Planet SolidWorks

February 21, 2018

SolidSmack

This 3D Printed Mini-Crossbow Will Have You Shooting Matchsticks Like a Pro

3d printed matchstick crossbow

Homemade weapons have come a long way since the traditional slingshot. Since nearly everyone, their dog, and old aunt Emma now has access to a 3D printer and the internet, more designs for must-have office battle weaponry are poppin’ up like inflamed nostrils. Case in point: this devilishly deceptive mini-crossbow.

Created by Etsy user Edwards for his RinkyDink3D crossbow store, the little survival tool shoots matchsticks, Q-tips, and quite possibly toothpicks as well, turning normal household items into ammunition that will have your mom or HR sweating foam bullets. While Edwards says you shouldn’t aim it at people or animals (suuuuure, we won’t do that)… yeah, we all know that isn’t going to happen.

3d printed matchstick crossbow

Each mini-crossbow is made by Edwards and comes with 16 wooden bolts and a target dummy for you to practice on instead of your neighbor’s mangy cat. Matchstick bolts can be fired up to a maximum of 50 feet, though Edwards recommends using a specific brand (Diamond Brand Large Kitchen matches) to get the furthest range possible. He doesn’t give a specific brand of Q-tips though, so feel free to fire your used ones at the target dummy –they can reach a maximum distance of 30 feet depending on what you used to clean them for.

You, and you alone, can save the country by completing these high risk covert missions. With one hand tied behind your back, you can knock out that house of cards, shoot down enemy drones, or show the Lego commander who rules the land.

This Bow will effectively shoot wooden match sticks or Q-Tips.

Specs:
1. Straight wood match range over 50 feet
2. Q tip range 30 feet
3. Easy thumb press trigger
4. Locks matches when loaded
5. Holds 10 matches (or Q-tips) for extra rounds.

3d printed matchstick crossbow

The crossbow is ready to fire once you’ve loaded a single matchstick into the drawstring mechanism (those extra bolts at the bottom are in the holster), a trigger fires the stick into whatever poor living or nonliving thing you aimed it at.

3d printed matchstick crossbow

Seeing a weapon so small marrying product design and 3D printing kind of makes you want to make one yourself, doesn’t it? If this weapon isn’t big enough for your liking however, there are a number of regular-sized 3D printed crossbows which you can take inspiration from, build and, perhaps, challenge your co-workers with during a lunch battle royale.

Edwards has other mini-crossbow designs on his Etsy page, though they mostly do the same thing. Head on over there to see all of his self-made weaponry!

The post This 3D Printed Mini-Crossbow Will Have You Shooting Matchsticks Like a Pro appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 21, 2018 09:28 PM

Model of The Week: “Old Barrel” Retro Motorcycle [6 Cylinders of Steampunk Speed!]

old barrel steampunk retro motorcycle 3d model

Yeah, I hear ya. *sips coffee* I use to chisel gears and form motorcycle fairings from raw metal with the delicate jawbone of water shrew… by which I mean, I’ve never actually done that, but have worn a motorcycle jacket… for a few minutes… it was hot… quite stiff, actually.

One thing is for certain though, if I did build my own motorcycle, it would look exactly like this “Old Barrel” Retro racer concept create by 13 Studio… this or a Ducati–A Ducati’s Monster is just all kinds of cool. But the Old Barrel concept has miles of style too–mainly because the rear wheel fairing is a mile long.

The design may be familiar if you recall the streamlined Killinger & Freud of the late 1930s. This beauty:

killinger & freund

As 13 Studio describes it, this concept bike was the inspiration:

Ever since I discovered the bike “Killinger and Freund Motorcycle”, I wondered if I were to make a cafe racer version, what will it looks like? Many years past, the shape in my mind became more and more clear. After modelling training in a new software, I believe it’s about time to make it happen. Presenting the “Old Barrel”, a retro streamlined racing machine. With rounded covers for the front and rear wheels, aerodynamically improved fork and transparent fairing showing all the details of a V6 engine.

Transparent fairing? V6 engine? Pardon me while I DROOL ON MY KEYBEARDS. Fabulous. I think the German engineers who designed the Killinger and Freund would be a bit awestruck… and totally jelly. 13 Studio used Fusion 360 to model up the moto after just learning it. My first project after learning Fusion 360? Let’s just say it wasn’t a FREAKIN’ MOTORCYCLE.

You can download the model at GrabCAD–.step version only. (Bonus! This isn’t 13 Studio’s first moto, oh no no. Check out Rocketman the Cruiser concept too!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

The post Model of The Week: “Old Barrel” Retro Motorcycle [6 Cylinders of Steampunk Speed!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 21, 2018 09:08 PM

Here’s A Modern Tucker Truck Concept Sketched on Colored Paper [Design Sketching]

Tucker Truck Design Concept Sketch

Taking a break from creating cast parts and mold boxes , designer Eric Strebel cracked his paper coloring knuckles to bring you a sketch render color paper challenge which has him sketching a design concept on… you guessed it, COLORED PAPER.

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The design in question is a modern approach to a Tucker truck from the fabulous 1940s. Whereas the old truck ran on gas and looked fit for holding bushels of corn and some livestock, Strebel’s sketch is the EV version with some interesting storage and plenty of truckbed to haul yo’ stuff.

Tucker Truck Design Concept Sketch

As with all his designs, he starts out with a couple of rough sketches on white paper before moving to the final sketch. Once he has the design laid out, he starts his sketch with a single cab for the truck’s body and works from there. Wheels, a small bed flap, and a second smaller cab come after the initial sketch lines of the truck body.

Tucker Truck Design Concept Sketch

With the framework of the Tucker finished, he adds more minute details such as a mini-fender in the front, raised brake lights on the back, and pocket doors which allows the user to easily store cargo in the trunk.

“The beauty of sketching on a colored paper is that the value of your object is built into the paper already. Your job as a designer or a renderer here is to pull out the form of the value of that object.”

Unlike a lot of artists, Strebel starts to shade his drawing early to bring out the details in his sketch. Seeing as he is drawing on grey paper, he uses varying shades of grey to make certain details pop. To make his drawing not seem too bleak, he also adds some light blue and white colors which give the truck a nice metallic color.

Tucker Truck Design Concept Sketch

Strebel isn’t above a little Photoshop, either. After doing all he can with pen and pencil, he scans his drawing to sharpen a couple of details and correct the shadows. He then caps everything with more obviously computer-generated Tucker logo. Pretty snazzy, eh?

You can find more of Eric Strebel’s designs, both realized products and concept designs, over on his YouTube channel.

The post Here’s A Modern Tucker Truck Concept Sketched on Colored Paper [Design Sketching] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 21, 2018 08:30 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

A Better Way to Rebuild in SOLIDWORKS: Verification on Rebuild

No matter the SOLIDWORKS rebuild command you use, whether it’s standard rebuild (the “green light” icon) or forced rebuild (CTRL-Q), it’s important to understand what is happening when SOLIDWORKS is building a feature.

When a feature is being built, the modeling engine is carrying out an instruction in the file’s instruction set. The resulting information is geometry in the design space. SOLIDWORKS will check this geometry against existing geometry in the model to make sure it “fits” geometrically.

By default, SOLIDWORKS checks the geometry it is building against the adjacent faces, e.g., the faces that share an edge with the face(s) of the feature it is building. For example, when building a fillet, SOLIDWORKS checks to see if the face of the fillet fits with the faces the fillet shares edges with (“connects to”). When it fits, SOLIDWORKS moves on, but when it doesn’t an error is generated.

While this level of geometry checking is generally efficient, in some cases it is not sufficient. There are cases where the face being built intersects with faces already in the model. However, there is no intentional connection; they aren’t supposed to share edges. While this will be a problem, the default level of checking doesn’t catch this because it only checks against faces in which it is supposed to connect.

The Better Way: Verification on Rebuild

For this reason, SOLIDWORKS has another level of checking. Tools > Options, System Options > Performance has a switch called “Verification on Rebuild (Enable Advanced Geometry Checking).” When this is active, SOLIDWORKS checks the face it is building against all existing faces in the model. This ensures nothing sneaks past. However, it does come at the cost of performance, especially in large and complex models with many faces.

Verification on Rebuild

In the end, part of your release procedure should be to activate the “Verification on Rebuild” option and hit CTRL-Q. Do this for every part, every assembly, and every drawing for the highest quality model and drawing geometry possible.

Author information

GSC
GSC fuels customer success with 3D engineering solutions for design, simulation, data management, technical documentation, and 3D printing, as well as the most comprehensive consulting, technical support, and training in the industry. As a leading provider of SOLIDWORKS solutions and Stratasys 3D printing technologies, GSC’s world-class team of dedicated professionals have helped numerous companies innovate and increase productivity by leveraging advanced technologies to drive 3D business success. Founded in 1989, GSC is headquartered in Germantown, WI. For more information about GSC, please visit www.gsc-3d.com.

The post A Better Way to Rebuild in SOLIDWORKS: Verification on Rebuild appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GSC at February 21, 2018 04:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools: Bezalel Wireless Smartphone Charging Pads and Cases (12% OFF)

Without a doubt, one of the coolest new features in modern smartphone tech is the ability to charge your phone wirelessly. While some Android users have already had this ability, the release of the iPhone 8 and the iPhone X have cemented the futuristic tech into the stronghold of our wildest tech desires.

And with every new smartphone feature comes a (useful) bevy of accessories from an army of third-party manufacturers. But if you’re looking for a compact and easy to use wireless charging solution that looks as good as it functions, look no further than the charge pads and cases over at Bezalel.

When used together, the company’s Futura X wireless charging pad and Latitude collection of cases connect seamlessly via magnet to ensure the optimal charging spot—every dang time. Available for iPhone models 6 through X (including Plus models), you won’t ever want to go back to charging with wires again.

We’ve been using it for iPhone 7s and it works just as described, plus the hard case adds a lot of protection. What surprised us most is being able to just pick up our phone after it was done charging, no messing with cords and such. Ideally, we would like to have the charge mounted somewhere to get the phone and charger off the desk. For that, they have the Omnia – it’s made for a car, but can be adapted to fit just about anywhere.

Better yet, SolidSmack readers can get 12% off through February using the code WIRELESSFEB at checkout.

Bezalel Wireless Smartphone Charging Pads and Cases – 12% OFF (Use Code: WIRELESSFEB)

Features:

  • Magnetic alignment guides
  • Works with all Qi-enabled mobile devices (Android compatability coming soon!)
  • Wireless charge at any angle
  • Ultra-thin and portable designs

GET IT!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more great deals here:
StackSocial Amazon

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by SolidSmack at February 21, 2018 03:35 PM

Samsung Plans To Blow Your Computer’s Storage Wide Open With A 30TB SSD

If you still think your desktop PC’s storage space isn’t enough to hold all your CAD projects, then you’ll be happy to know that Samsung just combined 32 1TB NAND flash packages to create the world’s largest SSD.

The PM1643’s name doesn’t roll off the tongue so well, but the 2.5-inch SSD holds 30.72TB worth of storage space. This roughly translates to 5,700 5GB HD movies, over a million songs, or your entire family tree’s photos – including your ancestors before film was invented.

Along with the added storage capacity, the SSD features random read and write speeds of up to 400,000 IOPS and 50,000 IOPS, while sequential read and write speeds run up to 2,100MB/s and 1,700 MB/s respectively. This makes the PM1643 run at approximately four times the random read performance and three times the sequential read performance in comparison to other 2.5-inch SSDS. Hold onto your seatbelts!

Apart from read and write speeds, the SSD also uses Through Silicon Via (TSV) technology to offer a total of 40GB of DRAM. In addition to its five-year warranty, the PM1643 also undergoes one fill drive write per day to make sure your plethora of files stays backed-up and up-to-date. Neat!

Manufacturing started in January, with 5.36TB, 7.68TB, 3.84TB, 1.92TB, 960GB, and 800GB versions coming later in the year. More details can be found over at Samsung.

The post Samsung Plans To Blow Your Computer’s Storage Wide Open With A 30TB SSD appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 21, 2018 02:48 PM

Spotify is Getting Into the Hardware Game. Any Guesses Why?

The Spotify versus Apple Music streaming audio battle has been heating up for a while now. And while Spotify has a significantly larger user base, Apple—as it always tends to do—is slowly creeping up behind with Apple Music thanks to an ecosystem that puts its hardware and software systems front and center with the Apple Music interface.

Well, if some recent job postings from Spotify can send any surefire signs, two can play that hardware game.

As spotted by music tech blog Musically, the Stockholm-based Spotify has three new jobs up for grabs that indicate they’re getting serious about getting into their own interpretation of a hardware-based streaming music interface.

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An early Spotify promotional video.

“Spotify is on its way to creating its first physical products and setting up an operational organization for manufacturing, supply chain, sales & marketing,” explains the job posting for Operations Manager – Hardware Product. “We are looking for a passionate and seasoned Operations Manager that will contribute in the creation of innovative Spotify experiences via connected hardware.”

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Introduced in 2015, Spotify Running pairs a smartphone’s sensor data to serve up playlists that are in sync with the tempo of a run.

In total, the company is currently looking to hire the aforementioned Operations Manager-Hardware Product, a Senior Project Manager: Hardware Production, and a Project Manager: Hardware Production & Engineering.

So…any guesses what that first hardware product might be?

Feature Image via Clément Goebels

The post Spotify is Getting Into the Hardware Game. Any Guesses Why? appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 21, 2018 01:59 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Costing Time per Operation and Time per Part

There are a number of locations to determine the SOLIDWORKS Costing time per operation and total time required per part.  The calculated time is based on the templates for setup time (load/unload, machine setup) and operation time (milling speed, drill speed, etc).

Within the Costing Design Tree, you can toggle between Show Cost and Show Time.  This will provide values per operation.

SOLIDWORKS Costing Time per Operation

SOLIDWORKS Costing – Show Time toggle

For actual operations (eg. Mill, Hole), you can expand the operation and hover your cursor over to get a Tooltip.

SOLIDWORKS Costing - Tooltip to show time

SOLIDWORKS Costing – Tooltip to show time

For a complete break down of time per operation as well as the total time required per part, you can generate a Word or Excel report with all of the details.  Be sure to select the Detailed Report option.

SOLIDWORKS Costing Detailed Report

SOLIDWORKS Costing Detailed Report

SOLIDWORKS Costing Word Report

SOLIDWORKS Costing Word Report

SOLIDWORKS Costing Excel Report

The post SOLIDWORKS Costing Time per Operation and Time per Part appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at February 21, 2018 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

App Smack 08.18: Timelogger, Fiery Feeds, SPACE, Notarize, and More…

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Timelogger (iOS — Free)

Timelogger is a time tracking app that allows you to actively manage and monitor various tasks on your iPhone, Apple Watch or iPad securely and updated across all devices with iCloud.

Fiery Feeds (iOS – Free)

Fiery Feeds is a feed reader built for power users.

Moleskine Actions (iOS — Free)

Collect your thoughts in a calm interface with simple natural language like “Water the plants every Saturday” then let Actions take care of reminding you automatically.

SPACE (Android — Free)

Supported by research from leading universities, our personalised digital behaviour change program will help you take back control of your phone to build more space in your life.

Notarize (Android — Free)

Upload a document, prove your identity, fill out your document, and connect with a licensed Virginia electronic notary by live video call. Sign before the agent who will then legally notarize your document.

Inbox by Gmail (Android — Free)

Your email inbox should help you live and work better, but instead it often buries the important stuff and creates more stress than it relieves. Inbox, built by the Gmail team, keeps things organized and helps you get back to what matters.

The post App Smack 08.18: Timelogger, Fiery Feeds, SPACE, Notarize, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 21, 2018 11:41 AM

Ledr is a Modern (and Awesome!) Take on the Traditional Leather Tool Roll

It goes without saying in any professional setting, but to look the part, it pays to play the part. In other words, you wouldn’t expect an engineer to show up at a design review with a plastic children’s pencil case. At least, this is what the folks over at Onehundred believe (we kinda do, to).

Fresh off the success of their modern interpretation of the Cubit measuring device, the company is keeping the old school vibe with the update of yet another critical accessory for the designers and enginers of yester-century: the tool roll.

Designed to hold everything from USB cables and pens to switchblades or calipers, the Ledr is a leather tool roll designed for today’s modern worker. While the Ledr 7 ($45) model is meant for conventional everyday objects, the larger Ledr 9 ($55) is intended for larger, more “tool-like” objects including wrenches, screwdrivers, and hammers. Both Ledr models are manufactured in New Bedford, Massachusetts out of full-grain, US-sourced leather and stainless steel fasteners.

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With over three weeks to go in their Kickstarter campaign, the Onehundred crew are currently sitting at over $25,000 in pledges—up from their goal of just $1,000. If you’ve been looking for a way to keep all those charge cables, pens, calipers, and other tools from bouncing around your workspace, look no further. Find out more over at Kickstarter.

The post Ledr is a Modern (and Awesome!) Take on the Traditional Leather Tool Roll appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 21, 2018 01:34 AM

February 20, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Visualize: Creating an Animated Fly Through Video in Visualize

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Occasionally when creating renderings it is helpful to combine a visual animation with your stationary rendering. In SOLIDWORKS Visualize we will use the flyover view to help emphasize certain areas of our part. Once the model has been loaded and appearance have been applied, simply open the cameras tab and create a copy of the view you are currently in. Once the copy has been made right click on the new view inside of the camera pane and click Add KeyFrame.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize

Once the Key Frame has been added open your project timeline by choosing the view drop down menu and activate the timeline. In here individual key frames can be added by simply dragging the yellow key to a new timestamp and rotating the model to the desired view. Place all required key steps into the timeline and push play to see a preview of the animation.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize

If any key step needs to be modified simply select the key step in the timeline and reposition the view. If more control is desired one can switch to the original view to activate the animation ribbon. The ribbon gives the ability to modify the speed and position for any key step.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize

To modify a key step select on the key and modify the tension in or out from the keyframe properties in the lower corner of the viewport.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize

Once the desired animation has been created, an export view can be created by going to the output menu and selected animation options. In here the desired name, folder and output format can be chosen.

Now you have the ability to send an animated video of your designed product. For more information, request a SOLIDWORKS Visualize quote or contact us at Hawk Ridge Systems today. Thanks for reading!

Author information

Hawk Ridge Systems
From engineering design to manufacturing production, Hawk Ridge Systems has the team and the expertise to deliver the solutions you need. Hawk Ridge Systems provides SOLIDWORKS 3D software, CAMWorks CAM software and 3D printers from HP and Markforged to over 25,000 customers in North America. We have the largest, most dedicated technical support team, with a 2:1 ratio of engineers to sales and over 20 years of experience with engineering design and manufacturing software systems.

The post SOLIDWORKS Visualize: Creating an Animated Fly Through Video in Visualize appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Hawk Ridge Systems at February 20, 2018 04:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | Slow Motion Marker Render Daydream (Powered by Spotify)

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll get the groove going with “Gatsby Intro” from Chris Bear before diving into sweet melodies from Night Moves, El May, Boy Webb, Dark Rooms, and others before wrapping up with “Hey! Little Child” from Alex Chilton. Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

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by SolidSmack at February 20, 2018 02:15 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: Leatherman Micra Keychain Multi-Tool

Sure—we’re all for having the right tools at the right time. But let’s be honest: having any tool, when the need arises, is better than having none. Which is why having a multitool on your key chain makes perfect sense.

But when it comes to multitools—keychain fobs or not—not all are created equal. And when it comes to the perfect combination of price and quality, it’s hard to go wrong with the original multi-tool manufacturer, Leatherman.

The company’s Micra multi-tool lives on your keychain and includes ten handy functions that are always at the ready: Knife, Spring-action Scissors, Flat/Phillips Screwdriver, Ruler (4.7 in | 12.0 cm), Nail Cleaner, Tweezers, Bottle Opener, Nail File, Medium Screwdriver, Extra-small Screwdriver.

The lightweight and easy-to-carry tool measures only 2.5 inches when closed and weighs a mere 1.8 ounces making it ideal for a tackle box, pocket, purse, fanny pack, or sewing kit if you’re not the keychain type.

Leatherman Micra Keychain Multi-Tool — $29.95

Features:

  • 10 Tools
  • Small, Lightweight, Easy to Carry
  • Spring-Action Scissors
  • Personal Care Features
  • Manufactured in USA
  • Leatherman 25-Year Guarantee

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

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by SolidSmack at February 20, 2018 02:03 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Introducing the New Artificial Intelligence Denoiser

What if I told you by clicking a button in SOLIDWORKS Visualize, you could instantly render 10x faster? Would your world change? What you would do with all that extra time given back to your life? Would you actually believe me?!?

Well I’m proud to say this is not a dream and very much a reality. A brand new super-feature is coming to SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2018 SP3! It’s called the AI (Artificial Intelligence) Denoiser.

Created by the innovative folks at NVIDIA, the AI Denoiser was born from machine learning and artificial intelligence, studying thousands of images and sample project files. This AI Denoiser allows Visualize to anticipate and magically eliminate noise in your scene. What does this mean? You can expect the same photo-quality results 10x faster!! Not only does it help your final renders finish 10x faster, you can also enjoy this dramatic speed-up while preparing your Visualize scenes as well. I’ve been testing the Denoiser the last couple months and it’s blown me away.

Completing any Visualize render job 10x faster is truly game-changing. This could be a still image, animation, camera fly, exploded view, new 360-VR content, etc – all 10 times faster than how it’s currently rendered today. Visualize is already known for fast rendering, but this AI Denoiser takes our render speeds to another stratosphere. This truly makes Visualize the fastest and easiest to use visualization tool on the market – period.

And for those wondering, yes, the AI Denoiser will work in both Fast and Accurate render modes. To fully take advantage of this new super-feature, you’ll need to adjust the final render settings. If you used to put 3,000 passes for Accurate, now you only have to enter 300 passes. Since rendering is 10x faster with the Denoiser, you can enter 10x fewer render passes! 5,000=500; 2,500=250; 1,000 = 100; 500=50 and so on. You might be able to lower the pass count even more – totally up to you!

The AI Denoiser will be available with SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2018 SP3, both Standard and Professional!

Here’s a video within Visualize showing the side-by-side results of the AI Denoiser’s powerful performance boost:

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AMAZING 30% DISCOUNT ON P4000!!

For those looking to upgrade, especially those with a Fermi card, NVIDIA and PNY have teamed up with an exciting limited-time offer of 30% discount on Quadro P4000. This is an extremely fast, versatile graphics card that is VR-ready (meaning it supports HTC Vive).

Visit the NVIDIA online store and use code P4000SWV30 if you’re located in the United States or P4000SWVEU if you’re in Europe. Or purchase through the PNY website here. Hurry up since this 30% discount only lasts through April while supplies last.

MORE SIDE-BY-SIDE AI DENOISER EXAMPLES:

PLEASE NOTE:
In order to take advantage of this awesome new super-feature, you will need an NVIDIA graphics card that has at minimum 4GB of memory (VRAM). Your graphics card will also have to be the Kepler-series or newer. Click here for a list of supported NVIDIA graphics cards that will work with the new AI Denoiser. Newer laptops meeting the minimum of 4GB VRAM (ex: M2000M) will also support the new AI Denoiser. Visualize will still run normally on lesser laptops, just without the new AI Denoiser speed boost. If your graphics card is not on this list, then please consider upgrading to take advantage of the 10x faster rendering performance.

DROPPING FERMI SUPPORT:
The update to include the AI Denoiser means we can no longer support very old NVIDIA graphics card of the Fermi generation. These cards no longer supported are Quadro FX series and Quadro x000. Updating to Visualize 2018 SP3 with these outdated cards will result in Visualize no longer working. To continue using Visualize, please remain on Visualize 2018 SP2 and do not update to new versions until you have a graphics card of Kepler generation or newer. This is why we’re offering the limited-time 30% discount on Quadro P4000. Please reference this Wikipedia page for all NVIDIA graphics cards ever made, with their chip generation.

BONUS:
When we introduce the AI Denoiser in Visualize 2018 SP3, that same Visualize version will also have support for ‘fading’ geometry using the new Opacity slider in FAST mode. This means you don’t have to use Accurate mode and can now use FAST mode to ‘fade’ the geometry in your scene. This ‘fading’ can then be animated using Visualize Professional for some really dramatic animations.

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Don’t forget to follow SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager @bhillner on Twitter for product news and updates, and share your SOLIDWORKS Visualize creations here and on social media with #swvisualize and #gettinvizzy!

More Resources to get started with SOLIDWORKS Visualize:

DOWNLOAD YOUR COMPLIMENTARY SEAT OF SOLIDWORKS VISUALIZE right now to bring your products to market faster than ever before.

WATCH TWO WEBINARS on SOLIDWORKS Visualize and its many benefits to up your render game to a whole new level.

*SOLIDWORKS CAD Professional & Premium users on active Subscription receive the matching number of complimentary Visualize Standard seats. Learn more here.

Author information

Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner is the Product Manager for SOLIDWORKS Visualize (formerly Bunkspeed) and is exited to bring 3D visualization to the masses. His unique blend of design, photography and digital painting helps him craft the future of visualization for SOLIDWORKS products. Prior to SOLIDWORKS, Brian led all content creation at Bunkspeed, designed cars and playsets for Hot Wheels & Matchbox, sport boats for Sea Ray Boats and kitchen appliances for General Electric.

The post Introducing the New Artificial Intelligence Denoiser appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Brian Hillner at February 20, 2018 01:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Motion Simulation in SOLIDWORKS

From the SOLIDWORKS help:

SOLIDWORKS Motion studies are graphical simulations of motion for assembly models. Motion simulation assumes all parts to be rigid during the simulation, meaning that during contacts, no deformations will take place.

Where to start?

To start a motion study in SOLIDWORKS you can click on “Motion Study 1” tab on the lower left corner of SOLIDWORKS user interface.

Motion Study Tab

Motion Study Tab

Make sure to click on “Expand Motion Manager” to display the SOLIDWORKS Motion Manager timeline view.

Motion Manager Timeline View

Motion Manager Timeline View

The first thing you need to do is to select the type of simulation you want to perform. There are 3 types of motion simulations in SOLIDWORKS including Animation, Basic Motion, and Motion Analysis.

Type of Motion

Type of Motion

Animation

Animation simulation is included in all the SOLIDWORKS Packages (Standard, Professional and Premium) and allows you to do quick animations for exploded views and rotating camera angles.

Basic Motion

Basic Motion is also part of every package of SOLIDWORKS. You can use Basic Motion to show basic contacts between models, approximating the effects of motors, springs and gravity on assemblies. Basic Motion takes mass into account in calculating motion. Basic Motion computation is relatively fast, so you can use this for creating presentation-worthy approximate simulations of motion that account for mass, collisions, or gravity.

Just remember that in Basic Motion no forces are being calculated.

Motion Analysis

Motion Analysis is most advanced motion simulation and is part of SOLIDWORKS Professional and Premium. It can be used for accurately simulating and analyzing the effects of motion elements (including forces, springs, dampers, and friction) on an assembly. Motion Analysis uses computationally strong kinematic solvers, and accounts for material properties as well as mass and inertia in the computations. You can also use Motion Analysis to plot simulation results for further analysis.

To have access to Motion Analysis other than having SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium packages, you need to activate the SOLIDWORKS Motion add-in from the Tools > Add-Ins menu.

SOLIDWORKS Motion Add-in

SOLIDWORKS Motion Add-in

The post Motion Simulation in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Saeed Mojarad (CSWE) at February 20, 2018 01:00 PM

February 19, 2018

SolidSmack

Revolve Innovates Wheel Design To Collapse and Convert Your Vehicle

Not much has changed with the wheel since it got us moving millennia ago. It’s design in the simplest form: a rotating donut which adapts to do everything from power machinery to provide exercise for your kid’s overweight hamster.

Seeing as the invention has survived years without a lot of improvement, designer Andrea Mocellin has taken it upon himself to bring the wheel into the 21st century. Revolve, his latest creation, is a modular wheel he hopes will pave the way for a new line of portable vehicles.

 

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Its operation is not unlike a bicycle or wheelchair wheel–it is a wheel after all. The primary difference is that when not in use, you can collapse the wheel on itself to make it more travel-sized.

revolve wheel

 

 

Two handles located on the innermost portion of the Revolve lock and unlock it. While this might not seem like the safest method of securing a wheel meant to carry the weight of a person, Mocellin ensures it is as safe as safe can be.

The Revolve covers the universal wheel dimension of 26″ (665mm) when spread out and a dimension of 8.9″ (226mm) when folded. Apart from occupying less space (about 60%, to be precise) and becoming more travel-friendly, the closed wheel can change your conveyance to be used as a scooter or trolley, as it holds the same weight as the open version.

 

 

As for the wheel’s composition, the entire frame is made from aluminum and features an airless tire – so, whether riden, carried or used to defend yourself in a knife fight, that wheel won’t be going flat.

With aluminum as Revolve’s hub material, you have anodized color options to customize it according to your taste. Different colors of aluminum, stainless steel, carbon fiber, and plastic can be applied to the Revolve – though you wouldn’t want all of them on a single wheel.

As mentioned, Mocellin’s goal with the Revolve is to spur on a renaissance of foldable wheel vehicles which he hopes will make transportation a whole lot easier for people who can’t afford a car. A concept design for a 3-in-1 bike/scooter/trolley has been presented and looks like a product fit for globe trekkers, urban adventurers, or those who just want to have more transportation options.

Revolve’s webpage has more info on this modern take on a timeless invention. Our take? For an item such as a wheel where there doesn’t seem much more to innovate on, this wheel design brings some interesting applications to mind.

The post Revolve Innovates Wheel Design To Collapse and Convert Your Vehicle appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 19, 2018 06:31 PM

The Monday List 08.18 | What We’re Reading This Week

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

When You’re a ‘Digital Nomad,’ the World Is Your Office

A global network of live-work spaces is springing up to serve this new breed of millennial wanderer.

Supertall Towers Are Driving an Elevator Revolution

A new generation of skyscrapers is pushing manufacturers to update a 2,000-year-old Roman technology.

The Rise of China and the Fall of the ‘Free Trade’ Myth

China’s economic success lays bare an uncomfortable historical truth: No one who preaches ‘free trade’ really practices it.

How to Become More Likeable

And steps to cultivate more satisfying, authentic relationships.

Silicon Valley’s Singularity University Has Some Serious Reality Problems

It’s lost Google funding and dealt with allegations of assault and fraud.

SpaceX Will Launch the First of Its Global Internet Satellites

With the Heavy’s test flight complete, SpaceX is back to business as usual. Or maybe not. What seems like a routine launch this week may have greater implications for the company’s future and profits.

The post The Monday List 08.18 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 19, 2018 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018 Drawing Styles and Attribute management

SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018 added new features enabling users to manage properties, and configure project Drawing styles such as Layers, Line styles and Text Styles. Just like existing configurations (such as terminals, PLCs, etc.) these can be defined at a Project level or at a Global level.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018 Drawing Styles Configurations

Drawing Styles Configurations

Where to Find Drawing Styles configurations:

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Schematic > Project ribbon (project must be open) > Drawing Styles

Drawing styles can be setup at Global or Project level

Drawing styles can be setup at Global or Project level

Project level attribute Styles:

In 2018, as a part of the project configurations you can now setup attributes at a project level. The attributes can be setup for symbols and titleblocks making it easier to manage.

Attributes can be managed at the Project configuration level

Attributes can be managed at the Project configuration level

Where to find Project Attribute Configurations:

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Schematic > Project ribbon (project must be open) > Configuration > Attribute tab

Watch our SOLIDWORKS 2018 Launch Broadcast

Javelin’s team of Certified SOLIDWORKS experts unveiled the new software in a live broadcast. Watch a recording of the broadcast to see technical demonstrations and tutorials on how to use the new software. Click here to learn more about SOLIDWORKS 2018

The post SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018 Drawing Styles and Attribute management appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Delvin Masilamani at February 19, 2018 01:00 PM

February 18, 2018

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 07.18

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

Siemens to Provide Free Solid Edge CAD Software for Launch Forth Members

Start-up capital has been a pain point—and roadblock—for many brilliant ideas that never end up seeing the light of day. Considering how costly software tools alone can be, it’s no surprise that some innovators refrain from moving forward at all knowing what they’re up against before even having a prototype in hand.</spcan>

Simplify3D Updates Their Free Ultimate 3D Printing Material Guide

While the term “3D Printing” has become synonymous with creating physical objects, the underlying method of manufacture—additive manufacturing—is a diverse and complex concept spanning multiple materials and design constraints. From ABS to SLS, there are a number of different pros and cons when picking the best methods or materials to get the job done.

An Animated History of the Iconic Emeco 1006 Navy Chair

Developed in collaboration with the Aluminum Company of America in 1944 by Wilton C. Dinges, the Emeco 1006 Navy Chair is one of the most iconic chairs in the history of industrial design. Initially designed for the Navy submarines during WWII as a chair that could withstand the rigors of life at sea—including a torpedo blast—it has since become a mainstay in high-end restaurants and the catalogs of discerning interior designers. To date, more than one million of the chairs have been manufactured over the last half-century.

MIT’s ‘ColorFab’ 3D Printing Method Will Let You Recolor Finished 3D Models

3D printing in color can be costly. Given how much time and resources spent upfront, having a failed print isn’t exactly as easy to deal with as printing a 2D color picture incorrectly.

Pour Reception Challenges Modern Interfaces with Water-Based Commands

From face-scanning smartphones to always-listening voice interfaces, we’ve come a long way since using dials and knobs to control the world around us. As a natural side effect, we’ve also created a much larger arena to play with interface design. The Pour Reception radio from interaction designer Tore Knudsen is one such project that aims to challenge our perception of cultural understanding and what an interface is or can be.

Immersive Augmented Reality Sweetness is Finally Coming to SolidWorks

It’s not uncommon for SolidWorks World to feel a little bit like Christmas for serious CAD junkies. Not to mention, it’s a great time for partner companies to get their announcements heard while everybody is in the ‘holiday spirit.’

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 07.18 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 18, 2018 12:37 AM

February 17, 2018

The Javelin Blog

Mechanical Engineering Meets Electricity Episode 4 – Electrical Routing

Welcome back once again, loyal readers! This blog marks the culmination of my project to design an exciting new home theater system. If only the improved system could also improve the Canucks quality of play… In our previous adventures we explored setting up 2D components, combining those components into an intelligent 2D drawing, and adding electrical intelligence to our 3D models. Today we will use SOLIDWORKS Electrical Routing to bring it all together by assembling a 3D digital replica of my system, complete with accurate wiring/cabling.

SOLIDWORKS Routing – It’s (Mostly) Not Magic

SOLIDWORKS Routing is the primary reason we taught our components electrical intelligence. It is the tool that interprets the detailed wiring information from our 2D drawings and outputs optimized 3D wire/cable/harness routes.

SolidWorks Electrical Routing Creates Optimized Paths According to User Specified Parameters

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Routing Creates Optimized Paths According to User Specified Parameters

If given no other options or parameters, routing will automatically draw a point to point path between connected components. While this may be appropriate in some situations, it is frequently advantageous to be able to define specific paths for our wiring. Luckily, this can easily be done with SOLIDWORKS Electrical Routing.

You Are on the Fastest Route

SOLIDWORKS Electrical 3D contains a Routing Path command, which allows us to quickly create a 3D sketch for routing, or convert any existing 3D sketch for use. The command ensures seamless usability by naming sketches according to the SOLIDWORKS Electrical conventions. Routing sketches can be added to components, locations, and/or the project level assembly, allowing for paths to be specified and standardized at any point in the design process. It was very easy for me to quickly add routing paths to my component models and top-level assembly to control the paths my wires would be routed on.

Routing path sketches can be created within components or the electrical assembly, allowing users to specify paths wherever is most convenient

Routing path sketches can be created within components or the electrical assembly, allowing users to specify paths wherever is most convenient

Users are further able to control routing through use of parameters. The parameters control rules for SOLIDWORKS Electrical Routing, such as the maximum allowable distance between an origin point and path, the maximum distance a wire can traverse between routes, or any paths that the wire styles are included/excluded from using. These parameters allow users to obtain repeatable, optimized results, according to their best practices. By carefully positioning and being aware of the start and end points of my routing paths, it was straight forward to specify routing parameters that would yield ideal results.

Routing makes it easy to perform a visual check of the connection information. Wire, cable, and harness colors can all be defined in SolidWorks Electrical Schematic.

Routing makes it easy to perform a visual check of the connection information. Wire, cable, and harness colors can all be defined in SOLIDWORKS Electrical Schematic.

Why be Approximate?

My completed wire and cable routes, provided immediate visual feedback for reviewing my design in 3D, sharing it with others, or just observing (with satisfaction) the fruits of my labor.

Fully routed designs can improve communication and visualization of the project with stakeholders, allowing them to more confidently give it a green light.

Fully routed designs can improve communication and visualization of the project with stakeholders, allowing them to more confidently give it a green light.

Key design outputs for assembling my design (and for manufacturing) are accurate lengths of cabling and wiring. Approximating cuts can lead to lost time if lengths are too short, and wasted material if they are too long. Regardless, approximating cuts can easily be a lose/lose scenario. By using SOLIDWORKS Electrical Routing, my lengths were automatically calculated and communicated back into my 2D design.

Do you remember the connection table from Episode 2 with all the connection information for my components? The cable lengths obtained by routing have now been populated back into the table, making it an invaluable tool for assembling my system.

Reports can customized and automatically be generated to document wire lengths

Reports can customized and automatically be generated to document wire lengths

Now it’s Your Turn

Thank you again, valued readers, for joining me on this journey to design my ideal home theater system. Through the process we have explored many ways that SOLIDWORKS Electrical creates value for designers at every stage in the design process. With powerful tools that encourage automation, flexibility, and effective communication, SOLIDWORKS Electrical provided an ideal environment for me to create a robust electrical design, that can be updated, expanded, or reused in the future with ease. Furthermore, this digital replica of my system is now ready to be leveraged through the many versatile tools of the SOLIDWORKS 3D Experience Platform.

This series of blogs has provided a single, specific example of how SOLIDWORKS Electrical enhanced my workflow and helped me create a useful design. I encourage you to contact us to learn more about how SOLIDWORKS Electrical can fit into and improve your design process. We look forward to working with you to get more from your designs!

The post Mechanical Engineering Meets Electricity Episode 4 – Electrical Routing appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Angus Hudson, CSWP at February 17, 2018 01:00 PM

February 16, 2018

The Javelin Blog

Master Cut List Property Management while inserting Parts into Parts

A variety of techniques can be employed when building assemblies in SOLIDWORKS. In some cases the weldment module is used as the primary assembly environment, in other cases we see welded bodies being created as individual assembly components before they are placed together at the assembly level. In the end it often narrows down to how you wish to manage the Weldment Cut List.

In this article, we are going to focus our attention on managing the Cut List properties from a component that is imported into another component. This is done when inserting a part file into the next and choosing the appropriate options from the list of items that “Transfer” from the component being inserted or added to the parent component.

We will start with two weldments each as its own separate part file:

Tube Weldment

This Tube Weldment is going to be inserted into the Shaft Weldment Part file as a part.

Shaft Weldment

This is our Shaft Weldment – it will be the receiving file for the tube weldment in our example.

Each one of these weldment components has it’s respective cut list that exist before any importing is completed:

 

The catylist for our next series of explorations is to use the Insert Part command in order to insert the Tube Weldment into the Shaft Weldment and maintain the references to the original Tube file.

Once the Insert Part command is engaged, SOLIDWORKS will prompt us for the various elements of the part file which we would like to have brought into the “Parent” or Receiving component.  In this case only the solid bodies are needed along with whatever custom or cut list property we choose to carry along with us into the receiving component.

The default selection of “File Properties” becomes less than stellar once a proper cut list is created in the drawing – The line item for our newly inserted weldment is blank, and void of any useful information.

Cut List

Let us revisit the custom properties option in the “Transfer” area of the Insert Part Command, this can be adjusted by right-clicking on the inserted component in the feature tree and choosing “Edit Feature”.

Choosing our second option this time “Custom Properties + Cut List Properties” gives us population of the resulting cut list – pushing the custom property from the File Properties of the Tube component down into the cut list properties of the Shaft Component file.

 

The final selection that one can make is the “Cut List Properties” checkbox within the “Transfer” area of the insert part command. This selection results in what we were seeking for a result, that the cut list properties come across into the receiving file cleanly from our Tube component.

 

Now that you are aware of your options for custom property imports during part insertion, give it a try! You may find that you can manage weldment assemblies without having to resort to a full SOLIDWORKS assembly file.

Want to learn more about weldments? Attend our SOLIDWORKS Weldments training course, either online or in a classroom near you.

The post Master Cut List Property Management while inserting Parts into Parts appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at February 16, 2018 01:00 PM

February 15, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

How to Create Drawing Templates and Sheet Formats in SOLIDWORKS

When it comes to creating projects in SOLIDWORKS, the main goal is to spend as much time as possible on what is important, the design itself. Nobody wants to be stuck wasting unnecessary amounts of time on tasks like recreating file templates over and over. Come on, we are trying to increase productivity here!

In this video, I’ll walk you through the process of creating a drawing template that can be used on multiple projects.

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View the video transcription below:

 

[Begin Transcription]

Hi everyone welcome to the Alignex blog, my name is Geoffrey and today we’re going to be going through setting up your drawing templates and your sheet formats in SOLIDWORKS. So what I’ve got open right now is a drawing template. Usually we like to start with the default templates so that’s just when you do a File > New and choose one of these sizes of drawing templates. What we’ll do from here is we’ll customize this template and will also save out the sheet format in a separate file and link the two together.

So the actual drawing template, this is when we do a File > Save As and we’ll choose type .DRWDOT. This is the actual drawing template. So what this stores is it just stores the document properties so if I go to my Options up here and then Document Properties this is what the template is storing, so like our units, our drafting standard, the types of views, fonts, thicknesses, that’s what’s being stored in our drawing template. Additionally the drawing template can also store predefined drawing views. These can be done by doing insert > drawing view > predefined.

We can define the type of view so I’ll just place that like an isometric and just hit OK. So these views will be automatically populated when a drawing is created using this template. OK so that’s what the drawing template stores. Now the sheet format this is accessed by right-clicking and I’ll just choose Edit Sheet Format here. The sheet format contains the title block down here the border and finally also if I go to File > Properties the custom properties that are stored.

So the title block this can contain information such as links too properties. This is linking to the description, this is done by just if we Double Click any text field, go over here to Link to Property, we can choose to link it to any properties in our drawing or any properties in the model. Once it’s inserted we would also have those properties to link to.

OK the drawing title block can also hold images we can put those in just with Insert > Picture, and we can edit any of these lines just by using our sketch tools to draw more lines, move them, etc. This sheet format also contains the border here, if we want to change this border we can use the Automatic Border reation tool so I’ll just hit that. This delete list this would be if we want to remove anything from my title block or mask it off. I’m just going to hit Next, I don’t need to use that.

So this is how we set up the border, we have rows and columns, we have our spacing line widths and weights, we have our zone dividers if we’re using those and we also have our fonts. Finally we have the option to add a margin mask. This would hide zone dividers and zone labels in certain areas. I don’t need that so I’m just going to hit OK.

Alright, so what we also might want to also store is those custom properties. So here if I add something like “Description” this will also be stored in the sheet format file. Alright so to save out this sheet format, first I’m going to exit it here in the top right, that’s the same thing as clicking Right Click and go back to Edit Sheet versus we were in Edit Sheet Format.

Alright so the last thing we want to do is save out our sheet format. To do that we’ll just use a File > Save Sheet Format and this will save it in the type .slddrt. So let me just save that on my desktop. OK lastly we want to make sure that our drawing template is linked to the sheet format. To do that I will just Right Click and we may have to hit this drop down to get to Properties, go ahead and hit that. And you can see here this is the sheet format that it’s linked to. I’ll just browse for the one I just saved out. Here it is, Apply Changes, and then I’m just going to re-save  the drawing template one more time. So .drwdotremember to change that. OK, so that’s how we would go about creating a new drawing template, saving out our sheet format and linking the two together.  

[End Transcription]

If you are interested in learning more, sign up for one of the many training courses we have to offer at Alignex or check out our Alignex support documents available on our website.

Author information

Alignex, Inc.
Alignex, Inc. is the premier provider of SOLIDWORKS software and partner products to the mechanical engineering industry in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, Colorado and Wyoming. With more than 25 years of technical experience, Alignex offers consulting services, training and support for SOLIDWORKS as well as support for partner products. For more information, visit alignex.com.

The post How to Create Drawing Templates and Sheet Formats in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Alignex, Inc. at February 15, 2018 04:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Introducing 3DXpert for SOLIDWORKS – Your Direct Path from SOLIDWORKS to Additive Manufacturing

Last week at SOLIDWORKS World in Los Angeles, Suchit Jain, Vice President, Strategy and Business Development, Strategy and Community at SOLIDWORKS announced a new partnership with Additive Manufacturing giant, 3D Systems.

The key for additive manufacturing to reach its full potential across a wide range of industries is to make design tools more accessible and the workflow easier to navigate for the designer community. Up till now, designers did not have the right tools to make Design for Additive Manufacturing (DFAM), an inherent part of their design process. The partnership announced today means all SOLIDWORKS CAD Subscription customers have access to a new product, specifically to enable Design for Additive Manufacturing.

Design for additive now at your fingertips

Lightning-fast creation, and editing of lattice and infill structures

 

3DXpert for SOLIDWORKS delivers an entire new toolset to SOLIDWORKS users for rapid, robust design for additive manufacturing. Supporting both plastic and metal 3D printing, 3DXpert for SOLIDWORKS delivers unprecedented ease-of-use to DFAM – adding latticework, support structures, arranging the build platform and more in an integrated workflow that removes long and cumbersome design iterations.

Let’s Dive Deeper

Optimize Printing Orientation

 

Understanding that getting the most out of additive manufacturing requires a change in mindset, 3DXpert for SOLIDWORKS includes model optimization as well as all preparations for printability as part of the design process. Being “additive manufacturing aware” allows designers to let their creativity lead the way and not be encumbered with traditional manufacturing limitations. As a result, it opens the door to a new world of opportunities that were previously extremely hard or even impossible to achieve. Producing complex geometries, achieving lighter weight parts without compromising on strength, and applying surface structures are only some of the benefits and capabilities that additive manufacturing introduces to the design process.

How It Works
3DXpert for SOLIDWORKS is a complementary software for SOLIDWORKS, equipping professional users, designers and engineers with everything they need to prepare and optimize their designs for additive manufacturing. A click of a button in SOLIDWORKS brings SOLIDWORKS native CAD data directly into 3DXpert for SOLIDWORKS and provides an extensive toolset to easily analyze, prepare and optimize the design for additive manufacturing.

Ensure Quality Prints with Minimal Supports

 

The all-in-one solution eliminates the need for back and forth iterative and cumbersome processes involving multiple software solutions. Instead, 3DXpert for SOLIDWORKS provides a direct path from SOLIDWORKS design to additive manufacturing and into the new world of additive manufacturing opportunities.

3DXpert for SOLIDWORKS is available exclusively for SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD subscribers. The Standard Edition is included in SOLIDWORKS subscription and can be downloaded at no extra cost from: https://www.3dsystems.com/3DXpert-4SW.

Author information

Mark Rushton
Mark Rushton
Mark is a Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS.

The post Introducing 3DXpert for SOLIDWORKS – Your Direct Path from SOLIDWORKS to Additive Manufacturing appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mark Rushton at February 15, 2018 03:23 PM

SolidSmack

Pour Reception Challenges Modern Interfaces with Water-Based Commands

From face-scanning smartphones to always-listening voice interfaces, we’ve come a long way since using dials and knobs to control the world around us. As a natural side effect, we’ve also created a much larger arena to play with interface design. The Pour Reception radio from interaction designer Tore Knudsen is one such project that aims to challenge our perception of cultural understanding and what an interface is or can be.

Aside from the striking Dieter Rams-approved industrial design exterior, the Pour Reception radio is built like your average radio including internal speakers and an AUX input. What’s different, however, are the two glasses that rest on the top surface. Rather than knobs, dials, or buttons, a user turns the radio on by adding water to one or both of the glasses. Once the radio is on, fine-tuning channel selections, filtering distortion, and adjusting volume are all achieved by pouring water into or touching the glass vessels.

“The ambition is that after interacting with Pour Reception, you will be more reflective on how you interact with other digital artifacts – maybe you could also begin to see new things in other everyday objects and have a more playful meeting with the technologies that surround us,” explains Knudsen.

The technology behind the unusual interface is smart but quite simple: a capacitive sensor makes readings from the conductive materials using Arduino. Using machine learning, gestures made with the glasses are mapped to commands for controlling the radio.

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“Pour Reception turns two familiar concepts upside down: the radio medium and two glasses of water,” adds Knudsen. “It is the combination of these two ordinary concepts that make it a playful and surprisingly experience – most likely no one has ever been asked to use their knowledge from interacting with a glass of water to control the radio with (or any technology for that matter).”

Well, we’d have to agree. Find out more about the unusual and thought-provoking project here.

The post Pour Reception Challenges Modern Interfaces with Water-Based Commands appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 15, 2018 02:48 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: The rOtring 800 Retractable Mechanical Pencil

When it comes to mechanical pencils, not all are created equal. And with rOtring, this couldn’t be truer.

Ideal for sketching, writing, and drawing, the iconic rOtring 800 Mechanical Pencil features an ergonomically enhanced full metal body, with centered weight balance and a comfortable non-slip knurled grip for long work periods without discomfort or fatigue. Featuring a “Twist and Click” retractable mechanism of the entire sleeve and lead, the rOtring 800 Mechanical Pencil can easily go from pocket to sketch without worrying about damage or lead breakage. Quite frankly, you’d be hard-pressed to find a better mechanical pencil for this price.

The rOtring 800 Retractable Mechanical Pencil — $34.25

Features:

  • An iconic tool meant for a lifetime of use.
  • Unique “Twist and Click” mechanism retracts entire lead and sleeve for durability and pocket-safety.
  • Full metal body providing the ideal balance of weight and feeling.
  • Hexagonal barrel ensuring fatigue-free writing and drawing.
  • Fixed lead guidance sleeve prevents breakage and gives a clear page view for ruler-based drawing.

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The post Cool Tools of Doom: The rOtring 800 Retractable Mechanical Pencil appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 15, 2018 02:22 PM

App Smack 07.18: Notability, Threader, Taskful, and More…

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Notability (iOS — $9.99)

Welcome to Notability: powerful, yet wonderfully simple note-taking and PDF annotation.

Thunderly (iOS – Free)

Do you love storms as we do?
Then you’ll love our app.

Threader (iOS — Free)

Discover a great selection of threads from Twitter every day./em>

Weather Live Free (Android — Free)

Rely on the accurate weather forecast and adjust your schedule to the weather coming in. You won’t even have to look out the window as the app will make you feel like you are already outside!

U Scanner (Android — Free)

Digitize, save and share meeting slides, whiteboard annotations, receipts, and even napkin scribbles, with a single click.

Taskful (Android — Free)

Taskful is a smart to-do list and task manager app that helps you stay on track and meet your deadlines

The post App Smack 07.18: Notability, Threader, Taskful, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 15, 2018 02:21 PM

The Javelin Blog

Input Formula aliasing using check boxes in SOLIDWORKS PDM Data Cards

Recently a customer inquired about an interesting challenge.  They wanted to control the value of a text field on their SOLIDWORKS PDM Data Card by using a “Checkbox” field.  The idea was to have a checkbox to indicate whether or not the file required approval, this would control how the file moved through the Workflow.  But they also wanted it to affect the value displayed in the “Approved By” and “Approved Date” fields.

This was a perfect place to use Input Formula Aliasing.  Input Formulas can be added to any “Edit” field in a data card, but in addition to the list of Functions that can be found in the SOLIDWORKS PDM Card Editor interface for Input Formula, you can also create a list of aliases based on the value from another variable in the same card.  Frequently this is used when the other variable is linked to “Combo box” field that relies on a list, but it can also be used when the other variable is linked to a “Check box” field.

Input Formula Aliasing uses the format: %VARIABLENAME(VALUE1=ALIAS1VALUE2=ALIAS2)%

So in our case, the “VARIABLENAME” would be name of the variable that is linked to the “Checkbox” field.  Checkboxes on the data card are binary, so a checked box will set a value of “1” to the variable, unchecked boxes set the value to 0.

Our goal is to have the “Edit” fields for “Approved By” and “Approved Date” to show “N/A” if the box is not checked and to show “PENDING” if the box is checked (once the file passes through the approval stage of the workflow the username of the approver and the date they performed the approval will be set by a Transition Action).

So the “VALUE1” we will use will be “1”, meaning the box is checked, and “ALIAS1” will be “PENDING”.  The “VALUE2” will be “0”, for the unchecked box, and “ALIAS2” will be “N/A”

The formula will be: %Approve Required(1=PENDING, 0=N/A)%
SOLIDWORKS PDM Card Editor

SOLIDWORKS PDM Card Editor

This formula will be added to the Input formula control on both the “Approved By” and “Approved Date” fields.

Also, it’s important to remember that the Input formal will not trigger until the user either checks or unchecks the linked checkbox.  So if they do nothing, the input formula will not be triggered, and so it won’t input a value to the “Edit” box.  In this case, the default state for our “Approval Required” checkbox will be “Checked”, so we will enter a “Default value” of “PENDING” for box of both of the “Edit” fields.

Setting Values

Setting Values

The result will be that by default when a new file is created in the vault, the “Approved By” and “Approved Date” fields will show “PENDING” and the “Approval Required” check box will be checked.  If the user unchecks the checkbox, then the values in the “Approved By” and “Approved Date” fields will change to “N/A”.  If the user checks the box again, they will change back to “PENDING”

Data Card Completed

Data Card Completed

The post Input Formula aliasing using check boxes in SOLIDWORKS PDM Data Cards appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at February 15, 2018 01:00 PM

February 14, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Use the ‘Exclude from Cut List’ Option to Manage SOLIDWORKS Modeled Welds

Author: Chris Briand, CSWE, Javelin Technologies

One of the most common practices we run across while discussing weldment functionality with clients is the use of ‘Modeled Welds’ which are additional Solid Bodies that exist in the weldment file to represent the physical mass where a weld would exist — generally in a shape that the fillet bead tool cannot be applied, as shown in the example below:

A typical weldment - Use the ‘Exclude from Cut List’ Option to Manage SOLIDWORKS Modeled Welds

A typical weldment with additional solid bodies

Typically the Cut List folder (Solid Bodies) would appear similar to the image below, if one was using Cut List items to apply properties to the various members comprising the weldment. This includes separation of the bodies representing welds into their own folder.

Cut List folders

Cut List folders

The technique that you may consider applying here is a workflow to specifically exclude a number of the bodies from the Cut List, such as those gathered within the MODELED WELDS folder, that can be created manually or automatically, depending upon your settings.

Exclude from Cut List

A right-click on the Folder that represents the MODELED WELDS will reveal options to Exclude the weldment from the folder directly or enter the Cut List properties area of the Cut List.  It is here on the Cut List summary tab, that you will find the checkbox to “Exclude” that weldment member from the Cut List.

Exclude from Cut List option

Exclude from Cut List option

With the “Exclude from Cut List” option Checked we end up with the following in our weldment cut list table.

Cut List Table

Cut List Table

Keep this in mind when you are planning your next welded component that has a requirement for the welds to be modeled directly.

Author information

Javelin Technologies
Javelin Technologies is a provider of technology solutions since 1997. We are experts in 3D design and have helped thousands of companies with solutions for mechanical design, electrical design and 3D printing. Large or small, we have the skills, experience, and services to propel your organization to new heights so you can aim high.

The post Use the ‘Exclude from Cut List’ Option to Manage SOLIDWORKS Modeled Welds appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Javelin Technologies at February 14, 2018 04:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Talking Topology with Tarso Marques

The new Topology Study was launched, to the delight of many users with SOLIDWORKS 2018 and although it’s only been on the market for a few months, it is built upon tried and trusted technology from SIMULIA and many companies have been quick to take advantage of it.

The topology study, part of Simulation Professional 2018, enables designers and engineers to refine components for minimum mass while maintaining the required level of stiffness (maximum displacement). The study applies linear static loads and constraints to a problem and, during an iterative solution, successive mesh elements are ignored until the last iteration when the mesh has the required stiffness with the least mass.

The results of this process tend to be very organic in nature, leading many to believe that the results of this require additive manufacturing to take advantage of this study, but this isn’t the case. The topology results can be used to guide parametric features and manufacturing processes with SOLIDWORKS CAM.

At this year’s SOLIDWORKS World I had the opportunity to talk with Tarso Marques, who together with his team are embracing this technology. (http://tarsomarques.com/) Tarso designs are very unique, a mixture of elegance and power, all realized with SOLIDWORKS. Tarso explained that design is a very personal expression of your vision. however, being able to communicate that vision was an issue early as he made his transition from driver to custom car designer. He admits that when he first started designing, his initial sketches were not great, which made explaining his ideas difficult and clay modeling was too time-consuming. That is when SOLIDWORKS, as Tarso put it, “changed my life.”

Taso believes that the new topology study will help him create a perfect balance between the aesthetics and performance of component on his vehicles. The shape generated from the topology process can be used as an inspiration for traditional manufacture or for additive manufacture. Topology isn’t just about design and simulation it is a transformational technology that will change the way Tarso designs and builds in the future. To Tarso, topology is “truly transformational” and it will change the way he designs and manufactures ‘100%” as it results in stronger, light parts that deliver high-end performance.

In vehicle design managing the vibrational behavior is key for longevity and driveability, and as such Tarso was pleased to see that in that the SOLIDWORKS 2019 sneak peek the team showed the addition of new constraints and goals for vibration and stress. In Tarso’s own words “This makes me very happy.”

After spending some time with Tarso I now belive he is a designer that learn to drive fast rather than a fast driver who now designs. He is always thinking looking for possibilities and new solutions and he uses SOLIDWORKS to quickly and easily communicate his vision to the whole team.  With the advent of topology in SOLIDWORKS Simulation Professional Tarso can now explore new solutions to refine his designs to explore new shapes and manufacturing processes all the while confident that they are fit for purpose.

What can topology do for you? Click here to learn more about topology and the new Simulation solutions available in SOLIDWORKS 2018.

Author information

Stephen Endersby
Stephen Endersby
Product Manager at SolidWorks

The post Talking Topology with Tarso Marques appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Stephen Endersby at February 14, 2018 03:16 PM

The Javelin Blog

3D Printing is Helping to Standardize Surgical Training

Surgical training

Surgical training

Traditionally surgical training has depended on the orderly exposure of the surgeons to graduated clinical experience in the operating room under the close supervision of senior surgeons. Such preceptor-apprenticeship on an operation table is the major bottleneck in training of congenital heart surgery because of the wide variation and complexity of pathological anatomy, relative rarity of the individual lesions and the small size of the heart. More importantly however, training someone to do a complex surgical procedure in the operation room may put the patient’s life at stake. As such, traditional training is mostly opportunity-based and the training period for congenital heart surgery is very long. Therefore, surgical simulation demand is increasing in training programs. However, either animal or prosthetic models have been scarcely available for training, proving to be an obstacle.

Learning Innovations Taking Shape with 3D Printing

Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has opened the door to the new world of surgical simulation. Using 3D volume image data of the patient’s computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or echocardiography, physical replicas of the patient’s heart can be printed. Initially used for surgical decision and planning, 3D printed models are now used for hands-on surgical practice and training. Since 2015, we have hosted or supported 7 hands-on surgical training (HOST) courses. It has clearly been shown that HOST courses are of tremendous help in improving surgical skills in various disease settings such as tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, double outlet right ventricle, coarctation of the aorta, interrupted aortic arch, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome. The attendees as well as proctors found that the models represent the surgical anatomy very well and that the intended surgical procedures were able to be performed without major difficulties despite that the physical properties of the printed material are significantly different from the real human tissue. However, the attendees of the first course in 2015 unanimously pointed out lack of valves and supporting structures in the models as the major limitation.  We have recently been successful in making the models more realistic by adding graphically designed valve structures to the patient’s image data. Additionally, a newly developed material under investigation is very promising, as the consistency and elasticity of the full thickness myocardium appears to be a close simulation to real human myocardium.

Surgical Training Advancements Bring the Future Forward

With further improvement of imaging and 3D printing technologies including better soft materials, surgical simulation with 3D printed models will be more realistic and the surgical training paradigm will change from opportunity-based to standardized learning by incorporating HOST programs.

Read the original article here.

The post 3D Printing is Helping to Standardize Surgical Training appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Alexis Szustak at February 14, 2018 01:00 PM

February 13, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – February 2018

Hello to all,

Welcome to this new edition of the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News, coauthored by members of the SOLIDWORKS Technical Support teams worldwide.

Looking back at SOLIDWORKS World 2018 with Brad Phillips

By Julien Boissat

On day 3 of SOLIDWORKS World 2018, I sat with Brad Phillips, Senior Technical Customer Support Engineer (TSE) from Woodland Hills, CA. Brad shared his impressions and his involvement at the conference.

Julien: So tell me, how many times have you participated in SOLIDWORKS World?

Brad: This is my fifth year at SOLIDWORKS World.  I have been lucky enough to be able to attend every year since the first year I started at SOLIDWORKS back in January 2013.

Julien: You and I know that only a limited number of SOLIDWORKS TSEs go to the event. What makes you want to be part of it each year?

Brad: For me I see this experience of being able to attend SOLIDWORKS World every year as an opportunity to experience the SOLIDWORKS community head on.  As part of support, a lot of times we only see customers when they are in difficult situations, but at SOLIDWORKS World I get the experience of interacting with the most passionate and excited members of the SOLIDWORKS community.

Julien: I understand you presented at breakout sessions. Tell me about it.

Brad: This is the third year that I got to present the CAD Managers Boot Camp on the Sunday before the conference begins.  This is this session that has been going on for many, many years that features four hours of all of the most relevant content that we in SOLIDWORKS Support think all CAD admins should know in order to best serve their clients and engineers that use SOLIDWORKS for their daily jobs.  The two sections that I presented this year were on installations and licensing.  The last couple releases of SOLIDWORKS have really added a lot of great new tools for CAD Admins. The Settings Administrator tool and the brand new SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal with Online Licensing are just a few. I was really excited to bring some of this never before seen features to the people that could best utilize them in the workplace.  I really encourage any CAD Admins that couldn’t make it out to SOLIDWORKS World on Sunday to see the session that they try to make it next year and also look for the slides to be released with all of the other SOLIDWORKS World presentation proceedings.

The session is four hours of very technical content, so the CAD Admin Boot Camp planning team really strives to make this year’s presentation very interactive and exciting.  This year’s session had about 400 attendees so it was great to see some of them come up to me at the booth in the partner pavilion and say that they had a great time and they learned a lot.

Julien: There was a ton of announcements about new products, services and features this year. Which got you most excited?

Brad: Well as a 3D printer hobbyist, the 3DExperience Marketplace Make was really interesting to me because if in the future I make a prototype and want it to be manufactured in steel or something besides plastic I now have a place where I can find reputable service companies that can do that for me.  Also from the announced solid works 2019 features, the convert texture to mesh looked really exciting and the crowd during the general session strongly agreed.

Julien: And which keynote presenter make the biggest impression on you?

Brad: Joe Hiura and Robert Andrew Johnson where the keynote that really made an impression on me. They were using SOLIDWORKS in a way that I’ve never seen before and really thinking outside of the box in the way they used it. I also got a chance to chat with them when they came by the SOLIDWORKS booth.  They were very personable guys and we were playing around in SOLIDWORKS and they were showing me some of the things that they do for their set designs that I haven’t seen customers use before. They’re using SOLIDWORKS to design art that has to capture our imagination but it also has to be functional.

 

 

Julien: See you in Dallas next year for SOLIDWORKS World 2019?

Brad: Absolutely.

Julien: Thanks.

 

Note: You can relive the action here at SWW18 with on-demand video at live.solidworks.com.

Understanding Multibody Sheet Metal Thickness, Derived Mirror Part Thickness and the Thickness Global Variable

By Mario Iocco

Single body sheet metal can be confusing. Adding sheet metal multi-bodies and mirror part into the mix, can be overwhelming to many users who don’t deal with these issues every day. However, this does not need to be confusing, as there is a very clear logic to the functionality. To find out more, click HERE to read the entire article.

 

 

 

Simulation Step-Up Series

Last month, Reza discussed the topic of Buckling analysis. This month, Yannick gives an Introduction to Fatigue analysis.

<iframe allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/I2PLynTvHYY?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

Next month, Ramesh will give an Introduction to Nonlinear analysis.

Noteworthy Solutions from the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base

icon - SW Why does my computer with an Intel® processor perform slower after installing a Windows® Update?
A critical security fault was identified with all Intel® x86 and x64 processors. The security fault was fixed by a Microsoft® Windows® Update security patch released on January 9th, 2018. This performance issue is not specific to the SOLIDWORKS® software. It has been reported that this required Windows Update security patch can reduce overall CPU performance by 5% to 30% of the normal CPU performance values.
For more information, see Solution Id: S-074167.

icon - SW When I launch SOLIDWORKS®, how do I fix the error ‘Failed to initialize Visual Basic for Apps, equations and macros will not work…’?
When launching the SOLIDWORKS® software, you might see the error: ‘Failed to initialize Visual Basic for Apps, equations and macros will not work. Are you low on disc space?’
There are many possible reasons for this error.
To learn how to troubleshoot it, follow the steps in Solution Id: S-074209.

Icon - EPDM How do I use the SOLIDWORKS® PDM Migration Assistant to migrate a SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM Vault that contains non-revision managed Standard Libraries and Toolbox parts?
The legacy “Workgroup-to-SOLIDWORKS PDM” migration tool does provide support for importing non-revision managed library components. It is possible to use the solution in KB S-027733 to work around the issue. However that solution has limitations. Mainly the solution does not update the paths in the parent SOLIDWORKS® file.
The new SOLIDWORKS® PDM Migration Assistant introduces support for importing non-revision managed files, such as Standard Libraries and Toolbox parts.
For a detailed demonstration of this process, see the document attached to Solution Id: S-073954.

Icon - EPDM Using the SOLIDWORKS® PDM 2018 software, is there a guide about how to set up and use the revision table integration for SOLIDWORKS® drawings in a file vault?
SOLIDWORKS® PDM 2018 introduced support to automatically update a revision table in a drawing when revisions are updated via workflow transition actions or by using the ‘Set Revision’ command.
To enable revision table integration in a file vault, follow the steps in the document attached to Solution Id: S-074196.

When meshing the same geometry in a Static study and a Topology study with the default element size, why does the Topology study generate more elements than the Static study?
In SOLIDWORKS® Simulation Topology studies, the quality of the results is dependent upon the generated mesh. Unlike Static studies where it might be possible to run a study using a poor quality mesh, Topology studies may experience problems when using the same type of mesh. Additionally, because Topology studies operate by varying the material density values of individual elements in order to govern the new material distribution, it is essential to have an adequate number of elements throughout the model geometry.
For these reasons, the default element size for Topology studies is smaller than for the other study types to encourage users to use a better quality mesh.
For more information, see Solution Id: S-073709.


That’s it for this month. Thanks for reading this edition of SOLIDWORKS Support News. If you need additional help with these issues or any others, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller.

Also, comments and suggestions are welcome. You can enter them below.

Author information

Julien Boissat
Sr. Technical Customer Support Engineer, SolidWorks, EMEA at DS SolidWorks Corp.
I have been a Tech Support engineer for Simulation products since 2002. I was previously a product manager at SRAC, the original makers of COSMOS for those who remember that time! ;-). I am currently in charge of the content of the certification exams for simulation products. I also initiated and still author the Simulation Knowledge Base and participate as much as possible in the expansion and evolution of the SolidWorks Knowledge Base. Finally, I handle the SolidWorks Support Monthly News blog.

The post SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – February 2018 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Julien Boissat at February 13, 2018 06:29 PM

Understanding Multibody Sheet Metal Thickness, Derived Mirror Part Thickness and the Thickness Global Variable

Before starting with the main issue of the article, let’s review how the sheet metal thickness works when dealing with multi body parts.

When you create a sheet metal part, you have one Sheet-Metal feature (Part Thickness) and as many Sheet-Metal# (Body Thickness) features as sheet metal bodies. The “Thickness Global Variable” always reflects the part thickness. (Fig. 1)

Fig. 1

By default, when creating a sheet metal body, the thickness of the body is controlled by the part thickness. If you want a body to have a different thickness from the part thickness, you edit the Sheet-Metal# body feature, check the “Override default parameters” and enter the desired thickness (Fig. 2)

Fig. 2

In this particular example, the part thickness still is 2 mm, and it will only control the thickness of the U-shaped body (Fig. 3)

Fig. 3

Any additional bodies created in the part will — by default — have the part thickness (2 mm) (Fig. 4)

Fig. 4

Now you insert a mirror part, with the “sheet metal information” option checked and still linked to the parent part (Fig. 5)

Fig. 5

Editing the mirrored part sheet metal feature shows the part thickness was “transferred” to the mirrored part thickness. Also, the thickness global variable is still representing the part thickness of the mirrored part. (Fig. 6a)

Editing the sheet metal features of the bodies show that now each body has the “override default parameter” checked. (Fig 6b and 6c).This means that the thickness of these two mirrored bodies are not controlled by the mirrored part thickness. The reason for checking the “override default parameter” is that otherwise, all the bodies would respond only to the mirrored sheet metal part thickness and have a 2 mm thickness.

Fig. 6

At this point you add another body to the mirrored part. Notice the “Override default parameter” is unchecked. Therefore, the new body will have the mirrored sheet metal part thickness at 2 mm (Fig. 7)

Fig. 7

Now you change the parent/seed sheet metal part thickness. Notice the mirrored part thickness and global thickness variable does not change. (Fig. 8)

Fig. 8

However, the U-shaped body –which was linked to the original/seed part — will update (Fig. 9). This was the same body that was responding to the seed part thickness (see Fig. 3)

Fig. 9

Why does the mirrored part thickness/global variable not change? Is this correct?

Yes, that is correct. Although we call the derived part a “Mirror Part”, in reality this is a different part. Even though the U-Shaped body has the “Override default parameters” option checked, this is the only body linked to the seed part thickness.

In summary: (Fig. 10)

  • The thickness global variable always displays the part thickness value.
  • When creating a mirror part, all the bodies in the mirrored part have their “Overall default parameters” options checked.
  • The part thickness of the seed and mirror part are independent from each other.
  • The mirror part could have bodies which may or may not respond to the seed part thickness.
  • Only the body in the mirror part — which responded to the part thickness in the seed part — will be linked to the seed part thickness. All other bodies will respond to either to the new part (mirrored part thickness) or to their individual body thickness.

Fig. 10

Author information

Mario Iocco
Mario Iocco
Sr. Technical Customer Support Engineer, SolidWorks, Americas.
Mario Iocco is a veteran CAD user. He started as a Mechanical Engineer first working in 2D with AutoCAD, moving on to 3D using  both SW and some  of the other CAD software on the market. He began his career with SolidWorks over 15 years ago. He started in R&D working on many of the new functionalities developed at the time -eDrawings, Sheet Metal, Weldments, etc. In the last few years, he moved to TS., working closely with VARs, Mario wrote the sheet metal functionality best practice manual, as well as creating hundreds of Sheet Metal Knowledge Base articles. He has presented webinars  on "Sheet Metal Tips and Tricks" and "Sheet Metal Bend Tables".

The post Understanding Multibody Sheet Metal Thickness, Derived Mirror Part Thickness and the Thickness Global Variable appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Mario Iocco at February 13, 2018 05:26 PM

How to Find and Activate Your Free Visualize Standard License

Get ready to amaze your customers with beautiful photorealistic visualizations of your parts or products before the prototype is even built! SOLIDWORKS Visualize leverages industry-leading rendering capabilities and an easy to use interface to create professional, photo-quality images, animations and other 3D content quickly and easily.

Not limited to technical users, SOLIDWORKS Visualize can be used by anyone in your organization, such as your marketing team, to create and communicate high-quality visual and emotional content to drive innovation, design decisions and business solutions.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard comes complimentary with every license of SOLIDWORKS Professional and SOLIDWORKS Premium that is purchased with Subscription. This complimentary seat of SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard can be given to anyone in your company! SOLIDWORKS Visualize is a separate standalone product and does not occupy the SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD license.

To give SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard to someone else in your company, please simply forward this blog post and provide them with the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard serial number.

How to Access Your SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard Serial Number

1 – Login to the SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal using the account your SOLIDWORKS serial number is associated with.

Activate Free Visualize Standard License

If you do not have an account you will need to register first.

2 – Once logged in, click on ‘My Products’

3 – If you see a SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium with a + symbol next to it, click this to expand to see your SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard serial number and skip to step 9. This will be listed as “with SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard”

 

If you do not see such a serial number, click Home go back to the portal main page. Please continue to step 4, as you will need to register your product to obtain the serial number.

How to Register Your SOLIDWORKS Visualize License

4 – On the portal main page, click on ‘Register My Products’

5 – Enter your 24 digit SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium Serial number and click ‘Next’*

6 – Click on the checkmark icon to choose a product/version.

Click the chevron next to SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium 2017.

7 – Click ‘Ok’ > ‘Next’ to finish.

8 – Click Home to go back to the portal main page.

9 – Click ‘My Products’, and the “with SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard” serial number should appear now.

10 – You can now enter this new Serial number when installing SOLIDWORKS 2017 or if SOLIDWORKS is already installed, follow the 3 steps below.

How to Install Your Complimentary Seat of SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard

  1. If SOLIDWORKS 2017 is already installed, you can modify your SOLIDWORKS Installation from your computer’s Control Panel and open > Programs > Programs and Features > Click SOLIDWORKS 2017 <minor version>, and click ‘Change’ at the top
  2. Click ‘Modify the individual installation (on this computer)’ > click on ‘Next’ > expand ‘Visualization’ and Click ‘SOLIDWORKS Visualize’
  3. Paste in your SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard serial number and proceed through the Installation Manager to complete the modification

* For network licenses, use the same serial number as your SOLIDWORKS license, simply reactivate the network license manager for 2017 and enter this serial number under both SOLIDWORKS and Visualize when installing on the clients.

If you purchased Visualize Standard separately or have purchased Visualize Professional, you will use the same serial number as Visualize 2016. Also new for SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional users is Visualize Boost (network rendering), this can be obtained from My Products using a similar process as above.

If you have any issues installing or updating your SOLIDWORKS Visualize license, please contact CAD MicroSolutions’ Support Team via email at support@cadmicro.com or call us at 416-213-0533.

Subscription customers can access free video tutorials on SOLIDWORKS Visualize via their MySolidWorks customer portal.

Author information

CAD MicroSolutions
CAD MicroSolutions is one of the most recognized and reputable SOLIDWORKS resellers in Ontario. Founded in 1984, we have 3 offices in Canada providing SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD software, training, consulting, and software development services.

The post How to Find and Activate Your Free Visualize Standard License appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CAD MicroSolutions at February 13, 2018 04:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: SAS Safety Classic Safety Glasses

It may not be your favorite shop accessory, but a sturdy pair of safety glasses is an absolutely critical piece of kit. Whether running a 2 x 4 through the table saw or simply sanding the final edges of a model, the last thing you need is dust in your eyes or worse—something much larger.

Which is why we love the Classic Safety Glasses from SAS Safety.

These no-bull safety glasses feature durable impact resistant polycarbonate 99.9% UV-resistant lens and offer additional protection with temple covers. Lightweight and comfortable with just the right amount of ‘Shop Boss’ style, you can’t go wrong with these no matter what gets thrown at you (quite literally).

SAS Safety Classic Safety Glasses — $8.98

Features:

  • Impact resistant polycarbonate lens
  • 99.9% UV Protection
  • Lightweight comfort
  • Stylish frame design

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: SAS Safety Classic Safety Glasses appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 13, 2018 02:21 PM

MIT’s ‘ColorFab’ 3D Printing Method Will Let You Recolor Finished 3D Models

3D printing in color can be costly. Given how much time and resources spent upfront, having a failed print isn’t exactly as easy to deal with as printing a 2D color picture incorrectly.

MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)’s new ColorFab method (not to be confused with printing filament company ColorFabb) doesn’t aim to make the process easier, but it does help to reduce the cost of printing the same object in another color. Unlike just about any other additively manufactured object, ColorFab uses specialized 3D ink which changes color when exposed to UV light, effectively allowing you to change the appearance of 3D objects after they’re printed.

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The printing process is a familiar one: users upload a 3D model, choose a color, and select to print. What’s different about a ColorFab print is that it uses UV light to change 3D pixels from transparent to colored and an office projector to replace the same colored pixels to transparent ones. The ink includes a base dye, light-adaptable dyes, and a photoinitiator. The base dye is your run-of-the-mill typical dye, while the light adaptable dyes bring out the different colors of the base dye when exposed to UV light. The photoinitiator is the agent which hardens the base dye during printing.

The recoloring process takes about 20 minutes to complete, but researchers say the time can be reduced as the method improves. Considering ColorFab is still in its early stages, recolored prints also tend to look grainy.

While researchers are currently only using plastic materials in their testing processes, it’s easy to speculate that this same technology could work its way over to other materials as well.

Read more about ColorFab over at MIT .

The post MIT’s ‘ColorFab’ 3D Printing Method Will Let You Recolor Finished 3D Models appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 13, 2018 02:16 PM

SolidSmack Radio | The Solid Edge (Powered by Spotify)

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll get the groove going with “Weapon of Choice – Set Mo Remix Edit” from Fatboy Slim before diving into sweet melodies from Nightmares on Wax, Radiator Hospital, Young Hunting, Dawg Yawp, Summer Camp, and others before wrapping up with “Sour” from Boys Age. Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

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The post SolidSmack Radio | The Solid Edge (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 13, 2018 01:25 PM

The Javelin Blog

Copy Tree Dynamic Variable Values in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018

One of my favorite enhancements in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 is a new option to use dynamic values when updating Variables while performing a Copy Tree.  In the past, this functionality only allowed Administrators to either clear values or set static values for Variables in files that are created by a Copy Tree command.

Now a new “Value” dialog box, shown below, will display when you click in the box beside the Variable name.  The > button will present a drop list of dynamic values that can be selected from.

Copy Tree Dynamic Variable Values Dialog Box

Copy Tree Value Dialog Box

Copy Tree Dynamic Variable Values

Here is what these selection will produce:

  • Current time:  This will be the time when the Copy Tree command is performed.
  • File Name:  This is the name of the SOURCE file that is being copied by the Copy Tree command including the file extension.
  • File name without extension:  The file name of the SOURCE file, but with the extension removed.
  • File Path:  The folder path for the SOURCE file that is being copied as displayed in the “Found In” column of the Copy Tree command dialogue box.  (If the source file set contains references in multiple folders, the “File Path” value written to each file created by the Copy Tree will match the “Found In” value for that file)
  • Logged in user:  This is the value in the “Login name” field in the User Properties for the user who launches the Copy Tree command.
  • Target File Name:  This is the “Target File Name” that the User specifies in the Copy Tree command dialogue for the file being created.
  • Target File name without extension:  This is the “Target File Name” only, with the extension information removed.
  • Target File Path:  This is the “Destination Folder Path” that the user sets for the file when performing the Copy Tree.
  • Today’s date:  This will be the date that the Copy Tree command is performed.
  • User – Full name:  This is the value in the “Full name” field in the User Properties for the user who launches the Copy Tree command.
  • User – initials:  This is the value in the “Initials” field in the User Properties for the user who launches the Copy Tree command.
  • User – User data:  This is the value in the “User data” field in the User Properties for the user who launches the Copy Tree command.

Any combination of these dynamic values can be used as well.

The post Copy Tree Dynamic Variable Values in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at February 13, 2018 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

How is technology influencing the 2018 winter games?

pyongyang_winter_games_south_korea

pyongyang_winter_games_south_korea

In 1924 in the French commune of Chamonix, the first winter games took place. Flash forward to today and the technology involved in the winter games has moved on spectacularly. Here’s a rundown of the some of the innovations that will be on show at the 2018 games.

A techy take on the torch relay

The torch relay is an enduring pre-games tradition. For the first time ever, the torch relay for the upcoming Pyeongchang games featured not one, but two humanoid robots. The first, HUBO, carried the torch before cutting through a brick wall and handing the torch to its inventor – Professor Jun-Ho Oh. The professor then handed the torch over to South Korea’s latest robotic innovation FX-2: an eight-foot-tall human-controlled walker, complete with articulated hands. 85 HUBO robots will be used at the games for security, cleaning and information services.

The dawn of the 5G era…

5G connectivity will be unveiled for the first time ever at winter games venues, compliments of Intel. For spectators, it will make Pyeongchang the most immersive games ever, with 5G-powered experiences including 360-degree video streaming, virtual reality and augmented reality.

For example, viewers will be able to “go inside” the skating rink, creating their own version of the bullet-time technology popularised by The Matrix. Producing this ability to zoom in and rotate live footage of the athletes, requires servers that pull images from a hundred cameras hung around the rink, reconstituting them in real-time, to create customised views. Viewers will also be able to track the progress of skiers as they race down courses and enjoy live cockpit-views in bobsleigh events. For most events, viewers will be able to choose their own camera angles and control their own replays of footage. Exciting stuff for sports lovers.

But it’s not just spectators who benefit. Athletes too can capture huge amounts of data that can be used to zero in on – and improve – their performance.

Getting to the games in bullet-fast time…

Broadcasting innovations are one thing. But spectators still need an efficient way to actually get to the site of the winter games in Pyeongchang. Good news there too. Back in November, the South Korean government trumpeted the completion of a £2.7 billion rail line for bullet trains, running from the capital Seoul to Pyeongchang. The 300kph trains can complete the journey in 69 minutes, which is way preferable to three hours in the car.

speed_skating_winter_games

Refining speed skater performance with the Samsung SmartSuit

Speed skating is a discipline where milliseconds count. Athletes are constantly striving for new ways to shave priceless fractions of a second off their times. Here to help is Samsung’s SmartSuit.

The South Korean technology giant has created a suit that’s bristling with sensors that capture an array of data on body position. This data is then fed in real-time to coaches, who can suggest posture improvements to athletes using buzz signals to a band on the athletes’ wrist. The Dutch speedskating team has been using the Samsung SmartSuit in training, though the technology will not be allowed during actual competition at the winter games.

Airbag protection for winter sport athletes

Hurtling down a mountain at speeds nearing 90mph can be incredibly dangerous. Here to provide invaluable protection against the unexpected is Dainese – a name that any motorcycling enthusiast will likely be familiar with. Dainese manufacture vests equipped with sensors that can detect when an athlete is losing control and is about to crash. When it senses danger, the vest inflates to protect the athlete from serious injury. That’s exactly what happened to Austrian downhill champion Matthias Mayer when he crashed at high speed in 2015, suffering just a fractured vertebra.

curling_winter_games_sport


Make like the stone and slide

Curling may not be every sports fan’s cup of cocoa, but it does demand two things: exceptional accuracy and the ability to control a long, graceful slide along the ice. Curling equipment pioneer BalancePlus reckon they can help athletes master the latter. Now, regular curling shoes are smooth-soled and flat. But, after taking inspiration from the underside of the curling stone, BalancePlus has created a shoe that has circular recesses carved into the sole. This reduces the surface area in contact with the ice and makes it easier for athletes to slide further.

The world’s best ice rinks are designed in SOLIDWORKS

Designing a shoe is one thing. Designing and manufacturing an entire ice rink is quite another. Just ask Finnish company ICEPRO, who use SOLIDWORKS to help perfect the design of the world’s most modern ice rinks, arenas and ice rink equipment. ICEPRO has supplied both rinks for the winter games in Pyeongchang. So when you see those athletes sliding gracefully across the ice, just remember: it all started in SOLIDWORKS.

Team USA won bronze with SOLIDWORKS

In the 2014 winter games in Sochi, USA scooped bronze in the four-man bobsleigh event. Their bobsled – Night Train 2 – was designed, tweaked and tested in SOLIDWORKS and also won four out of eight world cup races in the 2013-2014 season. You can read the success story, which includes details of how SOLIDWORKS helped the team come back from a potentially season-ending crash, here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post How is technology influencing the 2018 winter games? appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS UK at February 13, 2018 12:00 PM

February 12, 2018

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: SpaceX Falcon Heavy [Go For Launch!]

spacex-falcon-heavy-3d-model

On Tuesday, February 6th, SpaceX elbowed history in the neck bone with the test launch of Falcon Heavy, the most powerful rocket ever launched. At an estimated cost of 90 million (150 million at most) and the ability to push 141,000 lbs beyond our atmosphere, it’s putting space exploration back on everyone’s mind.

And, no doubt, it’s going to inspire many an engineer. Engineers like Lance Skelly, a Mechanical and Structural Draughtsman who runs thingimajigs.com. He knew anyone who is cool enough to freak the flip out over a Tesla Roadster being fired into space at over 18,000 mph would appreciate a 3D model of the spacecraft. So, he made one.

Lance modeled the Falcon Heavy in KeyCreator and, though it’s just a rough estimate, it’s a great starting point to reference to create your own 3D model, your own model rocket, or Falcon Heavy Jell-o mold you’ve been dreaming about over the last week.

You can download the Falcon Heavy model on GrabCAD. BONUS! Don’t miss his Falcon 9 model either. See it here.)

The post Model of the Week: SpaceX Falcon Heavy [Go For Launch!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 12, 2018 11:22 PM

The Javelin Blog

Experience Metal 3D Printers for Prototyping to Mass Production

Javelin in known across Canada as the top supplier for SOLIDWORKS software and the full range of Stratasys 3D printers, has just added Desktop Metal 3D printing systems to its additive manufacturing offerings.

Desktop Metal 3D printers are reinventing the way engineering and manufacturing teams produce metal parts – from prototyping through mass production.

There are two Desktop Metal 3D printing systems available:

  • The Studio System is an affordable metal 3D printer designed for rapid prototyping and basic tooling.
  • The Production System will mass produce tens of thousands of high-performance metal parts on the factory floor. 

Register for this webinar to learn:

  • Desktop Metal 3D Printing System process and technical specifications
  • A detailed look at the features and performance of the Studio & Production 3D Printing Systems
  • Industry & Applications highlights
  • In-depth look at the metals available and in development
  • And more!

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The post Experience Metal 3D Printers for Prototyping to Mass Production appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at February 12, 2018 06:38 PM

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 Enhancements You Never Knew Existed

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 includes great new enhancements. Not adjusting your setup prevents you from taking advantage of the latest PDM functionality.

Attend our SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 Enhancements Webinar on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 at 2:00 PM EST to learn how the latest version can benefit your team, and what is required to implement the enhancement in your environment.

Who should attend the SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 Enhancements Webinar?

  • SOLIDWORKS PDM Users.
  • SOLIDWORKS PDM Administrators.
  • SOLIDWORKS Users planning to implement a SOLIDWORKS PDM solution in 2018.

What is SOLIDWORKS PDM?

SOLIDWORKS® Product Data Management (PDM) products manage and synchronize your design data across your entire enterprise with a single, easily deployable solution tightly integrated with all SOLIDWORKS applications.

Why Product Data Management?

By leveraging a secure vault, you can extend the access to your 3D design environment and associated files, for all participants from engineering through manufacturing. This enables everyone involved in your projects to share information and collaborate on designs, while automatically protecting your intellectual property with the automated version and revision control systems.

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The post SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 Enhancements You Never Knew Existed appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at February 12, 2018 04:55 PM

Javelin is a Proud Sponsor of the University of Victoria Submarine Racing Club

Javelin’s Additive Solutions team is proud to be a Silver Sponsor of the University of Victoria Submarine Racing Club (UVSRC), providing them with funding to help develop their submarine. The UVSRC is run by students from both UVic and Camosun College. Although they have their eyes set on competing in both the International Submarine Races (ISR) and European International Submarine Races (eISR), the club’s focus is to introduce students to the Marine Systems Engineering field.

UVSRC propulsion 3

UVSRC Submarine Model

For the UVSRC, submarine racing isn’t just about competing, it’s a way to develop technical and manufacturing skills as well as networking between sponsors, employers, and students. The club is set to compete in the eISR in July of this year in Gosport, England. Competing teams come from universities all around the world. We can’t wait to see their craft come together and race this year!

submarine racing

eISR race course outline

The race is an out-and-back course that consists of straights, corners and slaloms. At the start of the race, two timing gates (located 42m away from the line) record each team’s top speed. Immediately after follows a 180 degree turn at a 25m radius. The final stretch involves navigating around slalom poles spread 13m apart. The craft needs to deploy a braking system so that it doesn’t hit the safety net situated 30m past the finish line. The entire course stretches a total of 175m.

UVSRC Submarine Design for 2018

Hull Design

The hull of the submarine is an assembly of four distinct sections. Each slice of the hull is designed to be small enough that it can qualify as an over sized piece of luggage on flights. This means the team doesn’t need to use a shipping container for transportation, which adds unnecessary time to their testing process. The overall hull design is centered around the diver and not the controls.

submarine racing

UVSRC Hull Design Draft

The main seam is horizontal rather than vertical, which means the entire top section can be the diver’s escape hatch. The team is also thinking about longevity, as they are using a modular attachment system for their internal components. By making a universal mounting system, components can be attached and removed easily in case it either needs to be replaced or modified. They can then keep the same hull for future use, which will reduce overall costs.

uVIC Hull design sanding

UVSRC team sanding the mould for the hull

The team decided to use Fibreglass for their hull, as it’s more cost effective than using carbon fibre. Because the submarine is free-flooded, weight saving isn’t really an issue, as the buoyancy of the craft will remain the same no matter how low its mass is. Fibreglass also provides enough strength to mount fastening points for the internal components. This means that the submarine doesn’t need an internal frame and can rely on the strength of the hull alone to keep everything together.

UVSRC Hull Design fibre glass

Sanded mould of the fibreglass hull

Propulsion

The team is approving and finalising their propulsion design, which includes a Kort Nozzle at the end of the craft and two sets of counter rotating propeller blades (which will be cast out of a 3D printed mould). Power input will be provided by the diver via bicycle pedals. The Kort Nozzle allows for the blades to be a lot more efficient, as water is channelled to the centre of the nozzle, creating a slipstream.

UVSRC propulsion 1

A Kort Nozzle at the end of the craft allows for more efficient power delivery.

Race your own personal submarine

International free-flooded submarine races take place biennially in both the US and in Europe. Each country takes turns hosting the races, similar to the Summer and Winter Olympics. The ISR and the eISR are non-affiliated organisations that strive to promote STEM fields to thousands of young people. The rules are simple: design a one or two-person free-flooded submarine that can navigate a course. Propulsion and guidance mechanisms must be manually controlled by the diver (no batteries, flywheels, or servos allowed). The designs aren’t restricted to any general shape, but teams need to take hydrodynamics into account in order to get the lowest friction and better handling.

UVSRC propulsion view

UVSRC propulsion view

The post Javelin is a Proud Sponsor of the University of Victoria Submarine Racing Club appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Eissa Ahmad at February 12, 2018 03:26 PM

SolidSmack

Siemens to Provide Free Solid Edge CAD Software for Launch Forth Members

Start-up capital has been a pain point—and roadblock—for many brilliant ideas that never end up seeing the light of day. Considering how costly software tools alone can be, it’s no surprise that some innovators refrain from moving forward at all knowing what they’re up against before even having a prototype in hand.

Both Siemens and design collaboration platform Launch Forth know CAD creators can’t live up to their full potential when their tools aren’t up to par, so they decided to provide an exclusive version of Siemens Solid Edge software to 185,000 Launch Forth members. Seeing as the SaaS (software as a service) platform’s goal is to harness crowdsourcing and co-creation to bring out innovative products by way of collaboration, the two companies want to give members the tools and tutoring they need to do just this.

For those unfamiliar, Solid Edge contains a sleuth of software tools which aid in all parts of product development, including 3D design, simulation, data management, and manufacturing. Launch Forth, a byproduct of Local Motors, aims to change the way people develop products in every industry by harnessing the world’s largest online community of designers, engineers, and technologists.

The exclusive software for Launch Forth, aptly titled the “Launch Forth Community Edition”, will have all the features of the standard Solid Edge software, but, like student editions of various software packages, will include a branded watermark on any 2D exported files. That said, the Community Edition has no expiration date and comes with unlimited usage for all existing Launch Forth community members and upcoming members starting July 1, 2018.

Membership at Launch Forth is also totally free, so there doesn’t seem to be any reason innovators shouldn’t take advantage of this. Sign up here.

The post Siemens to Provide Free Solid Edge CAD Software for Launch Forth Members appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 12, 2018 02:02 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: ‘Sketching’ by Koos Eissen and Roselien Steur

While there used to be a painful shortage of inspirational design sketching books out there, these days, design students and those looking to refresh their skill set may, in fact, have too many to choose from. The good news is, there’s something different to learn from each—so go ahead and build out that library.

Among other design sketching book favorites, we love the broad variety of sketching styles presented in Sketching.

While the book is ideal for any design student or classroom, many professionals and design studios will also likely learn a thing or two from the wide variety of sketching styles and form examples presented within the book’s 256 pages.

Sketching (12th printing): Drawing Techniques for Product Designers/em> by Koos Eissen and Roselien Steur — $29.77

About the Authors:

Koos Eissen is an associate professor and head of the Design Drawing Techniques staff (TU Delft, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, in the Netherlands). He is at present guest-lecturer at the Royal Academy of Arts in The Hague. Roselien Steur is a free-lance visualiser, and lecturer at the HKU/Utrecht School of the Arts, The Faculty of Visual Arts and Design in the Netherlands.

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!


Feature Image via Spencer Nugent
.

The post Cool Tools of Doom: ‘Sketching’ by Koos Eissen and Roselien Steur appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 12, 2018 01:11 PM

The Monday List 07.18 | What We’re Reading This Week

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Brokerage App Robinhood Thinks Bitcoin Belongs in Your Retirement Plan

The free trading platform has convinced millions of millennials to swap stocks. Can it get them to HODL?

What I Learned from Watching My iPad’s Slow Death

I’ve lost plenty of devices before, but this death feels different.

Inside the Two Years That Shook Facebook—and The World

How a confused, defensive social media giant steered itself into a disaster, and how Mark Zuckerberg is trying to fix it all.

73 Mind-Blowing Implications of Driverless Cars and Trucks

I believe that my daughter, who is now just over 1 years old, will never have to learn to drive or own a car.

Inside North Korea’s Hacker Army

The regime in Pyongyang has sent hundreds of programmers to other countries. Their mission: Make money by any means necessary. Here’s what their lives are like.

What I Learned from Working for Both Bill Gates and Steve Jobs

Warning: I didn’t understand any of this as I was living through it. You won’t, either, when it happens to you.

The post The Monday List 07.18 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 12, 2018 01:05 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018 Managing Wires

In SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018, there are 3 productive changes made with regards to managing wires.

Global Wire Mark Display:

We can now pre-define the connection label display style directly from the configuration. The options will vary depending on the numbering style selected between Equipotential or Wires.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018 Managing Wires Functionality

Changes to the Wire Mark management

Where to find the feature:

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Schematic > Project ribbon (project must be open) > Configuration drop-list > Wire Style Manager

Handling Unused Wires:

From the project configurations a user can define how unused wires can be assigned marks in a drawing set that already has wire marks assigned.

Assigning Unused Wire Marks

Assigning Unused Wire Marks

Wire Numbering Group:

In SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018, the numbering system now allows for numbering to begin at each location or book or file.

Watch our SOLIDWORKS 2018 Launch Broadcast

Javelin’s team of Certified SOLIDWORKS experts unveiled the new software in a live broadcast. Watch a recording of the broadcast to see technical demonstrations and tutorials on how to use the new software. Click here to learn more about SOLIDWORKS 2018

The post SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018 Managing Wires appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Delvin Masilamani at February 12, 2018 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Advanced Optimization Tools that Make Innovation Possible

What kind of car will we be driving in 10 years? Autonomous? Electric? Fuel cell powered? Levitating?

Who knows but innovation will certainly change our ride. That’s where SOLIDWORKS comes in. SOLIDWORKS optimization tools drive continuous improvement, allowing us to find solutions that make products stronger, lighter, faster, cheaper.

So what can you optimize with SOLIDWORKS tools? The answer is amazing: Mass, Volume, Center of Mass, Dimensions, Material, Surface Area, Force, Temperature, Frequencies, Pressure, Velocity, Acceleration, Pressure Drop, Flow Rate, Cost, Stress, Strain, Factor of Safety, and more!

As an example, let’s say we are designing a wind turbine and we want to minimize the mass to save cost while adhering to safety design requirements. We want to determine the optimum combination of tower height and length of blade subject to design standards where the tower can withstand sustained winds of 80 miles and a safety factor of 2X. SOLIDWORKS can accomplish all of this.

First, we set up a fluid analysis using SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation to apply the 80 miles per hour wind load.  Then we import the pressure calculations from Flow Simulation into SOLIDWORKS Simulation to solve for factor of safety and blade deformation. Then, using Parametric Optimization, SOLIDWORKS cycles through an unlimited number of scenarios to solve for the optimum combination of tower height and blade length given the constraints. With this capability, designers perform in minutes what otherwise took days.

And best of all, Parametric Optimization is included in all licenses of SOLIDWORKS, Flow Simulation and some licenses of Simulation. To see how we set up the wind turbine example or to find out about more Optimization techniques, we invite you to watch this short video:

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Author information

Mai Doan
Mai Doan
Mai is a Territory Technical Manager for SOLIDWORKS

The post Advanced Optimization Tools that Make Innovation Possible appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mai Doan at February 12, 2018 01:00 PM

February 10, 2018

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Unknown Tips and Tricks: Part One

Creating your own HDR Environments

SOLIDWORKS Visualize is an incredibly powerful rendering tool to get quick life-like renders of our CAD models done as fast as possible.  There are a lot of powerful and robust tools available to us in Visualize to give us some breathtaking results and you don’t have to be a hardcore rendering junkie to start using the simple and straight forward interface.

I have been lucky enough to have been using Visualize for the last few years and thought I would put together a list of what I call “Unknown SOLIDWORKS Visualize Tips and Tricks” that most users may not know is possible with the software.

Finding an Image

SOLIDWORKS Visualize uses HDRI and HDR Spherical maps for virtual environments so that our models can have realistic lighting for whatever scene we are trying to create. Generally if you Google HDRI you can find some free maps that you can use just by a simple drag and drop into Visualize.

Another type of HDR mapping you will see online is a flattened out HDR which is a lot more common, let’s see how we can take these “Flat” HDR’s and create spherical maps from them in SOLIDWORKS Visualize.

Here we have map that we want to create a Spherical HDR, you can find these all over Google by searching for free HDR’s or by creating them yourself with certain apps or cameras that will create maps of your environment and flatten much like the image above.

In this case I wanted a Kitchen setup and will be using this image (courtesy of Maxime Roz http://www.maximeroz.com/hdri-free-pack) to light the scene:

Flat Kitchen HDR Image in JPEG Format

Flat Kitchen HDR Image in JPEG Format

 

What’s the first step?

The first thing we do is start a new blank project with no model in it, you will see that it is unnecessary for models at this point. For those familiar with Visualize you know we have two options to use on our Scene Tab:

  • Environments: These are HDR/HDRI that are already Spherical and will Light our models for a look realistic to the environment
  • Back Plates: These help us position our Model by creating a static background that doesn’t move when we pan or rotate our camera.

In this case we want to use our Kitchen HDR as a backplate and the easiest way to do that is to simply drag and drop it from Windows Explorer into SOLIDWORKS Visualize.

Drag and Drop the Kitchen HDR image file directly into the Visualize Project

Drag and Drop the Kitchen HDR image file directly into the Visualize Project

Now that the plate has been applied to the scene you will see that the image has filled out preview window:

The Kitchen backplate has been applied with a drag and drop

The Kitchen backplate has been applied with a drag and drop

Getting the Spherical HDR

In order to change our “Flat” Image into a Spherical map we are going to use the output options within SOLIDWORKS Visualize. If we open the output dialog we have a number of options from where we want to save our render, how large do we want our render and what quality level we want it at; but what we are going to focus on is the file formats that we can output.  There are a number of different formats for different types of images but we are interested in the HDR format, we will select it and render our image on Preview settings as there is no model to worry about for quality.

Select HDR from the Image Format Dropdown Menu

Select HDR from the Image Format Dropdown Menu

Putting it all together

Rendering the HDR should only take a minute or two and we are now able to use it in any environment we want, we can open our model and drag and drop the newly created HDR directly into our project.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Tips and Tricks: Custom made Environment HDR

The final result using the Custom made Environment HDR

So not only can SOLIDWORKS Visualize create spherical environments but it can do it fast and with ease to make sure that no matter the scene we are creating our CAD Renders look real enough to touch.   Make sure you are using the power of SOLIDWORKS Visualize for your projects and as always get in touch with us if you have any questions or need SOLIDWORKS Visualize Training.

But wait there’s more!

As a bonus, If you want to see every part of the process step by step there is a video below that you can follow along with.

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The post SOLIDWORKS Visualize Unknown Tips and Tricks: Part One appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Ellery, CSWE at February 10, 2018 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 06.18

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

These Insane Lifelike Replicas of Animals Are Created by Hand with Paper and Wood

You know the book you’re reading is excellent when it escapes your imagination and enters the reality. Fan fiction, cosplay, recreations – these are just a few ways fans show their (sometimes creepy) appreciation for fictional worlds made up by an author.</spcan>

Learn Arduino in a Weekend with This Project-Based Bootcamp

As many a designer or engineer knows, there’s no better way to learn than to jump in and get messy. Heck, that’s why the best way to learn a complicated CAD tool isn’t to read a book, but to get your hands dirty and make mistakes. Only then will your brain start to program the rights from the wrongs.

Watch Industrial Designer Eric Strebel’s Method for Making 120 Cast Parts From Scratch

Always one for ingenuity, Eric Strebel puts his industrial design expertise to good use even with the simplest of tasks. This time, he’s been commissioned to produce 120 cast parts from a single solid master part. Seeing how costly it is to make solid parts, Strebel decides to take matters into his own hands and by using a specialized mold of his own design.

Article by Google Will Bring AR to Everybody From Any Web Browser

Remember those scenes in Iron Man where Tony Stark fiddles around with an interactive hologram? Of course, you do. Well, Google is about to bring that same experience to reality, because one of their latest projects seeks to make this technology available for everyone—right from your favorite device.

Immersive Augmented Reality Sweetness is Finally Coming to SolidWorks

It’s not uncommon for SolidWorks World to feel a little bit like Christmas for serious CAD junkies. Not to mention, it’s a great time for partner companies to get their announcements heard while everybody is in the ‘holiday spirit.’

Simplify3D Updates Their Free Ultimate 3D Printing Material Guide

While the term “3D Printing” has become synonymous with creating physical objects, the underlying method of manufacture—additive manufacturing—is a diverse and complex concept spanning multiple materials and design constraints. From ABS to SLS, there are a number of different pros and cons when picking the best methods or materials to get the job done.

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 06.18 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 10, 2018 09:00 AM

February 09, 2018

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Kyder Blast Shrapnel

Josef-Anton-art

A trip across the roots slowed us down but, gaining speed as we had, we were nary less than 100 meters upon the blast pad. There was something about the sparks as we reached it, seen for a blink as our grapplers sank through the metal. Once we were onboard, stopping the planet melt would be simple–all we have to do is initiate these links.

Josef Anton – I love the scale of Josef’s work, but also the rich attention to technical detail, especially on his ships and vehicles.

Falcon Heavy – Tuesday, history was made. SpaceX launched a successful launch of Falcon Heavy with both booster and core return (vertical) landing. This is the highlight reel.

Shooting a Super Blue Blood Moon – Anonther bit of history this year, the first super blue blood moon. This is how Michael Thomas shot it rising over the London skyline.

Mini Boots – I’d have trouble making a regular size set of leather boots. Hidden Foo is a Beijing based toy designer who makes miniature versions.

Torn City – A bit surreal and a bit Inception. Alex Chinneck creates architectureal installations that will have you questioning what you see and getting a closer look.

Earth, Stone, Sand, Art – James Brunt arranges stone, leaves, soil, sticks and other natural items to create beautiful patterns.

Paint –> Animate – The new release of Quill allows you to paint in VR, and now, animate your creations. This looks incredibly fun.
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Monstercat – A lil’ happy hardcore for ya weekend. Always cool to see how mixes are created. DJ Ravine is one of the best at showing you all the tunes used, buttons pressed and dials turned.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Qb5Vy4S8uXk?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

The post Friday Smackdown: Kyder Blast Shrapnel appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 09, 2018 08:17 PM

An Animated History of the Iconic Emeco 1006 Navy Chair

Developed in collaboration with the Aluminum Company of America in 1944 by Wilton C. Dinges, the Emeco 1006 Navy Chair is one of the most iconic chairs in the history of industrial design. Initially designed for the Navy submarines during WWII as a chair that could withstand the rigors of life at sea—including a torpedo blast—it has since become a mainstay in high-end restaurants and the catalogs of discerning interior designers. To date, more than one million of the chairs have been manufactured over the last half-century.

In all, over 77 steps are used in the process to turn ordinary aluminum into the extraordinarily strong chair. These include forming, welding, grinding, heat-treating, finishing, and anodizing. Perhaps most impressive is the chair design utilizes no hardware in whatsoever:

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More recently, French illustrator Jean Jullien and his animator brother Nicolas to create a film documenting the brand’s fascinating 75-year history—starting with the iconic Navy chair and ending with the brand’s more recent 1 Inch chair launched last year.

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Find out more about the Emeco brand and their full product lineup here.

The post An Animated History of the Iconic Emeco 1006 Navy Chair appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 09, 2018 02:11 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018 Natural Sort Option & Unused Marks

Leveraging the options of automation usually requires some setup and planning, lucky for us in SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018 there are some more additions in the configurations to creating device tags or marks. We can now sort using natural sort, which allows for mixing of automatic and manual marks/tags.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018 Natural Sort Option

Natural Sort Option for Marks

Unused marks can also be assigned through configuration. Users can apply this setup to Wires and Equipotential, Cables and Components.

Assign Unused Marks

Where to find these new features:

SOLIDWORKS Electrical > Project > Configurations > “Marks” tab

Watch our SOLIDWORKS 2018 Launch Broadcast

Javelin’s team of Certified SOLIDWORKS experts unveiled the new software in a live broadcast. Watch a recording of the broadcast to see technical demonstrations and tutorials on how to use the new software. Click here to learn more about SOLIDWORKS 2018

The post SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018 Natural Sort Option & Unused Marks appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Delvin Masilamani at February 09, 2018 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: How to Draw by Scott Robertson

With over two decades of experience teaching how to design, draw, and render at the highest college level, concept designer Scott Robertson knows a thing or two about what it takes to make concepts ‘stick’ for his students. And as one of the most widely-recognized design sketching masters, he’s proven these concepts in his own practice through and through.

In How to Draw: drawing and sketching objects and environments from your imagination, the Art Center educator consolidates years of design sketching knowledge—from thumbnail sketches and perspective grids to shaded renderings—into a digestible self-study program that can take anybody’s sketching ability to the next level. Frankly, if you’re even remotely serious about design sketching, this book is an absolute necessity.

Let’s just let the man himself give us a breakdown:

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How to Draw by Scott Robertson — $27.19

Features:

  • Supplementary Video Lessons Included
  • In-Depth Perpsective Drawing Lessons
  • Focus on Drawing from Imagination
  • Written for the Novice, the Student, and the Professional
  • Ideal for Designers, Engineers, Artists, and Architects

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: <em>How to Draw</em> by Scott Robertson appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 09, 2018 12:15 PM

February 08, 2018

SolidSmack

Simplify3D Updates Their Free Ultimate 3D Printing Material Guide

While the term “3D Printing” has become synonymous with creating physical objects, the underlying method of manufacture—additive manufacturing—is a diverse and complex concept spanning multiple materials and design constraints. From ABS to SLS, there are a number of different pros and cons when picking the best methods or materials to get the job done.

For example, ABS is a low-cost, heat resisting material, but undergoes heavy warping and smells a bit fruity during the printing process.Alternatively, carbon fiber, while one of the strongest materials to print with, is a lot more difficult to print due to increased oozing and brittleness.

Simplify3D has included the projected price, density, temperature, and a whole sleuth of properties for ABS, carbon fiber, and other materials in their new Ultimate 3D Printing Materials Guide and Filament Properties Table. While the Materials Guide shows an in-depth look at the materials themselves, the Filament Properties Table pits materials against each other for quick comparisons.

Whether you’re new to the 3D printing game or a seasoned expert who wants to try out different materials, it pays to know which materials to use so your 3D prints won’t look like a failed Ghostbusters reject monster. Check out the guides in-full over at Simplify3D.

Images courtesy of 3D Hubs.

The post Simplify3D Updates Their Free Ultimate 3D Printing Material Guide appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 08, 2018 02:15 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: OLFA 18mm Rubber Inset Heavy-Duty Utility Knife

For those who spend their days slicin’ and dicin’ material—be it for rough prototyping or simply just opening up all those Amazon purchases—having the right utility blade is an absolute must. While we love the simple and old-fashioned X-Acto blade, we’ve found them to be better for precision cutting versus all-around, at-the-ready utility.

When it comes to the right tool that gets the job done time and time again, the OLFA 18mm Rubber Inset Heavy-Duty Utility Knife is never far from our back pocket.

This grippy heavy-duty cutter makes use of OLFA’s unique snap-off blade system, so you’re never without a sharp blade at the ready. And with an anti-slip rubber grip design featuring a ratchet-wheel blade lock for safety, you won’t have to worry about slipping or unexpected pocket surprises.

OLFA 18mm Rubber Inset Heavy-Duty Utility Knife — $10.29

Features:

  • Ratchet-wheel blade lock
  • Anti-slip rubber grip
  • Includes LB heavy duty blade
  • Fits any OLFA heavy duty blade

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

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by SolidSmack at February 08, 2018 01:04 PM

The Javelin Blog

Choosing the right Stratasys 3D Printer Slicer Tool

Stratasys 3D Printer Slicer Tools: GrabCAD Print vs. Insight

GrabCAD Print and Insight are both specifically tailored for Stratasys 3D printers. The main difference here is that GrabCAD Print was built for Stratasys’ Idea Series and Design Series printers and Insight was built by Stratasys for their Production Series printers. Which one is better?

How they look

GrabCAD Print has a modern UI. It’s simple, well organised, and has a nice big 3D viewer which includes the printer tray and the object in question. Both the middle and left mouse buttons are used for panning and orbiting around the object. The print tray and bounding box size change based on what printer you’ve selected, and the program allows for the user to add multiple printers. Navigating around the UI is simple, you can pretty much drag and drop your 3D model into the virtual tray, select your connected printer, and hit “Print”. Easy.

Stratasys 3D Printer Slicer: GrabCAD

GrabCAD Print startup

Insight, on the other hand, is a little dated. The UI follows the same Windows 98 design style with big square buttons lined up across the top left toolbar. A 3D viewer takes up most of the window, and navigation around objects is the same as GrabCAD. After using Insight for a little while, however, I got used to its UI and began to discover some hidden gems under the hood, which I’ll talk about a little later.

How they Work

GrabCAD Print

GrabCAD Print has the capability of importing almost any 3D object file type, from standard STL exports to raw SOLIDWORKS project files (with the addition of an add-on). It also has useful features that help manage printers and print job scheduling. You can monitor your printers in real-time, see how much material is being used, and view estimated build completion time. If your printer has a built in web-cam, that can also be accessed from GrabCAD Print. There are basic print settings available, like slice height, material types for both model and support, and build style. If you have a Stratasys F123 Series printer, GrabCAD Print also includes a sacrificial purge part by default.

One of the biggest advantages GrabCAD Print has is its ability to repair or rebuild broken objects. Let’s say you were to print a desktop phone stand, like the one below. The stand was designed in SOLIDWORKS but to optimise file size, you saved it as a .stl. The process of exporting to .stl formats involves converting the surfaces of your object into a series of triangles. If the object is relatively simple, like this stand for instance, the conversion will be perfect. If a SOLIDWORKS part is too complex, for instance, the computer might miss a few vertices. This is where GrabCAD Print helps out. GrabCAD will analyse the file for any missing vertices. If it finds flaws, it will prompt the user to click “Repair all Models”, and after a few minutes your object will be back to normal. This saves a lot of time trying to manually repair 3D models yourself, however you can always import the actual .sldprt files directly into the program and avoid object conversion altogether.

GrabCAD knows whether or not a chosen 3D printer requires a purge par

GrabCAD knows whether or not a chosen 3D printer requires a purge part, and automatically adds it onto the virtual tray.

Insight

Insight is more complicated than GrabCAD Print, but since it’s been developed for industrial printers it’s incredibly powerful. Every finite detail of a print job can be customised down to each individual layer. Properties like raster width and angle, number of contours and their widths, and amount of air gaps between them are probably the most important ones. Toolpath grouping allows for print material optimisation. For example, if you know where the weaker points of your model are, you can assign that area to a toolpath group and increase the density of material.

In the picture above, I have a desktop phone stand that I’m printing using GrabCAD Print. I know that the two hooks of the stand are where the most weight will be applied (that’s where my phone will sit) so they need to be strong enough to support it. I can only change the density of the entire print in GrabCAD, which means I would be wasting a whole lot of material in areas that don’t need to be that dense. That’s not the same story with Insight. I can assign both hooks to a custom toolpath group and decrease the raster width, therefore increasing the density per layer. By assigning groups, I can optimise not only the strength of my stand, but the material usage as well.

Stratasys 3D Printer Slicer: Insight

By assigning my hooks to a toolpath group, I can change print density in specified areas, and optimise material usage.

By changing a few print properties in Insight, you can drastically change the physical attributes and dynamics of your final print.

Insight gives you the freedom of internally redesigning your print. Modifying the properties for specific layers allows for control over object strength, weight, heat tolerance, water resistance, and a lot more. The key is experimentation, taking some time to play around with the settings and find a combination of values that fit your needs.

So what should you use?

In short, it’s all up to you. Each of these slicers has its own unique set of “skills”, and its ultimately up to you, the user, to determine how many of those skills come close to – if not match – your specific requirements. GrabCAD Print is all about convenience and versatility. Its capabilities span from small hobby prints to large-scale complex objects, and its UI is tailored toward the everyday user. It’s fast, functional, easy to use, and works with almost every Stratasys FDM Printer. Insight is robust and focuses on the finer details of 3D printing. You can have full control over your print job layer by layer, to obtain the perfect final print at the end. The UI takes a little time to get used to, but that’s a very tiny inconvenience compared to its impressive capabilities.

The post Choosing the right Stratasys 3D Printer Slicer Tool appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Eissa Ahmad at February 08, 2018 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Become a Speed Reading Machine in a Weekend with this 4-Hour Course

At an average of 200 to 250 words per minute, most humans accept their reading rate—which hasn’t changed in over 100 years. But in the information age, have you ever thought about how much your productivity could skyrocket if you doubled—even tripled—that rate? What if you could finally get around to finally finishing off that stack of books you’ve been putting off all year in a couple of weeks?

By doubling your knowledge management rate alone—be it from skimming through emails or industry trade journals—you can quickly free up an additional working hour per day. For a typical work week, that’s no less than five hours gained back— all by just rewiring how your brain scans, comprehends, and ultimately, recalls information.

The Become A Speed Reading Machine Course teaches all of this and more—including how to apply your new skillset to get a job promotion or simply make income on the side. After all, reading isn’t something you should do; it’s something you must do—so why not invest in yourself? And for a limited time, the course can be yours for just 9 bucks—that’s a staggering 95% off the retail price of $195!

Become a Speed Reading Machine — $195 $9 (95% Off)

Included:

  • Access 67 lectures & 3.5 hours of content 24/7
  • Understand why everything you learned in school stops you from reading more than 20 books per year
  • Discover a hidden benefit of reading that will make you want to read every single day
  • Learn a little known trick that can instantly double your reading speed
  • Explore ‘The Double Time Solution,’ a simple thing you can do to read twice as much without spending any extra time
  • Know how to use what you learn from books to make more money

BUY HERE

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The post Become a Speed Reading Machine in a Weekend with this 4-Hour Course appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 08, 2018 12:46 PM

February 07, 2018

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS World 2018 General Session Recap: Day Three

Day three of General Sessions at SOLIDWORKS World started off with Mike Puckett, Senior Manager of the Worldwide Certification Program, who gave the audience a glimpse of the workforce of the future. According to Mike the SOLIDWORKS certification program, which celebrates its 20th anniversary, initially took 16 years to reach 100,000 certified users, but over the last two years it’s doubled in size with 200,000 new users now certified. In 2017 alone, the program added over 52,000 new certified users. In fact, every 10 minutes another SOLIDWORKS user becomes certified. Bottom line: if you want to be part of the workforce of the future, get SOLIDWORKS certified.

Mike also introduced two new, industry-focused exams to the program. Want to get schooled in additive manufacturing? There’s a new Certified Additive Manufacturing Associate exam coming in April on MySolidWorks, and there’s a new Mold Making Associate exam now available. To mark its 20th anniversary, the CSWP exam has been redesigned with new content, new models and new challenges.

Next Mike introduced everyone to future engineer Jason Ledon, who passed his first SOLIDWORKS certification exam at the age of 15, reached expert level by 16, and wants to pass all customer-facing certification exams by the time he graduates from high school. The future and the present can all benefit from being certified on the tool that everyone is using to innovate.

Next up on stage was Kishore Boyalakuntla, Vice President, Portfolio Management, Brand UX Leader at SOLIDWORKS, who introduced Ryan Kraft, an engineer from Arrivo, a company focused on the goal of eliminating traffic. Kraft told the crowd that people who live in the larger urban areas of the country spend an average of 100 hours a year in traffic and as a nation we lose billions of dollars as a result of traffic.

The company is using SOLIDWORKS and 3DEXPERIENCE solutions to design a high-speed super urban network to move people around cities. The Arrivo network would be composed on a magnetized track that parallels existing freeways. The system could support existing vehicles as well as cargo sleds and its own specially designed vehicles.

When asked why the company selected the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, Kraft said that they are first and foremost a company of builders, and their strategy for CAE, CAD, and PLM must support that. The company selected the minimum set of tools and processes to enable quick but accurate manufacturing and testing, and will add in further toolsets and processes as they move to a production mindset in the coming years.

What’s next for these pioneers of the brave new world of transportation? The company will spend the next 18 months to two years focusing on moving forward with technology, partners and customers, and it is actively seeking engineers to join the company, with hopes of doubling its engineering staff. The company also has plans to build a test track in Colorado and if all goes well, construction of that will begin in 2019.

Milos Zupanski, director of Product Portfolio Management, was up next introducing SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERINCE PLM Services. As products are getting more complex and time to market is getting shorter, there is a growing need to take control of your company’s data and protect IP. SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Services provide an affordable data and lifecycle management system regardless of company size and does not require investment in or hosting on your own hardware infrastructure.

Due to the fact that 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Services are hosted in the cloud, there is nothing to install, no hardware requirements. According to Milos, it was designed for SOLIDWORKS users in mind as a way to facilitate collaboration by enabling users to provide access to data for everyone on your team, even if they don’t have a full license.

Whether people are using SOLIDWORKS Desktop or xDesign and whether their needs require PDM or PLM, SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Services enable users to take the steps they want to take and grow at their own pace. As their needs increase, they can scale up and add additional capabilities with a click of a button. Users can start with xDesign today and can have full PLM capabilities connected to SOLIDWORKS by the end of the year. Click here to learn more about this announcement.

Stephen Endersby, director of Product Portfolio Management, was next up to introduce Tarso Marques, owner and founder of Tarso Marques Concepts and a former Formula One driver. Design is a very personal expression of your vision, Tarso said, however, being able to communicate that vision was an issue early on as he made his transition from driver to custom car designer. He admits that when he first started designing, his initial sketches were not great, which made explaining his ideas difficult and clay modeling was too time-consuming.

Fortunately Tarso’s experience with SOLIDWORKS changed the game for him. He said that SOLIDWORKS literally changed his life, making it much easier and faster to get his vision on the road. Once parts are created, the company’s designers must focus on performance so they have begun using the new Topology Optimization features in SOLIDWORKS Simulation, which he calls “truly transformational” and has resulted in stronger, lighter parts that deliver high-end performance.

The company has now changed the way it designs its car parts and components, starting a design using topology optimization, which enables them to create organic parts that not only look cool but can be 3D printed, something that would have been impossible with any other means.

Kurt Lundstedt, director of Product Portfolio Management, was next to cue up yet another amazing customer success story. ENVE is a company started by a small group of cyclers with an interest in carbon fiber technology. The company uses SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS Simulation to create high-strength components, such as molds and fixtures.

As the company grew, storing data on network folders was causing issues with version control and lost files. Back in 2012 the company implemented SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional to help them better manage its design data. The company is now using SOLIDWORKS Manage, which includes powerful project, process and item management tools along with interactive dashboards and reports. ENVE will use the project management capabilities to track their new product development activities and are considering creating their spare part orders using the item capabilities and reporting tools. They will also connect SOLIDWORKS Manage to their ERP system using the built-in data import and export capabilities to pull relevant data into Manage and send product information back.

Another cool customer, Gilo Industries, and its founder Gilo Cardoza, was next on the main stage to share how his company is using SOLIDWORKS to design the Mako jetboard. Cardoza said that while the concept of a jetboard has been around since the 1930s, no one has ever done it really well. It needed to be lightweight, like a surfboard and travel fast. The Mako goes 35 mph and has a 12-horsepower engine and goes from zero to 35 in a blazing 2.8 seconds. Using SOLIDWORKS the company went from art to finished product in 12 months.

One of the highlights of any SOLIDWORKS World is Model Mania, which also marked its 20-year anniversary. Mark Schneider came on stage to announce this year’s winners. The customer winners were: third place: Kam Smith, CACI, Inc.; second place: Jeremiah Feist, Omnetics Connector Corp. and first place: Tom Smith, Victaulic. The winners among the Resellers were: third place: Krystof Pluta, DPS Software, second place: Tobias Schnaars, Fisher; and first place: John MacArtuthur, DASI.

For the day’s Keynote Address Joseph Hiura and Robert Andrew Johnson, both art director and set designers, spoke about how they use SOLIDWORKS to design movie sets for films such as Oblivion, Passengers, Tron Legacy, and Batman Versus Superman. Robert said that movies are very collaborative in nature, with many parts that must come together to make the final product, which requires them to be fast and agile to meet the short deadlines they are commonly faced with. SOLIDWORKS is what enables them to meet this challenge.

Gian Paolo closed the show by telling the audience that we all share a big dream and that most importantly, we have the knowledge, talent, character, determination to make it happen – let’s make a better world for everyone.

See you in Dallas next year for SOLIDWORKS World 2019. In the meantime, you can relive the action here at SWW18 with on-demand video at live.solidworks.com. Thanks for making 2018 the best SOLIDWORKS World yet!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS World 2018 General Session Recap: Day Three appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 07, 2018 11:40 PM

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Technology Preview – Part 3

In case you missed PART 1 or PART 2

Day 3 at SOLIDWORKS World brings the fourth installment of the skit. The cast is working on the soundtrack, but can’t stop messing around. Megan has reached her boiling point and explodes! The team instantly snaps into shape and finish the voiceover work for Kurt’s demo.

Topology Study

  • Stress Constraint

  • Factor of Safety Constraint

  • Frequency Constraint

Mesh Slicing

  • Sketches created at intersection of mesh body and intersection plane
  • Exact or approximate sketches
  • Resulting Sketches and Planes grouped in a single folder in Feature Manager

With the final part of the soundtrack done, Megan fly’s off to put it all together, leaving the cast to continue their antics. That second script seemed quite familiar.

This brings us to the premier of DEMO-Lition, the final act of SOLIDWORKS World 2018. Everything seems to be going well UNTIL… JEREMY! Scorned by Megan, jeered by the rest of his team, Jeremy was determined to sabotage the show, get on stage, and show his talents, passion, and most importantly, all the rest of the functionality in SOLIDWORKS 2019.

Group Mates by Status

  • Errors
  • Suppressed
  • Inactive
  • Solved
  • Over-Defined

Component Preview

  • Multiple Components
  • Synched View Rotation
  • Mate Components

 

Lock Rotation for Toolbox Concentric Mates

  • Extremely simplified assemblies
  • Precise control
  • Great for general arrangement drawings
  • Great for protecting intellectual property

Before Jeremy could share any more functionality coming in SOLIDWORKS 2019, Yan dragged him off the stage, reminding everyone that BETA and ALL the functionality in 2019 will be available in a few short months.

*** As a reminder, this IS a TECHNOLOGY PREVIEW and features / functionality are always changing until fully vetted and not guaranteed to be in the next release.

Author information

Kurt Anliker
Kurt Anliker
Kurt is the Director of Product Introduction at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post SOLIDWORKS 2019 Technology Preview – Part 3 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Kurt Anliker at February 07, 2018 06:23 PM

SOLIDWORKS Distributed Data Management

With the release of SOLIDWORKS Manage the SOLIDWORKS Distributed Data Management process solution is becoming a reality for a long time SOLIDWORKS customer ENVE Composites. See the full Rachel Joyce-Ready video featured at SOLIDWORKS World 2018 here.

ENVE Composites, based in Ogden Utah, designs and produces high-performance carbon fiber bicycle components for demanding riders worldwide. ENVE Composites has utilized SOLIDWORKS since its inception back in 2007 and added SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional in 2012 to manage its expanding portfolio of product designs. Now the company is adopting SOLIDWORKS Manage to help streamline its processes and manufacturing data.

ENVE SES 7.8 DISC CARBON FIBER WHEELSET Designed in SOLIDWORKS

 

The first process EVNE will tackle with SOLIDWORKS Manage is its manufacturing Bill of Material (BOM) creation. They will take it from a manual process using disconnected Excel spreadsheets, to an integrated process that combines CAD data from its SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional vault and manufacturing information into a single deliverable for production.

ENVE’s manufacturing BOMs are more than just a list of the components that make up the product, they also information on how the products are built. This information includes images and diagrams that are manually added to the BOM. This will be streamlined and automated with SOLIDWORKS Manage due to its ability to store image and rich text data as metadata in field values. When items are added to the BOM, the visual data will also be added. Once the BOM is approved for distribution to manufacturing, the comprehensive reporting tool in SOLIDWORKS Manage will automatically create the deliverables for manufacturing. The generated reports can be automatically saved within the BOM record itself keeping all information in one place.

The SOLIDWORKS Manage Pillars of Functionality.

 

ENVE has plans to expand the use of SOLIDWORKS Manage to track its new product development projects, import and export data with their ERP system and even create spare part orders. Since SOLIDWORKS Manage can easily connect to SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional, ENVE will be able to leverage their existing data, including users and group membership, in all the new capabilities SOLIDWORKs Manage offers. This is without any costly data migration.

To find out more about the SOLIDWORKS Distributed Data Management process solution and SOLIDWORKS Manage, please visit the SOLIDWORKS 2018 Launch site.

For a deeper dive into all the functionality offered in SOLIDWORKS Manage, watch this overview video.

To learn more about the great products offered by ENVE Composites visit https://enve.com/

Author information

Kurt Lundstedt
Kurt Lundstedt
Product Manager - PDM Solutions at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post SOLIDWORKS Distributed Data Management appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Kurt Lundstedt at February 07, 2018 05:26 PM

SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Services

What if you could shorten the path from idea to finished product and experience increased productivity while reducing errors?  What if a complete, turnkey business environment involving minimal investment and administration overhead was at your fingertips? SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Services provide design, engineering and business process services on the cloud. Due to the flexibility of the product and the breadth of the portfolio, corporations of any size and business requirements can be supported by the solution.

For users who need rapid product development cycles, no matter product complexity or the size of the team involved, SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Services will provide a native cloud-based solution that delivers design, engineering and business process services. Unlike any other PDM and PLM solutions on the market, SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Services require a minimum amount of work to get started and provides the market’s most sophisticated capabilities.

SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Services provide an affordable data and lifecycle management system regardless of company size and does not require investment in or hosting on your own hardware infrastructure. With SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Services for your CAD data, you can:

  • Reduce development time and increased speed to market by improving productivity
  • Streamline digital continuity from Design to Manufacturing
  • Extend the accessibility of design review, collaboration and structure editing capabilities beyond the CAD tool environment to all enterprise users
  • Improve interdepartmental/partner/supplier collaboration in a mixed CAD environment
  • Reduce the occurrence of duplicate designs across multiple CAD systems
  • Leverage existing design data for full mock-ups review and analysis
  • Optimize access to IP – managing all of your multi-CAD design data in one secured environment, minimizing the risk of unauthorized access and maximizing design integrity
  • Reduce total cost of operation with cloud and web-based user experience
  • Simplify change and configuration management in a multidisciplinary environment
  • Provide real-time efficiency measurements, dashboards and reporting
  • Keep your current CAD system, protecting your investment while delivering experiences that delight customers

If you are a CAD user, SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Services can be a great solution for you. It will provide a unified product definition and a digital continuity throughout your connected enterprise by leveraging a parallel process across all disciplines resulting in faster, accurate, product development.

Keep an eye out on the SOLIDWORKS website and wait to hear more from your reseller.

Author information

Mohit Daga
Mohit Daga
Mohit is a Senior Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS Composer. Tables Tennis Champion, Vegetarian foodie and avid kickballer!

The post SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Services appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mohit Daga at February 07, 2018 05:23 PM

SolidSmack

Immersive Augmented Reality Sweetness is Finally Coming to SolidWorks

It’s not uncommon for SolidWorks World to feel a little bit like Christmas for serious CAD junkies. Not to mention, it’s a great time for partner companies to get their announcements heard while everybody is in the ‘holiday spirit.’

Among other announcements at SolidWorks World 2018 earlier this week, Meta is going to be the first company to provide 3D CAD viewing capabilities in augmented reality (AR) with SolidWorks applications. Essentially, the SolidWorks experience is getting transported into a new, even more immersive and intuitive dimension. Whaaaat?

Dubbed the “Publish to Xtended Reality” capability (which sounds pretty corny if you say it out loud), this new feature allows users to export a CAD model from SolidWorks to an open-source format known as “gITF”. Once converted, the gITF file can be viewed on a platform through a Meta 2 headset. File details including display states, color, model hierarchy, and animations are all retained during the conversion process.

According to the announcement, the new feature provides an “easier and more immersive experience than virtual reality”. The easy exporting nature is supposed to be a lot faster, as models don’t need to be made specifically for the AR headset. The more intuitive interface also means both seasoned and less experienced CAD modelers will be able to easily create their projects when given enough time with the new technology.

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It will be a while before the project gets released to the public, but a few companies, such as Black & Decker, are already beta testing it and proving its capabilities. If you really can’t wait to play around with your CAD model in the real world, you can sign up for a private Beta invite over on the Meta webpage.

The post Immersive Augmented Reality Sweetness is Finally Coming to SolidWorks appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 07, 2018 04:33 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: Otter Wax Heat-Activated Wax Fabric Dressing

Well, ladies and gents, winter isn’t quite over. And for many of us, this may mean applying another fresh layer of waterproof fabric wax to all of our canvas shoes, hats, jackets, rucksacks to prepare for the final wet and cold months ahead.

But when it comes to fabric waxes, not all are equal. Our choice? Portland, Oregon’s own Otter Wax brand.

Otter Wax offers long-lasting protection from the elements and contains only all-natural ingredients from renewable resources. It is also the first and only water repellent wax that doesn’t utilize paraffin, silicone, or other synthetic ingredients.

So whether you need to apply touch-ups to your existing gear, or want to give your new gear a solid base layer, you can’t go wrong with Otter Wax.

Otter Wax Heat-Activated Fabric Dressing — $20.95

Features:

  • Heat-Activated Fabric Dressing: 100% Natural Waterproofing Fabric Wax
  • Reproofs Oiled Cotton Jackets for a Factory-Waxed Look
  • Environmentally Friendly & Safe Ingredients -Handmade in Portland, Oregon, USA
  • 100% Natural Ingredients: Non-Toxic, No Silicone, No Petroleum
  • Large 1/2 Pint Can: Great for use on Oiled Coats, Canvas Shoes, Hats, Fabric Jackets, Rucksacks, Backpacks, & More!

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: Otter Wax Heat-Activated Wax Fabric Dressing appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 07, 2018 03:50 PM

Article by Google Will Bring AR to Everybody From Any Web Browser

Remember those scenes in Iron Man where Tony Stark fiddles around with an interactive hologram? Of course, you do. Well, Google is about to bring that same experience to reality, because one of their latest projects seeks to make this technology available for everyone—right from your favorite device.

Article is an upcoming 3D model viewer which works on any web browser (yes, even Internet Explorer). Whether it’s on a desktop computer or a mobile device, a 3D model can be rotated, zoomed, or panned to view from different angles.

But this isn’t the only exciting part. When opened on an AR-capable device, users can tap an icon on the lower-right side of an image to bring up a reticle that brings the model into the living world; the model sprouts up on-screen from the reticle’s location and allows you to walk around it, given you still have your device on hand.

As anybody who works in 3D knows, things can get hairy pretty quick with constant zooming, panning, and rotating. That said, using Article is a lot more intuitive than you would think. To reposition the image, a user simply has to drag it around like a piece of copied text. Mobile users, on the other hand, simply drag the image by using two fingers. Impressively, the models even have proper lighting and shadows to help blend into the real-world environment.

The project was made with cross-browser JavaScript library/API Three.js, as it makes rendering with WebGL more accessible to developers with its large library of examples and tutorials. To help make 3D models more fluid in the real world, Google uses a low polygon count, lowers the lighting and shadow resolution, and created a desktop AR emulator which renders their effects in an efficient manner.

Seeing as almost everyone from every age group already uses the Internet, having a more interactive browser experience can only help make a more immersive experience.

Think about it: you will be able to look at a 3D model of an item before purchasing it online. Learning online classes would be a lot easier now that they aren’t limited to using a 2D screen. These are just some of the ways having a 3D model viewer could improve life for those who don’t want to leave the confines of their own home. For those who want to get started making their own Article models, Google’s AR devsite is where you want to head.

The post Article by Google Will Bring AR to Everybody From Any Web Browser appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 07, 2018 03:34 PM

Watch Industrial Designer Eric Strebel’s Method for Making 120 Cast Parts From Scratch

Always one for ingenuity, Eric Strebel puts his industrial design expertise to good use even with the simplest of tasks. This time, he’s been commissioned to produce 120 cast parts from a single solid master part. Seeing how costly it is to make solid parts, Strebel decides to take matters into his own hands and by using a specialized mold of his own design.

Here’s how he did it:

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Using a reusable mold box, Strebel glues the master part and registration markers onto the bottom before submerging them under a mixture of green silicone. Once the silicone has cured, he removes the mold by disassembling the box.

To hollow out the mold, he lays down some sheet clay on a surface. After flattening it to a thickness of about 10mm, he cuts out the clay pieces and places them into the mold; taking care not to overlap the clay.

Taking his clay-filled mold, Strebel then clears out some room in his fridge and places it right beside his easy-cook lasagna. You don’t really need to buy lasagna to complete this part, but it helps Strebel’s viewers know he’s a connoisseur of only the finest frozen Italian foods.

Once the mold is hard and the lasagna is eaten, he scrapes the top of the mold before rubbing on some lacquer thinner to smoothen the whole thing out.

Placing the mold back into a mold box, he fills the hollowed-out portion with silicone and waits for it to dry.

He then adds some sticks to the sides of the mold which, once the second part of the mold is finished, will serve as weeping channels where resin can freely flow without messing the hollow casts. Strebel finishes the mold by covering the base with a second layer of silicone.

After the mold has dried, he pops the second blue mold out from the green one and removes the sheet clay between them. He finishes it off by continuing the weep cuts which were started by the previously placed sticks.

The blue part serves as the final mold which Strebel uses for the hundred or so hollow casts. He pours the resin into the mold and uses a syringe to top it off.

Considering how much cheaper this is than making a hundred solid parts, Strebel delivers some pretty awesome casts at a fraction of the cost. As always, you can find more of his design know-how over on his YouTube channel.

The post Watch Industrial Designer Eric Strebel’s Method for Making 120 Cast Parts From Scratch appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 07, 2018 02:41 PM

Learn Arduino in a Weekend with This Project-Based Bootcamp

As many a designer or engineer knows, there’s no better way to learn than to jump in and get messy. Heck, that’s why the best way to learn a complicated CAD tool isn’t to read a book, but to get your hands dirty and make mistakes. Only then will your brain start to program the rights from the wrongs.

Well, that same approach can be applied to just about anything—but off the top of our heads, we’re digging this project-based approach to Arduino consisting of 15 complete projects to get you on your way to becoming an Arduino ninja in no time.

At just $9, this 15-project Arduino Bootcamp bundle caters to both beginners and (curious) pros alike—with projects ranging from an online weather station to your very own working smartphone. Throw in some 3D printed parts, and you’ve got yourself a killer weekend project. So what are you waiting for?

Arduino Bootcamp | Learning Through Projects — $100 $9

Included:

  • Access 51 lectures & 9.5 hours of content 24/7
  • Build a remote-controlled car you can drive w/ a smartphone app
  • Create your own cell phone w/ which you can make/receive calls & send/receive messages
  • Understand components like ultrasonic sensors, motor drivers, servos, transistors, & more
  • Gain the confidence to build complex electronics projects
  • Learn how to prototype electronics projects
  • Become a confident maker & prototyper

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

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The post Learn Arduino in a Weekend with This Project-Based Bootcamp appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 07, 2018 02:09 PM

Solidworks World 2018 | Easton LaChappelle’s Unlimited Tomorrow New Model In Artificial Limb Creation

Unlimited Tomorrow artificial limb

We’re walking the floor at Solidworks World 2018. One must see is Easton LaChappelle’s Unlimited Tommorrow (UT) exhibit. He is cranking out some amazing prosthetic devices! Easton at 14-years-old took an interest in robotics where he submitted a robotic artificial limb in a science fair. His epiphany with regard to his future role in the world of robotics came by way of his “chance” meeting with Momo an amputee. Easton was moved by this young girl’s plight. He learned that Momo was outfitted with an $80,00 artificial limb. Getting a closer look, he saw that her prosthetic was clearly inferior to his. From that moment on he set out to develop a new model in artificial limb creation and accessibility.

The Birth of a Vision

For a greater good, Easton LaChappelle chose to deny himself of all that’s common in the life of today’s teens.  Now, seven years later at 22-years-old, his hard work is bearing fruit. Easton is garnering loads of industry support, with Microsoft showing up as one of the key sponsors. More importantly, he has perfected the artificial limb he set at to develop for Momo. Complete with physical characteristics natural to Momo, haptics, and much more, the prosthetic is a sight to behold. All I might add, to the tune of a modest $5k! It was a long time in coming, but LaChappelle and Momo finally met. Easton personally delivered and fitted Momo with her very own, personalized artificial limb!

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Mission

A general overview of the Unlimited Tomorrow mission and development model is as follows:

https://www.solidsmack.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Unlimited-Tomorrow's Mission & Approach-Overview-01.jpg

Process Overview

Unlimited Tomorrow - 3D Scanning Process 3-Unlimited Tomorrow - 3D Printing Step 4 - Component Integration Step 5 - user fitting Step 6 - Worldwide Availability

For a  technical overview of  LaChappelle’s new model in artificial limb development have a look at his 2018 CES interview. Much of Easton’s work is open-sourced and is available at TheRoboArm site.

For information on the availability of Easton LaChappelle, please email feel free to email him at Easton@UnlimitedTomorrow.com. If you want to support Easton’s effort visiting his Microventures Funding page.

The post Solidworks World 2018 | Easton LaChappelle’s Unlimited Tomorrow New Model In Artificial Limb Creation appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at February 07, 2018 01:21 PM

The Javelin Blog

Use the ‘Exclude from Cut List’ option to manage SOLIDWORKS Modeled Welds

One of the most common practices we run across while discussing weldment functionality with clients is the use of ‘Modeled Welds’ which are additional Solid Bodies that exist in the weldment file to represent the physical mass where a weld would exist — generally in a shape that the fillet bead tool cannot be applied, as shown in the example below:

A typical weldment

A typical weldment with additional solid bodies

Typically the Cut List folder (Solid Bodies) would appear similar to the image below, if one was using Cut List items to apply properties to the various members comprising the weldment. This includes separation of the bodies representing welds into their own folder.

Cut List folders

Cut List folders

The technique that you may consider applying here is a workflow to specifically exclude a number of the bodies from the Cut List, such as those gathered within the MODELED WELDS folder, that can be created manually or automatically, depending upon your settings.

Exclude from Cut List

A right-click on the Folder that represents the MODELED WELDS will reveal options to Exclude the weldment from the folder directly or enter the Cut List properties area of the Cut List.  It is here on the Cut List summary tab, that you will find the checkbox to “Exclude” that weldment member from the Cut List.

Exclude from Cut List option

Exclude from Cut List option

With the “Exclude from Cut List” option Checked we end up with the following in our weldment cut list table.

Cut List Table

Cut List Table

Keep this in mind when you are planning your next welded component that has a requirement for the welds to be modeled directly.

The post Use the ‘Exclude from Cut List’ option to manage SOLIDWORKS Modeled Welds appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at February 07, 2018 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

App Smack 06.18: Blinkist, Tailor, Twine, Gesture Control, and More…

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Blinkist – Always Learning (iOS — Free)

Where do the world’s smartest people get their ideas? From great books! Blinkist transforms the key insights of 2000+ bestselling nonfiction books into powerful packs you can read or listen to in just 15 minutes.

Tailor (iOS – Free)

Automatically stitch your screenshots into one long image with Tailor.

Twine (iOS — Free)

Twine is the first savings app built for two. It simplifies saving for major milestones like weddings, down payments and vacations.

Gesture Control (Android — $3.49)

There was never before, a more natural way, to control your smartphone.

File Manager Pro (Android — $1.49)

File Manager is the best file explorer, file tool for android device manager with powerful features: copy, cut, paste, rename, compress, transfer, download, and more.

Eins10 Clean (Android — Free)

Having analyzed millions of apps, Eins10 Clean cleans residual files, cache and restore several GB storage (ROM) space with perfect accuracy. Your music, chatting, pictures, documents and other files are safe with us.

The post App Smack 06.18: Blinkist, Tailor, Twine, Gesture Control, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 07, 2018 11:00 AM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS World 2018 General Session Recap: Day Two

Before diving into an amazing day two, let’s briefly revisit day one’s proceedings, specifically its focus on the user community. SOLIDWORKS CEO Gian Paolo Bassi stated that users are constantly top of mind. This focus permeates throughout the company. It’s your work, the great products you create, and the lives you change that drives SOLIDWORKS. This mantra took center stage on day two starting with SOLIDWORKS Vice President, Strategy and Community, Suchit Jain. Note, you can read the day one recap here.

Suchit stated, “What I love about SOLIDWORKS is very simple: you, our massive and growing of user community.” This statement clearly set the tone for the morning’s general session and was evident in the customers, technology, and teaching discussed at SWW18. Five million engineers and designers use SOLIDWORKS to innovate every day. Today was a day their stories were shared with the community.

Emerging startups are very important to SOLIDWORKS. For the last two years, the SOLIDWORKS Entrepreneur program has provided an opportunity for us to invest in new companies through free software and mentorship. Boom Supersonic, an aerospace company working toward commercially viable supersonic aircraft, is one entrepreneur program success story.

Mike Jagemann, Head of XB-1 Production, Boom Supersonic, first learned SOLIDWORKS in college as part of a competitive aerospace team. This fact is important as education is critical for growing the next generation of engineers. Mike explained that Boom uses SOLIDWORKS to design its entire aircraft – not just pieces of fuselage or the interior but for the whole thing including CAD, PDM, Simulation and AR/VR.

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Boom is growing almost as fast as its flight speed capabilities. Mike mentioned an ulterior motive for coming to SWW18: the opportunity to connect with the best designers in the business who can help Boom take flight. So if you’re not at SOLIDWORKS World, there’s a good lesson: it’s a great place to grow your career.

If you’ve been following the Fab Lab efforts at SOLIDWORKS, you may know that the company has recently helped launch Fab Lab locations in Bhutan and Rwanda. This stems from a close relationship with MIT Professor Dr. Neil Gershenfeld, who runs the school’s Center for Bits and Atoms. Fab Labs are community maker spaces where people can take advantage of design and manufacturing tools to make anything. Thanks to the efforts of Neil and his team, there are now 1,200 Fab Lab locations worldwide. This maker mentality is at the heart of the Industrial Renaissance.

The drive to become an engineer starts at an early age. Education plays a HUGE role in the SOLIDWORKS community, and the person driving that passion is Director of Education, Marie Planchard. Marie explained the important role that educators make in teaching students both in and out of the classroom. Inside the classroom, educators inspire their students and provide them with the best job skills to ultimately work for you – our customers. SOLIDWORKS also assists educators to connect with students outside of the classroom. By supporting 3,000+ competitive teams, and sponsoring hundreds of organizations, such as SAE, AUVSI, and FIRST Robotics, students get the opportunity to enrich their classroom work with real-life engineering projects.

Marie explained that SOLIDWORKS researchers inspire the community both in and out of the classroom by making the impossible, possible. Kyoungchul Kong (known as KC), CEO, SG Robotics and Professor at Sogang University, is one such inspiration. Some cynics might see the thought of engineering changing people’s lives has hyperbolic. If you encounter a person with this belief, please explain KC’s work. SG robotics is in the business of building powered exoskeletons to help people with disabilities or limited mobility walk again.

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After hearing amazing user stories from Boom and SG Robotics, conversation shifted to new tools that will give the SOLIDWORKS community the capabilities to continue innovating today and in the future.

With over 1 million users, MySolidWorks is the largest SOLIDWORKS online community in the world. Every day, tens of thousands of members use MySolidWorks to stay plugged in, to acquire new skills through online training, or to test drive SOLIDWORKS with the online product trial. MySolidWorks is known as a great place for training. Today, SOLIDWORKS announced the redesigned CAD Model service, a new way for you to share and showcase your skills.

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Next up, Suchit provided more information about Marketplace Make and Marketplace Part Supply. Marketplace Make is the seamless way to get your parts made and collaborate with leading digital manufacturers worldwide across all manufacturing processes: 3D Printing, CNC Machining, Injection Molding, Sheet Metal and more. Marketplace Part Supply is a comprehensive and intelligent online 3D components catalog service.

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Learn more about Marketplace by clicking here.

Solution partners are making massive contributions to the SOLIDWORKS community. Today, Suchit explored three emerging areas that are shaping the future of engineering: VR/AR, 3D Printing, and IoT.

Meta is shortcutting the process of taking a CAD model into an AR/VR model. With new capabilities set to launch this year, you can take a CAD model straight into AR/VR environments. Meta CEO and Founder Meron Gribetz provided a live demo that felt like it was ripped straight out of Tony Stark’s workshop. Meron called up a motorcycle model, conducted a design review and displayed a full-scale bike onstage. Meron explained the demo best by saying, “it’s just freakin’ awesome.” You can read more about the partnership and the beta program in this blog post.

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3D Printing was the next area of focus with three partnership announcements with 3D Systems, Desktop Metal, and Nano Dimension.

Suchit announced that, starting today, all SOLIDWORKS subscription users will have access to a new application “3DExpert for SOLIDWORKS” developed by 3D Systems. This partnership will make it easy for you to design and optimize 3D‐printable models and provide you the ability to easily prepare your designs for 3D Printing.

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Next, SOLIDWORKS is now integrated with Live Parts from Desktop Metal. This new integration enables you to conduct Shape Discovery for metal 3D Printed parts and engineer to mimic nature.

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With partnerships involving plastics and metal covered, the third announcement involved printing electronics. SOLIDWORKS is now integrated with Nano Dimension’s 3D Printer, giving you the capability to directly design and 3D print electronics.

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Connected products and IoT are changing the way products are designed. As the demand for “smart” products becomes more prevalent, SOLIDWORKS is investing in partnerships to ensure users have the tools to meet the demand for IoT. Enter Lior Akavia, Co-Founder and CEO of IoT platform provider Seebo. IoT is providing new business opportunities; however, it also brings a new set of challenges. Seebo’s goal is make the complex simple by giving you the tools to transform 3D models into IoT models in no time.

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These partnerships are a direct result of a key strategy to add value for SOLIDWORKS subscription users. In 2017, these users had access to SOLIDWORKS Visualize. In 2018, subscription users were able to take advantage of integrated CAM. Now, you’ll have access to cutting edge AR/VR, 3D Printing and IoT features thanks to innovative partnerships.

The day closed with a spirited presentation from Brent Bushnell, CEO of engineering and entertainment company Two Bit Circus. Brent’s discussion was a perfect example of the best that the SOLIDWORKS community has to offer. His passion for engaging with people, his work, and fellow engineers had the crowd captivated. It wasn’t a surprise seeing that Brent designs experiences like tequila clouds, flame tanks, and robot bartenders. Beyond the jaw-dropping projects, the point behind Brent’s talk was simple: engagement is the key to creative design. There’s no experience more immersive than real life, and everyone in the SOLIDWORKS community has the tools and skills to create something innovative, engaging, and memorable. Now got out there and make it happen. We’ll see you on day three. If you’re not in LA, you can watch live at live.solidworks.com.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS World 2018 General Session Recap: Day Two appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 07, 2018 01:26 AM

Additive Manufacturing Takes a Step Closer to Mainstream- Part 2

After the General Session concluded on Monday, the Additive Manufacturing Symposium kicked off. The 3D printing initiatives that have been worked on here at SOLIDWORKS were unveiled along with a demos of some brand new products from partners such as 3D Systems’ 3DXpert for SOLIDWORKS and Desktop Metal’s Live Parts.

The symposium also featured two special guest speakers. One was Terry Wohlers, is principal consultant and president of Wohlers Associates, Inc., an independent consulting firm he founded 30 years ago. What he doesn’t know about Additive Manufacturing and the industry is not worth knowing. He spoke about the importance of Design for Additive Manufacturing and also the future of the industry.

This was followed by another glimpse into the future provided by Tim Simpson, the Paul Morrow Professor of Engineering Design and Manufacturing at Penn State University. His presentation talked about the research he has been doing at the forefront of metal additive manufacturing and how it has the potential to disrupt industry one layer at a time. This session was also live streamed at live.solidworks.com and on Facebook live.

While the symposium took a break for lunch, the additive news continued. A press conference featuring SOLIDWORKS, Stratasys and CEO and founder of a start-up called Unlimited Tomorrow kicked off. Easton LaChappelle has been in the news before, showing his robotic hands to former US President Barack Obama, but things have moved on since then. His current project involves bringing a real looking, working robotic prosthetic to 100 people.

SOLIDWORKS and Stratasys are partnering with him to make it happen. SOLIDWORKS has contributed software, but also funding towards the next 100 arms. Easton LaChappelle spoke about how he has been using SOLIDWORKS since the 8th grade and how he is using to create custom 3D-printed robotic prosthetics. Very impressive stuff.

After lunch and the Symposium kicked off again, this time looking at a combination of additive and subtractive. Greg Paulsen from Xometry, spoke about the importance of design for the process you are going to be using, so how do you decide what process to use? Additive or Subtractive?

Vivek Govekar followed this up by showing how SOLIDWORKS CAM fits into the additive workflow, using it to remove support structures from metal additively built parts and improving surface finishes and machining in close tolerance features where required.

The last session of the Symposium was all about the desktop. Desktop printers were originally positioned as toys for hobbyists but now, the quality and reliability is far beyond that and are being used mainly by professionals now. In some cases, even for production. Formlabs and Ultimaker spoke about the opportunities Desktop printers present. After all, for the price of a huge scale industrial printer, you could have 10 or maybe even 20 or more desktop printers all running at the same time, finishing sooner, and if one is out of action, you still have all the others to take up the slack.

 

Announced on Main stage on Day 2 by Suchit Jain, VP of Strategy for SOLIDWORKS, were 2 new collaborations. 3D Systems and Desktop Metal. These collaborations enable SOLIDWORKS Subscription customers access to new tools from the partners, specifically for Design for Additive Manufacturing. The first product, 3DXpert for SOLIDWORKS, is available to download today from https://www.3dsystems.com/software/3dxpert-solidworks. The second allows SOLIDWORKS users to login to http://labs.desktopmetal.com/liveparts using their MySolidWorks account to get exclusive free time using the product, then preferred pricing going forward.

So much 3D printing in so little time! If there was any doubt that the SOLIDWORKS ecosystem was not the best option for designing for additive manufacturing before SOLIDWORKS World 2018, there is now no question whatsoever.

If you still haven’t had enough 3D printing content, why not stay in LA and visit the Formlabs roadshow?  SOLIDWORKS own Michael Puckett will be there along with SOLIDWORKS customer Matt from the Ring Brothers who were featured during the launch of SOLIDWORKS CAM.

With all of the talk, announcements, breakout sessions and product launches for additive manufacturing at SOLIDWORKS World, it is quickly establishing itself as not just a SOLIDWORKS event but also an event to learn about the latest developments and latest products to help you gain competitive advantage.

Author information

Mark Rushton
Mark Rushton
Mark is a Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS.

The post Additive Manufacturing Takes a Step Closer to Mainstream- Part 2 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mark Rushton at February 07, 2018 12:55 AM

February 06, 2018

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Technology Preview – Part 2

In case you haven’t read PART 1… click here.

Didn’t click? Ok, here’s the recap…. Ian wanted to do a Star Wars sequel, but that got scrapped. Megan cut Jeremy from the production, but he’s still hanging around. It took 43 takes, but Ian finally produced an incredible demo, although he was still lobbying for a Star Wars sequel.

Now that you’re caught up…

Day 2 at SOLIDWORKS World brings the second installment of the skit, and finds Megan in search of the reclusive Mark Schneider. She sends Jeremy on a mission to find him… and a cappuccino. Jeremy finds Mark hidden away in his trailer, which looks quite humble from the outside but upon entering, Jeremy finds it to be quite spacious and filled with surprises. Poor Jeremy, already on Megan’s cut list, now gets sucked into Mark’s demo:

3D Texturize Body

  • Appearance will create offset mesh body from existing solid
  • Lighter color, further offset
  • Controls for refinement, size, and invert

Partial Chamfer / Fillet

  • Uses existing Chamfer / Fillet tool
  • Distance, Percentage, Reference, and Drag Handle offsets

In the third installment, antics from the cast continue to frustrate Megan. Mark Barrow has become quite full of himself after winning SOLIDWORKS NEXT TOP MODELER in 2017 (yes, Lord Percy ultimately did win) as well as his heroic performance as Luke Sketch Drawer in the Star Wars skit in 2016. We find Mark in his dressing room where he demonstrates his need for so many devices.

Microsoft Surface Dial

  • Any Microsoft Surface device
  • Pan, Zoom, Rotate

Gesture Sketch Splines

  • Sketches converted to Splines

Gesture Sketch Slots

  • Slots recognized and converted automatically

 

3D Markups

  • Handwritten notes saved with model

 

Virtual Reality (VR) Support

  • Support for VR in SOLIDWORKS eDrawings

The third installment wraps up with Megan lamenting her decision to cut Jeremy, but the deed has been done.

TO BE CONTINUTED…………………………………

*** As a reminder, this IS a TECHNOLOGY PREVIEW and features / functionality are always changing until fully vetted and not guaranteed to be in the next release.

Author information

Kurt Anliker
Kurt Anliker
Kurt is the Director of Product Introduction at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post SOLIDWORKS 2019 Technology Preview – Part 2 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Kurt Anliker at February 06, 2018 06:27 PM

SOLIDWORKS Xtended Reality (XR) Toolkit BETA is Announced

When innovations like augmented and virtual reality emerge, it’s only natural that we immediately start dreaming of the potential they can bring. We’ve listened to your dreams and are proud to introduce new functionality that will allow you take advantage of these technologies and provide cutting-edge tools to inspire innovation and make great design happen!

Welcome to SOLIDWORKS Xtended Reality – a method to transform your CAD data and bring it to life, virtually – opening the future of design and engineering.

With this new add-in to SOLIDWORKS, you’ll be able to export the amazing content you’ve created in SOLIDWORKS to power rich AR, VR and Web experience for yourselves AND your customers to:

· Sell your designs more effectively
· Connect with global teams to drive better designs more efficiently
· Train and engage consumers virtually

We have implemented an optimized export option from SOLIDWORKS that retains valuable information like materials, configurations, display states, and meta data, ideal for AR, VR and Web applications. Simultaneously, we’ve been working with partners and innovators in this space to support this new format and build highly useful solutions to support the use-cases you’ve asked for.

Sign up for the BETA. Provide your contact information if you would like us to provide you with updates.

In the meantime, check out these amazing tools that will be supporting the new files: (with more to come!)

Meta:

  • https://www.metavision.com/
  • Meta Model Viewer (Beta)
  • Main use-case(s) that you intend to support from the list below:
    • Sell your designs more effectively
    • Connect with global teams to drive better designs more efficiently
    • Train and engage consumers virtually

 

Speedernet Sphere:

  • https://sphereapp.io/
  • Speedernet Sphere 2.0 (Coming March 2018)
  • Main use-case(s) that you intend to support from the list below:
    • Sell your designs more effectively
    • Connect with global teams to drive better designs more efficiently

 

MiddleVR Improovr:

Microsoft:

Epic Games Unreal Engine:

  • unrealengine.com
  • Download of free engine: https://www.unrealengine.com/register
  • Unreal Engine 4.19 (Beta)
  • Main use-case(s) that you intend to support from the list below:
    • Sell your designs more effectively
    • Connect with global teams to drive better designs more efficiently
    • Train and engage consumers virtually

Author information

David Randle
David Randle
David is a Senior Business Development Manager at Dassault Systemes SolidWorks Corp

The post SOLIDWORKS Xtended Reality (XR) Toolkit BETA is Announced appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by David Randle at February 06, 2018 05:35 PM

The 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace – The Amazon of Manufacturing

Ask any engineer or designer about creating the next new thing, engineering it, and prototyping it, and they will tell you countless stories of trial and error before they succeeded making their ideas a reality. In the past decade,  the internet has become an integral part of the design process and when it comes to finding the right commercial component for your design or selecting a trusted manufacturer to bring your ideas designed in SOLIDWORKS to life, the amount of content and service providers is endless. Finding what you need can be cumbersome and time-consuming.

We launched a new service to address this very need, and more: the 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace.

Our ambition is nothing shy of transforming the industrial world similar to the way companies like Amazon transformed the retail sector. 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace is an online e-commerce platform providing businesses worldwide with on-demand manufacturing and intelligent part sourcing capabilities. It is a global ecosystem of qualified industrial service providers powered by the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, and it connects designers and engineers with digital design, engineering and manufacturing service providers worldwide, streamlining interactions and collaboration and increasing productivity.

The 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace provides two services: Make and PartSupply, and you can access them directly from within SOLIDWORKS.

Marketplace Make is the most seamless way to get your parts made and collaborate with leading digital manufacturers online worldwide across all manufacturing processes: 3D Printing, CNC Machining, Injection Molding, Sheet Metal and more. Offered in two service tiers, Make Community and Make Enterprise, it features 50 qualified digital manufacturers with over 500 different machines to make anything.

Make Community is a public service accessible to anyone who needs parts made. Make Enterprise offers the same capabilities plus it enables purchasing teams to configure manufacturing providers taking established agreements and pricing into account as well as allows the inclusion of providers not publicly listed on the 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace.

Marketplace PartSupply is the most comprehensive and intelligent online 3D components catalog. With over 600 suppliers, all of which are trusted and recognized experts in their domains, it places over 30 million parts at the fingertips of every SOLIDWORKS user worldwide. It’s never been easier to find parts, compare them or search for parts using a geometric signature of a CAD Model. The best part is, with the integration into SOLIDWORKS Desktop, once the right component is found, one can simply drag and drop it in SOLIDWORKS.

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The 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace is a game changer. It allows engineers to iterate and collaborate on design and manufacturing specifications, compare quotes from several service providers and pick the best option. It reduces risk and errors by ensuring that a part or product can be manufactured, while managing all aspects of transactions between buyers and sellers and providing full traceability. The 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace is pioneering a new way of doing business, driving innovation and introducing value in the industrial world.

I recently had the opportunity to talk with a few SOLIDWORKS customers about their experiences with the Marketplace. Take a look at what they have to say, and then visit the 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace | Make and 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace | PartSupply services to see for yourself!

 
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Author information

Andreas Kulik
Andreas Kulik
Director of Product Portfolio & Business Development at Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS

The post The 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace – The Amazon of Manufacturing appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Andreas Kulik at February 06, 2018 05:23 PM

SOLIDWORKS World 2018 – Student Success In and Out of the Classroom

SOLIDWORKS World celebrates our community of Educators, Students, Makers, and Researchers.  In and out of the classroom, SOLIDWORKS is preparing skilled students to get the best jobs.

We couldn’t achieve this success without the help of educators from university, college, community college, and high school present at key break out sessions.  Every presenter on the SOLIDWORKS Education Track is focused on student success.  They are all SOLIDWORKS Academic Certification Providers.

Presenters School Subject 
Paul Clinton & Ben Nubel Cherokee Trail HS Design and Fabrication Projects Using SOLIDWORKS
Jerry Murray Spokane Community College Pair Programming & Team Based Learning for SOLIDWORKS Instruction
Dave Zamora Gateway Community College Teaching Design for Machinability
Elisa Moss Laney College Project Based Learning with SOLIDWORKS
Cyril Jack Johnson Elizabeth Town Community College SOLIDWORKS and the 3D Prototype Printing Technology within the Classroom
David S. Nobes University of Alberta Educating undergrad students in  solid modeling: success in the CSWA
Rustin Webster & Jeremey Clark Purdue University CAD Certifications: Just How Valuable Are They?

Over 30,000 certified users have been achieved in 2017 by our academic providers around the world, providing qualified students to our commercial customers.

Students from UCLA Bruins Racing showcase their vehicle in the Partner Pavilion.  They join students from the LA area on Wednesday for “Student Day”  featuring a career skills and learning session from professional engineers that use SOLIDWORKS everyday.

We start even younger, SOLIDWORKS is the Modeling Solutions Partner and Crown Supplier to FIRST Robotics,  providing the software tools to FIRST R&D engineers and 1000’s of young students to celebrate and to support Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) learning.

Researchers from Sogang University, Korea are center stage at SOLIDWORKS World, featuring Professor  Kyoungchul “KC” Kong, founder of SG Robotics and SOLIDWORKS Entrepreneur.  With the help of his team, KC develops various wearable robots to help those in need. Professor Kong showcases “ANGELEGS”, a wear-able robot system that helps people that have been severely impaired – walk.

On behalf of the SOLIDWORKS Education & Research team we celebrate with our community at SOLIDWORKS World.  We thank the SOLIDWORKS students, educators, makers and researchers that use our software to design and make great products everyday.  We also thank our commercial customers, VARs, and partners that hire students with SOLIDWORKS skills – strengthening our community. Marie.

Author information

Marie Planchard
Director of Education & Early Engagement, SolidWorks at Dassault Systemes SolidWorks Corporation
Marie Planchard is Director of Education & Early Engagement, SOLIDWORKS. She is responsible for global development of content and social outreach for the SOLIDWORKS products across all levels of learning including educational institutions, Fab Labs, and entrepreneurship.

The post SOLIDWORKS World 2018 – Student Success In and Out of the Classroom appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Marie Planchard at February 06, 2018 05:21 PM

SOLIDWORKS World 2018 General Session Recap: Day One

In his opening remarks SOLIDWORKS CEO Gian Paolo Bassi stated that two topics are constantly on his mind: SOLIDWORKS users and the future. He envisions an industrial renaissance; an era in which machines will expand the knowledge of people who want to design and create things. This future, and empowering the SOLIDWORKS community with tools to achieve it, was the theme of day one at SWW18.

Gian Paolo opened the day by demonstrating how users will have access to both desktop and cloud products, increasing the reach of technology and the depth of information found in existing designs. Five new product announcements were made to support the two-pillar strategy:

3DEXPERIENCE Social Collaboration Services: early engineering brainstorming is creative, but chaotic. 3DEXPERIENCE Social Collaboration Services provide social media-style brainstorming in a collaborative, secure environment.

SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Services: created to demystify PLM, SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Services will support everything from change management to project planning in the most complete and scalable way possible.

SOLIDWORKS Product Designer: natively developed on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, SOLIDWORKS Product Designer brings a complete set of design capabilities including Parts, Assemblies, Sheet Metal, Motion Simulation, and Drawings.

SOLIDWORKS xDesign: perfect modeling application that runs in a browser, on any device and is also capable of providing you with optimal designs through the Design Guidance feature.

3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace Make: connects you with certified industrial manufacturing service providers from all over the world.

The 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace is going to be central to this next design renaissance. Forence Hu-Aubigny, Senior Vice-President, 3DEXPERIENCE Platform R&D, discussed how this project aims to create the largest industrial marketplace in the world. Marketplace Make connects designers and engineers (buyers) with industrial service providers (sellers) to turn designs into manufactured products. Try Marketplace Make today: https://make.3dexperience.3ds.com

In addition to Marketplace Make, the 3DEXPERIENCE Marketplace – Community & Enterprise Services provide a one-stop shop with millions of sourceable parts at your fingertips through Part Supply. You can try the Marketplace Part Supply here: https://partsupply.3dexperience.3ds.com

SOLIDWORKS xDesign has been discussed in previous years at SOLIDWORKS World. Now, Kishore Boyalakuntla brought SOLIDWORKS expert Ed Gebo to discuss his experience using xDesign over the past few months. Ed explained that anyone familiar with CAD can pick up the tool quickly and that it’s a great tool offering flexibility to run CAD anytime, anywhere, and on any device. Currently, about 20 users are experimenting with xDesign, but the plan is to reach 7,000 users by the end of 2018.

Ringbrothers, custom car designers, took the stage by storm with their 1,000-horsepower Javelin designed and manufactured in SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS CAM. Jim and Mike Ring explained that the transformation to digital manufacturing has helped them work better, easier, and faster. SOLIDWORKS CAM speeds things up and takes precision to another level. If you’re at #SWW18, stop by the manufacturing shop floor in the Product Showcase to see the digital manufacturing process come to life.

Richard Doyle, SOLIDWORKS Advocacy Marketing Senior Manager – aka, the SWUGN guy, took the stage to present this year’s SWUGN award winners:

SOLIDWORKS User Group of the Year: Northeast Ohio, Craig Riedel and Jerry Kassil


SOLIDWORKS User Group Leader of the Year and Michelle Pillers Award: Todd Blacksher

Richard also took time to honor a 20-year SOLIDWORKS World veteran attendee Phil Sluder. Phil has been at user sessions at World since ’99 and his tips and tricks sessions are legendary. SWW18 will feature Phil’s final SOLIDWORKS World presentation. Thank you for your service, Phil!

SOLIDWORKS World is full of amazing additive manufacturing and 3D printing stories. Stephen Nigro President, 3D Printing, HP Inc., shared news of the company’s new line of 3D printers set to democratize 3D printing. The new HP Jet Fusion 3D Printer Series enables you to get high-quality, production-level parts, on par with injection molding and CNC machines from a 3D printer. SOLIDWORKS technology will be leveraged to enable these printers to take advantage of unique voxel-level capabilities. Learn more the HP/SOLIDWORKS partnership by clicking here.

Finally, MIT Professor Neri Oxman closed the day’s general session with an introduction to the age of organism. This new bio-digital age, one of bits, atoms, and genes, moves from assembly to biology where products are grown. What a time to be alive.

Day one general session is in the books and we’ve only just scratched the service. Make sure to tune into day two’s general session beginning tomorrow at 8:30am PT. Click here to get a reminder: https://live.solidworks.com/ Missed any of the action from day one? Relive the presentation here and start to Think: Future.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS World 2018 General Session Recap: Day One appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 06, 2018 03:58 PM

SolidSmack

These Insane Lifelike Replicas of Animals Are Created by Hand with Paper and Wood

You know the book you’re reading is excellent when it escapes your imagination and enters the reality. Fan fiction, cosplay, recreations – these are just a few ways fans show their (sometimes creepy) appreciation for fictional worlds made up by an author.

But Zack Mclaughlin is more than just a fan – he’s an illustrator of children’s books that keep kids’ nightmares at bay. With stories including The Finding of Blue Bunny, Zack was inspired to take some time off to create a line of nature-inspired sculptures. You would be forgiven if you thought the animals from Paper & Wood were actual taxidermy projects.

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Before painstakingly carving each piece, Mclaughlin begins with in-depth research on the bird he is planning to replicate. During this stage, he grabs as many angles of the bird in question, finds their distinct shape and color pattern, and creates a blueprint to work off of.

As opposed to an actual taxidermy project, these sculptures start off as a wire, wood, or clay fixtures before being layered in paper-made hair and feathers. The outer covering is then painted to create the illusion that these birds will come alive and peck at you incessantly. The steps sound easy, but it takes about 30-120 hours to develop a single bird from scratch. As of now, he’s made owls, sparrows, birds of paradise, hummingbirds, robins—the list just keeps getting bigger.

Apart from flying animals, Mclaughlin has also branched out into smaller wire sculptures of wolves, horses, and rabbits. Considering he doesn’t have to make a wood carving or cover them in feathers, these may be easier to make than their flying brethren.

We may never see his children’s book get finished, but judging by how enthusiastic he is about his future projects, Zac Mclaughlin seems to have found his calling. You can find more of his works at the Paper & Wood webpage and on his Instagram page.

The post These Insane Lifelike Replicas of Animals Are Created by Hand with Paper and Wood appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 06, 2018 02:28 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: Field Notes Pocket Sketchbooks

When it comes to being at the right place at the right time, nothing beats that old saying, “the best camera is the camera you have with you.” Perhaps the same can be said for sketchbooks—the best sketchbook is the one you have with you when inspiration strikes.

Which is why the pocket-sized Field Notes have always been a favorite for designers and engineers. At just over $3 a pop, these no-fuss 48-page memo books are perfect for laying down rough ideas without worrying about wasting precious paper in a leather hardcover book. Plus, they’re the perfect size for throwing in a shoebox to keep a record of all those great ideas.

Field Notes Kraft Ruled 3-Pack — $9.95

Features:

  • Ruled Paper 48-page memo book
  • 3 Books per pack – banded and shrink-wrapped
  • Three great memo books worth fillin’ up with good information
  • Made in the USA

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: Field Notes Pocket Sketchbooks appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 06, 2018 01:47 PM

SolidSmack Radio | Part Lines From Paradise (Winter 2018 Edition)

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll get the groove going with “Headsgiving” from Porches before diving into sweet melodies from Deer Hunter, Adult Jazz, Magic Bronson, La Luz, and others before wrapping up with “Wassup (Uh Huh)” from Yoni & Geti. Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

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The post SolidSmack Radio | Part Lines From Paradise (Winter 2018 Edition) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 06, 2018 01:44 PM

Watch a Giant LEGO 2×4 Get Built From 133,000 Bricks

Like peanut butter and jelly or biscuits and gravy, the combination of YouTube and LEGO is a match made in heaven. For one, it gives block builders an epic platform to socialize and comment on hundreds (if not thousands) of builds. Second, it provides the rest of us a chance to sit back and relax while watching insanse 10,000+ piece models come to life through time-lapses in mere seconds. And with last week marking the 60th Anniversary of everybody’s favorite toy brick, you know we’re in for some pleasant surprises.

Among others, the LEGO Master Builders took over the Denmark-based company’s Connecticut-based US headquarters to build and document a giga-fantastic 10-feet-tall, 1,200-pound version of the “2×4” classic LEGO brick. In total, this ode to the perfect 2×4 injection-molded infinitely-snappable plastic part took the Master Builders 50 hours to build and contains over 133,000 LEGO bricks:

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For more ridiculous LEGO speed-model-building madness, be sure to check out the BrickBuilder channel on YouTube to watch everything from the Millenium Falcon to a LEGO Mack Truck come together in minutes:

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“Welcome to the largest, most detailed LEGO® Star Wars Millennium Falcon model we’ve ever created—in fact, with 7,500 pieces it’s one of our biggest LEGO models, period!”

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“Developed in partnership with Mack® Trucks Inc., this model comes with an array of realistic technical details and functions, including front-axle steering, rear wheel drive and a 6 cylinder straight engine with working pistons and spinning radiator fan.”

The post Watch a Giant LEGO 2×4 Get Built From 133,000 Bricks appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 06, 2018 01:32 PM

The Javelin Blog

Five reasons to avoid ‘Redirected Folders’ if you use SOLIDWORKS

Redirected Folders seemed like a good idea at the time?

If you are an IT administrator that is tasked with providing support to SOLIDWORKS users, one can often get caught up in the various conflicts that arise between SOLIDWORKS and it’s need for accessibility to the local system in order to function properly. This will most often manifest itself within high security environments as SOLIDWORKS bumps into the various tools, policies and practices that you choose to deploy, in order to keep the entirety of your user base safe from malicious intent. One technique you may choose to employ with your users is the concept of “Redirected Folders” driven by your Group Policy.

 

The intent behind this option of redirected folders is a first class plan – re-point a user’s most common directories to a server location where they can be backed up each night automatically, without any complex procedural steps that need to be taken by the user.

Default options for Redirected folders can include a user’s Application Data, Desktop, Documents or (My Documents).  The PicturesMusicVideos folders can also be set to follow the location of the Documents folder.  If desired the start menu folder can be included as well.

We end up bumping into trouble with SOLIDWORKS users as the default values for SOLIDWORKS file locations will typically fall under the locations that have been “Redirected” by Group Policy.

Top 5 Redirected Folder issues

Below are five of the most typical victims of this GPO and how they can affect SOLIDWORKS performance.

1. SOLIDWORKS sensitivity with NETWORK Locations:

We know that one of the best ways to optimize SOLIDWORKS performance is to have SOLIDWORKS read files from local storage, this is why PDM products for SOLIDWORKS seek to bring the files into a “Local Cache”.

If SOLIDWORKS has the majority of its file locations pointing to a redirected location, it will always be communicating across the network, continually lengthening the trip that is needed for communications between the SOLIDWORKS and any referenced files. The references in SOLIDWORKS are “Live” references, thus SOLIDWORKS seeks out the referenced files on an ongoing basis while working with all SOLIDWORKS files.

Any hiccups in network performance will have a direct impact on SOLIDWORKS performance when using network locations.

2. Logging of the SOLIDWORKS Journal File:

The Default Location for the SOLIDWORKS Journal file is:

C:\Users\CURRENT_USER\AppData\Roaming\SolidWorks\SOLIDWORKS 20xx

If the Application Data folders has been re-directed to a location on the network, we have witnessed specific issues involving the poor performance of the SOLIDWORKS interface.  Various releases of SOLIDWORKS have reported slow zoom and graphic performance for parts and assemblies if the Journal file is located in a network path.

3. Use of the APPLICATION DATA folder:

SOLIDWORKS uses the Application Data folder or %appdata% folder for many diagnostic operations as well as the storage for many of the “Favorites” (Hole Wizard Styles, Toolbox Favorites, Dimension/ Annotation favorites etc… ) locations that can be stored in SOLIDWORKS to quickly recall common settings.  If accessing any of the favorites locations is across the network, it will take longer to access features that were originally designed to save you time.

4. Increased Chance of FILE CORRUPTION:

As SOLIDWORKS Part, assembly & Drawing files are continually communicating with each other when one of their referenced files is opened, hosting the “Documents” or “My Documents” folder on the network encourages users (knowingly or not) to work across the network as a default. The risks of file corruption increases greatly for SOLIDWORKS files as communication between files is stretched across a network path. Any turbulence encountered in the communication can often see files which corrupt as part of the information that was meant to be saved in the file container does not reach the destination.

5. MISDIRECTED PDM CACHE (Local Vault View) Locations:

We have witnessed several instances of a local PDM Cache or “Vault View” being located within a user’s “Documents” folder that has been redirected to a network location.  This act completely nullifies any benefit that an implemented PDM system would have in regard to SOLIDWORKS performance.  In actual terms it would easily the quadruple the communication distance needed to have SOLIDWORKS communicate with referenced files as opposed to the way PDM is designed to work, which is to limit the network communication for files that you are actively working on.

In Conclusion:

After a review of the five points above, we would strongly suggest exploring other alternatives for automatic backup of files that may be stored on a users system.  There are many applications and techniques available to assist with this, including the native PDM Standard & PDM Professional products, which allow SOLIDWORKS to handle data as it was designed to do, and avoid any of the unpleasantries above.

The post Five reasons to avoid ‘Redirected Folders’ if you use SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at February 06, 2018 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018 Classification Management

Probably the most anticipated development of SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018. Users can now create classes and sub classes. The classification can be fully defined and are searchable fields in the project environment.

Classification Management in SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018

Classification Management in SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018

Where can the feature be found:

SOLIDWORKS Electrical  > Library > Classification Manager

Classification Management rules:

  1. Existing classes will remain and cannot be modified
  2. New classes and sub-classes can be added to the existing top level of the database/classification tree
  3. Each classification will have 7 manufacturer specific data fields that can be configured
  4. Archive your classification environment before any upgrades or new installs

Watch our SOLIDWORKS 2018 Launch Broadcast

Javelin’s team of Certified SOLIDWORKS experts unveiled the new software in a live broadcast. Watch a recording of the broadcast to see technical demonstrations and tutorials on how to use the new software. Click here to learn more about SOLIDWORKS 2018

The post SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2018 Classification Management appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Delvin Masilamani at February 06, 2018 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Additive Manufacturing Takes a Step Closer to Mainstream at SOLIDWORKS World- Part 1

SOLIDWORKS World 2017 saw the introduction of SOLIDWORKS CAM and the start of SOLIDWORKS doing manufacturing. SOLIDWORKS World 2018 featured a “shop floor experience” showing the Design to Manufacturing workflow that SOLIDWORKS enables, manufacturing parts live in the Partner Pavilion. But cutting material to make parts is not the only way to make things anymore. Additive Manufacturing, or 3D Printing, is reaching a maturity where it is not just for prototypes anymore. This has never been as evident as at this year’s SOLIDWORKS World.

Even before the event got going, Rize Inc. announced an add-in for SOLIDWORKS. The team at Rize put it together in a very short amount of time but did a great job. No more saving files as STLs and opening them in the Rize software. The new add-in does it all in one click. From CAD to print prep software with the click of a button. Then with Rize’s printer, the support structures peel off like Velcro so the workflow is easy from both pre-processing and post-processing 3D prints.

On Day 1, Stephen Nigro, President of HP Inc’s 3D printing business was on stage talking to Gian Paolo Bassi about their new printer enabling full color prints, and announcing the start of a collaboration with us at SOLIDWORKS to enable voxel-level design. This is a particularly interesting capability of 3D printing that their machines will support in future. Not only can you color each voxel of material (a voxel is best described as a 3D pixel) but in future, you will be able to tailor the material properties of each drop. That means one part which has impact absorbing properties one end, high stiffness at the other and maybe something else in between!

Later on, Sindoh got a mention for their work in collaboration with both the Apps for Kids team and also Xdesign. The same approach was taken to allow designs from Apps for Kids or Xdesign to be printed on any Sindoh printer connected to the web. This sounds much more straight-forward than it actually is behind the scenes and that is testament to what a great job the collaboration has provided.

In the partner pavilion, attendees were treated to 19 3D print-related exhibitors to visit. This ranged from the printer manufacturers to service providers and software to make the workflow easier. The industry stalwarts 3D Systems and Stratasys were joined by the new startups like Desktop Metal and Rize. The Xometry booth was as popular as ever, particularly with their X-shaped fidget spinners as a giveaway.  Big Rep made their first appearance at a SOLIDWORKS World as did 3DHubs and Atlas 3D. Ultimaker, Formlabs, Markforged were also there along with 3D Platform, Sindoh, Makerbot and HP 3D.

 

Author information

Mark Rushton
Mark Rushton
Mark is a Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS.

The post Additive Manufacturing Takes a Step Closer to Mainstream at SOLIDWORKS World- Part 1 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mark Rushton at February 06, 2018 08:05 AM

February 05, 2018

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Microsoft Surface and SOLIDWORKS Transform how Ringbrothers Build Hot Rods

Start your engines, folks. The Microsoft Surface team is ready to roll on the ground here in Los Angeles for SOLIDWORKS World 2018. The opportunity to listen and learn from the thousands of engineers and designers who live and breathe SOLIDWORKS helps build the type of devices can bring their creations to life.

SOLIDWORKS World attracts individuals and businesses that create all kinds of awesome, innovative products – including some fancy hot rods. If you love classic cars, keep your eyes peeled for Ringbrothers.

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Ringbrothers hails from small-town Wisconsin to take the keynote stage and showcase how they used SOLIDWORKS on a Surface Book 2 and Surface Studio to redesign, recreate and rebuild a 1972 AMC Javelin. The Javelin, unveiled at SEMA Show 2017, is a true work of art that proves just how valuable the right hardware and software is for engineers.

If you missed Ringbrothers in the General Session – don’t worry. The Surface team had the chance to sit down with Product Development Specialist Matt Moseman to learn more about the Javelin, his work at Ringbrothers and how technology is changing the way engineers and designers work.

Q&A: Ringbrothers’ Matt Moseman

Tell me about Ringbrothers and your role on the team.

Ringbrothers is an automotive restoration company in Spring Green, Wisconsin specializing in customized auto parts and restoration of classic vehicles. I work with an incredible 15-person team to design, prototype, and manufacture products and unique pieces of automotive jewelry. Someone will bring in a vehicle from the 70s and our goal is to maintain that heritage while bringing modern technology and materials to it.

What’s your design process and ethos? What did your process look like previously?

I use Surface for everything – from reading e-mails to creating assemblies in SOLIDWORKS. In the past, we took a vision from a napkin to paper then tried to recreate it on a device. Surface enhances our creativity and helps us collaborate better as a team. We can offer our teammates and clients a more hands-on experience while creating and interacting with the device, providing tweaks and suggestions in real-time.

At the end of the day, it’s really about how the team culture and environment contributes to our collective design process. Everyone plays a role in the creation of these vehicles, whether we’re creating the parts and bolting wheels on the cars to changing oil. We don’t believe in titles or barriers between teams. Having everyone work elbow-to-elbow streamlines the process from design to manufacturing and breaks the communication barrier, shortening the time to market.

What’s the story behind the Javelin? What value did Surface and SOLIDWORKS offer as you and the team built it from concept to creation?

Prestone asked us to build a car to commemorate its 90th anniversary and unveil it at SEMA 2017. They wanted a vehicle that aligns with their brand and culture – a classic that embodies the rich American history and automotive innovation. The 1972 AMC Javelin was the perfect fit. We built the Javelin in less than 10 months and it was the first vehicle we went completely digital on with SOLIDWORKS on Surface.

The entire process was made more efficient with the release of SOLIDWORKS 2018 and the functionality offered by Surface. We worked with Gary Ragle, an incredible auto designer, to generate the renderings and leveraged SOLIDWORKS on Surface devices to design prototype parts that are 3D printed. Given the short runway to SEMA, every area we could save time was crucial. Everything we do is power intensive and Surface Studio and Surface Book 2 easily handled these tasks and allowed us to maintain our workflow, stay in the zone, and ultimately create higher quality products.

As you can see, Microsoft Surface and SOLIDWORKS 2018 make the perfect combination of hardware and software to help engineers like Matt bring their creations to life. The benefits of using SOLIDWORKS on a premium device like Surface are endless. Whether you’re drawing freehand with Surface Pen to create usable sketch geometry, using Surface Dial to rotate a part on different axes or using touch to intuitively magnify the details in your assembly, SOLIDWORKS 2018 lets you find new heights of creativity and productivity.

Check out the Microsoft Surface Booth (#401) to see how devices like Surface Book 2 can run intensive workloads like SOLIDWORKS Topology Optimization Simulation.

Thank you to the Microsoft Surface team and Ringbrothers for a great partnership and time here in Los Angeles. We are excited to see what else the talented SOLIDWORKS community creates on Surface!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Microsoft Surface and SOLIDWORKS Transform how Ringbrothers Build Hot Rods appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 05, 2018 08:15 PM

Improving the Design-to-Manufacture Process

There has been a lot of conversation lately about a design-to-manufacture workflow as it relates to improving communication and efficiency within a company. What does design to manufacture mean? The short answer is that there are lots of different thoughts on this process. The one that is correct is the one that works best for your company and procedures.

Our version of this method focuses on the reduction of extra steps as an idea goes from concept through validation to the customer. The National Institute of Standards and Technology recently released a study about improving the reuse of data and resulting annual savings for companies. It is estimated that annual cost savings and the percentage of reduction in production costs are 57.4 billion dollars annually.

So how do these savings happen? One of the main identified reasons for the savings is better communication and data reuse. A good example is using SOLIDWORKS as the center of the process. At a previous job, we implemented a digital design-to-manufacturing workflow using SOLIDWORKS as the center of our digital universe. All designs or customer concepts started in SOLIDWORKS PDM. All the information was stored in our design team to create the concept or idea and process the quote. Once an order was made for a customer, the designers created all the necessary specifications and got approval before starting the manufacturing process. After the customer signed off on the design, our programmers, and processing planning/order management used PDM to create orders for hardware and create toolpaths. All of the data revolved around the designed components. Hardware was ordered from BOMs in PDM. Programming for CNC equipment was created from the original CAD files using NestingWorks and CAMWorks 2.5 axis (this would now be SOLIDWORKS CAM Professional). All of the data was linked to the unique designs.

If a revision was needed, we controlled the change through PDM, and all the necessary information was updated including any CAM programming information. The final installation drawings and onsite planning info were created while manufacturing was building the product to make sure the final drawings shipped with the equipment to the customer. By creating a digital world, we were able to shorten the design and build process by weeks over traditional workflows. The main reason was that manufacturing could start making components earlier in the design process vs. waiting until all of the drawings were created. By programming from the SOLIDWORKS models, we were able to reduce the number of details needed in a traditional 2D illustration. We only had to identify high tolerance areas, which could be done in 3D to notify the programmer.

The unintended benefit of this transformation and process was that design and manufacturing started to speak in a common language, SOLIDWORKS. As our team became more proficient with SOLIDWORKS, our engineers and programmers began talking about extrudes, sketches, and planes to communicate issues versus work offsets, clamps, and you just don’t get what I am saying. This common language made it easier to make changes and understand where roadblocks were popping up and slowing down our efficiency. This evolution of the design-to-manufacturing process did not happen overnight and did have some growing pains, but the result was better than anticipated in the end.

As companies evolve and look to be more efficient and innovative in their manufacturing processes, the most significant improvements will happen in the digital workflows. All CNC machines run at the same speeds and feeds anywhere in the world; the difference between companies is how well they process information from concept through shipping. To learn more about SOLIDWORKS CAM and the Design-to-Manufacture workflow, please use the following link: https://launch.solidworks.com/design-to-manufacture-in-solidworks-2018/

Author information

Mike Buchli
Mike Buchli
Mike is a Senior SolidWorks Product & Portfolio Manager at Dassault Systèmes

The post Improving the Design-to-Manufacture Process appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mike Buchli at February 05, 2018 07:39 PM

SOLIDWORKS xDesign Launch Announced at SOLIDWORKS World 2018

On day one of SOLIDWORKS World 2018, SOLIDWORKS CEO, Gian Paolo Bassi took the stage to announce launch of SOLIDWORKS xDesign. The announcement was followed by conversation with SOLIDWORKS User Group Leader Edson Gebo. Ed has been using SOLIDWORKS xDesign for a little over two months. According to Ed Gebo, SOLIDWORKS xDesign has a very short learning curve and he was able to get up and running from zero to productive in a less than half a day.

Built on Dassault Systemes 3DEXPERIENCE Platform, SOLIDWORKS xDesign brings 3D CAD to any browser that supports webGL. SOLIDWORKS xDesign users will be able to author, edit, and collaborate with each other when building their 3D CAD models, without the need for powerful workstations. SOLIDWORKS xDesign shares its data model with other apps on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. This allows users to easily extend their portfolio of tools as their business grows and their designs evolve, letting them seamlessly scale their design and manufacturing process using the full power of the 3DEXPERIENCE Product Portfolio.

So what are some of the philosophies that are at the core of SOLIDWORKS xDesign. We’re glad you asked!

No installation required!

To get access to SOLIDWORKS xDesign, all you need is a web browser and login credentials. This allows for near instantaneous deployment, allowing companies to quickly add to their CAD portfolio as and when the need arises.

Available anytime, anywhere, on any device

A browser-based product makes it easy to design and access design anytime, anywhere and on any device, including mobile devices and non-Windows devices.

Simple to use

SOLIDWORKS xDesign is created with the end user experience in mind. CAD and non CAD users alike, can get running with minimal or no training. Innovative features that improve workflow include Design Guidance, Superfeature, Cloud 3DPrint, connectivity to FabLab environment and more..

Embedded Data Management

With SOLIDWORKS xDesign, all models are stored and managed on the cloud, iterations are created providing the user with a scalable data management capability out of the box – no deployments and set-up of traditional PDM systems.

Scalability

SOLIDWORKS xDesign shares the same data model as the rich portfolio of 3DEXPERIENCE roles and applications, such as SOLIDWORKS Industrial Designer, Product Designer and others. This allows users to easily extend their portfolio of tools as their business grows and their designs evolve. Whether you are a two-person startup or a multinational enterprise, this lets you seamlessly scale your design and manufacturing process using the full power of the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

Security

SOLIDWORKS xDesign is hosted on infrastructure owned and operated by Dassault Systemes.  After being in business for more than 35 years, and gaining the trust of more than 200,000 companies worldwide. Considering multi-million dollar annual investments in the infrastructure and security, DS 3DEXPERIENCE cloud services are here to stay. They are trusted. They are secure. They are here to protect you and your business.

Stay tuned – coming soon – a new blog about other great SOLIDWORKS xDesign capabilities – Design Guidance, Superfeature, Cloudprint and more.

Author information

Shyam Venugopal
Shyam Venugopal
Shyam is a Product Portfolio Manager at SOLIDWORKS. He has a Master's degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Texas and an MBA from Boston University. He has worked as an applications engineer for the microelectronics/semiconductor industry and has been with SOLIDWORKS since 2012.

The post SOLIDWORKS xDesign Launch Announced at SOLIDWORKS World 2018 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Shyam Venugopal at February 05, 2018 07:38 PM

HP and Dassault Systèmes Collaborate to Unleash the Next Generation of 3D Design Innovation for Additive Manufacturing

Today at SOLIDWORKS World HP Inc. and Dassault Systèmes announced their collaboration to empower a new era of product design innovation by entrepreneurs, makers, students and businesses. The two companies intend to optimize SOLIDWORKS 3D design and engineering applications to take advantage of the unique voxel-level capabilities of HP’s Multi Jet Fusion 3D printing solutions. Designers and engineers can completely reimagine products, leverage new materials, escape the limitations of traditional manufacturing, and produce new products more quickly and efficiently.

Powered by Dassault Systèmes’ 3DEXPERIENCE platform, SOLIDWORKS applications support the complete design-through-manufacturing process, enabling innovators to rethink their approach to how parts and products are made. Millions of designers and engineers use SOLIDWORKS applications to quickly bring innovative ideas for new consumer experiences to market.

HP is the world’s leading provider of plastic production 3D printers. Its Multi Jet Fusion 3D printing technology revolutionizes design, prototyping, and manufacturing with its unique ability to control part properties at the individual voxel level. This enables the design and production of previously unconceivable parts and, in the future, products with multiple physical properties such as variable stiffness and flexibility, numerous colors and textures, and electrical conductivity and communications.

HP and Dassault Systèmes will align future technology roadmaps to ensure that users have access to the latest design tools integrated with HP’s voxel-level technology, as well as design tools for new materials. This roadmap includes upcoming releases of the SOLIDWORKS portfolio to support the full-color capabilities of HP’s newly released Jet Fusion 300 / 500 series of 3D printers. Both companies are strong supporters of the 3MF standard to ensure reliable exchange of color information for 3D printing. They will continue to test, validate, and support 3MF for their solutions to assure accuracy of information exchange across the manufacturing workflow.

“The $12 trillion manufacturing market is being digitally transformed and HP and Dassault Systèmes share a vision to change the way the world designs and manufactures,” said Stephen Nigro, President of 3D Printing, HP Inc. “Some of the world’s greatest innovations spawn from the ideas of students, researchers, educators, and entrepreneurs. We are honored to bring the HP Multi Jet Fusion platform together with SOLIDWORKS’ leading design platform and millions of users worldwide to give creators the the tools to build the next great innovations.”

“Innovators are driving tomorrow’s industry renaissance, and additive manufacturing, new materials and 3DEXPERIENCE twins are opening up a world of possibilities where they can test and create their concepts,” said Gian Paolo Bassi, CEO, SOLIDWORKS, Dassault Systèmes. “Our investments in materials science combined with HP’s open approach to materials development are the foundation of a successful partnership between Dassault Systèmes and HP. Together we can expand on the technologies of both companies and collaboratively research new tools around materials science and the development of new materials. Innovators can stretch the limits of imagination, invent and reinvent, further the art of manufacturing and ultimately pursue sustainable innovation for products, nature and life.”

Changing the Way the World Designs and Manufactures

In addition to the HP Jet Fusion 300 / 500 series, HP also announced its new workstation, VR, and 3D printing and scanning products and services. Attendees at SOLIDWORKS World can experience the industry’s most comprehensive end-to-end solutions for every phase of the 3D product design and production process at HP’s booth #301.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post HP and Dassault Systèmes Collaborate to Unleash the Next Generation of 3D Design Innovation for Additive Manufacturing appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at February 05, 2018 05:59 PM

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Technology Preview – Part 1

The SOLIDWORKS 2019 TECHNOLOGY PREVIEW is always one of the highlights of SOLIDWORKS World. Users love getting a “sneak peek” at some of the new features coming in the next release and the Product Introduction Team always seems to find a unique and interesting way demonstrate the new features. This year’s edition takes you “Behind the Scenes and Behind the Screens” to share how the SOLIDWORKS World Skit gets created, personalities of everyone on the team, and insider information, like how we decide what demos to share, what we say, and even where Model Mania® Parts come from.

The skit for SOLIDWORKS World 2018 actually began on Saturday with the “accidental” posting of the wrong poster to Social Media and putting up the incorrect banners around the LA Convention Center spreading the word:

“This year the skit starts on Day 1”

 

In the first installment of the skit, Gian Paolo emphatically ends the production of the Star Wars Sequel. This created significant stress for Megan and Yan who quickly write DEMO-Lition and create some drama by cutting Jeremy Regnerus from this year’s edition. Needless to say, this new script was not well received by Ian Pilkington either, who was banking on another leading role in the SOLIDWORKS World skit. After repeated takes, Ian finally delivered a “good take” demonstration including:

Save Assembly as Multi Body Part enhancements

  • Remove internal components using a slider bar
  • Specify bounding box sizes to include or exclude individual components
  • Exclude all toolbox components with a single selection
  • Assembly mass properties can be transferred to the part
  • Settings can be saved as System options

Multi-Body Part Interference Checking

  • Works exactly as you’d expect
  • Supports Weldments

External Reference UI improvements

  • Highlight and break/lock references on a feature–by-feature basis (previously it was only possible to do this on a part-by-part basis)

  • Isolate components with external references

  • Break or lock external reference from the feature manager using the dynamic references tool

DeNoiser in SOLIDWORKS Visualize

  • Built on innovative new AI technology from NVIDIA
  • Visualize uses machine learning to analyze the scene, find, and remove noise
  • Drastic – 10X improvements in rendering performance

 

By the time Day 1 General Session was finished, the Posters had been changed out and the social media content updated. Stay tuned for more on Day 2.

 

This concludes Part 1 of the 2018 Skit Blog… stay tuned, tomorrow we’ll continue with the developments from SOLIDWORKS World General Session Day 2 and see what else the Product Introduction team can sneak out from the developers and share.

TO BE CONTINUTED…………………………………

* As a reminder, this IS a TECHNOLOGY PREVIEW and features / functionality are always changing until fully vetted and not guaranteed to be in the next release.

Author information

Kurt Anliker
Kurt Anliker
Kurt is the Director of Product Introduction at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post SOLIDWORKS 2019 Technology Preview – Part 1 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Kurt Anliker at February 05, 2018 05:45 PM

SolidSmack

The Monday List 06.18 | What We’re Reading This Week

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

How GE Went From American Icon to Astonishing Mess

Famous for great management, General Electric is staring down a plunging share price, a federal investigation, and possible breakup.

Women Once Ruled the Computer World. When Did Silicon Valley Become Brotopia?

How the tech industry sabotaged itself and its own pipeline of talent.

The Hidden Drama of Speedskating

At first glance, speedskating couldn’t be more boring. Two participants on metal blades glide round and around an oval ice track, and no sooner do they cross the finish line then a new pair is sent off to repeat the performance.

Our Online Identity Crisis

Social Media, Virtual Reality & Why It’s Time We Face Ourselves.

The Medieval Roots of Bro Culture

Our cavalier approach to sexual consent goes back more than 500 years

Brain Stimulation Is All the Rage—But It May Not Stimulate the Brain

Research indicates that techniques fail to trigger the type of brain activity thought to produce therapeutic benefits.

The post The Monday List 06.18 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 05, 2018 02:37 PM

The Javelin Blog

Practical Values for approximating “Zero Radius” bends in SOLIDWORKS

I am as sure as the words posted here that every sheet metal designer has been asked to fudge some values to represent a “SOLIDWORKS Zero Radius” bend or a “SOLIDWORKS Sharp Corner” at some point along the way.

As it turns out there is a procedure for ensuring sharp corners in SOLIDWORKS, however it leans more toward a work-around modeling method, which won’t always apply to your design scenario.

Strictly speaking you can enter 0.001mm or 0.00003937in as a tiny default bend radius, as these are the minimum values that SOLIDWORKS will accept. (FYI – SOLIDWORKS is converting everything in metric in the background)

Those values MAY work on parts that don’t have an odd angles, but once you add angular geometry to the component, the bend areas become too small and often fail with the complexity of the geometry.

SOLIDWORKS Zero Radius Not Complex - Complex Bend Bent Challenge Area

Most often the use of the absolute minimum bend radius values will result in an error during the flattening process:

"This part contains features that cannot be unbent."

This is generally due to the transition being too severe for SOLIDWORKS to interpolate the difference at the bend location.

One suggestion is to slightly increase the values away from the absolute minimum:

I suggest starting with values of 0.025mm or 0.0001in and increasing those values if the bend area continues to fail.

This will provide the complex transition more room to work with and alleviate the errors.

You won’t see any visible difference, and the component will not be any easier to dimension, however the use of these slightly larger values will allow you to maintain the appearance of a sharp corner without the errors in the feature tree when attempting to unfold the component.

The post Practical Values for approximating “Zero Radius” bends in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at February 05, 2018 01:00 PM