Planet SolidWorks

August 23, 2016

SolidSmack

This Desktop CNC Machine Gets You Milling for Under $500

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If you’re not getting your recommended daily allowance of sawdust and aluminum shavings, chances are you’re looking at desktop CNC milling machine options. There are A LOT more options that we had a year ago and boy are we glad to see it. Prices for most can still be in the thousands though. That’s why the MillRight CNC M3 is putting a smile on our face.

This desktop CNC machine is a fairly standard, quite simple 3-axis kit with a part, power and price combo that won’t break your exotic milling material budget. Though it’s as bare bones and basic as you can get, it sports features like NEMA 17 stepper motors, 9mm fiberglass reinforced GT2 timing belts and 260mmx260mm (10.25″x 10.25″) work area. It runs on an Arduino Uno control board, moving the table in one axis and the spindle in the other.

The MillRight CNC is on sale now for $299.00 USD (reg. $359.00), available through their store and shipping immediately. Options include a black epoxy finish, a homing switch kit and a rigidity kit.

Here’s a breakdown of the specs:

Cutting area: 260mm x 260mm x 50mm (10.25″ x 10.25″ x 2.00″)
Frame: CNC routed MDF
Motors: High torque NEMA 17 stepper motors
Belts: 9mm fiberglass reinforced GT2 timing belts
Attacments: Pronged tee nuts in work bed
Material: wood, plastics, printed circuit boards, thin aluminum
Extras needed:
CNC Clamps
Router (DEWALT DWP611PK recommended) $160.99
Router mount (Bosch Colt recommended) $34.50

For an additional $195 for the clamps, router and router mount, you’ll have a completely capable hobby level CNC machine atop your counter–at a grand total of $495. The MillRight website also has a resource section with assembly manual, milling settings, tutorials and everything else you need to get started with the machine.

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Read This Desktop CNC Machine Gets You Milling for Under $500 at SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at August 23, 2016 05:33 PM

That Insane Paper Saw Blade: What Else Can it Cut Through?

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This past Sunday, Canada-based woodworker John Heisz uploaded a video he made documenting a paper saw blade that he had made from standard printer paper cutting wood with surprisingly clean results. Unsurprisingly, the video went viral in a matter of hours and is currently sitting at over an impressive 4 million views.

While we’re still curious to see what would happen if cardstock or another –– more sturdy –– paper-like material were used in place of regular printer paper, Heisz just uploaded yet another demonstration video that details how the paper blade works against other materials. Considering that the paper had little problem cutting cleanly through dense wood leading up to failure, it would seem to make sense that it might work on other materials, too –– right?

“These are some of the things I tried cutting with the paper blade,” explains Heisz. “I picked what I thought was best for the original video, but thought that there might be some interest in these as well. The hardwood was hard maple and it cut remarkably clean.”

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Could there be a practical application for cutting soft materials? If the clean and mess–free foam cutting is any indication, Heisz just might be onto something here.

Read That Insane Paper Saw Blade: What Else Can it Cut Through? at SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at August 23, 2016 04:28 PM

InFlow Technology

DriveWorks World 2017 – Atlanta, GA

 

Driveworks has officially announced the chosen location for DriveWorks World 2017 – Atlanta, Georgia! The fun and festivities will be taking place in Atlanta, GA from Monday, March 6th until Friday, March 10th 2017 at the Twelve Atlantic Station Hotel. This year DriveWorks is offering two tracks for attendees to choose from. For those new to the product, they are offering Track 1 which will include DriveWorks training and DriveWorks Pro Professional Certification. For those already certified, Track 2 will offer training on more advanced concepts and additional modules that may not typically be used.

To register, visit www.driveworksworld.com. Their site will offer discounted rates at the Twelve Atlantic Station Hotel along with a staggering 32% "Early Bird" registration savings if you are able to register by December 18th, 2016! Special offers are available for large groups that are attending as well. Hurry and set up your DriveWorks World 2017 registration and we'll see you in Atlanta!

 - The InFlow Technology DriveWorks Technical Team

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by Derek Lawson at August 23, 2016 04:03 PM

SolidSmack

‘Automobile Design Graphics’ Dives Into the Incredible History of Automobile Brochures

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In the history of industrial design and engineering, perhaps no other industry is as storied and colorful as the automobile. While we may be on the cusp of a future consisting of self-driving cars that we can experience through virtual reality before purchasing, it’s the marketing and sales tactics that reflected consumer needs and buying habits of yester–century that ultimately helped shape the automobile as we know it today.

In the recently-released Automobile Design Graphics, cultural anthropologist and graphic design historian Jim Heimann takes a closer look at what was the ultimate marketing collateral during the heyday of the automobile: the brochure. Including everything from paint swatches and fabric samples, these brochures became the gateway for selling the public on the latest car model long before the days of Google or even glossy magazines.

Heimann –– along with other notable design historians Steven Heller and Steven Heller –– deep dives into the visual history of over 500 reproductions across 8 decades of rare customer brochures. The result –– while based in graphic design –– gives further insight into how engineering and industrial design were “made sexy” to the general public long before the iPod:

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“Testament to a bygone era when cars were, quite simply, the stuff dreams were made of, this book is a visual and informative pleasure for car enthusiasts, designers, and pop culture aficionados alike.”

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Automobile Design Graphics is currently available for US$ 59.99 over at Taschen.

Read ‘Automobile Design Graphics’ Dives Into the Incredible History of Automobile Brochures at SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at August 23, 2016 04:01 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Join us for a LIVE broadcast at the SOLIDWORKS 2017 Canada Launch

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Launch

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Launch

Learn What’s New in SOLIDWORKS® 2017 at our LIVE Launch Broadcast in October. SOLIDWORKS 2017 is packed with new, customer-focused enhancements. With more core power, performance, and new capabilities; SOLIDWORKS 2017 will help you easily turn your ideas into finished products in less time, with higher quality.

Choose from our four live broadcast events below:

BROADCAST DATE TIME REGISTER
Eastern Canada
Morning Broadcast
Tuesday, October 4, 2016 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM (EDT) REGISTER
Eastern Canada
Afternoon Broadcast
Tuesday, October 4, 2016 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM (EDT) REGISTER
Western Canada
Morning Broadcast
Thursday, October 13, 2016 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM (PDT) REGISTER
Western Canada
Afternoon Broadcast
Thursday, October 13, 2016 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM (PDT) REGISTER

Why tune in to a SOLIDWORKS 2017 Launch?

Here are three good reasons why you need to tune in to a SOLIDWORKS 2017 launch broadcast in October:

  1. Live Product Demos — See live demonstrations of SOLIDWORKS 2017. You will gain the knowledge of how you can make your product design process even more productive.
  2. Free Update Training — Our launch broadcast will focus on what’s new training for SOLIDWORKS 2017 where you will be able to learn about the latest SOLIDWORKS tools and techniques. Whether you’re an existing SOLIDWORKS user looking to learn the new features, or someone looking to implement 3D CAD in your business; you will gain essential knowledge about SOLIDWORKS 2017 during our broadcast.
  3. Chance to Win a Trip to SOLIDWORKS World! We are giving away some amazing prizes for broadcast attendees including a fully paid trip to SOLIDWORKS World in Los Angeles, CA., on February 5 — 8, 2017.

Featured in the broadcast

Featured in the SOLIDWORKS 2017 launch broadcast is the design of the MyoPro® myoelectric upper limb orthosis developed by Myomo. The MyoPro is a rigid brace used for the purpose of supporting a patient’s weak or deformed arm to enable functional activities.

Myomo MyoPro Orthotic Brace

Myomo MyoPro Orthotic Brace

It’s a very clever design and you can learn more about it in Myomo’s demonstration video below:

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The post Join us for a LIVE broadcast at the SOLIDWORKS 2017 Canada Launch appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at August 23, 2016 03:37 PM

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: Raspberry Pi 3 Model B [Berry Awesome!]

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This fabulous model? This is a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B. You know, the device you can use to brain a hexapod, integrate a complete home automation system or link to form an impressive Raspberry Pi SuperComputer.

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Yes, this wee device has more compute capacity and capability than a couple of inept presidential candidates and a candidly similar lack of moral conscience, being that it is, in fact, a machine. Alexandre Willame modeled this sweet little thing with all “the bottom parts, photorealistic textures, and components updated to match the Official Raspberry Pi documentation.”

Modeled in SolidWorks 2016, Alexandre has included the SolidWorks .sldprt file, along with STL, IGS, STEP files and the Raspberry Pi 3 spec sheet. I held my Raspberry Pi 3 up to this model and, folks, it matches beautifully. What can you use this model for? Well, you could use it to fashion a RasPi case, construct a rack for 100 Raspberry Pi’s or render out a sweet desktop wallpaper to show everyone how stoked you are about the palm size computer!

You can download the files on GrabCAD! (Bonus! Grab the Complete Raspberry Pi Starter Kit here!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

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Read Model of the Week: Raspberry Pi 3 Model B [Berry Awesome!] at SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at August 23, 2016 03:26 PM

The Soothing Process of Manufacturing Vinyl Records Never Gets Old

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While the renewed appreciation of vinyl records have led to the highest sales numbers in nearly 30 years, equally fascinating is how vinyl manufacturing equipment –– most of which is just as old –– have been put back into commission to give listeners that “warm and fuzzy sound”.

Starting with the manufacturing of the compression molding metal stampers –– metal plates that contain reverse images of the disc –– a perfect copy of the original mother copy is created with articulate precision before going through an arduous testing process.

Once these stampers have been rigged up, PVC pellets are loaded into a hopper where they are heated into “biscuits” before being pressed with 150 tons of compression molding force. The critical paper labels –– which have been cured overnight in an oven to ensure there is no moisture –– are embedded into the vinyl during this process.

Once finally stamped, the newly–pressed records are trimmed of any excess material before getting packaged up and sent to your local record shop. More recently, the team over at Super Deluxe took a closer look at this meditative manufacturing process:

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Although it might be a bit of a ways off, the tenth anniversary of Record Store Day will be celebrated on April 22nd, 2017 –– expect it to be one of the biggest celebrations for all things vinyl to date.

Read The Soothing Process of Manufacturing Vinyl Records Never Gets Old at SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at August 23, 2016 03:20 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Electrical IS the future of Electrical Drafting and Design [VIDEO]

SOLIDWORKS® Electrical Drafting Solutions simplify electrical product design with specific tools designed for the engineering discipline and intuitive interfaces for faster design of embedded electrical systems. Native integration with SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD provides better collaboration and productivity, resulting in fewer product delays, more consistent and standardized designs, lower costs, and faster time-to-market.

Learn how SOLIDWORKS Electrical is the future for electrical drafting and design by watching our demonstration video below:

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Boost product innovation

SOLIDWORKS Electrical provides industry recognized design solutions for seamless integration of electrical and mechanical designs allowing your business to:

  • Grow market share and differentiate through groundbreaking product design.
  • Empower your engineering teams with intuitive, powerful electrical design tools that simplify development and bring innovative products to market faster.

Ensure consistent manufacturing and assembly

Including electrical information from the schematic in the 3D model enables detailed planning, visualization, and documentation of the overall product design, helping to ensure consistent assembly from unit to unit.

Shorten time-to-market

Coordinating electrical and mechanical functions enables teams to work in parallel to save time. Specific time-saving benefits include combining mechanical and electrical Bills of Materials (BOMs) to streamline production planning. Along with faster planning of cable/wire/harness paths using the 3D model.

Interested in SOLIDWORKS Electrical?

Get a quote or schedule a custom demonstration of SOLIDWORKS Electrical software

The post SOLIDWORKS Electrical IS the future of Electrical Drafting and Design [VIDEO] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at August 23, 2016 02:14 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The Parts Oblivion

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This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “Outro” from Vulfpeck and work our way through tracks from Tweedy, Palehound, Tennis, Jimi Hendrix, Warpaint and others before wrapping up with “Oh! Sweet Nothing” from The Velvet Underground.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

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Read SolidSmack Radio | The Parts Oblivion at SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at August 23, 2016 02:03 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Design Automation, Not Frustration: Let SOLIDWORKS Electrical Manage Your Part Data

One of the most interesting aspects of working for DS SOLIDWORKS is that we get to meet and learn from the wide range of customers we serve. What is sometimes surprising is how many of them share the same challenges and frustrations. For electrical engineers, whether they’re designing life-saving medical devices, the latest consumer gadgets, or machinery to bag and palletize potato chips, one of the largest challenges is ensuring accuracy of their documentation while still having time to develop a great product.

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From the text on a schematic drawing to the details on the reports, and even down to the labels that will be printed and placed on each device or wire . . . even a “simple” design has a lot of data behind it, and that data must be accurate. For example, a recent project with fewer than 60 electrical components and minimal I/O yielded nearly 2,000 individual bits of data to manage! This is why many electrical engineers have told us that they spend more time creating and proofreading their documentation than they do actually developing and refining their design. As engineers, they would much rather be working to better their design than poring over spreadsheets and text attributes in CAD to ensure accuracy.

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This is where the real value of SOLIDWORKS Electrical is revealed: the software manages all the data… automatically…down to the last cell in a report. To illustrate this, let’s consider a trivial example of swapping one component from ACME Corporation of an equivalent product from BRAND X. We’ll assume that ACME labels its four terminals “A, B, C, D,” while BRAND X labels its “0, 1, 2, 3,” which would look something similar to the workflow steps seen here:

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So it’s obviously faster and more reliable to simply select a properly-defined part in a catalog than to search multiple documents created in multiple applications and update every instance of the affected data. More significant changes yield greater time savings. For example, if I want to change my wire numbering scheme, I can do this with a few clicks and update hundreds or thousands of data fields. In the traditional approach this may take days.

One might ask, though, “What if the part I need isn’t in my database?” Of course, we would have to obtain the specifications for the replacement part, so we’d have to do Step 1 above. In the traditional approach, I’ll update six symbol attributes in CAD, then I’ll update ten entries in three spreadsheets, and I’ll have to enter each bit of data more than once. With SOLIDWORKS Electrical, I enter each field of data only once, saving time and reducing the potential for costly errors.

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Enter part data once in your library once and use the part on any project. Here we can see a lot of valuable procurement and engineering data about the part, from the internal part number and supplier’s stock number, down to the valid wire sizes and associated symbols for each circuit on the part.

The point is, whether you’re designing systems that you consider trivially simple, mind-blowingly complex, or anywhere in between, you can benefit from the automatic data management in SOLIDWORKS Electrical. The key is to populate your library of the parts you need with the relevant data that you’ll include in any report documents.

Don’t be intimidated by this, and don’t worry about putting in all the information initially. You can always add data to the part record as you go and as you discover that you need it. Once you’ve set up a couple parts and seen how much time you save, you’ll never want to go back to the traditional way!

Learn more about how you can better integrate your mechanical and electrical design teams with SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD and SOLIDWORKS Electrical by watching this on-demand webinar “Charge Up the Power on Your Electrical Designs.”

 

Author information

Joseph Wilkie
Joseph Wilkie
Joseph is the SOLIDWORKS Senior Electrical Sales Manager for the Southern US and Mexico.

The post Design Automation, Not Frustration: Let SOLIDWORKS Electrical Manage Your Part Data appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Joseph Wilkie at August 23, 2016 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Edit your SOLIDWORKS Title Block on the fly!

The best practice for populating a SOLIDWORKS title block is to have the fields linked to model custom properties. So when your part or assembly model is dropped into the drawing the title block will be populated automatically.

But not everyone wants to work this way, so let’s assume that you have a part or assembly that does not contain custom property data and you need to make a drawing for it.

One option is to edit the sheet format, double-click on each text box, and type in the information directly. However, editing the sheet format always carries the risk of moving the text around, using the wrong font, and messing up the template settings. Fortunately, there is a better way to fill out the title block without going into the sheet format.

How to Setup the Template

The following steps provide the method to create a template without custom property linking.

Step 1: Right-click on the drawing sheet and select “Edit Sheet Format” from the shortcut menu as shown in the following image:

Edit Sheet Format

Edit Sheet Format

Step 2: Build up a title block table with all the required fields and probably your company logo. Then, add text boxes using the Note command to all fields and leave them empty (see following image). Place the text boxes where you want the final text to appear. You may need to align them properly to be in a column or in the center of each field.

SOLIDWORKS Title Block

Add Text Boxes Using the Note Command

Step 3: Now right-click again on the drawing sheet and select “Title Block Fields…”.

Title Block Fields

Activate Title Block Fields

Step 4: Add the text boxes created in the last step to the title block table. The order of selected boxes is important and for that reason, there is a set of up/down arrow on the left side of the selection space under “Text Fields” to re-arrange the order of the selected text boxes. The order is important because the boxes could be filled out one after the other starting the first text box by hitting “TAB” key.

The settings for scale, sheet number, and other drawing document related information could be set the same way as settings for any other drawing templates. Finally, the drawing template and sheet format could be saved to be recalled later.

4-Select text boxes

Add Text Boxes to Title Block Table

How to Use the New Template

Once the drawing views are in the new template, there is no need to worry about the properties settings at the part/assembly level. Also, there is no need to go into the sheet format. All you need to do is double-click on of the boxes that you added to the Title Block Table. Then, start filling in the boxes and hit the “TAB” key to jump to the next field until. Once all fields are filled out, hit the green check mark to complete the modification. The following images show the steps right after double-clicking on one of the text boxes, filling out the field, and the completed title block.

5-Double Click on the text boxes location

Text Boxes are highlighted by double-clicking on one of them

Note that the whole editing happens in the drawing sheet level. The drawing views are shown but the sheet format content is inaccessible.

6-Fill up the boxes

The Title Block is filled out at the Drawing Sheet level.

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The Title Block after populating the fields

Link to Custom Properties

In this technique as well, the content of the text boxes could be linked to custom properties in the part or assembly file that is inserted into the drawing. For that purpose, when the text boxes were created in the template (step 2), do not leave them empty. Add the custom property text: $PRPSHEET:”NameOfCustomProperty“. The result is that every time you fill out the title block, the custom properties are generated in the associated part/assembly and become updated with the information provided at the drawing level.

Use $PRP Commands in Text Boxes

Use $PRP Commands in Text Boxes

 

The post Edit your SOLIDWORKS Title Block on the fly! appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWP at August 23, 2016 11:00 AM

August 22, 2016

SolidSmack

Can a Paper Saw Blade Actually Cut Wood? (Yes)

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While saw blades come in a multitude of sizes and colors with a range of different kinds of teeth, you surely haven’t seen a saw blade like this for sale at your local hardware store before.

Canada-based woodworker John Heisz recently cut a circular disc/blade from regular ‘ol printer paper (no teeth) and installed it in his table saw for no other reason than to “see what would happen” if he attempted to cut wood with it.

While it’s surely not the most effective way to make a cut, the resulting cuts are remarkably clean for what is essentially the worst paper cut of all time.

“This redefines ‘paper cut’, I guess.”

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    With traditional metal saw blades, the number of teeth on a blade determine how fine of a cut to expect. Meaning, a toothless blade/disc will create (by theory) the finest possible cut. That said, it’s certainly not a fast cut. According to Heisz, sections of his demonstration video were sped up as much as 16 times:

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    Could testing unconventional materials as saw blades be the next Hydraulic Press Channel? Possibly. Just remember to keep your fingers out of the way and stay safe out there, John.

    Read Can a Paper Saw Blade Actually Cut Wood? (Yes) at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 22, 2016 07:01 PM

    The Monday List 34.16 | What We’re Reading This Week

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    Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

    Welcome to The Monday List.

    Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

    What We’re Reading This Week:

    Big Alcohol Tries to Go on a Health Kick
    Companies embrace millennials’ health-obsessed lifestyles.

    01

    Eleven Reasons To Be Excited About The Future of Technology
    “The strongest force propelling human progress has been the swift advance and wide diffusion of technology.”

    02

    Grateful Dead Live On: Why the Legendary Band Still Matters
    Everything you need to know about the new Grateful Dead tribute album curated by members of the National, along with insight on the band’s legacy from artists including Courtney Barnett, Real Estate, and more.

    03

    Uber’s First Self-Driving Fleet Arrives in Pittsburgh This Month
    The autonomous cars, launching this summer, are custom Volvo XC90s, supervised by humans in the driver’s seat.

    04

    This is Your Life in Silicon Valley
    You wake up at 6:30am after an Ambien-induced sleep.

    05

    King of New York
    It turned out that the last thing they wanted was another Elmo to compete with, especially one with real fur.

    06c

    Read The Monday List 34.16 | What We’re Reading This Week at SolidSmack.

    by SolidSmack at August 22, 2016 06:02 PM

    Level Up Your CAD Game Using a Stylus and the Wacom Intuos Pro

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    Whether you’re a next-level design sketching mastermind or a quick-on-your-feet CAD rockstar (or both!), chances are you’ve considered bringing a Wacom tablet into your digital workflow –– if you haven’t done so already. If that’s you, we’ve got a special deal. Up to $100 Off an Intuos Pro Pen & Touch Tablet! Deal ends 8/27/16! (discount shown in cart.)

    With over 2048 levels of pen pressure sensitivity and tilt recognition capabilities, the Intuos Pro Pen & Touch Tablet lets users access all corners of their computing experience with accuracy and precision. For those who work in CAD, industrial designer Adam O’Hern praises working with a stylus and a 3D mouse to alleviate wrist pain. (He uses the Intuos Pro Medium.)

    “In 2006 I gave up using a mouse in favor of a stylus and a SpacePilot,” said O’Hern. “At the time I was driving CATIA all day long, and yet with the SpacePilot in my left hand and a stylus in my right, suddenly my wrist problems went away entirely, and they’ve never come back.”

    SolidSmack has teamed up with Wacom for a limited time offer for our readers to get up to $100 off the purchase of one of the latest Intuos Pro models. (Note: Discount will show up when you view your cart.)

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    Intuos Pro Pen & Touch Tablets (Up to $100 Off)

    Features:

    • Sizes: Small ($30 Off), Medium ($50 Off) and Large ($100 Off)
    • Multi-Touch surface
    • Wacom Pen Technology
    • Wireless capabilities

    Included:

    • Intuos pen and touch tablet
    • Battery-free, pressure-sensitive pen
    • Wireless Kit
    • USB cable
    • Quick start guide
    • Software download instructions
    • Installation CD with driver
    • Online user manual and important product information
    • documentation

    To get started rockin’ and rollin’ with an Intuos Pro tablet, head over to the Wacom Store.
    *Remember! You can get this deal now until Saturday, August 27th. Valid for the Wacom US store only. And remember, the discount will show up on the shopping cart page!

    Read Level Up Your CAD Game Using a Stylus and the Wacom Intuos Pro at SolidSmack.

    by SolidSmack at August 22, 2016 01:32 PM

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    Make sure the SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Task Add-in gets updated!

    When upgrading SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional from one release to another, the Task Add-in does not automatically get upgraded.

    This Add-in should always be upgraded whenever you upgrade the PDM software. This ensures compatibility, and allows you access to any enhancements or fixes that have been added to the Task.

    Here is the process for upgrading the SWTaskAddIn, which runs the default Convert and Print tasks that are included with SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional.

    The four step update process

    Step 1:  First check which version of the Task Add-in is currently being used by your vault.  In the Administration console, expand the “Add-ins” node and double click the SWTaskAddIn to see the current Add-in Version.  In the case here it is the “2014040916” version, which means the Add-in was for Enterprise PDM 2014 SP4.

    Current Version of the SOLIDWORKS Task Add-in

    Current Version of the SOLIDWORKS Task Add-in

    SOLIDWORKS 2016 SP3 has been recently installed, so the Add-in should be upgraded to match that version.

    1 - PDM Version

    Step 2:  Next locate and open one of the tasks included in the SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional installation files.  In the Administration Console, click Open and browse to the installation directory for PDM Professional and into the “Default Data” folder.  The default path will be “C:\Program Files\SOLIDWORKS PDM\Default Data”.  Find one of the three tasks included with PDM Professional, “Convert_gb.cex”, “DesignChecker_gb.cex” or “Print_gb.cex” and open the file.

    Open a Task

    Open a Task

    Step 3:  From the opened file, select the “SWTaskAddIn” (not the task itself, just the AddIn), and drag and drop it onto the existing SWTaskAddIn under the Add-ins node of the Administration console.

    Drag & Drop Task

    Drag & Drop Task

    Click Yes to accept the new task.  This should only be done AFTER upgrading the program itself.  The updated add-in will now work for any of the 3 tasks (Convert, Print or DesignChecker). The updated task is replicated out to any additional Archive Servers and does not need to be run again until the next upgrade.

    Replace Add-in

    Replace Add-in

    Step 4:  You can verify that the clients are using the upgraded Task add in by right clicking on the PDM “blueberry” icon in the Windows Task tray and selecting “Task Host Configuration”.

    Task Host

    Task Host

    The Task add-in version that the client is using will be shown in the Version column.

    Task Host Configuration Version

    Task Host Configuration Version

    The post Make sure the SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Task Add-in gets updated! appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at August 22, 2016 11:00 AM

    August 20, 2016

    SolidSmack

    The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 33.16

    feature-29

    Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

    The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top ten stories on SolidSmack this past week.

    Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

    OpenKnit is the Open-source Machine for Bespoke Clothing Creation

    “It’s a cyberpunk dream to print clothes like vacation photos and TPS reports. Various companies have tried to combine 3D printing with fashion fabrication, like the mildly successful Elctroloom. Cool, but it’s not open-source. However, Gerard Rubio is doing things differently. Inspired by the open-source RepRap 3D printer project and community, along with other digital knit projects, he has brought weaving and 3D printing together with OpenKnit.”

    openknit-digital-loom-00

    FEBCAD AR­ 3D Modeling Software Lets You Model With Different Shapes

    “We’ve been keeping an eye out for VR/AR 3D modeling apps and, surprisingly… there’s not been much activity. Apparently, we’re not in the future yet… yet… yet. There are an increasing number of ways to play in VR, but not so many ways to model in it. FEBCAD AR ­is one of the first that kinda gets us going in that direction, combining AR viewing and interaction into a 3D modeling software that allows you to create right on your desktop.”

    febcad-ar-3d-modeling-app-00

    20 Product Designers You Should Follow on Instagram Right Now

    “Love ’em or just plain don’t have time for ’em, social media platforms are here to stay. While you don’t necessarily need to be an expert at Tweetin’ or Facebookin’, there’s a lot to be gained from staying in contact with old colleagues or finding inspiration for your next side project. Of all of the social media platforms, however, Instagram has become one of the easiest ways to accomplish the basics of sharing and viewing content quickly and easily.”

    feature-7

    Keeping it in the Family | The Story Behind Montana-Based Ruana Knives

    “In need of extra money to help support his family back in the 1930s, Montana welder Rudy Ruana began making knives on the side in a small garage. Before long, his reputation for high-quality handmade knives spread across the United States and what began as a side hustle to help put food on the family’s table became a thriving family business.”

    feature-25

    New Adventures in Package Design: Pizza Boxes Printed with Conductive Ink

    “Nobody will blame you if you’ve never taken a moment to think about the hard science behind a simple pizza delivery. After all, paying the driver and eating the pizza is usually the priority in any situation involving pizza.”

    feature-29

    ELWN Fit is Exactly How Wireless Earbuds Should Be Designed

    “Music. Just what you need to get you through a tough task. It’s why we bring you SolidSmack Radio each week. What’s keeping you from enjoying that? The right pair of headphones. If it’s not tangled wires, it’s battery life. If it’s not battery life, it’s someone yappin’ in your face. The first two issues is what Utah-based ELWN hopes to tackle with their new FIT earbuds. Wireless earbuds, mind you.”

    elwyn-fit-wireless-earbuds-design-00

    Read The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 33.16 at SolidSmack.

    by SolidSmack at August 20, 2016 10:00 AM

    August 19, 2016

    SolidSmack

    Autodesk Announces Gift of $25,000 in Product Design Software for Every Fab Lab

    feature

    When it comes to equipping tomorrow’s designers and engineers with the tools they need to create compelling projects today, few companies have been as generous in offering access to software, tools and even fabrication facilities as Autodesk has.

    While the company’s Fusion 360 design software has always been free to use for students and those who otherwise don’t use it for commercial projects, they recently expanded their generous offer to include their entire Product Design Collection to those on the Fab Foundation‘s global network of workshops and makerspaces. Facilities that qualify for the $2,460 per year collection will each be granted 10 licenses –– or approximately $25,000 per year to access Autodesk’s leading design and engineering software tools.

    “At each step of the way, we are learning more about how best to support Fab Labs so we can improve and deepen our relationship,” explains Autodesk’s Rama Dunayevich, Senior Manager of Brand Partnerships. “We are using an initial one-year renewable subscription term to collect feedback and data to be in a better position to consider further expansions, refinements and customization based on that data.”

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eaVb4NiVazM?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    In total, the Product Design Collection includes 14 software programs and utilities that cover the full end-to-end product design process:

    • 3ds Max
    • AutoCAD
    • AutoCAD Architecture
    • AutoCAD Electrical
    • AutoCAD Mechanical
    • AutoCAD 360 Pro
    • Fusion 360
    • Inventor Professional
    • Navisworks Manage
    • ReCap 360 Pro
    • Rendering in A360
    • Vault Basic
    • Cloud storage (25 GB)
    • Factory Design Utilities

    To qualify as a registered Fab Lab on the Fab Foundation’s network of global Fab Labs, a facility must include at least five different types of fabrication tools and be free and open to the public part-time. Those interested can apply for the Product Design Collection now.

    Read Autodesk Announces Gift of $25,000 in Product Design Software for Every Fab Lab at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 19, 2016 04:05 PM

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    Learn how to design your Printed Circuit Boards with SOLIDWORKS [VIDEO]

    SOLIDWORKS PCB is a new software offering focused on bringing the mechanical and electrical worlds closer together. You can not only develop the mechanical parts of your product in SOLIDWORKS but also design your printed circuit boards. SOLDWORKS PCB has been engineered specifically for SOLIDWORKS collaboration. Combining the best technology in PCB design with an easy-to-use interface and linking it with SOLIDWORKS CAD provides an efficient design experience that gets your PCBs done quickly and easily — just what you need when PCBs are an essential part of your product design workflow.

    Discover how to use SOLIDWORKS PCB in our recorded webinar included below:

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZSeaUn_9Ulg?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

    Learn more about SOLIDWORKS PCB

    Read our recent blog posts for demo videos, images, and detailed explanations to help you understand the benefits of using SOLIDWORKS PCB for printed circuit boards. Or call 1-877-219-6757 and speak to an electrical expert.

    The post Learn how to design your Printed Circuit Boards with SOLIDWORKS [VIDEO] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Rod Mackay at August 19, 2016 03:54 PM

    The SOLIDWORKS Blog

    DraftSight LIVE 2017 Call For Presentations

    Calling all 2D CAD and drafting experts, come share your knowledge and expertise as a presenter at DraftSight LIVE!

    What is DraftSight LIVE?

    New this year, DraftSight LIVE is a user conference hosted by SolidWorks. DraftSight is a powerful, professional-grade 2D design and drafting software solution which provides a robust design experience. This conference gives DraftSight users worldwide the opportunity to get together in one location to attend technical breakout sessions, see presentations and network with like-minded people. You will want to attend if you are an architect, engineer, construction service provider, professional CAD user, educator, or hobbyist.

    attendees

    When and where is DraftSight LIVE?

    DraftSight LIVE will be held at SOLIDWORKS World on February 7, 2017 at the Los Angeles Convention Center, Los Angeles, CA. SOLIDWORKS World and DraftSight LIVE are sponsored by SolidWorks.

    How is it going to benefit me if I submit a presentation idea?

    Get recognition as a DraftSight LIVE speaker. When you submit a presentation idea and it gets accepted SolidWorks will pay for your entry fee into DraftSight LIVE.

    Submitting a Presentation Proposal

    Submitting a presentation proposal is easy. Simply go to the SOLIDWORKS World 2017 call for papers online registration page and create an account.

    Select “Submit a New Presentation” and fill out the form with your presentation details. Make sure you select the “DraftSight” session category.

    cfp_page_submission

    cfp_page_submission1

    When is the deadline for submissions?

    The deadline for submissions is September 30, 2016 so send your proposal soon – space is limited.

    We are excited to welcome our 2D design and drafting community to SOLIDWORKS World 2017 and can’t wait to see your presentation proposals.

    Thank you for taking the time to submit a presentation for consideration and we hope to see you at DraftSight LIVE on February 7, 2017.

    DraftSight-MasterLogo-grey

    Author information

    SOLIDWORKS
    Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

    The post DraftSight LIVE 2017 Call For Presentations appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

    by SOLIDWORKS at August 19, 2016 03:29 PM

    SolidSmack

    M3D Heats Things Up (Literally) With the M3D Pro 3D Printer

    m3d-pro-3d-printer-00

    Maryland-based startup M3D gained fame back in 2014 when they successfully crowdfunded their Micro 3D printer on Kickstarter in a matter of minutes (surpassing their goal of $50K and ending with over $3.4M). The fledgling company is hoping for a repeat performance with their latest edition of their 3D printer lineup–the M3D Pro, which again, has already surpassed their initial goal of $100K with over $300K in and more than a month left to go.

    The M3D Pro is expected to retail for $499, however the increase in price over the Micro’s $350 is acceptable considering the number of features the new box has over its predecessor. According to M3D’s Kickstarter page, the company took two years to develop the Pro, taking feedback from their online community for the new 3D printers feature set. So what does the Pro pack under the hood that makes it better than the Micro?

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/y1mTxGInKOw?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    Unlike other 3D printers, the M3D Pro comes packed with two ARM-Core processors that act as a ‘smart’ controller for, not only the printer, but a network of over two-dozen sensors, which act as a monitoring/feedback platform for everything from filament usage to temperature and power levels. What’s interesting with this feature is how the Pro, equipped with lightweight motors to drive the printer, extracts data from the sensors to adjust the speed on all motion axes, which allows it to reach speeds of up to 150mm/s. What’s more, sensor data is stored locally when power begins to fluctuate and can be recovered if power is lost completely, allowing it to continue the print from where it left off.

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/z8-_ChNSGik?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    Putting speed aside, the M3D Pro features a new heated print bed, tempered heated glass that automatically adjust temperature for a more consistent printing experience. On top of this, there’s a larger build volume of 7 X 7 X 7.5-inches and a tighter layerh eight of 25-350 microns, depending on the project requirements. It can also accept all industry standard 1.75mm filaments, making it easy for users who prefer their own third-party print materials.

    On the software side, the M3D Pro comes standard with M3D’s own in-house platform (powered by Cura) that features a tutorial mode allowing users to learn the printers many features. It’s also compatible with many open-source slicers as well including Simplify3D and Octoprint, which allows users an air of familiarity while working with a new machine.

    Additional specs on M3D’s Pro 3D printer can be found on their Kickstarter campaign page here and those interested in getting in on the early product tier can pledge $499 and up (sorry no more @ $399), which nets you the printer and no extras (at this point). Ship date is set for March 2017 and with meeting the unexpected demand on their first 3D printer project, this looks to be another successful product launch by the crew at M3D.

    m3d-pro-3d-printer-01

    m3d-pro-3d-printer-02

    Read M3D Heats Things Up (Literally) With the M3D Pro 3D Printer at SolidSmack.

    by Cabe Atwell at August 19, 2016 03:27 PM

    This Incredible Picture Frame Uses a Clever Lighting Trick to Slow Down Time

    feature

    With four finished degrees from MIT (BS: Physics, Math, MS: Mech. Engineering, Media Arts and Sciences), scientist and engineer Jeff Lieberman knows a thing or two about –– well, a lot of things. As the host of the TV show ‘Time Warp’ on the Discovery Channel, his interest in the human consciousness took him down a long road exploring events that happen too quickly for the naked eye to register using state-of-the-art camera equipment and editing techniques.

    It is somewhere along that same road of exploring the art of bending time where Lieberman conceived of his latest –– and perhaps most ambitious –– project to date: a picture frame that appears to slow down time in real-time.

    For Slow Dance, Lieberman tapped into the same editing techniques and camera work that made the content of his TV show so mesmerizing to watch to make random objects move in such a way that they appear to be controlled by slowed down time.

    “By taking advantage of the limits of human visual perception, this optical illusion sculpture appears to be doing the impossible — right before your eyes,” explains Lieberman. “Slow Dance combines technology, science, and art, in order to remind us of the natural mystery, beauty, and wonder that surround us every day.”

    <iframe frameborder="0" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/xercyn/slow-dance-a-frame-that-slows-down-time/widget/video.html" width="800"> </iframe>

    While recording something using state-of-the-art camera technology and manipulating the footage is one thing, creating the same effect in the physical universe is an entirely different beast that taps into a phenomenon called persistence of vision.

    Prototyping_full

    Using high-speed strobe lights blinking 80 times a second (faster than the naked human eye is capable of seeing), the picture frame creates the visual illusion of the objects moving in slow motion. When combined with various timing manipulations to the strobe lights, the objects appear to jump into new positions near–instantaneously. The resulting visual spectacle really does appear as if time has stood still within the four walls of the picture frame.

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/176100733" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="800"></iframe>

    “This piece is a metaphor for all the unseen aspects of reality that are affecting us all the time,” adds Lieberman. “It expresses a desire to remind me, and anyone who uses it, that there is something beyond what we see with our senses — that there is this entire reality beyond human comprehension.”

    Over two years in development (and originally conceived of as a wedding present for his best friend), Lieberman is putting Slow Dance on Kickstarter to give everybody else the opportunity to slow down time, too.

    Early bird specials for Slow Dance will be offered as low as $199, with shipping expected in early 2017.

    Read This Incredible Picture Frame Uses a Clever Lighting Trick to Slow Down Time at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 19, 2016 03:17 PM

    Friday Smackdown: Wood Keggin’ Bebop

    Ivan-Smirnov-art

    Crooked fence posts propped up its torso and surly demeanor, clanking a grin as spindles and pumps whirred beneath the translucent neck skin. A movement would send tremors, with keg like mechanisms hitting the ground and spreading light from the cracks of these links.

    Ivan Smirnov – Super playful, colorful scenes full of all sorts of interesting characters, robots, ships, subs, vehicles and aircraft.

    Hot Wheels Roadtrip – This is all kinds of brilliant and so well executed. A GoPro Hero4 Session strapped to the top of a Hot Wheels car.

    Make it Stranger – Enjoy the Stranger Things series? Well, you’ll enjoy this site to make your own Stranger Things logo with the beautiful Benguiat typeface.

    Kitten Wedding – There’s nothing like seeing the odd sculptures of an eccentric taxidermist up close. You’ll want to see more photos of his work too.

    Parisian Floors – Photgrapher Sebastian Frras likes to travel and likes to take photos of strange and wonderful floors. Over 400 more on the Parisianfloors Instagram.

    Destino – Did you know about this? In 1945 Walt Disney and Salvador Dali collaborated on an amazing shortfilm that melds the two styles together perfectly.

    Spaceplan – is ‘an incrementally themed experimental piece of interaction based partly on Jake Hollands’ total misunderstanding of Stephen Hawking’s A Brief History of Time.’ Thanks Ian.

    Fav Deals This Week!
    Deals to good to pass up for this week–That GoPro in the video above, Sugru, a sweet LED desk lamp, a must have battery case and awesome deal on a camera drone!
    GoPro Hero4 Session ($199)
    Sugru Moldable Glue (36% Off)
    LE Dimmable LED Desk Lamp (62% Off)
    Mophie Juice Pack Battery Case (50% Off)
    Voyager Drone with HD Camera (50% Off)

    Way Down We Go – The Icelandic group has a debut album and a debut song. This is the video. Or watch the one where they play the song Þríhnúkagígur volcano.

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0-7IHOXkiV8?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    Read Friday Smackdown: Wood Keggin’ Bebop at SolidSmack.

    by Josh Mings at August 19, 2016 03:05 PM

    Every Model Shop Should Have Frank Howarth’s Clever Orbiting Time Lapse Camera Rig

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    When it comes to documenting a build, few people can top Frank Howarth’s creative use of camera shots and storylines to make otherwise mundane processes seem like Hollywood handiwork. And like any skilled videographer, Howarth spends just as much time building his own rigs for specific shots as he does actually filming them.

    Most recently, the Oregon-based woodworker built what is quite possibly his most impressive rig yet in the form of the Orbiting Time Lapse Camera Rig. Designed to rotate around a fixed point while documenting a process via time lapse, Howarth built the rig in true Howarth fashion –– out of CNC-cut wood parts.

    Says Howarth:

    “(This) camera rig allows me to shoot a time lapse while moving slowly and smoothly around a subject. I built a 1:100 gear reduction with two 80 tooth gears and two 8 tooth gears. The gears were cut out on the CNC router from ½ inch birch plywood. This gear reduction is between a variable speed motor and a camera boom. This allows the camera boom to rotate at a very slow speed.”

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fHWJTVCOhBs?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    Read Every Model Shop Should Have Frank Howarth’s Clever Orbiting Time Lapse Camera Rig at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 19, 2016 02:25 PM

    This Engineering Student Recycles Old Junk Into High-Speed Racing Machines

    feature

    Few things are as enticing to young engineering students as the opportunity to build their own go-karts from scratch, and 18-year-old engineering student Jasper Edwards is living the dream.

    The UK-based engineer, who works out of his own garage, creates his karts starting with shopping carts and wheelchairs scavenged from local junkyards. Using the existing form factors, Edwards then outfits the karts with motors to propel them at speeds of up to 50 MPH. If this isn’t one of the best and most entertaining use cases for upcycling, then I don’t know what is.

    In this short documentary made by members of the Edwards family, Jasper gives us further insight into the satisfaction one finds when riding on something you built yourself:

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ruVbYkVym2w?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    Frankly, we just can’t wait to see what happens if Jasper and fellow UK-based garage inventor Colin Furze ever meet up.

    Read This Engineering Student Recycles Old Junk Into High-Speed Racing Machines at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 19, 2016 01:31 PM

    The SOLIDWORKS Blog

    Industrial Equipment Design From Start to Finish in Five Easy Steps with SOLIDWORKS

    Whether the proposal comes as an internal idea or a customer request for a new product, industrial equipment manufacturers experience intense pressure to deliver a fully functioning product when it ships out the door. Using an integrated product development solution, like SOLIDWORKS, can help them accelerate time to market, while reducing costs and ensuring greater safety and reliability of machines.

    196_Kuka (2)

    SOLIDWORKS can help engineers and machine designers streamline the development of industrial equipment as they go through each step of the design-to-manufacturing process shown below. Click on image to see full-size infographic.

    dassault_workflow_final.jpg

    SOLIDWORKS assists users in every step in the process by enabling them to:

    • Assemble a team to review the proposal request. Your team of engineers, purchasing and manufacturing must work together to answer several questions about how to address the design challenge and whether existing assets can be leveraged. SOLIDWORKS PDM is one piece of this puzzle.
    • Once you answer the questions, you can easily develop the proposal using SOLIDWORKS tools for configurations, risk assessment, cost estimations and product drawings and animations.
    • When the proposal has been accepted, a detailed design team can work concurrently to finalize the design, integrate electrical components, verify performance, manage design data and collaborate with manufacturing.
    • Getting to manufacturing, whether in house or at a separate facility, is easy with SOLIDWORKS tools that leverage your CAD data to output the specific information needed by manufacturing and for the shop floor. You can also provide 3D product manufacturing information (PMI) and automate creation of inspection documents.
    • Finally, the existing 3D design data can be re-purposed to rapidly create high-quality graphical assets to create user manuals, field repair documentation and marketing content to promote your product.

    These are just a few examples of how SOLIDWORKS plays a role throughout the process. Check out the infographic to see the Industrial Equipment workflow in action.

    Learn more about the individual products that contribute to the integrated design to manufacturing process with demo videos on the Industrial Equipment Library.

    Author information

    Kristen Wilson
    Kristen Wilson
    Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, SolidWorks at Dassault Systemes
    Senior Brand Offer Marketing Manager, Dassault Systemes SolidWorks. PR flack turned marketer, tech geek and football fan.

    The post Industrial Equipment Design From Start to Finish in Five Easy Steps with SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

    by Kristen Wilson at August 19, 2016 01:00 PM

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    How to control the visibility of bodies in your SOLIDWORKS Drawing Views

    In a SOLIDWORKS drawing, hiding/showing bodies can affect one view or all views.

    Hide/Show a body from all views

    Hiding/showing a body from the FeatureManager affects all views in the drawing and changes the visibility of the body in the model:

    solidworks drawing view body

    Hiding a body from the FeatureManager affects the model and all views

    Body Hidden in All Views and in the Model

    Body Hidden in All Views and in the Model

     

    Hide/show a body from a single view

    Hiding bodies from the view context menu applies to that view only:

    Hide Body

    Body is hidden only in the view in which the selection was made

     

    Body Hidden in One View

    Body Hidden in One View

    Restore hidden bodies

    A SOLIDWORKS drawing view body hidden in the view will be listed in View Properties, under Show/Hide Hidden Bodies.  To make a hidden body visible, delete it from the list of excluded bodies:

    Show Bodies

    Show Bodies

    The post How to control the visibility of bodies in your SOLIDWORKS Drawing Views appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Sanja Srzic at August 19, 2016 12:00 PM

    August 18, 2016

    SolidSmack

    3D Printing Can Enable Amazing Things

    3d-printing-fabbaloo-one-small-step-00

    Some say 3D printing is not useful and is dying, but in fact our world is being slowly changed in fundamental ways behind the scenes.

    In factories around the world, designers and manufacturers are exploring the advantages of 3D print technology, trying to find ways to optimize their work. With the recent increase in awareness of metal 3D printing technology have come a number of components for powerful new applications.

    Perhaps one of the most profound applications I’ve recently seen is that of SpaceX. The company has been extensively using metal 3D printing to build stronger and lighter components for their series of rockets.

    That makes intuitive sense; if you’re attempting to lift things high, you want lighter parts with the same – or better – strength.

    But that is a rather abstract understanding of the benefits. Let’s examine something very specific.

    spacex-raptor-engine-wikipediaSpaceX Raptor Engine – Wikipedia

    SpaceX has been testing a newly developed engine for their future line of rockets, the Raptor. This engine, according to a report on NextBigFuture, includes a very sophisticated turbo pump. That’s the component that delivers fuel and oxidizer at an extremely fast rate to the combustion chamber. They explain:

    Raptor will utilize a full-flow staged combustion cycle, where 100 percent of the oxidizer—with a low-fuel ratio—will power the oxygen turbine pump, and 100 percent of the fuel—with a low-oxygen ratio—will power the methane turbine pump. Both streams—oxidizer and fuel—will be completely in the gas phase before they enter the combustion chamber.
    What this means is that this engine is far more powerful and efficient than previous generations.

    It was made possible through the use of metal 3D printing, which created many of the critical components. And that also sped up the development process, too.

    But let’s take this forward a bit. The Raptor engine is designed to be used on SpaceX’s future “super heavy-lift” booster, capable of sending up to 100 tonnes to the surface of Mars.
    SpaceX has hinted at what those 100 tonnes might be: a “transporter” for human colonization of that planet.

    It’s almost science fiction, but no, it’s real. SpaceX really intends on sending us to Mars with their Mars Colonial Transporter.

    Which will be powered by the Raptor rocket engine.

    Which was made possible by 3D printing.

    Yes, 3D printers can produce many plastic dragons, but they can also send us on impossible journeys. One that produces the next big footprint.

    Read more at Fabbaloo

    Read 3D Printing Can Enable Amazing Things at SolidSmack.

    by Fabbaloo at August 18, 2016 08:05 PM

    Gaze Standing Smart Desk Design Takes the Thinking Out of Sitting and Standing

    gaze-standing-smart-desk-00

    You could do worse than designing a new standing desk. And there seem to be enough new ways to approach standing to keep the options coming out. Gaze Lab thinks there’s a smarter way to manage desk fit and screen placement. With the Gaze Desk they want to solve these problems and then some, making it the smartest smart desk on the market.

    The Gaze Desk has a motorized, adjustable dual-tier design, but most sit-and-stand desks adjust for sitting and standing, right? Well, Gaze approaches this a little differently. The desk incorporates a dual mechanical lift design to control the front and back tiers separate from or together with each other. A dial on the desk lets you adjust the height of each, but beyond this it gets a bit futuristic. Tied to a companion smartphone app, it can be programmed to adjust the desk automatically for you, throughout the day, based on your settings. It can be tied in with other Internet of Things (IoT) devices, like smartlamps or sensors, to send notifications or be notified of your presence. They plan to provide a foot pad, to sense your standing position and suggest adjustments, and a height lamp, to automatically capture height and adjust the desk accordingly.

    The difference truly comes together in the smartphone app. Tied to the desk via Bluetooth, the app allows you to set reminders/notifications and tracks your sitting/standing routine, all while calculating your calorie loss. You have custom preset control, stats, and that fancy IoT compatibility through the app. On top of this, there are standing routine achievements badges, encouraging you to stick to your routine and provide tangible feedback on your progress. And yes, you can tie it in with social media to compete with friends or share (brag) about how much/little you’re standing.

    The design also stands out on it’s own with four different smart desk material options, with additional color options, in either a single or dual tier configuration. The basic version is very close to the bamboo top, single surface Uplift desk design–minimal and sleek with controls just under the front desktop edge. From there, you have desktop material options for MDF, wood veneer, whiteboard or hardwood. The Gaze dDesk Kickstarter campaign is halfway to a $100,000 goal with pledge prices ranging from $359 to $1,699 USD, depending on features and options, and shipping as early as October 2016.

    The Gaze wins big with smartphone reminders and notifications. As most of us at SolidSmack use standing desks, we find it all too easy to pull off the standing desk routine for a week and then return to old habits. Not to say it won’t happen with this desk, but it’s a step in the right direction. But a desk that has a mind of its own? What would you do if your desk suddenly started switching to standing mode? Stand up, I suppose. I suspect a few screams of “Noooo! Noo! Stop!” in there.

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    Read Gaze Standing Smart Desk Design Takes the Thinking Out of Sitting and Standing at SolidSmack.

    by Cabe Atwell at August 18, 2016 01:04 PM

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    How to customize the SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Convert Task for unsupported file types

    The default SOLIDWORKS Convert Task in PDM Professional (tasks are not available in SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard) allows you to export to many different file types.

    Unfortunately, at this time, .smg files (for SOLIDWORKS Composer) are not one of the supported file types.

    However, the SOLIDWORKS Convert Task is also HIGHLY customizable, so while we don’t have the option to output to .smg in the task interface, with a few script changes we can make our own task to do this.

    Customized Convert Task Steps

    Here are the steps to create a custom convert task to produce Composer .smg files

    Step 1:  Right-click on the Convert Task and select “Copy”

    Copy SOLIDWORKS Convert Task

    Copy Task

    Step 2:  Double click the new copy of the task that is created to begin editing it.  Start by renaming the custom task.

    Enter a Name

    Enter a Name

    Step 3:  On the “Execution Method” screen, make sure that the task is set up to run only on systems that have the SOLIDWORKS Composer Player software installed.

    Task System

    Task System

    Step 4:  On the “Menu Command” screen, adjust the task’s label in the Right Click menu.

    Right-click Menu Command

    Right-click Menu Command

    Step 5:  On the “Conversion Settings” screen, ANY output file format can be selected, we will specify the .smg file output directly in the task script next.

    Conversion Settings

    Conversion Settings

     

    Step 6:  On the “Output File Details” screen, click the “Advanced Scripting Options …” button.

    Task Details

    Task Details

    Step 7:  Find and comment out the line ext = GetExtension(docType, “[FileFormat]”) by adding a ‘ at the beginning.  Next, immediately below add the line ext = GetExtension(docType, “(*.smg)”)

    Edit the script

    Edit the script

    Step 8:  Find the lines near the end of the script:

    Else
      bIsSupportedExtension = False

    Immediately above this add the lines:

    ElseIf docFileName = "smg" Then
      bIsSupporterExtension = True
    New lines added

    New lines added

    Step 9:  Verify the location of the file composersolidworksplug-in.dll.  By default it will be in the folder C:\Program Files\SolidWorks Corp\Composer\Plugins\solidworks, however if SOLIDWORKS was installed to a different root directory, such as SOLIDWORKS 2016 instead of SolidWorks Corp, the path may be different.

    If you are using 2014 or older, the plugin name is 3DViaSolidWorksPlug-in.dll

    dll location

    dll location

     

    Step 10:  Find the line:  Convert docFileName  

    Immediately above this add the line:

    AddInStatus = swApp.LoadAddIn(“C:\Program Files\SolidWorks Corp\Composer\Plugins\solidworks\composersolidworksplug-in.dll”)

    Change the path shown in the line above if the path to the .dll on the system that will run the task is different.  Ensure that ALL systems that will act as hosts for this task have the same path to the plugin.

    Add another line

    Add another line

    Once the task is set up, you can now either launch the task from a right-click menu, or you can trigger it automatically from a Workflow Transition.

    The post How to customize the SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Convert Task for unsupported file types appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at August 18, 2016 12:00 PM

    August 17, 2016

    SolidSmack

    The ALPAKA 7ven Messenger Bag [Review]

    7ven-messenger-bag-solidsmack-00

    I bet you have one bag you really love. And then an excess of other bags you don’t use at all. If you collect the goody bags at your favorite Tech/CAD conference each year, you probably have a massive stack o’ bag history in your closet. “I’ve made them into a bed. I SLEEP ON THEM.” I believe you. Some would say you can’t have enough bags, but I’ve found a bag, a messenger bag, that may be the everyday bag you’re looking for.

    I’m not a messenger bag guy. Whenever there’s a choice between backpack and shoulder bag, I opt for the pack. Now, after ALPAKA sent over their new 7ven Messenger bag, I’m going through some deeply emotional turmoil, my old backpack (with steel-cable reinforced handle!) staring at me from the corner of the office with saggy mesh eye-bags of horror.

    The problem I’ve had with messenger bags is a messy array of wanton necessity, too little space and a smattering of this-is-so-tweakin-my-style. Too business, too small, too brown, too tall. (I do not like them, like them at all!) And once I found a backpack that fit a 17″ laptop, well, that was just a magical moment. *pause for sunset beach moment*

    sunset beach scene with backpack

    Then this guy shows up…

    7ven-messenger-bag-solidsmack-01

    Not that guy with the stripped shirt and over abundance of ‘you want this’ in his eye sockets, but the bag–that thing showed up. As you can see it’s about the width of a medium-sized man’s medium-sized chest and looks exactly like… a bag. OR DOES IT. It does.

    Well, that’s where the comparison can stop – except to say that, yeah, it has compartments like bags, and straps like bags, and even those cute, little hidden spots you can stash your ultra-healthy homemade granola chucks in, like bags. But after that, the comparison stops. Here’s the big, massive DETAILS list.

    7ven-messenger-bag-solidsmack-02

    So, as you can see, LOADS of pockets and things, but I’ll point out the highlights that, to me, make all the difference in the world. First, it has pockets right where you need them when you’re messenger baggin’ about. You’ve got one on the strap, perfect for a quick stash o’ cash, but not a phone. There’s a ‘secret’ side compartment for that phone or a quick access pocket on the flap that is somehow positioned perfectly to access even when it’s swung to your back. It has the fairly common luggage sleeve that, if just a wee bit larger, could also sleeve a skateboard. In the design they’ve considered locations for water bottles, sunglasses, headphone, external drives, power adapters and even a tripod.

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    The fastening bits are a first I’ve seen on a bag though. It has ‘silent’ Velcro that may wake a baby, but won’t interrupt your boss at the morning meeting when you go for that day-old breakfast sandwich stashed in the front pocket. You know those plastic pinch-latches? You won’t see those on this bag. Instead, the main flap clasp and tripod straps use magnetic latches that make you want to annoy others by playing with it repeatedly whilst discussing varieties of mustache waxes. Best of all though, it has an additional shoulder harness strap that wraps under your arm to attach to the main shoulder strap to keep the bag from swinging around in front of you.

    7ven-messenger-bag-solidsmack-06

    And apparently it provides the ability to run horizontally on a shiny red walls at high speeds…

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    And hang from bridges long enough for your freinds to catch an impressive pose to share on the Instagrams (can I let go now? now? did you get it? now?)…

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    There’s something both odd and amazing about the design of this bag. The triangular shape lends itself to sitting up without tipping and laying against your body better, all while maintaining the storage capacity. It holds so much while at the same time looks like you’ve put nothing in it at all. I wanted to drop my 17″ workstation laptop in the bag’s large compartment. I was convinced it wasn’t going to fit. It gobbled up the lappy like it was a syrup drenched Parisian crêpe… AND ASKED FOR MORE. So I added a 15″ laptop, both power adapters, two Kindles, an iPad, AND a bag of Cheez-Its–All fit with room to spare.

    I’ve had this bag for a week, 98% sure I’ve not found every compartment and use, but certain it’s the bag I’ll be using for years to come. It’s likely this bag will hold more weight than you can comfortably carry. It’s sturdy enough for it, if you are. Now, I’m looking forward to taking this out a bit, leaving my backpack to sulk in the corner, while I”m gallivanting around with a bag that fits my needs, has plenty of space and totally doesn’t tweak the style.

    The 7ven Messenger bag is now available on Kickstarter with an earlybird price of $139 ($90 off their estimated retail price) with ship date of December 2016.

    Have a question about it? What else I find useful? What else it can fit? Hit the comments and let me know. Now, onto the dramatic staring off in the distance shots.

    7ven-messenger-bag-solidsmack-09

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    Read The ALPAKA 7ven Messenger Bag [Review] at SolidSmack.

    by Josh Mings at August 17, 2016 09:44 PM

    Graphics Systems SolidNotes

    SOLIDWORKS Electrical Time Savers

    SOLIDWORKS releases five Service Packs each year to address user needs. Along with improving the software, there is often added functionality and fully functional features that may go unnoticed until, well, you notice them. Here are a few things you may not have seen bundled in recent service packs that are MORE than worth your time. These LITTLE time savers add up over the long haul - BIG TIME!

    1)  The TAB key works in TONS of places!  Click, click...while building up your libraries?  Now you can fly through all the text fields when setting up properties for your parts, symbols, title blocks and more! Now, what to do with all that time you'll save on clicks!

     

    2)  When working in your Manufacturer Parts Manager, you already know you can import part info from an Excel sheet, copy/paste a part to save time, but now you can copy a part and ONLY paste in the circuits of that part to another part. Have multiple manufacturers with similar parts? Or, adding a new part standard based on pricing?

      SOLIDWORKS Manufacturer Parts Manager


    3)  A new field and corresponding part attribute are now available: Reference Series. You can add that information to your part properties, and display the series in your symbols with the attribute #REF_SERIES.

    SOLIDWORKS Reference Series

    SOLIDWORKS Reference Series Part

    4)  The last one (a look behind the curtain of what's ahead for 2017), is a brand new feature called "Excel Automation". The feature saves you time by defining massive portions of your design simply and repeatably in an Excel Spreadsheet!  The big news is, you don't have to wait, it's right there in SP03 of 2016. Expect more information about this feature to surface as 2017 release becomes official this fall, but in the meantime, experiment and see how it can automatically generate pages of schematics with Macros placed according to your Spreadsheet TEMPLATE (Download TEST_automation_template).  The basics of this feature are that you define a name of a Macro in your library, along with its insertion point coordinates, give the sheet a number and a name description.  Choose the Excel file from the Excel Automation command, and watch it generate drawings automatically!  This is just another way you can leverage known working designs along with the SMARTS of SOLIDWORKS Electrical.

    SOLIDWORKS Excel Automation Excel Automation Template

    by Evan Stanek at August 17, 2016 08:04 PM

    SOLIDWORKS 2016 Makes Selecting Identical Components in an Assembly a Snap!

    By: John Setzer, Training Coordinator

    Enhancements in SOLIDWORKS 2016 make picking similar components in an assembly a snap! Just use the new "Select Identical Components" command found in the Selection tool fly out:

    SOLIDWORKS 2016 - Select Identical Components

    Getting Started

    Once you start the tool, there's an option in the Property Manager to Match configuration names. If this is checked, then only components with the same name AND same configuration will be selected.

    image from https://s3.amazonaws.com/feather-client-files-aviary-prod-us-east-1/2016-07-13/c2a9c4b8cf874d918427fa73e6f7166c.png

    In the example below, we have three instances of a part named pin_&. When Select Identical Components is run with Match configuration names active, selecting one of the SHORT pins will result in the two SHORT pins being selected, but not the LONG pin.

    SOLIDWORKS 2016 Selecting Identical Components Example

    If you clear "Match configuration names," you will get a different behavior. Instead, all components of the same name will be picked regardless of configuration, so all pins will be selected.

    SOLIDWORKS 2016 Match configuration names option

    Note: if you pre-select a part you won't get the Property Manager. Instead, SOLIDWORKS will use the last setting used for the Match configuration names option. I find this command extremely handy and I have customized my system so the Selection tool flyout is on my pop-up toolbars. (Remember, you can customize these as of SOLIDWORKS 2015!)

    SOLIDWORKS 2016 Customized Toolbar

    To add this button to your pop-up toolbar, select a component in an assembly to bring up the pop-up, then right-click on the pop-up and choose "Customize." From there you can go to the Standard page under the Commands tab, and drag and drop the Selection Flyout tool onto your pop-up toolbar. Now, this handy new command will always be at your fingertips when you select a part in an assembly!

    SOLIDWORKS 2016 Customizing Toolbar

    SOLIDWORKS 2016 Customizing Toolbar

    by John Setzer at August 17, 2016 06:41 PM

    SolidSmack

    Model of the Week: LEGO Technic Porsche 911 [Dream Car!]

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    One of my 200 dream cars begins with Porsche and ends with 911 GT3 RS. Until I can sell enough plasma to purchase a used one that needs the rusted out floorboard replaced, I’ll settle for the highly prized 1:8 scale LEGO Technic version. And until one of you buy that and ship it to me, I’ll settle for gazing up this 3D model of the beautifully bricked out Porsche 911 FT3 RS, built by GrabCAD user DK.

    DKs byline is “A single D, for that single dose of pimpin'” which is absolutely accurate. He’s been using Autodesk Inventor since R4 and claims that “Chicks dig guys who make stuff” which we won’t argue with. at. all. because IT’S TRUE. He churns out all sorts of LEGO models–highly accurate LEGO models–and has the process down to an art in Inventor, even to the point of creating an Inventor LEGO tools Library.

    The Porsche model is just beautiful in every way. He has all 228 numbered LEGO pieces, including engine and interior details, plus decals. For those without Inventor, he has included a STEP file – you provide the giddy laughter after opening it up in your modeling software to explore. Though I usually share items that can be 3D printed, this would be wonderful to use in creating some renderings, building some alternate assemblies or adding in a small, 1:8 scale 3D representation of yourself.

    You can download the files on GrabCAD! (Bonus! Grab one of his other LEGO models here!)

    (OH, and here’s that link to the actual LEGO Technic Porsche 911, in case you wanted it or, ya know, wanted to ship one over.)

    Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

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    Read Model of the Week: LEGO Technic Porsche 911 [Dream Car!] at SolidSmack.

    by Josh Mings at August 17, 2016 04:49 PM

    ELWN Fit is Exactly How Wireless Earbuds Should Be Designed

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    Music. Just what you need to get you through a tough task. It’s why we bring you SolidSmack Radio each week. What’s keeping you from enjoying that? The right pair of headphones. If it’s not tangled wires, it’s battery life. If it’s not battery life, it’s someone yappin’ in your face. The first two issues is what Utah-based ELWN hopes to tackle with their new FIT earbuds. Wireless earbuds, mind you.

    ELWN FIT earbuds are designed specifically to enable extended battery life and be the most comfortable fit. For taking in your tunes, watching your work out videos or receiving calls, ELWN promises to provide “endless” hours of run-time. Well, not exactly endless. The earbuds offer 3.5 hours of playback, extended with the “Infinity Band” charger, which brings another 6.5 hours when plugged in. So, keep the headphones charged, endless battery life. Not chance you’d forget to plug them in, right?

    Even still, they’re designed for a truely wireless experience. No wires; just connect the Bluetooth buds and you’re good to go. For top quality sound and prolonged battery life, the buds utilize a CSR certified Bluetooth chipset with CVC and A-PTX technology, with the wearable Infinity Band that’s designed to be lightweight and perfectly balanced, plugged into each earbud while it rests behind your noggin.

    elwyn-fit-wireless-earbuds-design-06

    For wirless earbuds, they’re low-profile and less bulky than an uncomfortably lodged piece of dried earwax. But they’ve gone to great lengths to make this the earbud for everyone and every type of ear hole. ELWN FIT earbuds knocks this challenge out of the way by including 48 different fit accessories, which together provide you with 180 combinations of comfortable ear fit–something most mass market headphones definitely don’t take into consideration.

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    The design and engineering crew are a group of athletes, headphone specialists and outdoor enthusiasts who were disappointing with the available wireless earbud options. And when designers are disappointed they make new stuff. They’ve been working the design for the better part of two years, filing for the Infinity Band patent and ramping up the team in 2015. The used SolidWorks to work out the design, followed by many, many prototypes and whittling down the 48 accessories to optimize fit.

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    If you’ve priced headphones, and the wireless options, you know the price range is staggering. The ELWN FIT earbuds sit in the mid-range price with a retail price if $190. However, as a result of a successful Kickstarter campaign you can grab them for $129 on Indeigogo or two pairs for $235 (plus shipping). Estimated shipping is set for December 2016. We’ll have to wait until then for more reviews, but the responses by people in the campaign video make these wee earbuds look like an interesting option for those saving their 1s and 10s for a higher priced, should we say, more functional option?

    No tangled cords… but lost earbuds? Probably.

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/174375682?theme=none&amp;wmode=opaque" title="ELWN Fit True wireless Kickstarter video" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="800"></iframe>

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    Read ELWN Fit is Exactly How Wireless Earbuds Should Be Designed at SolidSmack.

    by Josh Mings at August 17, 2016 03:55 PM

    Watch the Mesmerizing 160-Step Process of Crafting a Handmade Bamboo Fly Fishing Rod

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    Considered by many to be “The Contemplative Man’s Recreation,” fly fishing is also a favorite for craftsmen who prefer to make their own equipment –– be it tying a fly on the side of a stream or making their own fly fishing rods altogether.

    But with well over 160 or so steps that go into making a high-quality rod that’s both delicate and strong, pursuing the craft of making rods from scratch is not for the faint at heart. Among others who have the patience of steel is Australian bamboo rod craftsman Nick Taransky.

    As a devoted fly fisherman with over 25 years of experience, Taransky uses traditional fly rod building methods (hand tools) and materials (Tonkin Cane bamboo) to manufacture what is essentially a natural product with few metal components, adhesives or varnishes.

    From the initial flaming of the bamboo to provide additional strength and stiffness to turning the hand grips with high-grade Portuguese cork, Taransky’s 160–step process for making a world-class bamboo rod is nothing short of the perfect example of commitment to craft:

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/178400158?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="800"></iframe>

    Says Taransky:

    “As well as bamboo’s aesthetics, and the connection with angling tradition, bamboo rods are unrivaled in many fishing situations. Small to medium streams and still waters are ideally matched with the precise, delicate presentation offered by quality bamboo rods. Well cared for, a bamboo rod will last many years of fishing. Like all quality equipment, a bamboo rod should be treated with respect.”

    Find out more about his impressive rods over at NA Taransky Bamboo Rods.

    Read Watch the Mesmerizing 160-Step Process of Crafting a Handmade Bamboo Fly Fishing Rod at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 17, 2016 02:32 PM

    New Adventures in Package Design: Pizza Boxes Printed with Conductive Ink

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    Nobody will blame you if you’ve never taken a moment to think about the hard science behind a simple pizza delivery. After all, paying the driver and eating the pizza is usually the priority in any situation involving pizza.

    That said, everything from the carefully-placed humidity ventilation holes to the pizza saver dongles is the result of years of refining pizza delivery technology. With conductive inks further making their way into the mainstream, the pizza boxes of tomorrow just might be loaded with electronic capabilities –– such as this DJ deck for turning up your late night pizza party.

    Created in partnership with conductive ink startup Novalia and available at select Pizza Hut locations in the UK, these playable pizza boxes feature hidden electronics made with touch-sensitive conductive ink and Bluetooth technology for pairing with mobile devices and DJ apps:

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7H7RkIzNCJs?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    Says Novalia:

    “We play in the space between the physical and digital using beautiful, tactile printed touch sensors to connect people, places and objects. Touching our (paper thin) print either triggers sounds from its surface or sends information to the internet.”

    How the Playable DJ Pizza Box Works:

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BghWEOS-8NY?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    As for playing a cardboard DJ setup with the inevitable pizza grease? Just be thankful your party guests aren’t touching your actual vinyl collection with their greasy pizza fingers.

    Read New Adventures in Package Design: Pizza Boxes Printed with Conductive Ink at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 17, 2016 01:45 PM

    Quick PSA: This Video Will Remind You to Not Stand Behind a Table Saw

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    As if table saws aren’t already one of the most nerve-wracking shop tools to work with, now there’s another friendly reminder that you should always keep your wits about you when working on your next wood project.

    Toledo, Ohio–based hardwood dealer and founder of KenCraft (AKA “The Woodworker’s Candy Store”) Ken Spitulski was recently cutting a piece of molding –– something he has done thousands of times –– when his saw caught a snag on the wood and launched it 20 feet across his workshop and 8 inches into the wall –– effectively punching a dent in the workshop’s steel siding.

    While some modern table saws –– particularly those from SawStop –– can detect a hand or a finger that is accidentally placed in the blade, Ken’s close call is a good reminder that accidents can –– and will –– happen, so stay alert:

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9Ll3sP1Io8w?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    Read Quick PSA: This Video Will Remind You to Not Stand Behind a Table Saw at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 17, 2016 01:43 PM

    The SOLIDWORKS Blog

    Model the World’s Complexity Without Leaving Your CAD Environment

    The ability to predict how your designs will perform under real-world operating conditions is the essence of engineering and the purpose of prototyping. Knowing your end product will function as intended is a pretty good idea. Yet, in today’s uber deadline and bottom line-driven global market, manufacturers can no longer afford to take the time or incur the costs of conducting extensive physical testing. Without physical prototypes, what can do you? Crystal ball, fortune telling, the dark arts?

    Increasingly, the key to engineering successful products is to leverage simulation technology to quickly and cost-effectively obtain valuable design performance information that can help you design better, more innovative products and deliver them to market faster than the competition. To accurately and effectively simulate the complexity of real-world, physical phenomena, and address their effects on your designs, you need a powerful analysis tool. Whether you need to test nonlinear mechanics, vibration, heat transfer, fluid dynamics, or coupled systems, virtual testing can help you overcome your most difficult engineering challenges.

    flow_test_05b.png

    By simulating the complex physics impacting your designs, you can gather critical information that will help you make important design decisions. The results you glean from simulation testing provide answers to your most challenging engineering questions more efficiently and cost-effectively than through prototyping or hand calculations. Access to critical design performance information shortens time to market, cuts development costs, reduces material usage, validates design choices, improves quality, prevents returns and warranty claims, and increases profitability.

    drop_test.png

    Many leading manufacturers and engineers use SOLIDWORKS Simulation solutions because the software allows them to solve complex analysis problems without complexity. In short, SOLIDWORKS Simulation will help you, and your organization, become more innovative, efficient, and competitive. Download the new white paper, “Superior Product Design Through Powerful In-CAD Simulation,” to learn how you can use the SOLIDWORKS Simulation suite to:

    • Solve nonlinear simulation problems
    • Work with nonlinear loads and boundary conditions
    • Solve dynamic simulation problems
    • Conduct computational fluid dynamics analyses
    • Improve fluid efficiency
    • Improve thermal management
    • Understand flow-based process and manufacturing
    • Complete coupled analyses
    • Determine temperature’s impact on structures

    In addition, you’ll hear how customers Reutech Radar Systems, Center Rock and Penn-Troy Manufacturing use SOLIDWORKS Simulation and SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation to crush design complexity. Click here to read the white paper.

    SW_Complex_SimWP_Banner_961x250

    Author information

    Mike Fearon
    Mike Fearon
    Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

    The post Model the World’s Complexity Without Leaving Your CAD Environment appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

    by Mike Fearon at August 17, 2016 01:00 PM

    SolidSmack

    Weekly App Smack 33.16: Castro, Timelines, Hiking Project, TickTock and More…

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    Time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device, be it iPhone, Android or Windows!

    The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

    Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

    Hit it!

    Castro

    “Castro introduces a new concept to support today’s broad-minded podcast enthusiast: triage.”

    Castro

    Timelines

    “Timelines is the only time tracking app that shows your tracked time on a fully interactive timeline. Whether you are a freelancer, consultant or simply someone who wants to understand and improve her time efficiency, Timelines will provide the insights into your time necessary to make it happen.”

    Timelines

    Hiking Project

    “Hiking Project is your comprehensive guide to the best hikes near you, wherever you are.

    HikingProject

    Contacts+

    “Contacts+ is the world’s leading contacts (phone book) and dialer app, powered with caller ID, spam block and contacts backup – all in one place.”

    Contacts

    Download Accelerator Plus

    “Download Accelerator Plus (apk: ADA+ or DAP) is a powerful download speed booster, an advanced download manager, a must-have tool for Android phone/tablet.”

    DownloadAccelerator

    TickTick

    “TickTick is a powerful to-do & task management app with seamless cloud synchronization across all your devices.”

    TickTock

    Read Weekly App Smack 33.16: Castro, Timelines, Hiking Project, TickTock and More… at SolidSmack.

    by SolidSmack at August 17, 2016 12:49 PM

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    Changing SOLIDWORKS Dimensions to reflect changing design intent

    Okay, so you’ve spent some time designing a part and then you go to make a change and realize that your Design Intent has changed. Changing design intent involves changing SOLIDWORKS dimensions. Let me give you an example:

    Changing SOLIDWORKS Dimensions as design intent has changed

    Design Intent Changed

    So in the above example, I thought that the length of the middle bar of my “E” part was more important than the relative length of it to the top/bottom bars. This can often happen if there starts out being no design intent or if the design intent is unknown. It can also happen if you “inherit” someone else’s design. I don’t care what the 50mm dimension is, I want to control the dimension marked in red. While it might be easy enough to delete and replace the dimension, did you know I can change the dimension’s reference just by dragging it? Let’s take a closer look at that 50mm dimension:

    Select the dimension to get these blue handles

    Select the dimension to get these blue handles

    Drag and drop a dimension to make a change

    Once you’ve selected the dimension, it will show you blue handles, which can be used to redefine the dimension. Just drag and drop it to the edge you now want it to reference:

    Drag & Drop Dimension Handle

    Drag & Drop Dimension Handle

    Then, before you can blink twice, your sketch reflects your new design intent:

    Change Complete

    Ta-da! Change Complete.

    The post Changing SOLIDWORKS Dimensions to reflect changing design intent appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Jim Peltier, CSWE at August 17, 2016 12:00 PM

    August 16, 2016

    SolidSmack

    Keeping it in the Family | The Story Behind Montana-Based Ruana Knives

    feature

    In need of extra money to help support his family back in the 1930s, Montana welder Rudy Ruana began making knives on the side in a small garage. Before long, his reputation for high-quality handmade knives spread across the United States and what began as a side hustle to help put food on the family’s table became a thriving family business.

    Today, in the same facility that it was founded in over 70 years ago, Ruana Knives is still operated by members of the Ruana family who churn out American-made knives that are highly coveted by collectors around the world for their aluminum handles.

    In “The Bladesmiths,” we get a behind–the–scenes look at how the Ruana family continues to make knives today using the same equipment and methods honed by an original American craftsman decades ago:

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/lBKnLe7tYmU?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    Find out more about the family’s impressive knives at RuanaKnives.com.

    Read Keeping it in the Family | The Story Behind Montana-Based Ruana Knives at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 16, 2016 07:51 PM

    This New YouTube Series Documents People Assembling IKEA Furniture…on Acid

    feature

    As if spending an afternoon assembling IKEA furniture isn’t already a kick in the pants, imagine doing so while navigating your way around the Dark Side of the Moon under the influence of hallucinogenic drugs.

    Such is the premise of the aptly named new YouTube series HIKEA.

    Created by NYC-based creatives Hunter Fine and Alex Taylor, the new video series documents the struggles of young New Yorkers as they attempt to grasp onto reality while assembling Swedish flat pack wares in a haze of rainbows.

    “Today we’re taking acid and building furniture from IKEA.”

    While young couple Giancarlo and Nicole attempt to build the NORDLI cabinet while under the influence of LSD (they struggle to get past Step 1), bearded furniture assembler Keith attempts to build the MICKE desk after chowing down on a heavy dose of shrooms (nearly six hours later, he’s skipped 12 steps and has a pile of “extra” parts):

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/856TBCokG3U?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jBZ_ZeKy0yM?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    Read This New YouTube Series Documents People Assembling IKEA Furniture…on Acid at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 16, 2016 05:57 PM

    3D Design for 3D Printing Course Teaches You the Product Dev Process

    3d-design-3d-printing-course-bill-tran-00

    Think you need to be a 3D modeling pro to use a 3D printer? Think again. Consumers and the hobbyists among us can buy the equipment and start pumping out piles of plastic within the hour. We can even take local classes or find an online course, many free. Ah, what a time to be alive… But, software developer Bill Tran thinks these courses, well, they’re just too limiting. So, he’s making his own–3D Design for 3D Printing.

    Tran wants to help you make your ideas a reality and, joy of joys, he also want to show THE PROCESS, going from 3D design to 3D printing, so you understand everything that goes into creating prototypes and products, from learning the 3D software to building, calibrating and using a 3D printer. Chances are, as readers of SOlidSmack, you know a thing or 200 about 3D modeling and 3D printing. So he’s built the course to be beneficial for novice and expert alike. You start off learning Blender and Autodesk Fusion 360 with design projects including home hardware you’ll print via Shapeways, toy modeling, character sculpting, plus modeling a box cutter, a soap dispenser and more. The entire course is project-based so you can immediately apply what you’ve learned and he’s designed it with “mini-challenges” to help extend the concepts in each lesson, with access included to all project files, references and resources you need.

    3d-design-3d-printing-course-bill-tran-01

    You can expect to learn sculpting in Blender and part/assembly creation in Fusion 360, preparing 3D models for printing, along with constructing a Delta 3D printer of your very own, and how to make money off your 3D designs. All together, it’s easily over 20 hours of content, designed as an ongoing course, with more content planned over the duration and accessible whenever you need it.

    The Kickstarter campaign was funded in under 24 hours with a stretch goal of $12,000 reached to include a reverse engineering project and the complete delta 3D printer build.

    The course is now available at a $40 pre-sale price (20% off the $50 price) with assets coming online November 2016. Tran assures that students will get full lifetime access, including videos on iOS and Android, for the one-time cost. Considering all he’s teaching, continued content being pushed out and a fixed price, it’s not a bad deal at all. If someone is generally interested in learning 3D printing and creating their own projects may find that it’s worth the cost. But, if you just have a passing interest, then it’s best to stick with free programs.

    Read 3D Design for 3D Printing Course Teaches You the Product Dev Process at SolidSmack.

    by Cabe Atwell at August 16, 2016 04:01 PM

    SolidSmack Radio | So Many Details (Maniac Edition)

    feature

    This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

    This week we’ll start things off with “Sleep Sound” from Jamie xx and work our way through tracks from Wampire, Yeasayer, Arto Lindsay, Tirzah and others before wrapping up with the classic “Born Under Punches” from Talking Heads.

    Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

    *Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

    <iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:5hpJ5DNb8Fk8vTj8cuzGih" width="100%"></iframe>

    Read SolidSmack Radio | So Many Details (Maniac Edition) at SolidSmack.

    by SolidSmack at August 16, 2016 02:23 PM

    The SOLIDWORKS Blog

    Project Nevada: Plymouth University Goes for Land Speed Record in Nevada

    Forget your fast cars and questionable acting performances. Plymouth University has a different need for speed. Namely to smash the land speed record at the World Human Powered Speed Challenge (WHPSC) in the heat of Nevada this September. You may be able to help them, just like SOLIDWORKS has…


    Going for gold…

    It might look like some celestial spacecraft from a sci-fi film, but it’s actually the handcycle that Plymouth University have designed with the hope of powering towards prestigious land speed records at the World Human Powered Speed Challenge (WHPSC) this September. The West Country university’s engineering department is going for gold in the female category – and has recruited a renowned local athlete to help them.

    Project Nevada Plymouth University Goes for Land Speed Record in Nevada 1

    Few are as experienced with handcycling – a major Paralympic discipline – as Sarah Piercy. A former winner of the London Marathon, she will be required to pedal a significantly shorter distance at the WHPSC as she attempts to top a speed of 24.76mph along the 200-metre track.


    To break records, you have to be headstrong – but not like you think.

    This is not your run-of-the-mill handcycle. To hit world-beating speeds, you have to design something extraordinary. Aerodynamics are crucial. Plymouth University’s engineering team is confident its teardrop-shaped vehicle has significantly lower drag than that of previous record-breaking vehicles.

    Project Nevada Plymouth University Goes for Land Speed Record in Nevada 2

    That’s required some savvy design. For starters, Piercy will steer the vehicle with their heads (You read that correctly). The position of the rider and steering system has been meticulously designed to enable each rider to generate maximum power as they chase their record-breaking speeds.
    How did SOLIDWORKS help?

    Project Nevada Plymouth University Goes for Land Speed Record in Nevada 3

    From testing in 2015, the team at Plymouth University knew their handcycle was fast – but fast means nothing when your dream is to be fastest. The university’s engineering department has used SOLIDWORKS’ Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to optimise the aerodynamics and reduce drag to the bare minimum. It made it easy for the students to accurately simulate how airflow would affect the performance of their handcycle – right there in SOLIDWORKS, without the time and cost of developing, testing and reworking prototypes.

    Project Nevada Plymouth University Goes for Land Speed Record in Nevada 4

    Can you help?

    The team at Plymouth University are seeking corporate funding to give their project wheels and make the world-record dream a reality. Any business that gets involved with the adventure will have their logo emblazoned on the side of the world’s most futuristic-looking handcycle. If you are interested visit designflowplymouth.co.uk.

    To read the original Cadtek article, click here.
    READ NEXT:
    >> Females in tuition: tackling gender imbalance in UK engineering
    >> 6 great reasons to study engineering at university

    Author information

    SOLIDWORKS UK
    Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

    The post Project Nevada: Plymouth University Goes for Land Speed Record in Nevada appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

    by SOLIDWORKS UK at August 16, 2016 01:00 PM

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    Setting Up an Automatic Login for SOLIDWORKS PDM

    SOLIDWORKS PDM has the ability for administrators to enable automatic login for users, simplifying the process for users accessing the vault.

    Depending on which type of login used, here are the steps to enable automatic login;

    SOLIDWORKS PDM Login

    Start the Administration Tool and pick Local Settings >  Settings as shown below

    SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration Tool

    SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration Tool

    Within the Settings Dialog set the Vault you’d like users to automatically log into;

    Settings - Select Vault

    Settings – Select Vault

    Then check the box ‘Use automatic login for this vault‘;

    SOLIDWORKS PDM Automatic Login

    Settings – Use Automatic Login

    Input the Login details for the account you’d like to use;

    Settings - Login Info

    Settings – Login Info

    To complete the setup select ‘Ok

    As a result; the user will now automatically be logged into the vault.

    Note:  These settings are specific to the machine it was configured on

    Windows Login

    To enable an automatic Windows logon requires configuration on the server:

    Start the Archive Server Configuration Tool > Tools > Default Settings;

    Archive Server Config Tool - Tools - Default Settings

    Archive Server Config Tool – Tools – Default Settings

    Within the ‘Default Settings‘ dialog check the ‘Automatic Login‘ box;

    Default Settings - Automatic Login

    Default Settings – Automatic Login

    To complete, select ‘Ok

    As a result; this will change will update all clients to automatically login using their Windows credentials.

    Learn more about SOLIDWORKS PDM

    Attend a SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Administration training course either in a classroom near you or live online.

    The post Setting Up an Automatic Login for SOLIDWORKS PDM appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Justin Williams at August 16, 2016 12:00 PM

    August 15, 2016

    InFlow Technology

    SOLIDWORKS PDM One Click Open Files

    Recently with all of the Windows upgrades we have been receiving support calls regarding why some/all files are opening from the vault with one click. Although this is not a PDM setting but rather a Windows one, we thought we would share the most common solution to this issue. Below are a few screen shots of there that setting in windows is and how to correct it for the entire vault.

    To begin, below is a screenshot of my local vault (at the root, this is an important step) with the Organize menu displayed in the top left corner. Here you will select "Change folder and search options".

    Here, on the general tab of Change folder and search options is the radio button that is most likely causing the issue. Be sure that you options are always set to the double click radio button and hit apply and that's it!

    Aleks Vicentic| Consultant - PLM Solutions
    Inflow Technology

    http://www.inflow-tech.com/

    Hfv

    by Aleks Vicentic at August 15, 2016 06:56 PM

    SolidSmack

    FEBCAD AR­ 3D Modeling Software Lets You Model With Different Shapes

    febcad-ar-3d-modeling-app-00

    We’ve been keeping an eye out for VR/AR 3D modeling apps and, suprisingly… there’s not been much activity. Apparently we’re not in the future yet… yet… yet. There are an increasing number of ways to play in VR, but not so many ways to model in it. FEBCAD AR ­is one of the first that kinda gets us going in that direction, combining AR viewing and interaction into a 3D modeling software that allows you to create right on your desktop.

    FEBCAD AR is developed by the team behind the febtop-Optimus 3D Printer/Lasercut/CNC machine. The idea to use AR came from their desire to lower the barrier for those interested in 3D printing. Through many discussions around implementing a 3D modeling software to use with their system, they considered AR glasses or mobile devices. Since most people have a mobile phone and the point is to make it accessible as possible, they went with that. Development time? Roughly three months.

    In the AR environment, the idea is that you create your design by drawing basic shapes on the desk in front of you like boxes, cylinders, pyramids, spheres, cones etc., while looking through your phone or tablet. You can move and place objects naturally anywhere you want, and easily view your creation from any angle by moving your phone around the design. When you feel done with your design you can simply export your 3D model to the STL format. You also have the option to send the design for direct printing on one of our 3d printers, Optimus or Nimo 3D. Optimus is our modular, premium 3D printer developed for makers, product designers, engineers and artists. It is very robust, adaptable and low maintenance. The Nimo 3D is our smaller model and is designed for everyone. It is very affordable and easy to use.

    Their main goal was to make the app useful, yet simple; usable to easily model simple designs, yet not just a gimmick. Their next goal is to incorporate the features needed to draw something useful without making the interface more complex.

    What can you do with the app right now? The first set of features include:

    • Draw boxes, prisms, cylinders and cones.
    • Draw a 2D shape by freehand and extrude into 3D
    • Move around individual shapes that you have drawn and place them where you want
    • Rotate individual shapes around the X, Y or Z axis
    • Import STL files to view in the AR environment
    • Export your design to a STL file
    • Send your design directly to a FEBTOP printer

    Here it is in action:
    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hDieK9qoeA0?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    Now, I know what you’re thinking. “That has got to be the most grueling way to create 3D models I’ve ever seen.” I’m thinking the same, however they make a good point about making it more accessible–many people just don’t have VR/AR headsets. I look at FEBCAD AR as a proof of concept–The ability is obviously there–and I’m positive 3D software developers are conducting surveys, testing a headset or two and imagining the type of interfaces that haven’t been imagined yet.

    Perhaps the next step is using the Microsoft Hololens with something similar to Google Soli interaction. No holding a screen in one hand and a tiny block in the other.

    If you are interested, you can get on the FEBCAD AE beta via their site at febtop.com.

    febcad-ar-3d-modeling-app-01

    Read FEBCAD AR­ 3D Modeling Software Lets You Model With Different Shapes at SolidSmack.

    by Josh Mings at August 15, 2016 05:24 PM

    OpenKnit is the Open-source Machine for Bespoke Clothing Creation

    openknit-digital-loom-00

    It’s a cyberpunk dream to print clothes like vacation photos and TPS reports. Various companies have tried to combine 3D printing with fashion fabrication, like the mildly successful Elctroloom. Cool, but it’s not open-source. However, Gerard Rubio is doing things differently. Inspired by the open-source RepRap 3D printer project and community, along with other digital knit projects, he has brought weaving and 3D printing together with OpenKnit.

    OpenKnit is an open-source fabrication tool that’s part digital, part analog, and all cool. Two years in the making so far, Gerard has had progress over the years, refining the design. With all build details available, it allows anyone to enter measurements and, through a unique cartridge system, create their own bespoke clothing from various color yarns.

    Depending on the size of the garment, you can have a new piece of clothing in about an hour–a sweater, skirt, dress or sock-cap. Inspired by 3D printers, the OpenKnit machine has similarities to an DLP/FDM printer. In turn, it could provide some inspiration for 3D printer manufacturers. For instance, like a 3D printer, it builds the garment layer by layer, but instead of a single printer head, it uses a row of needles along a needle carriage. The carriage is controlled by an encoder and, instead of a single or dual filament line, there are three thread feeders, one for each tubular section of the garment–left arm, right arm, body. Like other 3D printers, it runs on an Arduino Leonardo board and follows instructions entered through the Knitic, open-source knit software. To keep the clothing taut while it’s being created, weights are placed manually to keep the machine feeding.

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/86987828?theme=none&amp;wmode=opaque" title="Made In the Neighbourhood (ft. a clothing printer, OpenKnit)" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="800"></iframe>

    As the video shows, you enter measurements, such as waist and arm length, to ensure the garment is a perfect fit. OpenKnit is still in development, but open to adventurers ready to start their own experiments, with assembly guide, BOM and design files available, if you need some help getting started. Gerard eventually wants to sell kits for roughly $600 USD, but is taking feedback for improvements until then.

    openknit-digital-loom-04

    What may be interesting to some is his stance against the fashion industry. Gerard points out how production cycles and processes take a long time to get product in people’s hands, the negative effect on the environment and how many companies choose to use cheaper materials, yet drive up the cost. Instead, he hopes to offer people the chance to create their own clothing as an alternative to the fashion market and to further push their creative mindset.

    So what do the clothes look like? They’re simple, yet almost elegant, with an intrinsic DIY style to them. While digital low-cost looms are still being developed, this may be just the tool for those who want to start fabricating their own clothes. And certainly a differentiator for those who want to make their mark as a fashion designer.

    The price point, open design, and usefulness will sure to foster further development. Perhaps we could transform it into a digital loom for heavy/plastic fibers for outdoor gear. If so, I may have to prepare my everyday “tactical-casual” style files.

    Here’s a very detailed video on how the machine works, created with beautiful 8-bit graphics and music:
    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/86889648?theme=none&amp;wmode=opaque" title="OpenKnit" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="800"></iframe>

    openknit-digital-loom-02

    openknit-digital-loom-01

    openknit-digital-loom-03

    Read OpenKnit is the Open-source Machine for Bespoke Clothing Creation at SolidSmack.

    by Cabe Atwell at August 15, 2016 03:28 PM

    The Monday List 33.16 | What We’re Reading This Week

    feature

    Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

    Welcome to The Monday List.

    Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

    What We’re Reading This Week:

    Stranger Things: meet the design genius behind TV’s most talked about title font
    Stranger Things has, well, a stranger thing that its followers have become fascinated by: its opening titles, and the font that is used within them.

    01

    100 years ago, people were eating things that most of us will never taste. So what happened?
    Um … where did all the seeds go?

    02

    How Hyperloop One Went Off the Rails
    The transportation startup is trying to make a pod levitate in a tunnel, but can it rise above founder clashes and employee lawsuits?

    03

    I hack time.
    Over the years, I’ve become somewhat of an expert on time. I have to be.

    05

    Keanu Reeves Will Build a $78,000 Motorcycle Just for You
    Tearing up L.A. on the Arch Motorcycles KRGT-1.

    04

    How Do You Ensure Track Runners Go an Equal Distance? Math!
    IN EVERY OLYMPIC event, officials try to keep things is as fair as possible. In track, this means making sure runners cover the same distance.

    05

    ‘Hell or High Water’ Is the Best Movie of the Summer, But Is There an Audience for It?
    This one, despite some familiar elements (it’s about bank robbers, and one of the characters is a shrewd and wily detective), isn’t something you’ve seen before. It’s an original: bold and sharp, enthralling and true, a movie loaded with action that’s never just an “action movie,” full of hairpin twists and turns that are as organic as they are exciting.

    06

    Read The Monday List 33.16 | What We’re Reading This Week at SolidSmack.

    by SolidSmack at August 15, 2016 02:10 PM

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    Earthscape use SOLIDWORKS and Javelin Services to design better playgrounds

    Javelin customer Earthscape is an award-winning studio specializing in playground design and construction. They work with educators, childcare providers, municipalities, NGOs, parents and children to bring nature back into play spaces. Their aim is to build awe-inspiring playgrounds, connecting children to nature through good design, high play value and natural elements.

    Take a look at the video for an example of the amazing playground designs by Earthscape, and read a testimonial below, from Ben Tolton at Earthscape, about the SOLIDWORKS training service they received from Javelin.

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-NEO6ZreBTQ?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

    Testimonial from Ben Tolton at Earthscape

    Designing custom playgrounds is often as challenging as it is rewarding and it’s what the design department at Earthscape looks forward to each day.  The balance of satisfying the client’s wishes, artistic appeal, engineering realities, safety considerations, buildability, costs and schedules is a distinct challenge and it wasn’t until we engaged with SOLIDWORKS and the team at Javelin that we were better able to meet these requirements.

    Designing a custom playground means the end product has to be fun but just as important it has to work in the real world.  It requires unconventional building materials and asking suppliers and our subs to do things a little bit differently.  The benefit of working with SOLIDWORKS is being able to manage our custom materials into unconventional designs and then communicate it into construction documents and CAD files that simply work for their intended purpose.

    When we started with SOLIDWORKS last year no one in our office had any experience with it.  It was a daunting prospect but after extensive consideration it was clear to us that Javelin was the most serious about committing to our success.  They made every effort to help us explore the ways SOLIDWORKS could work for us and even though some of our design requirements were outside of the box, Javelin gave us straight answers and clever demonstrations to help find the way.

    A program such as SOLIDWORKS has features that Earthscape perhaps will never fully utilize, as you might expect of a niche company using a program that’s been under constant development for 20 years.  Nevertheless, Javelin was very good about establishing a training program that would help Earthscape get to where we need to be so that we could take advantage of the simple tasks to the deep strengths that SOLIDWORKS offers as a program.  The courses have proven to be invaluable and we’re all better designers for it.

    What really surprised me about Javelin was the level of industry-leading expertise that committed to Earthscape in a way we never expected.  One of Javelin’s higher talents, Alin Vargatu saw what we did at Earthscape and extracted functionality from SOLIDWORKS in ways no one would have thought possible.  We have a unique challenge inherent to our product and Alin found ways to purpose SOLIDWORKS for us beyond what we thought possible in CAD.  Thank you Alin.

    The exciting thing for Earthscape is we feel like we have a partner that is keeping up with us and what our requirements are.  Javelin is more than just a software reseller, they’re committed to our learning and success and we’re grateful to have them on board with us.

    How do you model a complex playground sculpture in SOLIDWORKS? Javelin helped the Earthscape team with modeling best practices and techniques for the creation of their complex playground structures like the one shown in the video below:

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EZVOwzEuQxI?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

    About Javelin Training Services

    At Javelin we understand that people are your most important asset and the pressures of business force you to do more with less – like attracting, engaging and retaining the right talent. What makes us distinct as a value added reseller is that we offer unique solutions designed to meet your people needs; from sourcing strategies, tailored training, certification, and solutions to capture and develop your existing best practices.

    Learn More

    The post Earthscape use SOLIDWORKS and Javelin Services to design better playgrounds appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Rod Mackay at August 15, 2016 02:03 PM

    The SOLIDWORKS Blog

    SWOOD, Woodworking and SOLIDWORKS

    Designing and manufacturing woodworking projects requires a great amount of attention to detail. When it comes to bringing concepts to life in CAD, this means using dedicated woodworking features that require solutions specifically created for woodworking. This is especially important in the era of custom-made projects, when woodworkers must have strong modeling capabilities mixed with specific tools to address unique material and processing requirements.

    With SWOOD from EFICAD and SOLIDWORKS, woodworkers have the best design tools for meeting woodworking requirements. EFICAD, a SOLIDWORKS Solution Partner since 2001, has invested in CAD/CAM solutions for the woodworking industry for more than 25 years. SWOOD, created specifically for woodworkers, provides a unique tool that manages woodworking projects from design to production. For SOLIDWORKS users, SWOOD provides material and panel processing needs as well as native features in SWOOD libraries for taking on edge banding, grain direction, and laminates. This removes the need to complete properties to create a BOM. SWOOD takes care of the process with a simple drag and drop. Further, when using SWOOD to create parametric furniture, custom rules can be used to ensure models will fit predetermined requirements with a few drag-and-drop gestures.

    swooddesign_screenshot.png

    With SWOOD integrated directly into SOLIDWORKS, there are several pain points you will no longer need to address. These include the need to export drawings to DXF files, dealing with oversized systems that do not recognize multi-spindle drilling, programing all parts from scratch every time you make a change, and programing suction cups and beams before launching a program. SWOOD CAM embeds all of these technologies and provides SOLIDWORKS users with a fully integrated CAM system with nesting capabilities. In addition, as part of the SOLIDWORKS ecosystem, SWOOD can be used with other SOLIDWORKS solutions, such as SOLIDWORKS PDM and SOLIDWORKS Visualize to name two.

    Because of EFICAD’s long experience and collaboration with different CNC brands, a lot of post-processors are available, from G-Code to WOP system. SWOOD encodes full project assemblies at once and generates all the production documents (stocks list, hardware list, labels, costing, CSV or XML export for ERP).

    swoodcam_screenshot.png

    The most highly trusted CAD platform coupled with SWOOD suggests new design opportunities for woodworkers. The clearest evidence of this comes from the main European SOLIDWORKS resellers across more than 20 countries that have quickly made SWOOD the choice for customers in the woodworking industry.

    If you’re interested in learning more about EFICAD and SWOOD in person, come see us at the International Woodworking Fair (IWF) in Atlanta (booth #8328). IWF is global event for the woodworking industry and professionals in the furniture manufacturing, cabinetry, architectural woodworking and material processing fields. Please stop by and see all of the enhancements available in SWOOD 2016. To learn more about SWOOD, visit www.eficad.com or send an email to swood@eficad.com.

    Author information

    Bruno Calatayud
    Bruno is International Projects Manager at EFICAD.

    The post SWOOD, Woodworking and SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

    by Bruno Calatayud at August 15, 2016 01:00 PM

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    How to protect your Intellectual Property when sharing SOLIDWORKS files

    In most cases, neutral formats such as *.stp are used to hide the details of a design. The reason is that this format provides a dumb solid model without providing much information about how it was made. This capability and even more is possible with the SOLIDWORKS Defeature tool. Using defeature means that you can provide a SOLIDWORKS file to your customer without revealing any of your design details. The Defeature tool will remove details from a part or assembly and save the results to a new file where features are replaced by dumb solids (i.e. solids bodies without feature definition or history). You can then share the new file without giving up any sensitive information or the modeling techniques of your design.

    The Defeature Tool

    In addition to helping you protect your intellectual property the Defeature tool also helps reduce the overall size of the file and subsequently improve performance of the part or any assembly that contains the part file. Defeature provides the following capabilities for users:

    • Selectively remove internal details of a design;
    • Small features can be removed globally in a design;
    • Remove all holes or keep necessary holes;
    • Maintain motion between components within an assembly;
    • Compare the original design with defeatured version with two side by side windows;
    • Shrink size of original file and also save assembly file as a single part file.

    Defeature for Parts

    The image below demonstrates how details of a part model could be removed and provide a *.sldprt formatted file with a dumb solid geometry within it. Note the FeatureManager Design tree for the part in the right-hand window; there is only one feature in it. Whereas the tree on the left-side includes all features, planes, and sketches used to design the model. Alternatively, the original part model could be defeatured without removing any details. In the same way as using save as with *.stp format. However in the case of using the defeature tool, the result is a SOLIDWORKS Part format.

    Before and after Defeature is applied to a part

    Before and after Defeature is applied to a part

    Defeature for Assembly

    In the following image, the Defeature technique has been used on an assembly file. In this case, the internal components of the model are removed. Note that on the defeatured file, only solid and surface bodies are present in the FeatureManager Design Tree. Also, the model on the right is a part file whereas the model on the left is an assembly file. In addition, note that on the tree on the left includes a Defeature item. This is the same in the above image for the part model.

    Note: The result of defeaturing a SOLIDWORKS assembly file is a SOLIDWORKS part file.

    Before&After Defeature

    Before and After Defeature an Assembly File

    Other Considerations

    • You can save the less-detailed model to a separate file and maintain references to the original part or assembly;
    • Within defeature tool settings groups of components could be defined from which you remove details;
    • You can publish the fully-detailed model containing the Defeature settings to your Supplier Services account on 3D ContentCentral. You can specify that details be removed when customers configure and download the model.

    The post How to protect your Intellectual Property when sharing SOLIDWORKS files appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWP at August 15, 2016 12:00 PM

    August 14, 2016

    SolidSmack

    A Timely Update to the Mine Kafon Could Clear All Unmarked Land Mines in Less Than a Decade

    feature

    With over 70 people killed or injured by anti-personnel (land) mines each day, unmarked minefields not only destroy communities with death and injury but also through the loss of usable land and economic development.

    Having grown up in minefield-stricken Kabul, Afghanistan playing soccer just yards away from active minefields, product designer Massoud Hassani set out to do something about it while studying industrial design at Design Academy Eindhoven.

    The result – in 2012 – was the Mine Kafon; a wind-powered minesweeper that costs just $50 to produce and can sustain four explosions before needing to be replaced. In contrast, the professional removal of a single mine can cost over $1,000 and can take days or weeks to be effective. Considering that there are over 10 million mines in Afghanistan alone, that becomes not only an expensive task but a tedious one as well. The Mine Kafon earned Hassani a well-deserved spot in the permanent collection at MoMA where it is celebrated as a seamless combination of functional art and design justice.

    Flash-forward to Summer of 2016 and Hassani is back at it again with an all-new update to the Mine Kafon in the form of the Mine Kafon Drone (MKD).

    Using a three-step process to map, detect and detonate land mines, the airborne update to the original Mine Kafon is up to 20 times faster than currently available technologies and carries the ambitious goal of clearing the entire globe of unmarked landmines within the next ten years:

    <iframe frameborder="0" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/massoudhassani/mine-kafon-drone/widget/video.html" width="800"> </iframe>

    “With the Mine Kafon Drone we can save thousands of lives,” says Hassani. “Civilians will have access to agriculture, water resources, education, and the freedom to play outdoor sports. A billion people currently cannot move freely for fear of mines. Can you imagine that we could liberate these people in all affected countries with the Mine Kafon Drone?”

    mine_drone copy

    With a campaign on Kickstarter to help fund the final development, Hassani and his small design team are offering a number of creative rewards to backers including personalized postcards of sponsored areas to be swept with the drone and even a DIY miniature version for demonstrating the process in your own backyard.

    With over 3,000 backers already, Hassani has soared past his project goal with nearly three weeks left to go in the campaign. Find out more over at Kickstarter.

    Read A Timely Update to the Mine Kafon Could Clear All Unmarked Land Mines in Less Than a Decade at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 14, 2016 04:30 PM

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    SOLIDWORKS Simulation Standard Canadian Promotion on Now

    A new SOLIDWORKS promotion is now available in Canada: Buy SOLIDWORKS Standard or SOLIDWORKS Professional 3D CAD with subscription service and get SOLIDWORKS Simulation Standard at a discounted price.

    SOLIDWORKS Simulation Promotion

    SOLIDWORKS Simulation Promotion

    Go beyond the SOLIDWORKS SimulationXpress tool and unleash your design with SOLIDWORKS Simulation Standard. The essential simulation software package gives you an intuitive virtual testing environment for linear static, motion and fatigue simulation (not included with SOLIDWORKS Standard or Professional 3D CAD software), so you can answer common engineering questions.

    SOLIDWORKS Simulation Standard

    SOLIDWORKS Simulation Standard

    SOLIDWORKS Simulation Standard Features & Benefits

    • Verify your design with powerful linear static analysis
      • Test products made of weldments, sheet metal, and volume geometry with mixed mesh
      • Evaluate strain and stresses between contacting parts, including friction
      • Apply bearing loads, forces, pressures, and torques
      • Optimize designs based on structural, motion or geometric criteria
      • Use connectors or virtual fasteners to model bolts, pins, springs, and bearings, and dimension them under applied loads
      • Activate the Trend Tracker and Design Insight plots to highlight optimal design changes
        while you work (not included with SOLIDWORKS Premium software)
    • Evaluate your product performance throughout its operational cycle with motion analysis
      • Define motion studies with time-based approach for rigid body kinematic and dynamic
        problems
      • Leverage SOLIDWORKS assembly mates along with part properties for the motion analysis
      • Evaluate characteristics like actuator force and joint loads for motion optimization
      • Gain greater control of model actuators with servomotors
    • Study the effects of cyclic loading on product life
      • Check a system’s expected life or accumulated damage after a specified number of cycles
      • Import load history data from real physical tests to define loading events
    • Interpret analysis results with powerful and intuitive visualization tools. Once you have completed your analysis, SOLIDWORKS Simulation offers a variety of results visualization tools that allow you to gain valuable insight into the performance of your models.
      • Study the distribution of result quantities with 3D contour plots (including stress, strain, deformed shape, displacement, energy, error, strain energy, density, and reaction force).
      • Measure results at any location using predefined sensors or the probe tool.
      • Graph stress variation along a path.
      • Use section plots to display results along the depth of the model. The sections can be moved dynamically.
      • List results and automatically export data to Microsoft® Excel and Word.
      • Import physical test results at a specified location and compare them to analysis results, or export analysis data at critical locations for physical testing.
      • Determine the factor of safety using the Design Check Wizard.
    • Collaborate and share analysis results. SOLIDWORKS Simulation makes it easy to collaborate and share analysis results effectively with everyone involved in the product development process.
      • Generate reports in HTML and Microsoft Word format with a single mouse click.
      • Customize reports to include logos, images, and additional details.
      • Save result plots in several standard formats, such as VRML, XGL, BMP, and JPEG.
      • Export animations of results as an AVI.
      • Capture analysis results with SOLIDWORKS MotionManager.
      • Publish SOLIDWORKS eDrawings files with analysis information.
    Legal Terms and Conditions:

    Offer valid from July 1 – December 15, 2016 in the Canada, subject to export control laws of the United States. Offer expires December 15, 2016 at 11:59 pm Eastern Standard Time and cannot be combined with any other discount or offer. Only newly acquired licenses ordered after 12:00 am Eastern Daylight Time on July 1, 2016 are eligible. Educational and Research licenses do not qualify for this offer. Subscription Service must be purchased for one-year at full price on each new SOLIDWORKS product license purchased pursuant to this offer.

    Get a Quote for this Promotion

    NOTE: this promotion is for Canadian Individuals and companies – we cannot provide software to other regions:
    <iframe frameborder="0" height="800" scrolling="no" src="http://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2013-11-13/z84fr" style="border: 0;" width="100%"></iframe>

     

    The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation Standard Canadian Promotion on Now appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Rod Mackay at August 14, 2016 03:15 PM

    August 13, 2016

    SolidSmack

    The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 32.16

    feature-7

    Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

    The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top ten stories on SolidSmack this past week.

    Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

    The Art of Getting Things Done: Overcoming Procrastination Isn’t as Difficult as You Think

    “With a seemingly endless supply of content and social media updates getting hurled at us 24/7, it’s become increasingly difficult to break the time-sucking and vicious cycle of distraction. If you’re a freelancer or one of the few digital nomads who work from home without the pressure of an afternoon presentation deadline, this problem can easily be magnified tenfold at the blink of an eye.”

    feature-11

    CAD with a Stylus. It’s a thing.

    “My last post was ostensibly about my new SpaceMouse, but within half an hour I had not less than five different people ask about my stylus. What the what? Stylus? For CAD? In short: yes, I use a stylus for CAD. And everything else, actually. I don’t even own a decent mouse anymore.”

    stylus

    20 Product Designers You Should Follow on Instagram Right Now

    “Love ’em or just plain don’t have time for ’em, social media platforms are here to stay. While you don’t necessarily need to be an expert at Tweetin’ or Facebookin’, there’s a lot to be gained from staying in contact with old colleagues or finding inspiration for your next side project. Of all of the social media platforms, however, Instagram has become one of the easiest ways to accomplish the basics of sharing and viewing content quickly and easily.”

    feature-7

    Designer Paul Foeckler Turns to Firewood to Create His Latest Lighting Collection

    “While most people might approach freshly cut firewood as a way of fueling their bonfires or keeping their house warm on cold nights, designer Paul Foeckler has a different idea of harnessing light.”

    feature-14

    The World’s First Smart Football Just Might Change the Way the Game is Played

    “For some, it seems to come almost too easily before even having started grade school. For others, it can take a lifetime (if it ever happens) to master. Regardless, throwing a perfect football spiral is necessary for accuracy, and for the first time ever, beginner and expert players will now be able to measure those spirals with surprisingly honest feedback thanks to Wilson’s new smart football.”

    feature-15

    This Insane Pen Claims to Put a Handheld Scanner and Over 16 Million Colors in Your Pocket

    “It wasn’t too long ago when having maybe 3 or so colors in a single mechanical spring-loaded pen was a big deal – but what if you could carry nearly every shade (approximately 16 million colors) in your pocket wherever you go. That’s just crazy.”

    l41Yjcn3RLBOh6oGk-1

    Read The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 32.16 at SolidSmack.

    by SolidSmack at August 13, 2016 02:21 PM

    August 12, 2016

    SolidSmack

    Friday Smackdown: A Jolt of Whistles

    SlavaTriptih-art

    Around the castle it crept, a small, yet indecipherable gurgle of bones shifting. It was tall, lanky and faceless, yet with a whistle like a canary heard after a jolt of these links.

    Slava Triptih – HE has a way with ink. Beautiful black cloud spray portraits and even more ink illustrations and artwork.

    Little Prince – The making of the stop motion animation with Production Designer Alex Juhasz and Lead Animator Anthony Scott.

    Exploring Porto – Three photographers take you on a beautiful tour throughout Porto, Portugal with the Leica M-D. Video is a must see.

    Egg Rugg – and other breakfast food related hand-corcheted rugs and such by Carly Dellger.

    10K Rio – A super high resolution timelapse of Rio de Jinero shot by Joe Capra that takes you from the slums to the city.

    Rogue One – A new trailer for our new heroes in the Rogue One Star Wars story with much more dialogue.

    Jeep hood desk – This is a Jeep hood repurposed into a desk. It looks incredible.

    Reigns – This looks like an interesting choose your own adventure game.

    Coach – New video and single from LA rockers Gestures & Sounds playing in the back of a moving truck.

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/178429857?theme=none&amp;wmode=opaque" title="Gestures &amp; Sounds - Coach (Official Music Video)" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="800"></iframe>

    Read Friday Smackdown: A Jolt of Whistles at SolidSmack.

    by Josh Mings at August 12, 2016 03:57 PM

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    SOLIDWORKS Design Challenge: Build a Cupcake Stand

    Recently I got married, during the planning stages my fiancee and I were looking for ways (often subtle) to incorporate elements of our lives into the details of our wedding. As such, I tried to find a way to integrate SOLIDWORKS into our wedding. I could feel the most difficult part of this design challenge was going to be finding something to design. Thankfully, she soon saw a stepped cake stand that worked with cupcakes. Since such things are massively expensive when people add the “wedding surcharge,” we opted to design and build our own. Thankfully, my father-in-law is handy at building things and I have the best design software at my fingertips.

    Undertaking my SOLIDWORKS Design Challenge

    I got to work designing it. The initial design was circular, but we soon realized that this wouldn’t allow us to do the cupcake pattern design that we wanted. So, I started modeling up a square one. With the circular attempt, I created a series of planes and sketched a circle on each one. For this one, I wanted to try something different. I started with the square plate for my top step, then patterned it down:

    Start of Cake Stand design

    Start of Cake Stand design

    Then I opted to use the Move Face command to modify the size of the patterned instances. I couldn’t use Instances to Vary for this application, since it is a multibody part, and I’ve never used Move Face for a real-world application before. For those of you not aware, Move Face can be found under the Direct Editing tab of the Command Manager:

    Using Move Face feature

    Using Move Face feature

    Completed design

    I continued with Boss-Extrudes and Cut-Extrudes until the design was complete:

    SOLIDWORKS Design Challenge Completed Cupcake Stand

    Completed Cupcake Stand

    (The sketch lines represent the area of table we needed for the cupcakes unable to fit on the stand. My father-in-law actually created a 4’x4′ sheet and nailed it to the bottom once we were on-site)

    Still, I wasn’t yet done with the design. As I tend to design things that are cantilevered, I wanted to confirm where the centre of mass was.

    Determining the centre of mass

    Determining the centre of mass

    Using the design at our wedding

    Of course, when I tried asking the baker questions like “How much pressure do we need to apply to the knife when we cut the cake?” I was unable to get answers, so it’s a good thing we attached it to a base. Anyways, here is the finished result in real-life:

    Cupcake stand at my wedding

    Cupcake stand at my wedding

    The post SOLIDWORKS Design Challenge: Build a Cupcake Stand appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Jim Peltier, CSWE at August 12, 2016 11:00 AM

    Automate to Dominate: Automated Product Library Creation with DriveWorks

    One of the most common topics that arises during discussions about DriveWorks and Product Configurators is product libraries. Many companies mistakenly believe that they need to have every possible component and every possible assembly in their product library. For companies that design a high number of permutations and computations, libraries may never be complete.

    One of the great things about DriveWorks is that you do not need all of your product libraries to be complete. In other words, if you have 50,000 possible variations of your product, all you need is one master model, a database of values (or rules that govern design) and DriveWorks will automatically create them all.

    automate to dominate

    Flange library

    Build product libraries overnight or over time

    In the past, many designers used Design Tables to create new variants of a design. Design Tables are effective if there are a limited number of different variants. As your product library grows, Design Tables eventually become cumbersome and can have a negative impact on performance and productivity.

    DriveWorks architecture utilizes SQL databases to automatically create all the SOLIDWORKS parts and assemblies to build new configurations. Having the data in SQL also makes it quick and easy to track variants that have already been created so that parts or sub-assemblies that already exist can be re-used.

    For example, where two cupboards (shown below) are exactly alike except for the door style and handles, DriveWorks would re-use all the common parts and only create the new door and insert the new handles. This capability will enhance the speed with which all the assemblies are created and avoid designing duplicate parts.

    Cupboard with glass doors and round handle Cupboard with wood door and D-handle

    Virtual Electronic Catalogues

    Walk into nearly any design shop and you will see walls full of paper catalogues. With DriveWorks, you can eliminate the need for paper catalogues and provide your customers with a website that they can use to configure and ultimately specify your product in their designs.

    automate to dominate

    Bulky wall of catalogues and reference materials

    Designers can go online, configure what they need (within the parameters of what you will allow) and DriveWorks will generate the models and other information that they need to complete their designs.

    Manufacturers of cylinders, valves and other industrial components have been offering customers the ability to download models for use in designs for many years. With DriveWorks, your customers will have the ability to select from pre-existing libraries or create new designs to meet their specific needs.

    Automated SOLIDWORKS Library

    Online Conveyor Configurator

    In summary, every company needs a competitive edge. DriveWorks can help you create an automated SOLIDWORKS library as well as associated manufacturing content. The earlier this technology can be deployed in the design process, the greater the gains. “Automate to Dominate” the competition with DriveWorks.

    Want to dominate your competition?

    Join us for this upcoming webinar where we will discuss the many ways DriveWorks Design Automation & Sales Configuration can help your business Automate to Dominate.

    Topics will include:

    1. Automated Quoting – Integrated Product Specification and Automated Quote Generation
    2. Automated Drawings (and other manufacturing content)
    3. Automated Library Creation (Complete libraries overnight or over time)
    4. Automated Integration with enterprise business systems (ERP, CRM)

    <iframe frameborder="0" height="900" scrolling="no" src="http://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2016-08-11/79d7m1" style="border: 0;" width="100%"></iframe>

    The post Automate to Dominate: Automated Product Library Creation with DriveWorks appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by John Mignardi at August 12, 2016 03:58 AM

    August 11, 2016

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    Do you 3D print your models? Then you should tell the SOLIDWORKS World

    Do you or your business 3D print SOLIDWORKS models? Would you like to share your experience and knowledge with other users in the SOLIDWORKS community? Well now is your chance as Dassault Systemes SolidWorks Corporation are looking for 3D printing/additive manufacturing presenters at SOLIDWORKS World 2017, in Los Angeles, CA., on February 5 — 8, 2017.

    Ideally your presentation should be 45 minutes long and cover any of the following topics:

    • SOLIDWORKS Tips and Tricks for 3D Printing
    • Design for FDM/FFF
    • Design for SLS
    • Design for SLA/DLP/CLIP

    Submit your presentation  *submission deadline is September 14, 2016.

    Also check out the cool 3D printed models we discovered at the SOLIDWORKS World Stratasys booth earlier this year.

    Below is an archive video of Dassault Systemes executive Bertrand Sicot, 3D printing from SOLIDWORKS software onto a MakerBot.

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ilkXh3ryBGU?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

    The post Do you 3D print your models? Then you should tell the SOLIDWORKS World appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Rod Mackay at August 11, 2016 06:41 PM

    SolidSmack

    Cool Tools of Doom: The Rugged Lenovo N22 Windows Notebook $249.99 (24% off)

    feature01

    It’s incredible what can be done with so little these days. While PDFs can now be signed from our smartphones and entire presentations can be given off of our tablets, the need for a laptop still hasn’t entirely gone away for most – particularly those who do 3D modeling.

    While it’s hardly a performer for any system-intensive 3D modeling program, the $299 Lenovo N22 Windows Notebook is ideal for students, everyday users, and those looking for a budget laptop solution for their Cloud computing needs.

    Rocking an Intel Celeron dual-core processor with 4GB of RAM and 128 GB of SSD storage, the N22 Windows Notebook also features a 10-hour battery, a heavy-duty port and hinge reinforcement with a sealed touchpad and a water-resistant keyboard – meaning, you don’t have to worry about it taking the occasional beating if you happen to throw it in your beach bag.

    Currently, the Lenovo N22 Windows Notebook is also on sale for $224.99 – nearly 25% off the original price.

    01

    Lenovo N22 Windows Notebook: $299 $224.99 (24% off)

    Features:

    • Get outstanding processing power w/ Intel Celeron dual-core processor
    • Access rich Windows 10 functionality at a great price point
    • Use 4 GB RAM & & 32 GB SSD storage to keep up with modern computing demands
    • Protect your data w/ Windows 10’s intuitive security
    • Work w/ up to 10 hours of battery life to get more done when you’re away from an outlet
    • Enjoy the rotatable camera’s flexibility when capturing photos or video
    • Rest easier w/ heavy-duty port & hinge reinforcement, a sealed touchpad, & a water-resistant keyboard

    Get yours here.

    Read Cool Tools of Doom: The Rugged Lenovo N22 Windows Notebook $249.99 (24% off) at SolidSmack.

    by SolidSmack at August 11, 2016 04:27 PM

    This is How you Paint a 3D Printed Mech

    gambody-3d-print-mech-paint-00

    Remember the Mechwarrior model we shared a few weeks ago? So. Good. We’re in the process of printing up one of our own and can’t wait to paint it.

    Gambody, the same place we bought the model, has a interesting little operation going. They started as a marketplace for 3D prints of video game models. Now, they’re preparing to launch an online workshop with video tutorials and step-by-step guidelines on everything from printing to painting your 3D printed miniatures in home conditions.

    The first glimpse of this is the paint process on a TAU XV109 Y’Vahra battlesuit from the Warhammer 40k miniatures game, perfectly sped up to catch all the detail in a short amount of time.

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RUA7QpxSDz0?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    Slick, eh? I would have opted for an airbrush or a few cans of Krylon before hitting it with a brush, but this is a bit more economical, I suppose. One thing they don’t go into however is prep and materials. First, you want to give it a good sanding. A rotary tool (Dremel or Proxxon) comes in handy for this. Next clean with paint thinner or acetone, then spray with a good primer–I recommend Rust Oleum Primer for the consistency and other paint color options or Tamiya primer if you prefer a gray primer. (Tip: drill a small hole in the bottom to stick a dowel rod in to make the spray painting go faster.)

    After that, you’re off to the races and ready to paint up your model. Remember, mask off any moving joint areas and mask off your face so you’re not sucking down bits of plastic dust whilst sanding.

    Have a 3D print paint tip? What paint do you use?

    gambody-3d-print-mech-paint-01

    gambody-3d-print-mech-paint-02

    gambody-3d-print-mech-paint-03

    gambody-3d-print-mech-paint-04

    Read This is How you Paint a 3D Printed Mech at SolidSmack.

    by Josh Mings at August 11, 2016 03:41 PM

    These Giant Kinetic Wood Insects Seamlessly Blend Engineering and Craft

    feature

    Having graduated from the ISI Yogyakarta (Art Institute) of Indonesia as a Craft Major just last year, 24-year-old Indonesian native Dedy Shofianto’s wood sculptures carry the same level of expertise you would expect from artists twice his age.

    As the winner of multiple Craft Prototype Design competitions during his tenure at ISI Yogyakarta, Shofianto specializes in creating kinetic sculptures of insect-like creatures made from locally-sourced jati (teak) wood that he animates with hidden electronics.

    Having plotted the kinetic schematics before carving all the wood parts by hand, Shofianto carries that rare hybrid of engineering and art that leads to impressive kinetic sculptures like these wild mechanical beasts:

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MsHCXKb2ovs?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    beetle-1

    beetle-2

    beetle-3

    beetle-5

    Find out more about Shofianto and how to purchase his pieces over at Redbase Contemporary Art.

    Read These Giant Kinetic Wood Insects Seamlessly Blend Engineering and Craft at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 11, 2016 02:59 PM

    The SOLIDWORKS Blog

    Team Lycan: BattleBots, Gripping Jaws, and SOLIDWORKS

    We are highlighting different BattleBots teams that use SOLIDWORKS, as BattleBots and SOLIDWORKS go hand in hand. In this post we asked Team Lycan’s team leader Ravi Baboolal about his experience with building a robot for the competition. I think you’ll enjoy his responses to our questions.

    SOLIDWORKS: How did you first learn about BattleBots?

    RAVI: My first experience with BattleBots was 13-14 years ago as a young teenager eager to figure out what he wanted to do when he grew up. It didn’t take long after watching the first episode on Comedy Central; I was to be an engineer in the pursuit of fighting robots!

    SOLIDWORKS: What made you decide to compete in the BattleBots tournament?

    RAVI: Two reasons: Partially to fulfill that childhood dream of actually competing on the grand stage of engineering that is BattleBots; partially to help inspire the next generation of robot designers.

    Copyright © 2016 BattleBots Inc. Photographer Daniel Longmire

    SOLIDWORKS: How do you get started building a team/Bot?

    RAVI: This journey began about 13 years ago when I found a small local robot-fighting competition in Toronto. They hosted robots weighing in at anywhere from 1 lb all the way up to 30 lbs. I joined forces with a friend and we built our first little 1 lb robot and entered it in the tournament. The hobby has been a constant ever since.

    SOLIDWORKS: Why did you decide to use SOLIDWORKS? What advantage does SOLIDWORKS give you when building a Bot?

    RAVI: I’ve been using SOLIDWORKS for a number of years, before college and refined those skills while in college. I now use SOLIDWORKS daily at work. It was a no-brainer. In fact, most of the team uses SOLIDWORKS in their day-to-day work as well. As an industry standard it only made sense. The fact that everyone knew how to navigate and utilize the software was a huge help. The sheet metal, tab and weldment interfaces helped move things along very quickly and the vast library of materials was critical to ensuring our design would meet the maximum weight of 250 lb.

    SOLIDWORKS: How many hours did it take to design your Bot in SW?

    RAVI: Across two designers the process took nearly 80 man hours, including the 3-4 different revisions of Lycan.

    SOLIDWORKS: Have a favorite SOLIDWORKS shortcut/feature?

    RAVI: “Mass Properties” for the BattleBot builder, it is a life saver. You need to keep track of every bolt, every washer and certainly the mass of any armor going on the robot. The accuracy of Mass Properties and the ability to override certain parts (like setting custom weights for wheels etc.) is a very powerful tool in any builder’s arsenal.

    A close second is the belt/chain feature. Being able to produce perfect centre to centre distances for drive chains is a much appreciated bonus.

    SOLIDWORKS: What would you change in preparation for BattleBots season 3?

    RAVI: Well, there are a lot of design changes going into Lycan for Season 3. Fortunately we are able to move through them fairly quickly using the sheet metal function and weldments. Lycan 2.0 will feature a fairly unique main weapon; I feel the SOLIDWORKS motion study feature will come in handy there.

     

    SOLIDWORKS: What are the best weapons you faced? What were best defenses other Bots had?

    RAVI: The big kinetic energy weapons are always the scariest, like TombStone’s blade or Invaders massive titanium shell.  However I’m always impressed with weapons like Bronco’s flipper or Chomp’s hammer. These pneumatic monsters are truly something to behold, I have a soft spot for pneumatics. When it comes to defense it’s a versatile playing field, you have robots with a large steel or titanium plow or robots like RingMaster who are essentially all opposition in their design. That big spinning ring counts as a weapon AND defense, as they say sometimes the best defense is a better offence. Of the BattleBots we’ve seen so far I think LockJaw had a good defense in its fight against Yeti, it was able to grab and hold their drum without suffering damage to any critical components. It’s in that fight that we learn the best defense in a fighting robot is actually an air gap between armor and components. If your opponents weapon gets through your armor but has 2-3 inches of air left to go before hitting anything important then you can keep fighting. It’s much more efficient weight wise to use thinner armor and air gaps then using 1-inch steel plate!

    SOLIDWORKS: If you could develop the “dream” weapon for your Bot, what would it be?

    RAVI: I’m still hunting for the perfect weapon, I have dreams of a large robot with big heavy fist like appendages, and using these appendages to continuously hammer on an opponent. As perfect as that image seems it is unfortunately not a high damage type weapon, so the search continues.

    SOLIDWORKS:  Who do you believe is the toughest competitor in Season 2?

    RAVI: Minitour has proven to be relentless in its purist for destruction; that is a tough robot to beat. Speaking of destruction and tough competitors let’s talk Tombstone. Tombstone is a fairly simple robot, but there’s a reason it scores 100% on damage. That massive spinning blade does so much damage and has so much reach it is extremely difficult to fight. How do you get around that weapon? You have to be able to survive a handful of blows before you can hope to do any damage yourself. That’s a tall order, making Tombstone one of the toughest bots to fight.

    SOLIDWORKS: What has been your favorite BattleBots experience?

    RAVI: My favorite BattleBots moment…This picture about sums it up. Being in the pits with so many beautiful machines, talented builders and all the friends I’ve made over 13 years of fighting robot.

    SOLIDWORKS: When/what was the first robot you built?

    RAVI: My first robot was a small two wheel drive robot build almost 14 years ago named “Killer Instinct”. It was supposed to fight in the 1-lb weight class but ended up being heavy and fighting in the 3-lb bracket. It didn’t do well trying to punch above its weight, and needed some very intense repairs after its first fight.

    SOLIDWORKS: How well did you do in your first competition?  What did you learn from this experience?

    RAVI: The first competition held an important lesson, attrition is the key. No matter how beat up your bot is you must give it your all to repair and rebuild, you simply cannot give up. This need to repair eventually guides your design; your robot must be easily repairable and easy to work on.

    After our first fight against a 3-lb Tombstone type robot our 1.5-lb robot was left broken and defeated. We ended up having to rebuild the entire frame overnight, a tall order when you’re working with a small hack saw and a screw driver. Having rebuilt the robot overnight we returned the next day to meet a similar fate.

    I learned that defeat is only the beginning in this unique hobby, a majority of the fun and challenge is the building process. The destruction is really an excuse to keep building!

    SOLIDWORKS: What lessons did you learn from Season 1?

    RAVI: Season 1 showed us that the new BattleBots requires a little more show then most of the competitions I’m used to. The BattleBox can be distracting with the lights, hazards and cheering crowds so the robots really need to pop. I feel one of the best ways to do that is by building something other than a box on wheels. Melding functional design with ascetics presents a real challenge to the designer, meaning spending a lot of time in the computer aided design phase. The geometry of the robot itself should present an eye catching design!

    Thanks again Ravi, and Team Lycan for your insight into the world of BattleBots. Be sure to check out BattleBots every Thursday night on ABC, and find more about all teams here: battlebots.com.

    Author information

    Cliff Medling
    Cliff Medling
    Cliff Medling is a Senior Marketing Manager at SolidWorks

    The post Team Lycan: BattleBots, Gripping Jaws, and SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

    by Cliff Medling at August 11, 2016 02:10 PM

    SolidSmack

    The Metal Delta is a Surprisingly Good 3D Printer Option

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    Now on Kickstarter, the Metal Delta 3D printer from Blue Eagle Labs offers some very interesting features at a very low price.

    Blue Eagle Labs previously sold the Kossel Clear delta 3D printer on Kickstarter in 2013, which was wildly successful, reaching almost 27X their funding target. It took them a year to make and deliver the machines, but they did so.

    Now they’re launching a vastly improved machine, the Metal Delta. While the new machine is also a delta-style device, like its predecessor, the Metal Delta includes a number of interesting features.

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    First, the machine include a number of robust parts, some made from “3mm hot rolled steel”, like the all-metal frame. There’s also “Ultra-Precision Magnetic Ball Joints” to provide easy movement as well as a rapid method of swapping out the toolhead. They say the arms of the Metal Delta are essential “zero backlash”, with a maximum of 0.05mm variations within movements.

    All these changes mean the prints should be of higher quality and the machine should be reliable.

    The build volume is reasonably large, 250mm diameter by 280mm tall, and the machine includes an auto-calibration feature.

    The company has also decided to use faster 32-bit controllers and 0.9 degree stepper motors that could translate into higher print resolutions.

    But there’s more.

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    This machine includes a dual extruder, and it’s not like the ones you normally see. It’s actually a specially designed hot end that can accept two input filaments and mix them on the fly. I’m not sure they have the software to properly drive this feature, but it’s certainly a very advanced feature to find on a low-priced unit like the Metal Delta.

    For extra cost you can add a laser engraver! This toolhead simply snaps in and out courtesy of the magnetic ball joint attachments. This transforms your 3D printer instantly into a laser engraver, with its 2W laser. This should be sufficiently powerful to engrave wood and cut paper, but not not cut wood. Very useful, nevertheless.

    metal-delta-3d-printer-05

    Also for a small fee you can add an advanced print surface from GeckoTek that is magnetically attached and provides a permanent adhesion surface for highly reliable 3D printing.

    Finally, the machine is bundled with Autodesk Fusion 360, a popular 3D design tool, or at least one year subscription to the service.

    metal-delta-3d-printer-06

    I should mention that the Metal Delta is in fact a kit that you must assemble yourself. Now before you dismiss this option, you should know that Blue Eagle Labs has spent considerable time engineering this machine to be very simple to assemble. They’ve designed the parts in such a way as to simplify installation of components significantly. In fact, they say the entire machine can be built in only five hours.

    You might be wondering how much this interesting machine is going to impact your budget, and it’s actually quite low. Keep in mind the pricing is at Kickstarter levels, so perhaps it may rise in the future, but for now, you can get the basic PLA-only kit for only USD $499. An ABS-capable version (with heated bed) is now USD$599, still a great price. A full version with all upgrades (less the laser engraver) is USD $800, and it’s USD $900 with the laser.

    All good prices for what seems to be a very reasonable 3D printer.

    Read more at Fabbaloo

    Read The Metal Delta is a Surprisingly Good 3D Printer Option at SolidSmack.

    by Fabbaloo at August 11, 2016 12:12 PM

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    How to create a SOLIDWORKS Composer Executable (.exe) Package [VIDEO]

    There are a number of options to help export final outputs for your Composer projects. Perhaps one of the most useful options to save out your composer projects for customers or clients viewing is the Save as SOLIDWORKS Composer Package option.

    This option saves an .exe file which holds ALL project information as well as a copy of the SOLIDWORKS Composer viewer.  This means that anyone on nearly any machine can open and view your project, without needing any Composer software installer on their computer.

    An easy to open package

    To save a SOLIDWORKS Composer Package simply go to File > Save as Package, this will save your entire project as a SOLIDWORKS Composer Package (.exe).  It also gives you options for password protection and accuracy reduction to help protect your highly secure projects.  Depending on your project size, the file compression software does a great job to reduce your package to a few megabytes, which means it can easily be sent over email or thrown onto a USB drive.

    The video below shows the benefits of the Save as Package function:

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rJxDryRr2BA?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

    Learn more about Composer

    To learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer attend our essentials training course either in a classroom near you or live online.

    The post How to create a SOLIDWORKS Composer Executable (.exe) Package [VIDEO] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Justin Flett at August 11, 2016 12:00 PM

    August 10, 2016

    SolidSmack

    Golf Caddy Design 2.0: Ditch the Human, Use the GolfBoard

    golfboard-golf-caddy-00

    You can get a pretty good workout walking 18-holes and whacking balls all day, but grab a cart and you can forget about that 10,000 step goal on your Fitbit. Hate the cart, but want something slightly more dangerous? Meet the GolfBoard, perfect for golfers who can’t sit or surfers who hung up the board a pair of knickers.

    Co-founded by Don Wildman, founder of Bally’s Total Fitness, and world-class surfer Laird Hamilton, the GolfBoard is a motorized board that aims to be faster, more efficient and more hip than the traditional golf cart. Golfers can ride the board, standing three different ways: bag mount with stability handle, classic carry when you want to carry the bag, and free ride when you’re playing through with a single club.

    The design team began with the basic build of a skateboard, then began building electric, four-wheel drive, mountain boards. They wanted to make sure the board was sturdy enough for places where there are a lot of hills and unpaved roads, but reliable and easy to control. Prototypes were made from modified MBS mountain boards paired with a high-performance electric airplane motor to control each of the four wheels. The batteries and controllers were then placed on top or bottom of the board decks. The prototypes helped them further develop the board, though they were unreliable. Years later they began finalized the design for the GolfBoard, launched it through a successful Kickstarter campaign and have people and courses using them all around the world.

    golfboard-golf-caddy-01

    Some of the features of the GolfBoard include a steering damper for added stability when making sharp turns, a 15″ wide deck for easy steering, a stand up handlebar, 4WD gearbox, and easy to remove/replace tired and rims. The board also comes with a handheld controller allowing users to go forwards, backwards, accelerate, and decelerate. The GolfBoard uses automotive-grade lithium-ion batteries for optimized energy density, thermal management, and safety. It has a minimum range of 18 holes per charge, perfect for a whole day of golf or one hour trying to spin out of a sand trap.

    The GolfBoard is a different no doubt, claiming to “change the way you experience golf.” If we got our hands on one, I can guarantee it will change the way YOU experience golf. It’s quite the luxury, but lack the ability to hang tassels around the roof-line like traditional golf carts. Both get you from one hole to the next, but that GolfBoard is sure to make your golfing buddies jealous.

    Courses and Country Clubs are already adding them as transportation options, and you can snag one yourself (or lease) for $6,500 out the door. While it’s a cool ride, you just can’t trick it out like a golf out. But hey, since we’re at it, let’s just mount one of these to the side of our cart and have the best of both worlds. DONE.

    I see those motorized skateboards at retail stores for around $100. I think some clever SolidSmack readers know what I’m thinking.

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/B9VuKK5sbQo?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

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    golfboard-golf-caddy-05

    golfboard-golf-caddy-06

    Read Golf Caddy Design 2.0: Ditch the Human, Use the GolfBoard at SolidSmack.

    by Cabe Atwell at August 10, 2016 09:34 PM

    How to Make a Glow in the Dark Car Vehicle Antenna

    glow-in-the-dark-car-antenna-botzen-00

    I was having a tough time finding my white car occasionally. I wanted to remedy that situation by having an antenna that was unique and stood out in a crowd. I settled on a Glow option as it would be a lighter color than other vehicles and “of course” glows in the dark!

    MATERIALS

    How to Make a Glow in the Dark Car Vehicle Antenna

    glow-in-the-dark-car-antenna-botzen-01

    STEPS

    Step 1: Prep the Antenna

    I started by simply unscrewing and removing the antenna from the vehicle so I could work on it. First, I lightly sanded the antenna so I could prep it for the adhesion promoter. Then washed it with dish soap to remove any loose particles from sanding, and degreased it.

    glow-in-the-dark-car-antenna-botzen-02

    Step 2: Apply Adhesion Promoter

    Since I had no idea what kind of plastic I was coating I did not want to leave this to chance. I applied three coats of Dupli-Color adhesion promoter to the antenna to guarantee that whatever paint I applied on the antenna would stick. The directions recommend to wait ten minutes between coats.

    glow-in-the-dark-car-antenna-botzen-07

    Step 3: Apply the Primer

    Next, I laid down a light coat of white automotive primer to create a white base coat. (See video) I kept it light since the I did not want there to be any chance of it cracking. The main purpose of the primer was for the white base color and to improve the adhesion of the plastiDip.

    glow-in-the-dark-car-antenna-botzen-03

    Step 4: Apply the White Plasti Dip

    Once the primer had a chance to set but not fully dry (about 30 minutes) I began to lay down the first of the three coats of Plasti Dip. I waited about 20 minutes in between the coats for the material to flash before I applied the next coat. (“Flash” means some of the solvent in the paint has had time to evaporate, you can tell this when the paint changes from glossy to a satin finish)

    glow-in-the-dark-car-antenna-botzen-04

    Step 5: Apply the Glow Powder

    After the third and last white Plasti Dip coat, I immediately started to sprinkle on the Ultra Blue Glow in the dark powder (see video). I then sprayed a coat of clear Plasti Dip on top of the powder and repeated the process with another coat of glow powder. I did this three times until I felt there was sufficient glow in the dark material on the antenna.

    glow-in-the-dark-car-antenna-botzen-05

    Step 4: Apply the Clear Plasti Dip

    I then let that dry about an hour and applied two more coats of clear plasti Dip to seal the powder and make the antenna smooth again. I let it dry for 24 hours before I re-attached it back onto my car.

    glow-in-the-dark-car-antenna-botzen-08

    That’s it. It glows at dusk, maybe last for 2-3 hours, but is easy to recharge with the headlight of your car, or cell phone flash. Pretty sweet driving around with a glow in the dark whip tail on your car. Nobody else has one! At least for now. Good luck to everyone that tries the mod. Have fun.

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    Read How to Make a Glow in the Dark Car Vehicle Antenna at SolidSmack.

    by Eric Strebel at August 10, 2016 08:54 PM

    Graphics Systems SolidNotes

    How to Export Using a Custom Coordinate System in SOLIDWORKS

    I have often been asked about coordinate systems when it comes to CAM vs.CAD. In a nutshell, CAD systems like SOLIDWORKS and CAM systems use different directions for defining coordinate systems, specifically in regards to Y and Z. The result is, when a model is exported from SOLIDWORKS and imported to a CAM system, the model comes up in the CAM system in the "wrong" orientation. The good news is a SOLIDWORKS user can make their own coordinate system specifically for use in the export process, thus resulting in a model coming up in the correct orientation in the CAM program.

    The first step is to make your new coordinate system. Click on the "Reference Geometry" button on the Features tab of the Command Manager:

    Solidworks Reference Coordinate System

    Next, select a point on the model or use the Origin of the model to define the origin of the new coordinate system:

    Solidworks Reference Coordinate system define origin

    Now select edges to define any two of the X, Y, and Z axes for your coordinate system. Use the double-arrow buttons if you need to reverse positive direction. In my case, I'm picking edges on the model to define X and Z as shown:

    Solidworks Reference Coordinate System Select Edges to define

    The final result is a new coordinate system. Notice the direction of X, Y, and Z in the new coordinate system vs. the standard coordinate system.

    Solidworks reference new coordinate system

    To export the model using the new coordinate system, do a Save As, choose your file type, click the Options button, and make sure you change the coordinate system from "Default" to your new coordinate system near the bottom of the dialog box.

    Solidworks export new coordinate system

    solidworks coordinate system set as default

    And, that's it! Now you can save out any SOLIDWORKS file to any coordinate system you can define.

    by John Setzer at August 10, 2016 06:38 PM

    SolidSmack

    Model of the Week: LED Bridge Lamp [LIGHT IT UP!]

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    You know a mask of light that shoots out 50 million lumens whenever someone looks at you tends to cause temporary blindness and bouts of projectile vomit, so something at your desk that is still 1) eye-catching and 2) unique, is a must. Janis Jakaitis has a solution that will keep your 3D printer busy and your co-workers from loosing their morning donut, with a light arc customizable enough for the most unspacious of unspacious cubicles or work desks.

    You could go to the nearest store and buy an LED lamp, but that would be totally lame. You need to go through the joy and trouble of making your own 3D printed LED Bridge Lamp that shoots beautiful arced LED color from above your head. Janis has done the tough part for you, creating the first incredible prototype, getting feedback and improving the design to be even more incredible. His LED Bridge Lamp was modeled in SketchUp and Fusion 360, then printed on a sturdy Original Prusa i3.

    He provides all the .stl files and some simple PDFs to get you going. Though each section requires assembly of all the sides, he also provides a one-piece segment the print and assemble should you not give a poo if there’s a slight difference in each section. Me? I’m taking the easy route and installing some stage lighting. Yes, WITH PYROTECHNICS AND SMOKE MACHINES.

    You can download the files on Thingiverse, and have arcs of light all around your house by the weekend! (Bonus! See the previous LED Bridge Lamp with LED specs here!)

    Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

    led-bridge-light-02

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    Read Model of the Week: LED Bridge Lamp [LIGHT IT UP!] at SolidSmack.

    by Josh Mings at August 10, 2016 06:13 PM

    Glassblower Chris Mosey Reflects on the Rewarding Complexities of Working with Glass

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    While nearly every material requires some sort of a process to bring it from a raw state to a finished design, few materials demand the attention of the creator quite like glass. From the heat to the constant movement, and the teamwork often involved in creating larger pieces, the process of creating glass objects is not only sensitive but also a highly-skilled trade.

    Among others who have chosen glass as their medium is Chattanooga, Tennessee–based glassblower and ceramic artist Chris Mosey.

    Known for his original blown glass sculptures that appear to freeze liquid-like forms in a solid state, Mosey took his first glassblowing class over 20 years ago at the Appalachian Center for Craft and has since been churning out glass objects that “invite touch and exploit the tactile quality that glass can possess.”

    Aiming to capture the glassblowing process with deeper insight, Filmmaker Bill Cox recently documented Mosey at work in his 5,000-square-foot Chattanooga iGNis Glass Studio:

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="341" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/176650353?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="800"></iframe>

    Read Glassblower Chris Mosey Reflects on the Rewarding Complexities of Working with Glass at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 10, 2016 04:29 PM

    The SOLIDWORKS Blog

    Recreating Classic Cars with CAD: Tucker Torpedo Project Update

    Welcome to part seven of a blog series covering how a group of car and engineering enthusiasts are bringing the Tucker Torpedo concept car to life. If you haven’t read the other Tucker Blog entries, you can get caught up here:

    Part 1    Part 2    Part 3    Part 4    Part 5    Part 6

    In the last blog I reported on the work Bob Cuneo of Chassis Dynamics has completed on the Torpedo chassis. The majority of the structural fabrication was completed; the front and rear suspension components were assembled and installed as was the engine, transmission, and electronics. At this point, Bob turned his attention to the engine and getting it and the rest of the drivetrain operational.

    In Blog # 2 the Porsche 964 was introduced as the “donor car” from which the Torpedo chassis was fabricated. Since the original Porsche drivetrain was retained that has an automatic transmission it will require the original wiring harness and electronics to be retained as well in order to function properly as seen below:

    tucker_7a.jpg

    Bob worked with a local Porsche mechanic, Mark Lianos, and hooked up the electronics and got them operational again without making any smoke :). This is not an easy thing to do because some components have dependencies on other components. For instance, if you take out the radio in a German luxury car you won’t be able to start the engine! Since the Torpedo isn’t using all of the Porsche, like the electronics instrument cluster, Bob and the mechanic needed to figure out how the wiring needed to be fabricated in order to get everything working properly. The Porsche engine is running and the transmission is working correctly. One thing Bob needed to keep in mind is the location of each of the electronic components. Each component needs to be mounted in places that won’t get in the way of other design elements like to interior which hasn’t even been designed yet.

    After everything was working in the electronics arena, the next step was to re-make the wiring harness. The original wiring harness was cut up and cobbled together to get things working. It was not going to suffice for the Torpedo. A new proper wiring harness was needed. So, Bob set out to have a new harness built to replace the original one and the images you see here reflect the new and neat wiring harness.

    Not only has the electronics been taking up Bob’s time he’s also been busy completing the chassis with its unique turntable the interior seats are mounted to. This is one of many unique features of the Torpedo. So, why does the Torpedo need a turntable for the seats? Well, if you look at these images you’ll notice the roof is very rounded. Couple that with the driver’s seat centered and not on the left side like the car you drive it’s going to be a bit clumsy to get into the driver’s seat. So, the best way to solve this ergonomic problem is to position the driver’s seat at the door opening. Thus, the reason for the turntable.

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    Here’s the chassis and turntable frame modeled in SOLIDWORKS.

    tucker_7f.png

    Sean Tucker designed the triangular frame and the seat support frame you see in the image below. (Check the 2nd blog on this also) The seat support frame rotates inside the turntable frame and is driven by an electric motor with a right angle gear drive. Each seat support rotates driven with a chain drive. As the turntable rotates the seats will rotate a corresponding amount so the seat is in the correct position at the door opening. To make sure the seat support frame is doesn’t move while driving and to allow it to rotate when needed a linear solenoid is used to lock and unlock it. I’m sure Rob Ida and Sean will be using some cool electronics to control all of this.

    tucker_7b.jpg

    Speaking of Rob he’s been focused on the Tucker since the ’40 Merc has been completed. He’s still busy with it though as it keeps winning at more car shows. Here’s a nice video of the Merc at the Prestigious Amelia Island Concours earlier this spring. The Concours is where extremely rare and very expensive cars are on display. Please check it out.

    Rob’s work on the Torpedo is still focused on the body. But he’s shifted his efforts to the body support structure. Since the body shell is .03” thick aluminum it’ll need a lot of support in all the right locations. I’ll be writing about how Rob is doing this and why in the next blog. Until then here’s a couple of teasers of Rob’s recent work.

    tucker_7c.jpg

    Author information

    Mike Sabocheck
    Senior Area Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS, NA East

    The post Recreating Classic Cars with CAD: Tucker Torpedo Project Update appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

    by Mike Sabocheck at August 10, 2016 12:30 PM

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    SOLIDWORKS Composer Animation Timeline Enhancements

    SOLIDWORKS Composer like all other SOLIDWORKS products is constantly being improved from year to year.  One of the biggest enhancements for the 2016 release in my mind has been the improvements made to the animation timeline.

    In previous versions, the animation timeline had a limited number of rows representing the animation keys.  There was a row for properties, for camera views, and for digger keys.  These were navigated through the colors of the keys or by using the key filters.  In the screenshot below you can see how the animation timeline looks in the versions prior to 2016:

    Animation Timeline 2015

    Composer 2015 Animation Timeline

    In SOLIDWORKS Composer 2016 a number of rows have been added to improve the timeline navigation as shown in the image below:

    Animation Timeline

    Composer 2016 Enhanced Animation Timeline

    To show you exactly what each row refers to it has now be labelled in the timeline.  A location row and a viewport row have been added, and you can also see that the properties row now shows the most used properties in animations. Plus your key filters are displayed to improve timeline navigation even further!

    Learn more about Composer

    To learn more about the latest release attend our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training course. You can take a class either in a classroom near you or live online

    The post SOLIDWORKS Composer Animation Timeline Enhancements appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Justin Flett at August 10, 2016 12:00 PM

    SolidSmack

    Weekly App Smack 32.16: High Dive, Picniic, Page, DayGram and More…

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    Time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device, be it iPhone, Android or Windows!

    The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

    Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

    Hit it!

    High Dive

    “Help Walter break the world outdoor diving record in this pseudo–endless arcade diver!”

    HighDive

    Picniic

    “Picniic combines all the tools a parent needs in one, central location that can be accessed and updated by all family members, keeping everyone organized and on the same page.”

    Picnic

    Ulysses

    “Ulysses is your one-stop writing environment on iOS. Whether you’re a novelist, a journalist, a student or a blogger – if you love to write and write a lot, Ulysses gives you a uniquely streamlined toolset, covering every phase of the writing process.”

    Ulysses

    Amber Weather

    “Amber Weather is your best personal weather channel providing current weather for today and daily & hourly weather forecasts based on your current location or any location in the world.”

    AmberWeather

    Page

    “Start writing better and faster with Ginger’s revolutionary Writing & Translating app.”

    Page

    Daygram

    “Daygram is a simple diary application that provide users with the charming sense of e-ink. By writing down your everyday life events with Daygram, keeping a diary is no longer a burden.”

    DayGram

    Read Weekly App Smack 32.16: High Dive, Picniic, Page, DayGram and More… at SolidSmack.

    by SolidSmack at August 10, 2016 11:23 AM

    August 09, 2016

    SolidSmack

    Coffee Goes IoT With This High-End, Portable Grinder

    gir-smart-grinder-coffee-iot-01

    Ahhh, coffee. That rich, aromatic mixture of art and science. Stray a little on bean roast or brew temp and you’re in the repugnant realm of sippin’ a day-old cup of joe from 7-11. NOT GOOD. Brew your beans at home? Well, look at you, you connoisseur of fine caffeinated beverages, you. But do your beans connect to your router and smart phone? Yeah, of course not. Not YET.

    You’d be surprised. There are actually a few Wi-Fi connected grinders on the market, but none are able to monitor bean freshness and alert users to replenish said beans. Well, none except the Get It Right Voltaire Smart Grinder.

    The secret behind the Voltaire Smart Grinder is its array of sensors, which monitor temperature, humidity, BEAN MASS, gas concentration and volume. This ensures you maintain the freshest beans possible. Do people actually keep beans in a grinder long enough for them to go bad? Apparently they do. It doesn’t end there though as the device also monitors the grinder functions, including fineness, grind time, mass and volume throughput.

    gir-smart-grinder-coffee-iot-03

    When the bean count runs low, the Voltaire sends you an alert or, if you prefer, orders more beans from your favorite roaster. GIR says they plan to collaborate with roasters, subscription servers and even Amazon Dash Replenishment Service (DRS) for the auto replacement option.

    As far as features go, it’s what you would expect to see in a high-end grinder, including high-grade ceramic conical burrs, an LED timer and a LiFePO4 Battery pack for grinding on the go. The accompanying app can be used to monitor your grinder, to makes sure it’s behaving and not secretly grinding beans when you’re away from home.

    As an engineer (and chronic coffee drinker), I wanted to find out what prompted GIR to design a “Smart Grinder” and how it came about. Here’s what GIR’s CEO, Samantha Rose, told us:

    “One of our favorite design tasks is to take an ordinary object – like the spatula that gave GIR its start as a company – and hotrod it. Voltaire was inspired by a chef friend who said, ‘what do you think about spice grinders?’ And the wheels started spinning. From our perspective, it’s almost impossible to separate the suggestion of a product from our namesake impulse to “get it right.” And in the case of a grinder, the way to get it right was to make it good enough for even the nerdiest coffee aficionados.”

    She went on to say, “Of course, once you do that, it’s no longer just a spice grinder. It’s a really, really good coffee grinder. We spent a lot of time thinking about components, configuration, portability; rethinking grinders from the inside out. Voltaire is the result of that simultaneous ‘blank slate’ approach and obsession with detail.”

    Do they have any other interesting projects in the pipeline? “We’re working on some coffee accessories that are available as well–Travel cups for coffee and tea, an espresso tamper and tamping state, and a pour over stand. From there, we’ll jump back into the ‘tools’ category this fall, with GIR tongs and whisks.”

    With a successful Kickstarter campaign that beat their $100,000 USD goal, hitting $150,241 with 1,284 backers, production is under way with grinders scheduled to deliver December 2016. Those interested in getting their hands on the Voltaire can watch the GIR website for upcoming availability.

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zSiDOg0BK10?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

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    Read Coffee Goes IoT With This High-End, Portable Grinder at SolidSmack.

    by Cabe Atwell at August 09, 2016 08:56 PM

    This Insane Pen Claims to Put a Handheld Scanner and Over 16 Million Colors in Your Pocket

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    It wasn’t too long ago when having maybe 3 or so colors in a single mechanical spring-loaded pen was a big deal – but what if you could carry nearly every shade (approximately 16 million colors) in your pocket wherever you go. That’s just crazy.

    As the latest high-tech art tool, the Cronzy pen is a device that allows users to manually select one of (a purported) 16 million colors from an accompanying app for marking up their latest writing assignment or coloring their Lisa Frank-inspired rainbow unicorn drawing. Even more impressive, the pen also includes a built-in “color scanner” for users to scan the world around them and create color-accurate sketches in real-time without the guesswork or color generalization.

    Of course, the biggest question on everybody’s mind is, “how in the heck do you squeeze 16 million colors into a single pen?”

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HdLG1rSQKiY?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    According to the company, the pen’s main mechanism is based on solenoid valves that are controlled by an algorithm for mixing colors. In their current development stage, the engineers have been able to achieve high-precision mixing of CMYKW colors which exist as ink cartridges within the pen similar to an inkjet printer.

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Z0ewjKLyKlk?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    Although the Cronzy team already has plans to release a consumer-ready version of their technology in the near future, they’re hoping to speed up development and gain initial feedback via IndieGoGo. Those interested in being among the first to carry 16 million colors in their pocket can pre-order the Cronzy starting at $179.

    Read This Insane Pen Claims to Put a Handheld Scanner and Over 16 Million Colors in Your Pocket at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 09, 2016 04:27 PM

    The World’s First Smart Football Just Might Change the Way the Game is Played

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    For some, it seems to come almost too easily before even having started grade school. For others, it can take a lifetime (if it ever happens) to master. Regardless, throwing a perfect football spiral is necessary for accuracy, and for the first time ever, beginner and expert players will now be able to measure those spirals with surprisingly honest feedback thanks to Wilson’s new smart football.

    Featuring a small embedded chip with accelerometers, a gyroscope, and Bluetooth connectivity for capturing and relaying football throwing data via an accompanying app, the Wilson X Connected Football is the most advanced football to ever enter the game. Heck, not even the pros have had access to this level of information before.

    A single throw of the Wilson X football can tell a player or a coach the football’s peak velocity, an estimate of how far the ball traveled, the spin rate (RPM), whether a pass was caught or dropped, and finally, the spiral efficiency based on how “tight” of a spiral was thrown:

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sDKF0rO2m2g?feature=oembed&amp;wmode=opaque" width="800"></iframe>

    Similar to the company’s smart basketball that was released last year, the football also includes an embedded power source that’s good for 500 hours of continuous play. That said, the sensors are in a constant sleep state unless they are awoken and put in motion. The result is over 200,000 throws without the need to charge or replace a battery. In fact, the embedded chip is so light, it’s not even noticeable.

    At $199, the “The World’s First Smart Football” might not be an ideal ball for casual pick-up games in the park, however, it just might be the perfect practicing tool for becoming your team’s next MVP.

    Find out more over at Wilson.

    Read The World’s First Smart Football Just Might Change the Way the Game is Played at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 09, 2016 03:51 PM

    Designer Paul Foeckler Turns to Firewood to Create His Latest Lighting Collection

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    While most people might approach freshly cut firewood as a way of fueling their bonfires or keeping their house warm on cold nights, designer Paul Foeckler has a different idea of harnessing light.

    Using carefully selected pieces of firewood sourced from California forests, the LA-based woodworker forgoes setting a match to the wood and instead slices the firewood into precise slices, which then become the basis for his minimalist light designs that make up the Split Grain Collection.

    Interestingly enough, the idea for the project came when Foeckler noticed that the exterior texture and shape of a piece of ordinary firewood looked “too beautiful” to burn. After experimenting with wood splitting techniques, he discovered he could enhance the organic properties by sawing the forms into cross sections and lighting them in such a way that further revealed the grain patterns.

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    Says Foeckler:

    “The final works are minimalist and formal with a strong architectural sensibility which I think poetically speaks to the noble trees they came from. The balance between organic nature and refined technological materials is what I strive for in each piece with the added intention to aesthetically elevate both. I hope my work allows people to reflect upon nature in both intimate and public contemporary spaces.”

    Read Designer Paul Foeckler Turns to Firewood to Create His Latest Lighting Collection at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 09, 2016 02:20 PM

    The SOLIDWORKS Blog

    Produce Better-Performing, More Reliable Heavy Equipment with SOLIDWORKS Simulation

    Whether you’re a leading manufacturer of drilling rigs for oil and gas exploration like Paranthaman Exporters or the leader in design, manufacture, and marketing of aerial work platforms like SOCAGE, SOLIDWORKS Simulation can benefit you. While these heavy equipment manufacturers work in different industries, both can attest to the importance of cutting development time, saving money, and providing customers with reliable equipment.

    Most of the time, people believe they have to tackle one problem before moving on to the next, instead of taking both issues head on. With SOLIDWORKS Simulation, you don’t have to choose which issue gets priority over the other; you can eliminate both. It’s like filling two needs with one deed.

    truck.png

    Regardless of what product industry you’re in, SOLIDWORKS Simulation software can save your design and validation processes valuable time and money. Fabio Di Minico, Technical Director of SOCAGE recalls, “By enabling us to simulate and accurately predict how structural and kinematic design behavior will affect performance, SOLIDWORKS Simulation and SOLIDWORKS Motion software provide significant advantages in terms of a better project quality, which means that we produce better-performing and more reliable equipment.”

    For SOCAGE’s Design Head, Ramesh Rajamani, “SOLIDWORKS Simulation Professional software ran linear static stress analyses not only on critical components but also on each subassembly of the rig. This capability has allowed us to reduce the weight of our rigs by ten percent while maintaining strength and performance.”

    Using integrated SOLIDWORKS Simulation tools enables SOCAGE to achieve its overarching objectives of developing lighter, more compact aerial platforms while ensuring user safety.

    Using integrated SOLIDWORKS Simulation
    tools enables SOCAGE to achieve its
    overarching objectives of developing
    lighter, more compact aerial platforms
    while ensuring user safety.

     

    By using SOLIDWORKS Simulation you can detect all the minute, hidden bugs in your systems that have been slowly eating away at your time and money. As you uncover those weaknesses, the software allows you to improve the durability and performance of the equipment, which in turn leaves you with a happier customer.

    Read SOCAGE and Paranthaman Exporters full case study to learn what other SOLIDWORKS tools these companies are taking advantage of. Visit our Industrial Machinery and Heavy Equipment page to see how SOLIDWORKS product development solutions can help you quickly design complex assemblies and verify strength, durability, and performance to outpace your competitors by creating better machines at a lower cost.

    Author information

    SOLIDWORKS
    Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

    The post Produce Better-Performing, More Reliable Heavy Equipment with SOLIDWORKS Simulation appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

    by SOLIDWORKS at August 09, 2016 02:00 PM

    SolidSmack

    SolidSmack Radio | Sketch Slayer (Cloud Edition)

    feature

    This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

    This week we’ll start things off with “Southern Skies” from Yuck and work our way through tracks from Mr. Gnome, Tortoise, Axel Boman, Hundred Waters and others before wrapping up with “I’m Gone” from Tamaryn.

    Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

    *Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

    <iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:7kNGBsTyhHtawez98Lfgwi" width="100%"></iframe>

    Read SolidSmack Radio | Sketch Slayer (Cloud Edition) at SolidSmack.

    by SolidSmack at August 09, 2016 01:15 PM

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    SOLIDWORKS PDM Failed to create temporary file for SOLIDWORKS Simulation

    If your SOLIDWORKS Simulation results folder is associated with PDM, you may receive the error message ‘Failed to create temporary file‘. This can happen when PDM attempts to create a preview of the Simulation results. This will typically occur when you try to create a new mesh, or show a result plot.

    To avoid this error, you can add Simulation .cwr file to the Exclusion list located from the Display pull-down, of the PDM local vault view.

    Exclude .cwr file types in SOLIDWORKS PDM

    Exclude File Types in SOLIDWORKS PDM

    Alternatively, you can check-out the relevant .cwr file.

    The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Failed to create temporary file for SOLIDWORKS Simulation appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at August 09, 2016 12:00 PM

    SolidSmack

    20 Product Designers You Should Follow on Instagram Right Now

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    Love ’em or just plain don’t have time for ’em, social media platforms are here to stay. While you don’t necessarily need to be an expert at Tweetin’ or Facebookin’, there’s a lot to be gained from staying in contact with old colleagues or finding inspiration for your next side project. Of all of the social media platforms, however, Instagram has become one of the easiest ways to accomplish the basics of sharing and viewing content quickly and easily.

    While following the antics of your in-laws across their European vacation or your old college buddy’s home remodel are certainly fun and all, the real muscle that Instagram provides for product designers and engineers is in its ability to quickly gain inspiration and insight from valuable sources while simultaneously sharing your own material with ease. Needless to say, it’s not uncommon now for individuals to launch entire brands using their Instagram network as a springboard for exposure.

    Whether you’re already an Instagram Jedi Master with a loyal following or have been wondering where to get started, here’s a list of 20 of our favorite Instagram accounts for finding inspiration and staying ahead of the product design and development curve. Who knows, you might learn a trick or two from these guys and have your own loyal following before too long?

    reid.schlegel

    Reid Schlegel is a Virginia Tech ID Alumni and NYC-based industrial designer at Frog Design. Known for his fresh sketching style, Schlegel posts whatever he is working on near-daily which can range from treehouse concepts to ideation sketches of his current work projects.


    Some behind the scenes process work from @innalobel and my project LUMINARI. We went through a lot of form factors and activation methods for the algae before settling on the final form. #ID #industrialdesign #productdesign #design #idsketching #process #sketching #sketch #iteration #art #prototype #bioluminescence

    A photo posted by Industrial Designer & Artist (@reid.schlegel) on <time datetime="2016-06-14T02:08:25+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Jun 13, 2016 at 7:08pm PDT</time>

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    mnmllymnml

    Andrew Kim is a talented young designer fresh out of Art Center who works at Microsoft working on everything from the XBox to the HoloLens. His clean photography style highlights where he finds inspirations for his own designs. Needless to say, there are some good takeaways here.


    A photo posted by Andrew Kim (@mnmllymnml) on <time datetime="2015-07-16T23:28:03+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Jul 16, 2015 at 4:28pm PDT</time>

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    creativesession

    As a collaborative between two industrial designer brothers, Creative Session is one of the most creatively diverse accounts in this list featuring everything from animation and branding design processes to more polished physical products.

    Working out the pivoting mechanism. And the internal cavity. Next up the pads. #industrialdesign #productdesign #headphones #audiophile @go.hobo

    A photo posted by Two brothers. One Passion. (@creativesession) on <time datetime="2016-01-22T19:48:39+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Jan 22, 2016 at 11:48am PST</time>

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    scoro5

    As one of the original design sketching teachers, industrial designer and concept artist Scott Robertson deserves a place somewhere on this list. More recently, Scott has been sharing the development behind a custom vehicle of his own design.

    Not waiting for Inktober this year.

    A photo posted by Scott Robertson (@scoro5) on <time datetime="2016-01-04T03:31:46+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Jan 3, 2016 at 7:31pm PST</time>

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    astrostudios

    Astro Studios is a San Francisco-based multidisciplinary design studio. While their Instagram account is somewhat scattered across all their work disciplines, it does serve up a healthy dose of relevant musings from the world of modern design and technology.

    Color ways of our work with @machinawt seen in our article with @fastcompany. Link in bio. #fightgravity #spaceisdope #astro #astrostudios #fastcompany #fastco #fastcodesign #machina #machinaobe #machinawt #industrialdesign #productdesign

    A photo posted by @astrostudios on <time datetime="2016-05-31T19:02:21+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">May 31, 2016 at 12:02pm PDT</time>

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    d2lo

    As one of the more vocal members of the industrial design community, Michael DiTullo has made a name for himself having worked everywhere from Nike and Frog Design leading to his current role as Chief Design Officer at Sound United. Expect everything from shots of rare cars to speaker sketches and even the occasional sketching tutorial.

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    sketchadaydotcom

    Like Michael DiTullo, design sketching master Spencer Nugent has been one of the more vocal members of the industrial design community thanks in no small part to his devotion towards teaching the craft of ID sketching. As the founder of IDSketching.com, Nugent now shares his daily sketches on this Instagram account.

    Sony just killed the Betamax player yesterday. I was surprised to see they're still being made. Never had one but definitely a throwback. #sketchaday #designsketching #idsketch #idsketching #copic #marker #betamax #sony #consumerelectronics #tech #rendering

    A photo posted by Spencer Nugent (@sketchadaydotcom) on <time datetime="2015-11-12T00:28:01+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Nov 11, 2015 at 4:28pm PST</time>

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    frog_design

    With no less than two of the designers on this list having worked for Frog, it should come as little surprise that this design agency landed on our list. With everything from product teardowns to snapshots of their design process, Frog does a good job of making their feed worth your while.

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    yvesbehar

    One of the most well-known industrial designers of our time, fuseproject founder Yves Behar shares snapshots of his design processes and what makes him tick.

    Playing with the new @kodak #super8 prototype we've been working on…sketches in the background… @fuseprojectsf #super8mm #kodak @kodak_photo #analog #anidigi

    A photo posted by Yves Behar (@yvesbehar) on <time datetime="2016-01-23T21:36:00+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Jan 23, 2016 at 1:36pm PST</time>

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    blaster701

    Industrial designer Jeff Smith – an avid SOLIDWORKS and Fusion360 user – shares his analog and digital design sketches with the occasional tutorial in between his skateboarding sessions.

    Finally figured it out. This is very interesting! Thanks for all the motivation. #sketch #2015bestnine

    A photo posted by Jeff Smith (@blaster701) on <time datetime="2015-12-30T01:31:14+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Dec 29, 2015 at 5:31pm PST</time>

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    mnml1

    As an ex–Nike design director, successful Kickstarter brand launcher and founder of the multidisciplinary design agency MNML, Scott Wilson has seen it all. Keep an eye out for peeks into his design process.

    Epik proto tooling #applewatch #makeitepik #detailsmatter www.EpikWatch.com

    A photo posted by Scott Wilson (@mnml1) on <time datetime="2015-05-09T05:38:44+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">May 8, 2015 at 10:38pm PDT</time>

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    thesketchmonkey

    For full-blown design sketching, Marouane Bembli delivers. Expect sketch walkthroughs of everything from cars to consumer products as well as sketching tool reviews.

    I made a mess. #sketch #mess #sketchy #hairdryer #industrialdesign #braun #riwa #pritech #drawing #designsketch #idsketching #hair #rusk #dyson #copic #markersketch

    A photo posted by Marouane Bembli (@thesketchmonkey) on <time datetime="2016-07-26T22:39:37+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Jul 26, 2016 at 3:39pm PDT</time>

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    flowalistik

    Based in Paris, Agustin Flowalistik has made a name for himself by combining his passions for graphic design and 3D printing. The result is some of the cleanest 3D printed products we’ve ever seen. Look for his latest projects and glimpses into his design process here.

    Sketching and prototyping under the sun 🌞

    A photo posted by Agustin Flowalistik (@flowalistik) on <time datetime="2016-03-28T11:47:22+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Mar 28, 2016 at 4:47am PDT</time>

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    frank.howarth

    Frank Howarth (AKA Frank Makes) is trained as an architect but has since turned into a woodworking celebrity on YouTube where he shares the processes behind creating his wood products with compelling videography. Expect behind-the-scenes snippets and updates from his YouTube channel here on his Instagram feed.

    Diggin' it out

    A photo posted by Frank Howarth (@frank.howarth) on <time datetime="2016-06-14T03:13:16+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Jun 13, 2016 at 8:13pm PDT</time>

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    mostmodest

    Specializing in “craft-inspired technology goods”, Most Modest is a San Francisco–based design studio with a great looking Instagram feed that follows the manufacturing processes and final results of their small collection of products. If you’re looking for inspiration for launching a side project, these guys have done things right.

    Niko docks in their final stages of assembly. These bad boys will be in the mail Monday. Thank you to all the folks that pre-ordered Niko!

    A photo posted by Most Modest (@mostmodest) on <time datetime="2016-04-15T17:00:55+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Apr 15, 2016 at 10:00am PDT</time>

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    massmadesoul

    Mass Made Soul creator Adam Richardson leverages his background in both design and photography to find the “soul” in mass produced products. Here, he shares snippets of what are a part of larger series of product studies on the Mass Made Soul website.

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    mxrxvs

    Currently wrapping up his final year at school in Germany, industrial designer Marius Kindler has some of the most killer design sketches we’ve seen on Instagram – professionals and students included. Keep tabs on this guy.

    some loose morning sketches to warm up for a day full of sketching for my thesis project. try to give my coloured markers some work since nearly all my greyscale markers are empty.

    A photo posted by Marius Kindler (@mxrxvs) on <time datetime="2016-04-28T08:43:34+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Apr 28, 2016 at 1:43am PDT</time>

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    hakangursudr

    Having worked in the industrial design field for over 30 years, Hakan Gürsu has a level of experience we don’t see too often on Instagram. Here, he shares his various sketching projects – using the classic draw through method – and perspectives on everything from the state of industrial design today to various sketching tools.

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    filipchaeder

    Swedish freelance industrial designer and illustrator Filip Chaeder shares both analog and digital sketches as well as his musings on various design topics. We chose to feature Chaeder because not only does he have sketch talent, he also has a penchant for framing his sketches nicely for Instagram’s limiting square format.

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    SolidSmack

    Ah, yes. Where else will you turn to for your regular dose of rockin’ sweet product design goodness? Keep your eyes peeled for daily updates and exclusive content on the all-new SolidSmack Instagram feed.


    Watch the mesmerizing 20-minute video over on SolidSmack (link in bio).

    A photo posted by SolidSmack (@solidsmack) on <time datetime="2016-08-04T21:11:49+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Aug 4, 2016 at 2:11pm PDT</time>

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    Did we miss somebody? We’ll be expanding this list over time. Feel free to let us know who to add in the comments.

    Read 20 Product Designers You Should Follow on Instagram Right Now at SolidSmack.

    by SolidSmack at August 09, 2016 10:17 AM

    August 08, 2016

    SolidSmack

    CAD with a Stylus. It’s a thing.

    stylus

    My last post was ostensibly about my new SpaceMouse, but within half an hour I had not less than five different people ask about my stylus. What the what? Stylus? For CAD? In short: yes, I use a stylus for CAD. And everything else, actually. I don’t even own a decent mouse anymore.

    Quoth Myself:

    In 2006 I gave up using a mouse in favor of a stylus and a SpacePilot. At the time I was driving CATIA all day long, and yet with the SpacePilot in my left hand and a stylus in my right, suddenly my wrist problems went away entirely, and they’ve never come back.

    That’s nearly ten years of mouseless-ness, and I feel fine.

    Mouse Problems

    Bend your elbows and hold your hands out in front of you. Relax. Now, if your palms are facing the floor, you are either a kangaroo, or you have deeply misunderstood what I mean by “relax”.

    In fact, go ahead and turn your hands so that your palms face the floor. Comfy?

    Screen Shot 2016-08-03 at 6.14.44 AM

    This simple exercise illustrates why, if you Google “ergonomic mouse,” you’ll find a whole bunch of contraptions that try to allow you to use a mouse with your palm to face inward, its natural resting position.

    Let’s try another exercise. If I hand you a pencil and ask you to write “I like big butts” on a napkin, you’ll probably look at me with a squinty single-eyebrow-raised suspicion, then hesitantly reach down and scrawl something witty, or at least less offensive. But for the general awkwardness of the situation, the mechanics of the operation would be fluid, natural, and effortless. For some dextrous individuals, it might even be graceful.

    F80W0VGH2WEZ9Y0.MEDIUM

    Now, for comparison, imagine I’ve attached a pencil to the tip of a computer mouse and asked you to write something equally inane. Still graceful?

    Maybe you don’t find yourself handwriting bawdy messages in SolidWorks as frequently as I do, but the broader point is valid: pencils are shaped like pencils because that shape maximizes the fluid dexterity of the shoulder/elbow/hand/finger machine. Speed and precision are second nature with a stylus.

    I don’t hate the computer mouse. It’s fine for short stints and has some really nice advantages in that it works on any surface, sits still on the table, and doesn’t have that penchant for disappearing that pens so often do. But when it comes to speed, precision, and comfort, a stylus is far superior.

    fingerpaint

    Finger Paints

    I’m an industrial designer. I show up at a client meeting for a brainstorming session, and people are filing into the conference room. Well-dressed people around the table start pulling out moleskins, whiteboard markers, sticky notes, pens, and pencils. I pull out a sheet of butcher paper, a bowl of water, and start arranging tempera cakes in rainbow order across the top. “Um. What’s that?” “My finger paints.” “Oh.” Things go downhill from there.

    Here’s a fact: finger painting, fun as it is, is not a generally accepted professional practice for industrial designers. And yet some people have a persistent belief that an iPad sans-stylus should be a perfectly acceptable drawing medium. That is absurd. Humans have been using sticks to draw things for thousands of years. If finger painting were better, why would we bother?

    I do not finger paint in meetings, physically nor digitally. I sketch with tools.

    Style me Stylus

    So I use a stylus. And yes, I use it for CAD, MODO, Photoshop, web browsing, and everything else. For some reason when I tell CAD users that I use a Wacom tablet, they’re like “what? For CAD? How?” I’m not sure how to answer that question. It’s not any different from a mouse, really. You have a pen, and you touch it to things you want to click. The future!

    Seriously, though, it’s just a three button mouse.

    buttons

    With these three buttons I can do anything any other three button mouse can do. The only exception is scrolling, which can be done using the touch wheel on the tablet itself.

    Important: nib choice matters. The little plastic tip of a Wacom stylus is replaceable, and different kinds of nibs are available depending on user preference. I highly recommend replacing the default plastic nib with a hard felt nib. This one small change can make a world of difference. The plastic nib is too slippery, and allows the pen to slide too easily across the surface. The felt nibs grip the surface a bit more, giving you much greater control and accuracy, and greatly decreasing accidental-drag problems.

    By the way, if my gear looks a little battle worn, that’s only because I’ve been using it all day every day for eight years. I even travel with it in my backpack. Given the amount of abuse I’ve put it through, it’s in pretty great shape.

    leftrightmiddle

    As with a mouse, I keep my right hand on the stylus and my left hand on either the SpaceMouse or keyboard as appropriate for a given application. I don’t typically use the extra buttons on the tablet, but I have friends who swear by them. The only feature of the tablet I use with any regularity is the scroll wheel.

    And yes, you’re seeing my iMac in this image, because that’s what I’m using to write this post. But I have three other PCs in the office: a giant power tower, a mobile workstation, and a compact laptop. I use my Wacom tablets on all of them. In fact, I own two Wacom tablets: one for travel, and one for office use. I’m almost literally never without one.

    Intuos vs. Cintiq vs mobile tablet

    I think most people, on seeing a Cintiq for the first time, assume that it’s superior to the cheaper Intuos tablets in every way. Why draw on a separate tablet when you can draw directly on the monitor itself?

    Speaking as someone who spent several years working with Cintiq monitors, let me count the reasons:

    1. Parallax. The tip of the pen is never exactly pixel-for-pixel accurate because of the distance between the glass and the underlying LCD. This makes high-precision work difficult to do on a Cintiq. It’s improved a lot in recent years, but it’s still inferior to the pixel-perfect accuracy I have with a separate pointing device.
    2. Occlusion. With a Cintiq, your drawing hand is in front of the screen, blocking the right half of your screen from view. This might not seem like a big deal, but it’s actually a major humbug when driving a desktop CAD application, for example. Finding an icon and getting your pen onto it is surprisingly inconvenient when your arm is always in the way.
    3. Ergonomics. This is the big one. Spending all day hunched over a drafting board is physically exhausting work, and a Cintiq is no different. After a few hours of use, I found my neck and shoulder were tight and sore, and this problem persisted even after many months of practice. I found myself gradually favoring the Intuos tablet out of laziness.
    4. Cost. As I write this, the medium-sized Intuos Pro (the one I use) is $349. The cheapest 13″ Cintiq HD starts at $999, and that’s going to be a really small space for a decent CAD experience.

    Mobile tablets like the iPad Pro or Cintiq Companion 2 are really great, but limiting. As a digital sketching tool, there’s nothing better. As a CAD tool? Not so much. The only exception is Onshape, which works great on a tablet in isolation, but I still prefer the desktop experience for the daily grind.

    The Downside

    There are several difficulties with desktop stylus solutions.

    First, you need a tablet. The stylus is small, but the tablet is considerably larger than a travel mouse. That means you need a backpack with enough space to carry it. That said, it’s smaller than most laptops, so if you’ve got a laptop bag, it can almost certainly fit a tablet as well.

    Second, it’s easy to lose the stylus. I’ve lost a couple of them over the years, and they can be costly to replace.

    Third, there is a significant learning curve. Learning to use a stylus on a tablet while looking at a secondary monitor is definitely a pat-your-head-and-rub-your-tummy kind of experience at first, and it will take at least a month or two to get the hang of it. It can take as much as a year to become really fluid and accurate.

    Tips for CAD users

    The biggest problems you’ll face as a CAD user with a stylus are 1) the lack of a scroll wheel, and 2) the lack of a third button by default. The latter is an easy fix, as illustrated above: just map one of the rocker buttons to middle-mouse, and viola! Three button stylus. The lack of a scroll wheel is the biggest adjustment, and one without a rock solid solution.

    scroll

    One solution is to use the scroll pad on the side of the tablet. This works but requires you to move your hand away from the tablet. Inconvenient but workable. As a CAD user, however, you’re probably going to find it annoying.

    A second solution is to use the keyboard modifiers for zooming in CAD. I use this method a lot. In SolidWorks, for example, shift+MMB zooms toward the most recent mouse location. In Rhino it’s alt+RMB. In MODO it’s alt+ctrl+LMB. Nearly every 3D tool on the market has a keyboard modifier for zoom (except Onshape, much as I’ve begged them for it), so this is my go-to solution.

    The best solution, of course, is to use a 3D mouse. Left hand on the SpaceMouse, right hand on the stylus. Perfect. I can pan, zoom, and tumble using the left hand while dragging and tapping with the right. ‘Tis a thing of beauty.

    Worth it?

    The final say is up to you. I, for one, will never go back to the Land of the Mouse. After so many years driving a stylus, using a mouse feels ham-handed. I can point, click, drag, write, sketch, and model all with speed, fluidity, and pixel-perfect accuracy.

    What do you think? Do you use a stylus at work? Why or why not? Would you try it?

    Read CAD with a Stylus. It’s a thing. at SolidSmack.

    by Adam OHern at August 08, 2016 03:13 PM

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    Javelin sponsored athlete Pam Lejean promotes positivity and performance

    Javelin Technologies is now sponsoring a second world class athlete who is travelling the road to the Rio Olympics. She’s a down-to-earth, straight talking, upbeat Nova Scotian with a few shiny medals in her pocket and plenty of room for an Olympic gold.

    Pam Lejean is Canada’s top female para-athlete in three field events: javelin, discus, and shotput. Her breakthrough season in 2015 included a gold in the shotput and bronze in the javelin at the Parapan American Games in Toronto. A few weeks later at the 2015 IPC World Championships, she grabbed the silver in the shotput. She is the Canadian record holder in javelin, shotput, and discus for the F53 (her para competition designation, based on her type of injury and mobility.)

    Pam at the 2015 Parapan American Games in Toronto

    Pam Lejean at the 2015 Parapan American Games in Toronto

    In Rio, Pam will compete in shotput on September 12. The other two throwing events are not offered in her category at these Olympics so she’s focused on peak performance in one.

    “It’s all still completely surreal, how I find myself here,” Pam says. “I travel so much, all over the world. I find myself competing in places like the Middle East – places I never would have travelled to otherwise.”

    Lifting and liver

    Of course, it’s hard work and devotion that brought her to this moment. Pam throws every second day, and trains in the gym on the alternate day. She typically takes Fridays off, but in the run-up to Rio, she is training every day. On throwing days, her coach meets her in Halifax around mid-morning, and she throws for up to two hours. The rest of a typical week might include appointments for massage therapy, sports psychology, physio, or a meeting with a dietician.

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qTATqUiPYTY?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

    Speaking of food, Pam’s diet secret may not be what you’d expect (or even enjoy?) – it’s liver! To keep her iron levels up, as well as her energy, she eats liverwurst on rosemary crackers six days a week. Breakfast of champions, as they say!

    Pam trains with a younger, up-and-coming track athlete named Casey Perrin, who is four years post-injury and has her sights set on the Tokyo games in 2020. Pam says she enjoys having a training partner, both when throwing and when in the gym. She trained for years on her own, without knowing the value of having a buddy there with her.

    “It’s so nice to have another girl to train with, someone who is out there in the rain and snow with me. It helps a lot. She’s my number one girl and bit like my protégé.”

    Pam Lejean [left] with training partner Casey Perrin

    Pam Lejean [left] with training partner Casey Perrin

    School days and first sports

    Pam Lejean first got into sports in elementary school. Nearing six feet tall in grade 5, basketball was an obvious choice. Despite not being super competitive back then, she says she loved it – even sleeping with her basketball! She also tried competitive swimming, and performed noticeably well in her first meet. When another swimmer came to congratulate Pam on her impressive performance after training only a short time, and saying she’d been training for much longer, Pam felt so bad about beating her that she cried her eyes out when she got to her mom’s car! She vowed to stick to team sports where everyone wins or loses together. Insert winking emoji here, because just look at her now!

    New pursuits post-injury

    Pam talks about her journey in athletics as a “forced evolution.” In 2002, when she was 17, she injured her spinal cord in a car accident. In the early days afterward, although in and out of consciousness, she remembers just knowing she was paralyzed, not being told. She recognized that she had lost so much of who she was and what she knew – running in the woods, playing rugby, being active every day – and got focused on the hard work of rehab. She didn’t know what would come next, but wasn’t the type to be content with chilling out reading a book. Her physiotherapist, who was a swimmer, suggested that Pam try some time in the pool, and that relit the fire that once drove Pam. In a very short time, she was doing the butterfly, a stroke she had never mastered when able-bodied. Thinking big about attending the Athens Olympics, and pushing herself in her new pursuit, she developed devastating tendonitis in both shoulders and began to find it difficult to do everyday tasks like dressing herself.

    “My parents sat me down and told me I had to take care of myself. Did I want to keep training like this or have a good quality of life? I had to make the wise choice and stop swimming.”

    She turned her attention back to her education, graduating high school on time and heading to Cape Breton University. She’d always wanted to be an RCMP officer; plan B was a degree in communications and political science. Now, no offence to people working in windowless rooms editing press releases while wearing suits, but this was not the job for Pam.

    Her mom suggested she try out wheelchair basketball, and again Pam rediscovered her love of sport. She got good and was eyeing a competitive career, but the tendonitis came back. Even picking up the remote control was excruciating.

    It was then that she met a trainer who – after taking a look at Pam’s nearly six-foot wingspan – suggested she try throwing an indoor discus.
    “On my very first throw, I hit the national standard,” she says. “It was probably the ugliest throw you’ve ever seen but it went really far!”

    Her track sports – discus, shotput, and javelin – don’t put the stress of constant “tearing and thrashing” on her body. Training consists of throwing then resting, and heavy, slow lifting. In 2013, in her first year competing, Pam went to nationals and set new records, capturing three gold medals.

    Personal approach

    Pam says she “finds the positivity in everything” and lives her life as if people she loves and respects are always watching her. “I want to make them proud through my actions.”

    She also shares that becoming too comfortable is a dangerous mindset and that we can all continue to “aim high,” no matter what we do in our lives.

    “Don’t just go through the motions, even if you’re doing the same thing day in and day out, or not having your best day. If you spend one day doing that, and your competition spends the day giving 100%, you’ve fallen behind.”

    Pam radio interview

    Pam radio interview

    Plans for Pam Lejean

    Our east coast sponsored athlete will join us in October 2016 for a special appearance at Javelin’s Dartmouth location for the SOLIDWORKS launch event. We’ll also be working with her and Dalhousie University engineering students to come up with some 3D designs to help her house some of her equipment on her throwing chair.

    Pam is pumped about having the support of everyone at Javelin. She says she’s never had a corporate sponsor get as involved with her as Javelin has already.

    “It’s crazy to have all these people out there supporting me, whether it’s on social media, or by connecting me with the Dalhousie students to help me manage some inconveniences I’ve been living with. It means a lot.”

    Follow Pam Lejean on Twitter (@PammyPam) and Instagram (@PammyLynne) and cheer her on! The Paralympic Games run from September 7 through 18 in Rio. Canada is expected to send a team of approximately 155 athletes, participating in 19 sports. For more info, check out paralympic.ca and sign up to get Canadian Paralympic news and updates by email.

    The post Javelin sponsored athlete Pam Lejean promotes positivity and performance appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Karen Majerly at August 08, 2016 01:47 PM

    SolidSmack

    The Art of Getting Things Done: Overcoming Procrastination Isn’t as Difficult as You Think

    feature

    With a seemingly endless supply of content and social media updates getting hurled at us 24/7, it’s become increasingly difficult to break the time-sucking and vicious cycle of distraction. If you’re a freelancer or one of the few digital nomads who work from home without the pressure of an afternoon presentation deadline, this problem can easily be magnified tenfold at the blink of an eye.

    So how do we overcome procrastination – be it at work, at home or even on personal projects we actually go out of our way to make time for?

    While there is no “one size fits all” solution for putting an end to the agonizing internal procrastination monologue, we do know how it happens (it’s a biological battle between your brain’s limbic system and prefrontal cortex) and we do know the best possible way to “cure” it (we’ll get there).

    01

    The first step towards fighting procrastination is to understand that the unconscious (and more developed) limbic system is responsible for pleasure whereas the (weaker) prefrontal cortex wants to “plan” whatever work you have to get done as soon as possible. When a distraction pops up (as they so easily do nowadays), the limbic system overrides the prefrontal cortex and the result is work put off for tomorrow that can be done today (or right now). The good news is that you do have control over it, even if it takes a little practice.

    In this recently released short, filmmaker Stuart Langfield dives deeper into how we can overcome procrastination in the Age of Distraction and learn how to “do whatever it takes to get started”:

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/177458612?color=ffffff&amp;title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="800"></iframe>

    Read The Art of Getting Things Done: Overcoming Procrastination Isn’t as Difficult as You Think at SolidSmack.

    by Simon Martin at August 08, 2016 01:44 PM

    The Monday List 32.16 | What We’re Reading This Week

    feature

    Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

    Welcome to The Monday List.

    Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

    What We’re Reading This Week:

    My Pacific Crest Trail Moleskine Journals
    “I came home with a strong appreciation for life and nature, a thinner waistline, and over 650 pages of journals.”

    02

    Don The Beachcomber
    This midcentury LA bar was the birthplace of tiki culture.

    03

    The Brain That Couldn’t Remember
    The untold story of the fight over the legacy of “H.M.” — the patient who revolutionized the science of memory.

    01

    I hack time.
    Over the years, I’ve become somewhat of an expert on time. I have to be.

    05

    Superbike-Riding Women May Turn China Into Ducati’s No. 2 Market
    There are few things Laura Wu likes more than to take her Ducati 899 Panigale for a spin on the country roads outside Beijing.

    04

    In 1996, alternative rock died a messy, forgettable death
    If you’d tried telling Oasis’ Liam and Noel Gallagher that electronic music was the future in ’96, you’d likely get a pint glass to the face.

    06

    Read The Monday List 32.16 | What We’re Reading This Week at SolidSmack.

    by SolidSmack at August 08, 2016 01:08 PM

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    Understanding $PRPSheet in SOLIDWORKS PDM

    $PRPSheet can be used in an attribute block to map a model property to a custom or configuration specific property of a drawing. This is explained in the Javelin blog article SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional: Write Drawing Card With Part Card Variables. This property will then show up under the @ tab of the drawing data card.

    Data Card @ tab

    Data Card @ tab

    The term $PRPSheet, may seem to indicate that a property is being mapped to a drawing’s sheet, but a sheet is not a configuration. Properties can only be mapped as a custom, or configuration specific properties. Since a sheet is not a configuration, properties cannot be mapped to them. You can enter information for each sheet independently in the data card, but this will not be reflected in the drawing sheet itself.

    We can show values contained in $PRPSheet in the sheet tabs. This is done by checking ‘Update in all configurations‘ in the properties of a field in the data card.

    Update all configurations for $PRPSheet

    Update all configurations

    This will cause all sheet tabs, including the @ tab, to display the same value for that field. In order make make changes for this field, the changes must be made from data card and not the drawing.

     

    The post Understanding $PRPSheet in SOLIDWORKS PDM appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at August 08, 2016 12:00 PM

    August 06, 2016

    SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

    Go beyond the SOLIDWORKS Simulation Xpress tools and unleash your designs

    In a previous on-demand webinar we reviewed how to use SimulationXpress and FloXpress. While the free simulation tools are great starting points for simulation, complex designs require robust analysis. This on-demand webinar will explore the extended simulation product line from SOLIDWORKS and how the software tools can take your product design validation and analysis to the next level.

    • What are the limitations of the Xpress tools in SOLIDWORKS?
    • How can I analyze assemblies and multiple bodies?
    • How confident can I be in my results?
    Watch the SOLIDWORKS Simulation on-demand webinar below:

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uyXd8ZaY9vo?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

    Want to learn more about Simulation?

    Contact us to speak to a technical expert and learn how SOLIDWORKS Simulation tools can benefit your business.

    The post Go beyond the SOLIDWORKS Simulation Xpress tools and unleash your designs appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Rod Mackay at August 06, 2016 05:53 PM

    How to use the Simulation Xpress tools included in every version of SOLIDWORKS

    In this on-demand webinar, we will demonstrate the simulation Xpress tools included with every version of SOLIDWORKS; SimulationXpress and FloXpress. These entry level simulation tools let you do simple, quick, first-pass structural analysis and fluid analysis in parts. Learn how to activate and properly use your Xpress tools.

    Using the Xpress tools you can answer important design questions like:

    • How much will my part deform/flex under load?
    • What is the maximum load my part can handle?
    • How fast will liquid flow through my part?
    • How does the fluid flow inside my part?
    Watch the SOLIDWORKS Simulation Xpress tools video below:

    <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/suaqNluev5U?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

    Want to learn more about Simulation?

    Watch the next webinar in our Xpress series to learn how to go beyond the SOLIDWORKS Simulation Xpress tools and the benefits that the full versions of SOLIDWORKS Simulation and Flow Simulation can provide for your business.

    The post How to use the Simulation Xpress tools included in every version of SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

    by Rod Mackay at August 06, 2016 05:45 PM

    SolidSmack

    The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 31.16

    pen-uno-pencil-uno-00

    Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

    The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top ten stories on SolidSmack this past week.

    Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

    The 2 Go Backpack Lets You Prototype with the Ultimaker 2 3D Printer Wherever You Want

    “Already considered one of the most reliable and user-friendly consumer desktop 3D printers, the Ultimaker 2+ now has an entirely new feature for those who need to prototype on-the-run.”

    feature-1

    Become an Arduino Rock Star with This Complete Starter Kit & Course Bundle

    “While it may not be able to make your morning marmalade toast or scrub your cast iron skillets (or can it?), there are relatively few things that the Arduino single-board microcontroller can’t do.”

    feature-51

    This is How a Life-like LEGO Mini-fig is Made (to be Five Kinds of Creepy)

    “There’s a reason LEGO mini-figs don’t look like fleshy human flesh-sacks. They would 1) not match the playful appearance of LEGOs 2) be totally creepy and 3) require small bottles of moisturizer. “I lather my LEGO mini-figs with three coats of jojoba oil weekly.” Well, good for you. Me? I prefer to watch a life-size human mini-fig being made.”

    lego-minifig-tested-00

    Adam + SpaceMouse Wireless == Major Nerd Joy

    “As someone who’s struggled with RSIs in both wrists, input devices matter. Not just for convenience or efficiency, but for health and safety. In 2006 I gave up using a mouse in favor of a stylus and a SpacePilot. At the time I was driving CATIA all day long, and yet with the SpacePilot in my left hand and a stylus in my right, suddenly my wrist problems went away entirely, and they’ve never come back.”

    spacemouse_wireless

    Pen Uno + Pencil Uno: These are the ‘Most Minimal Writing Instruments’

    “Think of the basic parts to a pen. A tub and some ink. We use to use feather quills and an ink bottle. Now it’s highly engineered mechanisms with an endless choice of ink cartridges. Where’s the happy medium? Looking for a minimal, yet well-design led me to take a look at the Ensso Uno, a no frills writing pen + pencil that’s about as minimal as you can get without tossing the tube to use the ink cartridge alone.”

    pen-uno-pencil-uno-00

    20 Product Designers You Should Follow on Instagram Right Now

    “Love ’em or just plain don’t have time for ’em, social media platforms are here to stay. While you don’t necessarily need to be an expert at Tweetin’ or Facebookin’, there’s a lot to be gained from staying in contact with old colleagues or finding inspiration for your next side project. Of all of the social media platforms, however, Instagram has become one of the easiest ways to accomplish the basics of sharing and viewing content quickly and easily.”

    feature-7

    Read The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 31.16 at SolidSmack.

    by SolidSmack at August 06, 2016 09:30 AM