Planet SolidWorks

June 18, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation: Flow Freezing

Reaching a Steady-State

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation allows for the simulation of steady-state and transient heat transfer problems.  A steady-state analysis is run to determine how the heat transfer of a system stabilizes (i.e. becomes unchanging). A steady-state solution does not inform the analyst of how much time it takes for the system to stabilize. However, a transient heat transfer analysis can be run to determine the amount of time for the system to reach steady-state.

Drawback

The drawback with running a transient heat transfer problem is that the calculation can take a long time to complete. This is due to the SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation solver using very small time steps to march through the calculation. The time step used by the solver can be adjusted manually, but specifying too large of a time step can cause solver stability problems during the calculation.

One potential issue with using a manual time step is that the solution may march along with no problems and then all of a sudden the system temperatures spike to unreasonably high values and the solver terminates with a “Solver Abnormally Terminated” error message. This is the main reason why the solver automatically uses small time steps to help ensure solution stability.

There is a SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation solver option which can be enabled called Flow Freezing.  This option can be used to help speed up both steady-state and transient heat transfer calculations.

Flow Freezing

Flow freezing allows for the specification of parameters to minimize the CPU time needed for the solution.  This is done by freezing values of all flow parameters, with the exception of fluid and solid temperatures and fluid substances concentrations (if multiple substances are considered in the analysis).  These parameters usually converge more slowly as compared to other flow parameters.  So when flow freezing is active, the solid and fluid temperatures, as well as substance concentrations, are calculated at each iteration.  The other flow parameters are assumed static or unchanging when flow freezing is active.

How to Enable Flow Freezing

Flow freezing can be enabled from within the Calculation Control Options dialogue window.

Flow Freezing Settings

There are two strategies that can be used – Periodic and Permanent.

Periodic

The periodic strategy allows the user to configure when flow freezing starts, the period it is active, the period it is inactive and optionally the specification of a manual time step to use when flow freezing is active.  The start value can be set to use a unit of travel, iteration or physical time (if time-dependent is enabled in the General Settings dialogue window).  The freezing period and no freezing period value use iteration as the unit.  Beginning from the Start moment, the calculation is performed with freezing enabled for the interval specified in Freezing period.  Then freezing is disabled for the interval specified in No freezing period.  After this, the flow freezing is enabled again and so on until the calculation finishes.

 

Permanent

The permanent strategy includes settings to denote when flow freezing starts (unit of travel, iteration, or physical time) and optionally the specification of a manual time step to use when flow freezing is active.  Beginning from the Start moment, the calculation is performed with freezing enabled until the calculation finishes.

Result Comparison

I ran two natural convection transient analyses of a heat sink with an applied heat source to the bottom surface.  The first analysis was run without flow freezing enabled and using the auto time step setting.  The second analysis was run using the same base setup but with flow freezing enabled.  I set the physical time setting for both analyses to 1,500 seconds.  The first analysis took over 17 hours to run and more than 50,000 iterations (Fig. 1).  The second analysis took a little over 25 minutes to run and just over 1,100 iterations (Fig. 2).  This equates to the first analysis taking over 40 times longer to complete.

Fig. 1: First Analysis (auto time step)

Fig. 2: Second Analysis (flow freezing enabled)

 

The maximum solid temperature of the heat sink obtained was very close to each other between the two different analyses.

Fig. 3: Maximum Solid Temperature for First Analysis (auto time step)


Fig. 4: Maximum Solid Temperature for Second Analysis (flow freezing enabled)

 

 

 

 

 

Author information

GoEngineer
GoEngineer delivers software, technology and expertise that enable companies to unlock design innovation and deliver better products faster. With more than 30 years experience and thousands of customers in high tech, medical, machine design, energy and other industries, GoEngineer provides best-in-class design solutions from SOLIDWORKS, Stratasys, CAMWorks, Altium and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM). For more information, visit goengineer.com.

The post SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation: Flow Freezing appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GoEngineer at June 18, 2018 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Concept to Consumer Tour Will Break Down Lifecycle of URB-E Project

“Efficient Design with Layout Sketching” -Todd Trein

In the very beginning stages of design, ideas are commonly sketched out on paper; also known as “napkin sketches” due to the common practice of sketching at the local watering hole. This convenient method is ideal for visualizing our thoughts quickly but doesn’t allow us to prove out positioning and motion behaviors. A major design requirement for URB-E from the onset was to minimize the footprint in its stored position while maintaining the ideal wheelbase for stability and maneuverability.

Using SOLIDWORKS CAD, URB-E was able to utilize the powerful 2D Layout sketch functionality within an assembly to optimize this desired folding motion. Sketch blocks representing the key components of the design were used not only to validate the linkage positions and lengths, but this sketch geometry drove the downstream 3D design of assemblies and components.  Let’s take a look at how to get started with Layout Sketching.

“The major advantage of designing an assembly using a layout sketch is that if you change the layout sketch, the assembly and its parts are automatically updated. You can make changes quickly, and in one place.” – SOLIDWORKS Help File

To get started with a Layout Sketch, begin with a new assembly. From the “create new assembly dialogue”, you will see the option to “create a new layout sketch”.  If you miss this or if you are working with an existing assembly, you can select the “Create Layout” Command from the layout tab on the command manager.

Once we are active in the layout sketch, let’s create the initial layout design of the scooter linkages, using traditional sketch tools we already use every day, such as construction lines as shown below.

The next step is to identify sketch entities that will behave as individual components or subassemblies within the design. Multi-Select these groups of sketch entities and then use the “Make Block” command from the pop-up toolbar (this command is also found in the command manager).

PRO TIP: Blocks enable you to:

  • Create layout sketches using a minimum of dimensions and relations.

  • Freeze a subset of entities in a sketch to manipulate as a single entity.

  • Manage complex sketches.

  • Edit all instances of a block simultaneously.

 

Before we continue on with our concept layout, it’s worth noting another great use for blocks when designing in SOLIDWORKS.  Many new designs incorporate some number of existing components from previous designs. For example, we are going to reuse an existing seat that has been used in other models of the URB-E. For this reuse of commonly used components, blocks can easily be saved to the design library for future layout assemblies.This speeds up the layout process and ensures that we have an accurate representation. Additionally, when inserting the block from the library, you can select the option to “link to file”. This way, if there is ever an update to that particular seat design all existing designs referencing that block will reflect the change in geometry.

During the layout sketching process and block creation, SOLIDWORKS Motion can also be used to add motors and actuators to investigate the kinematic response, or we can also use inverse kinematics to help drive the design. From here, valuable information such as angular and linear displacements, trace paths and other data can be obtained to validate the conceptual design well before moving into a detailed, 3D model.

Now that the 2D concept design has been completed and validated, we can move forward to the 3D modeling portion of the design. Using the layout sketch and sketch blocks as the basis of the design, the geometry starts to form shape and come to life!

Do you want to see more on how the SOLIDWORKS solution has helped companies like URB-E bring products to market with fast and efficient workflows?  Register now for the Creation in Motion | Concept to Consumer Tour at a city near you!

 

 

Author information

Todd Trein
Todd Trein
Area Technical Manager at SOLIDWORKS
Todd is a Senior Area Technical Manager at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORK based out of Minneapolis, MN and has been using SOLIDWORKS since 1998. Prior to joining the SOLIDWORKS Team in 2005, Todd was a Product Design Engineer at Weber-Stephen Products (the outdoor grill company). In his spare time he enjoys outdoor activities, spending time with his family and snowmobiling.

The post Concept to Consumer Tour Will Break Down Lifecycle of URB-E Project appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Todd Trein at June 18, 2018 12:30 PM

The Javelin Blog

Generating all SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Sizes in One Step when using a Customized Toolbox

The SOLIDWORKS Toolbox add-in uses a database to store information on available SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Sizes and Properties of hardware.  The database is linked to a master part file for each type of hardware.  In a new Toolbox, master part files will start with only a Default configuration.  As you add the Toolbox components into an assembly, it automatically generates the size as either a new configuration in the master part or as a separate part file (depending on the Toolbox User Settings).

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Default Configuration

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Default Configuration

If you have customized your Toolbox (using the Toolbox Configure tool), you have the ability to generate all of the selected sizes of a component in one step.  This can improve performance in a shared environment with a small set of SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Sizes for a component so they don’t need to be generated on first use.

WARNING: This should only be done by a Toolbox Administrator and with a Toolbox that has been configured to include just the fasteners that are required.  Using these steps on a default Toolbox can create thousands of parts or configurations for a single component.  The Toolbox should be configured in such a way that only the required sizes and types are enabled, with the majority disabled.

Create All Configurations

If the Toolbox User Settings are set to Create Configurations, browse to the hardware type and select the drop down icon in the top right corner of the table to Create Configurations.

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Create Configurations User Settings

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Create Configurations User Settings

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Sizes

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Create All Configurations

Create All Parts

If the Toolbox User Settings are set to Create Parts, browse to the hardware type and select the drop down icon in the top right corner of the table to Create Parts.

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Create Parts User Settings

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Create Parts User Settings

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Create All Parts

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Create All Parts

The post Generating all SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Sizes in One Step when using a Customized Toolbox appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at June 18, 2018 12:00 PM

June 16, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

The Misaligned Mate in SOLIDWORKS 2018

The Misaligned Mate is a new mate introduced to the mating ecosystem in SOLIDWORKS 2018. In short, it’s a pair of concentric mates that have been relaxed so that the axes aren’t perfectly in line. Meaning that components that do not have identical hole centres can now be mated to one another.

An example of this could be imported, or “bought in” components, where modifying the centre to centre dimensions is not viable. Let’s look at an example of a sink and a mixer tap, where the holes in the sink are 145mm centre to centre, while the tap is 150mm centre to centre. In terms of absolutes, there is a 5mm disparity between tap pipe and sink hole centres. Prior to SOLIDWORKS 2018 fully defining the two components via concentric mates would be impossible and a workaround would have to be employed.

However, in reality a 16mm pipe in a 25mm hole means you can move the pipe up to 4.5mm off centre in any direction:

Misaligned Mate SolidWorks - below

 

Meaning in this example the holes on the sink could vary anywhere between 136 and 154mm, and the tap would still fit…

 

Misaligned Mate SolidWorks - below

 

…and this is where the Misaligned Mate comes in: With SOLIDWORKS 2018 we can apply a concentric mate to one pipe/hole set:

 

Misaligned Mate SolidWorks - below

 

Then when we attempt to apply one to the other set we get an additional line in the pop-up menu giving the option to make it misaligned:

 

Misaligned Mate SolidWorks - below

 

Toggling this on then activates the pull-down menu next to it giving three options:

  • Align This Mate‘ – aligns the current mate; pushing all misalignment on the first (linked) coincident mate.
  • Align Linked Mate‘ – aligns the first (linked) mate and all the misalignment is placed on the current mate.
  • Symmetric‘ – splits the misalignment between the two.

 

Misaligned Mate SolidWorks - below

 

For the purposes of this example the symmetric option is the one to go for as the disparity between centres is too great to be accommodated all at one end:

 

Misaligned Mate SolidWorks - below

 

Finish off with a standard coincident mate and it looks fine from above:

 

Misaligned Mate SolidWorks - below

 

And from underneath we can see the pipes are easily accommodated by the holes in the sink:

 

Misaligned Mate SolidWorks - below

 

There is one thing to note however -While this is an excellent and (by some) long awaited addition to the mating system, it is not fool proof. There is the provision of a ‘Maximum deviation’ within the properties (the default value being 12.7mm) so you can set that to help avoid interference. If set correctly the mate will error if the combined deviation is greater than the maximum set. In this case the holes in the sink have been set at a centre to centre of 135mm resulting in a deviation of 7.5mm per hole, a total of 15mm causing the mates to error:

 

Misaligned Mate SolidWorks - below

 

Setting the maximum deviation is easy enough. You can do it for the entire document in Tools > Options > Document Properties > Mates. You can also specify the default mate behaviour – ‘Align first concentric mate‘, ‘Align second concentric mate‘, or ‘Symmetric‘.

 

Misaligned Mate SolidWorks - below

 

Or you can apply a value to a specific mate. After applying the Misaligned mate, edit either of the linked concentric mates (click on it in the Feature tree and select ‘Edit feature’ from the pop up menu)>Untick the ‘Use Document Property’ and then specify the desired value in the Maximum deviation box.

 

Misaligned Mate SolidWorks - below

 

You can also disable the feature completely from the System Options: Tools > Options > System Options > Assemblies, and untick ‘Allow creation of misaligned mates’.

 

Misaligned Mate SolidWorks - below

 

However, if you keep them active and neglect to set the maximum deviation or set it incorrectly and this results in the maximum value being greater than the tolerance the components afford you (as with this example where the sink has been modified so the holes are a little further apart) the pipes will clash with the sink, but the misaligned mate won’t error.

 

Misaligned Mate SolidWorks - below

 

So treat it with care, use interference detection between the components after mating them and remember – with great power comes great responsibility!

 


We hope you found that useful!

Have you seen our blog archive where we have posted plenty of helpful articles? We also have a fantastic video library filled with easy-to-follow videos on a number of topics inspired by other SOLIDWORKS users – take a look. Also, don’t forget to follow Innova Systems on Twitter for daily bite size SOLIDWORKS tips, tricks and videos.

Author information

Innova Systems
We specialise in the supply, technical support and training of SOLIDWORKS software. Based in Cambridge we have a central location to service a UK wide customer base. We offer the skills and experience to help you develop new products using SOLIDWORKS - empowering smarter, faster and more cost effective design. We've been recognised by SOLIDWORKS Corporation for providing the highest rated customer support in Northern Europe in 2014, 2015 and 2016. Email: info@innova-systems.co.uk / Telephone: 01223 200690.

The post The Misaligned Mate in SOLIDWORKS 2018 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Innova Systems at June 16, 2018 03:00 PM

June 15, 2018

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Blistered Tentacle Bags

Ivan-Tantsiura-art

10 bags of blistered tentacles crawled their way through the corridor. Eyes bulging against the cloudy sack to peer deep into the darkness of the chasm that rent the ship in two and caused the escape of these links.

Ivan Tantsiura – Exceptionally minimal scenes of concept ships. And then you get an enjoyable smattering of robots, facilities, and more.

Strike Your Fancy – What happens when cats have too much to drink. Artwork on matchboxes by Ravi Zupa and Arna Miller.

Bauhaus – If you use Adobe Creative Cloud, you’ll have access to the Bauhaus fonts they’re bringing back via Typekit. Details here.

Devel Sixteen – Sixteen, because that’s how man cylinders are in this 5,007 horsepower, jet-inspired supercar. In production, with at least one in the U.S. at a price close to $2 Million.

Nimm0 – There are 880 possible order-4 magic squares. This is what that means and an example of just one, including the binary and the binary sum. Now find the other 879.

Peach Blossom Island – Chinese artist Yuanxing Liang sculpts characters and busts transforming their hair and surronding into surreal scenes.

Blue and White – 3D printed porcelain by Oliver Van Herpt, sort of an ode to the iconic Delft pottery of yesteryear.

Love Lost – A 3D interactive poem. Kind of sad, but also very cool.
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Break Apart – Time to chill with a bit of Bonobo. Oh, and here he is at The LA Lab with Machinedrum.

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The post Friday Smackdown: Blistered Tentacle Bags appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at June 15, 2018 09:06 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Series – Deadpool Inspired Tool Holder – Part 2

Welcome, SOLIDWORKS users, to part 2 of our 4-part series where we are designing a Deadpool inspired tool holder. No better place to hold our sharp tools than the Regenerating Degenerates head.

In part 1 of the series we successfully imported successfully imported Deadpool’s head into SOLIDWORKS and we have him positioned in the work area. In this part of the series we’ll begin manipulating the bust – scaling it to the desired size and simplifying the top surfaces of the head a bit.

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Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Series – Deadpool Inspired Tool Holder – Part 2 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at June 15, 2018 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Latest Hot Wheels Car Includes a Go Pro Action Camera Mount

Hot Wheels Go Pro

Toy company Mattel and the portable camera savants at GoPro have really done it now: they’ve attached a camera to something you’ll never be able to ride or experience yourself.

Dubbed the Zoom In, this toy car comes with a hollowed-out body and stand which allows adrenaline junkies to slap a GoPro Action Camera on top of. One the miniature camera is on, users can get a firsthand look at what it’s like to be on the hood of a Hot Wheels car as it zips down, up, and around all those crazy tracks people make—such as this insane Beach Run:

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The car costs roughly $1, and considering how much you’ll have to shell out to get an attachable GoPro Hero Session or Hero Session 5 camera (both of which are discontinued models and cost upwards of about $100), adding an extra dollar for a four-wheeled piece of plastic doesn’t seem too bad.

Hot Wheels Zoom In

Hot Wheels Zoom In

The Zoom In comes out later this month in limited quantities, so be prepared to see some awesome YouTube videos of cars going down impossible tracks.

The post The Latest Hot Wheels Car Includes a Go Pro Action Camera Mount appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 15, 2018 02:15 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Keep On (Monster) Truckin’: The Reveal

Jonah in his costume
Jonah in his costume

Jonah in his costume

It was a beautiful day in Foxboro on Saturday, June 9, and monster trucks were abound. In a parking lot next to Gillette Stadium, fourteen trucks and their drivers were getting ready for the Monster Jam Pit Party to begin, the mammoth machines shining in the sunlight. Among the trucks was Max-D, sitting massive and proud next to its trailer. And next to Max-D, at a 42.42% scale, sat the mini-Max-D, waiting to be revealed.

After six long weeks, after untold hours working late into the night, the SOLIDWORKS Magic Wheelchair build team reached their deadline and had one heck of a product to show for it. Jonah’s mini-Max-D was perfectly painted, with massive wheels, acrylic flames lit by fiery LEDs, a color-changing LED trim shining along the bottom, a sponsor panel featuring actual sponsors (including, of course, Jonah’s Monster Jamer Youtube Channel), and hyper-realistic spikes and rivets.

In fact, as the team pulled their cars into the monster truck parking lot and started constructing the costume at noon, they realized the mini-Max-D was beyond realistic. When finally faced with the real life Max-D, the build team discovered that some of the details they’d put into the costume were, well, too detailed.

Tire size comparison

Tire size comparison

“Stickers?” cried Annie Cheung, staring at the “rivets” on the real Max-D. “We could have used stickers?” Indeed, the 3D rivets she’d worked so hard to produce, that she designed, 3D printed, and attached to the body individually, were, in fact, stickers pasted to the sides of the real Max-D. So were the BKT letters on the monster truck’s tires. Albert Hernandez, who’d spent countless hours iterating the wheels for the mini-Max-D, just laughed. The protruding foam JTS’s (Jonah’s initials) he’d designed, cut, painted, and pasted onto the costume’s tires could have been stickers the whole time. The team’s attention to actual size, scale, and detail is a testament to their passion and excitement for the project, and for making Jonah the happiest boy in the world.

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As the team got to work putting the costume together for the reveal, Max-D driver Tom Meents came over to introduce himself. Tom is the original Max-D driver, Jonah’s favorite driver, and his enthusiasm for the project is part of what made the reveal so big. He thanked the build team for their hard work and marveled at the mini-Max-D. Monster Jam head announcer Ryan Lacrosse also came over to admire Jonah’s costume and the team’s work. The epic reveal would not have been possible without the support of Monster Jam and Feld Entertainment. Their excitement over giving Jonah an amazing day was only matched by their organization and professionalism in putting the day together. And what a day it was.

The SOLIDWORKS build team covered the mini-Max-D with a black cloth and rolled it under Max-D’s autograph-signing tent to keep it out of the heat. When workers came to wrap the real Max-D in Monster Jam branded caution tape (to ward off anyone trying to touch the truck), team leader Chinloo Lama sprang into action and asked for the mini-Max-D to be wrapped up too! Then it was time to wait for Jonah’s family to arrive.

Waiting for the reveal.

Waiting for the reveal.

For the past few years, Jonah’s family has attended the Pit Party at Monster Jam. This year, though, they got to go in early. While the Pit Party, a carnival-like event where fans can meet their favorite drivers and see the trucks up close, started at 2PM, Jonah got to come in at 1PM. He was told his family had lucked into an earlier meet-up time. In fact, they’d lucked into something much greater.

Joined by his parents and four of his siblings, Jonah was surprised to see the SOLIDWORKS team standing next to Max-D. He was especially surprised to see their specially made baseball caps, decked out with mohawks made of spikes and a patch that read “JONAH’S PIT CREW.” As Jonah reached the small crowd around Max-D, Chinloo, Tom, and Magic Wheelchair Regional Director David Vogel went out to greet him. SOLIDWORKS gave Jonah a swag bag, complete with a Max-D button up shirt that matched Tom’s, and Jonah put the shirt on immediately. Then Tom went one step further and gave Jonah a special Max-D hat, so Jonah could be a real driver. While Jonah and his family met Tom and chatted, the SOLIDWORKS Facebook Live crew got in place and the build team/pit crew moved the costume out into the sunlight. Finally, it was time for the big moment.

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Jonah couldn’t believe what was in front of him. The mini-Max-D! Complete! Ready for him! And in only six short weeks! He thought maybe he’d be lucky enough to see a prototype of the costume at Monster Jam, not a finished product. “How did you do that so fast?” he exclaimed.

Chinloo smiled. “We’re Magic Wheelchair. We can do magic.”

As the team reconstructed the costume around Jonah and his wheelchair, I asked Tom what he thought. “This is awesome,” he said, shaking his head in disbelief and grinning. You’d be crazy not to agree. Jonah fit perfectly into his tiny truck, and the full costume stuck to his wheelchair like glue—no lag, no wobbling, nothing. He was able to reach his max speed and brake, he was able to do donuts, he looked like a real monster truck and he even jokingly yelled to his sister, “I’m going to run you over!” And that was just the beginning.

Tom Meents signing a Max-D spike. The other one is already on Jonah’s hood.

Tom Meents signing a Max-D spike. The other one is already on Jonah’s hood.

As Chinloo explained all the details of the mini-Max-D to the newest mini-Monster Jam driver, Tom disappeared into his trailer and reappeared with two actual spikes from his truck. The real Max-D’s spikes were gigantic, and Tom signed the two different sized spikes for Jonah to take home with him. Tom also signed the “hood” of Jonah’s costume, much to Jonah’s delight.

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“Look at him over there, he’s orchestrating,” said Kathy, Jonah’s mother, as Jonah chatted with the various camera crews surrounding him. Jonah was a natural in front of all the cameras at the reveal (SOLIDWORKS, Monster Jam, and Fox Sports 1). “Hello TV!” he called out as he drove past. This attention was just a taste of the celebrity Jonah would be faced with. At 2PM, the pit party began, and Jonah and his family started exploring the rest of the lot, meeting other drivers. It was hard though—everywhere Jonah went, he was stopped by a fan, or a monster truck driver, and asked about his costume.

Monster Jam interviewed Jonah over the loudspeakers. Tom Meents did a shout out to him during his own loudspeaker interview. Professional monster truck drivers gazed in awe at his costume, asking him a million questions, complimenting him on his new look. And everywhere he went, people stared and said hello. It was more attention than he’d ever received before. When asked what it was like to be a celebrity, Jonah said, “This is amazing. I’ve never felt like this before. I can’t describe it.” His constant refrain: “I’m blown away.”

Jonah on Gillette Stadium’s Jumbo Tron

Jonah on Gillette Stadium’s Jumbo Tron

That was one of his quotes in his live interview during Monster Jam itself, on Gillette Stadium’s Jumbo Tron. As a final component to his epic day, Jonah was interviewed right before the freestyle event began. He was joined by Chinloo and David from Magic Wheelchair, and the sold out stadium watched him and got to hear about his costume, Magic Wheelchair, and SOLIDWORKS. It was an amazing day for an amazing kiddo.

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And Jonah’s pit crew? Before Jonah’s family went into the stadium to find their seats for the 7PM show, the build team helped Jonah out of his costume and packed it away in their cars. The costume went back to SOLIDWORKS so they could hard coat the hood to preserve Tom’s signature for Jonah. The team also wants to add a mechanism so Jonah can control the LED lights on his car in the future, and they need to write down specific instructions so Jonah’s parents can help him put on the costume by themselves. After loading the costume into the cars, the build team all sat together in the stands at Gillette and finally got a chance to relax and enjoy the show. Every time Max-D came out, the build team cheered. And when crowed roared while Jonah was up on the big screen, the group of people clad in Magic Wheelchair shirts screamed the loudest.

The build team

The build team.

The Monster Jam costume and reveal would not have been possible without the hard work of dozens of people. There’s the build team themselves: Chinloo Lama (team leader, detailing artist), Sal Lama (foam fabricator), Annie Cheung (foreman of the build, did everything), Rob Jost (body designer, self-proclaimed “coolest team member”), Albert Hernandez (inventor of the wheel, colorful aerosol texture artiste, part-time Zoolander impersonator), Nicolas Lefebvre (LEDs and electronics), Julian Galgoczy (sander of CNC’s foam parts, general build helper, legit Monster Jam fan), Jeff Turgeon (creator of faux suspension, sanded his fingerprints off in the making of this project, also a legit Monster Jam fan), Eben Gay (wheel motors), Heather Snider (costuming and fabrics), Kathy Howard (dashboard designer), Santiago Laverde (in-house CNC milling expert), and Jody Stiles (frame design advisor). There are the community teams that helped put the reveal together: Rachel York (Facebook Live host and reveal organizer) and Alison Visconti (Rachel’s right hand lady) from SOLIDWORKS, and the force of nature that is Monster Jam/Feld Entertainment, including Sallie Palmieri, Amanda Regan, and Tom Meents. There are the people behind the scenes at SOLIDWORKS: Marie Planchard (SOLIDWORKS Director of Education), Abhishek Bali (3DEXPERIENCE Lab Manager), and Sara Junghans (SOLIDWORKS Senior Product Portfolio Manager). The wonderful crew at Magic Wheelchair, including David Vogel and Christine Getman. Permobil for providing the team with the CAD files for Jonah’s wheelchair. All the marvelous Magic Wheelchair donators, who gave money to this incredible non-profit in Jonah’s name through his classy.com page, and shared the news of this build with so many people. And, of course, Jonah and his lovely, amazing family. Making this special for them was the best part of the whole project.

There’s still more to come from SOLIDWORKS and Magic Wheelchair. If you missed our Facebook Live reveal, you can watch all of the videos here. You can still donate to Magic Wheelchair in Jonah’s name. And you can watch out for some monster follow up. SOLIDWORKS’s first Magic Wheelchair build was an amazing success and we’ve got more on the way for you. Keep an eye on this space for more Jonah-rific content and, as always, keep on (monster) truckin’!

The mini-Max-D.

The mini-Max-D.

SOLIDWORKS is partnering with the Magic Wheelchair to create an over-the-top costume for a child in a wheelchair. According to their mission statement, “Magic Wheelchair builds epic costumes for kiddos in wheelchairs —  at no cost to families.” Keep On (Monster) Truckin’ is an ongoing series dedicated to updating our readers on the current project’s progress.

Read about Jonah’s costume from the beginning! Learn more about the build process by reading other articles in this series!

Thank you to all who support our team, including Magic WheelchairMonster JamPermobil, and MLC CAD.

Author information

Sara Zuckerman
Sara Zuckerman
Sara Zuckerman is a SOLIDWORKS Education Contractor, Social Media and Marketing. Formerly an intern, Sara has a B.A. in Writing, Literature, and Publishing from Emerson College and recently earned a Certificate in Web Development from MassBay Community College. She is excited about utilizing this blog to combine her two passions, writing and technology.

The post Keep On (Monster) Truckin’: The Reveal appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Sara Zuckerman at June 15, 2018 02:02 PM

SolidSmack

The Most Read SolidSmack Stories of the Week — June 15th, 2018

The Click Light System is a Brilliant New Approach to LED Lighting

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

How an Electrical Engineer Revolutionized the UX of Modern Transit

You may take it for granted nowadays, but the simplified nature of current metro maps can be attributed to a single person: Henry Charles Beck.

How an Electrical Engineer Revolutionized the UX of Modern Transit

Project Milestone to Be First 3D Printed Residential Community

The New Story charity organization may have beaten them to the first punch, but that sure won’t stop the Eindhoven University of Technology, contractor Van Wijnen, real estate company Vesteda, materials company Saint Gobain-Weber Beamix, and engineering firm Witteveen+Bos from setting up five 3D printed concrete houses in Bosrijk, a relatively new residential district in Eindhoven, Netherlands.

Project Milestone to Be First 3D Printed Residential Community

The Click Light System is a Brilliant New Approach to LED Lighting

If you ever get tired of the boring motion of flicking the same light switch on and off again, these rope LEDs might just shed some new light on your living quarters (literally).

The Click Light System is a Brilliant New Approach to LED Lighting

Looking For a Modern 3D CAD System? Here’s Your Buyer’s Guide.

Let’s say you sit down in your office chair, it absorbs you into 1992, and a mustached salesman in a mauve shirt smiles and starts pelting you with hard drives. That’s a nightmare for sure. And just so happens to be tantamount to the process of evaluating 3D CAD software. I’ve been through it multiple times, as you likely have, but… it doesn’t have to be like that.

Looking For a Modern 3D CAD System? Here’s Your Buyer’s Guide.

The Ultra-Minimalist Brdi Feeders Are Literally For the Birds

No, I didn’t make a mistake with the product’s spelling. Created by the father-son design team at Onehundred, Brdis are foldable bird feeders designed specifically for birds. So while humans have Ikea furniture to decipher and build, birds have Brdis (except humans have to make these for them as well).

The Ultra-Minimalist Brdi Feeders Are Literally For the Birds

Microsoft’s Groundbreaking XBox Adaptive Controller Launching in September

As modern video games continue to break out of their mold and become a new medium for immersive storytelling, so too does the need for more accessible—and considered—hardware designs for a growing population of gamers.

Microsoft’s Groundbreaking XBox Adaptive Controller Launching in September

The post The Most Read SolidSmack Stories of the Week — June 15th, 2018 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 15, 2018 01:54 PM

The Javelin Blog

Verify SOLIDWORKS PDM Connectivity with an ODBC Test

To verify that a PDM Client computer or Archive server can communicate with the SQL (Database) Server, a SOLIDWORKS PDM ODBC test can be performed.

ODBC (Open Database Connectivity) is accessed from the Windows Administrative Tools:

Windows Administrative Tools

The testing is defined from the System DSN tab, by clicking on Add and selecting SQL Server

System DSN Tab

System DSN Tab

Any Name can be added for the Data Source and optionally a Description can be added. The SQL (Database Server) can be selected from a pull-down or entered manually.

Defining the data source

Defining the data source

Choose, ‘With SQL Server authentication using a login ID and password entered by the user’ as the Authenticity type and enter your SQL Login ID and password. The default Login ID is sa.

Login ID and password

Login ID and password

Choose the Database, for which you want to test the connection.

Database to test

Database to test

The following screen, can be left with the default options. Click on Finish to create the ODBC Data Source.

Data source created

Data source created

You will be presented, with the Configuration of the ODBC Data Source being created. Click on Test Data Source, to test the connection.

Test Data Source

Test Data Source

You will then be presented with a summary of the test results.

SOLIDWORKS PDM ODBC Test Results

SOLIDWORKS PDM ODBC Test Results

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS PDM

Take a SOLIDWORKS PDM training course delivered by a certified expert either in a local Canadian city, or live online

The post Verify SOLIDWORKS PDM Connectivity with an ODBC Test appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at June 15, 2018 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Get Started on Your Smart Home This Weekend with the $34 Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle

Smart Home

We’ve said it time and time again, but the Raspberry Pi is just so dang cool and we believe all designers and engineers should have one in their toolkit—if not on their desktop. While there is a bit of a slight learning curve, it’s nothing that today’s designers and engineers can’t handle on a leisurely Saturday.

So why not start now?

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle includes 8 courses to get started creating your very own Amazon Echo or even a ‘vintage’ streaming internet radio over a weekend. Throw in your own 3D printed housings, and the opportunities are limitless!

For a limited time, The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle is 96% off of the $865 retail price and can be purchased right here for a mere $34.

Smart Home

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle — $865 $34

Courses Included in the Bundle:

  • Automation with Raspberry Pi Zero
  • Introduction to Raspberry Pi
  • Hardware Projects Using Raspberry Pi
  • Bitcoin Mining Using Raspberry Pi
  • Raspberry Pi Robotics
  • Internet of Things Automation Using Raspberry Pi 2
  • Home Automation in 48 Hours Without Coding
  • Build Your Own ArmBot Step By Step Using Raspberry Pi Zero

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
StackSocial Amazon

The post Get Started on Your Smart Home This Weekend with the $34 Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 15, 2018 10:16 AM

Cool Tools of Doom: The Hide & Drink Waterproof Waxed Canvas Tool Roll

When it comes to functional workspaces, proper tool organization cannot be stressed enough. After all, does anybody enjoy having to bounce from drawer to drawer looking for that one special screwdriver?

We didn’t think so.

While it may not organize every took in your shop, the handmade Waterproof Waxed Canvas Tool Rool from Hide & Drink is still one of our favorites. In fact, we like that we can bundle specific tools for specific tasks in different rolls—making it easy to grab and go when the time comes. In total, each roll includes slots for six different tools (or a variety of small tools). Not to mention, the waxed canvas and hand-hammered metal rivets are a nice touch.

The Hide & Drink Waterproof Waxed Canvas Tool Roll — $22.99

Features:

  • Hand-cut and sewn from waxed canvas
  • Hand-hammered metal rivets and hand-cut belt for easy open and close
  • 6 tool slots
  • Simple and functional design
  • Designed to be handed down over generations

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The Hide & Drink Waterproof Waxed Canvas Tool Roll appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 15, 2018 09:16 AM

June 14, 2018

SolidSmack

The WorkHorse 3D Concept Opens Up Continuous 3D Printing

workhorse-3d-printer-tilt-extruder-belt-system-00

I’m looking at a very interesting concept 3D printer from engineer Swaleh Owais.

The “WorkHorse 3D” is a 3D printer able to do some functions few other machines can accomplish.

First, it is one of several “continuous” 3D printers in that it can, by itself, automatically unload prints and commence 3D printing a subsequent object. The Workhorse 3D does this by use of a conveyor belt system.

The print is applied to the stationary belt in the usual manner. But when the print completes the belt is engaged and the print actually rolls off the belt when the belt curves away under one of its rollers. All you need is a basket to catch the prints as they complete.

This seems to be a scaled-up version of MakerBot’s “Automated Build Platform”, first sold eight years ago. While much smaller than the current Workhorse 3D option, the two solutions are of a similar concept.

I’ve used the MakerBot ABP and found it was indeed amazing in that it could literally allow near continuous production of objects. I actually did need a basket to catch the dozens of objects being printed.

But there was a problem, and I discontinued using the ABP, and in fact, MakerBot themselves discontinued the project shortly thereafter, never to market any similar product.

The problem was that when the belt is printed upon, it is subjected to high heat. After repeated high heat exposures, the belt began to warp slightly. This presented the nozzle with a less than even surface to print on, resulting in failed prints. The belt had to be continually replaced.

I’m not sure if the Workhorse 3D has the same problem, but it might be possible to avoid the issue if an appropriate material were used for the belt. It would have to be a flexible and elastic material that withstands high heat and also provides appropriate adhesion for prints in at least PLA, if not other materials.

Nevertheless, the Workhorse 3D as is can produce continuous prints.

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But there was something strange about the motion system, which seems to involve two parallel mounts. My confusion was answered when I continued to watch their video, which shows that the two extruder mounts can be tilted!

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_95762" style="width: 1069px">The Workhorse 3D printer with a tilted extruder to enable infinite 3D printing<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The Workhorse 3D printer with a tilted extruder to enable infinite 3D printing</figcaption></figure>

This creates a scenario where the nozzle is angled to the build plate – or build belt, I suppose. By moving the belt appropriately when the nozzle is at an angle it becomes possible to 3D print infinitely, in much the same way that Stratasys’ infinite build demonstrator was able to do.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_95763" style="width: 1066px">Unusual parallel linkage on the Workhorse 3D printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Unusual parallel linkage on the Workhorse 3D printer</figcaption></figure>

Owais created not only the hardware to do all this, but also created the software to drive it, which is obviously required because common 3D printing operational software would not understand this highly unusual configuration.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_95764" style="width: 940px">Screenshot of the software driving the Workhorse 3D concept printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Screenshot of the software driving the Workhorse 3D concept printer</figcaption></figure>

While the project was a submission to a Hackaday contest, it seems that Owais is hoping to refine the configuration sufficiently for it to be added to the RepRap family of 3D printer designs. If so, we may see commercial versions of the concept become available.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post The WorkHorse 3D Concept Opens Up Continuous 3D Printing appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at June 14, 2018 05:58 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Working with SOLIDWORKS files in a multi-user environment without PDM

First of all, in a multi-user environment, SOLIDWORKS PDM is the best solution to work together with the same files. And it offers a lot of extra useful functionalities. But when you own a small organisation, or when your organisation is starting to grow, then SOLIDWORKS PDM might not be on your priority list. So, to bridge the gap to PDM, I want to use this tech blog to explain an option in SOLIDWORKS to optimize the workflow to work with the same files at the same time.

A small example to clarify this: when an engineer opens an assembly, then he gets write access to the assembly and all the part files in the assembly. When another engineer opens one of the parts of that same assembly, he cannot edit it because of the read-only state.

To solve this, we can use an option in SOLIDWORKS that makes it possible for one user to edit the top-level assembly, while other users can still edit the parts of that assembly.

Setting up the Collaboration Options

To get started, go to Tools – Options, or Options  on the Standard toolbar. Select Collaboration.

A couple of options can be set:

  • Enable multi-user environment
    This just enables the other options.
  • Add shortcut menu items for multi-user environment
    Menu items Make Read-Only and Get Write Access are available on the File pulldown menu for part and assembly documents and when you right-click assembly components in the FeatureManager design tree or in the graphics area.

Now you can control the read-only status of every component in your assembly by right-clicking on it, and selecting Make Read-Only.

This enables another user to gain write access of that component. In the case of a part file you need to go to the pulldown menu File and select Get Write Access.

  • Check if files opened read-only have been modified by other users
    Checks files you have opened as read-only at the interval specified in Check files every X minutes to see if the files have been modified in one of the following ways:

    • Another user saves a file that you have open in SOLIDWORKS, making your file out of date.
    • Another user relinquishes write access to a file that you have open in SOLIDWORKS by making the file read-only, allowing you to take write access.

Note that lightweight components are not checked.

If the system detects a change, a tooltip in the lower right corner of the graphics area points to an icon on the status bar. By clicking this icon you gain access to the Reload dialog box.

If you want to check the status of read-only files manually, click Check Read-Only Files  on the Standard toolbar. It might be possible that this option is not available on the Standard toolbar. In that case you need to add it by going to Tools – Customize. You can find it under the Commands tab, Standard category. Then you can drag it to the desired location at the toolbar.

Bonus tip

When working with these options, it might be that you get a lot of warnings about saving read-only files. This can be quite annoying. To get rid of this, go to Tools – Options. Select External References and check Don’t prompt to save read-only referenced documents (discard changes).

Conclusion

I hope that these settings can help you when you are working with multiple engineers, but you don’t own a SOLIDWORKS PDM solution. It definitely helps you to get rid of all those read-only issues when working on the same files.

If you are interested in the capabilities of SOLIDWORKS PDM, you can always contact CAD2M to get more information of this solution.

Author: Martijn Visser, Elite Application Engineer, CAD2M

Author information

CAD2M
CAD2M is certified reseller of SOLIDWORKS, SolidCAM, DriveWorks and our private label dddrop 3D printer. The CAD2M approach integrates this range of products into an all-in-one solution that covers the complete product development process. Take the full advantage of working in 3D with our advice, training and expertise. For more information, visit www.cad2m.nl.

The post Working with SOLIDWORKS files in a multi-user environment without PDM appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CAD2M at June 14, 2018 03:05 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

xDesign: Beyond Browser-Based 3D CAD

Recently I was attending a SOLIDWORKS User Group Summit and people asked me “So xDesign is CAD on the cloud?” This question always makes me smile because SOLIDWORKS xDesign is beyond being just a browser-based online 3D CAD. Yes, you do get innovative 3D CAD capabilities, yes, everything runs in the browser, yes, on any device, yes, you can start using it right away (without installing any software), yes, you are always running the latest version, yes, you never need to install software updates… but your SOLIDWORKS xDesign is way beyond being just cloud 3D CAD.

The first thing to understand is that SOLIDWORKS xDesign is built as a part of Dassault Systemes’ 3DEXPERIENCE Platform. When you purchase SOLIDWORKS xDesign, you do not purchase a single application, you actually get the SOLIDWORKS xDesign Role that combines many different applications seamlessly working together and enabling our users to take advantage of, and complete many different activities during the product development process.

Data Management

All data – SOLIDWORKS xDesign models are automatically stored and managed online. Yes – unlike a traditional CAD system, SOLIDWORKS xDesign includes Data Management capabilities. This a transparent data management, where your everyday tasks of working with SOLIDWORKS xDesign actually incorporate data management capabilities. There is no extra hardware to purchase, no extra software to install – it is embedded inside SOLIDWORKS xDesign with the same user experience and it is immediately available to all the users. As a result, you are always running the latest version of software which forever eliminates the need for data migration at upgrade. Those of you that have a data management system on premise fully understand the time, productivity and financial saving of this.

Any user from anywhere in the world at any time and from any device will always access the latest version of xDesign models – no need to look into different folders for “latest” copies of the files made by other users, etc. And the work they do is transparent and immediately available for everyone else. You can easily create different versions of the models, branch your designs and manage maturity of the product through different phases of the lifecycle.

 

Search and you will find

Being online, all of the data created is automatically indexed for fast searching and navigation. In addition to the automatic tags created, you can also use your own words to create multiple tags for even faster searching. When searching you will see only results you have access to, ensuring data security and enforcing access rules you have put in place.

If you prefer a more visual way of finding what you are looking for, you can navigate product structures while at the same time exploring dynamic 3D view in order to make the right selection.

Review and Markup on the fly

We all—my managers as well as my customers—often want to review the progress and provide the feedback in order to drive the project in right direction. Without using CAD, any user can quickly view any xDesign models in a full 3D visualization mode – explore assemblies with automatic, dynamic explode capabilities, measure critical components and dimensions, create 3D mark-ups on the fly and share any comments back with the other members of the team. Again – users can view only data they have access to enforcing your security.

 

Collaboration- become extroverted

SOLIDWORKS xDesign is made for collaboration – collaboration with your customers, your partners, your teams – anybody involved in your product development – from initial design to the profit. Yes, that includes your executive, finance, marketing, legal, procurement and other teams as well as customers, partners and suppliers. With unlimited number of secure communities, you can collaborate with anybody on any specific topic ensuring timely and transparent information sharing and communication. This ad-hoc collaboration is chronologically saved and provides history and traceability of decisions made.

 

SOLIDWORKS xDesign is made for Innovation!

We all remember that moment when we had that great idea! Now with SOLIDWORKS xDesign being accessible through any browser, you can capture those ideas immediately regardless of what time it is or where you are. All ideas are immediately visible to other users for review, feedback and for giving you thumbs up for recognition. Your and other ideas are managed through the different phases of ideation process ensuring that all good ideas become IP included in your products or processes.

 

Don’t forget To Do

None of us is perfect – with all the complex products we make, feedback coming from customers and management, new ideas being proposed by the team – it is possible to miss and forget to do few critical things. Capturing to-do lists in Excel is disconnected from the real work that needs to be done – create models, documents, etc. With different people creating their own to-do lists, forgetting where they put them, forgetting to remove completed items, it is impossible to combine all information and get a clear view of the project and understand the uncompleted tasks.

With SOLIDWORKS xDesign you can easily create a task on the go. You can keep it simple with just few words to remind you of what needs to be done, or more detailed containing a dynamic link to the specific xDesign model related to the work to be done. Tasks can be assign to yourself or to anybody else on the team ensuring collaboration and transparency. Tasks are managed through different phases of the task lifecycle capturing the completion progress easily accessible by you, your team or management. This way everybody can clearly see what they need to do, what are completed or outstanding tasks. The manager can access the real time status of all the tasks at any time having the clear understanding of the project.

So Yes – SOLIDWORKS xDesign is way beyond browser based online 3DCAD!

Want to join us? Sign up for the SOLDWORKS xDesign Lighthouse at: https://www.solidworks.com/how-to-buy/join-xdesign-lighthouse-program or just click on the banner below.

Author information

Milos Zupanski
Milos Zupanski
Milos is a Senior Product Portfolio Manager at SolidWorks

The post xDesign: Beyond Browser-Based 3D CAD appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Milos Zupanski at June 14, 2018 02:01 PM

SolidSmack

Microsoft’s Groundbreaking XBox Adaptive Controller Launching in September

As modern video games continue to break out of their mold and become a new medium for immersive storytelling, so too does the need for more accessible—and considered—hardware designs for a growing population of gamers.

While we’ve seen a number of brilliant one-off solutions from hardware modders including Ben Heck, whose various one-handed PS4 and XBox mods can accommodate single-handed use, little has been done to solve these problems on a mass level by a major console manufacturer—until now.

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With their $99.99 Xbox Adaptive Controller, Microsoft is opening a new portal for gamers with disabilities by allowing them (or their gamer buddies) to program two large buttons and input a variety of different peripherals across 19 jacks to make Xbox and Windows 10 games more accessible to specific needs.

“For gamers with limited mobility, finding controller solutions to fit their individual needs has been challenging,” explains Phil Spencer, Head of Xbox. “The solutions that exist today are often expensive, hard to find, or require significant technical skill to create. A number of individuals and organizations are creating custom solutions, but it has been often difficult for them to scale when most rigs need to be so personalized.”

Developed in partnership with various gaming and disability organizations including The AbleGamers Charity, The Cerebral Palsy Foundation, Craig Hospital, SpecialEffect, and Warfighter Engaged, Spencer and his XBox team worked closely with gamers to create a modular setup that is versatile for a variety of needs, affordable, and is easy to plug-and-play.

“The Xbox Adaptive Controller has been years in the making, though we realize that this is only one step along our journey of inclusive design and that we have more work ahead,” adds Spencer. “This has been a passion project for people around the world, both inside Microsoft and beyond. We’re thrilled to introduce it to the world today, tell the story behind it, and take what we have learned on our journey to inform future initiatives in inclusive design.”

The Xbox Adaptive Controller will begin shipping in September of 2018. Pre-orders are available over at the Microsoft Store.

The post Microsoft’s Groundbreaking XBox Adaptive Controller Launching in September appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at June 14, 2018 01:28 PM

The Ultra-Minimalist Brdi Feeders Are Literally For the Birds

Brdi Hangar Feeder

No, I didn’t make a mistake with the product’s spelling. Created by the father-son design team at Onehundred, Brdis are foldable bird feeders designed specifically for birds. So while humans have Ikea furniture to decipher and build, birds have Brdis (except humans have to make these for them as well).

Crafted from .025” (6mm) foldable aluminum, these bird feeders—like Ikea furniture—arrive flat and require some elbow grease before you can fill them with nuts, seeds, or even Trail Mix.

Brdi Hangar Feeder Brdi Hangar Feeder Brdi Hangar Feeder

Before arriving at the final design, creators Dave and Calvin Laituri made the unfortunate mistake of crafting the initial prototype out of cardboard. Since birds tend to be finicky creatures and jump whenever they take-off, the cardboard bird feeder promptly ejected the seeds whenever a resident left the abode.

Brdi Hangar Feeder

By repositioning the strings and using a borrowed hiking boot lace, they were able to solve the balancing issue. To help make the Brdi even more durable, future prototypes were made from aluminum instead of cardboard.

Brdi Hangar Feeder Brdi Hangar Feeder Brdi Hangar Feeder Brdi Hangar Feeder

Different types of Brdis came from this initial design, such as the Brdi Diner (which lets birds quickly dine and dash from two entry points), the Brdi Flyin (an A-shaped feeder with a low center of gravity and a wooden perch with room for two birds to feed), and the Brdi Bar (which attaches outside a window using a suction cup hook and has a tiny roof where birds can enjoy their food under).

Brdi Hangar Feeder Brdi Hangar Feeder

As a bonus, the sloping designs of the Diner and the Flyin help keep squirrels from stealing seeds meant for flying animals (unless your neighborhood has flying squirrels).

The Brdi was first introduced back in 2014, but has since gotten an update with new design variations and colors. You can check all of them over on Kickstarter, where the project currently has a backing of $9,383 of its $10,000 goal.

The post The Ultra-Minimalist Brdi Feeders Are Literally For the Birds appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 14, 2018 01:19 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: The rOtring 800 Retractable Mechanical Pencil

When it comes to mechanical pencils, not all are created equal. And with rOtring, this couldn’t be truer.

Ideal for sketching, writing, and drawing, the iconic rOtring 800 Mechanical Pencil features an ergonomically enhanced full metal body, with centered weight balance and a comfortable non-slip knurled grip for long work periods without discomfort or fatigue. Featuring a “Twist and Click” retractable mechanism of the entire sleeve and lead, the rOtring 800 Mechanical Pencil can easily go from pocket to sketch without worrying about damage or lead breakage. Quite frankly, you’d be hard-pressed to find a better mechanical pencil for this price.

The rOtring 800 Retractable Mechanical Pencil — $34.29

Features:

  • An iconic tool meant for a lifetime of use.
  • Unique “Twist and Click” mechanism retracts entire lead and sleeve for durability and pocket-safety.
  • Full metal body providing the ideal balance of weight and feeling.
  • Hexagonal barrel ensuring fatigue-free writing and drawing.
  • Fixed lead guidance sleeve prevents breakage and gives a clear page view for ruler-based drawing.

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The rOtring 800 Retractable Mechanical Pencil appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 14, 2018 12:27 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to determine which SOLIDWORKS PDM Variable is connected to a Data Card Control

A quick way of determining which SOLIDWORKS PDM Variable is connected to a Data Card Control, is from within the Local Vault View. With the Data Card Tab selected:

Data Card Tab

Data Card Tab

Click on the Help Icon, in the top-right of the lower panel.

Help Button

Help Button

A question mark will appear next to the the mouse cursor:

Question mark mouse pointer

Question mark mouse pointer

Then click on the control to see the SOLIDWORKS PDM Variable attached to that Control.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Variable connected

Help information displayed upon click

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS PDM

Take a SOLIDWORKS PDM training course delivered by a certified expert either in a local Canadian city, or live online

The post How to determine which SOLIDWORKS PDM Variable is connected to a Data Card Control appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at June 14, 2018 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Learn How to Build Your Next CAD Workstation with This $19 Course

These days, you can get just about any computer rig designed to your exact specifications. Whether you’re a RAM-hogging SolidWorks user, or simply just want a powerful workstation, there’s something for everybody. But no standardized hardware mod will ever replace the satisfaction of building your own rig from scratch.

If you’ve ever wanted to create your own custom-built PC but didn’t know where to start, boy do we have great news for you.

The How to Build a Computer Bundle consolidates five intensive online courses (a total of 126 individual lessons) ranging from how to create a blueprint for your desired desktop or laptop setup to how to overclock CPU processor functions to speed up rendering times.

How to Build a Computer Bundle — $374 $19.00 (94% off)

Topics Covered Include:

  • Learn about the basic functions of a computer system
  • Pick out appropriate hardware for your build
  • Assemble all hardware needed for a fully functional computer
  • Wire everything within the case like an expert
  • Cover the most effective method of CPI cooling: closed-loop liquid cooling
  • Upgrade to a higher capacity storage device
  • Improve your RAM chip(s)
  • Clean & refresh your CPU cooling unit
  • Swap in an SSD
  • Learn about the various tricky aspects about RAID setups
  • Understand how to increase data read/write speeds & prepare your computer for a drive crash

Get It!

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Learn How to Build Your Next CAD Workstation with This $19 Course appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 14, 2018 10:22 AM

June 13, 2018

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: Rock Climbing Holds [Climb ON!]

3d printed climbing holds

There are a lot of reasons you might want to mouth-grapple bark lumps to climb up a tree–jowl toning, neck muscle fortitude, the look of horror and genuine concern on your gardener’s face–but there’s little doubt you could save some lip skin and dentist visits by using climbing holds instead.

I know, you’ve been climbing trees and office buildings since you realized you had toes on your feet, but imagine making your own climbing holds? And wouldn’t you know it? Devin Montes is at it again, modeling up some unique rock climbing holds–an idea we’ve been interested in making ourselves–and we can’t wait to get our hands on ’em… BAH!

Devon is visiting us from the future, so modeled the holds in VR using Google Blocks with an HTC Vive, then imported them to Fusion 360 to scale, clean, split and export to STL before bringing into Simplify3D. He split the part into two pieces using separate fill setting for the outside of the hold and the bolted area, reinforcing the bolted area with 100% infill.

These were printed with Rigid.ink’s Carbonyte carbon fiber nylon mix that creates a climbing hold 100x tougher than that bark you gnawed up earlier. In this video, Devon takes you through the process and shows how the climbing holds turned out. Nice!

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/inSMrs-vzNA?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

You can snag the model files and all the details at MyMiniFactory. (Bonus! Check out his latest project for connectors that connects 2×2 beams together here!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you! Thank you for your help in delivering better content!

The post Model of the Week: Rock Climbing Holds [Climb ON!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at June 13, 2018 08:59 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Making Magnetic Mates even Snappier

What is Magnetic Mates?

Introduced to SOLIDWORKS in 2017, Magnetic mates were one of the best new features, but as the Beatles put it: “It’s getting better all the time!”. With SOLIDWORKS 2018, things are not only getting better, snapping objects together is getting easier too.

Frustratingly, when using Magnetic Mates in 2017 there was often a struggle aligning connection points whilst ensuring the orientation was correct.

However, good news awaits you as you read on! Basically, now it’s just:

Snap, snap, snap, snap, giving you ‘The Power’ to do build awesome facility layouts in few click of the mouse.

 

So, new to SOLIDWORKS 2018, three pretty awesome Magnetic Mate enhancements make an appearance, making snapping more user-friendly, intuitive and fun:

Number 1: The ability to alternate between the active connection points

When using a magnetic mate to insert components, using the square bracket keys, ‘[‘, ‘]’.

  • ‘[‘ cycles between the connecting points on the moving component
  • ‘]’ does the same but on the static component

 

This allows us to design our Slot Car racing tracks with a breeze!

 

Alternate between the active connection points

Alternate between the active connection points

 

Number 2: The new Lock symbol has come to greet you

In SOLIDWORKS 2017, locking the mates was a bit of a chore; searching for the mate in the Feature Tree, right clicking and selecting Lock… In 2018, the Lock symbol pops up upon Snapping, greeting you and begging for a click. Just one click and the mates are locked in position.

 

The new Lock symbol

The new Lock symbol

 

Number 3: Multiple Ground Planes (Yes, you can now mate directly to floors and walls!)

Now, in 2018, you can define multiple Ground Planes, allowing users to create multi-story layouts with multiple planes or floors. Imagine a giant 3D Jigsaw in the real world. This is now replicable in SOLIDWORKS’ virtual world by just dropping the pieces of your jigsaw, automatically snapping into place.

 

Multiple Ground Planes

Multiple Ground Planes

 

SOLIDWORKS 2018’s new Magnetic Mates make large layouts a quick simple task. What you will notice is super-fast placement of components; getting it right the first time; increasing your efficiency, accuracy and productivity.

 

Tailored towards facility layout, Magnetic mates can be used for many other applications, just like with our slot car track model – in fact, any assembly. Magnetic mates are a fantastic tool for increasing productivity and in 2018, they are now even more user-friendly.

Author information

Cadtek Systems UK - Elite SOLIDWORKS Training & Support
Cadtek has been established for over 27 years. Based in the UK, we have unrivalled experience in providing design solutions for designers and engineers. We work across all disciplines and multiple industries. An award winning Elite Reseller we can help you understand and choose the right 3D CAD solution. Call 0800 804 7766 to speak to an account manager. For more information, visit cadtek.com.

The post Making Magnetic Mates even Snappier appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Cadtek Systems UK - Elite SOLIDWORKS Training &#38; Support at June 13, 2018 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

How an Electrical Engineer Revolutionized the UX of Modern Transit

You may take it for granted nowadays, but the simplified nature of current metro maps can be attributed to a single person: Henry Charles Beck.

In a recent piece by Eugen Esanu for UX Planet, he talks about how Beck – an engineering draftsman – worked on creating the London Underground Tube Map in the 1920s. Though he never stayed with the company past the decade, his contributions to cleaning up eight different railway systems which eventually became the London Underground cannot be understated.

London Underground Railway System Design

Before Beck came along, maps depicting the Underground were complex and nearly un-navigable — at least, by modern UX standards. While they accurately portrayed every river, park, tree, and road above ground, it was next to impossible for passengers to decipher them to find out where they needed to go to get from A to B.

London Underground Railway System Design

To this end, Beck took it upon himself to simplify the process. He cut out all the geographical markers people didn’t need and stuck to simple lines. These color-coded lines were strictly horizontal, vertical, and diagonal and featured dots signifying the stations they were connected to. The resulting diagram has helped countless London citizens find their daily tram.

London Underground Railway System Design

Beck followed three core principles when making the map: focus, simplicity, and thinking from all perspectives.

Focus is simple. By knowing who you’re making something for, you can tailor the experience specifically for the person. Since Beck had the common Londoner or foreign traveler in mind, he was able to envision a map which could be understood with little-to-no explanation.

Which brings about the second principle: simplicity. With all the cruft removed from the previous Underground map, people could easily understand the railway system and which trains led to where.

Lastly, Beck took the time to think from all perspectives. By looking out from an engineering standpoint and into the mind of a commuter, he was able to see how removing unnecessary details from the previous map—and refining the important ones—could help make the Underground a less scary place to navigate.

It’s fascinating how one man’s map became the standard for other big cities around the world. Tokyo, Paris, New York – all of which take inspiration from Beck’s design. You can read Esanu’s entire article here.

The post How an Electrical Engineer Revolutionized the UX of Modern Transit appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 13, 2018 01:24 PM

App Smack 24.18: Hitlist, Math Interactive, Autodesk Sketchbook, and More…

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Math Interactive (iOS — Free)

Improve your intuition by exploring the interactive illustrations and learn how to solve both simple and difficult math problems through elegant solutions.

Spark by Readdle (iOS – Free)

Spark is the best personal email client and a revolutionary email for teams. You will love your email again!

Spark by Readdle

Hitlist (iOS — Free)

Travel more for less. Tell us about the trips you want to take, and we’ll tell you when or where to go.

Hitlist Flights

Autodesk Sketchbook (Android — Free)

From quick conceptual sketches to fully finished artwork, sketching is at the heart of the creative process.

Autodesk Sketchbook Sketching

Flipboard (Android — Free)

Flipboard gathers news, popular stories and conversations so you can sit back and flip through the latest and greatest stories of our time.

Flipboard News

Google Keep (Android — Free)

Quickly capture what’s on your mind and get a reminder later at the right place or time. Speak a voice memo on the go and have it automatically transcribed. Grab a photo of a poster, receipt or document and easily organize or find it later in search. Google Keep makes it easy to capture a thought or list for yourself, and share it with friends and family.

Google Keep App

The post App Smack 24.18: Hitlist, Math Interactive, Autodesk Sketchbook, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 13, 2018 01:09 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – June 2018

Hello to all,

Welcome to this new edition of the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News, co-authored by members of the SOLIDWORKS Technical Support teams worldwide.

You can help improve SOLIDWORKS PDM and all SOLIDWORKS Products

By Larry Zolla

SOLIDWORKS customers have been driving the evolution of SOLIDWORKS PDM since 2006, and it has all happened because of the Enhancement Requests (ERs) that customers have filed!

Look how much SOLIDWORKS PDM has changed since this video from our website in 2006.

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As customers working in your own unique environments; you have insight into how our products could work better in your unique environment.

You think about how our products should work and filing ERs makes you a Development Partner of SOLIDWORKS.

Those ERs frequently drive Development and become part of the SOLIDWORKS PDM product line with passing Service Pack Updates and New Releases.

Records show that since March of 2006 our customers have been filing Enhancement Requests to enrich SOLIDWORKS Enterprise PDM, now known as 2 products:  SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional and SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard.

 

Enhancement Requests are accessed from within the SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal

Please refer to our Knowledge Base (KB) Solution S-032728 for the details. First, we recommend you to search for an existing Enhancement Requests and if it closely matches your idea; VOTE for it!

Yes, popularity is a weighing factor with our Product Development Team.

If you do not find an ER which matches your idea you can request that a new one is created. When your ER is accepted it will be assigned an SPR (Software Performance Report) Number and will soon be listed in the Knowledge Base.

The PDM Top 40 ERs to date; based on Customer Hits are listed below.

Thanks for being our partners and for helping to evolve the SOLIDWORKS PDM Products as well as all of our other SOLIDWORKS Products to best suit your needs.

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Beta – looking back 10 years ago

The SOLIDWORKS® R&D team has once again been hard at work and is very excited for the start of the 2019 Beta program which will be launched in late June 2018. As we did last year, lets set the clock back 10 years and see some of the highlights of the 2009 SOLIDWORKS release. 

SOLIDWORKS:

  • Assembly Bill of Materials – You can now create a bill of materials (BOM) directly in an assembly without first creating a drawing.

  • SpeedPak – The new SpeedPak technology creates a simplified version of a complex assembly without losing references. SpeekPak uses a subset of the parts or faces of an assembly, which reduces opening time, saves memory, and improves the performance of many operations.
  • Dimension Jog – You can now jog an extension line.

  • Drawing Sheet Quick View – You can now get a preview of a drawing before you open it. Quick view is a read-only mode that provides a simplified drawing representation.
  • Convert to Sheet Metal – You can now generate a sheet metal part from a solid part.

  • Other New Tools – Equation-Driven Curves, Slot Sketch Entity, Sheet Metal Cross Break, Lip and Groove Feature, Weld Gaps

SOLIDWORKS Simulation:

  • Unified Materials Database and User Interface – SolidWorks and SolidWorks Simulation now share the same user interface for materials and share the same materials, including their physical properties, default crosshatching, and appearances. Custom materials you create are available for both design and simulation.

  • Mates for Simulation – You can now build design intent into SolidWorks mates to automate Simulation setup and part-to-part interactions across all studies in a model. You can define contact, shrink-fit, and bonding once, at the mate level.
  • Meshes for Thermal Temperature Studies – Interaction of thermal studies with static and nonlinear studies now accommodates dissimilar meshes. Temperatures from a thermal study with certain mesh properties are interpolated seamlessly to a static or nonlinear study with different mesh properties.
  • Deformed SolidWorks Parts from Results – You can now save the deformed state of an assembly as a new multibody part document or as a new configuration.

SOLIDWORKS Motion:

  • 2D Mechanisms in Layout Sketches – You can now run animation and Motion Analysis studies for layout sketch mechanisms you create from sketch blocks. You can simulate the basic operation of 2D mechanisms in layout sketches before committing time to a detailed design.

  • Support for Lightweight Mode – You can run motion studies for an assembly in lightweight mode without first resolving it.

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation:

  • Multi-processor Support – Flow solutions are iterative and can take a few hours to complete. Multi-core and multi-processor support enable Flow Simulation to run 1.3 to 1.5 times faster than in previous releases.

  • Radiation and Non-Newtonian Models – You can now include bodies transparent to solar radiation. You can also test data on non-Newtonian fluids.

If you liked that time travel session, check out the May 2014, June 2014, May 2015 and June 2017 editions of the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News for a reminder of the best enhancements in versions 2004, 2005 2001 and 2008 respectively.

At SOLIDWORKS, we know that you not only create great designs, but also that your great designs get built. To help streamline and accelerate your entire product development process from concept through manufactured products, SOLIDWORKS 2019 contains hundreds of new, user-driven enhancements focused on these areas:

  • Design to Manufacture – Go from concept to manufactured parts even faster
  • Modeling and Drawings – Powerful enhancements to improve your design and detailing experience
  • Performance – Faster large assembly design, rendering and collaboration
  • New Technology – Increased productivity when using the latest Tough enabled devices
  • Collaboration – Smart tools for collaborating with partners and suppliers

No sign up is required. Access to the Beta software is automatically available to SOLIDWORKS® subscription service customers. If you are currently on subscription and  your SOLIDWORKS serial number is registered in your SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal account, then the Beta software will be available to download from the SOLIDWORKS Beta website during the beta period (late June to mid-September).

If you have any questions please email us at beta@solidworks.com.

Noteworthy Solutions from the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base

icon - SW When I install SOLIDWORKS®, why do I see the error ‘The Windows Installer for this product component did not run as expected: register_i386_SldShellExtServerExe’?
This behavior is possible if one or more of the prerequisite Microsoft® Visual C++ Redistributable dlls are missing. In some instances, the issue was resolved by reinstalling the Microsoft Visual C++ 2015 Redistributable software. For more information and the steps to resolve this issue, see Solution Id: S-074483.

 When routing in SOLIDWORKS® Electrical 3D, what determines the performance time?
Performance when routing relies on more than the number of wires or cables in a route. For more information, see Solution Id: S-074356.

Icon - EPDM When performing a content search in SOLIDWORKS® PDM, what could cause the error: ‘Could not access the item in the database.’?
To resolve this issue, follow the steps in Solution Id: S-074365.

In the SOLIDWORKS® software, how do I import as a mesh object the STL file from a Smoothed Mesh Export of a SOLIDWORKS® Simulation Topology study?
See Solution Id: S-074494.

In SOLIDWORKS® Flow Simulation, is it possible to use the ‘Free Surface’ feature to simulate capillarity?
Capillarity (also known as capillary action) is the ability of a liquid to flow in narrow spaces without the assistance of external forces like gravity, pressure gradients, etc. This motion occurs because of intermolecular forces between the liquid and surrounding solid surfaces.
For more information, see Solution Id: S-074512.


That’s it for this month. Thanks for reading this edition of SOLIDWORKS Support News. If you need additional help with these issues or any others, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller.

Also, comments and suggestions are welcome. You can enter them below.

Author information

Julien Boissat
Sr. Technical Customer Support Engineer, SolidWorks, EMEA at DS SolidWorks Corp.
I have been a Tech Support engineer for Simulation products since 2002. I was previously a product manager at SRAC, the original makers of COSMOS for those who remember that time! ;-). I am currently in charge of the content of the certification exams for simulation products. I also initiated and still author the Simulation Knowledge Base and participate as much as possible in the expansion and evolution of the SolidWorks Knowledge Base. Finally, I handle the SolidWorks Support Monthly News blog.

The post SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – June 2018 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Julien Boissat at June 13, 2018 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

The differences between 3D Printing and CNC Machining

In the product development phase there are many process options for creating models, prototypes, patterns or molds. Selecting the best approach requires an appreciation for the project requirements, an understanding of the process considerations, and an evaluation of the resulting time, cost and quality. Without this information, it is difficult to identify the optimal approach.

Read this white paper to learn about the differences between 3D Printing and CNC Machining, including:

  • Workflows, including setup and complexities
  • Time and cost outlines
  • Quality characteristics
  • Terminology overview

What is covered in the paper

The focus of this white paper is on rapid prototyping to support the product development cycle. Although both 3D printing and CNC machining can be used for production purposes, the goals and demands are different from those when product designs are taking shape. Generally, the paper will address quick-turn, low-volume part making.

Engineer Machining

Engineer Machining

The discussion of 3D printing will broadly encompass all technologies. However, when specific examples are required, Stratasys FDM® (fused deposition modeling) will be the source of detailed information.

There are many CNC processes, such as routing, turning, and drilling. This discussion will focus solely on CNC milling. Additionally, the discussion will cover only 3-axis CNC because 4- and 5-axis CNCs are commonly dedicated to repetitive, production applications.

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The post The differences between 3D Printing and CNC Machining appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at June 13, 2018 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

WHAT IF Thomas Edison used SOLIDWORKS?

Thomas Edison has over one thousand patents to his name (individual or joint), 1,093 to be exact.  Most notably for the light bulb, the phonograph, and an initial motion picture concept.  He was also very famous in his early 30s and throughout his 84 years.  He also had innovations in manufacturing and was a savvy businessman as well.

I always wonder, however, what would he be working on if he was alive today?  With so many advancements in technology and computers, it begs the question, what would he be working on?  Would he finally have developed a flying car, teleportation, or something else we could not have imagined?  I would figure that the patents would reach much higher numbers, as he could design and develop his ideas much quicker.  He could also hire a staff of engineers and collaborate with these people on designs…in SOLIDWORKS, of course.

We would like to believe he would be designing new electrical systems using SOLIDWORKS Electrical 3D, and collaborating with Alexander Graham Bell (see that blog here).  Well, we put together this video to ask that very question:  What If Thomas Edison had SOLIDWORKS?

<iframe allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/U95P_Ldd9GI?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

 
What are your thoughts on this? What do you believe Edison would have created with SOLIDWORKS?

Author information

Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling is a Senior Marketing Manager at SolidWorks

The post WHAT IF Thomas Edison used SOLIDWORKS? appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Cliff Medling at June 13, 2018 12:00 PM

June 12, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Dart Heads Improved Using SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation

I doubt there is anyone on this planet that would dare say they do not like toy Dart Guns. It’s hard to explain why it’s so much fun to successfully hit another object with a projectile. It’s too bad that the toy darts aren’t the most accurate.  Well, that won’t be the case for long. Keep following along.

The Problem

Here at GoEngineer, we take silly little questions and create big engineering challenges. Every. Single. Day. My story begins with this question:

So why are these darts so inaccurate?

I choose to believe this is due to pressure irregularities caused by a blunt object moving space with no spin. Time to prove me wrong. The first thing that comes to mind is modifying a toy dart gun to give a spin to the dart but this would take some serious planning and eventually become a real engineering job so I chose to modify the dart instead.

The Hypothesis

Will changing the shape of the head to have vanes and transfer some linear motion to rotational motion give me more accuracy? I may be losing some forward velocity but I can make up for it with stronger springs. We’ll need to study how much Drag and Rotational Force can be obtained from multiple vanes.

The Process

I made a few iterations of the dart head to test in SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation, compare results and see what configuration might be best. I stuck to one angle of attack and checked the results for more vanes. Afterall, more surface area = more normal and force = more spin.  I do have to be careful about drag and I must test if more vanes cause a discernible amount of drag.

These are the two contenders:

The dart heads are hollow to match the weight to the original dart head. It may affect the inertia but I will consider it a neglectable detail for this test. I may be wrong to do so but the interest is spin vs drag right now.

The Study

The average speed of a toy dart is around 16 m/s. I run an external Flow study with Air at ambient temperature to find out the output Torque on the Z axis (spin) and Force in the Z direction (drag) for both configurations. I used Standard SOLIDWORKS Materials, ABS for the head and Flexible Polyurethane Foam for the body.

A local mesh was added to the Flow study to refine meshing to level 2 at the Fluid/Solid Boundary around the complex geometry of the head.

The output Torque around the Z axis was obtained by using Surface Goal Torque (Z) with all the outer faces of the dart.

The Drag force was obtained with Surface Goal Force (Z) for the same faces used in the Torque Surface Goal.

The global Drag force Global Goal Force (Z) will be used as convergence criteria only.

You can download the Solidworks 2017 Flow simulation file here (Note: you must have Flow Simulation to view the study):

Results

The negative Drag force corresponds to the direction of drag force correctly, as does the negative torque in respect to the right hand rule.  According to the results the drag in the Z direction is 0.0119 N for 3 vanes and 0.0125 N for 4 vanes. This means 3 vanes give 4.8% less drag than 4 vanes.

The output Torque around the Z axis for 3 vanes is 0.0250 Nmm and 0.0461 Nmm for 4 vanes. This means 3 vanes give 45.7% less Torque than 4 vanes.

So 3 vanes give 4.8% less drag but 45.7% less Torque?!! I’m sticking to 4 vanes.

I am starting to regret not doing a 5 vane study. It may have added some serious Torque but it does seem it could be a bit too crowded for the print.

The Outcome

I printed these heads using a Stratasys Fortus 250M with ABS P430 and 0.007 layer thickness, layers were parallel to the flat side of the head. The print wasn’t too bad but I did have to file some areas at the vane tips for a satisfactory finish.

To mount the head I had to cut off the rubber off the dart and carefully cut away the remaining stem piece. The stem has a tendency to come off with some of the dart’s foam, this may contribute to disbalancing the spin. I’m going to consider it negligible. The “negligibles” are starting to pile up…

After a bit of super glue, the darts pass an airtight test and they are ready for action!!!

I was able to get a visual cue of the rotation obtained with the help of a high-speed camera we had laying around.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="360" id="video-19589-3" preload="metadata" width="640"><source src="http://www.goengineer.com/wp-content/uploads/Dart-spin-video.mp4?_=3" type="video/mp4">http://www.goengineer.com/wp-content/uploads/Dart-spin-video.mp4</video>

Just look at that spin! That was a lot better than I expected.

After shooting some of these darts I realized some flew consistently straight while others consistently wobbled off. This may be due to the surgery process to exchange heads, I strongly believe this is linked to that “negligible” dart foam. You can see a wobble pretty clearly on the second take.

Personally, I think the spin has improved the accuracy significantly as long as I use the good darts. I may need to put some time in refining the manufacturing process to get more good darts but overall, I would call this test a success!

 

Author: Erick Vega has a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering and 6 has years of Microcontroller Automation experience. You can find him venturing out climbing into the Wasatch mountains, tinkering around with salvaged electronics or trying to program an Windows application that probably didn’t need to exist.

 

Author information

GoEngineer
GoEngineer delivers software, technology and expertise that enable companies to unlock design innovation and deliver better products faster. With more than 30 years experience and thousands of customers in high tech, medical, machine design, energy and other industries, GoEngineer provides best-in-class design solutions from SOLIDWORKS, Stratasys, CAMWorks, Altium and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM). For more information, visit goengineer.com.

The post Dart Heads Improved Using SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GoEngineer at June 12, 2018 09:00 PM

Automate Your Task With Task Scheduler

TASK SCHEDULER 
SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler allows you set up tasks to perform at a later time. Performing a resource-intensive task such as rebuilding a large assembly could be time-consuming, you can use SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler to perform the job after office hours. You can choose to schedule a task on a daily basis or quarterly, depending on your workflow. SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler runs on detached window interface that is different from the SOLIDWORKS application.

You will need a SOLIDWORKS Professional, SOLIDWORKS Premium, or SOLIDWORKS Office license to fully utilize SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler.

Summary of Task Scheduler 
This will be the explanation of each task that SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler that is able to do. This short post, we will be talking the Print Files for easy reference.

Task scheduler

  • Convert Files – create a task to convert files from an earlier release of SOLIDWORKS to the current release.
  • Upgrade Assistant – planning to migrate to a new version of SOLIDWORKS, you can use the Upgrade Assistant to test that your parts, assemblies and drawings will migrate correctly.
  • Update Files – rebuilds the specified documents with any changes made since the last time the model was rebuilt.
  • Update Associated Files – Update a SOLIDWORKS document and its referenced documents.
  • Import Files/ Export Files – schedule tasks to import IGES (*.igs, *.iges) and STEP (*.step, *.stp) files into SOLIDWORKS part (*.sldprt) files
  • Update Custom Properties – Update custom properties in SOLIDWORKS documents.
  • Create Drawings – Create drawing files for SOLIDWORKS part and assembly files.
  • Create eDrawings – Export SOLIDWORKS documents as eDrawings® files
  • Update simulation – Update the SOLIDWORKS Simulation analysis in SOLIDWORKS part and assembly documents
  • Design Checker – Check designs of SOLIDWORKS documents using a standards file generated with Design Checker.
  • Render and Animation – Manage rendering tasks you set up in PhotoView or animation tasks you set up in Motion Studies
  • Build ECAD Files – Build multiple ECAD files as SOLIDWORKS solid models

SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler
Searching for Task Scheduler from start menu > All Programs > SOLIDWORKS 20__ > SOLIDWORKS Tools > SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler.

Creating Task from SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler allows me to create a task that is hectic and time consuming to do. For example, currently, I am required to print out SOLIDWORKS Drawings daily. However, I have my daily task and I am not able to just focus on printing my drawing sheets.

SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler is able to help me on this tedious task of printing drawing sheets. I am able to create a future task to be scheduled to meet my workflow.

SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler step-up

Print Step-up
Since I just started to use Print Files from SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler, I realised the printer step up is important. I have to have the correct printer driver that is installed on my workstation in order for this task to work. To change the settings of the printer, from the SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler step-up and clicking on the options will allow customizing.

From this print step-up, I am able to customize the drawing settings (for example, the background of the SOLIDWORKS drawings or even the size of the paper).

 

Author information

ateworks
From our humble beginnings in 2008, ATE has grown from a single-office reseller into a powerhouse of engineering solution provider, with 5 office locations in Singapore and Malaysia, with a 70-strong workforce that can provide localized support and services to our customers. Today, we provide unrivalled 3D engineering solutions as an premium reseller of Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS. Along the journey, we have also added Altair and SolidCAM, together with many other world-class technology partners, with the single focus on extracting the best return on technology investment for our customers.

The post Automate Your Task With Task Scheduler appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by ateworks at June 12, 2018 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

Looking For a Modern 3D CAD System? Here’s Your Buyer’s Guide.

onshape modern 3d cad system buyer guide

Sponsored by
Sponsored by Onshape

Let’s say you sit down in your office chair, it absorbs you into 1992, and a mustached salesman in a mauve shirt smiles and starts pelting you with hard drives. That’s a nightmare for sure. And just so happens to be tantamount to the process of evaluating 3D CAD software. I’ve been through it multiple times, as you likely have, but… it doesn’t have to be like that.

When you’re evaluating a CAD system, you’ll want to actually use the software that will define your product development for years (if not decades) to come. But, before you even get to the testing, there are some criteria you should consider and some key questions you should ask. It will focus your requirements and weed out the undesirables before you commit to hours of screen time and cheek-slapping the features.

Onshape's Modern 3D CAD Buyer's GuideAnd wouldn’t you know it? Onshape has put together their own little guide that collects it all. Want to cut to the chase? Grab your copy of “The Buyer’s Guide to Modern CAD Systems” here:

Download The Guide

Now, let’s look at the criteria and answer the most important questions. We’ll massage these in our hand like warm noodles and then–and only then–you tell me if these are ALL the critical aspects that make up the items to evaluate when deciding on a modern noodle… errrrm, CAD system.

What are the criteria? There are SEVEN.

1. The Modeling Tools

So, top o’ the list. If a CAD system doesn’t have the features you need, the rest of these don’t matter so much. Your CAD system needs to have the capabilities to model what you need to manufacture. On top of this, they need to NOT be a pain to use either. Any system that adds capabilities to ease the part-to-assembly-to-drawing workflow is going to pay dividends, not only during manufacturing, but if you ever have to revise or re-use that model in the future.

Top question to ask
How do your parametric modeling tools handle tough tasks such as part configurations, in-context editing, or multi-part design for assemblies?

The variation of 3D CAD software, against each industry, for each process and need seems exponential, but let’s boil this down. Parts have variations and some are driven by other parts. I want to set up part variations quickly, use context (without destroying it later), maintain that context with changes, and not have things blow-up without being warned. Here, consider the process of setting up multiple contexts (e.g. open and closed position) and how simple or difficult it is to do that.

2. The Interface

Of course, the best way to evaluate what modeling tools are available and how they work is through the the user interface. We don’t think about UI design… until it makes our life more difficult. For anyone who has migrated CAD systems, you know what this is like. Familiarity leads to productivity but, even more, productivity is compounded by usability. And when usability has been built around the workflow and the capabilities that allow each individual to be more productive, you have a system that gets out of the way, as it were, and lets the team get to work.

Top question to ask
How can we try out desktop and mobile versions and access our product design workflow?

This one’s easy. Ask a 3D CAD software maker for a trial and see 1) how long it takes them to respond and 2) how quickly you can get a trial. I can count on two fingers the software you can start using in under 10 minutes. Usability needs to be evaluated on the product design workflow as a whole, not only feature by feature. You may think your best CAD user is more suited to test the workflow but, if you’re able, have a less experienced user test as well and gather feedback from both. Though they may not be familiar with the system, the ways in which they’re able to access data, move through the process, and work together through the software is going to reveal where productivity will be increased and costs reduced.

3. Total Cost of Ownership

This may be at the top of your list or, based on the other criteria, at the bottom. Regardless, there’s a lot to consider here. Whenever I evaluated a software migration or upgrade, I’d just double software cost to budget for hardware and overhead. With modern 3D CAD systems, the lower cost of entry, subscription pricing, and reduced hardware requirements, total cost needs a closer look. There are costs for add-ons and maintenance to consider, costs for high-end computers or mobile devices, and finally cost for employees to support it and any downtime. Oh, and don’t forget about the cost of adding more seats later.

Top question to ask
What’s the total cost of all software and hardware required and what will be my cost to scale up?

In the past, I have budgeted the two-year software cost + maintenance + initial hardware cost + hardware upgrade + a percentage for overhead/lost time. It wouldn’t hurt to evaluate the same and I’m sure you’ll find some differences. What’s changed with modern 3D CAD systems is eliminating the barrier to entry with regard to cost. How many 3D CAD software websites can you go to right now to get pricing info? How long does it take to get a quote for 10 seats? What’s included? Are add-ons and maintenance required? Are transparency and the ability to get pricing info important? I believe it is.

4. Getting Help

This can really make or break a successful migration. It’s common for one person to serve as the go-to for support (If you’re that person, a high five to you). They’ll, in turn, consult the manual, contact their reseller or go into hiding. How long does that take? It’s important to consider here, because suddenly you can have time lost due to getting help and how accessible help and resources are. On top of all this, don’t forget about onboarding – your process to get users up to speed fast and become more efficient sooner. So, consider all your options for migration and determine how long your onboarding process would be for each system.

Top question to ask
If I need help, how soon can I expect an answer and how do you help us get up to speed faster?

People learn differently, so there are some things to check off here. First, look for these options:

  • Up-to-date feature documentation
  • Concise, accessible video tutorials
  • Active forum with involved users and staff
  • Responsive and helpful support

Ideally, you want content that 1) Gets you and users up to speed quickly and 2) Makes the migration to the new platform absolutely painless. Yes, it should be painless. Do they have migration support? Though a painless migration and getting every user up-to-speed quickly is something hard to promise, the software company should be there each step of the way.

5. Staying Up To Date

If you’ve been part of an upgrade where entire version or point releases are skipped, you know the pain that comes with upgrading, learning the new features and dealing with what has changed. It’s good practice to have a regular update procedure in place and to update everyone on the latest features. For that, you need reliability about the software release. Otherwise, as with getting help, you could be looking at lost time and additional problems that could have otherwise been avoided.

Top question to ask
How often do you release new versions of the software and what is the process to update?

A software company should be able to answer this question. Are software releases yearly? Monthly? Are resources for new features available with each release? From a CAD admin perspective, this is important. But when you can rely on a regular update schedule you then have the opportunity to not only plan for training on the new features, but also use them once they’re available. Then there’s the update process. Will it require other hardware or software upgrades or *gasp* involvement with I.T.?

So, that’s five criteria, you say? Where are the other two? Ah, they’re in “The Buyer’s Guide to Modern CAD Systems.” Yep, I just did that. But don’t worry. Even if I gave you the last two, there’s a CAD System Grading chart you’ll want to print out to score and evaluate the 3D CAD systems as you compare them.

Download The Guide

What’s your take on these criteria? Are there other things you would want to consider? I have one factor that I consider extremely important, especially for anyone migrating from one CAD system to another. Any guesses what it is?

The post Looking For a Modern 3D CAD System? Here’s Your Buyer’s Guide. appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at June 12, 2018 01:19 PM

The Click Light System is a Brilliant New Approach to LED Lighting

Click Light

If you ever get tired of the boring motion of flicking the same light switch on and off again, these rope LEDs might just shed some new light on your living quarters (literally).

At first look, StudioKnob’s’s Click Light system appears to consist of only LED ropes—however, the multi-part system also includes two metallic stands to which the lights are connected. Measuring 14cm (5.5”) in height, 80cm (31”) in width, and 20cm (8”) in depth, a low voltage runs through the two surfaces which transfers to the rope lights once they magnetize. So no, these ropes don’t run on batteries, nor can they light up remotely and be worn at a music festival.

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The premise behind the Click Lights is actually quite simple: both sides of the charged surfaces are magnetic, and it doesn’t matter which side you connect the rope lights to. Like its namesake, once the nylon ropes ‘click’ onto the metallic shelves, their intertwined LEDs light up the room instantly.

Click Light

The system consists of different rope lengths ranging from 70, 100, and 135 cm (which translate to 27.5, 39, and 53 inches respectively)—allowing users to create a spaghetti-like combination of lights which can continuously be twisted and turned depending on how streamlined—or tangled—your heart desires.

Click Light

The Click Light isn’t quite for sale yet, but you can bet parents will be jumping at a chance to get these as night lights for their kids—or themselves. More details can be found on StudioKnob’s official webpage.

The post The Click Light System is a Brilliant New Approach to LED Lighting appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 12, 2018 01:01 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: ‘Sketching’ by Koos Eissen and Roselien Steur

Industrial Design Sketching

While there used to be a painful shortage of inspirational design sketching books out there, these days, design students and those looking to refresh their skill set may, in fact, have too many to choose from. The good news is, there’s something different to learn from each—so go ahead and build out that library.

Among other design sketching book favorites, we love the broad variety of sketching styles presented in Sketching.

While the book is ideal for any design student or classroom, many professionals and design studios will also likely learn a thing or two from the wide variety of sketching styles and form examples presented within the book’s 256 pages.

Sketching (12th printing): Drawing Techniques for Product Designers/em> by Koos Eissen and Roselien Steur — $26.73

About the Authors:

Koos Eissen is an associate professor and head of the Design Drawing Techniques staff (TU Delft, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, in the Netherlands). He is at present guest-lecturer at the Royal Academy of Arts in The Hague. Roselien Steur is a free-lance visualiser, and lecturer at the HKU/Utrecht School of the Arts, The Faculty of Visual Arts and Design in the Netherlands.

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!


Feature Image via Spencer Nugent
.

The post Cool Tools of Doom: ‘Sketching’ by Koos Eissen and Roselien Steur appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 12, 2018 12:55 PM

SolidSmack Radio | Copy + Paste (Powered by Spotify)

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’ll get the groove going with “Friday Morning” from Khruangbin before diving into irresistible tracks from Gorillaz, Father John Misty, Beck, Fog Lake, and others before wrapping up with “Pay No Mind” from the all-new Beach House. Let’s Go!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

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by SolidSmack at June 12, 2018 12:20 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Check out the Concept to Consumer Tour Coming to a City Near You This Summer

So there I was in Los Angeles for SOLIDWORKS World 2018, minding my own business walking between the hotel and convention center when all of a sudden Mike Sande comes zipping by me on this sleek electric scooter. He was obviously enjoying his time at the event and getting to know one of our local SOLIDWORKS customers in California, URB-E:

Mike SANDE enjoying his conference “commute” on an URB-E at SOLIDWORKS World 2018.


 
URB-E was on-site this year at SOLIDWORKS World to share its story and its epic rideables in the Partner Pavilion. We got to know more about them and how its product was born. URB-E is a story of Concept to Consumer:  a rapid scale-up from a zippy electric scooter startup to crowdfunding success to victory at CES 2017 — they won a ‘best Rideable’ award!

It’s a highly trendy market landscape for electric rideables, which means consumers have myriad product choices and thus empowered. I bet the following top of list for competitive pressures URB-E faces:

  1. Cut production costs: This is crucial for companies like URB-E in order to expand the base of addressable customers through lower price points and maximize margins to fuel growth.
  2. Streamline production/partner collaboration:  If URB-E can cut out cycles with vendors, they can not only reduce cost, but also shorten time to market, and increase operational efficiency in the long run.
  3. Respond to (and create value from) the rise of consumer power: Consumers are empowered more than ever with their ability to research, purchase, and review anything online. How can URB-E use that to their advantage?
  4. Continually innovate and differentiate to keep winning: When consumers search online, there are dozens or hundreds of offerings for any category. How does URB-E stand out in a heavily competitive market?

Thanks to Mike (and URB-E for its generosity in spending time with us!), we got to know a lot about the team over at URB-E and it became clear: we MUST tell their story!  So, this summer, a cast of SOLIDWORKS technical managers will be hitting the road in a first-ever “Concept to Consumer Tour.” Think of this event like a demo of almost a dozen SOLIDWORKS products and how they can work together to enable rapid product development. If you’re new to SOLIDWORKS or leading a team, this is a great chance to witness one of our core workflows across almost our entire portfolio.

Being a design leader means driving efficient development process, fast concept evaluation, drawingless manufacturing deliverables, stunning media and consumables, online marketplaces, and seamless process and project management. And, that means pushing your CAD tools and deliverables to the limit.

The Concept to Consumer event will bring to you the power of end-to-end SOLIDWORKS workflows wrapped in the URB-E case study. Here’s a quick video that will give you a feel for the story and for URB-E:
 

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I am excited to dive deep into the world of URB-E as it scales up for full production in Pasadena, California, and strategizes on what’s next for its offerings, its CAD tools, and its business model. At this event, I get to fill the roll of project manager and emcee. In the coming weeks, expect to hear from my fellow SOLIDWORKS team members, in character, as they respond to the mounting competitive pressures! Check out our event page to learn more about the team and the event!

PS: Even if you aren’t located in the first round of cities, PLEASE sign up so we can include you in the digital event or future events. Click on the image below for more information.

Author information

Brian Zias
Brian Zias
Senior Territory Technical Manager at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS
Brian is a 15-year, expert SOLIDWORKS CAD, FEA, and CFD user and community advocate. His interests include engineering, simulation, team leadership, and predictive analytics. Brian holds a BS in Aerospace Engineering and an MBA in Data Science.

The post Check out the Concept to Consumer Tour Coming to a City Near You This Summer appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Brian Zias at June 12, 2018 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to quickly create a SOLIDWORKS Sketch Normal to Curve

Here is a quick method to create SOLIDWORKS Sketch Normal to Curve without having to create a plane first, and then sketch on that plane.

First, select the curve or edge, as shown in the sheet metal example below, then click Sketch from either the Insert menu or the Sketch CommandManager.

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This will start a sketch on a newly created plane that is normal to the curve, located at the nearest endpoint on the curve.

Upon exiting the sketch, you will notice that a new plane has been created and is located in the FeatureManager design tree.

The post How to quickly create a SOLIDWORKS Sketch Normal to Curve appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at June 12, 2018 12:00 PM

June 11, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

KEEP A STEP AHEAD FROM IMAGINARY TO REAL WORLD

ZONAL SECTION VIEW:

In general, understanding the internal constructions of an assembly model is typically difficult. The components included in the model is very important to visualize what the part (such as internal shafts, cuts, bearings, bushes etc) will look like after cut is open. Also choosing the type of section and location of the cutting plane is more crucial thing than any other. Those crucial things can be done easily and effectively through design of models either in paper drawings or software drawings. Therefore, design and manufacturing communication should be good and enriched in every organization.

However, the interior parts induced in difficult construction design models can understand easily by a helping tool called “Section View”. A Section View is a productivity tool that allow the designers to focus on internal components. A cutting Section View is a view used on a drawing to show an area or hidden part of an object by cutting away or removing some of that object.

A Section View is generated by running the cutting plane through the entire length or some area of the object being sectioned. To create view that we want to use as the parent view can create by start and end direction in respective area of a drawing.

Section View

SOLIDWORKS let the users to come out of an imaginary world and manufacture the part easily no matter how complicated it is. Build a 3D Model utilizing potential tools in SolidWorks and enhance your design communication by one of the special tool called Section View.

ZONAL SECTION VIEW

Here I would like to show an example
  • Go to Flyout Tool bar-> Click Section View (View tool bar) or View-> Display-> Section View.

  • In the Section View Property Manager, below Section Method, select “Zonal”. In that, we can define a section view by selecting one or more zones. Usually Zones in model are defined by the intersection of the selected plane or face and also with bounding box of the model.

ZONAL SECTION VIEW

  • If you require specific distance between two model use section option. And select how the section offset is needed. Offset can be done in two different ways such as Reference Plane and Selected Plane.

  • Reference Section can be taken up to three different planes/faces. Here choose the plane depends on areas to be cut. In addition to the planes to cut, Section 2 and Section 3 can be chosen and control its properties too.

  • The speciality of SolidWorks Zonal Section View is, we are able to include and exclude the bodies or components from the Section View. In this example, I have chosen excluded option for components such as nuts, bolts and washers.

    ZONAL SECTION VIEW

  • Also, One or more Zones can be selected which depends on how an assembly or part model to be highlighted. The intersection Zones shall be controlled in the graphics area.

  • In Zonal Section View, We can highlight the face or body by different colours. So that you can differentiate model easy.
  • ZONAL SECTION VIEW

  • Finally, Click on the “Preview” option. This will enable us to have a look at our model after sectioning.

ZONAL SECTION VIEW

 

  • Here the below picture shows you a defined Zonal section view.

ZONAL SECTION VIEW

Its easy for the manufacturer to understand the assembly of the interior components in the complicated assembly Model

Author information

Natarajan Ramamoorthy
Design Professional with almost 3 decades of experience working with numerous companies, providing designs for new products, VAVE on existing products, conducting Design Audits and Dimensional Management programs. Teaching Finite Element Analysis, Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing (GD&T), Tolerance Stack Up Analysis for well over 2 decades. Certified ASME GDTP Technologist. Education: MSME from The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA Past: Consultant, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI, USA

The post KEEP A STEP AHEAD FROM IMAGINARY TO REAL WORLD appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Natarajan Ramamoorthy at June 11, 2018 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

Project Milestone to Be First 3D Printed Residential Community

Project Milestone

The New Story charity organization may have beaten them to the first punch, but that sure won’t stop the Eindhoven University of Technology, contractor Van Wijnen, real estate company Vesteda, materials company Saint Gobain-Weber Beamix, and engineering firm Witteveen+Bos from setting up five 3D printed concrete houses in Bosrijk, a relatively new residential district in Eindhoven, Netherlands.

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Dubbed Project Milestone, these houses will be built consecutively as construction improves over the course of the project.

Project Milestone Project Milestone

The first house to be built in the new residential district will be a single-story living space with three rooms, a wooden roof structure (meaning it won’t be completely 3D printed) and cover 95 square meters. As for the succeeding homes, they will have more than one floor and feature 3D printed concrete floors and roofs (making them completely 3D printed).

Project Milestone

Printing of the first house will be done by a concrete printer at the Eindhoven University of Technology and start this year. The building will be ready for occupation mid-2019, but they’re hoping the process will be shortened as they get more familiar with it. The succeeding houses will be printed by an on-site printer, further shortening production time.

Project Milestone

As for the design of the houses, well, see for yourself. They aren’t exactly residences you’d find in a suburban neighborhood; more like hollowed-out boulders repurposed as living spaces. Thanks to 3D printing, constructing these irregularly-shaped buildings is a lot easier than chiseling concrete.

Other advantages of 3D printing besides a freedom of form include reduced carbon dioxide emissions when making the concrete as well as being able to customize the house layers. Different colors and wall materials with varying functions can be applied to specific areas of the house depending on their purpose. Instead of mixing in a different batch of concrete for another wall, an engineer can program the 3D printer to change the composition midway through printing, making it a lot faster and convenient.

They may not have been pioneers when it comes to 3D printing houses, but they sure want to make theirs as post-modern looking as possible. You can find more on these boulder-looking bunkers on the Project Milestone webpage.

The post Project Milestone to Be First 3D Printed Residential Community appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 11, 2018 01:09 PM

The Monday List 24.18 | Design and Engineering Stories We’re Reading

Elon Musk Tesla

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Tears ‘R’ Us: The World’s Biggest Toy Store Didn’t Have to Die

An object lesson in financial mismanagement and miscalculation from the fallen Toys “R” Us.

Tears ‘R’ Us: The World’s Biggest Toy Store Didn’t Have to Die

Inside Tesla’s Model 3 Factory

If Elon Musk can make this dance of robots and people work, it will change how cars are made.

Inside Tesla’s Model 3 Factory

The Race to Send Robots to Mine the Ocean Floor

As worldwide demand rises for electric vehicle batteries and wind turbines, along with next-generation technologies and weapon systems, demand for these metals has taken off. And the seabed is a prime target for those mining operations.

The Race to Send Robots to Mine the Ocean Floor

It’s official: Ikea is no longer just a furniture company

Ikea is partnering with Adidas, Lego, and Sonos to sell you everything.

It’s official: Ikea is no longer just a furniture company

Apple has no idea what’s next, so it’s just banging on the same old drum

If you want to witness a company that’s simultaneously in its prime and losing control over its own narrative, look no further than WWDC, Apple’s second-most splashy event of the year, designed to offer a glimpse of the future.

Apple WWDC

Engineers aim for the stars with new rocket engine

A ‘self-eating’ rocket engine which could place small satellites in orbit more easily and more affordably is under development at universities in Scotland and Ukraine.

Rocket Science

The post The Monday List 24.18 | Design and Engineering Stories We’re Reading appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 11, 2018 01:03 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS Skills: The Difference Between Educated and Hirable

Engineering students at the University of South Carolina (USC) feel so strongly about the value of SOLIDWORKS that they showed up in droves on the Saturday before finals to gain exposure to the most popular CAD tool in the industry. For them, having SOLIDWORKS skills is a must, not an option if they want to rise to the top of the list of the candidates in a competitive job market.


This message is not unique to students of the University of South Carolina, Application Engineers (AEs) all over the world are in demand for putting on events where students and faculty alike receive an introduction to SOLIDWORKS.

In this case, Chris Duchaine from TriMech organized an event on Saturday, April 21st at the University of South Carolina, which does not offer SOLIDWORKS as one of its CAD tools. Demand for this event was so strong that he had to cap the registration at 90 students and people stayed from noon to 5 PM.

According to participants, they attended this event to get an introduction to SOLIDWORKS, to receive a student version of the software and because they believe that SOLIDWORKS certifications are a difference maker for getting hired.

Let’s hear from Anil Kircaliari, ME student, President of Society of Manufacturing Engineers USC chapter, event organizer.

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Ready to test drive SOLIDWORKS now?
Want to plan a similar event? Contact your Value-Added Reseller.

Author information

Mai Doan
Mai Doan
Mai is a Territory Technical Manager for SOLIDWORKS

The post SOLIDWORKS Skills: The Difference Between Educated and Hirable appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mai Doan at June 11, 2018 12:41 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to Adopt Model Based Definition (MBD) Guide

Download the “How-To Adopt Model Based Definition Guide” to learn best practices that will help you shorten the learning curve for adopting MBD and achieve the fastest possible ROI.

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Companies initially adopt Model Based Definition to improve communication with manufacturing and suppliers, but its benefits expand well beyond dialogue. In fact results from research conducted by Tech-Clarity indicate that among the companies that have adopted MBD, a resounding 89 percent are either satisfied or extremely satisfied by their results.

Download Tech-Clarity’s white paper to learn how you can reap benefits, which include:

  • 61 percent fewer manufacturing mistakes/less rework
  • 50 percent improvement in communications with suppliers
  • 33 percent happier employees focused on more value-added work
  • 28 percent shorter design cycles/time savings
  • 22 percent faster access to product information
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The post How to Adopt Model Based Definition (MBD) Guide appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at June 11, 2018 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: Preppin’ Weapon Ergonomic Sanding Blocks

Sanding Blocks

Those wood parts won’t smooth themselves!

But how often do you spend wrestling a piece of sandpaper around weird edges—only to be left with a half-crooked and totally botched result? There’s a remedy for that — and we can’t recommend it enough.

The Preppin’ Weapon sanding block is a workshop necessity that lets users load sandpaper and adjust tension quickly and easily. And while just one Preppin’ Weapon sanding block will go a long way in your process, arming yourself with a four-pack for four different levels of grit will take it to another level—no need to stop and reload!

For power users, the Preppin’ Weapon also lets you stack up to four sheets of sandpaper in each block for quick tearaways when a new sheet is needed without stopping to reset. Fast and consistent sanding has never been this easy.

Preppin’ Weapon Ergonomic Sanding Blocks (4-Pack) — $79.98

Features:

  • Dramatically reduces sanding time
  • Color-coded (yellow, blue, green and red) for different grit
  • Easy to use wet or dry with multiple materials
  • Ergonomic for reducing pain points
  • Preload multiple sandpaper sheets into each block
  • Durable construction with Lifetime Warranty

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: Preppin’ Weapon Ergonomic Sanding Blocks appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 11, 2018 11:13 AM

June 10, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Time Saving Tips You Can Use Everyday

There’s just 24 hours in a day and it seems like we all want to get more and more done in that time. With a fixed amount of time, the only way to get more done is to increase efficiency. Here are five things I use everyday to save time. These tips will super charge your SOLIDWORKS efficiency so you can get more done. No matter what you make or how you’re using SOLIDWORKS, these tips can be used to help save some time.

 

  • Mouse gestures: With just a swipe of your mouse you can activate commands. When you use mouse gestures it’s like you don’t slow down for even a second as you go from one thing to the next. After a little practice you’ll be so quick with mouse gestures that you won’t even see the wheel appear. It’s completely customizable and context sensitive meaning you have a different set of commands for sketch, part, assembly, and drawing modes.

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  • The S-key: By pressing the “S” key on your keyboard you’ll bring up the short cut bar. This gives you access to a set of commands right next to your mouse. There are two major pros to using the shortcut bar: By visually seeing the commands, you won’t have to worry about forgetting how you customized the interface. You’re not limited to only a handful of commands like mouse gestures which brings more commands to your finger tips. As with mouse gestures this is completely customizable and context sensitive.

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  • The D-Key: The D-key was a recent addition to SOLIDWORKS a few years ago which can help you save a lot of time by bringing the confirmation corner or breadcrumbs directly to your mouse pointer. More on breadcrumbs below.
  • Bread-Crumbs: These were hinted at in the last tip but these bring everything related to your selection directly next to your mouse. Think of this as a listing of anything you can access in the FeatureManager.

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  • Command Search: Don’t spend time looking through menus to find that command you need to use. Just use the command search to access the command. Just type it in the search bar at the top of your screen and launch the command directly from the list.

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And those are the five things I use on daily basis to help save time with SOLIDWORKS. As you can see they are not unique to a job function and can be used by any user in any industry. These aren’t specific to weldments, sheetmetal, drawings, or only meant for industrial designers. These are 5 things that should be implemented in your workflow to help you shave a few seconds off your process which will add up to significant time savings.

 

Here’s a bonus tip: after customizing your interface and getting used to your SOLIDWORKS set up save your settings you can take them with you to load on to any machine you might be using.

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Author information

Stephen Petrock
Since 1998, TriMech has helped our clients design better products by partnering with them and offering, not only CAD, CAE, PDM, FEA, CAM software products, but also by engineering solutions involving full-time and temporary staffing, contract design, analysis and drafting services, rapid prototyping, custom programming and implementation services. TriMech is a value-added reseller of SOLIDWORKS and Stratasys 3D Printers in the Mid-Atlantic and South-East including New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana.

The post Time Saving Tips You Can Use Everyday appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Stephen Petrock at June 10, 2018 09:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Umbrella Tutorial

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Umbrella: There are two configurations in this multi-body solid model. One configuration is open and one that is collapsed. A master “layout” sketch helps to plan and organize the ribs and stretchers in the two configurations. With help from the layout sketch, the geometry can be easily created and the components line up as desired. A few surface features are used to create the canopy. There are several examples of basic sweeps and circular patterns. Other features in this model include revolves, move/copy body, surface boundary, knit surface, and thicken.

Download this moderate file to discover more about layout sketches and configurations. Want to learn more? You can view the full list of previous Part Reviewer Tutorials here.

DraftSight Download: In conjunction with DraftSight, Dassault Systèmes’ 2D CAD product, the 2D drawing(.dwg) file of the Umbrella Tutorial is now available for download here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Umbrella Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at June 10, 2018 03:00 PM

June 09, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Quickly Delete Surface Holes In SOLIDWORKS

Have you ever imported surfaces from an outside design system, only to be greeted with surface holes, gaps, and voids in the resulting model? We have identified some easy techniques to address these situations. Even longtime SOLIDWORKS users may be surprised by how easy it can be. Watch our video to see a few of our go-to commands, and be sure to try these tools on your next project!

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Author information

GSC
GSC fuels customer success with 3D engineering solutions for design, simulation, data management, technical documentation, and 3D printing, as well as the most comprehensive consulting, technical support, and training in the industry. As a leading provider of SOLIDWORKS solutions and Stratasys 3D printing technologies, GSC’s world-class team of dedicated professionals have helped numerous companies innovate and increase productivity by leveraging advanced technologies to drive 3D business success. Founded in 1989, GSC is headquartered in Germantown, WI. For more information about GSC, please visit www.gsc-3d.com.

The post Quickly Delete Surface Holes In SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GSC at June 09, 2018 03:00 PM

June 08, 2018

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: The Wood Spider’s Howl

ShuoLin-Liu-art

Peaks tipped in the trees of a juniper freeze rose out ahead of us. Nine times out of ten you wouldn’t see, wouldn’t hear, the wood spider’s howl but, on a night like this, your chance was better than others, when in your bait pouch, you carried these links.

ShuoLin Liu – EVA units and other armor-clad characters with a style that’s both blocky and refreshing.

Funny Monsters – I love hand drawn monsters. So does Robert Romanowicz apparently. His illustration style is marvelous as is the sketchy style of these new creatures.

Milk Truck Garden – Now, this landscape project looks like a bit o’ fun, ya know, if you have a small milk truck available.

Rhythm Garden – A gravity-based musical instrument set in a VR environment of your own making/ Place and position objects in space as the spheres fall.

New Currency – Love this US currency makeover by Industrial Designer Andrey Avgust. A switch to portrait mode – could do with some of the fingerprinting though.

Fire Pits+ – If you’ve been contemplating making your own fire pit, may I present some inspiration – Death Star, River Run, Savannah, and more.

Beat Saber – I can’t help but think this would be better applied against opponents… and not in spandex.

Dodge Challenger RT – A 1970s model and an absolute beauty. One of only 34 convertible versions produced, on auction starting at $199,900.

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3.5 Nation Army – 7 nation Army by White Stripes, but with every other beat removed. A slew more of these by YouTuber EveryOtherBeat.

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The post Friday Smackdown: The Wood Spider’s Howl appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at June 08, 2018 09:31 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Using xDesign features to create a Wheelbarrow

Back in early May, I modeled a wheelbarrow (sans fasteners) in xDesign.  You can find the tweet I posted by clicking this link https://twitter.com/Edsonius/status/994300274444525568. This blog post is all part of an ongoing effort to display and introduce xDesign features, as well as push the boundaries to make the product a CAD tool that everyone can use.

For this technical blog, I show how I create the bucket of the wheelbarrow with a new tool called Through Points. I start with a master sketch to drive the top and bottom planes that own the sketches for the top and bottom of the bucket. Using the Thru Points feature, I select the end points of the sketches to draw a spline that is not bound to an X, Y, or Z direction. The Loft feature, just like in SOLIDWORKS helps create the body, by selecting the top and bottom sketches, and then Shell the object by selecting the top face.

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The workflow, as you can see in the video, has a similar workflow that you would find in SOLIDWORKS. The Loft default option, Vertices, creates an error because that option cannot calculate the correct geometry as both sketches have a different vertices count. The Tangency Discontinuity option, which has more solving power to create the desired geometry, produced exactly what I needed, especially after selecting the splines for guides.

I initially created the geometry for the bucket of the Wheelbarrow using the Extrude feature, Draft, then added a few Radii. This approach would have worked fine but I wanted to observe the workflow with the Through Points feature to witness the behavior of this new tool.

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To create the rounded lip at the top of the bucket was easy. Create a sketch on the right plane, make the sketch coincident to the edge of the lip, then use the inside edge of the wheelbarrow bucket to Sweep along the path, just as you would in SOLIDWORKS.

There were some challenges to create this part. Sketching can lead you down a narrow path sometimes. I am not sure if it is because I went to fast, or if I inadvertently did something during the sketching that made it go sideways, metaphorically speaking. The good news; I was not able to reproduce this problem and the recreated sketch was fine. I also do not like how the Design Tree (called Design Manager) does not allow to be grouped or to be unflatten. This could make for a very long tree structure for even the smallest of parts.

I am hoping the next xDesign update, which will be around mid-June, makes improvements on sketching tools, assembly mates, and has more user options to make xDesign customizable. I have heard that the “S” will make its debut in the aforementioned release. Now that is awesome news and even more reasons for me to get a replacement “S” key for my laptop. If you are not using the “S” key in SOLIDWORKS, and don’t plan to use it in xDesign…you are missing out!!!

Nonetheless, I am confident the next round of improvements will bring xDesign up another level. The product today, compared to the beta version I first used back in December of 2017, is vastly better and much more fun to use.

Just an FYI…I have limited access to info on new tools or enhancements in xDesign. I mostly find them on my own which is preferred; it also forces me to do a deep dive to figure out how features work. This is valuable information for the Product Definition Team when I share notes and recorded sessions using #xDesign. It also helps them determine if they need to change how the feature behaves.

Want to join us? Signup for the SOLDWORKS xDesign Lighthouse at: https://www.solidworks.com/how-to-buy/join-xdesign-lighthouse-program or just click on the banner below.

Author information

Ed Gebo
Ed Gebo
Owner & Designer of Digital Detail & Design. Lover of Life! I can talk craft beer just as good as I can SOLIDWORKS. Follow your passion and make a difference!

The post Using xDesign features to create a Wheelbarrow appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Ed Gebo at June 08, 2018 06:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Series – Deadpool Inspired Tool Holder – Part 1

If you have never heard of Deadpool – you may want to get to know some of the other characters in the Marvel universe before introducing yourself to the Merc with a Mouth. He can be a bit…abrasive. But for those of you in the SOLIDWORKS community ready for an awesome Deadpool inspired tutorial, check out our 4-part series where we’ll be running through working with imported mesh geometry to create a Deadpool inspired tool holder. There’ no better place for a maker to store all of his sharp tools than in Deadpool’s skull. Don’t’ worry, he can take it.

We’d like to give a shout out to Britt Michelsen, who put together a great Instructable on designing and building a similar Deadpool knife block, and who supplied the original mesh file that we’ll be working with. Take a look at the video description below with instructions on how to download the mesh file we used, as well as the completed SOLIDWORKS model we’re creating in this tutorial series.

Let’s kickoff part 1 of the series by getting to know the various options for importing mesh files into SOLIDWORKS.

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Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Series – Deadpool Inspired Tool Holder – Part 1 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at June 08, 2018 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Most Read SolidSmack Stories of the Week — June 8th, 2018

Take a Behind-The-Scenes Look at the Insane Electric-Powered Bollinger B1

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

Watch a Bladesmith Turn an Old Drillbit Into a Karambit Knife

Deadly objects crafted by and from molten metal are nothing new here on Solidsmack, but it isn’t every day you see an old hardware material get repurposed into a Southeast Asian curved knife.

Watch a Bladesmith Turn an Old Drillbit Into a Karambit Knife

Block-Loving Car Nuts Will Find the LEGO Bugatti Chiron Right Up Their Alley

Continuing the tradition of making miniatures of some of the world’s most remarkable automobile designs, LEGO and French car manufacturer Bugatti have teamed up to create one of the most complex block builds you’ll ever find: a 1:8 scale LEGO Bugatti Chiron. The stunning model measures 14cm high, 25cm wide, and is made up of 3,599 pieces which all play a part in crafting the car’s many features.

Block-Loving Car Nuts Will Find the LEGO Bugatti Chiron Right Up Their Alley

How to Survive the Gig Economy (5 Mistakes to Avoid)

The gig economy is great. You can hail a cheap cab home with Uber, get McDonald’s delivered with Postmates, beer with Drizly, sit back and watch someone from Task Rabbit assemble your Amazon delivered furniture while your hair is cut with Priv. The positive of the gig economy is that everything can be outsourced, however, therein lies the negative, everything can be outsourced.

How to Survive the Gig Economy (5 Mistakes to Avoid)

Take a Behind-The-Scenes Look at the Insane Electric-Powered Bollinger B1

Last year, we took a quick peek at the Bollinger Motors B1 – a humongous off-road vehicle powered exclusively by electricity. Big, blocky, and just as transformable as any Transformer, this puppy was made to adjust to almost any outdoor need you can imagine.

Take a Behind-The-Scenes Look at the Insane Electric-Powered Bollinger B1

The Engineer’s Curse — What is It and Do You Have It?!

If you went to college on your path to becoming an engineer/designer/maker you may have learned there are a lot of occupational hazards you were not warned about in that schooling. Even if you didn’t, I bet there were a lot of nasty surprises. Like, what about being cursed? I don’t mean in a profanity way, but more in the black-magic-bad-mojo way. Did anyone warn you of the Engineer’s Curse? More importantly: ARE YOU AFFLICTED?!

The Engineer’s Curse — What is It and Do You Have It?!

Newcastle Scientists Just Created the World’s First 3D-Printed Cornea

Sufferers of corneal blindness due to burns, diseases, and other misfortunes can see the light once again; for Newcastle University researchers have found a way to 3D print human corneas in just 10 minutes.

3D printed eyeball

The post The Most Read SolidSmack Stories of the Week — June 8th, 2018 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 08, 2018 01:12 PM

The Javelin Blog

A closer look at 3D Printing Support Structures and their effect on part wash time

Soluble Supports

The use of soluble support material lifts one of the biggest barriers in designing for Additive Manufacturing (AM), which is the generation of complex structures and embedded channels within parts. Soluble 3D Printing Support Structures are designed to dissolve in a wash station, leaving only the model material behind.

For context, the “wash station” that I’m referring to represents any circulation tank system which involves submerging a printed part in a heated bath with a specific amount of added cleaning solution.

The cleaning process is naturally very slow, and it’s not that easy figuring out how much time it will take to clean your specific part. Unfortunately there is no tried-and-trusted method you can follow to accurately determine wash times for parts. You can make very broad estimates, but there are many factors that are constantly at play that could affect the dissolving process. The ones we’ll cover in this blog include:

  • Wash station temperature
  • Part complexity
  • Support structure type (Basic, sparse, box, surround, SMART)
  • Support structure density in relation to model

Wash Station Temperature

Wash station temperatures are set according to the support material used in the printing process. Stratasys offers documentation regarding FDM support removal on their website. The full document can be found here. The document includes a table showing the recommended temperatures for cleaning parts with each type of support material:

Setting the wash tank to higher temperatures than the ones listed in this table could potentially damage parts.

Setting the wash tank to higher temperatures than the ones listed in this table could potentially damage parts.

Part Complexity

Take a look at this part:

Filleted cube with a series of holes on the top.

Filleted cube with a series of holes on the top.

Looking at this part, it’s evident that there shouldn’t be that much 3D Printing Support Structures in the first place, meaning the wash time will be very short. But if we look at the part a little closer, we can see that may not be the case:

There are lots of little channels within the block that need to be filled with support material.

There are lots of little channels within the block that need to be filled with support material.

Every single one of these small channels will be filled with support material during the printing process:

3D Printing Support Structures

Support material used to fill in the channels. You can see an isolated view of support structures using GrabCAD Print.

These support structures track the inner surfaces of the channels all the way through the part. Channels like these take a lot longer to clean out, as they don’t get as much exposure to the wash solution. As I mentioned before, there is no accurate way of determining wash times, but from my experience with printing parts like these, I would expect at least a 6-hour cleaning process.

Now lets look at this next part:

This is a simple cradle for a phone. It has no inner channels or complex structures.

This is a simple cradle for a phone. It has no inner channels or complex structures.

A part like this doesn’t have any super intricate features that require concealed support placement. The wash solution can chew away at the structures relatively easily, meaning the total wash time is significantly decreased.

The supports for the cradle are easier to clean, as they're out in the open.

The supports for the cradle are easier to clean, as they’re out in the open.

This specific part took about 2.5 hours to clean.

Part complexity is the biggest factor when determining wash times, but it’s not the only factor. The next thing to take a look at is the type of 3D Printing Support Structures used for the printing process.

Types of 3D Printing Support Structures

3D Printing Support Structures are generated by software but is based on user input. There are a few options available for support generation, mainly “sparse”, “surround”, and “SMART”. A few other structure types exist as well, such as “basic” and “box”, which are variations of “sparse” and “surround” respectively.

  • Sparse support uses the simplest support generation method to build structures based on layer overhang. Overhang angle is different for every printer, but the average tends to be around 45 degrees.
  • Surround support engulfs the entire model within a support shell in order to maintain stability during the printing process. This type of structure is great for parts that are tall and have small surface areas.
  • SMART support uses a series of optimization algorithms to determine the best possible support generation while using the least amount of material. It’s the best option for most 3D printing applications, and is set as the default support type in GrabCAD Print.
One model can have many types of support structures.

One model can have many types of support structures.

SMART supports take the least time to dissolve, purely due to their material optimisation. Surround supports, on the other hand, take the most time to dissolve, as they engulf the entire part with support material. A good example of this can be seen below:

Here you can see the comparison between two extremes of support structures.

Here you can see the comparison between two extremes of support structures.

You can probably infer which of these parts will have a shorter wash time. I highlighted a layer of the part to show the toolpaths for each print job. Notice how the toolpaths for Surround support structure look more dense than the SMART support? This leads into the next factor for determining wash times.

Support Structure Density

Looking at the image above one more time, you can see a significant difference in the densities of material that is being laid down for each layer. SMART supports are “lighter”, whereas Surround supports are a lot “heavier”. These densities cannot be changed in GrabCAD Print, however can be manipulated using Insight. Insight’s toolpath customisation parameters allow you to set distances between parallel and adjacent contours and rasters. It’s not a perfect compensation strategy to reduce wash time, but the availability is there nonetheless.

Final Thoughts

For most applications, leaving parts to wash for around 3 to 4 hours (with the recommended temperature) does the trick. However, there are some cases where the amount of support material being used can be drastically decreased with a quick part reorientation or change of support type. The key is to understand the behaviour of soluble support material and part geometry. Of course, every printing application has a unique purpose, but knowing some of the information stated in this blog, you might be able to clean your parts and implement them faster than before.

The post A closer look at 3D Printing Support Structures and their effect on part wash time appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Eissa Ahmad at June 08, 2018 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Keep On (Monster) Truckin’: Speeding Towards the Finish Line

Rob, Albert, and Sal in the mini-Max-D

 

The wheels have been painted, the body has been hard coated and sanded umpteenth times, the decals have been laid out, the LEDs have been tested, the chassis has been fitted, and the last week of work arrived. Yes, the SOLIDWORKS build team is finally seeing light at the end of the tunnel their monster truck costume has been racing through these past frantic weeks, and the closer they get to their end goal, the more excited and nervous they are.

Any free time the build team has is spent in the Dassault Systèmes airplane hangar. There, they have done an unimaginable amount of hard coating, gluing, testing, and sanding (“My phone doesn’t recognize my fingerprints anymore,” said team member Jeff Turgeon. “I must have sanded them off.”). Hard coating, as a process, is easy to do on paper—it’s just a list of steps to follow to apply the coat evenly. But in reality, it’s a much more difficult process. Annie has mastered the art of hard coating, but it’s still a process that involves precision in thickness, and then once the coat is applied you have to know how to sand so you don’t ruin details.

Chinloo with her toothbrush-sander

Chinloo with her toothbrush-sander

 

Speaking of details, the face of the mini-Max-D is one of, if not the, most detailed pieces on the costume. The original idea was to sand it with a Dremel, but none of the Dremel’s in the lab were right for the intricate sanding that needed to be done. So Chinloo brought in her electric toothbrush! A piece of sandpaper was attached to the toothbrush head, and the mini-Max-D faces were brushed/sanded to perfection with a simple hack.

The team has actually used a lot of hacks in their build. When the for the chassis switched from 3 wheels to 4 wheels, the way the weight of the attached pieces fell on the PVC pipes had to be taken into account. The way you design something in a 3D simulation doesn’t necessary reflect how it will come out in real life, where gravity exists, and the team could only add so many T-pipes and crossbars for stability. Soon, there was no room left on the chassis for more crossbars and T’s to be added. So Annie, Rob, and Sal decided to repurpose another piece that was being added to the chassis: the aluminum U-channels. The U-channels were being used to hold up the acrylic pieces that would be attached to the costume, and now they have another purpose. U-channels will be used as a cross brace to stabilize two of chassis sides as more costume parts are added on.

Jonah in the chassis

Jonah in the chassis

 

Stability is good for a lot of reasons, and that stability was tested when Jonah had his costume’s dry fit! On the last Wednesday in May, Chinloo, Sal, Albert, and Rob traveled down to Jonah’s home to test the costume in person. While his younger siblings played in the yard, Jonah finally got to put part of his costume on.  His wheelchair has eyehooks, normally used for stability in a moving vehicle, and the team was able to attach the chassis to the wheelchair. It worked beautifully! Jonah was able to reach his chair’s max speed of six miles per hour and brake with the chassis attached, no problem. Jonah was over the moon; he was even able to take his chassis off-roading into his grassy backyard, rolling over rough terrain like a real monster truck. There was no lag, no rattling, no wobbling, the chassis stayed together perfectly—everything the team wanted. “I was like, “Whew, thank God!” laughed Rob. 

The team working on Jonah’s costume with him inside

 

The only hiccup during the dry fit was the right bar of the chassis hitting Jonah’s hand as he turned. There was some scrambling among the team members present about how to fix the issue—should they add a piece of foam to cushion his arm? Should they take Jonah off center so his arm isn’t so close to the pipe? Then Sal had a simple, perfect idea. He asked Jonah is his seat could move up and down. Jonah moved his seat up by half an inch and the bar was cleared. With new measurements of Jonah’s eyesight and height, the team will have rethink their plans for attaching the truck body to the chassis. Fortunately, it’s not a huge concern; they have options. When building the casters, they created ½ inch shims, and they can add two shims underneath each caster on the chassis to give it extra height. They also have some wiggle room with the size of the truck body itself. The truck body already sits a little high and the original plan was to drill holes into it so it would sit lower on the chassis. With the change in Jonah’s seat height, they may not have to drill the holes and can just glue the body to the chassis’ PVC caps.

A rare group photo (this isn’t even everybody on the team!)

 

There’s still so much to do. Detail painting on the wheels, painting the body, fitting the body on the frame, all the electronics, LEDs, and wiring, and still more sanding and hard coats. But even with all the work before them, the team is feeling good. Nervous, but still optimistic about finishing on time and giving Jonah the most incredible monster truck costume any kid has ever seen.

The day this blog posts will be one day before Monster Jam, where the SOLIDWORKS build team is going to reveal Jonah’s completed costume to him for the first time. He doesn’t know that his costume will be complete by then—Jonah still thinks he’s getting this costume for Halloween. He thinks this is just a normal, fun family time at Monster Jam (hopefully he hasn’t been reading this series!). At the time of writing, there is little more than a week left to build the mini-Max-D, and the team is chomping at the bit to finish up their epic creation. Will they make it in time? Will Jonah have the experience of a life time? We’ll find out tomorrow and we’ll all keep on (monster) truckin’!

Keep On Monster Truckin': Speeding Towards the Finish Line

Help support Magic Wheelchair and amazing kiddos like Jonah!

SOLIDWORKS is working hard to make Jonah’s dreams come true, and helping the non-profit Magic Wheelchair achieve its goal of providing kids in wheelchairs with epic costumes. SOLIDWORKS is funding Jonah’s costume build in its entirety, but we invite all our readers to support Magic Wheelchair in Jonah’s name! If you visit this classy.org page, you can donate directly to Magic Wheelchair and help support them and all the lives they touch with their great work. Stayed tuned for more updates on this exciting build and always remember to keep on (monster) truckin’!

SOLIDWORKS is partnering with the Magic Wheelchair to create an over-the-top costume for a child in a wheelchair. According to their mission statement, “Magic Wheelchair builds epic costumes for kiddos in wheelchairs —  at no cost to families.” Keep On (Monster) Truckin’ is an ongoing series dedicated to updating our readers on the current project’s progress.

Read about Jonah’s costume from the beginning!

Thank you to all who support our team, including Magic WheelchairMonster JamPermobil, and MLC CAD.

Author information

Sara Zuckerman
Sara Zuckerman
Sara Zuckerman is a SOLIDWORKS Education Contractor, Social Media and Marketing. Formerly an intern, Sara has a B.A. in Writing, Literature, and Publishing from Emerson College and recently earned a Certificate in Web Development from MassBay Community College. She is excited about utilizing this blog to combine her two passions, writing and technology.

The post Keep On (Monster) Truckin’: Speeding Towards the Finish Line appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Sara Zuckerman at June 08, 2018 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: ‘The Design of Everyday Things’ by Don Norman

When it comes to product design books, it’s not always easy to eliminate glamorized portfolios from those that get down to the real nitty-gritty of product design. And when it comes to those actually worth reading, Don Norman will never do you wrong.

As a strong (and very early) advocate for user-centered design, Norman is a pioneer in UX and UI design principles that exist in many of the products we use today.

In his book, The Design of Everyday Things, Norman dives deeper into not just why…but how smart design is changing the landscape all around us—and what you can do to give your designs a competitive edge. If you haven’t read this one yet, consider it essential for your bookshelf. If you’ve already read it, consider giving it another spin.

The Design of Everyday Things by Don Norman — $12.92

About Author Don Norman:

Don Norman is a voyeur, always watching, always on the lookout for some common-day occurrence that everyone else takes for granted but that when examined, yields insight into the human condition. (If you are rushing to catch a train, how do you know if you got to the station on time? Empty platform? You probably are too late. People milling about, looking at their watches, peering down the tracks? Probably OK. Who needs technology when people are so informative, even if as an accidental byproduct of their activities.

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Feature image via Reid Schlegel

The post Cool Tools of Doom: ‘The Design of Everyday Things’ </br>by Don Norman appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 08, 2018 11:13 AM

June 07, 2018

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Ryan uses xDesign to tackle “Designing for Kids”

Can you tell me about yourself?

I’m an engineer by day and a gamer by night. When not doing either of those, I’m usually taking care of things around the house, working on side projects, and spending time with my wife and baby son. Sleep happens too, somewhere in there.

Professionally, I’m employed by Apogee Instruments as their lead mechanical engineer. Apogee sells environmental instrumentation for weather stations, research, agriculture, and more. My role there is to design and develop the products we sell. I work with research scientists and electrical engineers during the development process, bringing together marketing and technical requirements, overall aesthetics, and manufacturing/production considerations. I typically oversee and develop a product from inception to completion, handling everything from conceptual sketching and prototyping to component sourcing and production training. Out of all that I do there, my favorite is taking ideas from concept to reality using SOLIDWORKS.

What problem did you want to solve?

I spent about a week and a half of the contest period brainstorming ideas and looking for problems to solve. I poked around in xDesign a bit, eager to give it a spin, but didn’t want to dive in too far before I had something to work on. It turns out that I didn’t have to look too far. Our son is a large part of our daily lives, and being a parent is full of challenges and opportunities for improvement.

We strive to keep him well fed, safe, happy, and healthy.  He loves pacifiers, so we often end up taking them with us wherever we go. As most parents know, they can easily pick up dirt, germs, lint, or hair when not in use. Gross. What I usually end up doing is washing them off periodically, but that’s both wasteful and inconvenient.

What solution did you come up with?

I decided to design a pacifier that could fold up to protect itself, and reduce the overall size for storage. I have seen a couple examples of this on the market, but I wanted to try to give it a unique spin, and more importantly, see if I could do it in all within xDesign. It took some time to figure out, along with plenty of trial and error. In the end I came up with a solution that worked as intended. Most excitingly, I was able to export my design and 3D print a prototype to play around with.

How did you use SOLIDWORKS xDesign?

I used xDesign on both Windows and macOS using an internet browser. I started with sketches on paper and then used xDesign to give them shape. The process proved to be pretty enlightening, as it was both limiting and liberating.

Using xDesign presented some frustrations, which is expected from new software. The version I was given access to had some missing features, bugs, and occasional crashes. This version was a bit tedious when trying to bounce back and forth between assemblies and their individual components, a process much slower than SOLIDWORKS desktop. I also struggled without 3D mouse support and mouse gestures, which have become second nature to me. When time is limited, these can be some tough pills to swallow.

On the bright side, there were some great features I came across. I liked the simplicity of changing from an extruded boss to a cut, and the more intuitive mating features. There were a few times I realized that SOLIDWORKS could learn a thing or two from xDesign. Sure, there are still a lot of missing features, but for the ones present I could tell that plenty of thought had gone into making them right.

I appreciated being able to leave one computer, and pick up right where I left off on my home laptop, which cannot run typical CAD software. I also experimented with my phone, and while harder than a keyboard/mouse setup, the potential and utility is clear. With continued development, I wouldn’t be surprised to see xDesign rival, or perhaps surpass, the capabilities of SOLIDWORKS.

Want to join us? Signup for the SOLDWORKS xDesign Lighthouse at: https://www.solidworks.com/how-to-buy/join-xdesign-lighthouse-program or just click on the banner below.

Author information

Divi Lohiya
Divi Lohiya
Divi is a Senior Manager, Product Portfolio Management at SOLIDWORKS. He is passionate about how new technologies are coming together to change the way how products are designed, made and sold and engaging/teaching kids in STEM activities. Divi graduated from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Bombay with a dual degree in Mechanical Engineering and a Masters degree in Engineering from University of Texas at Austin.

The post Ryan uses xDesign to tackle “Designing for Kids” appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Divi Lohiya at June 07, 2018 06:20 PM

SolidSmack

Breakthrough: Ultra-Detailed Voxel-based 3D Printing Is Nigh

Incredibly detailed 3D print

Researchers from MIT have developed a new technique to enable highly detailed, multi-material 3D prints from 3D scanners.

“By using voxel-printing methods, superfluous preparation overhead and loss in detail can be prevented. This approach enables one to directly translate volumetric property gradients to 3D printable material gradients. Hence, if preservation of the given data representation is of importance, including volumetric color, transparency, or continuous material property transitions, our method presents a valuable alternative to current practices.”

3D prints have long been produced with models generated from 3D scanners, but in almost all cases these prints are a representation of the outer surface of the scanned object only – and then usually only in a single material or color.

This has limited use of 3D printing in many industries. Consider a 3D scan obtained by an MRI or CAT scan device that represents the internal structure of a person’s body. The “external shape” of such a 3D model is not instructive: it’s a box. What is of interest is the differentiated interior where different tissue types make up the structure.

Those structures have been impossible to 3D print unless they were crudely extracted from the 3D model and printed separately. But then the context of the medical situation is less clear.

The MIT researchers were able to develop a voxel-based analysis technique in which such medical data is transformed into a highly detailed 3D multi-material 3D model that can then be 3D printed on certain devices.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_95573" style="width: 852px">The workflow required to transform medical 3D scans into high resolution voxel 3D prints<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The workflow required to transform medical 3D scans into high-resolution voxel 3D prints</figcaption></figure>

In particular, they used Stratasys’ PolyJet technology, best on the full-color J750 device. By mapping the internal structures to different material combinations, and surrounding them with a bulk of transparent material, they can now 3D print actual representations of individual 3D medical scans with tremendous resolution and fidelity.

To do so they transform the incoming point cloud obtained from the medical scanner, likely in DICOM format, and convert it layer by layer into a complex geometry of multi-material voxels in very high resolution. This does require some thought as to the nature of the structures and an intent for how to perform the mapping, which I presume would vary depending on the exact purpose of the print.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_95574" style="width: 882px">A detailed transparent 3D print of an actual human hand obtained from medical scan data<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">A detailed transparent 3D print of an actual human hand obtained from medical scan data</figcaption></figure>

The applications of this are several. The researchers mention:

Presurgical planning, where surgeons can now 3D print a highly detailed model of their surgical target. They’ll be able to see – and touch – it in extreme detail, making the surgical results more reliable, safe and successful.

Learning and Education, where students can examine highly detailed models of body structures that are nearly identical, visually, to the real thing.

Preservation of Artifacts, where unique historical objects can be scanned and preserved, not just from the outside surface, but the interior as well.

I would add one more to this:

Artistic Pursuits, where complex 3D scans could be mixed to produce highly unusual artwork, in much the same what that astrophotography uses “scans” of the heavens to create attractive art.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_95575" style="width: 750px">These detailed 3D prints of human lung tissue are not only instructive, but also artistic<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">These detailed 3D prints of human lung tissue are not only instructive but also artistic</figcaption></figure>

But in a more profound thought, this technology could enable one to 3D scan an entire human and then 3D print a life-size replica – inside and out. It wouldn’t be a working human by any means, but instead a 100% accurate sculpture of the entire human body.

For a working human print, we’ll have to wait for several machine upgrades to occur.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Breakthrough: Ultra-Detailed Voxel-based 3D Printing Is Nigh appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at June 07, 2018 06:08 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Display Settings

You are able to use the display settings in SOLIDWORKS to provide greater flexibility when applying different appearances, decals and display modes. This allows the user to manipulate the way that the model is referenced in either drawings, or visual renders.

Along with appearances (colours/decals), you also have the ability to change the visibility, display mode and transparency of components within your model. Linking these values within different display states allows you to focus on particular aspects of the model, highlighting important aspects of your design.

How to Create a New Display State:

To create a new display state, navigate to the configuration tab. Towards the bottom of the property manager there will be a section for display states. Right-click and select the option to “Add Display State” – the created display state will automatically become active. You can rename the display state through slow double-clicking, or via F2. Just like changing between configurations, you can change display states by double-clicking the one you wish to activate.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="619" id="video-19958-4" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Video-1-Creating-Display-States.mp4?_=4" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Video-1-Creating-Display-States.mp4</video>

Manipulating a Part’s Display Settings:

Once you have created your display state(s), you can begin to control their settings. If you navigate to the feature manager, at the top of the design tree there is an option to extend the options that are displayed. This can be done by clicking the “>” icon. In a multi-body part, expand the solid bodies folder, then click on the column you want to manipulate from the fly out options and change the value(s). The mouse cursor will then change to display a pointing hand, which indicates the ability to change the field.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="619" id="video-19958-5" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Video-2-Using-the-Extended-Options.mp4?_=5" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Video-2-Using-the-Extended-Options.mp4</video>

Hide/Show Options:

You can easily toggle between the two visibility modes: shown or hidden. If you are unsure which body you are currently editing, you can select the ‘solid body’ from the ‘solid bodies folder’. Doing this will highlight the chosen body in the graphics.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="619" id="video-19958-6" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Video-3-Hide_Show-Options.mp4?_=6" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Video-3-Hide_Show-Options.mp4</video>

Display Mode Options:

The display mode options allow you to control the line properties that the model is displayed in. This is especially useful for showing different aspects of your design, with the added ability to reference specific display states within your drawings.

The display mode settings are:

  • Wireframe
  • Hidden Lines Visible
  • Hidden Lines Removed
  • Shaded with Edges
  • Shaded

See the below video to identify the differences between the various display modes:

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="619" id="video-19958-7" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Video-4-Different-Display-Modes.mp4?_=7" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Video-4-Different-Display-Modes.mp4</video>

Appearance Options:

You can use the appearance column within the extended options to easily manipulate:

  • The colour appearance applied to the solid body
  • Remove appearances
  • Copy the appearance to other solid bodies
<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="619" id="video-19958-8" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Video-5-Adding-appearances.mp4?_=8" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Video-5-Adding-appearances.mp4</video>

Transparency Options:

Toggle between the two transparency states by clicking within the transparency column.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="619" id="video-19958-9" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Video-6-Transparency-Toggle.mp4?_=9" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Video-6-Transparency-Toggle.mp4</video>

Referencing Display States within Drawings:

You can specify the display state you want your drawing view to reference through the options within the ‘drawing view property manager’. Within the property manager the various display states created in your model will be listed. Click on the one you want the drawing view to use, and the display state will be shown. Ensure that the separate display state option is set to the default in the model – this is recommended to be the ‘Shaded with Edges option’.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="619" id="video-19958-10" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Video-7-Linking-Display-States-in-Drawings.mp4?_=10" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Video-7-Linking-Display-States-in-Drawings.mp4</video>

Decals in Display States:

Along with the control of colour appearances, you can also control the display state of decals within your model. This can be done by specifying the display state that you wish to apply the decal to. It is best advised that you create a configuration and display state in which has all of the appearance details applied to it – this would be a default and makes controlling decal properties across your display states easier.

Author information

NT CADCAM
NT CADCAM is the UK's most established SolidWorks reseller in England, Scotland and Wales. Offering a fully supported CAD and CAM product portfolio and high levels of expertise internally, makes NT CADCAM unique within the SolidWorks community, giving customers the confidence and assurance they need that their support issues will be dealt with both promptly and efficiently. As a SolidWorks Certified Training Centre, NT CADCAM provides clients with fully certified and accredited trainers who are experienced engineers.

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by NT CADCAM at June 07, 2018 03:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Time-Lapse Tutorial: Grabber

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="480" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1SzfYkqVjaY" width="718"></iframe>

The key to designing and 3D printing complex designs is problem solving. Coming up with an awesome idea, figuring out how in the world you going to make it and the hooray moment when the print finishes. This awesome grabber we have created shows how that can be achieved.

 

We wanted to have a device which can grab our snacks for us without getting greasy fingers. The solution was a grabber that can extend out. Printing all the individual parts and assembling wasn’t an option as we wanted it to come off the print bed working.

So we set off on our adventure in SOLIDWORKS. We extruded a basic X and cut away at it so that the two bodies were no longer intersecting. If you go back to one of our earlier blog on the ogre battle axe, we explain what happens when you try to print parts that intersect.

Once we saw they weren’t intersecting. We used the move command to open the scissor mechanism. This allows us to cut away the areas that would interest in the open position.

We put it back in the closed position and added the pins to allow them to move around. We used a 0.5 mm tolerance to make sure the parts would move. Once we added the pins, we patterned the bodies across till we were satisfied with how long we wanted it and added the finger holes.

We wanted to see how much the grabber opens so we made a quick assembly with the parts and mated them. This allowed us to test the mechanism. We created the grabber tips and did the same as what we did with finger holes to test the mechanism in an assembly and how it all works.

We sent it off to printer! Our first two models failed, the first one failed as one of the faces didn’t have a big enough gap between two faces. This meant it snapped when I tried to open the parts. The second ones fused on the face touching the bed so we added a little chamfer to fix the problem.

Once we got the third one printed it worked right away like we planned. It took thinking and pre planning to make sure we could achieve our goal. A lot of SOLIDWORKS features help with the problem solving phase. The ability to test the mechanism within SOLIDWORKS allows us to ensure they will all work before manufacture. It can be a time and money saver.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Time-Lapse Tutorial: Grabber appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at June 07, 2018 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Bootcamp is Now Just $15

As if it even needs to be said to the many thousands of designers and engineers that read SolidSmack every day, the best way to learn just about new skill is through project-based learning—AKA gettin’ your hands dirty.

And while we all clamor for a just a few extra minutes in the day to pursue that side hobby or learn a new skill, it can be challenging to do so without some structural foundation in place. Which is one reason why we love the Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Bootcamp.

Designed to be a comprehensive and structured introduction to the Raspberry Pi platform, the 2-hour course is catered for different ages and skill levels to get anybody up to speed with Raspberry Pi, fast. After learning how to build a gaming system to play old Nintendo, Sega, and PlayStation video games, users will progress to developing a personal digital assistant using the Google Assistant API. Throw in some CAD and some 3D printing to build a custom housing, and you have yourself a full and satisfying weekend project.

Or…go all out and build a freakin’ Raspberry Pi Smart Mirror:

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fkVBAcvbrjU?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

The Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Bootcamp – $100 $15 (85% Off)

Topics covered include:

  • Access 50 lectures & 2 hours of content 24/7
  • Understand all the components needed to get your Raspberry Pi up & running
  • Learn how to easily prepare an SD card & flash it for any OS
  • Work w/ GPIO pins & learn how to programmatically control them w/ Python
  • Build simple circuits w/ an LED & a fully function gaming system w/ RetroPie
  • Discuss the different types of Raspberry Pi models

GET IT!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
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Feature image via Pensar Development

The post The Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Bootcamp is Now Just $15 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 07, 2018 12:55 PM

Newcastle Scientists Just Created the World’s First 3D-Printed Cornea

3D Printed Cornea

Sufferers of corneal blindness due to burns, diseases, and other misfortunes can see the light once again; for Newcastle University researchers have found a way to 3D print human corneas in just 10 minutes.

Using ‘bio-ink’ as the additive material – a solution made from human stem cells, collagen, and alginate – Professor of Tissue Engineering Che Connon and his team have found a way to preserve stem cells while producing a material soft but solid enough to come out of a 3D printer nozzle. This could mean a limitless supply of corneas and a lesser need for donors for those 10 million people worldwide who need surgery to prevent corneal blindness, plus the 5 million who already suffer from it.

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The cornea is the outermost layer of the human eye which helps focus our sight and protects the inner layers from bacteria and dirt. But since it does this over the course of our entire lifespan, it is prone to injury and diseases such as trachoma which can cause corneal blindness. These 3D printed corneas would easily solve the cornea transplant shortage as well as the immense cost of doing the surgeries.

3D Printed Cornea

Before printing the corneas, researchers scan a patient’s eyes to determine the proper dimensions and shape of the cornea. This allows them to print a replica specific to the ailing person.

Professor Connon states the 3D printed corneas will still have to undergo more testing before actual transplants can be done, but the fact the technology exists means an end to the worldwide cornea shortage may soon be in sight.

The post Newcastle Scientists Just Created the World’s First 3D-Printed Cornea appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 07, 2018 12:49 PM

The Javelin Blog

Is it time to consider making the switch to SOLIDWORKS?

We are in an age where technology is changing faster than we can consume it, this can make it difficult to keep up with the latest and greatest in the CAD market and you may not be aware that your CAD platform could be limiting your design and document workflows. With the ever changing landscape of CAD solutions we see many companies are making the switch to SOLIDWORKS. Here are the common questions we hear from companies that are re-evaluating their current 3D design solution:

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Software Licencing

“We feel like our CAD provider is bullying us into a software as a service (SaaS) subscription license model!”

With most of the industry switching to a software as a service (Saas) model, SOLIDWORKS is dedicated to giving you the choice of the best solution that suits your needs. SOLIDWORKS provides both Perpetual licensing for a permanent license that you own, as well as Term licensing if you only need to bring on a temporary or co-op employee for a specific short-term job or project. We pride ourselves on leaving the choice in your hands instead of forcing you to comply.

Market share and Education

“It’s difficult to find employees that know our CAD Platform”

SOLIDWORKS is taught in almost every post-secondary institution in Canada, this makes it easy to find talent that is already up to speed on the platform. Javelin Technologies is the preferred SOLIDWORKS educational reseller in Canada and supports over 125 education facilities across the country and can help connect you with skilled graduates.

SOLIDWORKS is the most used CAD Solution on the professional market today, which means there are more potential employees who are proficient with SOLIDWORKS than any other 3D CAD system.

Features and Enhancements

“We are not seeing any major improvements to our system to help support our growth goals…”

SOLIDWORKS in not just a CAD system; it’s a platform. This gives you a toolbox that will connect your business with unparalleled features and connectivity. As the industry leader, SOLIDWORKS delivers hundreds of enhancements and ground breaking features in a new release every year.

Legacy Data

“Change is hard… What about all of our legacy data (IP)?”

Javelin has helped many companies make the switch to SOLIDWORKS. We understand how important your data is and can mentor and guide you through the process with best practices to leverage and migrate your intellectual property.

How Javelin can help you switch to SOLIDWORKS

Javelin Technologies has over two decades of experience providing the best in class 3D solutions to meet the growing demands of Canadian designers and manufacturers.

  • Javelin is the largest Canadian value-added reseller (VAR) with 9 offices from coast to coast supporting our over 6,000 Canadian businesses.
  • Our dedicated account managers will partner with you to find the best solutions to meet your business goals.
  • Award winning, certified technical staff will help you make the move and support your goals moving forward.

Contact us now about switching to SOLIDWORKS »

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The post Is it time to consider making the switch to SOLIDWORKS? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Ellery, CSWE at June 07, 2018 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: Trusco Toolboxes

Founded in 1959 as a professional tool manufacturer to support Japan’s burgeoning manufacturing industry, Trusco—a combination of the words “Trust” and “Company”—is still manufacturing some of the best toolboxes, today.

While their stripped-down design makes them a must-have for many design aficionados, the pressed steel boxes are ridiculously useful for just about anything—tools or not.

Still manufactured in Fukui, Japan, Trusco toolboxes now come in more sizes than ever—capable of whatever storage challenges you throw at them.

Trusco Toolboxes — $12.27 – $171.12

Features:

  • Steel body, formed for extra strength
  • Versatile sizing for specific storage solutions
  • Double-hinged construction for smooth opening
  • Dividers included
  • Equally useful in the home, office, or the shop

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: Trusco Toolboxes appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 07, 2018 04:03 AM

June 06, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Shaky Breaky Part: Analyzing a U-Joint Driveshaft with SOLIDWORKS Motion

We all know how amazing the internal combustion engine is. From weed wackers to cars to bulldozers, it powers much of the equipment that makes our lives convenient. However, the engine wouldn’t be as useful without a way to transfer its motion. Without a way to get the engine’s power to the trimmer head of a weed wacker, the wheels of a car, and the tracks of a bulldozer, the engine is useless. So, the drivetrain (that doesn’t get nearly enough credit or moment in the limelight) is just as important as the engine.

Any mechanical engineer of heavy machinery will tell you how much care and consideration goes into the design of mechanisms and drivetrains. One of those considerations is how the system vibrates when power is driven through it. If the system is not properly designed, vibrations may cause premature wear, cracks, or an unpleasant experience for the operator. In this article, we will study how a universal joint (U-joint) driveshaft system vibrates as it is turned with SOLIDWORKS Motion!

Let’s study this simple U-joint system. The U-joints are shown in orange and are comprised of a pair of hinges held together by a cross shaft. The joint shown in blue is a prismatic joint, which means the units are allowed to slide in and out of each other, but if one rotates, the other rotates with it. The joint shown in green is a pin joint and will allow us to adjust the input and output angles to do some testing!

3D Model of U-Joint System

Let’s suppose that we build one of these in real life and, when driving it with a constant velocity electric motor, the system is shaking. Can we find out why that is? With SOLIDWORKS Motion we can!

Here is going to be the set up on our model:

3D Model of U-Joint System Setup

 

There are no fasteners on the model at all. This helps reduce complexity and will, instead, be taken care of with mates. Now for the fun part! Between each member of the drivetrain (i.e. from U joint hinge to cross shaft to U joint hinge to prismatic joint etc.) we will specify solid body contact. This is what tells SOLIDWORKS that they should not pass though each other. And what kind of experiment would this be if we didn’t take any measurements? Let’s place a sensor on each of the areas of interest: the very beginning of the drive train, another on one of the prismatic joints, and one on the very end. These sensors will measure rotational velocity at each point. Last, but not least, we place a motor set to constant velocity on the beginning of the U-joints. It’s a good idea to set it at a slow velocity so we can really observe the effects (like 5 or 6 RPM is good).

Now, we should test a simple case to see if it matches our intuition, verifying that the set up is correct. The simplest case to do is one in which both the input shaft and output shaft angle is parallel to the ground (i.e. zero degrees). Let’s see how this works!

U-Joint System Subcase. 0 Degrees Both Sides

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The results are as we expect: a constant velocity in the input results in a constant velocity in the prismatic joint (center) which also results in a constant velocity in the output, as if the whole system was a single component. Good! Now, let’s make it more interesting!

U-Joint System Subcase Results at 0 Degrees

For this next simulation, lets change the angle mate on the input pin joint to incline at 30 degrees. For most purposes, it is not a practical configuration of a U-joint, but it will be interesting! So with all the other setting the exact same, let’s re-run the study!

U-Joint System Subcase. 30 degrees and 0 degrees

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This change shows that the constant velocity at the input transforms into an oscillating variation in speed as it crosses this U- joint bent at an angle. We can deduce from the first experiment that an angle of zero degrees on the U-joint results in no change in rotational velocity. Therefore, the result makes sense between the second and third graphs; they should be identical.

U-Joint System Subcase Results at 30 degrees and 0 degrees

That’s cool and all, but how is this useful? If I put a constant rotational velocity  on the input, I should get that in the output! What use is it if I’m going to shake the thing that’s connected to my output? Well, check this out: We will angle both ends at 30 degrees. This is the configuration that is found in most motor vehicles. The angle usually isn’t this extreme, but it’s the input and output shafts that are parallel.

U-Joint System Subcase. 30 degrees and 30 degrees

Let’s see how this fares with the motion study. Same parameters, new angles.

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The results are very exciting. It starts as a flat-line, constant velocity, changes into that sinusoidal rotational velocity, then magically changes back to a flat-line! Now, what could be going on here? We know that a U-joint at an angle will change the constant velocity to speed up and slow down. Let’s study that even further. The beauty of this configuration is that when the first joint is speeding up, the second joint is slowing down and vise versa. This actually cancels out the change in velocity! How fascinating!

U-Joint System Subcase Results at 30 degrees and 30 degrees

 

The next question that some of you may be asking is if the parallelism of the input and output is the only condition that needs to be met for the changes in velocity to cancel out. We will find out in the next experiment!

U-Joint System Subcase. 30 degrees Both Sides, Phase at 45 degrees

For this one, we will phase (i.e. twist) one of the U-joints with respect to the other one, as shown in the diagram. Keep in mind that the input and output shafts are still parallel to each other at 30 degrees. That means the output should be a flat line, right? Well….

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What a twist (pun not intended)! The result is that the output not only remains sinusoidal, but it also gains magnitude! This is because we have moved the phase of how the two motions combine. Instead of harmoniously canceling out, they now add up. When one joint speeds up, the other also speeds up. This makes a more aggressive fluctuation in speed that causes a vibration. This is why if you ever take the driveshaft out of a car, you must mark the phasing to remember the exact orientation it went in. Otherwise, you’re in for a bumpy ride once the car hits the road…

U-Joint System Subcase Results at 30 degrees Both Sides, Phase at 45 degrees

These results are important because even though the plots don’t directly measure vibration, they are enough to detect its presence and its overall magnitude. Since all the joints and the shaft have mass, changing its rotational velocity will cause inertial vibrations as indicated by the sinusoids. But one question remains. Are these results accurate, as in, does this phenomenon actually occur in real life? Well, let’s ask this guy because he will tell your part, your shaky breaky part! Thank you for following along!

Check out more blogs like this one here. You’ll find helpful articles and educational videos on a wide range of engineering and manufacturing topics to help you maximize efficiency in your job role!
And don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn to stay up-to-date on our latest blogs, videos, promotions, and more!

Author: Robert Maldonado, Application Engineer at DesignPoint

Author information

DesignPoint
DesignPoint is passionate about building solutions that help product design, engineering and manufacturing companies maximize their potential. By developing trusted partnerships, we help our customers achieve game-changing results and support them in their journey as they strive for more. With DesignPoint, More is Possible.® Our solutions include SOLIDWORKS 3D software, 3D Systems and MarkForged 3D printers, technical support, training and more. Contact us today at design-point.com!

The post Shaky Breaky Part: Analyzing a U-Joint Driveshaft with SOLIDWORKS Motion appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by DesignPoint at June 06, 2018 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Engineer’s Curse — What is It and Do You Have It?!

If you went to college on your path to becoming an engineer/designer/maker you may have learned there are a lot of occupational hazards you were not warned about in that schooling. Even if you didn’t, I bet there were a lot of nasty surprises. Like, what about being cursed? I don’t mean in a profanity way, but more in the black-magic-bad-mojo way. Did anyone warn you of the Engineer’s Curse? More importantly: ARE YOU AFFLICTED?!

Chances are: YES.

What Is the Engineer’s Curse?

Well, due to your professional experience, is there something that is absolutely ruined for you because you know too intimately about the right or proper way it should be done? Is there something you rigorously and repetitively trained your eyes or ears or fingers or whatnot to pick up on during your 9-5? You know, something you, therefore, can’t help but waste time noticing (and commenting vociferously about) outside of work when no one else would give a flying flip about such details?

If so, you, my friend, are cursed.

Let’s See Some Examples

To illustrate this affliction, let me lay bare my own suffering. I give you Exhibit A: me totally distracted in a bar in Chicago by the ceiling instead of the bourbon. This was a tweet from 2014 when I was working fulltime in designing optics for this kind of lighting.

Fast-forward to this year, 2018, nearly 3 years after I quit aforementioned optical engineering job in lighting . . . the curse remains in Exhibit B:

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_95464" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">This “Recessed” Light Is Meant To Be Hidden or Recessed. In A CEILING. But whatever *cringe*</figcaption></figure>

Brandon Fritts, a former printer, was one of the first to chime in when I asked for stories from people suffering from the Engineer’s Curse.

As a printer, I would see packaging misprinted and avoid buying those products–something I still do. Even though I’m not a printer anymore, it still irks the hell out of me.

#triggered the blue is off”Brandon Fritts, former Printer

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_95468" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Nailed It! Photo credit: Brandon Fritts</figcaption></figure>

It’s OK, Brandon, we understand your pain. How dare they not line up subsequent color printing plates precisely with the first?!

Symptoms Include: Heightened OCD Tendencies

Usually, the Engineer’s Curse regards a highly specific thingamajig. However, some report suffering from overall amped-up Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) tendencies in a general way.

I can relate to this. One day, my friend with an electrical engineering background, Nicholas Stopher, whom I attended college with, picked me up from the train station. To pick up my baggage, I had to wait in a line down a super narrow hallway leading to a room where all the passengers’ bags were held. It took forever. As each person picked up their bag and turned around to leave, an improvised dancing production ensued. Each waiting person had to first maneuver around the lucky one and then the lucky one’s bag. The holdup had nothing to do with waiting for the bags to be unloaded. They were all already there, waiting for us.

When I finally collected my bag, my friend asked something like, “I’m curious, even though you’re on sabbatical, are your engineering instincts kicking up right now?” I replied with a vitriolic torrent of profanities aimed at the lack of forethought in the design of the space.

He replied, “Ok, yep. It bothered you too, then. I guess it never goes away.”

We’d never studied or worked in train station interior design, and yet, there it was.

SolidSmack’s very own Josh Mings and Simon Martin had the following to say when I asked if they also suffered from The Engineer’s Curse.

Yes, oh yes. I’m not sure if it’s OCD that creates the irritation or the complete lack of competence by someone that creates the OCD. Either way, yeah – those edges not lining up, the inconsistent slot sizes, weld spacing, placard locations… *cringe*”          Josh Mings

I am definitely in the OCD camp with Josh.

Maybe it’s a natural side effect of any occupation, but seeing “finished quality” work (in this case, mass manufactured objects) that is so obviously poorly done is one of my biggest pet peeves. Ultimately, I know these things are out of my control, but one can’t help reverse engineer and think about how they might have done things differently to create a better product.” — Simon Martin

Also, please note: I intend no offense to those who suffer from a truly clinical form of OCD. That really, really sucks, and I get it — not the same league. If you are suffering from tendencies that interfere with your normal day-to-day life, please do consult a professional.

The Cure

Hahaha . . . what cure? This is a curse, not a bacterial infection from some indiscriminate Spring Break encounter.

If it helps, though, reports tell us sometimes you can wear down your specific perfectionism with time. If you’re lucky.

I worked in vehicle acoustics. In every vehicle I heard every bump, squeak, rattle, grown, moan and grind. Took a few years out of auto industry for it to start going away.” — Seth Shepard, then: Development Engineer, now: Senior Design and Manufacturing Engineer

An Additional Caution — Premature Forms of the Curse Exist

Although I started this article in rant-form aimed at the lack of warning before entering the working world, sometimes effects set in even before graduation. If you go to a university that mandates co-operative internships, you might already be toast. Many of the people polled graduated from my alma mater, Kettering University (formerly GMI), which gives students a lot of real-world experience. Some respondents reported the beginnings of their curse stem from their co-op/internship.

Brake pads, especially for disk brakes. Left over from co-oping at Federal-Mogul’s brake pad testing group.” — Rebecca Junell, former Co-operative Intern at Federal-Mogul, now Mechanical Engineer at NASA Plum Brook Station

Bad and confusing signage. Working for the airlines I would see placards that were supposed to instruct passengers to do (or not do) a myriad of things, but they all just looked like nonsense symbols drawn by preschoolers.” — Ashley Q. Swartz, currently Mechanical Engineer in robotics for bio applications, at the time of developing her occupational tic: Intern in Interiors Engineering

Your Support Group

If this sounds like you, please read the additional reports below of the Engineer’s Curse. If nothing else positive comes from this article, know you’re not alone. And if you’d like to add your own stories in the comments, please do–We could use the extra support! Plus, I find these things fascinating to read. Asking this question quickly highlights one of the most important parts of a person’s job and how it’s done correctly!

I’ve worked in forging, aerospace, and interior trim plastics. With that I find disappointment in several areas of manufacturing. Sadly, my car is one of them. The angles of the wood trim on the doors are far different than the dash. This leads to uneven sun fading as the car ages. Most people turn these in on lease or trade for the next model before it is obvious but I buy my cars toward the end of their depreciation. That’s probably why all the features are now failing.” — Alex Dunn, Quality Engineer

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_95476" style="width: 476px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Photo credit: Alex Dunn</figcaption></figure>

“I can’t go to any concert, venue or church without judging the A/V setup. Any sound related issue, no matter how small, is a complete distraction from the experience. I can’t get into an unfamiliar vehicle without poking, prodding and generally nerding out over the interior trim material, quality and fit/finish. I inspect my niece’s and nephew’s plastic toys to see how they were molded and to see if I can find defects. I’m surprised I’m still allowed out in public . . .” — Jeremy Bemis, former Project Engineer/Program Manager in Automotive Acoustic Development and Testing, now Account Manager

“From designing interior trim in cars I see ALL of the gaps, flushness and parallel mismatches . . . it’s a curse” Jenn Grimm, currently Sr. Business Process Engineer

“Just like how Jeremy is with sound at venues, I consciously critique the visual setup. It’s most glaringly obvious with presentations on screens, posters, and monitors . . . brightness, contrast, color coordination, ambient lighting, etc. – most concerning are fails from the pros whose research focus is on these topics. I’m a diagnostic medical physicist so I’m looking at many aspects of image quality for medical imaging… from acquisition to display and interpretation.“ — Simon Murphy, Diagnostic Medical Physicist

“I design interior for automotive. The list is long on what is ruined for me. I’ll do a shortened version. I can’t buy a car that I know its development history. Even if it’s the safest car ever. Tried buying a new car recently. Had to inspect for buzz squeak and rattle because hearing that now, even imperceptible by most is like the loudest nails on a chalk board. I literally rejected a car because its storage under the radio was too small to fit my phone. Most people would just put their phone somewhere else. I couldn’t stand to look at it. And there are so many more things.” — Jessica Witt, Lead Product Engineer-Interior Systems

“Quality control is lacking on the work cafeteria plastic utensils.” Alvin Wurfel, Mechanical Engineer

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_95469" style="width: 272px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">QC Fail. Photo credit: Alvin Wurfel</figcaption></figure>

“Hmm, from my aerospace, automotive and defense days, if something was wrong or askew, I’m pretty sure I’d be in big trouble by now. For a while I was watching landing gear and wing actuators like a hawk.

In general, I check all fits and finishes. Everything is ruined for me because I’m always checking seam lines, integration gap, etc. Local carnivals I’m mentally disassembling the rides. Fireworks–I’m thinking thru the mortar and ignition and then the chemical coloration and burn rates.

Medical products are the worst because if I’m in a doctor’s office I’m always checking to make sure, if it is my product or a competitor’s, and then I have to force myself not to go over and inspect it for use. The worst of the worst is when it comes to surgical instruments and procedures. It’s been a while but I have sat and argued with surgeons that ‘No, you’re not going to use a general anesthetic, you’re going to use a local, and you’re going to position a mirror so that I can see precisely what you’re doing while you’re doing it.“ — Anonymous, Principal Engineer

Any time a web app promises that my data is deleted, I know it’s bulls*&^$!g me. Deleting data is hard and virtually no one does it completely” — Anonymous, Software Engineeress

Air flow. After having to tackle the task of ensuring adequate air mixing inside the spacecraft (insufficient mixing can lead to literal “bubbles” of stagnant carbon dioxide that would suffocate astronauts if they were to dwell in that part of the cabin too long), every time I go into a building, or even an individual room ina building with ventilation that is highly dependent upon convective flow that would not be possible in the absence of gravity, the thought “astronauts would definitely asphyxiate in here if we were in space” crosses my mind . . . every time.”Anonymous Spacecraft Engineer at some company that makes spacecrafts

Remember, you may never heal from the Engineer’s Curse, but, hey, at least you’re not alone! Welcome to the group and please share your story in the comments if so inclined.

The post The Engineer’s Curse — What is It and Do You Have It?! appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at June 06, 2018 02:14 PM

Take a Behind-The-Scenes Look at the Insane Electric-Powered Bollinger B1

Last year, we took a quick peek at the Bollinger Motors B1 – a humongous off-road vehicle powered exclusively by electricity. Big, blocky, and just as transformable as any Transformer, this puppy was made to adjust to almost any outdoor need you can imagine.

Now thanks to Bollinger Motors, we finally get to take a behind-the-scenes look at how this environment-friendly monster was made over the course of 16 months:

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Function over form drives almost all of the Bollinger B1’s features.

Bollinger B1 Behind The Scenes

Take for example the choice to make the vehicle electric. Making the B1 electric from the get-go was always the plan, according to Robert Bollinger. Apart from having a quiet engine, being able to plug in and power any electric device you need is a big plus whenever you’re far away from civilization.

Bollinger B1 Behind The Scenes

The B1’s cavernous interior was also designed with practicality in mind. Having the ability to adjust the vehicle depending on what you plan on using it for is one of the B1’s coolest features, but it sure wasn’t easy to make.

Bollinger B1 Behind The Scenes

To this end, a dedicated team worked tirelessly on the B1 to make sure it came out the beast they wanted it to be. Most of the vehicle’s initial designs were done via CAD and used as a framework for the prototype. It then comes down to the team’s various fields of expertise – electronics, interior and exterior design, and painting – to bring the vision to life.

Bollinger B1 Behind The Scenes

As the build was ongoing, more features were added to the B1 which drove it away from its core concept: a simple, in-your-face 4×4 for people who love the outdoors. Since most electric vehicles tend to exaggerate their futuristic power, Bollinger and his team wanted the B1 to look like a more traditional 4×4. They stripped down a lot of unnecessary features (they won’t say which) until they ended up with a bare-bones vehicle – one whose features were practical and easy to understand.

All of the Bollinger B1’s features can be found on the Bollinger webpage (which is also electrically powered).

The post Take a Behind-The-Scenes Look at the Insane Electric-Powered Bollinger B1 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 06, 2018 01:20 PM

SolidSmack Radio | The Helical Array (Powered by Spotify)

Album Covers

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’ll get the groove going with “Crystal Blue” from Fantasy Guys before diving into irresistible tracks from Sugar Candy Mountain, Sports, Loving, Toro y Moi, and others before wrapping up with “Nocturne” from Wild Nothing. Let’s Go!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/1C06B5b9TjznIV7cNkcy94" width="100%"></iframe>

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by SolidSmack at June 06, 2018 01:18 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: SAS Safety Classic Safety Glasses

It may not be your favorite shop accessory, but a sturdy pair of safety glasses is an absolutely critical piece of kit. Whether running a 2 x 4 through the table saw or simply sanding the final edges of a model, the last thing you need is dust in your eyes or worse—something much larger.

Which is why we love the Classic Safety Glasses from SAS Safety.

These no-bull safety glasses feature durable impact resistant polycarbonate 99.9% UV-resistant lens and offer additional protection with temple covers. Lightweight and comfortable with just the right amount of ‘Shop Boss’ style, you can’t go wrong with these no matter what gets thrown at you (quite literally).

SAS Safety Classic Safety Glasses — $9.39

Features:

  • Impact resistant polycarbonate lens
  • 99.9% UV Protection
  • Lightweight comfort
  • Stylish frame design

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: SAS Safety Classic Safety Glasses appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 06, 2018 01:12 PM

App Smack 23.18: Medium, Camera+ 2, Hatch, Duo, and More…

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Medium (iOS — Free)

The best reads tailored just for you.

Medium App

Camera+ 2 (iOS – $2.99)

Whether you’re a seasoned photographer or someone who’s barely touched a camera, Camera+ 2 will make you love taking photos.

iPhone Camera App

Hatch – Stay Focused (iOS — Free)

Hatch is a powerful tool to help you check your phone less while you study, work, or just take a break from all the noise. Get ready to become a focus black belt while hatching fun digital creatures. Use your focus energy to unlock legendary and ultra rare exotic species.

Hatch iPhone App

Google Duo (Android — Free)

Google Duo is the highest quality one-to-one video calling app*. It’s simple, reliable and works on both iOS and Android phones.

Google Duo App

Google Play Books (Android — Free)

Google Play Books is the one app you need for enjoying audiobooks and e-books purchased from Google Play.

Google Play Books App

OneNote (Android — Free)

Type, hand write, draw, and clip things from the web to get down your thoughts into your notebook. Use OneNote’s flexible canvas to place content anywhere you want. You can even scan hand written notes or pages straight into OneNote then make them searchable.

OneNote Android App

The post App Smack 23.18: Medium, Camera+ 2, Hatch, Duo, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 06, 2018 01:07 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

The Dawn of the Mechatronics Product Designs

Product performance and capabilities are evolving exponentially, design and technologies are becoming more challenging, and market/business pressure are constantly mounting. These factors are driving the need for cohesive, adaptive design capabilities for today’s products that can only be produced effectively through purpose-built mechatronics software.

With the dawn of the Mechatronics product design, the day of siloed engineering design tools has gone the way of the drafting board. Having purpose-built collaborative tools is critical to tackling today’s complex designs.  The use of translators or data import tools does not come close to the seamless collaboration needed between engineering disciplines required to design today’s smart, connected products.

Design software purpose-built for Mechatronics product design is one of the most critical items necessary.  Most tools today support collaboration via translation and import of cross-discipline data, however, using data from cross disciplines can lead to design errors and mass productions failures, scrap and reworks.

Having purpose-built mechatronic solutions also mitigates the risk that design data between disciplines is not synchronized or is out of date, eliminating the most common source of design errors. As the complexity of design increases, so does the risk of design-related failures.

Mechatronics design development and collaboration methodology will ensure that design issues are found early in the product lifecycle, and will eliminate costly consequences from discovery later in the design lifecycle.

Author information

Louis Feinstein
Senior Product Manager Solidworks Electrical

The post The Dawn of the Mechatronics Product Designs appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Louis Feinstein at June 06, 2018 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

3D Printing a Small-Block V8 Engine | PART 3

This is the third part of my 3D Printing a Small-Block V8 Engine Project using a Stratasys F123 Series 3D Printer. For previous parts, please refer to the following links:

Part 1 – Design and Printing 3D Models »

Part 2 – Initial Engine Assembly »

External Assembly

The next stages in the assembly process involved attaching all the external elements of the engine assembly.  These elements include:

  • piston heads (with intake and exhaust valves)
  • intake manifold
  • oil pan
  • valley plate
  • flywheel

The oil pan, valley plate and flywheel were the easiest to attach to the block. Eric’s designs included spots for small disc magnets on every external component, with the intention of quick removal and reattachment to show the insides of the engine block when its running. All I had to do was press the small disc magnets into the slots, and make sure that the magnets inserted in the opposite slots would be of reverse polarity. The flywheel was screwed into the front end of the crankshaft.

Cylinder Heads

The cylinder heads were basically a secondary sub-assembly. The heads were housings for a total of 16 valves, rising pins, rocker arms, and rocker arm pins. Everything was aligned together with one rocker rail each. The tapping and threading process was very tedious, as there were about 24 holes to tap and thread on each cylinder head. The rocker arms also had to be tapped so that they could move freely when attached to the arm pins.

Threading the cylinder heads.

Threading the cylinder heads.

The risers were glued to ball bearings on one end and 65 mm metal rods on the other end. The rods had to slide in and out of  the cylinder heads, so those holes had to be tapped to twice their size.

Magnets

The final goal of this project wasn’t just to show a working model of an engine, but also to show how it works. This meant that the external elements listed above had to be easily removed to show the pistons underneath. Fastening these components down with screws would not allow for quick removal and reattachment, but there was an alternative method: disc magnets.

Disc magnets are simple to install and can hold a lot of weight if multiple magnets are used for one object. The engine block, cylinder heads, valley plate, intake manifold, and covers were all designed with small inserts so that disc magnets could be easily pressed into place. The only thing to be careful about was the polarity of the opposite magnet.

Attaching the everything to the block using magnets was easy, and parts stuck together like glue. The one problem with using these magnets is that when they’re pressed into place, its very difficult to remove them. This is especially problematic if one of the polarities is wrong.

Valves

The valve assembly was the toughest portion of the build. It involved a lot of threading, tapping, and cutting. I used a rotary saw to cut down metal rods and screws in order for them to fit in the cylinder heads. The rocker arms were tapped to allow for easy movement around the pins. The rocker arms were then screws into the rail for alignment. Before the rail could be set into the cylinder head, a series of 8 threaded inserts needed to be tapped into each head.

The intake and exhaust valves were glued to 50mm M3 screws, which were then inserted into their tapped channels. After grinding down both the screws and the metal rods, the valve assembly was complete.

Motor and Electronics

The last step of the main assembly process was setting up the motor and its electronic components. This part of the build was very simple. There were three main electronic components:

  • 12V DC motor
  • Speed controller/potentiometer
  • AC power input

The motor was attached to the engine block using threaded inserts and M3 screws. The starter gear was mounted to the motor and synced with the flywheel. After some small readjustments, the entire motor control system was working perfectly.

LS3 engine sitting on a shelf in our lab with the motor and stand sitting next to it.

LS3 engine sitting on a shelf in our lab with the motor and stand sitting next to it.

Subscribe for Part 4

At this point, the engine is pretty much complete. There are a few other things, mostly centred around visuals and aesthetics, that I want to complete before I can declare this project officially finished. A few of these include a “gas pedal” setup which changes the state of the speed regulator, as well as mounting the whole engine on the rotating stand (pictured above).

These two things will be covered in the last installation of this mini-series, which will be published soon. Subscribe to our blog to stay informed on this project.

The post 3D Printing a Small-Block V8 Engine | PART 3 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Eissa Ahmad at June 06, 2018 12:00 PM

June 05, 2018

SolidSmack

How to Survive the Gig Economy (5 Mistakes to Avoid)

5-mistakes-survive-gig-economy-00

The gig economy is great. You can hail a cheap cab home with Uber, get McDonald’s delivered with Postmates, beer with Drizly, sit back and watch someone from Task Rabbit assemble your Amazon delivered furniture while your hair is cut with Priv. The positive of the gig economy is that everything can be outsourced, however, therein lies the negative, everything can be outsourced.

If you’re on Solidsmack, chances are you’re a 3D modeler, designer, engineer or something in-between. And, if you’ve been working or looking for a job in the last 10 years, it’s painfully obvious, you can be outsourced. By outsourced, I don’t mean overseas, I just mean, if there’s more than one person who will do a job, one will do it for less money.

How do you survive in the gig economy? Avoid these five mistakes.

1. Don’t Apply by Brute Force

Just because you can apply to 100 projects a day doesn’t mean you should. Perhaps eventually you’ll land something, but it’s not likely any good. I tried to apply to tons of stuff and undercut my rates; I ended up getting paid little money to do a lot of work for a difficult client. If someone is looking for the lowest price, do they really want someone who puts pride in their work? Will they treat their contractors well? Will they even be trusted to pay? Unlikely on all accounts.

Worst of all, you will get burned out. It may not be the first day you do it, or the first week you do it, or even the first month, but it will happen. Take it from someone who has burned out several times, all of the projects you have applied this week mean nothing if you’re too exhausted to apply to any projects for the other three weeks of the month.

2. Don’t Stay Online

For online projects, you are competing with everyone. Very few people will win projects based on low prices, very few people will win projects because they are the best in the world and it is very difficult to distinguish yourself in cyberspace. Unless you are part of the less than 1% of the population who are openly sought out by headhunters, you’re more likely to get lost in the rat race.

On the other hand, if you network in person, it doesn’t matter if you’re the world’s best product designer, world’s worst, or somewhere in between. You’re in front of clients, you are there and that’s what counts. Comedian Ron White is not the world’s best comedian, nor is he a standout in terms of his content or approach. But, Ron White is there and has constantly been there, and as a result has been able to take advantage of many opportunities.

Lastly, networking can help you online as your offline friends can send your information as a bonefide to your skills. Websites are great, but you have to break out of the web to see all of the opportunities.

3. Don’t Be Basic

I can buy 10 pounds of coffee for $45 (0.14 cents/oz), or I can buy a large coffee for $4.50 ($15/oz) from a coffee shop. The difference is that one is a commodity and one is a specialty. If you’re a product designer, you’re a commodity.  If you’re a designer of consumer athletic accessories for women, you’re a specialty. In the course of your 3D modeling and designing studies, you probably found something you enjoyed working on. Maybe it’s sporting goods, shoes, cell phones, cars or food storage. Whatever it may be, it’s your specialty.

Work towards projects with your passion. If you don’t have a lot of experience in the field you would like to be, make your own conceptual projects, look online for tips from established figures that are doing what you want to do, and don’t shy away from reaching out to those figures via email. If you are especially ambitious, reach out to projects and offer to charge a low price for the opportunity to build your reputation within a niche.

4. Don’t Toss Your Life Raft

Whether feast or famine, bills still come. Rent, car payments, and mortgages are due regardless if you have a five-figure month or a two-figure month. You need security.

The best-case scenario is that you work at your day job until you are so overwhelmed with your side gig that your “nuisance” of a side gig becomes your main gig and your day job becomes the “nuisance”. However, let’s be real, this takes a long time. The bigger your monthly “nut” (expenses) the longer it will theoretically take. When I lived with my parents after college, I had a tiny monthly nut. Now, with a mortgage, the money I need to bring in per month is substantially higher.

My uncle is an entrepreneur and has a wife with a stable job that provides him financial security, healthcare and a safety net should his business fail.  Yes, you don’t need healthcare every day of your life, but when you need it, you need it and the alternative is bone-chilling.

5. Don’t Stop Learning

You can always become better, faster, more concise. Once again, beware of burning out, but learn everything you can. Are you a student? Many universities have free subscriptions to tons of magazines and newspapers you can read online.

Newspapers I recommend that have free articles you can read in a daily email include:

Likewise, there are some great learning resources also with daily emails:

Your local library has tons of technical books and, yep, a photocopier. Get to work! The sky is the limit. If you have more coin, community college classes are an inexpensive way to learn new skills. The way you learn doesn’t matter, as long as you learn.

In summary, the gig economy is tough, but avoiding these five mistakes will give you the best chance of making it.  Rome wasn’t built in a day, so my last bit of advice is to be patent.

What are you waiting for?!

The post How to Survive the Gig Economy (5 Mistakes to Avoid) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Jacob Eberhart at June 05, 2018 05:48 PM

The Javelin Blog

Additive Manufacturing Event Recap: Society of Automotive Engineers Ontario

Javelin hosted a great Automotive Additive Manufacturing event with the Society of Automotive Engineers Ontario in April 2018. The event kicked off with an amazing dinner as well as a networking session, followed by a special guest speaker presentation and success stories from Canadian manufacturing companies. Watch the highlights video below:

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About the Society of Automotive Engineers

The SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) is a global association of more than 120,000 engineers working in aerospace, automotive, and commercial-vehicle industries. They provide the most comprehensive collection of mobility engineering resources, and establish consensus-based standards to advance quality, safety, and innovation in the world of transportation.

Researching 3D Printing at the Event

During this special event at Javelin’s Oakville office, Greg Whitman – a Senior Applications Engineer at Stratasys – discussed how Additive Manufacturing can improve vehicle assembly processes. He also spoke about the use of 3D printing materials like Nylon and ULTEM for jigs and fixtures. Greg went over the Stratasys Ecosystem and workflow, along with an in-depth explanation of both FDM and PolyJet 3D printing technologies. After the presentations, attendees went on a tour of the Oakville 3D printing lab, where they got hands-on experience with Stratasys 3D printers, including a live demo of a Stratasys F123 Series Printer 

Society of Automotive Engineers event

Automotive Additive Manufacturing Example Parts

3D Printing Jigs & Fixtures

Additive Manufacturing provides great benefits in the development of jigs and fixtures in the manufacturing industry. Manufacturers can now design and 3D print custom jigs and fixtures in-house to fit their specific needs. The lack of design limitations allows designers to engineer parts that are ergonomic and reduce strain on workers. Parts are also more lightweight and rugged than ever with new developments in industrial plastics for FDM.    

We were very excited to work with the SAE in hosting this event at our Oakville, Ontario location. We look forward to working with them again on future events!

Want to attend our next Additive Manufacturing Event?

Check out our event schedule for the next event happening in a Canadian city near you. You can also watch recorded webinars on a variety of 3D Printing / Design and Manufacturing topics.

The post Additive Manufacturing Event Recap: Society of Automotive Engineers Ontario appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Eissa Ahmad at June 05, 2018 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

Block-Loving Car Nuts Will Find the LEGO Bugatti Chiron Right Up Their Alley

LEGO Bugatti Chiron

Continuing the tradition of making miniatures of some of the world’s most remarkable automobile designs, LEGO and French car manufacturer Bugatti have teamed up to create one of the most complex block builds you’ll ever find: a 1:8 scale LEGO Bugatti Chiron. The stunning model measures 14cm high, 25cm wide, and is made up of 3,599 pieces which all play a part in crafting the car’s many features.

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To begin with, the cockpit has an 8-speed gearbox with a movable gearshift and steering wheel.

LEGO Bugatti Chiron

Even the seats were recreated using different panel, beam, and tile LEGO blocks.

LEGO Bugatti Chiron

You can also insert a top speed key to switch the rear wing from a handling to a top speed position. The Chiron isn’t mechanically powered, but having an extra layer of detail helps you imagine your fantasies as you play with it.

LEGO Bugatti Chiron LEGO Bugatti Chiron

Speaking of power, popping the car’s rear hood (it is a racecar, after all) allows you to access the recreated W16 engine made entirely out of LEGOs. Two crankshafts allow each of the 16 cylinders to be completely moveable, while the gearbox has enough space for eight functioning gears.

LEGO Bugatti Chiron

All this machinery connects to four low-profile tires which pull the car along. A mix of overlapping rims and a connecting disc break were used to create a low-profile illusion for the tires, while the car’s four-wheel drive and suspension functions make their transition to the LEGO world pretty smoothly.

LEGO Bugatti Chiron
LEGO Bugatti Chiron LEGO Bugatti Chiron

While the model kit is significantly cheaper than a real Bugatti Chiron, it still ranks up there among the costliest LEGO sets at $349.99. Whether you want to dive right into this behemoth build or not, you can ogle all you want over at LEGO.

The post Block-Loving Car Nuts Will Find the LEGO Bugatti Chiron Right Up Their Alley appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 05, 2018 01:15 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: ‘The Pushing Points Topology Workbook’

When it comes to SubD topology, having the ability to construct a variety of meshes with clean polygon flows can mean the difference between yelling an obscene amount of profanities at your monitor or having a blast. Thanks to a new book from the renowned 3D artist, writer, and director William Vaughan, getting to that fun place won’t have to be so challenging after all.

Vaughan’s comprehensive 125-page Pushing Points Topology Workbook includes over 60 exercises to train anybody in managing their mesh topology. Even those who may consider themselves “experts” at SubD could certainly learn a thing or two from the master modeler—whose portfolio spans across Nickelodeon and Pixar.

The Pushing Points Topology Workbook — $48.00

About Author William Vaughan:

William Vaughan is an award-winning artist, writer, and director. He has created thousands of original computer-generated characters, including Tofu the Vegan Zombie. William has trained thousands of CG artists throughout the world and authored more than one thousand tutorials and instructional videos. He has been published by major cg magazines, contributed to twenty books, has written and directed several award-winning films, and has created digital art for many top studios, including Nickelodeon and Pixar Animation Studios.

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

Feature image via Polycount

The post Cool Tools of Doom: ‘The Pushing Points Topology Workbook’ appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 05, 2018 01:11 PM

Watch a Bladesmith Turn an Old Drillbit Into a Karambit Knife

Deadly objects crafted by and from molten metal are nothing new here on Solidsmack, but it isn’t every day you see an old hardware material get repurposed into a Southeast Asian curved knife.

This is precisely what Australian knifemaker Steve has done with an old drill bit he found in one of his drawers. With lots of cutting, filing, and hammering, he transforms it into a karambit – a curved knife with origins in Indonesia resembling a claw.

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Steve begins by firing up the kiln and heating the tip of the drill bit. Though this used to be the most dangerous point of the object, he hammers it down flat to provide a holding ring for the karambit.

Drillbit Karambit

After cutting out a massive chunk of the other side, he hammers it to make a large flat portion which serves as the knife’s blade. You’ll notice he keeps some of the drillbit’s drilling curves, possibly as a reminder of the object’s previous life.

Drillbit Karambit

He then cuts out a diagonal portion of the edge to form the blade’s curve; then it’s back to hammering both sides of the blade to create the karambit’s unique shape.

Drillbit Karambit

After working on the blade, Steve then forms the holding ring which allows a user to spin the deadly weapon like an overzealous Southeast Asian ninja. He also bends the drilling curves a little to create a more curved shape.

Drillbit Karambit

A bit more cutting, polishing, and sharpening and this thing is fit to slice open even the most stubborn envelopes.

Drillbit Karambit

As with all karambits, you can hold this baby either with the blade extending from your forefinger or your pinky. No matter which way you choose, you can be pretty sure no one will want to ambush you in a dark alley.

For more obscure knife making videos, head to Steve’s YouTube channel, Miller Knives.

The post Watch a Bladesmith Turn an Old Drillbit Into a Karambit Knife appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 05, 2018 01:04 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS Helps RoboTeam Twente Tackle RoboCup 2018

robocup_2018_canada_montreal

robocup_2018_canada_montreal

Robots taking on robots? If you thought that was the stuff of game shows, toy manufacturers or multi-million dollar film franchises, think again. Mechanoids battling against their synthetic siblings for supremacy isn’t just a reality, but a sport. Football, to be precise.

Football fever is in the air this June as the whistle blows in Russia. Yet, over in Canada some decidedly more android athletes look set to take to the pitch in pursuit of glory.


It’s all kicking off in Canada

The Canadian city of Montreal is playing host to RoboCup 2018. It’s a week-long collaborative initiative that seeks to advance state-of-the-art intelligent robotics. At the heart of it is the football tournament that pits machine against machine. 35 countries, 5,000 robots and not a single half time orange.

The inaugural tournament was held in 1997. By 2050 the organisers behind RoboCup would like to see a team of robots take on and beat a team of world-class human players. RoboCup’s constant hive of ingenuity is devoted to making this possibility a reality. Who’s to say we won’t one day be cheering on Ronaldo’s grandson as he nutmegs his robotic counterpart?


Stress testing for six-a-side

One team that can’t wait to get their mechanoids limbered up is RoboTeam Twente. This band of eager students from the Netherlands’ University of Twente is diving into the challenge of RoboCup with their own robotic team.

Students from a diverse range of sciences such as Mechanical Engineering, Computer Science and Advanced Technology, RoboTeam Twente has collaborated, engineered and crafted six ball-kicking ‘bots to tackle their artificial opponents.

That football team is taking to the pitch courtesy of SOLIDWORKS. It remains to be seen whether RoboTeam Twente has saved themselves goals conceded in the matches, but by utilising SOLIDWORKS the students have certainly saved time and expense during the planning stages.

How so? Artificial intelligence (AI) doesn’t come cheap. Applying modification on the fly and stress-testing within SOLIDWORKS prevents the need for costly, time-sinking prototype rebuilds. In a crowdfunded project where every donated penny is squeezed extra tight for added value, that’s got to be a bonus.

RoboCup2018_Logo_Horizontal_Red 

The small (but still beautiful) game

Secondly, robotics that seek to score big on the pitch require precision-engineering. The design process for the automated players must be pin-sharp in its accuracy to account for every last millimetre. For RoboTeam Twente, size really does matter.

The team is preparing for domination in the tournament’s Small Size League. In deference to the frenetic pace and confines of a football match, the team built a centralised system that makes the decisions for every robot in a team. It’s a tricky, fiddly process that SOLIDWORKS facilitated seamlessly, with some assistance from its reseller Design Solutions.

The RoboCup tournament was created to drive a deeper understanding and mastery of AI, robotic manoeuvrability and innovation. The incentive of competition is a tremendous catalyst for creativity; the lustre of victory ensuring all participants bring their A-game to the pitch. This June prepare to be amazed and enthralled by football’s latest stars. Batteries definitely included.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Helps RoboTeam Twente Tackle RoboCup 2018 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS UK at June 05, 2018 11:00 AM

June 04, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Mechanics of Mozzarella: Section Properties of Pizza in SOLIDWORKS

My mother always told me to never play with my food, but little does she know, you can get a lesson in engineering from it! In this article, I will discuss this with one of my favorite foods: pizza! As delicious as it is, it can prove to be a little bit difficult to eat it. We’ve all been there, unless your pizza is super thin and crispy, the slice will droop.

 

Pizza Simulation

Still, humans are resourceful and have found ways to tackle the challenge. First, there are some who try to duck their heads and ambush the slice from below. While this gets the job done, it can be messy if the maneuver is executed incorrectly. Not to mention, then you become that person that droops a pizza over his/her face to eat it.

Some have found that they were able to subdue their pizza by using both of their hands. While effective, this technique can be dangerous to wielder. Many recount near death experiences, coming from the brink of dehydration as they were unable to hold a drink with what would, otherwise, be a free hand.

Another controversial technique is to leave the pizza on the plate and bring tools called “forks” and “knives” to it! This is polarizing among activists, who note that cutting up a pizza with cutlery is inhumane to the pizza, which should be treated with more respect. Once again, you become THAT person that eats a pizza with a knife and fork.

Surely, there must be a better way! We have technology! We have SOLIDWORKS!!! Well, the most recent development from the world’s top pizza researchers gives us this technique: the pinch.

This is when you pick up the slice of pizza by the crust and pinch the piece of pizza in half. This magically coerces the pizza to stand at attention, ready to be enjoyed.

Pinched Pizza Simulation

 

 

But why does this work? Let us step back and ask the question: Why do pizzas droop in the first place? When we hold a slice of pizza by the crust, the force of gravity is pulling down on the pizza, the average location of the force at the center of mass. This force is far forward from the fixed point (human hand) that is holding the crust. This situation is analogous to a cantilever beam and results in a net bending moment that makes the pizza droop (annoyingly) downwards!

This makes sense, except how does crimping the pizza on the end help with this at all?? Crimping does not change the mass (or gravity of the Earth) so the magnitude of the weight force remains the same. The location of the center of mass hasn’t changed either (assuming you haven’t taken a bite out of it while reading this, of course), and the location of the hand hasn’t changed either. So, the net bending moment is the same too! What gives?!

There is another property that determines the net deflection on a cantilever beam: section properties specifically. That’s right, the shape of the beam affects how a beam bends under load. It is this property that explains why civil engineers love the I-beam so much. The I beam is really good at resisting bending moment because of its I shape. Specifically, the I shape has a high second moment of area (or principal moments of inertia of the area) property. If you look on this page, it gives the formulas for many cross section shapes. I looked for hours and was unable to find the equation for pizza. That’s not a problem though, because we can calculate it with SOLIDWORKS!

Pizza 3D CAD Model

Here, I’ve made a you guys a slice of pizza! But this pizza isn’t for eating, its for science…and then eating. So how can we find the second moment of area of this pizza at a particular location? It is a section property, so we need to section it first! Click the section tool at the top of the heads-up view toolbar. I’ll place a section plane about an inch from the crust (no I didn’t eat it already)!

Cross Section of 3D CAD Pizza

Now, the cross section here is basically a rectangle and can be manually calculated if you’re a nerd and like math but it can also be computed with SOLIDWORKS. Go to the Evaluate tab and click on “Section Properties”. A window not unlike mass properties appears. Select the section face and click “Recalculate”. SOLIDWORKS will display the results in that window.

Section Properties Snapshot

Many numbers are displayed in the window, because SOLIDWORKS calculates the moments of inertia with respect to many axes at once, but the value we are looking for is listed as Ix = 3759 mm^4. This is the principal moment of inertia with respect to the x axis (the neutral axis).

Now, let’s apply our secret technique and then recalculate Ix! Here is my masterful crimp of this slice as well as its section:

 Pinched Pizza 3D CAD Model3D Model of Crimped Pizza with Cross Section

That cross section looks wildly different, but let’s see what the numbers say!

Section Properties after Pizza Pinch

We can see that, even though the cross-sectional area remained virtually the same at 925mm², the Principal Moment of Inertia of the Area Ix ballooned to over 130982mm^4, an increase of 35 times!

So that’s good and all, but how exactly does a large Principal Moment of Inertia correspond to resistance in bending for a cantilever pizza?

Let’s consider the equation that describes the maximum deflection in a cantilever beam under uniform distributed load where:

  • delta (δ) is maximum deflection
  • q is the uniform distributed load
  • L is the length of the beam
  • E is the Modulus of Elasticity (a material property)
  • And I is the Principal Moment of Inertia of the Area.

The real take away is this: the equation for deflection is inversely dependent on the Moment of Inertia. In layman’s terms, when the value of Ix gets large, the value of the deflection diminishes…and that’s exactly what we like in our pizza. Thanks for following along!

Check out more blogs like this one here. You’ll find helpful articles and educational videos on a wide range of engineering and manufacturing topics to help you maximize efficiency in your job role!
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Author: Robert Maldonado, Application Engineer at DesignPoint

Author information

DesignPoint
DesignPoint is passionate about building solutions that help product design, engineering and manufacturing companies maximize their potential. By developing trusted partnerships, we help our customers achieve game-changing results and support them in their journey as they strive for more. With DesignPoint, More is Possible.® Our solutions include SOLIDWORKS 3D software, 3D Systems and MarkForged 3D printers, technical support, training and more. Contact us today at design-point.com!

The post Mechanics of Mozzarella: Section Properties of Pizza in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by DesignPoint at June 04, 2018 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Monday List 23.18 | What We’re Reading This Week

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

This Former Tesla Staffer Became an Internet Millionaire in His Spare Time

Sisun Lee just raised $8 million for his hangover drink company, now valued at $33 million.

This Former Tesla Staffer Became an Internet Millionaire in His Spare Time

How to Pose for a Photograph

“You look your most attractive when you have a strong jawline,” says Peter Hurley, a portrait photographer in New York City who has taken headshots for some 30,000 people, including the likes of Mikhail Baryshnikov and Ariana Grande.

How to Pose for a Photograph

Letter of Recommendation: Airport Layovers

I’ve had, in my life, two 12-hour layovers in Shanghai.

Letter of Recommendation: Airport Layovers

How to Leverage Introversion as a Career Strength

Being an introvert doesn’t mean you lack great management potential—but you need to play to your strengths.

How to Leverage Introversion as a Career Strength

Can a New Kind of Consumerism Help Fight Climate Change?

Boy, it’s hard to stay optimistic these days, what with the impending doom of our species at the hands of…our species.

Can a New Kind of Consumerism Help Fight Climate Change

High-End Auto Designers Go Electric

Whoever you ask, EVs mean far greater freedom for designers, engineers, and marketers.

high-end auto designers go electric

The post The Monday List 23.18 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 04, 2018 12:51 PM

The Javelin Blog

Free SOLIDWORKS Certification Exam for Subscription Customers

If you have an active subscription with SOLIDWORKS you and your team can write a Free SOLIDWORKS Certification Exam.

SOLIDWORKS Certification is like the black belt, that patch on your sleeve, or the badge on your sash. Its a symbol of one’s knowledge, skill, and competency with SOLIDWORKS, so what are the benefits of obtaining a certification?

  • Looks good on the resume — Having a SOLIDWORKS certification on your resume is a booster because it represents your knowledge and competency using the software to somebody who hasn’t seen your work.
  • Looks good on the company’s resume — There is a boost of confidence in your company knowing that you employees are capable, especially if your business is service based, having a certified staff inspires more confidence from customers and makes your company more competitive.
  • Test your skills — Benchmark your abilities with SOLIDWORKS. The certification exams are a perfect measure of your skills and proof that you can use the software competently.

Discover the benefits of SOLIDWORKS Certification in the video below

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DS SolidWorks has created a multitude of exams that focus on different areas of their products and in varying difficulties. The catalogue includes:

  • CSWA – Certified SOLIDWORKS Associate
  • CSWP – Certified SOLIDWORKS Professional
  • CSWE – Certified SOLIDWORKS Expert
  • PDM (CPPA)
  • Simulation (CSWA, CSWP)
  • Electrical  (CSWA)
  • Surfacing (CSWPA)
  • Mold Making (CSWPA)
  • Sheet Metal (CSWPA)
  • Weldments (CSWPA)
  • Drawing Tools (CSWPA)
  • Additive Manufacturing (CSWA)
  • Sustainability (CSWA)
  • Mold Based Design (CSWP)

Get Your Free SOLIDWORKS Certification Exam Codes

To begin the process you need to sign in to the SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal. If you do not have an account already you will have to create one. It is highly recommended to take advantage of this resource because it gives you access to the knowledge base, forums, training files, downloads, SPRs, etc. You can create your Customer Portal Account / SolidWorks ID here: https://customerportal.solidworks.com/

Note: The VOUCHER CODE retrieved from the SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal is not the same as the EVENT ID you get via text for the exam. The voucher code is for subscription users and it is used to obtain the event ID and the event ID is used for the exam.

  1. Once you’re logged in click on “Certification”

    Certification in Customer Portal

    Certification in Customer Portal

2. On the right side of the page click “Certification Offers for Subscription Service Customers”

Certification Offers for Subscription Service Customers

Certification Offers for Subscription Service Customers

4. The voucher code will be displayed in the blue window. This is the code you will need to use to get your event ID via text.

NOTE: If you need vouchers for multiple users, simply REFRESH the page and a new voucher code will be generated.

Free SOLIDWORKS Certification Exam Code

Voucher Code

5. To get your Event ID  text the voucher code followed by the exam code to (617) 795-3131 (In North America)

Exam Codes are:

  • CSWA: CSWA
  • CSWP: CSWP
  • CSWE: CSWE
  • Sheet Metal: SM
  • Weldments: WD
  • Surfacing: SU
  • Mold Tools: MT
  • Drawing Tools: DT
  • Additive Manufacturing: AM

 

Text Message

Text Message

SAMPLE – If I wanted the Event ID to write the CSWP core exam and the Specialized Surface Modeling exam using the voucher code obtained above, my text would read:

XSQS5WBZ2 CSWP SM

You would then receive the event ID codes back for each exam. The return text will consist of event ID’s for each of the 3 segments of the CSWP exam (CSWP Exam is written in three parts), and the event ID for the Surfacing exam.

These are the event ID / Voucher codes you will have to enter into the test client to gain access to your FREE exam. Remember, the exam must be written as soon as the code is entered, each mobile device provides two vouchers per year (first between Jan. 1- June 30 and the second between July 1- Dec. 31), each event ID expires after 180 days and exam vouchers are non-transferable and violating this policy will result in cancellation of certificates and freezing out your Virtual Tester account.

Getting Ready for the Exam

  1. Exams are written online through the Tangix TesterPro client. Download the client here https://vt-cdn.tangix.com/sldwrks/Tangix_TesterPRO_Client.exe then click run. 
  2. Login or create a VirtualTester account.
    Candidate Registration

    Candidate Registration

     

  3. After logging in, enter you Event ID then select the exam that corresponds with the ID entered and then begin your exam.

    Exam Selection

    Exam Selection

Sample Exams

DS SolidWorks provides sample exams for CSWA and CSWP so you can prepare for the one that counts! Doing sample exams are beneficial because it will let you gauge the difficulty of the test, what to expect and get familiar with the format of the test. The tests are located in the same area as the other exams within the Virtual TesterPro client.

Sample Exams

Sample Exams

The PDF Versions of the practice tests can be found here:

The post Free SOLIDWORKS Certification Exam for Subscription Customers appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Adam Ferrer at June 04, 2018 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

New eLearning Course Gets Users Up to Speed in 3D Printing

Although 3D printing has been around for about 30 years, the recent past has seen a huge adoption in additive manufacturing (AM) technology in both the commercial and personal arenas. Low-cost 3D printers have made the technology so affordable that today you can simply walk into a number of retail establishments and purchase a machine for less than the cost of a family vacation!

Most consumers and small business are choosing to jump into the 3D printing pool as cautiously as possible, which means they may first choose to invest in lower-cost technologies like SLA of FDM printers. While 3D printers use the term ‘printer’ in their name, that’s about the only thing in common they share with their paper-consuming cousins. While the terms printer and plug and play may lead us to believe that a 3D printer is as easy to set up and use as a paper printer, that simple isn’t true.

I discovered this first hand when I bought my first 3D printer in 2013. Back then, most printers featured an acrylic build plate, which most people quickly discovered was better replaced by a piece of tempered glass that was much flatter and allowed for better printed parts. My first printer didn’t even have a self-leveling routine found in pretty much every entry-level printer today. And, don’t get me started about how limited the software and slicers were back then!

SOLIDWORKS debuts AM Certification

When we set out to create the Certified Additive Manufacturing Associate (CSWA-AM) learning and exam, our goal was to develop a short learning course that would cover the very basic topics of mainstream and consumer-level 3D printing. We knew we couldn’t cover everything, so we focused on teaching things that would be helpful to the parent looking to buy a machine for their budding young engineer, or for the school teacher looking to buy a machine for the classroom with a grant, for the hobbyist or maker who simply wanted to further the development of their invention of the century, and finally, for the company that was looking to try out the technology to see how they could revolutionize their business.

The CSWA-AM program teaches how both FDM and SLA machines work; how parts are designed for 3D printing; and also how both slicer software and today’s CAD tools, such as SOLIDWORKS and 3DExpert, are making the process of 3D printing easier for everyone.

With the participation of SOLIDWORKS partners FormLabs and Ultimaker, the CSWA-AM eLearning course will walk users through the following topics:

  • Material types
  • Machine types and processes
  • Design for printing considerations
  • Part model preparation
  • Machine preparation
  • Post printing finishing
  • Slicer software features and functionality
  • Software-based printing aids

Upon completion of the eLearning, the CSWA-AM exam can be taken to provide a validated form of learning with a certification provided by the SOLIDWORKS Certification Program. The eLearning is free with a MySolidWorks account and doesn’t require the use of SOLIDWORKS. And while the learning and exam are designed for a user of any CAD program to take, SOLIDWORKS users on subscription can get the exam for free. The exam is also free for educators participating in the SOLIDWORKS Academic Certification Provider Program.

 

Author information

Mike Puckett
Mike Puckett
Senior Manager, World Wide Certification Program SOLIDWORKS

The post New eLearning Course Gets Users Up to Speed in 3D Printing appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mike Puckett at June 04, 2018 12:00 PM

June 02, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Automate your design with DriveWorksXpress

Does part of your project involves integration and reuse of existing components and assemblies with just slight changes in some standard dimensions? Creating files for such application can be a simple yet time consuming activity, and automating the creation of such parts for reusability is definitely something worth considering. With SOLIDWORKS DriveWorksXpress, you can actually reduce the amount of work needed to create the variations to just a simple form filling which can directly generate the model base on the controlled dimension.

Using Driveworks

Taking a conveyer assembly as example, the design and components of a conveyer may be standard but it can still vary in Length, Width and Height depending on the project it is used for. With a bit of time, you can create the whole model for your requirements by just indicating the desired dimensions. Having this option to create CAD files, even users without knowledge of SOLIDWORKS can easily create variations of existing CAD files and drawings. All the respective related drawings will be automatically generated according to the original, with update in all the dimensions.
 
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Using SOLIDWORKS DriveWorksXpress to automate the modelling of your reusable assembly and part files can help reduce time spent on modelling. As usual, aim to improve your efficiency with SOLIDWORKS – spend lesser time on modelling, spend more time on designing.

Author information

ateworks
From our humble beginnings in 2008, ATE has grown from a single-office reseller into a powerhouse of engineering solution provider, with 5 office locations in Singapore and Malaysia, with a 70-strong workforce that can provide localized support and services to our customers. Today, we provide unrivalled 3D engineering solutions as an premium reseller of Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS. Along the journey, we have also added Altair and SolidCAM, together with many other world-class technology partners, with the single focus on extracting the best return on technology investment for our customers.

The post Automate your design with DriveWorksXpress appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by ateworks at June 02, 2018 03:00 PM

June 01, 2018

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Neck Foam Sockets

Alexandr-Iwaac-art

A spray of foam exploded out the sockets of the metal chewer’s rusted neck seams. It was the first time he’d laughed in centuries. Before he had finished devouring any more of the pickled light orbs though, there was a job to do. It was time to get to work, hunt down, and capture these links.

Alexandr Iwaac – Paint over renders, keysketches, and speedpainting with finished ship and scene pieces throughout.

Nobe – The three-wheeled car/trike is launching. Top speed – 68 mph. 0-60 in 5.9 seconds. Fully charged in two hours. This is the video.

Project Wingman – There just are not enough flight sim games, and this indie dev project looks like one to watch. With a playable demo already available and fully funded Kickstarter after just starting.

Mani – Instagram follow of the week. He’s a photographer who has his way with Photoshop creating surreal imagery and placing large animals in scenes with tiny people.

Ocean – A 10-hour relaxing oceanscape of ocean goings-on. Fishes and such. And lots of water wave sounds. Did I mention it was 10 hours long?

Spacetype – A fun little type/shape experiment from Patrick Benjamin. See the Instagram page to get a better idea of what you can do.

May Disease – A single long shot pencil-drawn monster fight adventure filmed on an iPhone. How it was done right after the video as well.

LEGO Bugatti – What has 3599 LEGO pieces and a $350 price tag? The new LEGO Technic Bugatti Chiron kit. You can buy it on the LEGO Technic site.
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Use My Mouth for War – What’s that? You want to see a Bill Withers and Pantera mash-up? Well, Mr. McClintock has you covered with a mix of “Use Me” and “Mouth For War”.

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The post Friday Smackdown: Neck Foam Sockets appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at June 01, 2018 10:40 PM

The Javelin Blog

University of Victoria Submarine Racing Club – Getting Closer to Race Day!

As introduced in a previous blog post, Javelin’s Additive Solutions team is a proud Silver Sponsor of the University of Victoria Submarine Racing Club (UVSRC), providing them with funding to help develop their submarine. The UVSRC is run by students from both UVic and Camosun College.

The UVSRC has been hard at work over the last several months building the last their racing submarine and are hoping to get it in the water within the next few weeks for some initial testing. Components like the viewing dome, gear box, and steering controls are all very close to completion, with all sub-teams working together to ensure a seamless systems integration.

University of Victoria Submarine

University of Victoria Submarine Nose Cone

Some of the final steps in the manufacturing process include:

  • finalizing the safety release system
  • polishing and sanding the hull before second coat of paint
  • finishing touches on technical drawings
  • building and welding gearbox shafts
  • fine-tune buoyancy and stability calculations and foam placement after initial water test
University of Victoria Submarine

University of Victoria Submarine

Last month, the UVSRC attended Mari-Tech 2018, a conference run by the Canadian Institute of Marine Engineering (CIMarE). Innovators from across Canada attend this event to bring forth their advancements and technological developments in the field. The UVSRC displayed their submarine to countless marine industry professionals, and proudly represented Babcock Canada!

We are all very proud of the UVSRC and can’t wait to see their first dive! We will keep our readers updated as the UVSRC approaches race day.

The post University of Victoria Submarine Racing Club – Getting Closer to Race Day! appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Eissa Ahmad at June 01, 2018 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Best SolidSmack Stories of the Week — June 1st, 2018

Kickstarter Hardware Studio Launches New Badge System for Product Fulfillment

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

Behind the Design: Bram Ramon’s Watch Engravings

Engraving isn’t just for little league trophies or IT departments; for Bram Ramon, it’s an evolving art medium. Ever since he started working on fine jewelry and eventually making his way to expensive watches, Bram has been on the search for what he calls “the beautiful line” – traditional engraving techniques which he makes with his own hands.

Behind the Design: Bram Ramon’s Watch Engravings

Kickstarter Hardware Studio Launches New Badge System for Product Fulfillment

While the mission behind Kickstarter is great for “small guy” entrepreneurs with a good idea and enough chutzpah to launch it into the world via the internet, the ending result isn’t always so great for some project backers.

Kickstarter Hardware Studio Launches New Badge System for Product Fulfillment

Industrial Design Process: How to Finish Your Models with CMF Studies

Continuing work on his cellphone charger prototype, industrial designer Eric Strebel takes this opportunity to show how he completes his designs with a bit of high gloss finish.

Industrial Design Process: How to Finish Your Models with CMF Studies

Precision-Engineered Reel-to-Reel Tape Decks Make a Stunning Comeback

With over 14 million vinyl LPs sold in the United States alone in 2017, it’s no wonder that some artists and hardware manufacturers are putting their lossy MP3 files on the backburner to take a closer look at physical media—including cassette tapes— all over again. But for some extreme audiophiles, nothing beats going straight to the source. And when it comes to analog music, that’s a reel-to-reel tape deck.

Precision-Engineered Reel-to-Reel Tape Decks Make a Stunning Comeback

Building Robots is Fun with the Six-Legged STEMI Hexapod

We may have never gotten the chance to build the robots of our dreams as kids (tears), but that doesn’t necessarily mean our children of this generation should also miss out.

Building Robots is Fun with the Six-Legged STEMI Hexapod

Is Your Awesome Design Patented? (And Tips to Patent It Faster)

America is a litigious country. Without any subjective opinion, many of our founding fathers were lawyers and many of the rights and benefits that we enjoy today are the result of court cases. In terms of intellectual property, it can be a double-edged sword.

Is Your Awesome Design Patented? (And Tips to Patent It Faster)

The post The Best SolidSmack Stories of the Week — June 1st, 2018 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 01, 2018 01:38 PM

MIT and BMW Just Developed 3D Printed Liquid Inflatables

3D Printed Inflatables

Fans of inflatable bouncy castles and comfy car seats have reason to rejoice because 3D-printed inflatables are now a thing! Created by the minds at the Self-Assemble Lab of MIT and BMW, these inflatables adapt and transform by themselves to suit your comfy needs.

Dubbed “Liquid Printed Pneumatics,” these silicone materials take on different shapes depending on how much air pressure is pumped into them. While this would no doubt bring improvements to the balloon animal industry, the guys behind these printed inflatables are planning to put the materials to more practical fields, such as car seats. With this technology, having a seat which adjusts itself based on user preference just got a lot more realistic.

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The potential of these inflatables doesn’t stop with adjustable bum rests, either. Say you’re driving alone in your car and don’t need those extra seats. You could deflate the unused seats to make room for other stuff. According to BMW’s Head of Brand Vision and Brand Design Martina Starke, “There will be no need to lock the car of the future into any particular shape.” She even goes as far as to say future interiors could take on more malleable, modular uses.

3D Printed Inflatables

As for the material itself, it is printed using MIT’s “rapid liquid printing technique,” which is a method of printing furniture and other home-related objects. Silicone material is extruded from a nozzle into a tank of gel where it hardens. This tank is what keeps the softer materials from collapsing before they completely dry and set. It also helps that the process is quick, making mass production a lot easier than other additive manufacturing technologies.

Though the technology was initially developed with vehicles in mind, Self-Assemble Lab head Skylar Tibbits says Liquid Printed Pneumatics could eventually make its way to other fields. Inflatable furniture, footwear, and even soft robotics are just a few industries which could use a little 3D-printed inflatable love.

BMW doesn’t have any immediate plans for the technology, but the fact it exists opens a new world of bouncy possibilities. You can find a Liquid Printed Pneumatics display at the London V&A museum as part of The Future Starts Here exhibition from now until November 4, 2018.

The post MIT and BMW Just Developed 3D Printed Liquid Inflatables appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 01, 2018 01:22 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: The Rollbahn Gold Pocket Memo

Having a place to jot down your ideas when inspiration strikes is a must for any designer or engineer. Yet, finding the ideal (durable!) scratchpad to keep in your pocket (or close by) at all times isn’t always easy. Which is why we love the Rollbahn pocket memo from Rollbahn.

Featuring a gold metal cover (yep—really!) and tearaway gridded pages, this edition of the iconic Japanese notebook is the perfect fusion of simplicity and function.

Rollbahn Gold Metal Cover Pocket Memo (Gridded Pages) — $12.14

Features:

  • Made in Japan
  • 112×138mm
  • Durable Metal Cover
  • Elastic Enclosure
  • Perforated Tearaway Pages

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The Rollbahn Gold Pocket Memo appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at June 01, 2018 01:11 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Keep On (Monster) Truckin’: Detailing the Max-D

Min-Max-D’s face, simulation vs reality

 

“The devil’s in the details,” or so goes the old phrase. For members of the SOLIDWORKS Magic Wheelchair build team, however, Maximum Destruction is in the details. Taking pieces of pink and black foam and transforming them into a perfect replica of an intricate monster truck is no small feat. Sub teams have been working together to create the details that will bring Jonah’s costume to life.

Magic Wheelchair suggests teams build a cardboard mock-up of the costume being built, and a PVC mock-up of the child’s wheelchair, so any issues can be worked out before production. It’s a great idea, but with barely a month to create their mini-Max-D, the SOLIDWORKS team forwent the cardboard and instead stuck with what they know best: CAD. “We’ve made a lot of progress in the short time,” said Annie Cheung. “And a lot of [the progress] has benefited from the fact that we’ve done more virtual prototyping in SOLIDWORKS to see what the problems are…SOLIDWORKS is helping us to cut down a lot of trial and error.” Using SOLIDWORKS, the build team was able to go straight from design to production.

“Spike” design, math, and paper prototyping

 

As the detail work on the mini-Max-D comes closer to fruition, the discussion over bought vs. printed became more pertinent. For pieces like the mechanism that connects the costume’s tires to the motor that will move them, do you spend money on specific, hard to find ball bearings, or just print them in the lab? Do you use the connecting PVC pipes that are already bought and try to finagle those to work with the chassis design and casters, or cut out the middle man and print custom connecting parts? Do you purchase Styrofoam cones to imitates spikes and rivets, or do you cut already purchased foam to save on time and testing? As the deadline draws near, more and more custom parts are being fabricated.

Laser cut cones, with a “spike” finish test in the middle.

 

Take the “spikes” and “rivets.” There was a lot of back and forth on the Magic Wheelchair Slack channel over what size the “spikes” should be—again, the team is going all out for scale. But the actuality of a premade Styrofoam cone, that then needs to be shaped, cut, tested for prime, paint, and adhesive, led Annie to some geometry. She created paper cone prototypes to show the team what the best to-scale “spikes” and “rivets” would look like, then created a cut pattern in SOLIDWORKS what would allow the team to not only use material they already had, but also provide flexibility when attaching the “spikes” to the car body. The body of the mini-Max-D has angles and curve to it, and instead of cutting and sanding pre-made Styrofoam cones into submission, the team has flexible foam “spikes” ready to be placed wherever they need to go.

Max-D face progress

Max-D face progress

One of the details that had to be made via machining was Max-D’s face. This iconic visage is found on both sides of original truck, and as it came to life on the Shop Bot, the build seemed that much closer to making Jonah’s dreams come true. Albert Hernandez ran the face through the Shop Bot with a ½” bit, and rather than risk any issues by passing over the face again with a ¼” bit, the team will do the rest of the face details by hand.

Various flame designs

 

It’s been a while since we’ve checked on the mini-Max-D flames, and there is some news to report! Testing for the flame effect is in full swing, and the team is tossing linear regulators for switching regulars—they don’t want the lights to get too hot! The plan is to have LEDs all over the mini-Max-D: flames on the sides of the car, lights on the dashboard and in the interior where Jonah will sit, headlights and taillights, undercarriage lights, and lights on the faces. Regulating the currents and the placement of wires and the power source is at the forefront of the team’s minds.

The details for the costume are all coming together, and the build team is moving at a brisk, exciting pace. Team members are in and out of the 3DEXPERIENCE Lab and the airplane hangar every day, at all hours. The details are starting to pop, and next it’s hard coating, priming, painting, and putting it all together.

Help support Magic Wheelchair and amazing kiddos like Jonah!

SOLIDWORKS is working hard to make Jonah’s dreams come true, and helping the non-profit Magic Wheelchair achieve its goal of providing kids in wheelchairs with epic costumes. SOLIDWORKS is funding Jonah’s costume build in its entirety, but we invite all our readers to support Magic Wheelchair in Jonah’s name! If you visit this classy.org page, you can donate directly to Magic Wheelchair and help support them and all the lives they touch with their great work. Stayed tuned for more updates on this exciting build and always remember to keep on (monster) truckin’!

SOLIDWORKS is partnering with the Magic Wheelchair to create an over-the-top costume for a child in a wheelchair. According to their mission statement, “Magic Wheelchair builds epic costumes for kiddos in wheelchairs —  at no cost to families.” Keep On (Monster) Truckin’ is an ongoing series dedicated to updating our readers on the current project’s progress.

Read about Jonah’s costume from the beginning!

Thank you to all who support our team, including Magic WheelchairMonster JamPermobil, and MLC CAD.

Author information

Sara Zuckerman
Sara Zuckerman
Sara Zuckerman is a SOLIDWORKS Education Contractor, Social Media and Marketing. Formerly an intern, Sara has a B.A. in Writing, Literature, and Publishing from Emerson College and recently earned a Certificate in Web Development from MassBay Community College. She is excited about utilizing this blog to combine her two passions, writing and technology.

The post Keep On (Monster) Truckin’: Detailing the Max-D appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Sara Zuckerman at June 01, 2018 12:00 PM

May 31, 2018

SolidSmack

Manufacturing the Ideal Design – 3D Printing Shifting Business Models

manufacturing the ideal design - shift of 3D printing business models

I’m reading a brief analysis by Gartner’s Pete Basiliere on how 3D printing could affect business models.

Business models, of course, are critical devices for the successful operation of a business. They define how money is spent and collected based on the creation and distribution of value to clients. Companies without business models are not long for this world.

Basiliere correctly points out that the business models we’ve long been familiar with are a product of the technologies employed by businesses for a century: mass manufacturing and the pursuit of efficiency led to a world where “all products are the same”.

But he points out that 3D printing could shake this concept considerably, saying there are four major impacts on business models:

3D printing enables a shift from designing for ideal manufacturing to manufacturing the ideal design: Not the end of mass manufacturing, but the addition of a new expectation for personalization or customization, even down to the level of a single product instance.

3D printing can have a beneficial impact on finances by cutting production, inventory and manufacturing costs: While many products, if simply made by 3D printing, would actually be more expensive than using traditional technologies, it is sometimes possible for ingenious designers to modify product designs to leverage 3D printing technologies and create more effective products.

3D printing can enable new value propositions that transform existing and facilitate new customer relationships: This one was new to me. The idea is that mass manufacturing meant “this is the product, how many do you want?” That implies a certain type of business relationship – mainly ordering. But if customization through 3D printing is enabled, then the relationship could change to more of a “what are your needs and maybe I can make it for you?” I suspect that almost all manufacturers are not prepared for this type of change.

3D printing can not only deliver immediate benefits to existing manufacturing business models, but also be a disruptive technology that enables radically new business models such as mass customization: Here Basiliere points out that changes to the business model could be advantageous to a company, but also devastating if done by a competitor earlier. This suggests that companies might consider introducing 3D printing faster than simply waiting until forced into it, as they might be out of business by then.

I’d add one more business model effect, and that is the possibility of an entirely new business model based on products previously unattainable. Traditional manufacturing processes have significant constraints that have for decades molded our thought processes of how products can be designed. These constraints largely decided which areas could be addressed by a business, but now the constraints may be partially relieved with 3D printing.

This means a company could, in theory, invent an entirely new product never seen before, simply because it could not be made efficiently.

But those situations will be rare and require considerable out-of-the-box thinking, and perhaps even an injection of new thinkers from other industries and disciplines.

Nevertheless, 3D printing is set to make dents in your business model, either positive or negative.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

Image: ARUP

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by Fabbaloo at May 31, 2018 04:47 PM

Is Your Awesome Design Patented? (And Tips to Patent It Faster)

how do you search for your design patent idea

America is a litigious country.  Without any subjective opinion, many of our founding fathers were lawyers and many of the rights and benefits that we enjoy today are the result of court cases.  In terms of intellectual property, it can be a double-edged sword.

While intellectual property and the protection that it affords to companies in the U.S. is invaluable to producing great products, many have bastardized the protection that a patent affords. Companies have often been sued over patent infringement by no-practicing entities who abuse the system (as was done in a small East Texas district).

Regardless, it is imperative to patent your new product idea as soon as possible.  The America Invents Act means that patent rights go to first-to-file, versus first-to-invent.  For us laypeople, this means that if two inventors create the same product, the patent goes to the first person who files a full patent application, versus the first person who files a provisional patent (which used to serve as proof that they invented it).  

Before you patent it, however, you have to make sure you know the scope of what you are patenting, and why.  

In the event that you are patenting an entirely new invention in an entirely new industry, as in the first internal combustion engine,  your patent can be as broad as you would like. As the internal combustion engine patented by Alphonse Beau de Rochas is almost 160 years old, if you wanted to patent an internal combustion engine, you would have to be very specific, otherwise, you are infringing on others’ work. 

Thus begins the search.

A warning though–patent searches take time, especially if you haven’t done it before.  

At the United States Patent Office (USPTO), the patent examiners have a lot of systems in place to search patents easily.  They even have their own database available to the public for searching.  In my opinion, Google Patents is much easier to use, however different strokes for different folks.

And still, the best way to learn how to search patents is to search patents… for a long, long time. However, as with many things in life, there are some hacks. You can save a lot of time if you know what to look for.  Here, we’ll cover Design Patents and tips for saving time while doing your due diligence searches. (Utility Patents are a different animal altogether that we can cover later.)

In a Design Patent, the shape is the claim, as in the pictures of the invention in the patent are the invention itself. 

And here’s your tip–If you are patenting a design, don’t start with Google Patents, start with Google Image search.  Select ‘Search by image’, then ‘Upload an image’ to make the magic happen.

Google Image search looks for visually similar images to the one you uploaded. So, if you take a sketch, screenshot, rendering or a photo of your design, Google Images will find the closest thing to it.  Careful, though. As with all Google searches, you may uncover images of drugs, sex and maybe even *ahem* rock and roll. So, act accordingly if, you know, you’re in a public place 😉

Now, let’s say so far that your invention didn’t turn up many image matches. Ok, now you’re ready to search google, by images. When I was a Design Patent Examiner, searching through the first 10 pages of google images was a very good litmus test if a design was new.  

How do you search?

First, when you upload your image, is anything similar? Search through 10 pages of google images. Yes? No?

Second, what is your invention? Search through 10 pages of google images. Try different keywords/phrases. Does anything match? 

Third, drill down into anything similar. At this point, you’ve got an exhaustive list of visually similar objects, brands, and models.

Now. Now it’s time to search Google Patents.  

Here, you are searching for several things:

  • stuff that looks like your invention
  • the companies that make them
  • the people who invented them 

From your previous searches, you should already have a good idea of stuff that looks like your invention as well as the companies that make them. So, what’s next?

Google Patents has its own syntax (e.g. [assignee:”Google Inc”], [inventor:page], and [before:2001]). Use it to find the companies who patented products as well as inventors who work for those companies.  

Although it is not always the case, many listed inventors for Design Patents tend to stick to one area. For example, Frank Nuovo has patented a lot of cell phone designs for Vertu, so if your invention is a high-end cell phone, see if Frank Nuovo patented something close to your design.  Although Frank Nuovo is the inventor, he assigned the patent to Vertu. So if you’re looking for similar designs, look for patents where Vertu is the assignee.  And wait, doesn’t this look like a Blackberry?  Let’s search patents where Blackberry is the assignee and then find the designer(s) who invented it.

While Utility Patents may be more involved, Design Patents are a lot simpler. As an analogy, if Utility Patents are six degrees of Kevin Bacon, Design Patents are a good three. Yeah… that works. In short, to make sure your patent is original, search out three degrees (products, assignees, inventors) from your idea. If you search out that far and receive more dead ends than hits, you can be more confident your invention is unique.  Likewise, if you search out four levels and you’re still turning up matching designs, it may be time to go back to the drawing board.

Lastly, I teased how to differentiate your invention if you find that it’s already patented. Fortunately, you’re not the first person this has happened to. Let’s think about cell phones again. In the era of smartphones, most phones are rounded rectangles. There are only so many ways you can design a rounded rectangle. Companies such as Apple and Samsung patent elements of their phone’s shape, not the entire phone. While you may not be able to patent the entire shape of your invention, you can certainly patent elements, such as the top, bottom, or sides, and if you have enough money, some of each!

Establishing your patent can be tough, but not impossible, and I am certainly not the only source of information you should rely on.  Think of this article as an introduction to the wide and complicated world of Design Patents. Happy inventing!

Disclaimer: The information in this blog post is provided for general informational purposes only, and may not reflect the current law in your jurisdiction. No information contained in this post should be construed as legal advice from EvD Media, SolidSmack, or the individual author, nor is it intended to be a substitute for legal counsel on any subject matter. No reader of this post should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any information included in, or accessible through, this post without seeking the appropriate legal or other professional advice on the particular facts and circumstances at issue from a lawyer licensed in the recipient’s state, country or other appropriate licensing jurisdiction.

The post Is Your Awesome Design Patented? (And Tips to Patent It Faster) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Jacob Eberhart at May 31, 2018 04:12 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Easily create opposite-hand versions of parts in SOLIDWORKS

Quite often engineers need an opposite-hand version of a part. A commonly used method is the Mirror feature at assembly level. Here you have the possibility to create an opposite-hand version during the definition of this feature. This works great, but sometimes you want to create an opposite-hand version beforehand (pun intended), or without the need of creating an assembly. In this tech blog I want to show you the way to create opposite-hand versions of parts directly from part level.

Using Mirror Part

With the help of Mirror Part you can create a part that is the opposite-hand version of an existing part. By default, the mirrored version is derived from the original version. This means that the two parts will always match.

To create a mirrored part:

1. In an open part document, click a model face or plane about which to mirror the part.
This step is crucial, because otherwise the Mirror Part feature will be unavailable.

2. Click Insert > Mirror Part.
A new part window appears and the Insert Part PropertyManager appears.

3. Under Transfer, select any combination of items from the source part to be included in the opposite-hand version. In this case, for the sheet metal part of step 1, I use the following options:

  • Solid bodies: obviously necessary, because otherwise we do not have a solid geometry.
  • Hole wizard data: useful when creating a drawing, so you can dimension the holes correctly.
  • Sheet metal information: transfers the sheet metal and flat pattern information. This is very useful, because you can directly flatten the opposite-hand version.
  • Material: transfers the defined material

4. (Optional) If you want to independently edit the features of the mirrored part without affecting the original part, under Link, select Break link to original part.

5. (Optional) If you want to maintain all appearances of the original part, under Visual Properties, select Propagate from the original part.

6. Click OK. The mirrored part appears.

Conclusion

As we have seen, it is really easy to create an opposite-hand version of your part files. And instead of using the assembly mirror feature, you can even create these files upfront. For sheet metal parts it is good to include the sheet metal information in the mirrored part, so you don’t need to recreate the flat pattern.

Author: Martijn Visser, Elite Application Engineer, CAD2M

Author information

CAD2M
CAD2M is certified reseller of SOLIDWORKS, SolidCAM, DriveWorks and our private label dddrop 3D printer. The CAD2M approach integrates this range of products into an all-in-one solution that covers the complete product development process. Take the full advantage of working in 3D with our advice, training and expertise. For more information, visit www.cad2m.nl.

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by CAD2M at May 31, 2018 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

Pay What You Want for This 10-Course Arduino Super Bundle

Most designers and engineers already know that Arduino is a powerful and versatile platform for creating electronics projects. Yet, knowing where to dive into learning about the powerful little computer isn’t quite so easy.

From building robots to adding a little IoT intelligence into weekend projects, the Pay What You Want: 2018 Arduino Enthusiast E-Book Bundle is the perfect place to begin broadening your horizons in the world of Arduino.

The project-based approach presented in the course teaches users how to create everything from DC motor controllers operated by a web page, slide switch, or touch sensors to constructing electronic operating status displays for just about anything. Best of all, the course is yours forever—so tackling projects on the weekend can be done at any pace.

The Pay What You Want: 2018 Arduino Enthusiast E-Book Bundle

Skills Presented Include:

  • Monitor several Arduino boards simultaneously
  • Tweet sensor data directly from your Arduino board
  • Post updates on your Facebook wall directly from your Arduino board
  • Create an automated access control w/ a fingerprint sensor
  • Control your entire home from a single dashboard
  • Make a GPS tracker that you can track in Google Maps
  • Build a live camera that streams directly from your robot

Get Started Here!

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by SolidSmack at May 31, 2018 08:00 AM

May 30, 2018

SolidSmack

Building Robots is Fun with the Six-Legged STEMI Hexapod

STEMI Hexapod

We may have never gotten the chance to build the robots of our dreams as kids (tears), but that doesn’t necessarily mean our children of this generation should also miss out.

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The STEMI Hexapod is a brilliant do-it-yourself robot. And before you go saying it looks like a mechanical spider, take note this robot only has six legs.

STEMI Hexapod

Each of those six legs (count ’em!) has three motors which work with the other appendages to give it lifelike movements. These connect to the body of the bot which serves as the housing for the main operating electronics.

STEMI Hexapod

The legs are programmed on a computer using various lines of code, which range from turning your little spiderbot on to having it move in different directions. It sounds pretty ho-hum on paper, but being able to control the angle, direction, and speed at which the Hexapod turns and moves adds a bit more personality than your average robot slave.

STEMI Hexapod

Controlling and programming the robot is usually done on a computer, but STEMI also lets you make your own mobile app to commandeer the Hexapod. While you won’t be doing a lot of programming on your phone (it seems better to do it on a computer), controlling the bot using the mobile onscreen thumb sticks looks a lot more intuitive than a mouse and keyboard.

If you don’t mind shelling out almost $400 ($314.32 as of the moment) for this robot to prepare your child for a job in manufacturing, then you can find it on the STEMI webpage.

The post Building Robots is Fun with the Six-Legged STEMI Hexapod appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at May 30, 2018 10:34 PM

Model of the Week: Giant LEGO Bulldozer [Track Forward, Boom Down!]

Mantis Hacks giant 3D printed LEGO Bulldozer Kit 856-1

Ever since we saw Matt Denton’s LEGO Technic Go-kart, we’ve been keeping an eye on his YouTube channel for what’s next. He’s gone through phases of small hexapods, large hexapods, animatronics, Arduino controlled hydraulics and, most recently, massive 3D printed LEGO kits.

After completing two other giant LEGO builds, we were pretty sure it was going to be… ANOTHER GIANT LEGO BUILD. When we saw it was the 1979 LEGO Bulldozer (Kit 856)… well, we ran outside, started making construction sounds and crashing into random people, spreading THE JOY.

mantis-hacks-giant-3d-printed-lego-bulldozer

Yeah, we see what a cool uncle you are Mr. Matt.

This build is 372 pieces (!) printed on a Lulzbot TAZ 5, TAZ 6, and Mini 3D printer. He used premium PLA filament from 3DFilaPrint as well as 1.75mm Grey and Black Polylite at a resolution 0f 0.3-0.4mm with no rafts or supports (varying infills). The total cost came in at ~$683 USD (£514) with a build time of ~650 hours.

Each set of bricks is organized by color into zip files and he provides the 3D model (.scad) files as well, He also breaks down both the time, cost, part number and material quantity for each piece in a very handy parts list.

You can snag the model files and all the details on the Thingiverse project page. (Bonus! Check out his other giant LEGO builds on his YouTube channel and find all the files on Thingiverse!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you! Thank you for your help in delivering better content!

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by Josh Mings at May 30, 2018 10:04 PM