management with Aras

Example of a Yanmar Gas Heat Pump Air Conditioning System and CAD drawing. This air conditioning system is used in restaurants, shops, hotels, office buildings and other facilities.

As the company continued to grow, Yanmar knew they had an increasing challenge with their segmented data management system. When deciding whether they should continue to use their system or replace it with a product lifecycle management system, the company discovered Aras PLM and decided to explore further.

Aras PLM provides Yanmar with a unified PLM backbone that is accessible by all users in multiple departments and locations. One of the major benefits that Yanmar found was the ability to customize the solution in-house so they could have a PLM solution that fit their business needs.

With Aras PLM, Yanmar:

  • Improved information storage and retrieval
  • Increased collaboration with a unified solution for data management that is accessible to all essential employees
  • Streamlined customer service and quotation process for customers

“From a business perspective, Aras was an easy choice not only because of the subscription model and lower total cost of ownership, but also because upgrades and training were included in the subscription price,” said Keiji Otsubo, Planning Division at Yanmar Energy systems.

Download the full case study:

<iframe frameborder="0" height="700" scrolling="no" src="http://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2016-09-21/7gtyhr" style="border: 0;" width="100%"></iframe>

The post A Unified Approach to Data Management with Aras PLM appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sarah Pew at September 22, 2016 05:56 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

The Helping Hand Project: Changing Lives One Hand at a Time

Swing a baseball bat, eat with a fork and knife, steer a bike with both handles – without two hands, a child can’t do any of these ordinary activities that most children take for granted. But now The Helping Hand Project (The HHP), a nonprofit organization based in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, is using the latest advancements in 3D printing technology to make sure fewer children have to live life with such limitations.

The HHP is non-profit organization that was started by students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and specializes in providing 3D-printed prosthetic hands – free of charge – for children in need so they have every opportunity to live their lives to the fullest potential.

In the U.S., each year, at least 1,500 children are born with upper-limb differences. This loss of function may be restored with prosthetic devices, but the costs are high, and children may quickly outgrow the devices. In addition, many children who have physical disabilities and need prosthetic hands can use standard designs, but some require custom designs that fit their unique anatomies. Because of this, many families are unable to provide children with devices to reestablish full functionality.

In the fall of 2014, biomedical engineering students at UNC-Chapel Hill recognized this need and began working on prosthetic hands as a project under the University’s Biomedical Engineering Club. The club’s very first “helping hand” was built for a young boy named Holden Mora, who was born with symbrachydactyly, a condition in which the hand stops growing early in amniotic development. Using 3D-printed parts, the team created a hand for Holden for less than $40 worth of materials.

Since then, The HHP has printed hands for 20 children and continues to serve them by maintaining contact with these children so they may receive new devices as they grow. And through in-person meetings and online groups offered to the children and their families, The HHP provides support that goes far beyond simply providing a prosthetic device.

Students dedicated hours of their time developing these hands, using the resources available to them in the Biomedical Engineering Labs, along with a mix of open-source and custom designs. In 2015, when the demand for its 3D-printed hands outstripped the supply the nonprofit’s older 3D printers could deliver, The HHP partnered with Lenovo to help provide the performance and speed the nonprofit needed to keep its waiting list as short as possible.

Now, HHP engineers design and print devices using SOLIDWORKS applications, easily capturing their design ideas on the Lenovo ThinkStation P500. They also count on Lenovo’s lead ThinkStation engineer, Rodrigo Samper, to quickly print the 3D printer at Lenovo’s own facility based on the CAD files and the child’s hand specs received from The HHP. Having Lenovo’s engineers onboard to help cuts the printing time substantially, allowing children to receive their hands in just 18 to 24 hours.

Many children who have physical disabilities and need prosthetic hands can use standard designs, but some require custom designs that fit their unique anatomies. For all kinds of hands, The HPP engineers design and print devices using SOLIDWORKS applications on the ThinkStation P500. And to keep the waiting list for new prosthetics as short as possible, The HPP counts on Lenovo’s lead ThinkStation engineer to quickly 3D print devices at Lenovo’s own facility.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZtxKzYKAyE0?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

To learn more about The Helping Hand Project or find out how to get a device or support the cause, visit http://www.helpinghandproject.org/home.html.

Author information

Tom Salomone
Tom is a Vertical Marketing Manager at Lenovo Workstations.

The post The Helping Hand Project: Changing Lives One Hand at a Time appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Tom Salomone at September 22, 2016 05:30 PM

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Spotlight: Nicolas Michel-Imbert

The Visualize Featured User spotlight has now launched! Join us here for a monthly Q&A highlighting how one of your peers uses SOLIDWORKS Visualize in their daily workflow. This month’s featured Visualize user is Nicolas Michel-Imbert from ZAMAK Design, located in France.

What you are seeing are not photographs or videos! They’re images and animations created in SOLIDWORKS Visualize.

Q: Let’s start with the basics. Tell us a little about yourself and ZAMAK Design.

A: I’m Nicolas Michel-Imbert, design manager and co-founder of ZAMAK design. Our studio was created in 2012 and is now composed of five people + externals partners. We have two offices, located in Paris and Angouleme (France). We specialize in Global Design (Graphic, Product, Architecture, Transport and Motion design). We create innovative solutions for wide variety of projects, from logos to trains and everything in between.

Q: Your images and animations created in Visualize are truly remarkable. How long have you been using Visualize?

A: We’ve used Bunkspeed since 2009, and now have transitioned over to the new SOLIDWORKS Visualize earlier this year. The CAD package we use to create our 3D models is Rhinoceros 3D.

 

crystal_reglages_3.jpg

 

Q: How has Visualize improved or accelerated your workflow?

A: Visualize is very helpful to us because it can quickly and qualitatively show what our design concepts will look like in real life. This is an excellent tool for the designer because it’s very easy to learn and is very useful to communicate any work to a client.

Q: It sounds like Visualize is used quite a bit at ZAMAK Design. Please describe how Visualize is currently used in your workflow.

A: We work a lot in 3D. Thus, we import our models into Visualize, which gives them all their beauty and credibility. Visualize is like a virtual photo studio, where you can adjust the lights, camera, materials etc. As the rendering is fast as lighting, we can generate a high number of renderings, for all desired views. We can then communicate the images/photos of the project to our client, which in turn we can reuse it as collateral for marketing campaigns.

 

ldv_exter__1_.jpg

 

Q: Why is SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional integral to your daily workflow, and a ‘must-have’ for your company to stay ahead of the competition?

A: Visualize will always have a place of prime importance in our workflow because it’s the hinge element, or key, between the world of 3D modeling (complex, technical and for insiders) and traditional photography (easy to understand and envision for the larger public). It’s essential because without it, we could not communicate our project as simply and quickly, from engineers, marketers, commercials to the larger public and rest of the world. The images we produce are so realistic that sometimes they are used to replace pictures. Visualize makes it a very simple job; timely and efficient. I don’t see what could compete, near or far, with Visualize in the design world. Really.

 

bel_air_2_-_4k.jpg

 

Q: What features do you use the most in Visualize?

A: I would say, all! But in the studio, we are fans of all the Professional cameras settings to produce photographic renders, and animations, with some blurs, imperfections, all creating a picture-perfect atmosphere.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/111856732" title="Switch - Bäcken" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="1140"></iframe>

 

Q: Your animations are incredible and very life-like. What is your favorite feature in Visualize?

A: I personally love all the materials settings, to produce realistic textured parts with all the details and imperfections of the real-world. Visualize is easy to learn, so we have time to precisely create and really make what we want.

Q: What tip would you share with all the new Visualize users out there?

A: There are a few tricks to know in Visualize. My best advices could be to take the time to explore all the settings. Don’t be shy, the render will be fast at the end! I first take the time to correctly set the materials in my CAD package, to help break up my model in Visualize into the desired parts. Don’t skip this step, as it’s crucial to get the correct part break-up and realism in your images. Then, choose the appropriate HDR environment to light your model looking its best, knowing it’s rarely the same for all your projects. Finally, move your camera into a good composition, both to show the object’s beauty but also in realistic manner. Stay in a focal length between 30mm and 50mm for products, with camera angles you could replicate with your own eyes. In my opinion, 3D rendering is only the accumulation of several small details that really make the difference.

chair.jpg

 

 

Q: Anything else you’d like to add about your Visualize experience that our Visualize community will enjoy reading?

A: At the beginning, GPU computing can be a little bit confusing, I know. But when you understand the subtleties, you never want to return back to the CPU! For me, Visualize exploits this GPU technology brilliantly and cleverly, offering a first-class tool for designers. Fast, simple and very qualitative. I challenge anyone to find a better software in the current market!

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/121690779" title="TALLANO TECHNOLOGIE" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="1140"></iframe>

 

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/132412945" title="BACKEN - AUTOCUISEUR PROFIL" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="1140"></iframe>

 

Here are some more examples of Nicolas’ amazing work. Thanks for sharing, Nicolas and happy Visualize-ing!

 

brake_rotor.jpg

 

newshoot_02.jpg

 

display_02-wood.jpg

 

3_bis.jpg

chambre.jpg

mineral_moulee_6.jpg

 

traiteur_asiatique__1_.jpg

 

If you have SOLIDWORKS CAD Professional or Premium and are on active Subscription, then you get SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard for free! And this free seat of Visualize Standard can be given to anyone in your company…even a different department! Visualize is a separate stand-alone product and does not occupy the SW CAD license. Sign into your SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal and click any of the “Download Visualize” links to get started.

Do you want to be spotlighted in this monthly blog post? Simply post your Visualize content to this Forum link for consideration.

banner_v3.png

Author information

Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner is the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager.

The post SOLIDWORKS Visualize Spotlight: Nicolas Michel-Imbert appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Brian Hillner at September 22, 2016 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Pay What You Want for this Killer Hardware Design & Internet of Things eBook Bundle

feature

Where to even begin with this one? Well, we can start by saying this is one of the most killer bundles we’ve ever seen.

From building your own 3D printer to designing, coding and building your own wearables using Arduino, this DIY Hardware & Internet of Things eBook Bundle belongs in the digital library of every designer and engineer –– if only because you can freakin’ pay whatever you want for it even though it’s worth a total of $340.

So while you may not necessarily jump into building your first interactive touchscreen mirror immediately after buying the bundle, these books are certainly what you’d want to have around when you finally do.

Pay What You Want: DIY Hardware & Internet of Things eBook Bundle: $339 Pay What You Want

What’s Included (9 eBooks Total):

  • Building a RepRap 3D Printer: Soar Into the Future by Learning to Build Your Very Own 3D Printer
  • Learning ROS for Robotics Programming (Second Edition): Building Robots Has Never Been Easier Than With the Robot Operating System (ROS)
  • Raspberry Pi Blueprints: Design & Build Your Own Interactive Hardware Project Using the Raspberry Pi
  • Arduino Wearable Projects: Design, Code & Build Exciting Wearable Projects Using Arduino Tools
  • Getting Started with Python & Raspberry Pi: Launch Into Programming by Programming for One of the World’s Most Popular Single Board Computers
  • Arduino by Example: Master the Arduino Platform By Getting Your Hands Dirty Designing & Building Real Projects
  • Internet of Things with Arduino Blueprints: Develop Interactive, Arduino-Based Internet Projects with Ethernet & WiFi
  • Arduino iOS Blueprints: Integrate the Arduino & iOS Platforms to Design Amazing Real-World Projects
  • Arduino Android Blueprints: Interface Arduino with Android to Create Engaging, Interactive Projects

Get yours here!

IMPORTANT REMINDER:

The links in this post are affiliate links, so if you click one and purchase any item, we get a commission. The revenue we generate from these links makes a huge difference in helping us cover the costs of hosting and bringing you awesome content. So thank you.

If you want to bookmark our general affiliate links to use for shopping later, you’ll be supporting us simply by buying stuff you were going to buy anyway. We’d greatly appreciate it!

Here are three great options:

StackSocial Amazon 3D Hubs

Happy shopping… and please share this with a friend who you think might be interested!

We’ll be back with another sweet deal next week.

The post Pay What You Want for this Killer Hardware Design & Internet of Things eBook Bundle appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 22, 2016 11:22 AM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Mirror Drawing View

In SOLIDWORKS 2017, you can Mirror SOLIDWORKS Drawing View, including display model, relative to model, and predefined drawing views without having to create the mirror components. Projected and other derived views carry over the mirror state from their parent view.

How to Mirror SOLIDWORKS Drawing View

To mirror drawing views:

  1. In the drawing environment, select a Model, Relative to Model, or Predefined drawing view;
  2. In the Drawing view PropertyManager, in the mirror panel, select Mirror view;
  3. Under Mirror view, select Horizontal or Vertical.

The following image demonstrates how to Mirror SOLIDWORKS Drawing View vertically, including the dimensions, which remain in their associated locations:

Mirror SOLIDWORKS Drawing View Vertically

Mirror Drawing View

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017, including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 Mirror Drawing View appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWP at September 22, 2016 11:00 AM

SolidSmack

MakerBot Revamps Desktop 3D Printing Ecosystem for Professionals

feature

If there’s one thing that MakerBot has learned over the course of its short existence, it’s that you can’t please them all.

While early adopters seeking a well-rounded user experience for 3D printing at home welcomed MakerBot’s push towards a cohesive ecosystem, those in the Open Source–heavy DIY community pushed back as the company attempted to close off what they believed should have been open technology. Also –– the printers didn’t work that great anyways.

But despite the various ups and downs over the years –– including the major low point of shipping manufacturing overseas –– the company has finally gotten one thing right: their market is professionals and educators…NOT DIY enthusiasts.

With the announcement of new products this week –– including two new 3D printers –– geared specifically towards professionals and educators, the Brooklyn-based company is finally coming full circle and answering (or at least attempting to) to the specific needs of their target users:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/k2pHdMIKjd8?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

First up is MakerBot Print, a free software offering designed to optimize the 3D printing process for the professional’s workflow. More specifically, it helps users prepare, manage, share and print both native CAD files and STL files with ease. As a sidekick, the new MakerBot Mobile app lets users tap into these functionalities via their mobile devices –– including the ability to monitor and control a network of 3D printers over the Cloud.

makerbot_for_professionals

Next up are two new MakerBot Replicators: The Replicator+ and The Replicator Mini+. Similar in appearance to their predecessors, the new lineup has reportedly been tested rigorously for quality control purposes to offer greater reliability and precision. Additionally, the new printers are capable of printing up to 30% faster and with a 25% larger build volume (although specifics are left to each model). Combined with a redesigned gantry and z-stage, this is –– in a nutshell –– the best lineup from MakerBot, yet.

replicator_module_1

mini_module_1

“We have gone through a cultural shift here at MakerBot over the past year, where listening and understanding the needs of our customers are cornerstones of our company. As a result, we’ve gained an in-depth understanding of the wider needs of professionals and educators that has informed our product development process,” said Jonathan Jaglom, CEO of MakerBot. “Our new solutions for professionals and educators are based on feedback addressing how we could accelerate and streamline the iterative design process and make teaching with a desktop 3D printer easier and more effective.”

Through October 31st, the company is selling the Replicator+ for $1,999 (before jumping up to $2,499) and the Replicator Mini+ for $999 (before jumping up to $1,299). Find out more over at MakerBot.

The post MakerBot Revamps Desktop 3D Printing Ecosystem for Professionals appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at September 22, 2016 02:35 AM

September 21, 2016

SolidSmack

The Dango Tactical Wallet is Dango Cool

dango-tactical-wallet-00

What’s that you say? Your wallet can store five stamps and a breath mint? That’s nothing. The Dango Tactical Wallet can do all the things a regular wallet can do PLUS saw down a small tree, open a can, open a bottle, measure your bicep, tension a rope, break glass, tighten bolts, drive screws, pry nails and still have enough time to act as your trusty phone stand. “Who needs all that?” WHO DOESN’T?

Charlie Carroll and Thuan Tran head up Dango Products and IN A WORLD of waaaay too many multi-tool options, waaaaay to many wallet options, and waaaay to many combinations of both, they’ve developed a design that puts the others in a tub of soggy, milk-curdled shame, not just with its functional capabilities, but also in the intricately thought out design and material selection. You have 6061 aerospace grade CNC’d aluminum layered lovingly beneath a top grain leather exterior with a microfiber interior, banded by a silicon strap to keep everything in its place. The video really breaks down how they approached the design, showing the thought behind it and the things it can do.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HvnOhp00ZzQ?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

All together, the Tactical Wallet has 14 built-in functions (doubled if you holding one in each fist). The multi-tool slides into the card cavity and engages with safety locks built into the wallet chassis when you pop it out to saw, cut or pop a bear in the jaw. There are two color options–raw hide leather and jet black leather–and both look fabulous. On top of all that, it’s handcrafted and made in the good ‘ol US of A, is completely RFID resistant and is TSA compliant (without multi-tool).

They laid the design of the wallet out, modeling each piece in SolidWorks, creating renderings in KeyShot and developing dozens of prototypes. Tran also tells us that a soft wallet had to be realized in order to push the design process forward to develop a hard wallet.

dango-tactical-wallet-design-process-01
dango-tactical-wallet-design-process-02
dango-tactical-wallet-design-process-03

dango-tactical-wallet-design-process-04

The Dango Wallet Kickstarter campaign is in full swing, blowing past their $15,000 goal and nearing $150,000. There are actually two wallet options, the D01 Dapper Wallet (without multi-tool) and the T01 Tactical Wallet (with multi-tool). They have single options starting at $49 (D01) and $69 (T01) or two and four packs for each with delivery slated for November.

dango-tactical-wallet-design-00

dango-tactical-wallet-design-01

dango-tactical-wallet-design-02

dango-tactical-wallet-design-03

dango-tactical-wallet-design-04

dango-tactical-wallet-design-05

dango-tactical-wallet-design-06

The post The Dango Tactical Wallet is Dango Cool appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 21, 2016 09:17 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

More Efficient File Versioning in SOLIDWORKS 2017 PDM

The SOLIDWORKS 2017 PDM product line is full of new enhancements that will make managing your SOLIDWORKS files even easier and more efficient. For one, SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard and Professional 2017 now offer the ability to overwrite versions, which will help reduce the number versions that are stored and tracked by PDM, making search and overall performance better. It will also encourage users to do more frequent check-ins so their edits are visible to other users sooner and provide better backup in case they encounter a hardware issue.

Other benefits include the ability to fix minor mistakes on released files, such as spelling errors, without they need to send the file(s) through another approval process. Assemblies can be updated more frequently to point to the latest versions of their referenced files without adding unwanted versions.

Of course, overwriting versions may not be desired in all circumstances so new folder and state permissions have been added. These permissions allow the administrator to control who has the ability to choose the overwrite option at check in and in what workflow state the action should be allowed. For instance for files in a preliminary design state where there are frequent changes, version overwrite may be a good option so others can see the changes without creating lots of versions. However, once the files are released, maybe only administrators would have the overwrite ability.

Kurt_launch_blog_pic1

We didn’t stop at just adding this new capability as a user option; we also added it for workflow transition actions, set variable in Dispatch, and via the API. Now when transition actions write to variables, like Revision, the system can overwrite the version. To keep track of when file versions are overwritten, there is a new history line item titled “Checked-In with version overwrite” that captures who and when the action was taken.

Kurt_launch_blog_pic2

 

Explore the SOLIDWORKS 2017 website to see all of the great SOLIDWORKS PDM enhancements along with more than 200 new, user-driven features.

It’s never been easier to remove the overhead of manual file management by adopting a purpose-built SOLIDWORKS data management solution as it is with SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard and Professional. Learn more and see all of the new enhancements and features in action here.

SW_2017_Manage_Banner_961x250_FINAL

Author information

Kurt Lundstedt
Kurt Lundstedt
Product Manager - PDM Solutions at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post More Efficient File Versioning in SOLIDWORKS 2017 PDM appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Kurt Lundstedt at September 21, 2016 06:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

The Top 5 Ways a SOLIDWORKS & MakerBot 3D Bundle will speed your design cycle

This month we are running a great promotion for SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD software. When you buy a SOLIDWORKS Bundle which includes training and technical support, you will receive a FREE MakerBot desktop 3D printer to create your prototypes. Here are the top 5 ways a SOLIDWORKS MakerBot 3D bundle will speed up your engineering design cycle, resulting in a rapid return on investment:

  1. Reduce prototyping time and expenses. Instead of outsourcing every prototype, a desktop 3D printer can democratize design by allowing more engineers to test proof of concept, especially in the early stages of development.
  2. Create better designs. The ability for design engineers to 3D print at their desks allows them to try new ideas and make mistakes. Without real-time prototyping, the most innovative design may never be discovered.
  3. Speed approvals. Hand a client or upper-level management a physical model to transform the design cycle. 3D printing speeds the design process by ending arguments and avoiding long meetings, leaving more time to focus on the best ideas.
  4. Ease of use increases productivity. Using the latest generation of MakerBot® Replicator® Desktop 3D Printers allows design engineers to:
    • Choose settings that range from fast drafts to finer resolutions that don’t need postproduction.
    • Accelerate prototyping with the printer’s large build volume, on-board camera and diagnostics, and assisted build plate leveling .
    • Use Wi-Fi, USB and Ethernet connectivity to ensure a seamless production workflow that can be remotely monitored.
  5. Competitive advantage. Be faster out of the gate with a design that has been prototyped and improved multiple times by incorporating desktop 3D printing into your design engineering workflow.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BztvTSWDJ3k?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

SOLIDWORKS MakerBot 3D Bundle

A SOLIDWORKS MakerBot 3D bundle provides the tools you need to design your products and build a plastic prototype. We will provide you with the essential knowledge you need to get started with 3D CAD and 3D printing. Plus the technical support to solve your tough design problems. Our bundles include:

SOLIDWORKS MakerBot Bundle

SOLIDWORKS Bundle

  1. SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD Software
    • Choose from SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional or Premium software.
    • Includes 3D design tools and application specific add-ins.
  2. SOLIDWORKS training
    • Includes our 4 day SOLIDWORKS Essentials course.
    • Your choice of a 3 day SOLIDWORKS Advanced course (e.g. SOLIDWORKS Surfacing).
  3. SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service for 1 year
    • Technical support from Javelin’s SOLIDWORKS experts.
    • Software updates and new releases.
    • Access to MySolidWorks online training and resources.
  4. A FREE MakerBot 3D Printer and Training
    • Receive either a MakerBot Mini Replicator or a MakerBot Replicator desktop 3D printer, depending on which bundle you choose.
    • Includes our exclusive 3D Printing Essentials course to learn the fundamentals.

Act Now. This special offer ends September 30, 2016.

CHOOSE A BUNDLE

The post The Top 5 Ways a SOLIDWORKS & MakerBot 3D Bundle will speed your design cycle appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at September 21, 2016 05:33 PM

Marine Canvas & Upholstery Design using SOLIDWORKS and ExactFlat [WEBINAR]

ExactFlat is a SOLIDWORKS add-in solution featuring 2D/3D design, pattern, nest, costing and documentation tools. ExactFlat gives industrial fabric and textile manufacturers the ability to take their product design from screen to machine.

Javelin is hosting a complimentary webinar on Wednesday, September 28, 2016, from 2:00 PM – 2:45 PM (EDT) that will focus on Marine Canvas design solutions, including boat covers, biminis, and boat seating/upholstery. Watch the video below for a quick overview of ExactFlat:

ExactFlat for Boat Cover (Flattening) Demo

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uzVaYp-OXLk?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Grow your business without increasing costs

Whether your business focuses on marine canvas, Biminis or custom seating, ExactFlat process automation software can help by:

  • Eliminating fit problems
  • Predicting material waste before it happens
  • Communicating details to suppliers ensuring they get it right the first time

See images below for real examples of the 2D flattening and 3D design process. 

Boat Cover [Flat Shaded] in ExactFlat

Boat Cover [Flat Shaded] in ExactFlat

Boat Cover - 3D Shade

Boat Cover – 3D Shade

Attend our Webinar

Attend our Marine Canvas Design Webinar on Wednesday, September 28, 2016, from 2:00 PM – 2:45 PM (EDT) to see the ExactFlat SOLIDWORKS add-in software live.

During the webinar you will see how you can streamline your design /manufacturing process to make boat seating and covers that fit right the first time! Learn how FEA technology has been deployed with custom flattening algorithms to creating a mathematical solution for creating 2D flat patterns from 3D geometry.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="900" scrolling="no" src="http://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2016-09-21/7gtyg1" style="border: 0;" width="100%"></iframe>

The post Marine Canvas & Upholstery Design using SOLIDWORKS and ExactFlat [WEBINAR] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Erin Elliott at September 21, 2016 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Launch Event Recap

The best and most passionate CAD community in the world assembled today in person and online for a first look at SOLIDWORKS 2017. CEO Gian Paolo Bassi was joined by executives Suchit Jain, Kishore Boyalakuntla and Kurt Anliker, along with innovative users Myomo, Chairslayer, and RunnitCNC, to introduce SOLIDWORKS 2017, talk about the future of design and share results of breakthrough engineering projects.

Gian Paolo opened the event by sharing the theme of SOLIDWORKS 2017: the power you need to drive innovation. SOLIDWORKS 2017 has the power to enable designers and engineers to take advantage of the speed of technology to create the new products that will solve the world’s problems. Technology is lowering traditional barriers to business. It’s now easier than ever to access capital and resources to create the next breakthrough product. This provides many new opportunities, but it also means challenges are everywhere and innovation is critical for survival.

SW_PCB_2016_PCB_3D_Viz

For SOLIDWORKS, this power translates to simplifying and streamlining the product design process onto one platform. This means connecting with manufacturers, like Xometry, for rapid fabrication in a matter of clicks or providing real-time personalization with SOLIDWORKS Make. Power means being able to take advantage of optimization-driven design that advises your design process and truly delivers on the promise of “aided” in computer-aided design. It’s a suite of tools, including model-based definition (MBD), to take your CAD data from art to part faster than ever before; keeping you ahead of the competitive and technological curve.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/mY4UGO08yI4?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

 

Several examples of how SOLIDWORKS users are already taking advantage of tools that lower the barriers to bring connected devices were presented. The first, Freight Farms, takes big farm production and condenses it into a shipping container. The container is equipped with lighting, cooling and filtration systems connected to a mobile app for constant monitoring. The second, Halo Smart Labs, builds the world’s safest and smartest smoke alarms. In addition to detecting smoke, carbon monoxide and fire, Halo can actually detect the threat of tornadoes. Further, the company did not want to stop at just being connected – it needed to be compatible with every home platform on the market regardless of device or location.

Freight Farms and Halo are two examples of how traditional industries and products are being disrupted every day. Smoke alarms are being reimagined. Farms are being reimagined. As technology continues to evolve, everything will be reimagined. A survey conducted at the Consumer Electronics Show found that 70 percent of all connected devices presented at the show were designed in SOLIDWORKS. If these results are any indication, reimagination will happen with SOLIDWORKS tools.

Keeping with the theme of lowering the bar to technology and devices, Brand UX Leader and Product Portfolio Management Senior Director Kishore Boyalakuntla introduced 3DPartSupply, 3D Interconnect, 3DDrive, SOLIDWORKS Make and Term Licensing.

3DPartSupply enables you to create a physical shape and find parts to match its likeness on 3DContentCentral and Traceparts. As 20 percent or more of product components are typically common, 3DPartSupply provides more ways to save time and avoid recreating existing parts.

3D Interconnect was created for many customers who work in mixed CAD environments. In the past, these files would need to be translated, a process that often results in lost design intelligence and rework. Now you can simply take CAD data created in many other CAD systems, in its native format, and easily add it to SOLIDWORKS models without translation and continue to build on top of the models and make geometry changes.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MqF8RYkTcH0?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

 

3DDrive enables you to collaborate, connect and share files. Part of the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform, 3DDRive connects disconnected products and enables you to securely manage who, how, when and where your data is being accessed.

Term licensing provides flexibility into when, what and how you buy and control intellectual property. SOLIDWORKS users can choose to purchase perpetual licenses or subscription forever or opt for a term license when extra seats or design functionality is needed. Term licensing will include the option to rent SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional or Premium as well as SOLIDWORKS Simulation, Simulation Professional or Premium.

Director of Product Introduction Kurt Anliker gave attendees a deeper dive into a handful of the hundreds of new features in SOLIDWORKS 2017 – including SOLIDWORKS PCB, Modeling Power, Surfacing, Magnetic Mates and the Stress Hot Spots feature in SOLIDWORKS Simulation. These new features included:

SOLIDWORKS PCB

Seamlessly synchronize electronic and mechanical design on demand with SOLIDWORKS PCB that combines the electronics design expertise of Altium® with SOLIDWORKS ease of use.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/h3QXorong08?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

 

Modeling Power

SOLIDWORKS 2017 delivers even greater modeling power and performance that speed up your design process. After listening to your feedback, SOLIDWORKS 2017 includes a better user experience, plus refined and improved technology, including new tools for Chamfer, Fillet, and Advanced Hole specification.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Z52sKetUBN0?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

 

Surfacing

New surfacing features remove obstacles to creating complex 3D geometry faster by avoiding the need for complex workarounds.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gmWZ5rznM6w?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

 

SOLIDWORKS Simulation

New enhancements here enable you to speed up the process of finding creative breakthroughs for your products by providing greater insight into your design and improving productivity. Among the new features is Stress Hot Spots, which enables you to quickly identify potential stress problems.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uAP4E8NcP_U?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

 

Magnetic Mates

SOLIDWORKS 2017 introduces new and enhanced tools and workflows to answer the challenge of working with large assemblies. Magnetic Mates simplifies and speeds the mating process significantly by enabling users to drag and drop mating.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1rowTbDvdTU?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

 

In addition to the product roadmap and SOLIDWORKS 2017 updates, the event also discussed the power of the SOLIDWORKS user community. Suchit Jain, VP of Strategy, Business Development and Community, kicked off the discussion with some impressive stats.

Tied into discussion of the future of product design is how we prepare the current and next generation of engineers to create innovation. Over the last 22 years, 10,000,000+ students have learned SOLIDWORKS and 100,000+ are certified users. These students are moving on to join the engineering workforce and are responsible for amazing products, such as Freight Farms and Myomo. To get an even younger audience interested in STEM, Suchi shared details of the SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids Beta program, which allows kids to capture, shape, and style their ideas from concept to reality.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/a6VIWL35mvo?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

 

Suchit also provided updates on the SOLIDWORKS for Entrepreneurs program, which currently includes over 200 hardware startups working on everything from app-enabled robots to supersonic passenger jets. This commitment to startups also manifests itself into partnerships with more than 60 business incubators. Another way SOLIDWORKS is helping to lower barriers to business and engineering knowledge is through its partnership with the Fab Foundation. The foundation’s Fab Labs are community-driven makerspaces providing widespread access to modern means for invention. Started by Neil Gershenfeld of MIT’s Center for Bits and Atoms, there are now more than 1000 FabLabs around the world.

Given the power of the SOLIDWORKS community, it’s no surprise that inspirational user stories stole the show. First, Andrew Harland, Principal Mechanical Engineer at Myomo, discussed his company’s evolution and the design of its flagship product: the MyoPro® myoelectric upper limb orthosis. One out of 100 people experience some form of paralysis. The MyoPro is an exoskeleton used by people to regain functionality lost to accidents or strokes. Andrew shared details of MyoPro’s complex combination of form, electronics, flexibility and fashion along with the challenges SOLIDWORKS helps him solve in order to pack these features into an effective wearable device. Remarkably, some of its more than 600 users suffered accidents decades ago and are now using the device to regain arm functionality that they haven’t had in 10, 20 or even 50 years!

Finally, users Rob Parsons of Chairslayer and Andy Blood of RunnitCNC shared their inspirational stories along with their passion for fast cars and dangerous things. Rob was paralyzed during a dirt bike crash and Andy was similarly injured in a work accident. The two have since connected and are revolutionizing the world of racing and how people with paraplegia are getting back behind the wheel with Rob’s custom hand clutch system and Andy’s manufacturing work. These are the users who fuel innovation. Their power to transform what life throws at them into truly world-changing ideas is what drives the SOLIDWORKS community.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZmcCoDmwhXc?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

 

A big thank you goes to the SOLIDWORKS 2017 launch sponsors BOXX Technologies, Dell, HP/NVIDIA and Lenovo. This event would not be possible without their support.

Two hours seemed to go by in a flash. It was certainly a lot of content to cram into a short amount of time. The event was a great primer for SOLIDWORKS 2017. If you want to get hands-on with the more than 200 user-driven features, click here to find a reseller event near you so you can test drive SOLIDWORKS 2017!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 Launch Event Recap appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at September 21, 2016 02:58 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2017 SpeedPak enhanced to now include reference geometry

In SOLIDWORKS 2017 you can now include reference geometry and curves in a SpeedPak. Sketches from any level of the assembly can be included in a SpeedPak. Previously, all top-level unabsorbed sketches were included in the SpeedPak. You had to suppress top-level sketches that you wanted to exclude, and you could not select sketches in subassemblies.

To make a SOLIDWORKS 2017 SpeedPak, right-click on a configuration and select Add SpeedPak from the shortcut menu as shown in the following image:

Add a SpeedPak under a Configuration

Add a SpeedPak under a Configuration

Unlike previous versions in SOLIDWORKS 2017, an extra field is available in the PropertyManager to include sketches, reference geometry, and curves. The SpeedPak PropertyManager for both SOLIDWORKS 2016 and 2017 is shown in the following image. On the right, an axis and two sketches were selected to include in the SpeedPak while as shown on the left there is no field available in SOLIDWORKS 2016.

Compare SpeedPak Options in 2016 vs. 2017

Compare SpeedPak Options in 2016 vs. 2017

The following image demonstrates the result of including reference geometry in the SpeedPak, they are now visible/selectable. This capability enhances the use of SpeedPak and applying mates in assembling components becomes much easier.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 SpeedPak

Reference Geometries and Sketches can be included in SpeedPak

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017, including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 SpeedPak enhanced to now include reference geometry appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWP at September 21, 2016 02:00 PM

SolidSmack

This Stunning Full-Sized Nissan Sedan Wireframe Sculpture Was Made Using a 3D Printing Pen

feature

Despite raising nearly $4 million across two Kickstarter campaigns, the 3Doodler 3D printing pen never really took off as a tool for professional designers and architects to hash out 3D sketches quickly (note: they are trying to change this). Instead, the hot plastic–extruding handheld device became more popular with artists and sculptors who praised the ability to quickly develop more abstract forms.

Among others who have taken the 3D printing pen under their belt (quite literally) is sculptor Grace Du Prez. Heck, she even defines herself as a “3D Printing Pen Artist” –– although her background is in mixed media textile design.

More recently, the sculptor –– who has made everything from sunglasses to lamps to hats from the 3Doodler –– was commissioned by Nissan to create the world’s largest sculpture to date using a 3D pen: a full-sized replica of the new Qashqai Black Edition to celebrate the crossover’s launch.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NYy5C5dlfbw?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

Working with a team of assistants, Du Prez guided her 3D pen-wielding team from wheels to roof to create the stunning wireframe sculpture. In total, nearly 8.5 miles of filament was used:

3d-printing-pen-nissan-5

3d-printing-pen-nissan-4

3d-printing-pen-nissan-3

3d-printing-pen-nissan-2

3d-printing-pen-nissan-1

Check out the rest of Du Prez’s work –– or commission her to create your own sculpture –– over at her website.

The post This Stunning Full-Sized Nissan Sedan Wireframe Sculpture Was Made Using a 3D Printing Pen appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at September 21, 2016 11:24 AM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How SOLIDWORKS PDM eliminates the risk of files being overwritten

Do you ever have trouble coordinating who can work on a SOLIDWORKS file at any given time? Has there been a time where you finally finished your work, saved it and the next time you open the file find out your work has been overwritten? Eliminate the risk of files being overwritten by using SOLIDWORKS PDM. Check out the video below to see what precautionary measures are taken by SOLIDWORKS PDM to ensure a zero risk working environment.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0I4aqbcMWr4?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Prevent overwritten files with automatic file locking

SOLIDWORKS PDM files will be automatically locked when they are currently being edited. This eliminates the issues of another user overwriting the progress that you just made working on your file. SOLIDWORKS PDM will tell you who is currently working on the part and even gives you the option to instant message or call them within the software itself.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Files in Check Out dialog

When a file is currently open, SOLIDWORKS PDM restricts access to prevent the data from being overwritten

Outdated files and different revisions

In order to prevent you from using outdated SOLIDWORKS PDM files the system will highlight them in red notifying you to refresh the file. This can all be done without having to close your project file and reopen it, speeding up the process even further. By simply right-clicking and choosing “Get latest version” or “Get” you will be able to update your part immediately within the software.

Another feature that SOLIDWORKS PDM provides is the ability to open different versions of the same file. When you check the file back in after editing it you can leave a comment explaining the difference that you just made. This condenses every version of the same file into one. You no longer have to worry about which version is the correct one for a specific application.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS PDM

SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard is a new data management solution for smaller workgroup environments in a single location.  Included in SOLIDWORKS Professional and Premium packages. SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard allows you to manage your SOLIDWORKS data more effectively on local and shared network drives.

Read additional blog articles to learn how to get started with SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard, including installation, setup, and usage.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional provides even more functionality, learn about the differences between the Standard and Professional PDM versions.

The post How SOLIDWORKS PDM eliminates the risk of files being overwritten appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Dimos Siagoulis at September 21, 2016 11:00 AM

SolidSmack

Weekly App Smack 38.16: Google Trips, Isoland, Manual RAW, Skyscanner and More…

feature

Time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device, be it iPhone, Android or Windows!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Google Trips

Google Trips makes exploring the world easier by organizing your essential info in one place and making it available even offline. Get activity suggestions based on what’s nearby, customizeable day plans, and your travel reservations from Gmail.

googletrips

Isoland

ne of the most anticipated independent puzzle games of 2016! Nominated for the IndiePlay Awards of “Best Art”.

isoland

Manual – RAW

A powerful camera app with full control over your image. Quickly and simply adjust all parameters of your image. No more tapping and hoping automatic can understand what you want. Take control.

manual

Download Accelerator Plus

Download Accelerator Plus (apk: ADA+ or DAP) is a powerful download speed booster, an advanced download manager, a must-have tool for Android phone/tablet.

download

AcuuWeather

AccuWeather offers the weather with same Superior Accuracy™ and great experience across all Android smartphones and tablets, and Android Wear.

accuweather

Skyscanner

Travel smarter with Skyscanner’s slick new all-in-one travel app. Instantly search, compare and book cheap flights, hotels and car rentals anytime, anywhere for your next trip. Independent and unbiased and completely free, we simply find you the best deals out there in seconds. The award-winning, easy to use app brought to you by the world’s travel search engine.

skyscanner

The post Weekly App Smack 38.16: Google Trips, Isoland, Manual RAW, Skyscanner and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 21, 2016 05:01 AM

September 20, 2016

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Making the Most of Your SOLIDWORKS Investment

Staying competitive means implementing new ways of learning. For something as dynamic and complex as CAD software, the tools are evolving more rapidly than ever; there are always new best practices and techniques. Continuous learning needs to become a normal part of an engineer’s work week.

Jonas Blankenship, CAD Administrator at Zodiac Pools, implemented SolidProfessor Enterprise to maximize their SOLIDWORKS investment and increase design proficiency across his team. Blankenship shared that he “needed a way to ensure that our employees are staying on top of the design software. SOLIDWORKS is constantly releasing new features and updates, so we needed to give our designers a tool that would allow them to stay on the cutting edge. The main reason we were looking for a professional development tool was to keep pushing our employees forward, so that they’re constantly expanding their knowledge and capabilities, allowing us to further improve our industry leading design services.”

“The Update Training course has been really helpful for us as it allows us to ensure that we’re maximizing our SolidWorks investment. SolidProfessor has significantly improved our team’s efficiency within SOLIDWORKS. They’re much more comfortable using different tools, shortcuts, mouse gestures, hot-keys, etc. Even employees that have been working with SOLIDWORKS for years are picking up these time savers and gaining efficiency.”

Another useful feature was the SOLIDWORKS add-in that allows SolidProfessor members to get answers without leaving their design. “SolidProfessor allows our team to learn while they’re designing, so if they run into an obstacle they can look up a solution and get right back to work. Whether they need to relearn functionality or just quickly refresh on best practices, SolidProfessor is always there.

SolidProfessor isn’t just a collection of videos. The online training is personalized with each member having their own profile, assessing where their skills are sharp and where they could use additional training, then tracking their improvement. Blankenship uses personalized learning with his team at Zodiac Pools. “The biggest benefit is our ability to identify a ‘benchmark’ of where our employees are right now. We can then set goals and assign lessons so that they can improve. We use the reporting tools to track their progress through the learning paths to measure their retention and skills improvement.”

With SolidProfessor, members can go through a linear approach to learn a new topic or they can get answers to their questions quickly by using the powerful search functionality. SolidProfessor’s concise, self-paced video lessons, hands-on exercises, and assessments help their members learn and improve their skills.

Visit the SolidProfessor website to learn more. Sign up for a free account to check out the courses and use promo code SOLIDWORKS20 during the month of September to save 20% on paid memberships.

Author information

Michelle Stansbury
Michelle Stansbury
Michelle Stansbury is a marketing expert for SolidProfessor, a company specializing in self-paced video lessons, hands-on exercises, and assessments to help you learn and improve your engineering skills so you can design with confidence.

The post Making the Most of Your SOLIDWORKS Investment appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Michelle Stansbury at September 20, 2016 08:11 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Hardware Recommendations for SOLIDWORKS Simulation

For overall computer hardware recommendations for SOLIDWORKS, see our Hardware FAQs from our FAQ page. In terms of SOLIDWORKS Simulation hardware you may want a bit more firepower for complex studies.  However be aware that even the top of the line computer does not replace SOLIDWORKS Simulation best practices such as using shell/beam elements, symmetry, mesh controls, etc.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Hardware considerations

For order of importance of hardware when running Simulation studies, here is something to consider:

  1. Number of CPU cores (within a single CPU)
  2. RAM – 16GB or more is recommended, better to be 2 x 8GB instead of 4 x 4GB
  3. CPU Speed (GHz)
  4. CPU Cache Speed
SOLIDWORKS Simulation Hardware

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Hardware

Computer Processor (CPU)

While all aspects of a computer are important, as everything works in together. But the CPU is still the most important component in terms of the speed for running Simulation studies.  SOLIDWORKS Simulation and Flow Simulation take advantage of multiple cores within a CPU… to a point.  While going from dual-core to quad-core you will see a dramatic boost, moving from quad-core to 8-core will be a bit less though still a good improvement.  However anything past 8 cores doesn’t net much of an advantage compared to the money involved.  It just doesn’t scale as well past 8 cores.

Avoid choosing a system with more than one CPU.  While it sounds like having two 8-core CPUs sounds impressive, a single 8-core CPU will give you better bang for the buck.

An Intel Xeon processor is typically seen as a better CPU for Simulation.  And you’ll see these high in the list of overall SOLIDWORKS Performance Benchmark tests (https://www.solidworks.com/sw/support/shareyourscore.htm).  High CPU speeds are good, but because Simulation studies are shared over multiple cores it’s not as critical.  However in terms of pure model rebuild in SOLIDWORKS (which is a single thread process), high CPU speeds will net faster rebuild times.  Ensure you get a workstation grade system, which will come with a high-quality motherboard.

Random Access Memory (RAM)

Additional RAM for your SOLIDWORKS Simulation Hardware won’t necessarily speed up your studies. But the more the better so you don’t find yourself running out of memory in the middle of running a complex study.  A minimum of 16GB is recommended for a machine running Simulation studies.  However 32GB should be your limit.  Anything past 32GB indicates your Simulation study may be poorly setup.  While you may be able to solve millions of degrees of freedom (DOF) with the Direct Sparse Solver, why leave a study running for days when it could be solved in a couple of hours with proper methods?

Try to minimize the number of memory boards.  Having boards with 8GB or 16GB each is better than using several 4GB boards.  Not only does this allow for easier upgrades in the future, but it can actually provide slightly better performance as the motherboard doesn’t have to split memory over more chips.

Error correcting-code memory (ECC) is also beneficial while solving to fix any errors during long solution time.

Graphics Cards (GPU)

While the graphics card does not affect the overall calculation time to solve the study, it does affect the time it takes to view the results.  Having an old graphics card installed with an out-of-date date driver will cause slow performance and issues when trying to view the plots.  Be sure to have a SOLIDWORKS certified OpenGL workstation graphics card and install the certified driver.  Read through Andrew’s blog post about graphics card drivers for more details.

Purchasing the highest end graphics card may sound like it will give you amazing performance.  However be aware that installing the most powerful graphics card will cost significantly more, however the performance boost is marginal.  Consider a mid-range graphics card to have the best balance.  Read through our Hardware FAQs for more detail.

Hard Drive

SSD (solid state drives) have become cheaper over the years.  These drives are much faster and more stable.  In terms of performance, having your operating system, applications and active working directory installed on an SSD drive will be faster.  Store your files on a secondary drive. Which can be another SSD (again for better performance) or a traditional HDD which will be cheaper for the amount of storage.  Just make sure you ALWAYS keep continuous backups of your files on separate drives in case of failure.  Having more than one backup on a semi-regular basis doesn’t hurt either.  Even consider an off-site backup in case of theft/fire.

The post Hardware Recommendations for SOLIDWORKS Simulation appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at September 20, 2016 04:00 PM

SolidSmack

This Insane Glass Vase Collection Was Made From Molds Created with Fireproof Textiles

feature

Having been in existence since the 1st century AD, there is nothing necessarily revolutionary about mold-blowing –– an alternate form of the glassblowing method that came shortly after free–blowing. However, designer Fabio Vogel just might have brought one of the more refreshing updates to the glass manufacturing method that we’ve seen in quite a long time.

For his new collection ‘105 ltr Formen’, Vogel implemented mold-blowing mold patterns made from fireproof textiles to both shape and impact the improvised final result. The finished objects not only carry distinctive organic shapes that are unique from one to the next but also feature a worn fabric pattern left behind that brings a raw, woven contrast to an otherwise pristine and polished material.

Says Vogel:

“The idea of creating objects out of fabric covers, shows, what is possible if you combine handcrafts with new technology. The base of this work has always been the experimental approach. The subject of the project was to create something new, using the power of the element fire as a designer – with all its destroying but also creative strength. The work does not only show the development of new production technologies but also points out another important aspect of successful innovation processes: allowing blurs.”

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/154492195?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="800"></iframe>

01

img_7_1474051061_08fc54c52d08da62b1f90869d23d3f4e

Be sure to check out the rest of Vogel’s impressive work over at his website.

The post This Insane Glass Vase Collection Was Made From Molds Created with Fireproof Textiles appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at September 20, 2016 11:42 AM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 Automatically Update Beam Joints

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 has improved the workflow on how SOLIDWORKS Simulation beam joints get updated.  In previous versions, modifying a model would cause a joint group in an existing studies to go out of date.  The Joint Group feature would need to be edited and recalculated to update the joints.

Joint Group warning message after a modification to the model

Previous Versions – Joint Group warning message after a modification to the model

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Beam Joints Option

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 now has an option under Simulation > Options > System Options > General to select ‘Automatically update beam joints when study is activated‘.  The joints are recalculated when the Simulation study is opened, saving you time by avoiding this manual step.  The joints are only recalculated when there is a change to the model from the last time the study was active.

Simulation Options

Simulation Options

Activating the Simulation study after modifying the model will automatically update the joints.

Joint recalculation

Joint recalculation

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Beam Joints Calculated

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Beam Joints Calculated

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017, including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 Automatically Update Beam Joints appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at September 20, 2016 11:00 AM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The Disruptors

feature

This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” from The Slits and work our way through tracks from John Cooper Clarke, Mac Demarco, John Maus, Leisure and others before wrapping up with “Special” from Andrew Ashong.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:55GkxCbnzirdDMPusmZq6S" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Disruptors appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 20, 2016 05:15 AM

Watching Manufactured Plastic Objects Melt Up-Close is Strangely Fascinating

feature

While Gallagher might have pioneered the act of destroying things for the amusement of a late night TV audience, YouTube has certainly helped reinvent it.

From compressing random objects with a hydraulic press to cutting them in half with a waterjet cutter, the internet has been strangely fascinated with using industrial equipment to destroy things as of late. But why not? Isn’t it fascinating –– even therapeutic –– to see Gorilla Glass on an iPhone 7 buckle under the pressure of a hydraulic press treatment?

One of the latest creators to hit the destruction scene on YouTube is Macro Room. As you might have guessed, these guys have a knack for stunning macro videography worth going full-screen for –– ranging from melting ice cream to burning kindling in all of its close-up glory.

For their latest, the creators put flame to plastic to give us an unusual –– and what they claim as “satisfying” –– way of viewing the manufactured world around us:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0Oq4ATYyw_U?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

Check out the rest of the up-close shenanigans over at the Macro Room.

The post Watching Manufactured Plastic Objects Melt Up-Close is Strangely Fascinating appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at September 20, 2016 02:35 AM

September 19, 2016

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: Shellmo Robot Centipede [With 32 Legs!]

shellmo-robo-micropede-00

Why aren’t there more excessively long, undulating-legged centipede style robots?! That’s the question I always ask a packed room at the local retirement village. Sure, they throw mashed potatoes and teeth at me, but late at night, they wonder the same thing as they fall asleep to the sound of sci-fi battle sounds on that mixtape I gave out to everyone.

Shellmo is the creation of Sho Yoshida, inspired by the sadly discountinued, yet still impressive Gakken Mechamo Centipede of the mid-00s. It’s an incredible 32 legs of creepy motorized motion made extra creepy by a pair of excessively large humanoid eyes. Outside providing hours of fun and the inevitable nightmares, this is a build that’s so open-source, he’s provide all the details on multiple websites, including the 3d model, the circuit layout, the Aurduino source and the app to control your new friend.

The 3d models are provided as SketchUp (skp), Belnder (blend) or .3ds and .stl. You can get all the details on their website, an overview of the parts or drop a couple bucks to get the pre-built chassis on their Shapeways store, or snag the files and share your own build on Thingiverse.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xYNSvGK80Wg?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

Sho says, “Assembling the motor module requires some skill,” but I know you all are up for it. And if not, you can hop over to 3D Hubs and print one out. Pay attention to the making of notes though!

You can download the files from the Shellmo website. Or from Thingiverse!

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

shellmo-robo-micropede-01

shellmo-robo-micropede-02

The post Model of the Week: Shellmo Robot Centipede [With 32 Legs!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 19, 2016 10:05 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

The Top 10 New Features in SOLIDWORKS 2017 [VIDEO]

SOLIDWORKS 2017 is packed with new, customer-focused enhancements. Whether you design single components, incredibly complex equipment, or even entire facilities, SOLIDWORKS 2017 delivers easy-to-use tools to help turn your ideas into higher-quality products. Check out the SOLIDWORKS 2017 Top Ten list of features to look out for in the new release:

1. SOLIDWORKS 3D Interconnect

Work seamlessly with anyone, and incorporate design changes dramatically faster.

  • Open proprietary 3D CAD data directly into SOLIDWORKS
  • Includes Creo®, CATIA® V5, SolidEdge®, NX™, and Inventor®
  • Retain associativity to the original file

Register for our SOLIDWORKS Interconnect Webinar to see the new features LIVE

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nUckD-_xq_U?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

2. Improved Large Assembly Performance

Speed design of large assemblies and layouts machinery and equipment.

  • New Asset Publisher, Ground Mates and Magnetic Mates speed equipment layouts
  • Replace sub-assembly with multi-body part and maintain downstream references;
  • Replace missing references all at once

Register for our Large Assembly webinar to see the new features LIVE

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yih7s0_N7kU?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

3. More powerful modeling tools

Faster, easier modeling with fewer picks and clicks.

  • New Advanced Hole Wizard creates/reuses customized holes
  • Wrap Feature now for any surface; Offset 3D Curve on surface with multiple faces
  • Sheet Metal support for three-bend corners

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/59cIgSiWtx8?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

4. Renderings and Animations get a boost from Visualize

Dramatic improvement in rendering speed and improved workflow between modeling, rendering, and viewing.

  • New “Visualize Boost”: Network rendering made simple for blazing fast render speeds
  • Import animations and motion studies
  • Map SOLIDWORKS camera navigation and hot keys
  • Support for HTC® Vive™, Oculus, Google® Cardboard, Samsung®

Register for our What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017 Communication Tools webinar to see Visualize LIVE

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PGmblwoQgBo?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

5. Faster 2D Drawing Creation

Simplified, faster drawing creation.

  • Reference and link to BOM table cell elements in annotations
  • Parametrically mirror drawing views without the model
  • Pre-defined layers

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4BTNW1utqZA?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

6. Expanded capabilities for Model Based Definition

Ease the transition from 2D drawings to MBD and enable model-based enterprises (MBE).

  • Compare geometry and 3D PMI between two revisions
  • Define DimXpert 3D PMI more easily for drafted parts
  • Export STEP 242 with 3D PMI to automate CAM and CMM
  • Attach multiple files to 3D PDF to build Technical Data Packages (TDP)

Attend our What’s new with SOLIDWORKS MBD 2017 webinar to see the product LIVE

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/840fJ-YxIWY?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

7. Electrifying Electrical/Electronic Design

Expanded capabilities mean improved productivity for electrical design.

  • SOLIDWORKS Electrical:
    • Automatic creation of schematic from a spreadsheet
    • Compound parts – accessories
  • SOLIDWORKS PCB: Unified design environment between schematic editing, board layout and 3D layout

Attend our What’s New in SOLIDWORKS PCB 2017 webinar to see PCB software LIVE

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kRwsgtP3KRI?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

8. Simplifying Design Validation

Simulation expanded to handle more use cases – extended capabilities tackle more design scenarios.

  • SOLIDWORKS Simulation: Display simulation results in SOLIDWORKS model; arc length control for nonlinear contact
  • SOLIDWORKS Plastics: Part Mass can be used in addition to gate temperature for gate freeze and pressure holding time determination
  • SOLIDWORKS Flow: Parametric Study now allows multi-parameter optimization

Attend our What’s New in SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 webinar to see the products LIVE

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tPLrxytyVx8?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

9. Integrating design and manufacturing

Extending SOLIDWORKS capabilities for the manufacturing ecosystem.

  • 3D Printing: Import/Export 3MF. Import mesh data
  • SOLIDWORKS Inspection: Manual and selective ballooning
  • SOLIDWORKS Costing: Instant estimates from manufacturers via My.SolidWorks Manufacturing Network

Register for our SOLIDWORKS 2017 for 3D Printing webinar to learn more

10. Improving data management and collaboration

Collaborate at more levels and manage data more efficiently.

  • SOLIDWORKS PDM:
    • Version overwrite;
    • Rollback with references;
    • Improved viewing
  • SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional: Vault Database Replication
  • eDrawings®:
    • Augmented Reality (AR) for the Android™;
    • 3D Views and annotation views for assemblies;
    • Component descriptions;
    • Weld beads;
    • Undo/redo

Register for our SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 webinar to learn more about data management

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/D41RjbRP7m0?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017, including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars. You can also download a copy of the SOLIDWORKS 2017 Top Ten features.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post The Top 10 New Features in SOLIDWORKS 2017 [VIDEO] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at September 19, 2016 05:30 PM

SolidSmack

TechShop Makes Adam Weep Happy Tears

techshop-dc-metro-makerspace-solidsmack

TechShop first popped up in SF circa 2011. Think gym membership, but sub a CNC mill for the Stairmaster. Our own Dan Slaski swears by it. Adam takes a field trip to see what he’s been missing.

Put succinctly, TechShop is a big, clean, well-equipped space for making stuff. One monthly fee gets you large-scale CNC milling and routing, a waterjet cutter, a full machine shop, wood shop, welding stations, spray booths, sewing machines, soldering stations, laser cutters, FDM printers, banks of computers (each with the full Autodesk suite), work tables, cage lockers, conference rooms and, not least, ample floor space.

If it sounds too good to be true, you’re not alone. I was skeptical when I first heard of it five years ago, and so little was our general enthusiasm that I was appalled to find that a search for TechShop in our archives turned up almost nothing at all. For shame.

I guess it just sounded like a typical Bay Area sky pie that would never be of use to me here in Northern Virginia. Except that it is. I heard about it when the buildout first began a couple of years ago, but never took the time to check it out in person. (At the time my excuse was a vague notion that traffic and/or parking would be too annoying to deal with. I now know that TechShop validates garage parking for the mall so… yeah. No excuse.)

img_2713-1

img_2691

A Personal Quest

I’ve been an independent contractor for eight years. It’s great. With a beefy laptop and a solid broadband connection I can work whenever and wherever is convenient for me and my family. Someday I may extol the virtues of the Indy Life in a purpose-written article. For the moment, suffice it to say that there’s a lot to love.

One of the biggest disadvantages of independence is a lack of access to a proper machine shop. And when you live in urban areas like I do, it’s hard to find the space to set up a passable workshop. Sure, it can be done, but it’s expensive, time-consuming, very limiting, and far from ideal. I don’t care how space-efficient you are, MIG welding in your spare bedroom fits squarely in the bad ideas category.

Another disadvantage of the Lone Wolf is a general lack of community, not to mention physical movement. There are days when I go to bed with the realization that I quite literally never left the house nor spoke to another living being. Pathetic? Absolutely. Hopeless? Not with TechShop.

img_2711

img_2695

Tour

Last week I met with Steve Davis over at TechShop for a walk-through, and it made me Happy. It’s huge, beautiful, and located in the middle of a busy retail complex in Arlington.

I can haz

I tried to play it cool, but wtf? How on earth did this startup manage to pay for a 20,000 square foot lease in one of the busiest malls in Arlington?

And why here? The Bay Area makes sense: tons of little hardware startups, tons of just-out-of-college kids with big dreams and small wallets. I get it. But Arlington?

As I looked out the window of the machine shop, I realized exactly why this location makes so much sense. The building immediately across the street is a giant Lockheed Martin office building. Raytheon and Boeing both have similar buildings within a block. And while those companies clearly have no need of TechShop, the types of people they draw to the area certainly do.

img_2708

Northern Virginia is actually a perfect place for something like TechShop: high population density (i.e. no space for backyard workshops), high cost of living (i.e. well-heeled population), an unusual density of engineering talent (obvious), and–while not very well-known–a thriving startup culture, especially in the defense and civil services.

img_2699

(And yes, some guy just happened to be building an airplane at TechShop.)

Too Good To Be True

So let’s see: I have a place to work, free parking, and all of the tools required to build my own full-scale Mech Warrior. What’s the down-side?

Well, at the Arlington location, it’s currently priced at $150/mo with a discount rate for students, teachers, military (veteran or active duty), and first responders at $95/month. (As of the date of this posting.)

Depending on where you live, that might sound impossibly expensive, or shockingly cheap. Given that I live in one of the most expensive cities in the nation, my needle definitely skews toward the “wow, that’s a bargain” side of things. I’m guessing our friends up in the Bay Area feel similarly.


img_2701 img_2700 img_2702 img_2703 img_2704 img_2705 img_2706 img_2693


If you’re living in rural Arkansas, the TechShop model might not make a lot of sense. It may be expensive to buy and maintain your own machine shop, but that’s really your only option. But with population density comes economy of scale: I don’t need to buy an entire machine shop, store it in a barn behind the house, and maintain everything myself. Instead, I can share one with a few thousand of my closest friends, and we all come out ahead.

And yes, there are makerspaces and hackerspaces in the DC area as well. Those are cool too, and much more affordable. But the difference is clear. A makerspace is perfect if you need a table, a box of tools, and a makerbot. But I have yet to see a makerspace sport one of these bad boys:

haas

Verdict

I’m sold. If you’re living in the DC Metro Area you know damn well that $150 is a steal for access to 20,000 square feet of super-equipped fab shop goodness. (The average rent for a one bedroom apartment in Arlington is nearly fifteen times that much at about $2200/mo, and that sure as hell doesn’t include an NC mill.)

It would be worth it even if I weren’t self-employed. For me, it’s ideal.

See you at TechShop.

The post TechShop Makes Adam Weep Happy Tears appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Adam OHern at September 19, 2016 02:21 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Advanced Hole Functionality for SOLIDWORKS 2017

If you design parts that require hole types that are not found in the standard Hole Wizard offerings, you’ll love the new Advanced Hole functionality in SOLIDWORKS 2017.

Most SOLIDWORKS users will find use for the Advanced Hole tool, but customers who design products with many customized holes, such as manifolds, molds and tooling, will find it especially helpful.

Creating Advanced Holes – The new Advanced Hole functionality lets you define your own hole types with combinations of counterbore, countersink, straight and tapered sections.  In this way, you won’t have to create multiple holes just to get what you need.

In addition you can save Advanced Hole features as Favorites to reuse them later. In the PropertyManager, on the Type tab, under Favorite, you can add, update, delete, save, or load a favorite advanced hole.  This helps speed up custom hole design, and can also help ensure adherence to design standards.

You can access Advanced Hole from the Features toolbar, or by Insert > Features > Advanced Hole.  The PropertyManager opens with the Near Side flyout displayed.  You can then define a series of hole features that can be built from the Near or Far sides of the part.  Finally, like Hole Wizard, use the Positioning tab to locate the hole.

Customizing Advanced Hole Callouts – You can customize hole callouts for advanced holes, which is useful for ensuring that proper manufacturing processes are used.  The manufacturing processes for holes do not always match the order shown in the advanced hole flyout. You can customize hole callouts that match the order and variables needed for manufacturing, then use these callouts in your drawings.

For example, the advanced hole flyout might show this order:

  • (1) Nearside Counterbore
  • (2) Straight
  • (3) Straight Threaded

However, this is the order in which manufacturing creates the holes:

  • (3) Straight Threaded
  • (2) Straight
  • (1) Nearside Counterbore

To customize Advanced Hole callouts, click Customize callout in the Advanced Hole PropertyManager, under Hole Callout.  Then reorder the callouts by selecting the Callout String and clicking to Move Up and Move Down.

To customize a callout string, double-click it in the Callout String list and select variables. You can also select Callout Variables to display a list of all variables.

Modified strings are marked with an asterisk in the list. To restore the default settings for individual Callout String items, right-click a string and click Restore Default String. To remove all customizations, under Hole Callout, click Default callout.

 

 

Author information

Craig Therrien
Craig Therrien
Craig Therrien is a Product Manager at SolidWorks

The post Advanced Hole Functionality for SOLIDWORKS 2017 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Craig Therrien at September 19, 2016 12:30 PM

SolidSmack

The World’s First Desktop Waterjet Cutting Machine Has Already Raised Nearly $1 Million on Kickstarter

feature

If we had a quarter for every 3D printing-related Kickstarter project that’s swept in over the past four or five years, we’d likely be on our way towards buying our own desktop machine by now with heavy pockets. But frankly, we’re more interested in a different type of desktop fabrication machine at the moment: the world’s first desktop waterjet cutter from new hardware startup WAZER.

Billed as a compact waterjet machine that can “cut any material with digital precision using high-pressure water,” the WAZER team is out to disrupt the waterjet cutting industry by bringing this subtractive manufacturing technology to every workshop.

While 3D printers –– at least the ones you would likely find in a small workshop –– are limited to plastics, waterjet cutting opens the door to nearly any material that can fit into the workbench, including ceramics, carbon fiber, stone, metals, and more. Previously, prototyping or otherwise producing objects with waterjet cut parts involved finding a local industrial provider. Now, designers and engineers can cut everything from knife blanks to bicycle cranks directly on their desktop:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/D5ziiX_235Q?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

As you might expect, the process of going from part design to fabricated product has been relatively streamlined by the team:

“With WAZER, going from design to cutting is fast. Design your part in whichever software you’re used to, like Solidworks, Adobe Illustrator or Google SketchUp. Load that drawing file (DXF and SVG) into WAZER software and let the easy to use software guide you through setting up your cut.”

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/P9d8l09Rqoc?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

Despite having four experienced engineers at the helm, bringing industrial machine technology into a desktop experience is no piece of cake. Although the team raised early seed funding to help get their impressive prototype off the ground, they’ve since turned to Kickstarter to help put the machine into production. With nearly $1 million raised from their original goal of $100,000 and nearly a month and a half left to go in their campaign, these guys should be just fine.

Although the expected retail price will be $5,999, early backers have the opportunity to get theirs for 25% off ($4,499). Find out more over at Kickstarter.

The post The World’s First Desktop Waterjet Cutting Machine Has Already Raised Nearly $1 Million on Kickstarter appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at September 19, 2016 11:23 AM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 Display Simulation Results in the Graphics Area

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 now gives you the ability to display the results of a Simulation plot in the SOLIDWORKS graphics area.  This is useful for demonstration purposes if the Simulation study has been simplified by excluding components.  Viewing plots in the Simulation study itself will only show components being analyzed.  Excluded components are hidden.  Now you can show stress or displacement results within the active model view so all components are visible.

Display SOLIDWORKS Simulation Results

Simulation Results Displayed

To display SOLIDWORKS Simulation Results

To display SOLIDWORKS Simulation results in the graphics window, either choose Simulation Display from View Settings (in the Heads-up Display) or View > Display > Simulation Display.

  • You must have the Simulation add-in enabled
  • An existing Simulation study of the same configuration must be available with results
SOLIDWORKS Display Option

SOLIDWORKS Display Option

Then the PropertyManager provides you with options on what plot to view and different display options.

SIMULATION display PropertyManager

SIMULATION display PropertyManager

This pop-up is given  when first enabling Simulation Display indicating its functionality.  You can also overlay the Simulation results in Photoview 360 renderings.

Simulation Display Pop-up

Simulation Display Pop-up

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017, including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 Display Simulation Results in the Graphics Area appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at September 19, 2016 11:00 AM

SolidSmack

The Monday List 38.16 | What We’re Reading This Week

feature

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Why Supermarket Bacon Hides Its Fat
Better check that window on the back of the package.

02

Could Ancient Remedies Hold the Answer to the Looming Antibiotics Crisis?
One researcher thinks the drugs of the future might come from the past: botanical treatments long overlooked by Western medicine.

03

Why You Should Tell Your Children How Much You Make
When Scott Parker wanted his six offspring to know more about the value of money, he decided to do something that many parents would consider radical: show them exactly what he earned.

01

Here’s What Happens When You Give $1,000 to Someone in Extreme Poverty
My wife, Adrienne, and I are long-time supporters of unconditional cash giving. From handing $5 to a homeless person on the street in Manhattan to raising $450 to give to a working father of one in rural South Africa — we believe in the virtues of sharing abundance in an empowering fashion that enables people to decide how best to allocate their resources themselves.

04

Up in the Air: Meet the Man Who Flies Around the World for Free
Last year, a young man walked into the Seattle airport and took the next flight to anywhere — and he hasn’t come down since.

05

Spam Has Officially Arrived on the Mainland, and We’re Into It
As Hawaii’s culinary traditions gain traction on the mainland, the 50th state’s favorite mystery meat is getting a chef makeover.

06

The post The Monday List 38.16 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 19, 2016 05:15 AM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Opening Large Assemblies

In SOLIDWORKS 2017, more functionality is now available while waiting for components to fully resolve when opening SOLIDWORKS large assemblies. This change is most noticeable in assemblies that take a long time to load. In addition to previous releases in which you could only pan, zoom, and rotate the model while waiting for components to fully resolve, now you can do the following:

  • Navigate the FeatureManager design tree;
  • Measure distances;
  • Create cross sections;
  • Hide and show components

Indication of being Resolved

In the SOLIDWORKS 2017 FeatureManager design tree, an eye icon will be visible beside components that are still being resolved. The icon disappears when the components are fully resolved. In the following images, the SOLIDWORKS interface while loading is compared between 2016 and 2017 versions:

Opening SOLIDWORKS Large Assemblies in 2016

Opening Large Assemblies in SOLIDWORKS 2016

Opening Large Assemblies in SOLIDWORKS 2017

Opening Large Assemblies in SOLIDWORKS 2017

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017, including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

What’s New Resources

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 Opening Large Assemblies appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWP at September 19, 2016 02:27 AM

September 16, 2016

SolidSmack

Graphic Designer Builds Automated LEGO Rotary Dumper and Cargo Loader

lego-train-rotary-dumper-08

People have been building unique creations using LEGO bricks since Ole Kirk Christiansen (The Lego Group) began manufacturing the toy bricks back in 1949. Over the years, LEGO bricks have evolved into multiple revisions over basic blocks, including Duplo and Technic, which is the more popular among makers. One such maker took his Technic set and created a truly unique semi-autonomous train set that features a rotary dumper and cargo loader.

Graphic designer Paul Kmiec designed his Automated Rotary Dumper and Cargo Loader using various Technic pieces, which include the Control Centre (set 8094) that’s used for manual control during the Belt Loader sequence (more on that in a bit). Paul designed his Automated Rotary Dumper using a LEGO WeDo movement sensor and SBrick Plus that begins the automated rotary process with a ten-second delay (to allow for uncoupling of the train engine) when tripped.

The SBrick takes the sensor information and begins the dumping process by locking the cars in using an overhead bar system. A pair of motors then engages the rotary gears and conveyor belt, which empty the cars of their cargo and then rotate the cars back to their upright position. The train then embarks on a journey to the Belt Loader.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gkyV9hD8cQ8?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

Paul’s Belt Loader was designed around the Technic Control Centre, which is used to activate the platform before it can follow an automated routine. Once activated, it engages a pair of motors that positions the loader over the cargo cars and actuates the dump bucket for filling them. The Control Centre can also be used to control the Belt Loader manually using the d-pad to control the gantry and buttons to activate the dumper if the need requires.

To program his setup, Paul used the SBrick Profile Designer app, which allows you to program in different function profiles for different tasks as well as using your mobile device in the same fashion as a gaming controller, complete with joystick and coin-cell buttons. Paul designed his platform, as a “proof-of-concept” to see if he could recreate every detail from its real-world counterpart, which it does with reasonable precision.

lego-train-rotary-dumper-01

lego-train-rotary-dumper-02

lego-train-rotary-dumper-08

lego-train-rotary-dumper-03

lego-train-rotary-dumper-04

lego-train-rotary-dumper-05

lego-train-rotary-dumper-06

The post Graphic Designer Builds Automated LEGO Rotary Dumper and Cargo Loader appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 16, 2016 10:03 PM

Weekend Project: Hubs Geodesic Dome Kits (Now Ready to Buy!)

hubs-geodesic-dome-kit-ss-00

I’m pretty sure, that if you built a geodesic dome fort with your kid, you would be classified as the best parent ever… which is part of the reason why we’re SUPER EXCITED the geodesic dome HUB KITS are now available! The other reason we’re excited is this is secretly a reason for us to construct geodesic domes ALL over our yard.

When we first saw the Hubs kits, we were impressed with both the simplicity and the variety of structures the system lends itself to. With a set of Hubs and some sticks, you can build anything from a garden room, fruit cage, outdoor reading room, greenhouse, chicken run, children’s den, aviary, festival tent, hideaway or nearly anything else one could think of.

We heard back from Mike Paisley, co-creator of Hubs, with an update on things and some sweet new construction pics to take us into the weekend. The only thing we’re a bit sad about is that we don’t already have some in our hands!

“It’s been a fascinating process for Chris [Jordan] and I, going from 3D printed prototypes to injection moulded final parts and it’s fantastic to have the kit ready (finally…!). It’s a start-point for people’s ideas and we’re really looking forward to seeing what people create. So thanks for your help in spreading the word.”

hubs-geodesic-dome-kit-ss-03

If you got in on the Kickstater campaign, you’ll have your Hubs shortly. If you don’t, you can snag a box or five for £120($156 USD) a pop. Buy the Hubs kit here.

They’re also planning on designing some 3D printed add-ons and developing accessories too. So, keep an eye on them and find out a bit more on the Hubs website.

hubs-geodesic-dome-kit-ss-02

hubs-geodesic-dome-kit-ss-04

hubs-geodesic-dome-kit-ss-07

hubs-geodesic-dome-kit-ss-06

hubs-geodesic-dome-kit-ss-08

hubs-geodesic-dome-kit-ss-05

The post Weekend Project: Hubs Geodesic Dome Kits (Now Ready to Buy!) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 16, 2016 09:15 PM

InFlow Technology

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 What’s New – Copying Group Permissions and Group Members – #SW2017

With SolidWorks PDM 2017 comes a feature that will have admins everywhere celebrating. Right now the quickest way to copy group permissions and group members is manual and error prone (scroll down to the bottom to see this method).

In the NEW! 2017 Admin tool it only requires a few clicks. After creating and naming a new group, go to its Group Properties, select Copy from Group, and choose the desired source group. Click Next and OK.

CreateNewGroup

That’s it!

Inconsistent group settings are thing of the past. By utilizing a template group, new groups can be quickly created so only customization remains, saving precious time and money.

Current Method

In the Admin tool, create a new group and confirm that no permissions are checked. Then right click on Groups and select Open. In the new window select the existing group (with the desired permissions) and the new group, right click and select Properties.

Properties

The shadowed boxes indicate that one of the selected groups has this permission. Since the new group has none, these are all driven by the old group’s setting. Go through all the tabs and select the shaded boxes so they display as checks instead. Make sure to check the permissions in EVERY section in Group Properties including the Settings.

GroupPermissions

I hope this part of the What’s New series gives you a better understanding of the new features and functions of SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017. Check back for at our InFlow Site where we will continue to blog about everything 2017. Also please look at our CATI Blog where the CATI and MCAD Support Teams break down many of the new items in SOLIDWORKS 2017. All of these articles will be stored in the category of "SOLIDWORKS What's New." You can also learn more about SOLIDWORKS and PDM 2017 by clicking on the image below to register for one of CATI’s or MCAD’s Design Summits.

Emily Cannizzaro

InFlow PDM Consultant

www.inflow-tech.com

DIS2016

by Emily Cannizzaro at September 16, 2016 05:49 PM

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Fur-laden Swarm of Awesome

wojciech-ostrycharz-art

Crackling, layers of grass snapped beneath our toes–All the way to the shore we thought we would never reach. The edge of the sky was behind us, seeming to keep up with the swarm of small, fur-laden creatures–a mat of them spreading across the valley, with the awe-amplifying, juice box convenience of these links.

Wojciech Ostrycharz – Freelance animator, filmmaker and concept artist with a certain panache for capturing your imagination and showing it something amazing. See his Paper World short as well.

Astronomy 2016 – Galaxies, Auroras and more in the winners and runners-up of the 2016 Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year put on by the Royal Museums Greenwich.

Literary Guide to Whiskey – Mark Twain, Hemingway and Steinbeck all referenced the brown liquid. Here are the books and a bit of the history.

Du Hast Bossa Nova – Rammstein’s Du Hast set to a jazzy Bassa Nova beat. Much mor fitting for these guys.

Beards and staches – In case you need some inspiration for your own or just want to look at interesting people with interesting facial hair.

Thermodynamics CC – Shini takes you through a crash course on thermodynamics, another fine episode from the fine people at Crash Course.

Animal Sleep Stories – These screen prints by Daria Tessler are bizarre, colorful, cool and your loft will look great with a few hanging on the wall.

Fav Deals This Week!
Deals to good to pass up for this week! –- A great backpack that fits 17″ laptops, a sweet mini tube amp, a take anywhere bluetooth speaker and a must have charging case for those getting an iPhone 7.
17″ laptop backpack (44% Off)
Mini tube amp (43% Off)
Portable Bluetooth speaker (63% Off)
iPhone 7 Charging Case (40% Off)

Kids – Impressive visuals on this Jerry Folk tune about growing up, directed by Quentin Deronzier.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="338" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/173102273?theme=none&amp;wmode=opaque" title="Jerry Folk - Kids (Official Music Video)" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="800"></iframe>

The post Friday Smackdown: Fur-laden Swarm of Awesome appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 16, 2016 03:35 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

How to Use 3D PDFs

3D PDFs are a great tool for those who might not have the SOLIDWORKS software to view 3D models and annotations. 3D PDFs can be viewed in Adobe Reader, which is a free program available for download.

Although 3D PDFs are easily accessible via Adobe Reader, most of the time users are not taking advantage of 3D PDFs various functions and abilities due to the lack of training materials on this topic.

This video will teach you the necessary knowledge of viewing a 3D PDF using Adobe Reader, and will address these 11 common concerns:

1.    I open the 3D PDF in Adobe Reader, but the 3D content does not show up

2.    I want non-design teams that don’t have CAD software to view my models

3.    I want the shop floors and suppliers who don’t use digital devices to have hard copies of my models in different views

4.    I want to see exactly which datum features are the datum symbols referencing

5.    I want to easily locate the components in the assembly to the BOM table

6.    I want to add additional PMI to the 3D model

7.    I want users of 3D PDF, such as designers to add comments and suggestions

8.    I don’t like the white background color of the viewports

9.    I want the SOLIDWORKS file and STEP file in the 3D PDF

10. I want to see a section cut, but the viewport doesn’t include one

11. I can’t clearly see the boundaries between edges because of the model’s color

If you would like to follow along, the 3D PDFs used in the video are attached below.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JeeGaao15gY?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

3D PDF Examples:

3D PDF_Myomo 3D

PDF Spindle Shaft

3D PDFs can be used to lower the 3D data communication barrier between everyone that needs to view the models, which makes it an extremely powerful tool. 3D PDFs are also printer friendly, which can expand the use of 3D PDFs in manufacturing and design.

This post is not sponsored by Adobe Reader. Adobe Reader was used in this tutorial video for the purpose of illustrating 3D PDF’s functions.  

Author information

Jamie Lee
Jamie Lee
SOLIDWORKS MBD intern and rising junior double majoring in Economics and Business at Brandeis University. Avid golf player and photographer.

The post How to Use 3D PDFs appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Jamie Lee at September 16, 2016 12:33 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to Hide or Show Edges behind SOLIDWORKS Transparent Components

Depending on the assembly display-state settings, model edges behind transparent components can be shown or hidden in high-quality ‘shaded with edges’ drawing views.

High Quality - Shaded with Edges

High Quality – Shaded with Edges

Drawing views seen here are both set to high quality and ‘shaded with edges’ mode:

SOLIDWORKS Transparent Component Display States in Drawing Views

SOLIDWORKS Transparent Component Display States in Drawing Views

The setting that makes model edges visible behind transparent components (right-hand view) or hidden (left-hand view) is found in the display state of the assembly.

Comparing display states

Comparing display states

State Display Effect
Default Setting transparent components to default display hides model edges behind transparent components.
Shaded Setting transparent components to shaded with edges makes model edges in the background visible.

The post How to Hide or Show Edges behind SOLIDWORKS Transparent Components appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sanja Srzic at September 16, 2016 11:00 AM

September 15, 2016

SolidSmack

The Rova4D is the Color Blending 3D Printer We’ve Always Wanted

rova4d-cfull-color-3d-printer-00

You can’t taste this rainbow, but it sure looks great when it’s blended together to make truly multi-colored 3D prints. That’s exactly what the ORD Solutions new RoVa4D 3D printer is able to accomplish using five different (CMYK+W) colored filaments.

This is ORD’s third successful Kickstarter-backed 3D printer with the first (MH3000) debuting in 2013 and followed by the popular RoVa3D in 2014, making them a trusted manufacturer among the maker and DIY communities. To their testament, ORD successfully funded the RoVa4D printer in less than six hours, garnering $216K, way beyond their $25K goal.

ORD designed their new printer to blend colors seamlessly using everyone’s most beloved color model CMYK (cyan, yellow, magenta, black, plus white) for the wides color combination possible. On top of this, you can use a mix of different PLA-based filaments to form hard or soft sections of the printed model. The metal spools of filament are attached to the sides of the aluminum frame and feed into a hot end where they are blended (or mixed) together before being extruded–similar to like an inkjet printer.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/weUsOm6Y_Qs?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

The RoVa4D is packed with features that include a build volume of 12 X 12 X 12-inches(!), automatic bed leveling, liquid cooling and a print resolution of 3.75um for the X/Y-axis and 10um on the Z. Additional features include auto-nozzle height control, electronic offset control, auto cooling fan touch screen and Wi-Fi.

The printer construction is impressive, sporting a solid aluminum reinforced frame with all non-metal parts fabricated using injection molding rather than 3D printing, adding to the printer’s solid construction. According to ORD, the software interface is so simple that “even a child can do it.” It involves first choosing a model (either from an ORD library or your own), then painting said model using ORD’s RoVaSlice Custom Printing Design Software and then printing it out–seems easy enough.

While ORD’s Rova4D Kickstarter campaign is over, you can still pre-order it from their website for $3,796 USD, which nets you the printer, 5 CMYK+W filament spools, 1 PVA and RoVa-Flex spools as well as a GeckoTek Quick Change bed and two Quick Change plates for printing with different filaments. Retail price after pre-orders is estimated to be at least $4650 USD, printer only with all additions listed above being sold separately.

rova4d-cfull-color-3d-printer-01

rova4d-cfull-color-3d-printer-02

rova4d-cfull-color-3d-printer-03

The post The Rova4D is the Color Blending 3D Printer We’ve Always Wanted appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at September 15, 2016 09:29 PM

3D Platform Unleashes Not One, But TWO Gigantic 3D Printer Concepts

3d-platform-large-format-3d-printer-00

3D Platform has long been known as a producer of “huge” 3D printers, but the word “huge” will have to be replaced after this announcement.

Their flagship product, the 3DP Workbench, was a well-received 1m-sized 3D printer, far less costly than most industrial alternatives. It was essentially a highly-tuned, scaled up version of a desktop 3D printer. It even uses the same spools of plastic that desktop machines consume, although for printing large objects you might need more of them. Quite a few more.

But now that’s all changed with the introduction of two brilliant new 3D printing concepts.

The first is the 3DP Delta Additive Manufacturing Series. As you might guess from its name, it’s a delta-robot style 3D printer. These have been around in the industry for a while, but never at this size.

Print

The 3DP Delta AM Series from 3D Platform comes in four sizes. The first size is large, 1 x 1m (cylindrical – this is a delta, machine, remember!) The next machines are 1 x 2m and 1 x 4m! But the largest is the 1 x 4m version. (For non-metric types, that’s an astonishing 13 feet tall!)

Previously, the tallest machine I’d seen was the also very tall Leapfrog Xcel, which requires a ladder to get to the top. It seems that the 3DP Delta AM Series will require an elevator!

For 3D printing the tallest objects, this is the biggest you can get.

3d-platform-large-format-3d-printer-02

The second concept unveiled by 3D Platform is more intriguing. It’s called the 3DP Excel Additive Manufacturing Series, shown at top.

The concept is a kind of gantry system on which they can hang not only 3D printing extruders, but also CNC equipment, creating a hybrid capability. You can also install robotic equipment to add the ability to do assembly functions.

The 3DP Excel AM Series starts at a similarly large 1.2 x 1.2 x 2.4m build volume, which is quite large. That’s the “100 Series” size. They also offer a 200, 300 and 400 series that are 2m, 3m and 4m on a side. And they can also custom build even larger if requested.

There’s another extremely important feature on this machine: it’s throughput. As you might imagine, the larger the print, the longer it takes to complete. That’s been the case, more or less, with 3D printers ever since they were conceived. But 3D Platform has broken that barrier with some very interesting developments.

The Series 100 can use a 6mm spooled filament for printing (as opposed to the previous 2.85mm filament) and it uses larger sized nozzles. This enables greater ability to deposit material.

But that’s not all. The 3DP Excel AM Series can use standard plastic pellets as its input material in addition to filament. This is not only less expensive but also enables the delivery of even more material during printing.

In fact, with a huge 4.5mm hot end nozzle, the Excel can deposit up to an amazing 55kg of material per hour! Theoretically in a single day this machine could print up an object weighing more than a tonne! No other 3D printer can do this.

I can’t wait to get a look at these new machines.

The post 3D Platform Unleashes Not One, But TWO Gigantic 3D Printer Concepts appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at September 15, 2016 04:54 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Engineered with SOLIDWORKS for SOLIDWORKS Users

As a 3D CAD engineer or product designer, SOLIDWORKS enables you to transform ideas into new, innovative products. No one know understands this better than BOXX Technologies’ engineering team, the elite professionals who rely on the CAD application to design custom chassis for all of our APEXX workstations and one-of-a-kind renderBOXX and renderPRO dedicated rendering systems. These enclosures, manufactured in the USA, require precise design in order to accommodate features like overclocked or dual processors, liquid cooling, SSDs, multiple GPUs, and more.

However, the fact that we use SOLIDWORKS ourselves (and are therefore intimately familiar with the software) is only half the story. BOXX Technologies uses SOLIDWORKS to design SOLIDWORKS-certified systems that run the application better than any other computer hardware on the market. If you’re a CAD engineer, you likely don’t need a workstation that runs AEC or VFX software at peak performance. Our 3D CAD systems are specifically built for SOLIDWORKS and other single-threaded CAD applications with one goal in mind: to resolve your productivity bottlenecks. You can pick up a one-size-fits-all PC from our competitors and continue to experience the pain of long rebuild times, slow assembly openings, and sluggish model interactivity, but as a solution provider, BOXX knows that this is not how SOLIDWORKS is supposed to run. We resolve your productivity bottlenecks and accelerate your workflow with hardware solutions optimized to reduce wait time in SOLIDWORKS 3D Design and Simulation software.

The BOXX Advantage
When discussing the essential SOLIDWORKS workstation, you first need to get to the core(s) of the matter. Because SOLIDWORKS is a lightly threaded application, selecting the correct number of processing cores is critical. Core frequency determines performance more than any other variable, so a workstation with less cores (but higher frequency) is ideal. That’s why we built APEXX 2 2402, the premiere workstation for single-threaded applications. Featuring a safely overclocked Intel® Core™ i7 running at 4.4GHz, APEXX 2 is the world’s fastest CAD and 3D design system. Consult any reputable trade publication that conducts thorough benchmark testing (Digital Engineering for example) and the advantages of overclocking (and APEXX workstations) are well documented. In general, CPU overclocking delivers reduced rebuild times and improved model interactivity through the viewport—especially with large assemblies. APEXX 2 also accommodates multiple GPUs and up to 64GB of RAM. Another key feature is fast SSD storage which provides faster opening and saving of your large assemblies.

For SOLIDWORKS Simulation, you want the right balance of CPU cores and frequency. Unlike modeling and design tasks, rendering and simulation are multi-threaded and take advantage of multiple CPU cores. But remember to keep this in mind: while SOLIDWORKS Simulation is multi-threaded, the performance gains level off after ten cores. As a result, the ideal SOLIDWORKS Simulation solution is an overclocked eight-core or ten-core APEXX workstation.

GPU Rendering With SOLIDWORKS
If you need to render your SOLIDWORKS assemblies, you have a few options, each with different compute requirements. SOLIDWORKS Visualize is a standalone GPU-accelerated rendering tool based on NVIDIA Iray and overclocked, multi-GPU APEXX workstations are ideal for Visualize.

CPU Rendering with SOLIDWORKS
Many BOXX customers integrate CPU-based rendering tools into their workflows. In this scenario, you may opt for dual Intel® Xeon® solutions with many CPU cores.

If your workflow requires substantial rendering, we recommend The BOXX Workflow, a unique hardware solution specifically designed to address the integration of single-threaded and multi-threaded tasks. The BOXX Workflow pairs your APEXX workstation with renderPRO, the ultimate rendering and simulation sidekick. Fully managed by your APEXX workstation and featuring dual IntelXeon processors, renderPRO is the world’s only personal, desk-side rendering solution, allowing you to move computationally intensive tasks from your workstation to a render node without the cost and complexity of a render farm.

Whether you chose an overclocked APEXX workstation, renderPRO, or even one of our GoBOXX mobile workstations, legendary, U.S.-based BOXX Tech Support will be on hand to support you and your specific workflow. Utilizing our own hardware and SOLIDWORKS software, we’ll recreate any issue you may encounter in order to quickly find a solution. We’ll even overnight parts when necessary during the premium warranty period because your productivity will always be our top priority.

From our products, to consultation and service, no hardware manufacturer knows more about your SOLIDWORKS workflow than BOXX.

For more information, visit www.boxx.com/solidworks or call 512-835-0400.

Author information

Joe Pizzini
Joe Pizzini
Joe is a Senior Technical Marketing Manager at BOXX Technologies. Learn more about Boxx and SOLIDWORKS: http://www.boxxtech.com/solutions/manufacturing/product-design/solidworks

The post Engineered with SOLIDWORKS for SOLIDWORKS Users appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Joe Pizzini at September 15, 2016 12:43 PM

SolidSmack

You Won’t Want to Be on the Wrong End of This Lethal Water Pistol

feature

Although summer is officially coming to a close, squirt gun weather is still in full effect in most places. But regardless if you have sniper-like skills from the bushes or have a more run and gun approach, you’ll likely want to stay home for the afternoon if this (big) kid comes out to play.

Built by YouTuber Asp and simply known as “The Impulse Gun Mk. 1”, this lethal pressurized water blasting device is closer to an arm-mounted waterjet cutting system than your average Super Soaker. Unfortunately, Google Translate failed to give us much more detail than that –– although it’s clear that Asp just might have unknowingly put himself in the running for becoming Japan’s own version of wacky garage inventor Colin Furze.

Just look at the thing! Frankly, this is probably in the same class of weapon as the freaky captive bolt pistol used by Chigurh in No Country for Old Men:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/w2eIkcv1IRQ?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

The post You Won’t Want to Be on the Wrong End of This Lethal Water Pistol appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at September 15, 2016 11:26 AM

Cool Tools of Doom: The SMRT Carbon Fiber Rollerball Pen $29.99 (39% off)

feature

Sure, there’s dozens –– if not hundreds –– of pens out there that are the perfect everyday carry companion. But how many of those are made from Grade A butt-kicking aerospace-grade material? Heck, how many also double as a tablet stylus?

The SMRT Limited Edition Carbon Fiber Rollerball Pen offers the rare combination of an interchangeable pen and stylus combo paired with a quality carbon fiber outer shell similar to more classic elegant pens.

When it comes to actually putting pen to paper, the Rollerball uses German-made Topball 850 refills, which offer smooth and continuous ink for writing and sketch sessions. The best part? The Rollerball is just $29.99 through the rest of the week –– that’s 39% off the retail price of $50.

SMRT Limited Edition Carbon Fiber Rollerball Pen: $49.59 $29.99 (39% off)

a2e85b91ef206946c416865fd7359086884bc9f7_main_hero_image

Features:

  • Ensures smooth, continuous liquid ink for easy writing
  • Provides a smooth pen-like writing experience for your touch screen tablet or phone
  • Compatible w/ all capacitive touch screen devices, making it perfect for drawing apps

Get yours here.

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The SMRT Carbon Fiber Rollerball Pen $29.99 (39% off) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 15, 2016 11:06 AM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Controlling Decals by Display States

SOLIDWORKS Decal Display State is new for SOLIDWORKS 2017. When placing a decal, there is now an additional section to the Decal PropertyManager that will allow you to choose the display state[s] the decal should be applied to.

SOLIDWORKS Decal Display State

Decal PropertyManager with Display State

The results of this addition are better control of decals and scenes, for inclusion in renderings and drawing views. Also reducing the need for creating additional configurations where the sole changes are the decal.

Display States Decals

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017, including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 Controlling Decals by Display States appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at September 15, 2016 11:00 AM

Control the display of SOLIDWORKS Component and Top Level Annotations

Starting with SOLIDWORKS 2015, it is easier to control the display of SOLIDWORKS component annotations and top level annotations in an assembly file.  They now have separate display options in View > Hide/Show, which can help reduce the visual clutter in assembly models.

Hide/Show Annotations in View

Hide/Show Annotations in View

These annotation display options can also be accessed in the Heads-up toolbar:

Display Component and Assembly Annotations in the Heads-up Toolbar

Display Component and Assembly Annotations in the Heads-up Toolbar

In an assembly, annotations cannot be shown or hidden for individual components or their annotation views, so enabling component annotations can bring in redundant information.

SOLIDWORKS Component Annotations Enabled

Component Annotations Enabled

With component annotations hidden and assembly annotations shown, the same assembly looks like this:

Only Assembly Annotations Enabled

Only Assembly Annotations Enabled

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Assemblies

Take our SOLIDWORKS Assembly Modeling training course either live online or in a Canadian city near you to learn more assembly best practices.

The post Control the display of SOLIDWORKS Component and Top Level Annotations appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sanja Srzic at September 15, 2016 11:00 AM

September 14, 2016

SolidSmack

First Glimpse at Vectary Online 3D Modeling Tool

vectary-online-3d-modeling-cad-cloud-00

Well, we’ve been waiting a long six months, but we’ve finally received access to Vectary, the highly anticipated, online 3D modeling tool, and we’re all sorts of excited to pop open a browser and see what it can do.

When we first saw Vectary, we got a glimpse of a simple, intuitive looking interface with an object library, parametric and procedurally generated geometry, templating and various export options. With the attraction of an ALWAYS free, “no limits” 3d modeling system and an open API in the works, it has a lot going for it, but they’re coming into an arena of stiff competition with the likes of Onshape, already in the browser, and Fusion 360, with Project Leopard kicking off their own beta.

NOTE: Vectary is currently in Beta and this is an early look at what is currently possible with the online 3D modeling tool.

Vectary aims to combine mesh modeling, subdivision modeling and parametric design–all apparent from the interface layout and initial features and toolset. The Vectary UI is a beautiful, wide open environment with your modeling Tools to the left, your model Objects to the right, Snap and View setting at the bottom and Selection options up top.

The mouse controls all of your view controls–LMB to rotate, MMB/Scroll to Zoom, and RMB to pan. Currently, there is no RMB context menu, so you’ll be accessing modeling and selection tools through the on-screen toolbars.

vectary-online-3d-modeling-cad-cloud-03 The Vectary user interface – model by George Solo

The geometry and terminology should be familiar to any who have used other 3D modeling systems, but at it’s core, it’s a polygonal modeler, so you’ll be working with geometry by selecting polygons (faces and edges). The Tools provide you with primitives to get started quickly or you can sketch using Lines on an existing surface or the plane of a selected item’s (Coordinate) Gizmo. Once you have some lines, a face, or set of faces, you can Extend, Bridge, Bevel, Slide, Weld and Cap Boundaries. You also have a Slice tool to divide faces into smaller faces.

As you progress through the modeling process, Vectary keeps track of your Objects and actions in a list to the right of the screen. Expanding each item provides some additional options for Max polygon size, Smoothing and Edge Sharpness and quick toggles for Revolve and Mirroring. Beyond this, a simple set of scene options are available to control Units, Grid, Background, Lines, Camera and Shadow.

vectary-online-3d-modeling-cad-cloud-05

Currently, you can import an OBJ file and have options to export the model as OBJ or STL. I was able to successfully export an OBJ file, import it into KeyShot with hierarchy maintained and add materials to each part.

Now, just because it’s stated that Vectary will always be free, that doesn’t mean there won’t be a paid subscription option. In fact, a “Vectary for Business” is planned. The free version includes 3D modeling tool access, five private projects, unlimited public projects, import/export and non-commercial use. The Business version is sure to add to these options. No pricing has been announced.

I love the experience in this already. Though I was expecting a bit more capability, the direction is already very promising. It’s incredible easy to get started modeling organic shapes, modifying them, moving between different objects and exploring designs. It’s also a great example of how far we’ve been able to push OpenGL/WebGL web interfaces.

I’ve provided them feedback with a list of things I’d like to see. I’d like to see what you think though, find out if it’s what you were expecting and what you’d like to see yourself. If you haven’t had a chance to check it out yet, you can request beta access here.

The post First Glimpse at Vectary Online 3D Modeling Tool appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 14, 2016 08:54 PM

InFlow Technology

DriveWorks Pro 14 What's New Highlight - Model Insight

What Does It Do?

The new Model Insight feature in DriveWorks Pro 14 allows you to view each step required to generate your SOLIDWORKS files, pausing and moving forward at your command to allow precise review of your project.

Why Is It Important?

The ability to step into your model generation to see exactly how your parts, assemblies and drawings are going to be generated by DriveWorks based on your settings and configuration is a huge step forward in testing your projects. One of the largest issues with any application or program is methodological transparency to the individuals using it. Under most circumstances, we are forced to guestimate the "black magic" going on behind the scenes that perform the tasks that we are expecting. This new feature opens a new window to see behind the application and find out where you may run into errors long before the DriveWorks configuration is released to the users.

How Does It Work?

The new Model Insight feature can be used in two different locations; the Specification Test Mode in the DriveWorks Administration tool or by right-clicking on the Generate Models dialog inside of the SOLIDWORKS add-in. Once started, the user will have full control over each step that DriveWorks would go through to generate your SOLIDWORKS files, including the ability to run up until a certain pausing point, or go through each step one-by-one.

For more details, take a look at the DriveWorks Pro 14 documentation located at http://docs.driveworkspro.com/Topic/ProjectEditorSpecExplorerTestModeModelInsight. For any additional questions, please contact your DriveWorks reseller.

- The InFlow Technology DriveWorks Technical Team

by Derek Lawson at September 14, 2016 07:57 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Don’t Miss the Action As SOLIDWORKS 2017 Is Unveiled LIVE

Over the past year, our R&D team has been hard at work going through thousands of submissions by all of you—our users—to determine how to make SOLIDWORKS 2017 the best release yet. On Tuesday, September, 20th at 10 am (EST), we will unveil the fruits of their labor, our 24th release of SOLIDWORKS. You will hear from our key executive as well as some of our customers who are pushing the level of innovation in product design to the extreme.

GP

Register for this live event to hear CEO Gian Paolo Bassi discuss SOLIDWORKS’ vision for product and technology strategies that will transform the way products are designed, manufactured and supported. In addition, other key executives will provide you with updates on new product development initiatives, exciting new strategic partnerships, community engagement and educational programs as well as more in-depth information on the hundreds of new features and enhancements – 90 percent of which were requested by users like you.

Passionate SOLIDWORKS customers, such as Myomo, the Chairslayer Foundation and the Blood Brothers Foundation will show how they use SOLIDWORKS to overcome extreme challenges and make the world a better place to live. Get inspired to learn how SOLIDWORKS can help you overcome any design challenge by watching this video about Rob Parsons, AKA the Chairslayer.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLLDnxB3ymWr3OlAZz0pXQ_Aq4UYYJmmFG" width="1140"></iframe>

 

Register today for the live webcast!

Register today to be among the first to hear how SOLIDWORKS 2017 will help you get your job done faster and easier than ever before by helping you:

  • Innovate – New capabilities to help you incorporate emerging technologies
  • Design – More core power and performance to help you get your job done faster
  • Validate – Greater design insight to help you create breakthrough innovations
  • Collaborate – Unlock any 3D model to work with SOLIDWORKS
  • Build & Manage – Data integration from concept to manufacturing to drive business needs

Find out more information about the new features and enhancements in SOLIDWORKS 2017 on the official launch site.

09sep16_sw_2017_savethedate_banner_961x250.jpg

 

Author information

Barbara Schmitz
Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks
Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post Don’t Miss the Action As SOLIDWORKS 2017 Is Unveiled LIVE appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Barbara Schmitz at September 14, 2016 06:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Which plastic is best for your products? Find out with SOLIDWORKS

Did you know that there are fewer than 100 commonly used plastic materials? But, part designers are forced to choose from thousands of commercial-grade plastics because they are so highly customizable due to the use of fillers, additives, reinforcements, blends, copolymers, etc. In fact, just the addition of different colorants can cause a given material to have one set of physical properties while the same material in another colour has a different set of physical properties – which may not be adequate for a particular end-use application. Learn how to choose which plastic is best for your products.

SOLIDWORKS Plastics

SOLIDWORKS Plastics

Avoid the pitfalls of choosing the wrong material for your plastic products

Learn a basic methodology for understanding the different types of plastics available and how customization of those materials can affect physical properties, chemical resistance and processability, by using SOLIDWORKS Plastics to analyze and visualize polymer melt flow.

Get it right the first time – choose the best plastic for your application

In just 22 minutes, you can learn how to determine the best plastics materials for your specific application based on:

  • Physical strength
  • Chemical resistance
  • Impact strength
  • Surface appearance
  • Recyclability
  • Cost of material

WATCH THE VIDEO

The post Which plastic is best for your products? Find out with SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Erin Elliott at September 14, 2016 05:12 PM

SolidSmack

ReSpeaker Brings Voice Interaction to (Almost) Anything in Your Home

respeaker-iot-smart-device-speaker-00

Imagine having an Echo (Amazon’s voice-activated home automation device) controlling every device in your home. That’s the idea behind Seeed’s latest endeavor, the ReSpeaker. The ReSpeaker adds voice recognition/interaction to everything from speakers and home appliances to IoT devices. What’s more, the device was designed using open-source hardware and can even be uploaded with your voice service of choice, including Amazon’s Alexa, Google Speech API and Microsoft’s Cognitive Service (among a host of others.)

The tiny round PCB comes packed with some impressive hardware for any number of voice interaction projects, which includes an ATmega32u4 microcontroller along with a MT7688 Wi-Fi module, onboard analog microphone and SD card slot for external storage. Additionally, the ReSpeaker features a 3.5mm AUX out jack, micro USB port and two 8-pin headers. Those headers can be used to connect any number of other boards for additional functionality such as Seeed’s Wio Link module (Wi-Fi for IoT projects), Wio Node (smaller Wi-Fi module) and Wio Link (ESP8266-based dev board).

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gE7JsPiEtHA?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

For those who want more than what the onboard microphone offers, Seeed has also developed a sensitive microphone array that can recognize a voice from across a room even while music is playing. Known as the Mic Array, the board is outfitted with seven PDM digital microphones that are controlled by an XMOS XVSM-2000 DSP module, which can programmed to react to certain voice commands to initiate interaction.

Seeed’s ReSpeaker can also be connected to a Grove platform board, which allows for quick connecting the company’s popular Modules or sensor boards, giving the ReSpeaker Core board with yet even more functionality. Temperature, motion, light and even gas sensors are just a few of the modules that can be incorporated. The Grove board also features I2S, I2C, AUX, USB 2.0, GPIOs (and several more interfaces) that provide users additional project options if the need arises. Oh boy, GPIO? I feel a mad-rush of inspiration.

Seeed’s ReSpeaker (along with the Mic Array and Grove board) has been funded on Kickstarter, nearing $200,000 of their $40,000 goal, and can be had for $49, which nets you the Core board with and 8GB SD card. It just so happens that Amazon launched the 2nd generation of their Echo Dot product today, a smaller version of their Amazon Echo product, for $49. While the Echo Dot uses Amazon’s Alexa voice activation technology to control home automation devices, access apps and ask questions, the ReSpeaker is open-source and maintains the ability to expand, hack, customize and integrate with just about any device you have.

Which are you buying? Alexa, add a ReSpeaker to my shopping list. “ReSpeaker, added.”

respeaker-iot-smart-device-speaker-01

The post ReSpeaker Brings Voice Interaction to (Almost) Anything in Your Home appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at September 14, 2016 04:23 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 [WEBINAR]

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 (Product Data Management ) products manage and synchronize your design data across your entire enterprise with a single, easily deployable solution tightly integrated with all SOLIDWORKS applications.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/D41RjbRP7m0?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Attend our SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 webinar on Tuesday, October 25, 2016 from 2:00 PM – 2:45 PM (EDT) to see the latest enhancements in software. During the webinar we will review many of the new features including:

  • Changing a Category of a Checked in File
  • Controlling the Download Permissions for Users and Groups
  • Copying Group Permissions and Group Members
  • Generating SOLIDWORKS MBD 3D PDFs
  • Latest Version Overwrite
  • Preview Enhancements
  • Quality Enhancements in SOLIDWORKS PDM
  • Reference Tree Display Enhancements
  • Rolling Back a File with References
  • Searching Local Files
  • SOLIDWORKS PDF Task Add-in
  • SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 Viewer Enhancements
  • Vault Database Replication
  • Adding Custom Columns

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 takes care of your data

During the webinar you will learn how SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 centralizes the storage of all your engineering data and related files to give you these benefits:

  • Secure repository for fast information retrieval
  • Version control for both minor changes and major revisions to help prevent data loss
  • Integrated workflows that automate your design and approval processes for more efficient review and release of final designs
  • Implemented in a fraction of the time required by other product data management solutions

<iframe frameborder="0" height="900" scrolling="no" src="http://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2016-09-09/7gq3n5" style="border: 0;" width="100%"></iframe>

The post What’s New in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 [WEBINAR] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at September 14, 2016 02:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Students Experience the World of 1990s 3D CAD

1998 was a great year for technology. Apple launched the iMac, the first MP3 player hit store shelves, Game Boy was offered in color and a little-known search engine named Google hit the World Wide Web. Luckily gas was $1.06 per gallon in the United States, so at least you had a chance at affording some of these amazing new devices.

That brings us to SOLIDWORKS in the 1990s. Yup, Pokémon was there, and so were we. The revolutionary idea fueling the company was our mission to deliver powerful 3D CAD to every engineer’s desktop at an affordable price. By enabling users to access 3D CAD on a Windows® machine, SOLIDWORKS essentially knocked the price down from $40,000 to $4,000, marking the beginning of the democratization of 3D CAD.

What better way to celebrate bringing affordable 3D CAD to the masses than giving five intrepid students, who only recently reached voting age, a chance at experiencing the CAD of the 90s? Watch the video to see their reaction to SOLIDWORKS demos, marketing materials and, ultimately, a SOLIDWORKS 98Plus test drive.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vLo95ZlRrtg?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

The desire to bring the best design and engineering tools to every workstation still drives SOLIDWORKS today. This begins by listening to the most passionate community of CAD users and including its feedback in each product release for the last three decades. SOLIDWORKS 2017 contains more than 200 new, user-driven enhancements waiting for you to explore.  See what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017 today at solidworks.com/launch.

 

Author information

Mike Fearon
Mike Fearon
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post Students Experience the World of 1990s 3D CAD appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mike Fearon at September 14, 2016 12:30 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Is your SOLIDWORKS Update/Reference dialog dismissed too quickly before you can take action!

Dismissed messages in SOLIDWORKS can prevent files from being saved or opened in the expected way.  Reviewing and re-enabling them is commonly used when troubleshooting issues related to saving or opening files.

SOLIDWORKS goes through a search routine when opening files with references.  If a reference is not found, a SOLIDWORKS unable to locate file dialog box appears (if it has not been dismissed) offering you the option to either search for a replacement file, suppress the component or suppress all missing components.  Note the countdown until the message is dismissed highlighted in the screenshot below:

SOLIDWORKS Unable to locate file dialog

Unable to locate file dialog

Adjusting the dismissal time

The dialog sometimes times out before you have made a selection.  That should not be a cause for frustration because starting with SOLIDWORKS 2015, the duration of the dialog for missing references can be changed in Tools > Options > Messages/Errors/Warnings.

If the option ‘Dismiss reference/update dialog boxes when opening assemblies after n seconds’ is disabled, the reference/update dialog will remain on the screen until one of the options is selected.  If that option is enabled, the duration of the dialog remaining on the screen can be set in seconds.

SOLIDWORKS Options for Messages/Errors/Warnings

SOLIDWORKS Options for Messages/Errors/Warnings

The post Is your SOLIDWORKS Update/Reference dialog dismissed too quickly before you can take action! appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sanja Srzic at September 14, 2016 11:00 AM

SolidSmack

Making a Tattoo Gun from Scratch is Surprisingly Simple…If You Can Find the Parts

feature

If you’ve seen such tv shows as OZ, The Wire or anything of the sort, chances are you’ve seen some brilliantly hacked together tattoo guns made from little more than approved items found in the prison commissary.

Needless to say, these prison tinkerers aren’t starting with anything close to a DIY Build Your Own Tattoo Gun Kit –– and more often than not, they likely don’t even have tools to build something even with the few parts that they may be able to scrap together.

More recently, A&E took a closer look at the build process that goes into one of these surprisingly effective DIY tattoo gun solutions made from parts stripped from otherwise innocent objects including a Walkman, paper clips, a pen, batteries and a few rubber bands:

<iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="600" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2F60DaysIn%2Fvideos%2F1081608458614075%2F&amp;width=800&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=345&amp;appId" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" width="800"></iframe>

The post Making a Tattoo Gun from Scratch is Surprisingly Simple…If You Can Find the Parts appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at September 14, 2016 10:39 AM

Weekly App Smack 37.16: Rubek, Venmo, ETA, Wavvy, and More…

feature

Time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device, be it iPhone, Android or Windows!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Rubek

“Rubek is a minimalist color based puzzle game. Roll a cube to pick up and match correct colors on the floor, as you make your way to reach the end point while figuring out a way to solve the puzzles. Play through 70+ handcrafted levels of mind bending difficulty and collect stars to compete on the global leaderboards.”

rubek

Venmo

“Make and share payments.”

venmo

ETA

“ETA is your personal driving assistant providing you with quick access to travel times and driving directions to all your favourite destinations.”

eta

Wavvy Theme

“A gorgeous system-wide theme including settings, Google Now, volume and pop-up panels, and quicksettings.”

wavvy

Document Manager

“Document Manager is one of the best & first application in market to get list of all documents available in you android smart phones and tablets at single place. So, you don’t need to search for any document in to your smart phone.”

documentmanager

Logo Maker & Logo Creator

“Logo Foundry is a professional logo design suite that lets you create powerful branding for your business in a matter of Minutes!”

logomaker

The post Weekly App Smack 37.16: Rubek, Venmo, ETA, Wavvy, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 14, 2016 09:38 AM

Ricky Jordan's Blog

Reinventing CAD – Where are we headed? – Part 3

In this series of posts, I’ve laid out a few observations on some of the new trends in the CAD industry and where we might be heading as new platforms are developed for the future. You can...

by Ricky Jordan at September 14, 2016 03:07 AM

September 13, 2016

SolidSmack

This SolidWorks Add-In Gives You Instant Quotes and Manufacturing Feedback

xometry-on-demand-manufacturing-05

Presented by
xometry-logo-100

You don’t have to wait for quotes any longer. The new Xometry SOLIDWORKS Add-In gives you instant pricing and manufacturability feedback on your CAD file directly within SOLIDWORKS. It’s dead simple to use and the handy “Production Guide: Designing Early for Custom Manufacturing” gives you all the tips on designing your parts for a variety of processes and materials.

How does it work? Let’s watch the Xometry Add-in in action:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/mY4UGO08yI4?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

After you have the Add-in installed and you’re logged into Xometry, just open the part you want to have quoted. In the sidebar, click ‘Add part to quote’. In just a few seconds you’ll see an instant quote with cost, lead time and manufacturability.

Not only do you get all the details for the applied material, but instant options and details on other possible materials and finishes. Based on this, the feedback provides warnings and recommendations if there are improvements that can be made.

It doesn’t stop there though. A Features tab allows you to specify inserts, threaded/tapped holes, surface roughness and tolerances. A Finish tab allows a wide variety of plating and coating, and a Notes & Drawings tab is there to provide additional information.

Since the Xometry add-in is right within SOLIDWORKS, it allows you to make changes and update the quote instantly. The Xometry add-in is the full featured, on-demand manufacturing tool that keeps you working instead of spending hours and days collecting bids.

Want to see some real world products that Xometry brought to life? Avid SOLIDWORKS user, Mat Kyle, used Xometry to make beer infusers. Because, beer.

xometry-on-demand-manufacturing-02

Another inventor, Les Meadowcroft, used Xometry to make it easier to look in dog ears. If that’s your thing.

xometry-on-demand-manufacturing-04

College student Karel Bachand created a $20k luxury watch with Xometry. One for the wish list.

xometry-on-demand-manufacturing-03

Need on-demand manufacturing? Don’t sweat it. Get Xometry. Get to work.

<style> .ad-970x90, .insert-post-ads {display:none;} </style>

The post This SolidWorks Add-In Gives You Instant Quotes and Manufacturing Feedback appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 13, 2016 10:05 PM

Model of the Week: Pip (Storage) Boxes [For Your Things!]

pip-3d-printed-storage-drawers-00

“Ello Pip!” Why hello yourself! I’m glad you showed up because I need to talk to someone about storage. I have 397 Mason jars filled with nuts, screws, stamps, snail shells, dried shellac, dry lint… well, you get the idea. I need a better storage solution.

“Did you see this splendid, stackable, sensational set of 3D printed storage drawers?” I see them now, thank you! And while I could order a wall-size set of storage drawers online and have them here tomorrow, 3D printing them is so much more challenging! Plus, imagine the combinations one could come with. Yes, I’m fairly certain the ultimate use for 3D printers is printing storage for other 3D printed items like prosthetics, space ship ventilation ducts and extra lung tissue.

Created by Andrew Askedall, not only is this a 3D printed storage solution for all your bits and bobs. It’s a ONE PIECE, 3D printed storage solution for all your bits and bobs. The units all print as one piece. The inside of the drawers are angled so no supports are needed and if anyone ask why your printing storage drawers, you can lift one slowly in front of their face… then open and close the drawer rapidly until they leave.

All .stl files are provide and even separated so you can print a different color/material for frame and drawer. Splendid indeed! If you’re freaking out about labels, Andrew has eliminated the most challenging part of this project by providing a PDF template. Phew.

You can download the files from the Thingiverse.

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

The post Model of the Week: Pip (Storage) Boxes [For Your Things!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 13, 2016 10:04 PM

Incredible ‘Skate Art’ Chopping Knives Made From Recycled Skateboards

2nd-shot-john-gibson-skate-art-knife-00

2nd Shot is the Ontario-based company that takes a love of skateboarding and its culture, turning discarded decks from local skaters, skate shops and skate parks to create just about anything imaginable – watches, art, and yes, knives–beautiful.

The company is the brainchild of John Gibson, mixing his former freelance job painting cars and customizing random products with his passion for skateboarding, into a manufacturing mash-up of “Skate Art” that’s awesome enough to be displayed in a gallery. Pieces were already hanging in hos how, so with the piles of cracked skateboards piling up, his business was created.

2nd-shot-john-gibson-skate-art-01

If you’ve ever split a skateboard after hurling yourself down a double-set, you’ve probably noticed the vibrant plys as you lay there bleeding. Obviously, those layers of color are what makes these knives so unique looking–cut, shaped, arrange and sanded in various patterns that truly give these decks a second shot at being a tool for serving up something cool. Then you have the pattern of the Damascus steel complimenting the pattern of the handle to give your friends the ultimate in pattern envy, especially when combined with your plaid board shorts and apron.

John creates versions with both a seven inch blade and a five inch handle. For a custom knife they’re not incredible pricey with an average cost around $165 USD. Along with the chopping knives, John also creates other knives, using the same build process for items such as pocket knives, butter knives, axes, swords and some outstanding knife blocks.

2nd-shot-john-gibson-skate-art-knife-07

2nd Shot is currently out of the handmade Skate Art Knives, but you can keep an eye out for them and find watches, sunglasses and other items on the 2nd Shot Etsy store.

Inspired? Have a few boards laying around? Maybe it’s time to recycle?

2nd-shot-john-gibson-skate-art-knife-01

2nd-shot-john-gibson-skate-art-knife-02

2nd-shot-john-gibson-skate-art-knife-03

2nd-shot-john-gibson-skate-art-knife-04

2nd-shot-john-gibson-skate-art-knife-05

2nd-shot-john-gibson-skate-art-knife-06

2nd-shot-john-gibson-skate-art-knife-08

The post Incredible ‘Skate Art’ Chopping Knives Made From Recycled Skateboards appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 13, 2016 08:18 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Preview the Future of SOLIDWORKS

When SOLIDWORKS® 95 was introduced it revolutionized the way engineers and designers created products. One of the company’s original missions was to put easy-to-use, but powerful 3D CAD on every engineer’s desktop. At the time the idea was radical; 3D CAD was expensive and required specialized hardware. SOLIDWORKS cut the price from $40,000 to $4,000 and created a powerful program capable of running on a Windows® operating system. Fast forward a few decades and we know the approach was a great success.

Now, where does that leave us? Our commitment to bring powerful tools to every engineer’s desktop remains. We’re certainly not moving away from our mission to provide our users with the best CAD tools on the market…in fact, we need to go further. We are determined to expand the scope of these tools to bring an entire product design and development ecosystem to you.

A large part of this scope involves choice in how you prefer to access this ecosystem. We do not want to force you into one way to pay or even one way to use SOLIDWORKS products. In SOLIDWORKS 2017 we’re introducing term licensing to provide even more flexibility and choice. Flexibility will also extend to how you create products in SOLIDWORKS. As you know, we’re continuing to develop cloud-based solutions for this ecosystem. Our cloud focus goes beyond simply providing flexibility in where and when you design. SOLIDWORKS’ goal is not CAD in the cloud. It’s to provide a design ecosystem capable of using the power of cloud computing to your advantage. This means increased ability to validate your projects, work in concert with internal and external teams, and smart computing features that make suggestions to optimize your designs. The future is not simply putting CAD in the cloud. It’s providing you the power to choose how you want to innovate – whether that be in your office or a virtual environment.

From engineering to manufacturing and marketing, design has evolved to a more holistic activity that involves many disciplines. Our job at SOLIDWORKS is to ensure you have the capability of easily connecting these design disciplines with tools to complete the entire product development process in a single environment. As SOLIDWORKS 95 put the power of 3D CAD on your desktop, we’re now evolving our mission to empower you with the capabilities to take a product from art to part and beyond…directly inside of SOLIDWORKS.

Our strategy to bring these capabilities to you is three-fold. Beyond continuing to hear your feedback on improving your CAD experience, SOLIDWORKS will target three key areas: validation, performance, and data management.

Validation

Design in CAD has gone beyond the creation of 3D models and drawings; it has become the center of your complete product development process. We want to help you create the highest performing, most reliable designs possible to delight your customers. This starts with expanding the functionality within the SOLIDWORKS Simulation portfolio. Today, many engineers are familiar with traditional simulation techniques and want to push the envelope. Designers are looking to test larger and larger models with more complex set-ups than ever before. What was once the domain of analysis experts has now become the aspiration of designers. Our plan is to deliver a powerful multi-physics analysis tool, where structural, motion and fluid loads interact, and make them accessible to all designers so that complex product uses cases can be solved quickly and easily and most importantly where designers can have confidence in their answers.

Performance

As we continue to upgrade CAD features, managing performance is very important. While we work to improve drawings, rendering and modeling, we need to be certain that we’re adding these features so they are scalable across many different types of workstations. One example is how we’ve approached the new graphics engine. While it’s great with multi-GPU graphics cards, it can also support older hardware. Again, we’re looking to introduce cutting-edge features, but we want to ensure that these features remain accessible to every engineer.

Data Management

CAD data is the life blood of your product lines. From information contributing to streamlining manufacturing with MBD to marketing materials with SOLIDWORKS Visualize, your product data plays an important role in your entire company. We need to build tools to help you democratize this data for true collaboration. Database replication was an important technological step in this journey, but we need to keep making advancements. It’s time to take the buzzword out of collaboration and truly make it translate to working with global teams to manage quality, collaborate with supply chains and bills of materials.

SOLIDWORKS is invested in developing tools to put an entire product design and development ecosystem on your desktop. In addition to the solid modeling that we’ve continued to improve upon over three decades, we want to give you new tools, such as mechatronics, advanced simulation and electromechanics, to bring the next generation of legendary products to life.

If you’re interested in hearing more about the future of SOLIDWORKS and see new features available in SOLIDWORKS 2017, I encourage you to register for our live launch event on Tuesday, September 20th. During the event, you will learn what’s new, what’s coming, and how your engineering peers are making great advances and products with SOLIDWORKS.

Author information

Gian Paolo Bassi
Gian Paolo Bassi
Gian Paolo is CEO of Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS.

The post Preview the Future of SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Gian Paolo Bassi at September 13, 2016 01:16 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2017 allows you to customize the order of your configurations

I am certain that everyone who uses SOLIDWORKS configurations wishes they had the ability to control exactly how the configurations are sorted in the configuration manager. Dassault Systemes SolidWorks Corporation has fulfilled our wish with new functionality in SOLIDWORKS 2017 giving us control over how the configurations are ordered/sorted.

Setting the SOLIDWORKS Configuration Order

Right-click on the component at the top of the configuration manager and note a new shortcut-menu item called “Tree Order“, from here you can set the order of the configurations to be:

  • Numeric
  • Literal
  • Manual (drag & drop)
  • History-Based
  • Or by the order they appear in the Design Table.
SOLIDWORKS Configuration Order

SOLIDWORKS Configuration Tree Order

The Manual order provides you the greatest flexibility to reorder your configurations as you see fit.

This is just one of the many new improvements that we will see with the release of SOLIDWORKS 2017. Check back for more SOLIDWORKS 2017 tech tips.

Experience SOLIDWORKS 2017 at our launch broadcast

Attend our LIVE Launch Broadcast in October to learn What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2017. The latest release is packed with new, customer-focused enhancements. With more core power, performance, and new capabilities; SOLIDWORKS 2017 will help you easily turn your ideas into finished products in less time with higher quality.

REGISTER FOR A BROADCAST NOW

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 allows you to customize the order of your configurations appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at September 13, 2016 12:53 PM

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS PCB 2017 [WEBINAR]

The new SOLIDWORKS PCB 2017 design tool combines the power and usability of Altium with the 3D expertise of SOLIDWORKS to unite the “electronic” and mechanical worlds, one design at a time. By integrating Electronic designs seamlessly with SOLIDWORKS utilizing your trusted mechanical workflow, designs come to life with integrated design data, managed ECO processes, and greater analysis capabilities. SOLIDWORKS PCB is focused on bringing the best of both worlds together. Do what you do best in SOLIDWORKS, and let SOLIDWORKS PCB handle your PCB design needs.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kRwsgtP3KRI?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Attend our SOLIDWORKS PCB 2017 webinar on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 from 2:00 PM – 2:45 PM (EDT) to see the latest enhancements in the software. During the webinar we will review many of the new features including:

  • Interactive Router
  • Real-Time 3D Clearance Checking
  • Differential Pair Routing
  • Comprehensive Design Rule Checking
  • Hierarchical Multi-Sheet Design
  • Electrical Rule Check
  • Library Management
  • Schematic to PCB Engineering Change Order
  • Streamlined Interface
  • Version Control
  • Component Placement Rules
  • Pin Swapping
  • Supplier Links
  • ECAD/MCAD Project Collaboration Server
  • Copper Analysis

What you will learn at the SOLIDWORKS PCB 2017 webinar

During the webinar we will demonstrate the easy-to-use interface and how it is linked with SOLIDWORKS CAD to give you an efficient design experience. You will learn how to get your PCBs done quickly and easily — just what you need when PCBs are only a part of your product design workflow.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="900" scrolling="no" src="http://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2016-09-09/7gq36c" style="border: 0;" width="100%"></iframe>

The post What’s New in SOLIDWORKS PCB 2017 [WEBINAR] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at September 13, 2016 11:00 AM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The Brand New Hustle

feature

This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “You Know, You Know” from Mahavishnu Orchestra and work our way through tracks from Animal Collective, Wings, Yo La Tengo, RJD2 and others before wrapping up with the classic “Anyone Who Knows What Love Is…(Will Understand)” from Irma Thomas.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:7lbZS2sg60chqfVj9pH4dy" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Brand New Hustle appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 13, 2016 08:00 AM

Ricky Jordan's Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Announced

SOLIDWORKS took the wraps off their 2017 version today.  This is the 25th major release of the product.  (Had to count to make sure.)  There are quite a few enhancements as usual with over 90%...

by Ricky Jordan at September 13, 2016 01:24 AM

September 12, 2016

SolidSmack

Level Up Your Design Sketching with this Guided Figure Drawing Sketchbook and Template Guide

feature

When it comes to design sketching, one of the most difficult –– but oftentimes absolutely necessary –– components to lay down are various components of the human figure. Among other reasons, understanding the scale and ergonomics of early design ideas can make or break a project early in the process.

Which is why the How to Draw: FIGURES Sketchbook by footwear designer Mark Kokavec just might be one of the best new resources you should add to your arsenal.

The $25 Moleskine-like sketchbook uses templates and guidelines to help teach you how to draw the human form using a “phase-out” system that begins with lots of guidelines that are simplified as you progress through the sketchbook. Additionally, the book includes commonly used industry reference material and over 100 sketch templates to use in your own projects.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2089529310/how-to-draw-figures-sketchbook/widget/video.html" width="800"> </iframe>

Says Kokavec:

“Although (the human body) is a complex mechanism, it’s something that we can easily break down into bite-sized parts. The intrigue of this Sketchbook is that it gives you the ability to sketch alongside what you are learning. The guidelines help improve your understanding of proportion and perspective, but as the guides phase-out, your mind begins to learn what’s missing, so you will eventually be able to draw without the need of any guidelines.”

Check out more over on Kickstarter.

The post Level Up Your Design Sketching with this Guided Figure Drawing Sketchbook and Template Guide appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at September 12, 2016 04:14 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 [WEBINAR]

With the new powerful and intuitive SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 solutions, product engineers can virtually test new ideas quickly, efficiently evaluate performance, improve quality, and get the knowledge for product innovation.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tPLrxytyVx8?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Attend our SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 webinar on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 from 2:00 PM – 2:45 PM (EDT) to see the latest enhancements in the software. During the webinar we will review many of the new features including:

  • Displaying Simulation Results in SOLIDWORKS Graphics Area
  • Converting a Static Study to a New Study
  • Detecting Stress Hot Spots
  • Editing Multiple Contact Sets
  • Improved Arc Length Control Method for Nonlinear Contact Analysis
  • Intelligent Solver Switch
  • Managing Dynamic Analysis Results
  • Macro Recording in Simulation
  • Mass Properties in Simulation
  • Automatic Update of Beam Joints and remote Loads and Mass for Beams
  • Offloaded Simulation
  • Performance Improvements for SOLIDWORKS Simulation
  • Post Processing Improvements for SOLIDWORKS Simulation
  • Probing Results at Selected Nodes

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 can help your business

We will also cover best practices and the benefits of incorporating simulation into your business, allowing you to:

Boost product innovation
  • Grow market share and differentiate through groundbreaking product design
  • Empower the engineering team with intuitive, powerful 3D simulation tools to compare design scenarios and new ideas to bring innovative products to market
  • Improve product efficiency
  • Improve product performance, such as lower pressure drop and increased horsepower
  • Improve eco-effectiveness of product designs
Shorten time-to-market
  • Optimize product development with intuitive, CAD embedded simulation for structural, fluid flow, motion, plastics injection molding, and sustainable design
  • Reduce the need for time-consuming physical prototyping
  • Optimize assembly performance by verifying part and mold designs in the earliest stages of development

<iframe frameborder="0" height="900" scrolling="no" src="http://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2016-09-09/7gpyyw" style="border: 0;" width="100%"></iframe>

The post What’s New in SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 [WEBINAR] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at September 12, 2016 04:00 PM

SolidSmack

This Milling Genius Created His Own Stovetop Coffee Maker From Scrap Metal

feature

While Frank Howarth of Frank Makes may be one of our favorite go-to YouTubers when it comes to woodworking, This Old Tony is close behind when it comes to machining and other forms of metalworking.

While the scope of his videos vary from designing and making your own springs to machining tool holders for a lathe, his latest video just might be the most interesting of all –– at least, for the coffee connoisseurs among us.

Starting with a hunk of scrap metal, Tony spends over a half hour detailing the process of machining a macchinetta –– otherwise known as a Moka Pot –– from scratch. These stovetop coffee makers produce coffee by passing boiling water pressurized by steam through ground coffee.

In any case, watching somebody create their own product from scratch on the mill is always worth a watch:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qMrlyEreba8?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

The post This Milling Genius Created His Own Stovetop Coffee Maker From Scrap Metal appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at September 12, 2016 03:35 PM

The Monday List 37.16 | What We’re Reading This Week

feature

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

How to pretend you’re a great designer
Practical tips and principles to trick people into thinking you’re an industry thought leader.

01

The Golden Mean of Design and Engineering
“There was a time when I viewed designers with the same scepticism as I viewed homeopathy.”

02

The Drug of Choice for the Age of Kale
How ayahuasca, an ancient Amazonian hallucinogenic brew, became the latest trend in Brooklyn and Silicon Valley.

03

Against Minimalism
A Plea for Cyberpunk

04

Designs of the Time: Tokyo
Welcome to the future of the Japanese house – delivery-friendly outdoor fridge and handy pull-down bath included.

05

How Chromebooks Are About to Totally Transform Laptop Design
Chromebooks outsold Macs for the first time in the first quarter of this year, and according to Google, US schools buy more Chromebooks than all other devices combined.

06

The post The Monday List 37.16 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 12, 2016 03:05 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Wrapping sketches over complex surfaces

Every year an exciting new version of SOLIDWORKS comes out with shiny new features that have been requested by users. SOLIDWORKS 2017 is definitely no exception with plenty of new tools to geek out about. In this blog we’ll be discussing the enhanced SOLIDWORKS Wrap feature in 2017. If you saw our first teaser video for SOLIDWORKS 2017 you might of guessed that it relates to the Wrap feature.

The SOLIDWORKS Wrap feature has always been a great way to project sketches onto 3D geometry, up to SOLIDWORKS 2016 we have only been able to Wrap sketches over Cylindrical and Conical shapes, well with the added functionality in SOLIDWORKS 2017 you can now wrap over complex surfaces as shown in the figure below:

Sketch wrapped over a SOLIDWORKS model

Sketch wrapped onto a SOLIDWORKS model

SOLIDWORKS Wrap Feature

The user interface for the Wrap feature has an added button to indicate that the text you are using can be wrapped around a complex surface. Simply select this option when using wrap and click on the faces of your model that you would like your sketch to be wrapped around. Once you are satisfied just hit apply and SOLIDWORKS will work its magic to wrap your text around the surfaces. There is also an accuracy slider that lets you adjust the wrap.

SOLIDWORKS Wrap Feature

SOLIDWORKS Wrap FeatureManager

What are the limitations?

After playing around with the wrap feature for a little while the only limitation that I noticed was that your text cannot wrap over itself. This makes perfect sense, as long as the text isn’t touching it can go around the object multiple times it just cannot overlap itself.

Text wrapped multiple times

Text wrapped multiple times

An important thing to note is that you can wrap sketches around freeform objects that have been imported from SOLIDWORKS Industrial Designer. This allows you to easily add text, logos, arrows and other miscellaneous details on your project file.

Model from SOLIDWORKS Industrial Designer

Model from SOLIDWORKS Industrial Designer

We are really excited about this and many other features that SOLIDWORKS 2017 has to offer, we encourage you to give the new wrap feature a spin and tell us what you think!

Experience SOLIDWORKS 2017 at our launch broadcast

Learn What’s New in SOLIDWORKS® 2017 at our LIVE Launch Broadcast in October. SOLIDWORKS 2017 is packed with new, customer-focused enhancements. With more core power, performance, and new capabilities; SOLIDWORKS 2017 will help you easily turn your ideas into finished products in less time, with higher quality.

REGISTER FOR A BROADCAST NOW

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 Wrapping sketches over complex surfaces appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Ellery, CSWE at September 12, 2016 02:00 PM