Planet SolidWorks

September 18, 2020

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: The Crunch Goes Boom

All around us, the cavities emptied, spreading apart with a hiss and a pop. The floor moved – Everywhere, it moved. And then, as if out of nowhere, the ship appeared, reverse thrusters on, incinerating anything around it unshielded by the fire-retardant off-gas of these links.

David Thor Fjalarsson – He’s an illustrator and comic book artist by trade but his mix of environment and perspective are some of my favorite.

Skydivers Unite – An aerodynamic sim created in Cinema 4D by Nikita Diakur that brings you along for a unforgettable jump.

BMW R80 Custom – A custom build by Eastern Spirit Garage with a modular design that is a “piece of craftsman art… like 3 bikes in one.”

Bob Ross 3D World – CG Geek takes on a Bob Ross painting, this time, turning it into a 3D world using Blender in nearly a month’s worth of model work.

Pipes, Robots, Buildings – Instagram follow of the week. Greg Olijnyk creates awesome robots, buildings and more using cardboard, glue, and toothpicks.

2D to 3D People – What if you could turn a single photo of a person into 3D? This recent research paper shows how it’s possible. Real-time mocap video too.

Mos Eisley LEGO – Get your hands on the Star Wars Mos Eisley Cantina LEGO scene. It’s coming October first. 3187 pieces – $350.

Flight Sim vs Real Life – Side by side of Microsoft Flight Simulator and a real-life landing. The IRL graphics look a bit rough.

Weird Al Piano Medley – I wasn’t going to tell you what it was but you’ll still get a kick out of it – the best of Weird Al in a 9-minute piano medley.

<script type="text/javascript"> amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "solid0a-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Deals We Love"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "b87df9a3aaf751508eec8685d1e68ebc"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B07YVYZ8T5,B07KR4Y48S,B07MR3KWSL,B082F615S3"; </script> <script src="http://z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>

Break the Cycle – For Today brings it, with an apropos sentiment… for today and, even more, this year.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/q1z91zfPJAw?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Friday Smackdown: The Crunch Goes Boom appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 18, 2020 10:36 PM

Best RFID Jamming Device is a Paper-Thin ‘Skeleton’ Card

voidscan

We may not all have a complete scientific understanding on how radio frequency identification (RFID) works, but we do know it plays an integral role in how our credit and debit cards transmit data, and includes our passports and driver’s licenses.

Should someone happen to use an RFID scanner without your knowledge, they can easily gain access to your personal information, bank accounts, and the potentially other info beyond that access.

RFID blocking has been around for a long time now, with specialized wallets and sleeves incorporating the technology into their material, but those solutions tend to be large, replacing your wallet, satchel, or bag to wrap your RFID enabled card within. The VoidScan Skeleton Card changes that.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2cxigLk298c?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The VoidScan RFID jamming card may take up more space in your wallet, but it is a lot cheaper AND shows you how RFID blocking technology actually works.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">voidscan</figure>

You use the card as you expect you would. By storing this baby in your wallet or over a card you are using, you can prevent the intentional or unintentional scanning of your RFID-enabled cards. Wallets up to 1.6 inches (4cm) thick are fully protected from all sides, while contactless tap payments can be done as long as the VoidScan is 16cm away from the card you are using.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">voidscan</figure>

Of course, you can’t see the RFID blocking tech while it’s in your wallet or far from one of your cards, but taking the VoidScan out and putting it over a credit card as you use it reveals just how it works.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">voidscan</figure>

The transparent design of the VoidScan lets you see the small RFID microchip, transmitter wire, and antenna setup inside which jams incoming RFID signals at a 13.56MHz frequency, preventing your cards from being scanned without your knowledge. It’s a neat little feature, one which lets you feel smug as you explain to your friends how RFID jamming works with the card in your hand.

The VoidScan has already been fully funded on Kickstarter, but you can still check out the rest of its features and specifications there if you want to know more.

The post Best RFID Jamming Device is a Paper-Thin ‘Skeleton’ Card appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 18, 2020 01:45 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Project Management Workflow with ENOVIAworks

ENOVIAworks is a new portfolio of browser-based, scalable, cloud data management and PLM offerings built on 3DEXPERIENCE platform designed specifically to provide SOLIDWORKS users with project management capabilities.

ENOVIAWORKS offer key data management and PLM capabilities needed during the product development process, including:

  • Lifecycle Management
  • BOM management
  • Project Management
  • Change Management
ENOVIAworks Project Management

ENOVIAworks Project Management

The main advantage with ENOVIAworks is that it is system is designed for SOLIDWORKS teams that are not currently using a formal PDM or PLM system. It is easy to implement as it is a turnkey solution that allows you to quickly start using a full-blown PDM/PLM system without the need to purchase expensive hardware or install software.

ENOVIAworks connects with both the desktop version of SOLIDWORKS and the new cloud-based 3D Creator. But what does the project workflow actually entail for SOLIDWORKS users, and how easy is it to collaborate on projects?

Example project workflow

Watch the on-demand webinar below as DS Data Management expert Lisa Costa demonstrates ENOVIAworks management tools on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform and takes you through a project management workflow. Learn how to improve your ability to collaborate and manage your projects and team members:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rUAsOM0wcaM?feature=oembed" title="Design Iterations with ENOVIAworks | Exploring 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS Live" width="500"></iframe>

With ENOVIAworks, SOLIDWORKS designers are able to:

  • Securely save and access CAD data to/from the 3DEXPERIENCE platform
  • Perform product lifecycle and maturity
  • Easily navigate CAD data to visualize designs
  • Find CAD data from a web browser and directly open into SOLIDWORKS
  • View and mark-up complex 3D product designs
  • Perform formal change management
  • Visually compare designs in a web browser
  • Review tasks without leaving SOLIDWORKS
  • Communicate with team members with embedded task comments
  • Leverage CAD data with 3DEXPERIENCE platform design, simulation, manufacturing and collaboration apps and processes

Interested in learning more about ENOVIAworks?

With its growing app portfolio, ENOVIAworks enables you to manage all facets of your product development process. Contact us to get a custom demonstration and learn how ENOVIAworks can help your business.

The post SOLIDWORKS Project Management Workflow with ENOVIAworks appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at September 18, 2020 12:00 PM

September 17, 2020

SolidSmack

How To Turn a Block Of Wood Into A Nike Air Force Shoe Replica

wooden nike air force

With months of self-isolation getting to him, YouTuber The Q thought it would be a good idea to buy a pair of Nike Air Force shoes. He must not have thought too far ahead however, because now he has a new pair of shoes with nowhere to run. What’s one to do? Recreate the same shoe using blocks of wood, of course.

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</figure>

After finding three suitable blocks of wood in his workshop and gluing them together, The Q starts work on recreating his Nike Air Force shoes in wood form:

1. Cut The Shoe Outline

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden nike air force</figure>

The Q starts off by tracing both the bottom and the sides of the shoe onto the wooden block. He then cuts this outline out, first with a handsaw and then with his wood cutter. He also makes some deep cuts on the top of the shoe where you would slip your foot in.

2. Chisel Out The Top

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden nike air force</figure>

Using the deep cuts he made earlier, The Q chisels out the excess wood on top to make the upper part of the Nike Air Force. Once it has some grooves, he makes a simple stencil of the top and chisels out more wood until the block resembles the rough outline of a shoe.

3.  Draw In The Simple Details

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden nike air force</figure>

Now the hard part begins. Using a ruler, The Q measures the defining details of the real Air Force shoe and draws it onto the wooden shoe. Linings and even the Nike logo are painstakingly drawn onto the wood using a pencil before he even begins cutting the more intricate details into the wood.

4. Time To Chisel Away

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden nike air force</figure>

With the details drawn in place, The Q can finally start chiseling in the features of the shoe into the wood. He uses a wooden platform held by clamps to hold the shoe in place as he works. Indents and grooves are added onto the wooden shoe as he spends hours chiseling and cutting away at it.

5. Sand and Dust

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden nike air force</figure>

Though far from finished, the wooden shoe actually looks very close to a shoe now. Before moving on to the next part, however, The Q does a quick sanding and cleaning just to make it easier to work with.

6. Trace On Even More Details

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden nike air force</figure>

Using a measuring compass, a ruler, and his own eyes as guides, The Q traces on more details to make the shoe look as close to the original as it can be. Shoelaces, the holes on the front top of the shoe, even the groove pattern on the shoe’s bottom are added to give it that extra layer of authenticity.

7. Add The Finer Details

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden nike air force</figure>

Since these are very small details, a chisel just won’t cut it (pun unintended). Instead, The Q uses a dremel and a variety of detail carving bits to add in the finer features of the wooden shoe. He also uses a small metal bit to add the “holes” for the stitching, as well as a tip of a screwdriver for the grooves on the bottom of the shoe.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden nike air force</figure>

After a bit of cleaning to remove excess wood dust, the shoe looks exactly like its mass-manufactured counterpart. Of course, you’ll never be able to wear this shoe, but it makes for a really cool paperweight and a memento of a time when you were unable to get out and break in your new kicks.

As always, you can find more of The Q’s DIY projects on his YouTube channel.

The post How To Turn a Block Of Wood Into A Nike Air Force Shoe Replica appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 17, 2020 05:44 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Create Your Own Flexible Component (Intro.)

[A New Balloon Air Pump Design]

Flexible Component” is one of the new features in SOLIDWORKS 2020. You can define part component as flexible to drive the geometry of flexible components by the assembly geometry.

That’s means it works only in assembly file to make a rigid part model become flexible without create several configurations.

Better Explanation for Assembly Model!

 

To make the spring body as “flexible component”, we can avoid to create several configurations to explain our design in different position as above pictures. However, this blog will be the introduction purpose first.

In other words, this blog will be continuous in part2 and part3.

 

Introduction for The Flexible Component

Please note that the external reference must be one of the following entity types:

The “Make Part Flexible” feature you can find it in customize > commands > Assembly categories. Or you can direct use the search commands function.

For the part2, I will show the details of how to create the spring sketch for the flexible components feature.

For the part3, I will show you more advance about how to create the sketch for the flexible balloon!!!

 

 

 

 

 

Written by Roy Fu, Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.

 

 

 

 

Author information

Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.
Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.
Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.

The post Create Your Own Flexible Component (Intro.) appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd. at September 17, 2020 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

nTopology Snags $40M to Boost its Generative Design Platform

ntopology-investment-series-40m-00

Software company nTopology has announced a hefty Series C funding round set to accelerate its offerings of engineering design tools for advanced manufacturing.

The $40 million round is led by Insight Partners and joined by Grant Verstandig and existing venture partners Root, Canaan, DCVC, and Haystack. Insight Partners’ Josh Fredberg is joining the nTopology Board of Directors, which also boasts former Autodesk CEO Carl Bass.

$40 million is a nice investment round at any point, but raising multi millions during a pandemic is its own feat — and one that advanced manufacturing companies seem to be seeing a lot of recently. Digital manufacturing technologies like 3D printing have proven resilient during this crisis, and the software to continue to drive their advances and adoption naturally has its place in investor interest.

nTopology specifically has been on the rise for some time, launching its nTop Platform and expanding operations into Europe last year alone.

The company’s software is today put to use “at hundreds of engineering companies by thousands of engineers on their most advanced projects in the aerospace, automotive, medical, and consumer industries.”

As the novel coronavirus pandemic has swept the globe, advanced manufacturing has risen to the many challenges that have impacted logistics. Directly pandemic-response supplies and equipment have been 3D printed, while decentralized production has helped fill holes in traditional supply chains. None of that, though, would be possible without the right software to design these many parts and products.

Software can present something of a bottleneck in operations; nTopology notes that they have seen that too often “engineers are forced to fight with their software and compromise on designs.” This is where the company sees its tools fitting, as the nTop Platform was created to eliminate this bottleneck.

They explain that nTop Platform is built on three major pillars geared toward individualized needs and adaptable to a variety of real-world use cases:

  • Fast, Unbreakable Geometry
  • Field-Driven Design
  • Reusable Workflows

Looking ahead, nTopology sees a bright future for its platform. They note adoption-leading deployments in the aerospace and medical industries, which have also been leading the way generally in many advanced manufacturing sectors. Additive manufacturing is a major player in these industries.

Of note for aerospace and medical especially is that these are very heavily regulated industries — once technologies have been proven out in these fields, trickle-down expansion is more immediately possible for less-regulation-heavy applications. Automotive, consumer, and manufacturing tooling are also rapidly adopting nTopology’s — and additive manufacturing — tools, underscoring the general shape of adoption in these advanced technology areas.

Again aligning with much of the messaging we see in additive manufacturing, nTopology also sees the best place for their offering being alongside traditional workflows, rather than in place of; explaining this and a small look ahead of what we can expect from this Series C round, today’s announcement says:

Do we want to end up replacing traditional CAD? No, that’s not our purpose. Rather, we expect engineers to use nTop Platform alongside existing systems, to solve new and hard problems that traditional CAD was never built for. Overcoming those challenges will enable engineers to innovate faster, create new solutions to pressing global issues, and foster new markets. The types of problems that nTop Platform solves are more & more becoming a daily occurrence for all engineers. Closing this new round of funding will help make the most advanced engineering software accessible to all.”

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post nTopology Snags $40M to Boost its Generative Design Platform appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at September 17, 2020 01:37 PM

The Javelin Blog

Colour SOLIDWORKS Sketches to communicate ideas and design concepts

SOLIDWORKS provides the ability to colour sketches in your design and this can be useful when you want to prove out your concepts, communicate ideas to other team members, or produce layout sketches.

Typically sketches are grey in colour when they are not being edited, but you can easily apply a colour to a sketch from the Feature Manager Design Tree:

  1. Select a sketch in the Feature Manager Design Tree
  2. Right-click and select Sketch Color from the shortcut menu
SOLIDWORKS Sketch Colour

SOLIDWORKS Sketch Colour

  1. Choose the colour you would like for that specific sketch from the Property Manager
    • There are three colour palettes to choose from
    • You can also apply different colours to different configurations
  2. Pick OK when you’ve select the required colour
Sketch Colour Property Manager

Sketch Colour Property Manager

NOTE after you have modified the colour of a sketch the colour will remain after features have been applied, which makes them ideal for reference geometry and layout sketches.

Sketch colour applied

Sketch colour applied

The post Colour SOLIDWORKS Sketches to communicate ideas and design concepts appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at September 17, 2020 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Explore 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Live

Working remotely can be tough. 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS makes it easier. Real-time data is stored in one place, making connecting and collaborating with teammates and outside stakeholders both simple and secure.

Our 3DEXPERIENCE experts are ready to take you on a high-level journey through the functionality of 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS and show how you can leverage cloud-based tools and SOLIDWORKS CAD on the desktop together. On Monday, September 21 at 11:30 AM EST, discover the power of 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS in a new Exploring 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS Live webinar.

Using a prosthetic leg model created by SOLIDWORKS customer BioDapt, Industry Process Consultants John Martorano III and Gian Calise will demonstrate how an engineer and manager can use 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS and work together, while apart, to make necessary design changes. Viewers will learn how to use simulation, design, markup, and collaboration tools—all in tandem to create the best project outcomes.

Designers and engineers are now able to connect the functionality they know and love in SOLIDWORKS to the robust cloud-based tools on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. Register for the webinar and learn about the tools that will change the way you work.

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Explore 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Live appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at September 17, 2020 12:00 PM

September 16, 2020

SolidSmack

CNC ONE Is A Beginner-Friendly, Powerful Milling Machine

cnc one

For some, using a CNC machine may be an intimidating skill. If you don’t have access to one or someone who knows how to use one – nevermind the cost of most commercial CNC machines – it’s difficult to know where to start. Fortunately, desktop CNC machines are becoming more prevalent.

The CNC ONE is such a machine, made to address the problems conventional CNC machines have in terms of accessibility, affordability, and power. Rather than leaving you to fend for yourself once you’ve bought it, the CNC ONE has a companion learning app that teaches you how to use the shiny new making machine.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">cnc one</figure>

Called the CNC ONE Academy, the program includes over 50 videos that cover everything about the subject, from the basics all the way to more advanced techniques. To make the machining experience even easier, the CNC ONE has done a few things differently:

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">cnc one</figure>

To begin with, the parts are pre-assembled. You’ll still have to connect a few parts manually, but the work you have to put in is much less than other CNC machine kits. As you would expect, the CNC ONE Academy has a detailed guide on how to put together your CNC ONE. According to the creators, you’ll have it up and running in about 30 minutes.

Once it’s set up, the machine is remotely connected via Wi-Fi by your phone or laptop. If you want to do things the old-fashioned way, you can walk to the CNC ONE and use the built-in touchscreen.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Dn-7B_GxO7g?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Software-wise, the CNC ONE is optimized for Autodesk Fusion 360. You can also upload your projects to the cloud and work on them elsewhere, or use the machine’s Micro SD and USB slots to transfer your files manually (but seriously, no one really does that anymore).

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">cnc one</figure>

The CNC ONE uses servo motors, making it four times faster than other machines that use stepper motors. It also incorporates ball screws in its axes, making it more precise while lowering energy consumption. Finally, the 20mm aluminum parts which make up the CNC ONE make it more durable than other CNC machines.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">cnc one</figure>

The idea was to create a (slightly) more affordable CNC machine which had just as much power as the bigger, expensive machines. These versions of the CNC ONE are the fifth iterations of a prototype which was made a year ago. Further improvements are already in the pipeline, with hopes to expand the horizons of aspiring CNC millers.

The CNC ONE comes in many sizes, but all of them can cut a variety of metals, wood, plastics, and other hard materials. Their Kickstarter project has been completely funding, passing the $59,000 goal in hours. Options start at $2240 for a complete CNC ONE machine (shipping to be determined) with an estimated delivery of March 2021.

The post CNC ONE Is A Beginner-Friendly, Powerful Milling Machine appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 16, 2020 06:51 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Introducing Fluid Dynamics Engineer

Liquid and gas flows can have profound effects on the performance of designs. The earlier you can understand these effects, the better you can adapt your design to either mitigate or enhance them. For many industries, design is all about maximizing efficient fluid flow for cooling or processing, for others it’s about resisting and controlling the forces generated by the flow.

This means that design engineers need to be able to assess the fluid flow around or inside their products efficiently and accurately—exactly what the new Fluid Dynamics Engineer role delivers. Fluid Dynamics Engineer enables design engineers to carry out high-fidelity internal and external fluid flow and thermal simulations, delivering actionable information to improve a product while designing it.

Access to fast, accurate fluid flow solutions allows a design team to evaluate multiple design alternatives so they can create optimal flow distribution, efficient thermal management, minimal pressure losses, or whatever key flow performance their product requires. Possessing this information early in the design cycle can reduce costs while improving performance and quality.

The Fluid Dynamics Engineer role

 

SOLIDWORKS Designs

Because the role is on the 3DEXPERIENCE® platform, the user benefits from all the platform’s capabilities. For example, there is direct associativity with SOLIDWORKS® data saved on the platform, so any changes in the design are easily updated in the simulation and the results are reflected in the design.

Additionally, the cloud environment leverages cloud resources to solve large problems more quickly than what would be possible in a desktop-only environment. Unique engineering collaboration empowered by the 3DEXPERIENCE platform allows design engineers to create projects, brainstorm on design ideas with their team, and review design and simulation data easily to make informed decisions.

Intelligent Guidance

Setting up a simulation can be complicated and tedious, especially for new users, so Fluid Dynamics Engineer includes an intuitive User Assistant that guides the user through the steps required to set up a simulation.

Each step, or action, is clearly presented with a choice of commands that can be performed to complete the step. As the user works through the process, the simulation setup is continually monitored to provide feedback regarding any missing items or any specific warnings the user should be mindful of.

This guidance is provided via a panel through which the user can access integrated help for additional information if needed as they work through the steps. Experienced users can directly access the commands via the panel, which indicates warnings in any scenario.

Guided simulation setup with the User Assistant

 

High-Fidelity Flow Simulations

An additional benefit to having the fluids role on the platform is the ability to leverage additional simulation roles for performing structural simulations for thermal-stress testing that enables additional multi-physics capabilities that will be added to future releases of the 3DEXPERIENCE Works portfolio.

The Fluid Dynamics Engineer role provides SOLIDWORKS design engineers the ability to quickly analyze the fluid flow and thermal transfer behaviors of product designs as part of the design iteration process. The guided simulation setup greatly assists the user in gaining proficiency in setting up a fluid simulation with very little domain knowledge.

This role will be a great benefit in the design processes that could benefit from early indication of how a product will perform in a fluid environment. Check out the SIMULIA fluids web page or contact your local reseller for more information.

 

 

 

 

Author information

Steve Grace
Steve Grace
is an Operations Excellence Expert, Mainstream Portfolio for SIMULIA focused on providing simulation capabilities to the mainstream user.

The post Introducing Fluid Dynamics Engineer appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Steve Grace at September 16, 2020 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Adjusting a Sketch without having to use Edit Sketch

Dragging Instant3D manipulators in the SOLIDWORKS graphics area is a quick and easy means of adjusting features, but it is also applicable to sketches. Rather than editing a sketch you can simply select the feature or sketch that you want to adjust and the underlying sketch manipulators will appear.

The Instant3D functionality works for the following sketch entities:

  • Boss and cut features
  • Circles
  • Polygons
  • Center rectangles
  • 3 point center rectangle

To adjust a sketch with Instant3D:

  1. Ensure that Instant3D is active in the CommandManager as shown in the figure below
Instant3D Command

Instant3D Command

  1. Select a sketch from the FeatureManager Design Tree or select a feature in graphics area and note that manipulators will appear on the sketch entities, as shown in the figure below a slot sketch has been selected and handles appear on the dimensions in the graphics area
Instant3D Sketch

Instant3D Sketch

  1. Select a manipulator associated with the sketch as shown in the graphics area below, and drag to resize

NOTE: Drag on the ruler to snap adjust with accurate increments

Instant3D drag

Instant3D drag on ruler

NOTE that if you do not have Instant3D active only the maniupulators associated with the feature will appear and you will need to use Edit Sketch to make adjustments.

The post Adjusting a Sketch without having to use Edit Sketch appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at September 16, 2020 12:00 PM

September 15, 2020

SolidSmack

Modeler Recreates Scenes From Studio Ghibli’s “Nausicaä” in 3D

nausicca 3d scenes

If you’ve never watched a Studio Ghibli movie before, stop what you are doing and watch one now. From ever-popular classics like My Neighbor Totoro to the most recent 2014 release When Marnie Was There, the distinct art style, animations, and methods of storytelling are wholly unique and what I like to call, “classic Disney with a dash of real-life issues”.

Before their more famous films however, the studio’s first movie was a little title called Nausicaä and The Valley of The Wind, and was released way back in 1984. Taking place after an apocalyptic war, Princess Nausicaä of the Valley of The Wind becomes entangled in a plot by the kingdom of Tolmekia to destroy a Toxic Jungle full of giant insects. The movie was made in 2D using traditional animation techniques and marked the start of Studio Ghibli’s rise to fame both in the east and the west.

From 2D to 3D

Recently, a Ghibli fan by the name of Granicoph started taking scenes from Nausicaä and recreating them in 3D spaces. The scenes allow you to fully explore the world created by Studio Ghibli from all angles – something which wasn’t possible back in the 1980s.

<figure class="wp-block-embed is-type-rich is-provider-sketchfab">
<iframe allow="autoplay; fullscreen; vr" allowfullscreen="" allowvr="" class="" frameborder="0" height="433" mozallowfullscreen="true" onmousewheel="" src="https://sketchfab.com/models/a470329d0e6345da90668413195f6404/embed" title="Nausicaa in Toxic Jungle" webkitallowfullscreen="true" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Apart from moving around et, viewers can also zoom in and out to get a closer look at the characters and their surroundings. The magic starts to wear out once you zoom in or out too much and discover the scenes aren’t fully rendered to the smallest details, but they still give you the opportunity to take some nice, non-Studio-Ghibli-approved pictures when viewed on a full screen.

<figure class="wp-block-embed is-type-rich is-provider-sketchfab">
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</figure>

Granicoph has only two full 3D scene renders for now: one of Nausicaä in the Toxic Jungle and another of her flying through a dessert. He plans on making this an ongoing project, so here’s to hoping he does scenes from other Ghibli movies as well!

You can follow Granicoph’s Twitter for updates, but seeing as most of his Tweets are in Japanese, you might be better off checking his Sketchfab or ArtStation pages.

The post Modeler Recreates Scenes From Studio Ghibli’s “Nausicaä” in 3D appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 15, 2020 06:19 PM

Xometry Snags Biggest Funding Yet, Cracks Open a Cool $75MM

On-demand manufacturing got a big lump of money love with T. Rowe Price leading a $75MM Series E equity round to boost Xometry’s expansion, payment system, and AI-driven on-demand marketplace development. To date, Xometry has had seven multi-million dollar rounds of funding totaling $193MM.

The funding was announced alongside the news that Jim Rallo, former CFO of Liquidity Services, joins the company as Chief Financial Officer.

Has Xometry had good growth? Indeed they have. Since 2015, they’ve seen their revenue double each year through launching their own RFQ Service to acquisitions, including that of Shift, to expand their European market.

Our favorite aspect of Xometry is not only their online quote system, SOLIDWORKS Add-in, or vast supplier network but that they span nearly any manufacturing capability you need for a small job or large, with the finishing and design services to go along. If you haven’t already, check out Xometry here.

The post Xometry Snags Biggest Funding Yet, Cracks Open a Cool $75MM appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 15, 2020 01:55 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to Scale an Assembly in SOLIDWORKS

The Scale feature (found by selecting the Insert menu, Features, then pick Scale) can be used to change the scale of all features within a single part.  When used, this tool appears as an extra feature in the Feature Tree.  However, this feature is limited to use with a part ( .sldprt) file only. How do you scale a SOLIDWORKS assembly?

SOLIDWORKS Assembly to Scale

SOLIDWORKS Assembly to Scale

To scale an entire SOLIDWORKS assembly, it is possible to scale each part independently, however this could be extremely tedious for an assembly with a large number of components.  Alternatively, you can save the assembly as a multi-body part and scale this part in a single step.

NOTE that a multi-body part will have different properties and capabilities than an assembly file.

When saving an assembly as a part, you can include or remove components based on specified criteria to simplify the saved part. You can use the following criteria to save an assembly as a simplified part:

  • Visibility of the component from outside the model.
  • Size (volume) of the component.
  • If the component is a Toolbox component.

To save a SOLIDWORKS assembly as a part:

  1. From the assembly in SOLIDWORKS, select FileSave As, and choose Part (*.prt,*.sldprt) for the Save As file type.
  2. From the Save As dialog options, choose All Components, click Save as shown in the figure below. Note that you can save only the exterior faces if you simply need the part as a reference:
Save Assembly as Part

Save Assembly as Part

  1. Open the newly saved multi-body part.
  2. Access the Scale feature (Insert FeaturesScale).
  3. Select all of the solid bodies in the part to be scaled – note you may need to access the Feature Manager and expand the Solid Bodies folder to select the bodies. Choose the Scale Factor and other options as desired (for best results with a multi-body part, scale about the Origin).  Click OK, as shown in the figure below.
Scale solid bodies

Scale solid bodies

The Scale will now be applied and an additional feature will be visible (and editable) in the Feature Manager Design Tree of the multi-body part.

Multi-body part scaled

Multi-body part scaled

The post How to Scale an Assembly in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at September 15, 2020 12:00 PM

September 14, 2020

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: Flexi Print-In-Place Hand [High Five!]

3D printed hand model

Put five in the sky if yo’ feelin’ alive. Put ten up in the air if you just don’t care. Who needs a hand or fifty? I could always use a hand. I could use it for help on the farm of course, but also just to stick at random locations in hallways or slap things around… wet noodles, a large ball of moss, a muddy chicken… you know, the usual.

Whatever the need, Dan Sopala, from the great state of Texas, (who in no way condones the slapping of muddy chickens) has created the most incredible 3D printed print-in-place hand you’re likely to see, at least, this year. It has all the things you would want in a 3D printed hand: five fingers (including a thumb), fully articulating joints, and a bone nubbin’ shooting out the wrist.

It’s really fun to play with because it flops around and moves in any which way. I went through several iterations to make sure it was strong, and easy to print without supports.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

Did you get that last bit? it requires NO SUPPORTS. As in zero, none, nada of the support structurals. High five. Even better than that, it’s completely print-in-place, as in no assembly required. Double high five. What’s that? The bone nub can be printed with another material for an extra dose awesome. BOOM. Mr. Dan modeled it using 3ds Max but it’s available, of course, as a single .stl file. He used (what I believe) is a Creality Ender 3 Pro 3D printer (see enclosure bundle here) and recommends a 20% infill and PLA for strength.

Now, I know we usually share free models but this is almost free – only $1.25. You can download the model or add it to your collection on MyMiniFactory or Cults3D. [Bonus! Dan has a handful of other print-in-place models, all a buck-25 a piece! Grab ’em all!]

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Model of the Week: Flexi Print-In-Place Hand [High Five!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 14, 2020 10:14 PM

A Wearable Heating/Cooling Device for Comfort in Adventure

gemm portable air conditioner

With summer nearing its end and fall just around the corner, folks are starting to feel the changes in temperature. Whether it’s the heat or the cold, an air conditioned room is a welcome sight to escape the extremes of either.

But what about those times when you need to work, play, or adventure in the extremes? You can’t just bring an air regulator around with you… or can you?

The Gemm by Polar Seal is a wearable cooling and heating device worn around your neck. It is used when playing sports, working outdoors, during those winter sprints between your car and the house, or at meetings when a hot, heavy suit is required. Even more, the thought put into the design make it one of the more interesting wearables we’ve seen this year.

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</figure>

The Gemm is small, discreet, and wearble in the office or on high adventure. The control module (the little square dangling from the necklace cord) houses a lithium-ion battery and allows you to switch between three different cooling or heating power levels.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">gemm portable air conditioner</figure>

On a single charge, it operates up to seven hours with an illuminated logo to display when it’s on or off and in heating or cooling mode. Though the light may make you feel a bit like Iron Man sans suit, stealth mode allows for operation without a bright LED light glowing from under your shirt.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">gemm portable air conditioner</figure>

While the control module is the first thing you’ll notice, it’s the neck module that provides the actual heating and cooling. Thermoelectric semiconductors allow you to heat it up to 108°F (42°C) or cool it down to 50°F (10°C) with an elongated dissapation plate to transfer the effect. The concept is much like putting an icepack on the back of the neck of someone who is overheated. With the back of the next one of the body’s quick-cooling points, the module cools/heats the blood flowing through the area, distributing it throughout the rest of the body.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">gemm portable air conditioner</figure>

Even with its small size, the Gemm is easily disassembled into its core components for storage. When you need it, just snap the pieces back together, turn it on, and bam, instant cooling or heating.

As you might suspect, the size of the Gemm has nothing to do with its price. It starts at $199 for a personal heating and cooling device and, even then, that’s 50% off it’s expected price of $399. Depending on how often you’re out in the elements, either one of those prices may look attractive.

You can find out more about the Gemm heating and cooling necklace on the Polar Seal webpage.

The post A Wearable Heating/Cooling Device for Comfort in Adventure appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 14, 2020 03:08 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Making SOLIDWORKS Feel Like Home – Customizing the UI

When you go home at the end of the day, I am sure your house is laid out just the way you like it, making it easy to get around. Why not layout SOLIDWORKS in the same way, making all your useful and commonly used commands just a mouse click away?

Think of it this way, most people spend more time in the office than they do in their own living room, so why not make it comfortable.

When it comes to customizing the SOLIDWORKS User Interface you can go as subtle or as drastic as you wish, whether it be simply changing icon size, adding a new command to the command manager or all the way to rearranging the tool bars on your screen. So, lets start simple. When it comes to the command manger everyone has their own personal preferences, some people like to see text next to each command and some people like to simply have small icons that they can use. All these things can be controlled from within one simple window which can be accessed by a right-click on the command manager and selecting the ‘Customize…’ option.

 

 

In the customize window there are a ton of customization options just waiting to be discovered:

  1. Using these options, you can select if you want the Command Manager to be displayed at all and if you want text to be displayed next to each command.
  2. You can even select the size of the icons for each of the commands, making things a little easier on the eyes.
  3. With the shortcut bars we can add commonly used commands for the relevant file that we are working with, whether it be a part, assembly, drawing or even if you are in a sketch. This means that we access the commands we need at a click of a button. From the series of drop downs, we can find the commands we need and simply drag and drop them onto the relevant toolbar.
    Finally, we can use these shortcut bars by simply hitting the S key on our keyboard when working on our files and then menu will appear right at out mouse, ready to use.
    FUN FACT
    – When you hit the S key it also activates the search commands bar.
  4. Using the commands tab we can quickly and easily add new commands to the command manager, by dragging them from the customize window and dropping them on the tab of the command manager that we want (This can also be done by dragging commands from the search bar).
    Don’t worry if you accidentally drop the wrong command on the Command Manger as you can simply drag and drop it in the graphics area to remove it again.
  5. Using the Keyboard tab, we can get access to the default keyboard shortcuts available within SOLIDWORKS. Not only this, but we can also set our own custom keyboard shortcuts from within this tab. All we need to do is find the command we are interested in and set the shortcut.
  6. Mouse Gestures are a great way of increasing your productivity and generally just making your job a little bit easier. Mouse gestures can be used by holding down your right mouse button in the graphics window and moving your mouse. The commands on the gesture wheel can once again be customized to suit your needs best. You can have as few as two commands here, or if you are feeling confident then you can have up to 12 commands.

    Just like with the shortcut bars, we can drag and drop commands from the search list on to the gesture wheel we want. This is one of my favorite ways to work!

 

Another couple of ways you could make the SOLIDWORKS UI more homely is by adjusting the icon color and background theme. This is a good one for anyone who liked the retro look used in SW 2014 & 2015. These options can be adjusted within your System Options > Colors:

(For the retro look, try setting the icon color to classic and the background to Medium Light) These options are just the tip of the iceberg for the level of customization within SW, but they certainly make your day of day work that little bit easier.

 

****

Kieran Young is an Applications Engineer at TMS CADCentre, a SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller in Scotland.

You can read more from Kieran on the TMS CADCentre blog

Author information

TMS CADCentre
TMS CADCentre is a SOLIDWORKS Reseller based in Scotland providing CAD Design Software, analysis software & product data management software. Founded in 1981, TMS CADCentre is the only UK SOLIDWORKS Reseller based and funded within Scotland and have been providing SOLIDWORKS software, training and support since 1996 when the product was first launched in the UK.

The post Making SOLIDWORKS Feel Like Home – Customizing the UI appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by TMS CADCentre at September 14, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Leveraging the strength of 3D Printed Carbon Fiber on the Shop Floor

Your goals are clear: high productivity and worker safety, low cost and materials that can withstand the rigors of a manufacturing environment. Traditional manufacturing has its place but it’s not the only path to strong parts. Additive manufacturing (AM) using carbon fiber-filled nylon material 3D prints strong, lightweight parts with a high strength-to weight ratio for rapid prototyping, short-run production parts and even production-grade parts.

Factory floors that capitalize on the powerful combination of traditional machining and additive manufacturing realize the most efficient, cost-effective scenario.

3D printed carbon fiber tooling

3D printed carbon fiber tooling

3D printing with carbon fiber gives you strong, complex, customizable parts for needs ranging from functional prototypes to full production runs. You can reduce the weight of tools and manufacturing aids and customize them so they’re more ergonomic, comfortable and easy to use. The lightweight strength and stiffness of carbon fiber-filled material enables a streamlined process from initial design all the way through manufacturing. Your floor becomes more efficient. Barriers are eliminated, cost and lead times are cut and worker lost-time injuries are reduced. This solution brief demonstrates not only the benefits of 3D printing with high strength-to-weight materials like carbon fiber, but also provides a path to a full-circle solution integrating 3D printing on your shop floor.

Adding 3D Printing to your Shop Floor

CNC machining isn’t going away for long-runs of strong parts. But 3D printing with strong, lightweight, stiff materials like carbon fiber means additive manufacturing can supplement current factory floor processes, adding value in time-to-part, design freedom and complexity. The key is identifying exactly where on your floor AM can help reduce costs of tooling and maintenance and repair. Sometimes, identification of key use cases for AM can be provided by factory floor workers. But this isn’t the only place to get insight into the value of AM on your factory floor.

Start by identifying your pain points. Then move to factory floor applications that can be improved by shorter production timelines, which can improve your bottom line. Finally, seek the services of experts in the field of AM strategy and deployment for cutting edge solutions.

Roadblocks To Efficiency

From worker lost-time to production line inefficiencies, to maximizing production equipment utilization, anything that stands in the way of efficiencies costs you money. Eliminate waste, reduce inventory and learn how to implement smart manufacturing with an IoT connected shop floor.

Tooling Applications

Non-ergonomic tools can cause worker injury resulting in worker downtime. Long tooling production timelines as well as a lack of surrogate parts are all areas where AM can improve your efficiencies and decrease costs.

Seeking The Right Advice

You need AM advice that doesn’t fit a particular process but rather advice that fits your production line. A full-circle AM solution begins with the right strategy from an Expert Services team. The right advice answers not just if AM fits into your workflow but how. A Shop Floor Walk-through with AM experts can further pinpoint key areas for greater production throughput and help identify time and cost savings.

The Strength of your Material Matters

Carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic meets the demanding needs of the production environment and can be a replacement for metal tooling. With a blend of Nylon 12 resin and chopped carbon fiber, at a loading of 35% by weight, this material has the highest flexural strength of any FDM® thermoplastic. Carbon Fiber delivers the strength and stiffness you need for rigid tools, prototypes and production parts. Even functional prototypes for the frame rails on a OneWheel motion device.

One Wheel motion device One Wheel carbon fiber components

Keep Your Factory Floor Humming

Rapid prototyping may be the AM term you’re most familiar with but it isn’t the only rapid process for 3D printing. Thanks to strong material properties such as carbon fiber, rapid tooling can mean less downtime when tools fail. 3D print replacement parts fast that have the strength necessary to hold up in a production environment. Jigs and fixtures 3D printed with FDM Nylon 12 Carbon Fiber are not only lightweight but have the strength to get the job done, either as stop-gap replacement tools or functional prototypes.

Reduce Downtime

Downtime is lost revenue. With 3D printing you can have your part replaced in a fraction of the time of traditional tooling methods. All with user-friendly software that makes everyone a 3D printing expert.

Increase Efficiencies

Need a new tool to improve your line efficiency? With 3D printing you can design in GrabCAD Print™, then move seamlessly to print, all in less time than traditional manufacturing with comparable strength and less cost.

Decrease Waste

Additive manufacturing by its very nature is less wasteful than traditional machining. Instead of cutting material away to form a piece, material is added layer-by-layer to form a part that has essentially no waste. This is not only more cost-effective but more green.


Use Case Highlight

Thule Embraces FDM Nylon 12 Carbon Fiber

A big user of 3D printing, one hurdle remained for the outdoor company, Thule – the ability to print prototypes with the stiffness and strength of fiber or glass-reinforced injection molded parts that would enable the company to perform functional testing. Early adopters of FDM Nylon 12 Carbon Fiber, the company can now move beyond design validation to actual road-testing of clamp mechanisms for products like their rooftop kayak rack.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CyqCpqW-RY8?feature=oembed" title="Thule Embraces FDM Nylon 12CF" width="500"></iframe>

“We’ve made rotating parts, like our clamp mechanism that has teeth that fit into each other that wouldn’t hold up without the capabilities of Nylon 12 Carbon Fiber. They’d break off or bend completely over, without breaking.”

— Rob Humphries, prototype engineer, product development at Thule


Strong Manufacturing Applications

3D printing’s value for manufacturers lies in its ability to reduce cycle time and lower cost. The combination of 3D printing’s design freedom and Stratasys’ material capability and reliability gives manufacturers powerful leverage to achieve economical customization, short-run production and functional prototyping.

High-strength materials, like FDM Nylon 12 Carbon Fiber, let you replace heavier metal materials to create lighter parts and tools. Consider the following use cases as you look for opportunities within your production operation to lower your manufacturing and product development costs.

Manufacturing Aids

Fast production of fixtures, jigs, check gauges and inspection tools lets manufacturers improve task cycle time efficiency, reduce tool cost and get more tools faster than traditional means.

Functional Prototypes

High-strength materials make functional prototyping achievable, reducing development time, lowering development cost and accelerating time to market.

Ergonomic Optimization

3D printed tools are lighter and can be optimized for specific tasks, increasing worker safety and job efficiency.


Use Case Highlight

Utah Trikes

The ability to use Stratasys FDM Nylon 12 Carbon Fiber in all stages of the manufacturing process gives Utah Trikes more time to perfect their designs. The company uses 3D printed nylon 12 carbon fiber for prototypes, tooling and short-run production parts due to its superior mechanical properties. Being a manufacturer of customized products, 3D printing with FDM Nylon 12 Carbon Fiber gives Utah Trikes the ability to reduce product development time.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rkyca1KvfmM?feature=oembed" title="Utah Trikes 3D Prints Prototypes pieces for product testing" width="500"></iframe>

“Stratasys FDM Nylon 12CF™ parts can be printed faster, with superior stiffness-to-weight performance and with better repeatability than any other 3D printing technology we’ve seen.”

—Ashley Guy, Utah Trikes president and CEO


Multiply your tooling capabilities

Tooling applications are one of the largest opportunities you have to gain the time, cost and ergonomic efficiencies of 3D printing. Because Stratasys 3D printers work with a broad variety of thermoplastics, including high-strength carbon fiber nylon, PEKK and ULTEM™ resins, you can apply 3D printing to multiple tooling applications.

Common manufacturing aids like holding fixtures and other production line tools are easily implemented and represent a vast opportunity for savings with 3D printing. Essential to the production process, these tools are usually prevalent on the factory floor. However, they are typically expensive and time-consuming to produce when made with traditional methods and materials and can be 3D printed more quickly, for less cost, and easily optimized for worker safety and efficiency.

Beyond common manufacturing aids you’ll also find additional opportunities among more specialized tooling applications that include the following:

Thermoforming Tools

These tools are usually made from wood, RenShape board, cast aluminum or machined aluminum billet and are usually expensive, with long production lead times.

Hydroforming Tools

Hydroform tooling made from aluminum or other metals requires considerable time to program for CNC machining, particularly for complex shapes, and results in considerable material waste.

Composite Tooling

Used to form composite structures, this tooling is usually bulky, heavy and costly with lead times consisting of weeks or even months depending on size and complexity. These applications are well-suited for 3D printed replacements for limited-run production or to evaluate designs prior to investing in high-cost hard tooling. High-strength materials like FDM Nylon 12 Carbon Fiber are strong enough to replace metal tools in certain applications. ULTEM 1010 resin is capable of autoclave cure and provides a much more cost-effective way to make lightweight composite lay-up tools.


Use Case Highlight

Genesis Systems Group

Genesis builds and implements robotic automation systems and needed a faster, lighter, less-costly robotic end effector for gripping and trimming composite parts. Using high strength ULTEM 9085 resin, Genesis made a new end effector resulting in a 94% weight reduction compared to the traditional gripper, enabling the use of a smaller robot motor. Production turn time was also reduced by 85%, from 20 days to three.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/KWv_1owBojE?feature=oembed" title="End of Arm Tooling Stratasys Customer Story" width="500"></iframe>

“Normally, it would take weeks to get traditional grippers made. With the FDM gripper, you can have a new end effector complete and bolted up to the robot within a day or so.”

— Doug Huston, Genesis Systems Group technical advisor


Manufacturing Ready 3D Printers

Many manufacturers believe the status quo is good enough; is your company making this costly mistake? The truth is that 3D printing, often alongside time-proven technologies, is essential to efficient manufacturing. In the race to zero inventory and point-of use creation, traditional manufacturing cannot compete with the time and cost savings of 3D printing. In addition to the design freedom and cost and weight savings of additive manufacturing, Stratasys FDM printers complement existing technologies and give you the power to lower production cost, reduce time-to-market, increase manufacturing efficiency and trim supply chains.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xpb8nvo61r4?feature=oembed" title="Stratasys F900 Overview" width="500"></iframe>

The Stratasys F900™ is MTConnect-ready, so you have full factory floor connectivity. Our broad material selection lets you cost effectively match your design requirements with the right material, from economical engineering-grade materials to advanced, high performance polymers like carbon fiber nylon, PEKK and ULTEM. GrabCAD Print software makes it easy to go straight from CAD model to finished print while giving you access to critical print information.

Need help realizing the full potential of 3D printing for your factory floor?

Let the Javelin Additive Team validate 3D printing for your business and help map specific areas ripe for AM integration on your shop floor. What’s your current manufacturing methodology costing you? Contact a Javelin representative and see how 3D printing can lower your costs.

The post Leveraging the strength of 3D Printed Carbon Fiber on the Shop Floor appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Stratasys Ltd. at September 14, 2020 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

More Than 160k People Have Watched xDesign Automate This (Formerly) Manual Table Saw

So, what kind of learner are you? Do you know? It’s something I’ve been thinking a lot about lately, actually. Our 2-year-old daughter seems like she’s only stimulated to learn once she realizes and accepts the real-world utility of a given item. And it seems that we, into our 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, and so on, may continue to revisit this seemingly basic yet fundamental question about ourselves.

SOLIDWORKS Champion Jeremy Fielding actually brings this up in his latest video, where he takes on the crazy project of building out a manual table saw in his shop to be automated. This involves a heavy deal of mechanical design (where the 3D Creator role comes into play), some electrical work, as well as some Python programming – which is a subject Jeremy hadn’t really tackled yet (not even at the “Hello World” level!)

On a personal note, my first software programming project wasn’t automating a table saw. Maybe yours was, but not mine.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JEImn7s7x1o?feature=oembed" title="How To Make A CNC Table Saw : # 084" width="1140"></iframe>

The other fascinating component here is that I wasn’t making a project to show to hundreds of thousands of people. As you might remember from last year, Jeremy, in addition to being a longtime SOLIDWORKS user in production, has a YouTube channel that is currently surging towards 400k subscribers at time of writing. But hey, that’s Jeremy – a self-proclaimed (difficult) project-based learner.

As always, Jeremy narrates the project for you, his mechanical engineering-loving audience, to take you through his exact steps and thought process. He defines the problem he faced, shows the result, and then takes you on the wild self-defined path he created and took to get to where he wanted to be.

Pretty early on, Jeremy establishes the core problems and dissatisfaction he faced with his (then) manual table saw.

Before he integrated all the crazy sensors, the emergency stop, and the motors used in his current, automated table saw, the initial problem was one of inconvenience. He didn’t trust fence on original table saw, leading to annoying micro-alterations to make sure he had angles/measurements correct.

If you’re the type who walks around the house making sure all your light bulbs light up, that the spindles on your railings are tight, and the handles on your cabinet doors are tightly applied practically 24/7, this should drive you crazy. Sorry for causing you stress by proxy.

As far as the manual saw went, he eventually made his own fence. But, per usual, Jeremy didn’t stop there. He then thought: ‘Hey, what if I automated the fence?’ This was quickly escalated to “’Hey, what if I automated the entire saw?’

So, he removed all the nonessential components, then measured and modeled full table saw. He disassembled the base of the saw as he was making a new cabinet design.

Across the three core parts of the project (mechanical, electronics, and software), the 3D Creator role featured in a major way during the design. Modeling existing components was crucial in ideating on the changes and additions that needed to be made to make his automation dream come true.

This included the cabinet design, an area for the dust collector chute, the rack and pinion setup, certain housings and mounts, and much more. As a cloud-based mechanical design application, xDesign was a great fit, because it allowed Jeremy to seamlessly access and add to these design elements – from his PC or his iPad. He didn’t need to make crude measurement notes, either, as he could measure components and spacing dynamically from his tablet while he was working.

Be sure to check out the full build – which features an awesome build montage with a bunch of welding, hole drilling, laser cutting, and more – in the video embedded in this blog. You’ll definitely learn a thing or two (or, I don’t know, 5,439). Big thanks to Jeremy – make sure to subscribe to his channel!

 

 

Author information

Sean O'Neill
Sean O'Neill
I'm a Community & User Advocacy Manager here at SOLIDWORKS. As a longtime SOLIDWORKS user myself, I love meeting with users and hearing about all the interesting things they're doing in the SOLIDWORKS community!

The post More Than 160k People Have Watched xDesign Automate This (Formerly) Manual Table Saw appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Sean O'Neill at September 14, 2020 12:00 PM

September 11, 2020

The Javelin Blog

Discover markets and track competitors with the 3DEXPERIENCE Social Business Analyst

The new 3DEXPERIENCE Social Business Analyst will help you to get answers to your critical business questions using real-time data insights; driving faster decision-making with automated alerts and actions.

The 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS provides more than just design apps for your business. Social Business Analyst is a browser-based solution that enables your team to listen to, learn from and act on all the information that matters to your business. Aggregate content from across the social web alongside enterprise data.

3DEXPERIENCE Social Business Analyst

3DEXPERIENCE Social Business Analyst

The Social Business Analyst delivers an all-in-one dashboard view, enabling you to compare and analyze internal business metrics alongside web data to measure social impact. Choose the sources you want to monitor, visualize data with custom charts, and drive faster decision making by automating actions triggered by events and data insights. Take a look at how the Social Business Analyst works in the on-demand webinar below:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CYt1pBFR5XE?feature=oembed" title="Tracking the Latest Topics with 3DEXPERIENCE Buisness Intelligence Dashboards" width="500"></iframe>

Who should use the Social Business Analyst?

For product management, marketing, sales teams who need to analyze marketing data and customer feedback, such as tweets, articles, video and images posted around the world and use the data to improve the product. Social Business Analyst offers a powerful and easy-to-use set of online content analysis tools to quickly filter relevant content and identify marketing trends, patterns and consumer feedback for your brand and product. That provides business leaders an analytics and market intelligence application for product marketing management, marketing and sales, delivering powerful online content aggregation and analysis that enables data driven decision-making for every team and member of the organization. Unlike other social media analytic tools

Social Business Analyst differentiates itself from other social media analytic tools by offering comparable capabilities—but in a single environment in the cloud. It is the only solution on the market that is able to connect product, sales and marketing to the product development process.

Social Business Analyst will help you to…

Find potential customers

Social Business Analyst provides the tools that can track prospects who are interested in your product and inspire your business with new ideas and better ways to market your product. You will be able to analyze data and connect insights into the product development process via social collaboration tools to make the right decision at each step. Other social analytics tools like Brandwatch, Linkfluence, or Hootsuite are disconnected from the rest of the product development process and cannot effectively interoperate and copy information across systems.

Gather market research and opinion

Social Business Analyst allows you to gather customer feedback and perform sentiment analysis to understand how customers react to your or competitor products, enabling you to adjust, make changes and improve your product. The result of your analysis is accessible from a single environment in one dashboard, delivering a centralized view into everything. The main benefit is you can share real-time insights, competitive analysis and marketing data with your entire organization.

Track competitors

With tracked topics, you can collect real-time information about your competitors to understand how they are doing business and identify opportunities or potential risks for your business. Important articles and feeds can be automated and pushed to individuals via email or to the entire team using collaborative communities so everyone is up-to-date on the latest and greatest information.

Other departments in the ecosystem (development, marketing and sales) that are typically disconnected from the competitive analysis view can obtain the intelligence for the entire product development process via 3DEXPERIENCE social collaboration services.

Research Topics of Interest

For instance if your sales department is interested in pricing for a specific type of product in a specific region, they could use the Library to search for the topic, enabling them to understand what people are saying about the topic in real time. Read and analyze all related content in one dashboard. Monitor new articles added and even add an opinion and share it with the team for feedback.

Brand Awareness

Executives have a high-level brand overview. What are customers saying about their brand versus competitor’s? What is the overall sentiment around the brand? Automatically track and analyze the social media conversation and customer feedback.

Product Launches and Marketing

A product manager in charge of launching new product events can track the event’s most important details. Understand what attendees and the press are saying about the event in real time. Identify top speakers and sessions, analyze social sentiment around exhibitors, and collect all the latest news as it is published.

Key features of Social Business Analyst

The three key features of the Social Business Analyst are:

  • Aggregate content: Aggregate all relevant social content and data in one place
    • Monitor content relevant to your industry.
    • Take advantage of libraries of curated sources for multiple industries, such as high-tech,
      financial services and more.
  • Analyze content: Analyze content to extract actionable insights
    • Focus on what matters.
    • Keep all articles in one place and follow every update.
    • Analyze web data. Know what is said, where and by whom.
    • Drag to compare to visualize social impacts.
  • Act on insights: Automate the way you share your insights
    • Create Potions to automate the way you share information.
    • Put your dashboard on autopilot 24/7.

Interested in the Social Business Analyst?

Contact us to get a personalized demo and pricing to determine if the Social Business Analyst is right for your business.

The post Discover markets and track competitors with the 3DEXPERIENCE Social Business Analyst appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at September 11, 2020 01:32 PM

September 10, 2020

The Javelin Blog

Javelin Helps to develop the Canadian ProtectON Face Shields

The ProtectON Reusable Protective Face Shield was designed, developed and manufactured through a partnership of Canadian businesses. Javelin contributed to the project with initial product design, testing, and development with additive manufacturing.

We worked with leading neurosurgeons and medical professionals from Sunnybrook, North York General Hospitals, along with Canadore College’s Innovation Centre for Advanced Manufacturing and Prototyping (ICAMP) to provide critical testing and feedback to create a comfortable, user-friendly shield that is both recyclable and/or reusable.

3D Printed PPE Face Shield 3D printed face shields Face Shield Prototype

The final product is physically manufactured in Northern Ontario, Canada, by North Bay Plastics Ltd; the firm has over 35 years’ experience in plastics manufacturing, and the shields are manufactured in an ISO and MDEL certified facility.

ProtectON Face Shield

ProtectON Face Shield

Face Shields Standards and Testing

Third-party testing has shown the ProtectON exceeds CSA and ANSI standards and can be sterilized or disinfected through many common processes. This helps hospitals and care facilities to reduce their Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) costs and resultant waste when compared to disposable face shields currently in the market.

North Bay Plastic Molders Ltd., manufacture the ProtectON, they hold a distributor holder Medical Device Establishment Licence (MDEL) – 13398

  • ANSI/ISEA Z.87.1 (2015)
    American National Standard For Occupational And Educational Personal Eye And Face Protection Devices
  • CSA Z94.3 (2020)
    Eye and face protectors
  • CSA Z94.3.1 (2016)
    Guideline For Selection, Use, And Care Of Eye And Face Protectors

Testing Standards that are currently met:

  • Device must provide adequate coverage
    (CSA Z94.3 Sections 10.2.1/10.2.2/10.3/10.4)
  • Device should be made of optically clear, distortion free, lightweight materials
    (refer to CSA Standard Z94.3.1-16 and Footnote 1)
  • Device should be free of visible defects or flaws that would impede vision
    (ANSI Z87.1 Section 9.4)
  • The device should allow adequate space between the wearer’s face and the inner surface of the visor to allow for the use of ancillary equipment
    (medical/surgical mask, respirator, eyewear, etc. Footnote 1)
  • Device should fit snugly to afford a good seal to the forehead area and to prevent slippage of the device
  • Device should withstand impact from sharp or fast projectiles
    (ANSI Z87.1 Section 9.2 and 9.3, CSA Z94.3 Section 10.1)
  • If available, device should display anti-fog behavior on inside and outside of shield
    (CSA Standard Z94.3.1-16) (Have not had complaints of fogging, but the clear material is not antifog)
  • User contacting materials should provide adequate material biocompatibility
    (skin sensitivity and cytotoxic testing) (ISO 10993-5, 10)

ProtectON Features

User-friendly face shields that are reusable and recyclable:

  • Reusable: ProtectON face shields can be safely sterilized and reused, whether in clinical, professional, or personal setting. The aim is to reduce PPE costs and ensure Canadians are protected in a sustainable manner.
  • Safety: ProtectON shields are made from robust materials designed to withstand the rigours of daily use. Superior droplet protection is ensured via our closed-halo design with foam forehead seal, and optimized shield length for comprehensive coverage.
  • Testing: ProtectON shields have successfully undergone extensive development and rigorous testing in clinical settings. We meet Canadian Standards Association and ASTM International safety guidelines, ensuring the shield is safe for use in all environments. View test results »
  • Recyclable: The makers of ProtectON are very conscious of their responsibility to the environment and the implications of its operations. The sterilizable design is intended to reduce medical and/or personal waste; whenever possible, recycled polymer is used within the manufacturing process. Polypropylene is prime grade and 100% recyclable.

From the hospital to the shop floor, long term care facilities to your local grocery store, the ProtectON Reusable Protective Face Shield has you covered.

ProtectON box of 50

ProtectON box of 50

Are you interested in purchasing ProtectON Face Shields?

The ProtectON is available as a 50-box unit from our web store »

The post Javelin Helps to develop the Canadian ProtectON Face Shields appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at September 10, 2020 06:51 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 User Interface Improvements

With the release of SOLIDWORKS 2020, it has brought some radical and exciting improvements to the user interface and as we learn in this blog, a few of these changes were brought in as a surprise. Let’s take a closer look at how these improvements to help you navigate through the interface to assist you in accomplishing your everyday tasks.*NOTE: NEW changes are present as of SWX 2020 SP3

#1 – NEW Quick Access Tools Location

With the latest service pack update, our favorite quick access tools can be stored within a new column inside the CommandManager. Users are free to customize this location by accessing the CUSTOMIZE dialog and using the new quick access tools option to select its default location. This option gives users greater flexibility for moving this toolbar to a more commonly used area for ease of access.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 User Interface Improvements

SOLIDWORKS 2020 User Interface Improvements

#2 – NEW Location for the Help Menu

The release of 2020 brought some new options under the Help menu and with the latest service pack update, this menu has been moved to a new icon at the upper right corner. This update will consolidate additional menu functions that were available elsewhere now under one roof including a direct-link to the SOLIDWORKS support webpage and a new dropdown for activating/deactivating the SOLIDWORKS license.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 User Interface Improvements

 

#3 –Improved Dropdown Customization Menu

By right-mouse clicking inside the CommandManager area, a new drop-down was created in 2020 to allow for additional customizing using a much simpler drop-down menu approach. This change was made to consolidate both the addition of tabs and toolbars as well as another option to access the customize dialog within the same menu.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 User Interface Improvements

 

#4 – Search capability for materials

When editing materials for models, a new search box appears in the 2020 release to quickly enter the keyword(s) of any material. The options for keywords include the category name or the physical name of the actual material. This enhancement aligns with the other popular options for searching within SOLIDWORKS including the built-in search command window.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 User Interface Improvements

Author information

Alignex, Inc.
Alignex, Inc. is the premier provider of SOLIDWORKS software and partner products to the mechanical engineering industry in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming and Illinois. With more than 25 years of technical experience, Alignex offers consulting services, training and support for SOLIDWORKS as well as support for partner products. For more information, visit alignex.com.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 User Interface Improvements appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Alignex, Inc. at September 10, 2020 03:00 PM

September 09, 2020

SolidSmack

New HP Z Line Brings The Power to Entry-Level Workstations

HP Z Mobile Workstation Line

Hang onto your Zeats, they said. It’s must-Zee, they said. We’re launching a new line of entry-level workstations the likes of which HP fans have never Zeen. You chuckle but it’s true, HP has announced their new entry-level desktop and mobile workstations. The new options include the ZBook Fury G7 (15″ and 17″) and ZBook Power G7 (15″) mobile workstations and the new Z2 Mini G5, Z2 Small Form Factor G5, and Z2 Tower G5 desktop workstations. All are designed for 3D professionals and students who need a place to snuggle up with hefty 3D/VR capability with affordable entry-level options or pro-level upgrades. Let’s have a little look.

ZBook G7 Mobile Workstations

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large is-resized"><figcaption>Front to Back: HP ZBook Power G7 (15″), HP ZBook Fury G7 (15″) and HP ZBook Fury G7 (17″)</figcaption></figure>

HP’s mobile line-up is squeezing all the power possible into smaller, lighter packages sporting the latest 10-gen Intel Core CPUs with up to 8 core/16 threads. The Fury G7 15″ and 17″ models sit at the top of the Z mobile workstation line ringing in at a starting price of $1,989 and $2,039, respectively, with options for NVIDIA RTX or AMD Radeon Pro GPUs and up to 4TB of M.2 storage. The Power G7 15″ (price unavailable) will offer NVIDIA Quadro T-series GPUs and up to 2TB of M.2 storage.

Z2 G5 Desktop Workstations

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

The Z2 G5 Mini, SFF, and Tower desktop workstations bring a touch more power to your office, again with 10th gen Intel Core CPUs but up to 10 cores/20 threads. The Tower G5 (starting at $869) gets you into high-end graphics territory with NVIDIA RTX and Radeon Pro GPU options while the Mini G5 (starting at $899) limits you to P-series NVIDIA Quadro GPUs and the SFF G5 (starting at $849) provides P-series and the mid-range Quadro RTX 3000. All offer up to 2TB of M.2 storage with the SFF G5 providing up to 8TB of SATA HDD storage.

You can certainly plan to jump quickly into $1k range for any options outside the base configurations here but these are attractive starting price nonetheless.

For the mobile workstations, the ZBook Fury G7 options will be available on September 14 with the ZBook Power G7 following October 5th. The Z2 Mini G5 is available soon with the Z2 SFF G5 and Z2 Tower G5 models following on September 28th.

The post New HP Z Line Brings The Power to Entry-Level Workstations appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 09, 2020 08:23 PM

The Javelin Blog

Converting a logo bitmap image file into a vector sketch for SOLIDWORKS

When creating your models in SOLIDWORKS there may be occasions when you want to make use of a logo image in your design. For instance you might want to have your company logo engraved or embossed on your model, or create a 3D model of your logo for sales and marketing.

The challenge is converting a bitmap image file (could be a JPG, GIF, PNG, BMP, or another type of bitmap) into a vector file that you can generate sketch entities from and then create a solid or surface body.

In this example I’m going to cover a couple of methods I used to convert our corporate logo, a PNG image, into a 3D model.

Javelin Logo Converted

Javelin logo converted into a 3D Model

Method #1: Trace your bitmap in SOLIDWORKS

In a previous post we demonstrated the SOLIDWORKS Autotrace Add-in, which allows you to insert a bitmap picture into your sketch and then automatically trace over it to create your sketch entities. Here is a quick summary of how to do that:

  1. Start a new part
  2. Insert a new sketch on a plane i.e. front plane
  3. Insert a new sketch picture from Tools > Sketch Tools > Sketch Picture
  4. Select your bitmap file, in this case I’ll select the Javelin logo PNG file
Import sketch picture

Import sketch picture

  1. Then select F on the keyboard to fit the image into the display
  2. In the Sketch Picture Property Manager select the right arrow in the upper-right corner
  3. Then under Trace Settings pick a selection tool, in this example I selected the Use to select colour (dropper icon) and then selected the white background of the image
  4. Select the Begin Trace button and you’ll see an outline of the image as sketch entities
  5. Use the sliders to adjust colour and recognition tolerance and repeat steps 7 and 8 until you are happy with the outline
  6. Then select Apply
Autotrace Sketch

Autotrace Sketch

In this example the results were not that great, you can see in the image below that the sketch outline has captured the basic form of the logo and the sketch is comprised of lines and splines. So some tidy up and adjustment to the sketch is required.

NOTE: You can also apply the sketch trace over multiple passes if it makes sense, e.g. to capture the internal area of objects. Learn more about using AutoTrace effectively in this blog post »

Traced outline

Traced outline

An alternative method that will likely produce better results is to convert your bitmap to a vector image.

Method #2: Import your bitmap as a vector image

There are two main vector formats that you can import into SOLIDWORKS, these are:

  • AI/Adobe Illustrator — in order to import/open an Illustrator file you actually need Illustrator installed on your machine!
  • DWG/DWG — this is the Autodesk propriety file type associated with AutoCAD, and you don’t need a license of AutoCAD or DraftSight to use it in SOLIDWORKS, so I’ll be using this type of vector file as an example

Step A: Converting your bitmap to a DXF (vector) file

First thing to do is to convert your bitmap into a vector file, this can be done with an online converter tool. I typically use the Convertio website to convert bitmaps into DXF:

  1. Go to Convertio.co
  2. Select Choose Files
  3. In the open dialog select your bitmap file e.g. javelin-logo.PNG and pick Open
Choose files to convert

Choose files to convert

  1. For the to selection, you can select CAD > DXF
Convert file to DXF

Convert file to DXF

  1. Then pick Convert and the file will be generated after a few seconds
  2. Pick the Download button to obtain the file

NOTE: it is always a good idea to run a virus scan on any unknown files you obtain from the internet before you use it.

Step B: Import DXF into a SOLIDWORKS Sketch

Now that you have your logo vector DXF file you can now import it directly into SOLIDWORKS. This is a simple step as SOLIDWORKS has a wizard for importing DWG/DXF data:

  1. Select File > Open and choose your DXF file (you might need to filter the file type to select it)
  2. In the DWG/DXF Import Wizard dialog:
    • Select import to a new part as 2D sketch
    • And uncheck the Import as reference option
  3. Select Finish (to skip the next wizard step)
Import DXF

Import DXF

The DXF will now be imported into a Sketch, and as you can see in the example below there are more reference points and a better representation of the logo bitmap file than using the Autotrace:

Imported DXF sketch

Imported DXF sketch

Step C: Clean up your SOLIDWORKS logo sketch

Depending on how you are going to use the SOLIDWORKS logo sketch some cleanup might be required, in this example I’ve extruded the sketch to produce a model and you can see that the curves of the letters are comprised of smaller curves and points rather than single curves. This means I have additional faces than required.

DXF 3D Model

DXF 3D Model

To solve this I just edit the sketch, delete the curves, and apply a spline using the reference points. Then colour the model and the design is complete:

Javelin SOLIDWORKS Logo Completed

Javelin SOLIDWORKS Logo Completed

The post Converting a logo bitmap image file into a vector sketch for SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at September 09, 2020 06:29 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Intro to Metal Forming Simulation with an Explicit Solver

The 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS® Simulation portfolio includes the ability to simulate the metal-forming process. The products can be leveraged on SOLIDWORKS® models when connected to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

Forming processes may include stamping, punch stretching, forging, drawing, and more. Truth be told, simulating forming processes can be a difficult task. Usually because they involve geometric, material, and contact nonlinearities.

However, simulation of forming processes offer advantages that outweigh the difficulties. Forming simulations can reduce both the cost and length of a product development cycle by identifying potential problems prior to tooling or fabrication.

Simulation can also improve the quality of the part being manufactured through testing to ensure that the manufacturing processes appropriately account for spring back, stretching of the parts, and thickness reduction.

Figure 1: Forming a flap into a sheet metal part

Validate on the Fly

Forming simulation tools on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform recreate manufacturing processes virtually to check for potential problems such as thinning, wrinkling, or cracking. This enables you to adapt on the fly during development, which often eliminates the need for multiple physical prototypes. Plus, you can experiment with different kinds of materials to see how they will behave in the real world (virtually) and then decide which material works best for your application based on actual performance. Also, you can test process parameters such as manufacturing speeds or temperature levels.

Costly Physical Testing Cycle

In a traditional production environment, without metal forming simulation, you must develop physical tools along the way to validate your design. And this process may require several iterations before getting to a final version—a very slow and expensive process to be sure. However, finite element analysis (FEA) testing shows you how your products will perform, without ever doing a physical test. You can eliminate iteration cycles, since you can test designs and materials to validate what will happen during the forming process.

 

Figure 2: General development process supported by FEA

 Simulation Tool Belt

Metal forming simulations are numerically challenging because you will often see large deformations, plasticity, or complex contact situations (with large sliding interactions and friction) which makes for highly nonlinear simulation studies.

The 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS portfolio of simulation solutions provides additional tools for your FEA tool belt. When you encounter simulations in SOLIDWORKS that demand a deeper level of nonlinear studies, you can simply reach for another tool, in this case, the explicit solver within 3DEXPERIENCE to validate forming processes that will increase the efficiency and speed of your product development process.

If you would like more information about simulation for metal forming processes, please contact your local reseller.

Figure 3: Plastic strain result of a deep drawing simulation

Click here to watch the forming simulation technical webinar that will walk you through the part development process and demonstrate how forming simulation recreates the manufacturing process virtually. If you would like more information about simulation for metal forming processes, please contact your local reseller.

Find more information about 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS Simulation here: https://www.solidworks.com/product/simuliaworks.

Author information

Matthias Ernst
Matthias Ernst
Matthias ERNST is Technical Territory Manager for the Solidworks Simulation Products in Central Europe. He has more than 17 years experience in the domain of linear and nonlinear FEA. Matthias started his professional career at Abaqus Inc., were he did technical presales, trainings, projects and customer support. After Dassault Systemes aquired Abaqus Inc., he continued his work in the SIMULIA Center of Excellence and the SIMULIA BT TechSales team, focusing on Abaqus, 3DEXPERIENCE and CATIA V5 FEA. Since 2019 he also supports customers and partners with Solidworks Simulation Products.

The post Intro to Metal Forming Simulation with an Explicit Solver appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Matthias Ernst at September 09, 2020 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – September 2020

Hello to all,

Welcome to the new edition of the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News!  This monthly news blog is co-authored by members of the SOLIDWORKS Technical Support teams worldwide.

SOLIDWORKS Tips and Tricks: Displaying file properties in drawings and parts with a note from the Design library

By Mario Iocco

A customer wanted to create a note with a custom property and the following conditions:

1) The annotation must work for any sheet metal part or drawing
2) The annotation must be inserted as a Design Library note
3) The annotation must be generic and extract the part bend radius

Please see the below video demonstration on how to achieve this:

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="615" id="video-27256-1" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Tips_and_Tricks_FileProperties.mp4?_=1" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Tips_and_Tricks_FileProperties.mp4</video>

 

Troubleshooting SOLIDWORKS Manage and PDM Integration

By Kevin Crawford

SOLIDWORKS Manage works closely with SOLIDWORKS PDM.  A common issue is when changes are done in PDM and the changes do not appear when the record is viewed in Manage.  This is typically caused by an issue with the Manage add-in inside of PDM.  The Manage add-in will push any changes in PDM to Manage.  Here are some steps to go through when this issue occurs.

The first thing to check is if the Manage add-in is loaded in PDM

If not, go to the PDM Administration tool and load the add-in from the Manage client folder (default location is C:\Program Files\SOLIDWORKS Corp\SOLIDWORKS Manage).  You will need to add the following files: epdm.interop.epdm.dll and swm.swpdm.dll.  You also should add the configuration file, SWManage.swmc.  The configuration file is necessary for users that do not have Manage installed in order to connect to the Manage database.  It must be named exactly “SWManage.swmc”.

  1. Is the add-in the same version as Manage? The add-in is not automatically updated during an upgrade.  As part of the upgrade process, the add-in must be updated.  To check the version of the add-in, you can browse into PDM and if you see the Manage tab, simply hover your cursor over the tab and the version number will appear.

In the newer versions of Manage (2020 SP3 and SP4), the version number of the swm.swpdm add-in is now displayed when you look in the PDM Administration tool of the add-in’s folder.

If the add-in is a different version, it must be updated to match the version of the Manage clients.  This can be done by deleting the add-in and loading it back.

  1. Do you see the Manage tab in the PDM vault view? If the tab is missing, the most common issue is the add-in failed to register.  If the add-in was just loaded, browse into the PDM vault and right-click on a file.  If no error appears, the add-in likely registered but the tab may not appear until after a reboot or a restart of explorer.  If a user has never logged into the Manage client, the tab will not appear until after they have opened the Manage client and login.  If they are not a Manage user, it may not be necessary to login to the client.  In this scenario, you must include the configuration file (SWManage.swmc) with the add-in from step 1 or else the user will not connect to Manage.

If there is a failed to register error, the troubleshooting is similar to other PDM add-ins that fail to load.  There are a couple Knowledge Base solutions that may help troubleshoot the issue.  See S-017133 and S-075202.  If this doesn’t resolve the issue, contact your support team for assistance.

If the synchronization between PDM and Manage is working now but there are files that are still out of synch with Manage, you’ll need to re-synchronize the PDM object in Manage.  In the Administration tool, go to Structures > Documents and Records and edit the PDM object.  On the Connection page of the wizard, select “Enable Synchronization and get all PDM objects”.

The “Synchronization details” dialog appears and you can run the synchronization to update the files in Manage.  To save time, you can avoid scanning the entire PDM vault by only selecting the PDM folders where files are out of synch.

To summarize, the key to resolving synchronization issues between PDM and Manage is to ensure the Manage add-in is working properly in PDM.

 

Understanding graphics software

Please go through the below article to get a better perspective of graphics.

What is OpenGL? What is a graphics driver?

SOLIDWORKS uses OpenGL technology for rendering. OpenGL is a graphics language specification which is implemented by the respective graphics card vendors. For example, nVidia and AMD have their implementation of OpenGL in their corresponding drivers. A driver is a piece of software provided by the graphics card vendor which communicates between application like SOLIDWORKS and the graphics card hardware.

With the announced renderpipeline initiative we require graphics card that support Opengl 4.5 at a minimum. We are bringing cutting-edge technology to improve customer experience and so its imperative users update their graphics card drivers to a SOLIDWORKS certified version.

Where do i find my driver version?
nVidia:
Right click on your desktop:

AMD:

What driver versions are needed for SOLIDWORKS enterprise users?
You should always install the latest certified drivers as indicated by SOLIDWORKS hardware certification.

For nVidia, we certify against the driver branch and we ask you download the latest driver from nVidia from that branch. As of this article, we have certified R440 branch. This means you can download the latest driver from this branch such as 443.18 released on June 24, 2020. Please make sure to download ODE (Optimal Drivers for Enterprise) version. For nVidia customers, I would recommend installing nVidia Quadro Experience software : Quadro Experience: The Ultimate Quadro Productivity Companion | NVIDIA if you’re interested in the release log for fixes for SOLIDWORKS.

For AMD, we certify each individual driver drop from AMD. As of this writing, 19.Q3.2 was certified for SOLIDWORKS 2020.

How do I switch between nVidia and intel GPU on my laptop?
In general, SOLIDWORKS should automatically run on your discrete GPU. But we’ve have heard of issues when the laptop uses hybrid solutions. For example intel paired with nVidia GPU or intel paired with AMD GPU. If you come across a situation where SOLIDWORKS Rx reports that the discrete GPU is not used, please report this error with your VAR or let us know here in the forums. In meantime, you can disabled intel GPU within your BIOS. Each machine has its own BIOS, so its best you look at your machine’s user manual. The other option is to enable discrete GPU from your nVidia control panel or from AMD Radeon Pro settings.

nVidia:
Please navigate to your nVidia Control Panel:

AMD:
SOLIDWORKS should always run on AMD discrete GPU in a laptop hybrid situation. But in general, you can assign any application to run on discrete AMD GPU by right clicking on desktop->AMD Radeon PRO Settings->System

Once you see SOLIDWORKS under “search”, use the pull down menu and select “High Performance”. This will make SOLIDWORKS or any other software to run on discrete AMD mobile GPU. I also request, if you come under this situation, to please let us know.

Is there a free tool that i can use to introspect my machine’s configuration?

There are several tools available online, but i usually use CPU-Z to introspect my CPU and RAM. For GPU, i use GPU-Z. Just google for them. This could be daunting to use for beginners as it display a lot of details..but i think its not bad to have all the information you may need.

What other options do i need to look for in nVidia control panel for a better user experience?

In general, I always recommend keeping your Global Presets to “Base profile” when using SOLIDWORKS. You may want to look at recommendations when using other DS products.

What other utilities are there from nVidia that I can use to improve my experience?

We recommend checking out nVidia Quadro Experience:

Quadro Experience: The Ultimate Quadro Productivity Companion | NVIDIA.

If you’re using multiple monitors, then you can also use nVidia Quadro View:

Quadro View Desktop Management Software | NVIDIA

What are DCH Display Drivers from NVIDIA?

Microsoft DCH (Declarative Componentized Hardware supported apps) drivers refers to a new universal Windows driver package. . Per Microsoft requirements, the NVIDIA Control Panel is no longer included in the base DCH driver package and is instead distributed exclusively through the Microsoft Store and seamlessly installed following the completion of the NVIDIA driver installation.

What is the difference between NVIDIA Standard and DCH Display Drivers?

Functionally, there is no difference between NVIDIA’s Standard and DCH drivers. While the base core component files remain the same, the way DCH drivers are packaged and installed differs from previous (Standard) drivers. When directly comparing the two driver types, the DCH driver package has a smaller size and a faster installation time than the Standard package.

Which versions of Windows 10 support NVIDIA DCH Display Drivers?

NVIDIA DCH Display Drivers are supported on Windows 10 x64 April 2018 Update (Version 1803 OS Build 17134) and later versions.

My Windows 10 PC has NVIDIA Standard Display Drivers installed. Can I download and install NVIDIA DCH Display Drivers from NVIDIA.com?

Yes. NVIDIA DCH Display Drivers can be installed on top of NVIDIA Standard Display Drivers.

My Windows 10 PC has NVIDIA DCH Display Drivers installed. Can I download and install NVIDIA Standard Display Drivers from NVIDIA.com?

Yes, you can locate and download the driver through the  Advanced Driver Search.When installing Standard Display Driver versions posted 12/6/19 or later, the driver installation will force a clean installation which will fully remove the previous DCH driver before the Standard driver is installed. Should you be attempting to install a Standard Display Driver version posted before 12/6/19, we recommend you manually uninstall the previous DCH driver before beginning the installation.

How can I tell which NVIDIA Windows Driver Type is installed on my PC?

To confirm the type of system you have, open the NVIDIA Control Panel -> select “System Information” from the bottom left hand corner -> locate Driver Type. The text that follows will show if the driver type is DCH or Standard.

We uninstalled the NVIDIA DCH Display Drivers and NVIDIA Control Panel and then proceeded to download and install the latest driver from NVIDIA.com. Once the driver installation was completed, I am no longer seeing the NVIDIA Control Panel.

The NVIDIA DCH Display Driver will install the base display driver components but the hardware support apps (NVIDIA Control Panel) must be reinstalled from the Microsoft Windows Store manually. This should happen automatically without any user input. However, if the NVIDIA Control Panel is not installed during the installation of an NVIDIA DCH display driver, you may manually install it from the Microsoft Store be searching for “NVIDIA Control Panel” or directly from the URL below:

https://www.microsoft.com/store/apps/9NF8H0H7WMLT 

Please note: Reinstallation of the NVIDIA Control Panel is only necessary if you manually uninstall the NVIDIA Control Panel. If you are performing a clean install of Windows 10 x64 on a system which came preloaded with NVIDIA DCH Display Drivers, Windows Update will download and install both the NVIDIA DCH Display Driver and NVIDIA Control Panel automatically once you connect to the internet.

After updating my NVIDIA DCH display driver, I am no longer able to open the NVIDIA Control Panel. When I attempt to open the NVIDIA Control Panel, I get an error message “NVIDIA Driver is not installed on your system”.

The NVIDIA Control Panel app from the Microsoft Store may periodically get updated.  If you are seeing the message above, it likely means the latest NVIDIA Control Panel app was not updated to the latest version from the Microsoft Store during the driver update process.

How to fix it:

  1. From the Windows Start Menu, open the Microsoft Store app. 
  2. In the search field on the top right-hand corner, type “NVIDIA Control Panel” until the search as you type result shows the NVIDIA Control Panel app as shown in the screenshot below.  Once it appears, proceed to click on it to bring up the page. Note: If you accidentally clicked on the search icon after typing “NVIDIA Control Panel”, the Windows Store search results will show you several other games and apps.  You will find the NVIDIA Control Panel under the Apps section.

From here it should automatically start updating the NVIDIA Control Panel app. If it does not, you may manually update the app.

Once completed, you should be able to open the NVIDIA Control Panel.

Noteworthy Solutions from the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base

 

icon - SW When I try to activate the ‘Include extended logging data’ option in SOLIDWORKS® Rx, why do I see the error: ‘Extended logging cannot be enabled on this computer due to missing Windows settings.’?
To activate the ‘Include extended logging data’ option in the ‘Problem Capture’ section of SOLIDWORKS® Rx, you must have Administrator privileges.To get more information, see Solution Id: S-078121

icon - SW Is it possible to obtain all flattened DWG or DXF geometries from a multibody sheet metal part simultaneously?
Yes, this is possible. To know more, please visit the solution Id: S-078042

Icon - EPDM Where can I download the hotfix (SPR 1178466) for SOLIDWORKS® PDM 2020 SP1, SP2 and SP3 that fixes stability problems with Hole Wizard, Smart Dimension, and other functions until restarting SOLIDWORKS?
The following issues can affect some environments when working with the SOLIDWORKS® software on a system with a SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 (SP0-SP3) add-in installed. In order to have more details about the hotfix, please visit the solution id: S-078185

Is there a SolidPractice available on the topic of “Managing Large Files”?
The document attached to solution id: S-078218 contains the solidpractice document for managing large files.

That’s it for this month. Thanks for reading this edition of SOLIDWORKS Support News. If you need additional help with these issues or any others, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller.

 

Comments and suggestions are always welcome. You can enter them below.

Author information

bishwarajroy
bishwarajroy

The post SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – September 2020 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by bishwarajroy at September 09, 2020 05:07 AM

September 08, 2020

SolidSmack

Evo Shaver Is The Smallest Shaver Designed for Travel

evo shaver

If you use an electric shaver, you know it’s usually the bulkiest thing you pack, and that’s not including the charging base and/or cord. You may have thought it was travel-friendly but you’ll think again after you see the Evo Shaver. For those on the road, it might just be in your top five must-have things for a business trip.

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</figure>

Unlike most electric shavers which could double as an appendage for Edward Scissorhands, the Evo Shaver is more like a small brush used for traditional wet shaving.

The shaver measures a mere 1.6″ (40mm) by 2.4″ (60mm) taking up very little space in a backpack or travel bag. Heck, it fits nearly undetected in a jean pocket if you have nowhere else to stash it.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">evo shaver</figure>

Despite its size, the Evo Shaver is designed to be a powerhouse when it comes to shaving your face or bod. The stainless steel outer mesh blade net measures .07mm stands between your rugged mug and the shaver’s inner blade, making shaves closer and more comfortable. The low clearance between the mesh blade and the inner blade actually sharpens the Evo Shaver as you use it, reducing the hassle of regular blade replacement.

To cap off the shaving specs, the 6000 RPM motor speeds up the shaving process and reduces the number of passes and increase the speed to a clean shave.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">evo shaver</figure>

Once finished, the Evo Shaver is easily cleaned by rinsing the blade under tap water and/or using the tiny brush included with the shaver. How does it charge?

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">evo shaver</figure>

Instead of a unique charging cable like other electric shaver brands, the Evo Shaver matches the majority of your electronics with a Type-C USB charging port. It’s likely you have a Type-C charging cable as part of your travel gear and, if so, reduces what you need to pack by one more item.

It takes roughly 1 ½ hours to charge the Evo Shaver and is the same amount of time it runs on a full charge. If you estimate shaving time to around 1-2 minutes, you could technically use the Evo Shaver for 50 shaves before the need to recharge it.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">evo shaver</figure>

Considering the portable nature of the device, the creators of the Evo Shaver put in a nifty safety lock which requires you to hold the button down for three seconds to turn it on or off, saving TSA from reporting a ‘strange buzzing sound’ from your bag and you from delays.

The Evo Shaver is currently live on Indiegogo, fully funded and available at a steal for $29 USD or as a kit (with extra blade) for $37 and includes a free bag, free shipping, and not tax/VAT.

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Evo Shaver Is The Smallest Shaver Designed for Travel appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 08, 2020 10:07 PM

Amazon Prime Air Gets FAA Clearance for Drone Delivery

amazone prime air

Well, it’s finally happening. After years of promising to bring drone deliveries to the masses, Amazon Prime Air has finally gotten approval to operate as a drone airline.

The clearance, which comes from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), classifies Amazon’s drone delivery program as an “air carrier”. This will allow Amazon to begin commercial trial deliveries across certain parts of the United States, which will in turn allow the FAA to modify its rules and regulations when it comes to unmanned aerial deliveries.

You wouldn’t want hundreds of drones flying around your neighborhood now, would you?

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">amazone prime air</figure>

This comes as a big change for the FAA, who have until recently been mostly working with aircrafts meant for people. According to Bloomberg, Amazon had to provide a wide list of documentation, from the training the drone pilots receive to actual drug tests.

Even though Prime Air is certified, it may take years before it can become the norm. The FAA is still working on finalizing its regulations for drone deliveries, and Amazon itself has to test it out in different-sized areas before it can bring Prime Air to the country (or better yet, the world).

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">amazone prime air</figure>

Amazon is keeping quiet as to where these initial tests will take place, but there’s a good chance they will take place somewhere in the Northwest United States and Vancouver, where Amazon has various test sites.

Considering the state of the world we live in now, where human contact is discouraged and online shopping is seeing a large surge, Prime Air couldn’t come sooner.

The post Amazon Prime Air Gets FAA Clearance for Drone Delivery appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 08, 2020 03:49 PM

The Javelin Blog

Discover 3DEXPERIENCE Project Planner for SOLIDWORKS

3DEXPERIENCE Project Planner is a new role on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform that is designed for SOLIDWORKS users and other team members to manage their projects.

Project Planner promotes team-based planning for all business users through simple and assisted iterative planning, execution and monitoring of projects. It connects team members through a flexible and collaborative approach. Team members define, share and complete tasks and deliverables through continuous planning and execution of a project. An innovative engine automatically optimizes the schedule to meet key milestones and delivery dates.

Project Planner in SOLIDWORKS Desktop

Project Planner in SOLIDWORKS Desktop

Using the Project Planning App available within SOLIDWORKS allows users to:

  • Create, modify and update project information directly from the SOLIDWORKS interface.
  • Connect SOLIDWORKS design data to tasks from a project to avoid wasting time searching for product information to complete assigned work.

Take a look at the Project Planner in action in the video below:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QYvxaZwYIpk?feature=oembed" title="First Look Video: Project Planner" width="500"></iframe>

3DEXPERIENCE Project Planner Benefits

The Project Planner allows 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS users to:

  • Accelerate time from idea to delivery
  • Improve team productivity
  • Securely collaborate with team members through ad-hoc access rights
  • Connect attachments and deliverables to tasks for review by team members
  • Define project scope, min-max task duration, dependencies and milestones
  • Automatically schedule and optimize planning activities and resources to meet key milestones
  • Keep up with the progress and work to be done from anywhere with real time notifications
  • Access anywhere, anytime through a cloud, in-app and mobile experience

Project Planner Use Cases

Project Planner can be used by your team to accomplish the following project management tasks:

Product Development and Marketing

Project Planner supports a wide variety of business efforts that benefit from having a plan to organize and execute. Users can flexibly define tasks and schedules according to their needs, and then track efforts through to completion. With the ability to associate tasks with current product data, Project Planner excels in the delivery of projects that are based on design information.

Project Planner Schedule View

Project Planner Schedule View

Project Management and Analytics

The Project Planner Summary View offers real-time insights into various aspects of a project. Views include status of on-time and late tasks, achieved versus yet-to-complete milestones, tasks at risk and the stages of completion of deliverables.

Project Planner Summary View

Project Planner Summary View

Resource Planning and Allocation

With Project Planner, users can get an estimation on resource usage versus time for the project. This helps teams assess burdened assignees with pending tasks. If the assignees associate deliverables to their tasks, a chart displays the number of deliverables that are in various stages of completion.

Project Planner Task View

Project Planner Task View

Project Planner Features and Capabilities

Project Planner includes the following features:

  • Project Tasks:
    • Create tasks and milestones with estimated duration
    • Configure project tasks with fixed or flexible dates for planned start and end
    • Associate reference content to project with simple drag/drop from other widgets or upload from local drives
    • Flexibly create projects based on existing templates or on an ad-hoc basis
    • Easily define and modify project attributes
    • Ensure that assigned project resources are not overbooked
  • Schedule View:
    • Establish visual order between tasks in schedule view of project by connecting end of one task to beginning of next task through simple drag/drop action
    • Create dependencies between tasks or milestones in “dependencies” attribute of task
    • Select task and associate it with another to re-sequence tasks in Schedule View
    • Rapidly develop and adapt project schedules based on tasks and their dependencies
  • Schedule Management:
    • Manage schedules better with built-in optimizer engine
    • Determine flexibility on task delivery dates while defining estimated duration for tasks
    • Use this “cushion,” project’s scheduling strategy, and dependency between tasks to allow project optimizer to automatically adjust tasks to provide most favorable project scheduling
    • When making adjustments to a schedule, benefit from automatic color coding of tasks (yellow or orange) to indicate that adjustments are not compatible with set estimates
  • Summary View:
    • Show tasks that are on time or late, milestones achieved versus incomplete and tasks at risk
      Indicate burdened assignees with pending tasks using resource usage versus time chart
    • Consult chart displaying number of deliverables in various stages of completion if assignees are expected to associate deliverables to tasks
    • Improve productivity by identifying critical tasks and collaborate around them in real time
  • Universal Access:
    • Access tasks, milestones or deliverables anywhere and on any mobile interface
    • Automatically send notifications through preferred methods of communication when tasks are assigned or completed
    • Work quickly and efficiently
    • Stay up-to-date on project task status

Interested in Project Planner?

Contact us to get a personalized demonstration and pricing for the Project Planner role on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform.

The post Discover 3DEXPERIENCE Project Planner for SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at September 08, 2020 03:29 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

ABCO Automation Shortened Design Cycles by 35 Percent with SOLIDWORKS PDM

ABCO Automation, Inc. designs and builds custom turnkey factory automation systems that enable manufacturers across the globe, including 3M, Goodyear, GE, and Coca-Cola, to overcome manufacturing challenges to achieve excellence. The company has developed a reputation for developing high-quality automation equipment to overcome difficult challenges within increasingly shorter lead times.

In 2010 ABCO added SOLIDWORKS® PDM Professional product data management (PDM) system to automate its use of SOLIDWORKS 3D design software and related development processes to support ongoing growth, tighten revision controls, shorten design cycles, and reduce costs.

Window into Product Development

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional system quickly gave ABCO greater insight into its operations and enabled the company to automate workflows, both inside and outside of engineering. The company was able to realize productivity gains by shortening design cycles by 35 percent, accelerating time to market by 25 percent, reducing development costs by 20 percent, and cutting costs related to scrap and rework by 55 percent. In addition, ABCO realized an additional 5 percent in efficiency improvements company-wide.

“We’ve developed several methods for pulling design data out of the SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional software system and using it for other purposes,” ABCO CAD Administrator Michael Sveda explains. “For example, we bring data from our PDM system into our enterprise resource planning (ERP) system to support associated business functions and utilize Microsoft® SQL Server Reporting Services to dig into PDM’s SQL database and collate that data to generate reports. By leveraging our PDM and ERP systems in this manner, we are able to provide a window into the precise status of any part, assembly or project, at any time in the process.”

Automating Workflows, BOM Generation, and Purchasing

With SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional, ABCO has also expanded its workflow automation into other areas, such as changing to a customer’s revision scheme when it differs from ABCO’s, automating the generation of bills of materials (BOMs), and making quoting and purchasing more efficient.

“We created some Microsoft Excel macros that access the raw data in SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional and use it to generate the final BOM information in a format that uploads into our ERP system cleanly and notifies our purchasing agent,” Sveda points out. “In addition to realizing a 50 to 60 percent efficiency improvement in BOM generation, these data mining capabilities make it much easier and faster to order parts, saving additional time and money.”

Reusing Standardized Parts

Every system ABCO develops is a specialized, one-off solution engineered to order, so the potential for design reuse is somewhat limited. Nevertheless, with SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional, ABCO can identify parts common to most of its systems, so when a need is recognized as similar to systems the company has developed in the past, PDM enables engineers to save time by accessing the old design data for use as a springboard into a new design.

With its proven reputation for delivering dependable, effective solutions that provide customers with a competitive edge by reducing costs and increasing productivity, ABCO’s repeat client base exceeds 90 percent. Click here for the complete ABCO case study.

Are you curious about how much money you could save by implementing SOLIDWORKS PDM? Find out by clicking on the banner below and plugging in your own company’s information and you’ll receive a customized report showing exactly how much and from where you can save with SOLIDWORKS PDM. You can also learn more about SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional, by contacting your local reseller.

 

 

 

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post ABCO Automation Shortened Design Cycles by 35 Percent with SOLIDWORKS PDM appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at September 08, 2020 12:00 PM

September 05, 2020

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Candlestick Phone

Candlestick Phone: This model is a multi-body part that uses Sketch Pictures to help guide the creation of several revolved and extruded features. The techniques shown here are the same that can be used to create 3D geometry from a 2D dxf or dwg file. This is an example of Non-Dial “Candlestick” Phone. This sample model is easy to follow, breaking the steps down into manageable pieces. candlestick phone

Complexity: Moderate

Features: The model shows an example of the Move/Copy Body feature. There are some examples of the Combine and Mirror feature. There are four circular patterns. There are three revolve cuts. There are two 3D sweeps using the circular profile where you don’t have to sketch the circular cross-section.

Want to learn more? You can view the full list of previous Part Reviewer Tutorials here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Candlestick Phone appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at September 05, 2020 03:00 PM

September 04, 2020

SolidSmack

Onshape CAD | Four Surface Modeling Tech Tips to Grow By!

The folks over at Onshape have been cranking out a ton of resource material across all categories. I’m especially excited over the uptick in surface creation related content being published out. For example, two new surfacing courses recently went live on the Learning Center. So if learning Onshape is on your bucket list, I encourage you to hop over there and have a look. They’ve currently got six Learning Pathway Courses to choose from. Each pathway is designed to help you lay a good foundation and for growth over the long haul.

However, if you are looking for some tasty educational morsels, you’ll want to turn your attention to the Onshape Tech Tips page. There you will find quick tips designed to both entice and energize you to further explore modeling in Onshape.

I’ve rooted out four surfacing tech tips to take us into the weekend. So, if you are looking to build up some surfacing-related muscle, go ahead hit one of the below links!

Until next time, Keep Learning!

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The post Onshape CAD | Four Surface Modeling Tech Tips to Grow By! appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at September 04, 2020 10:29 PM

Learn Autodesk Fusion 360 & Build A Cool Vintage Tank At the Same Time!

Hey, Solidsmackites If you are looking to learn Autodesk Fusion 360 starting at ground zero, but don’t want to go it alone, then we’ve spotted a series that may be just the ticket! Ben over at 3DGladiator kicked off a guided Fusion 360 series building a super cool vintage military tank. Currently, he is on Day 10 where he builds his first honest-to-goodness Fusion part, a tire, and rim. Now that’s the way to set the model build in motion!

<figure class="alignleft size-large is-resized"><figcaption>Ben | 3D Gladiator</figcaption></figure>

Now Ben’s aim in the series is to chronicle his personal learning journey while building an object of sufficient complexity. He’s set up the series in a “Learn-With-Me” format. He makes no bones about being a newbie to Fusion. He invites each of us to weigh in via posting comments below each video if we have tips and tricks or happen to know an alternative feature or modeling strategy. Although Ben is a Fusion novice, his professional CG pedigree shines through. I’ve perused the content of his first few days and it is premium stuff! Along the way in each video, he offers up all sorts of educational nuggets from Fusion functionality to modeling theory. It’s good stuff! It’s not clear how many days it will take to complete the tank, but in the end, I’m certain it will be an awesome model to behold!

I’ve dropped in the day 10 video just because I love to watch 3D geometry come to life. Enjoy!

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</figure>

The post Learn Autodesk Fusion 360 & Build A Cool Vintage Tank At the Same Time! appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at September 04, 2020 06:11 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Cottage Dolls House Part 1 – Tutorial

The Dolls House tutorial series involves creating the Dolls house as a whole part file with multiple separate solid bodies before exporting the solid bodies as grouped or singular part files to create an assembly. This allows you to attach the dolls house doors onto it and add limit mates for opening and closing the Dolls House doors freely.

The Dolls House was designed in SOLIDWORKS first to ensure everything slotted together correctly before I exported out all the face DXF’s individually to create custom decals. The decals seen in the renderings will be available to download for Part 3.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RlGSsT6WcHI" width="560"></iframe>
 

The tutorial is a walk-through of the construction and measurements of the house, it is a lengthy tutorial, but you do need to be quite accurate when creating the panels to ensure that they slot together correctly. The Dolls House has been designed 1:12 scale like many current models on the market. The house can be constructed without the need for screws or dowels, it is either slotted or glued. This is preferable in the toy industry as it saves money on parts, speeds up production times and is more customer and child friendly.

By the end of the tutorial you should be left with the main frame of the Dolls House. Ensure you save your file at this point ready for Part 2 and 3.

Author information

Jade Crompton
I am a 3D Designer and Solidworks Blog Contributor from the UK. I am a self taught Solidworks user, and have been using it to inform and create my designs since 2012. I specialise in the design of Ceramics, Home Accessories and Wooden Toy Design.

The post Cottage Dolls House Part 1 – Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Jade Crompton at September 04, 2020 03:00 PM

September 03, 2020

SolidSmack

SkillCoach | Plastics Playground -Exploring Multi-Cavity Tooling | Protolabs Whiteboard Session

Multi-cavity tooling is the topic we’ll be exploring in today’s SkillCoach Plastics Playground. Now I’m not referring to picks, scrapers, or the high-pitched rotary tools used to make quick work of a menacing cavity wreaking havoc on your molar. Rather, I’m speaking of an injection-mold tooling configuration.

Multi-cavity tooling helps optimize the production of plastic parts. Instead of an injection press spitting out only one plastic part per cycle, multi-cavity tooling enables the injection press to pump out oodles of parts in a given cycle! The net result, more parts in less time. As they say, “time is money!” So, if you’re needing to find a way to shave a few pennies off your piece-part costs, multi-cavity may just be the ticket. Intrigued? Then read on.

To help us along the path of learning lets turn to Protolabs a rapid prototyping service headquartered in Maple Plain MN. If you’ve not heard of Protolabs do check them out. Without a doubt, you will be privy to a smorgasbord of rapid prototyping goodness! From their design guides and aids to the Cool Awards program, opportunities abound for learning and procuring services to help bring your novel product ideas to life.

I recently discovered the Protolab Whiteboard Session video series which is a collection of informative videos covering various facets of plastic part design and manufacturing consideration. Let’s see what nuggets we can glean regarding the world of multi-cavity tooling!

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</figure>

SkillCoach Video Takeaways

Having absorbed the video I’ve outlined some of my key takeaways. Perhaps some additional things will capture your attention.

Firstly, multi-cavity tooling simply means a tool that has multiple voids aka, “cavities” machined out in order to make plastic part production more efficient or cost-effective. Having said this, one may be tempted to think the more cavities the merrier. But unfortunately, it does not quite work that way. In the Multi-Cavity White-Board video, ProtoLabs application engineer in cliff-notes fashion points out an array of considerations you’ll want to take into account. He offers up just the right amount of guidance on the topic to put us all on the right path. If you desire more in-depth information specific to multi-cavity have a look here or seek out a living breathing expert. Below is a graph that highlights the pros associated with a multi-cavity tooling approach.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Source: Protolabs</figcaption></figure>

Multi-Cavity Configuration Options

There are two primary approaches or configurations to multi-cavity tooling 1) Family (a group of unique parts) and 2) Common Cavity (multi-cavities of the same geometric part). There are pros and cons to each configuration so you’ll want to be sure to do your homework in order to best understand the tradeoffs.

Common Cavity

Let’s have a look at a common cavity tooling scenario. Say you have a sweet new multi-piece thingy-ma-jobber product you are gearing up to sell. Its got a front, back, and a top. Your aim is to build a marketing strategy around Color Material & Finish (CMF) such that you can provide the consumer with numerous color options. In this instance, you may want to go with three separate injection tools. Each tool would be configured with an array of cavities of the same part as depicted in the graphic below. The advantage here is the flexibility to mix and match colors. Having said this though, keeping up with inventory for each color could be the tricky part.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Common Cavity Tool with cavities of the same part</figcaption></figure>

Family Cavity

Let’s have a look at a family tooling scenario. This time lets say you are extremely tight on cash. So figuring a way to minimize your tooling investment is a high priority. Also, you want to ensure you get a complete product with every cycle of the injection press. Then family cavitation most likely will be the ticket.

Family tools consist of a cavitational layout that accounts for the parts required to produce a whole product. In the video, Chris the applications engineer uses the example of a two-piece handle consisting of left and right halves. Let’s build on that. If we through in a trigger and gimble cover we’ve got ourselves a joystick product. Together this array of pieces make up the entire product. Pretty sweet huh? But what might a downside or limitation be to such a configuration?

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Family Cavity Tool</figcaption></figure>

In our example, each piece differs in size and shape. This produces a different set of inject-molding challenges in order to produce a geometrically stable and high-quality aesthetic part. Chris spoke about the importance of part arrangement to best control balancing mold fill rates. The .GIF image below demonstrates the mold fill issue that must be overcome. Take note of the resulting issues associated with grouping very dissimilar size and shape parts in the same tool. Flashing (that is the leaking of material out of a given cavity), short-shots (cavities that do not get filled), and over-packing (cavities that have too much material force in). The good news is, managing these molding conditions is something that is done every day. So keep your chin up!

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large is-resized"></figure>

There you have it! A quick primer on multi-cavity tooling. I’ve personally gone through this process many times in my product development journey. Each time I learn something new. A piece of advice from SkillCoach, especially if you are responsible for each stage from art-to-part, COLLABORATE! Identify a tooler early. Inquire as to what services they offer. Share your preliminary CAD such that you can work together to hammer out molding issues and requirements that may affect the final aesthetics of your product. Enjoy the journey!

Until next time, Keep Learning!

The post SkillCoach | Plastics Playground -Exploring Multi-Cavity Tooling | Protolabs Whiteboard Session appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at September 03, 2020 09:40 PM

Circle Guitar’s Rotating Body Creates New Playing Possibilities

circle guitar

We all know how a guitar works: put your fingers on the strings across the frets, use your other hand to strum the strings, and BAM, you’re creating music. But what if you could change how one of those elements works entirely?

Anthony Dickens’ Circle Guitar (created by engineers Jacob Boast, Luke Perkin, and Marie Tricaud) looks very similar to a conventional guitar… that is, until you reach the body. Located at the center is a special device designed to strike specific guitar strings at a specific time and rate. In essence, it introduces multiple other fingers to strum, allowing an entirely new sound to be generated which would otherwise be impossible using human hands.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9dtrvc6gOc4?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Circle Guitar Step Sequencer

In the video above, for example, sounds are mixed using a multi-channel pickup. By setting certain strings to specific sound effects, you can mix and match a vast number of rhythms depending on what you’re feeling at the moment.

The Circle Guitar’s six onboard switches correspond to the guitar’s six strings. Pressing or releasing each switch denotes whether or not a signal will pass through to whatever output you have hooked up to the guitar. So, along with strumming, the guitar can also be played more like a piano. He explains:

The sound is caught by a hexaphonic or ‘multi-channel’ pickup. Each string has its own output that can be amplified, recorded and processed individually. You can pan each string across the mix, blend different effects across the strings or set up rhythmic gates to turn individual strings on and off in time with Circles set speed. The options for audio processing using guitar effects pedals, amplifiers, modular synthesis or digital audio workstations are vast.

There are six switches on the body of the guitar that control whether the signal either passes freely to your amp, mixing desk or computer interface or to a button that releases the signal only when pressed. This enables you to play the Circle Guitar a bit like a piano, creating interesting rhythmic chords, lead lines or whatever you want to call what I’m playing above!

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/38VNCn56e5Y?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

In another video, Dickens plays a more techno sound; this time without strumming or pressing any switches. Instead, he puts his entire hand over the strings (also called “dampening”) while playing chords with the other to create a sound that falls more into the background.

The circle mechanism is essentially a series of plectrums (you know them as “picks”) which pluck at the strings as they pass by. With a rotating speed of 250bpm and a programmable circle that allows you to modify the hardness and arrangement of the picks, you can create very different sounding rhythms or songs.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/l5sePz48ejM?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

In his most recent video, Dickens just slides a strumming finger back and forth over the E and A strings. While not complex by any stretch of the imagination, it does create this boppy rhythm which he then adjusts with the placement of his fingers on the left-hand side.

Anthony Dickens is constantly trying new things with the Circle Guitar and showing the results of his musical experiments on his YouTube channel. Though there are no plans mentioned to put the instrument into production, you can join his mailing list at anthonydickens.com for updates and let them know you’re interested.

The post Circle Guitar’s Rotating Body Creates New Playing Possibilities appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 03, 2020 05:24 PM

The Javelin Blog

Learn the advantages of bringing your SOLIDWORKS Data to the Cloud

New SOLIDWORKS cloud data approach improves collaboration, reduces IT overhead

In a time of disconnection, it’s critical to be able to easily manage product data regardless of its location.

The ability to manage product data throughout its lifecycle is a proven tactic organizations use to more effectively plan, design, manufacture and manage their products—all the way from concept through to product delivery.

While data management software has been around for decades, vendors are now delivering cloud-based data management solutions to increase flexibility and convenience, while also decreasing upfront costs and ongoing IT investments for organizations.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Cloud Data

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Cloud Data

Included in the White Paper

This white paper from Engineering.com takes a closer look at the many benefits of adopting a cloud-based approach to product data and lifecycle management.

The eBook covers:

  • Where PLM came from, and where it’s going
  • The many benefits of cloud PLM
  • How cloud-based PLM can increase data security
<noscript> <iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="1000" src="https://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2020-08-31/d4fnm1" style="border: 0" type="text/html" width="100%"></iframe> </noscript> <script type="text/javascript"> var form = 'https://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2020-08-31/d4fnm1'; var params = window.location.search; var thisScript = document.scripts[document.scripts.length - 1]; var iframe = document.createElement('iframe'); iframe.setAttribute('src', form + params); iframe.setAttribute('width', '100%'); iframe.setAttribute('type', 'text/html'); iframe.setAttribute('frameborder', 0); iframe.setAttribute('allowTransparency', 'true'); iframe.setAttribute('scrolling', 'no'); iframe.setAttribute('id', 'sizetracker'); iframe.style.border = '0'; thisScript.parentElement.replaceChild(iframe, thisScript); </script> <script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/iframe-resizer/3.5.3/iframeResizer.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> // Create browser compatible event handler. var eventMethod = window.addEventListener ? "addEventListener" : "attachEvent"; var eventer = window[eventMethod]; var messageEvent = eventMethod == "attachEvent" ? "onmessage" : "message"; // Listen for a message from the iframe. eventer(messageEvent, function(e) { if (isNaN(e.data)) return; // replace #sizetracker with what ever what ever iframe id you need document.getElementById('sizetracker').style.height = e.data + 'px'; }, false); </script>

The post Learn the advantages of bringing your SOLIDWORKS Data to the Cloud appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at September 03, 2020 03:01 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Be Stress Free from File Issues after a SOLIDWORKS PDM Upgrade

Did you just upgrade your SOLIDWORKS PDM and are you finding now all your files are taking a considerable amount of time to open and save?

We know why and we have the solution, although you have upgraded the software version, all of your SOLIDWORKS files are still sitting in an older version. Working with older version files can be quite frustrating as they can lead to longer open and rebuild times, this is because they have to check the version of all referenced documents and upgrade them. But you cannot possibly go and open all these referenced documents, check them out and update them to the current version. This would be time consuming and inefficient.

This is where the PDM File Version upgrade tool comes in handy. This is pretty similar to the “Convert Files” option of SOLIDWORKS Task Scheduler but its best suited for files that reside in the normal Windows Explorer.

For the files within the Version Controlled PDM Environment, we need to consider a lot more things since the files have versions and are checked in the server. The PDM File Version upgrade tool automatically checks out, upgrades, and checks in the preferred SOLIDWORKS files that are stored in the vault for you, while maintaining all the file references, revision/version tags and workflow states. In case you have a massive data set to upgrade, the upgrade tool also allows multiple machines to manage files simultaneously to speed up the upgrade process.

Installing the File Version Upgrade Tool

The upgrade tool needs to be installed on all machines that are being used for the upgrade procedure.

It is available as a separate installation in the SOLIDWORKS installation media folder “…SWPDMClient\Support\File Version Upgrade\”. Run the file “File Version Upgrade.exe” and follow the steps accordingly to finish the installation.

Preparations for the Upgrade

Following are some options and recommendations to prepare the workstations before you start the upgrade process:

  • Backup your file vault database and the archive files
  • Make sure that the correct SOLIDWORKS version is installed on all the machines participating in the upgrade process and close all unnecessary running applications.
  • Check in all files into the vault as any checked-out files will not be updated by the Upgrade tool.
  • Ensure that the participating clients and the logged in user have required access and permissions to all the files in the vault that you are upgrading.
  • Perform a test run of the file upgrade process to check for any conversion errors and confirm that the upgrade runs smoothly.

Running the File Version Upgrade Tool

After completing the installation, run the tool from the Windows Start menu (Start > All Programs > File Version Upgrade). You will see a welcome screen as shown below where you can choose which task you want to launch.

 

The default option when starting a new upgrade process is “Initiate a new upgrade process”. If you are planning to split the workload among several workstations this option still needs to be run on the master computer first to generate the work instruction files.

“Participate in an upgrade process” task needs to be run on the slave workstations after generating the work instructions. You also have the options here to restart an interrupted upgrade process as well as monitor the overall progress of the upgrade procedure.

 

Next is to select the version of SOLIDWORKS you would like to use for the upgrade tool. NOTE: The selected target version of SOLIDWORKS must be installed on the workstation.

Select your PDM file vault where all your files that you want to upgrade are stored as shown below. You may be prompted to log in if you have not already.
NOTE: Make sure you sign in as a user who has the required permissions to read and check out all the files you wish to upgrade irrespective of what state and workflow, they reside in. Hence, it is advisable to use “ADMIN” user.

 

After this you will have the options to search for and select the preferred SOLIDWORKS files for the upgrade.

  1. You can use the file type section to choose to upgrade either all file types or one of the following: part, assembly or drawing files.
  2. You can search and select files in specific file locations,
  3. You can choose to select files that are in a specific state (although, all states recommended)
  4. You can also specify some input conditions to choose any files based on particular variables.

You can always leave these settings at default if you do not want to sort out the files chosen for the upgrade.

 

Based on your search criteria, FVUT will then list all the files that matched the specified conditions in the previous step. All the files are chosen for the upgrade by default, but you can un-check those that should not be upgraded individually if you want to.
NOTE: It is especially important that you upgrade all the parent files if you are upgrading any of the referenced files.  If only the parent files are shown in the search list, then the child references will be automatically incorporated in the final stage of the upgrade process.

 

Now you will see the most important screen out of all. This is where you do the version settings. You can select between the two options on how you want to upgrade the versions and revisions of the files.

A.Create New Version of files

You can choose the “Create new version of files” option to upgrade only the latest version of the chosen files to a new version. This is the recommended option because this way the older versions still exist and can be rolled back to in case there is an issue with the upgraded file.

You also have the choice to move the references to their latest version if an assembly or sub-assembly references older version of the parts using “Are re-linked to the new version” option.

NOTE: Use this with caution because if the newer versions of referenced files have undergone geometry modifications, using this option could result in unwanted assembly changes or rebuild errors. In addition, if file properties such as Part Number, Description, or Material have changed, in the newer versions, this could cause changes in Bills of Materials.

In case you have modified new version of referenced files, you should choose “Are Excluded”.

Finally, you can choose to update the revision by either incrementing it or just moving the existing revision to the new version.

B. Overwrite existing Version of files

If you want to upgrade a specific version of the file and replace the existing version with the upgraded files, you can go with the second option to “Overwrite existing versions of files”. With this option you can either choose to upgrade all existing versions of the files or only the latest version of files in combination with files that have a revision tag.
NOTE: Upgrading all files in the vault can be time consuming hence its recommended to clear the check box for the “Skip check for broken references” option  to ensure that any parent files referencing the files chosen are also upgraded.

Once you select your desired option and go Next, you will see the penultimate screen of the process which consists of the Upgrade Settings.

Here we can:

  • Add a comment (which is compulsory) and will show up in the history of the files.
  • You also have some further options to automatically update BOMs in drawings created prior to 2003 and do a complete rebuild of the files (recommended) even though it might add a bit more time to the process.
  • You can create work instruction files to run the upgrade simultaneously on several machines to speed up the upgrade process. You will need to specify the amount of work instruction files to create depending on how many machines you are planning to use and then put these in a shared drive/location (must be in UNC format) with appropriate permissions.

 

Finally, you will see a detailed summary of the upgrade process as shown above. This will give you a bigger picture of how many files and versions are being upgraded. Press continue and let the File Version Upgrade Tool do the rest for you.

 

Without a doubt, with this very user friendly and useful tool, you too will be stress free and will no longer have to worry about the lengthy opening/rebuild times which is one of the most common issues you face after a software upgrade. If you have all your files checked in, then simply let FVUT do its magic and at the end you will have all your files upgraded and ready to be used with the new version of SOLIDWORKS and PDM.

If you have any issues or need more information regarding the use of this tool, please contact our experienced staff at CADspace.

 

Written by

Sajith Wei Henage, CADspace Applications Engineer

Author information

CADspace
CADspace is a dedicated SOLIDWORKS Reseller in Australia, partnered with SOLIDWORKS early in 2013 and since that time we have grown rapidly into a full-service provider to our clients. Over the years we have built trusted relationships based on honesty and outstanding service levels from the most dedicated support and sales team in the country.

The post Be Stress Free from File Issues after a SOLIDWORKS PDM Upgrade appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CADspace at September 03, 2020 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

An Unusual 3D Print Accessory: Plastic Repellent Paint

3d-printing-plastic-repellant-00

I bumped into a 3D print accessory I’d never heard of, and think it’s a pretty good idea.

The accessory is “Plastic Repellent Paint”, distributed by Slice Engineering. They are a reseller of unusual components for 3D printing since 2017, and their product line consists of a few exotic hot ends, replacement parts, accessories, and nozzles.

One of their products is Plastic Repellent Paint, and while I haven’t tried this yet, I believe it could be a tremendous way to avoid major damage on desktop 3D printers.

The problem being addressed here is a certain type of 3D printer failure, in which a large amount of material is deposited on the hot end.

3D Printer Hot End Blobs

Every 3D printer operator, at least for filament machines, has likely encountered this problem. It usually starts with poor bed adhesion, which eventually causes the print to become loose during printing. The loose print is dragged around the print surface, as the printer merrily continues its duty, having no knowledge of the impending failure.

Sometimes the loose print presses against the hot end in such a way to block the flow of hot thermoplastic. This is the opposite of the “spaghetti”-style failure, where you end up with a pile of loose filament strands. Instead you get a growing blob of solid material attached to the hot end.

In extreme cases, which, unfortunately I’ve had several times, the blob grows significantly and slowly encases major portions of the hot end. Sometimes the geometry of the blob is just right to yank off wire connections or snap air ducts.

But most of the time the blob will simply encase the hot end, with flowing thermoplastic seeping into every crevice. Then, when the print “completes”, the device shuts down the heating and the blob solidifies into an unmovable mass.

Novices will typically abandon all efforts at 3D printing upon seeing the hot end catastrophe, but more experienced operators will try to heat up the hot end once again and painstakingly pull off the plastic with needle nose pliers.

If you’re lucky the mass will pull off in a big hunk. But more often it doesn’t, particularly when it’s heated. You will usually end up disassembling the hot end and picking off all the stray plastic bits. After some time you’ll reassemble the hot end and just possibly the machine will resume operations.

But sometimes not. The blob can very easily damage some of the delicate parts of the hot end. At the very least your machine will be down until repaired, and at the worst it will be a write off.

Plastic Repellent Paint

Enter Plastic Repellent Paint. This is a small 3cc bottle of a specialized mix that repels common thermoplastics. The idea here is to paint the hot end components — when they’re cool, of course. When set this surface coating will prevent bonding of thermoplastic to the painted components.

This could make recoveries from “blob situations” a lot easier, as the material would easily pull off. It may also be possible that the stray plastic bits may simply be shaken or brushed off, but I’ll have to give this material a try to find out.

On second thought, maybe I don’t want to try this experiment, as I really don’t want to risk blobbing my hot ends.

According to Slice Engineering:

Plastic Repellent Paint is a revolutionary, water-based, PTFE nanosuspension that repels plastic from the outside of your nozzle and hot block. Which is awesome, because it prevents that annoying plastic buildup that causes print failures! Plastic Repellent Paint can be applied in seconds using the vial’s brush top, forming a dry, transparent coating that endures print temperatures up to 290°C. Keep your nozzle clean with some high-tech space magic, and worry no more.”

Apparently the paint is good up to 290C, which should cover most common 3D printing material temperatures.

I’d avoid raising the temperature of the nozzle beyond that level, however, as the material safety sheet for the paint says:

“The thermal decomposition vapors of fluorinated polymers may cause polymer fume fever with flu-like symptoms in humans, especially when smoking contaminated tobacco.”

Tobacco?

Also, it seems that the paint is quite irritative to the eyes, so they make it quite clear you should be wearing eye protection when applying it.

Nevertheless, I suspect this product can be easily used in a safe manner, and it should offer an additional level of protection for FFF 3D printers, especially those with poor surface adhesion solutions.

It’s available at Slice Engineering for US $15. And yes, the URL does indeed have a “TM” character in it, the first I’ve ever seen.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post An Unusual 3D Print Accessory: Plastic Repellent Paint appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at September 03, 2020 12:37 PM

September 02, 2020

SolidSmack

This Lightweight Shopping Bag Easily Holds Up To 66 lbs

nanobag 4.0

My family and I do our best to use recyclable bags for grocery shopping whenever possible. And while it’s a great way to save some pennies and tossing excess plastic bags, it’s a pain to stash bulky bags and a hassle at checkout. It needs to change and Nanobag aims to do so.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tGOQHiVJufo?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The Small, Adjustable Shopping Bag

Nanobag 4.0 is the newest lightweight shopping bag from TipTop Things. You would think, since the bags are a mere 0.05 mm thick they would rip as soon as you drop a head of soggy lettuce into it but no, these babies can carry up to 66 lbs (or 30 kg) easy.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">nanobag 4.0</figure>

Depending on the style of bag or the amount of items you need to carry, there are six variations of Nanobags: The Standard, the Mico, the Mini, the Pack, the Sling, and the ever dependable XL. Each have their own dimensions, carrying capacities, and graphic design.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">nanobag 4.0</figure>

If there was a secret to them, it could be that the bags are made from Oeko Tex 100 standard fabric and are inlaid with a diamond-shaped mesh which prevents rips and tears. This allows the Nanobag 4.0 to carry 12-25 liters without showing the strain they are under.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">nanobag 4.0</figure>

But the best feature of these paper-thin reusable bags is how much they compress. You can crumple up the Nanobag 4.0 and fit it in all kinds of places: from your backpack or satchel/purse to the useless tiny front pocket of your jeans. Since the bags weigh practically nothing (the Standard weighs in at 22g), they store like a tissue packet – you may even forget you’re carrying them.

The Nanobag 4.0 is currently live and already fully funded on Kickstarter, starting at $11 for the earlybird option and your choice of design. Bulk options are available in quantities from 10 to 200 with all options expected to deliver December 2020.

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post This Lightweight Shopping Bag Easily Holds Up To 66 lbs appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 02, 2020 06:51 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Why Your Perfect Product is Failing?

Even if a product design hits the ideal balance of form and function, wows everyone regarding usability, and utilizes a design process that is second to none, leveraging the top technologies in the world, if no one buys it, it is a complete waste of time.

It’s a risk all companies take that design, engineer, and build products—both large and small. The solution is not all that complicated: decrease product failures by increasing market research.

The Social Business Analyst role on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform enables you to make insight-driven business decisions through trends gathering, market listening, and competitive intelligence. Choose the sources you want to monitor, visualize data with custom charts, and drive faster decision-making by automating actions triggered by events and data insights.

Across-the-Board Benefits

Using the Social Business Analyst helps you both on the front-end and the backend of market research challenges. Executives can benefit by monitoring industry trends and developing competitive and economic insights, as well as staying ahead of news that may impact the market. Product managers can benefit by understanding product feedback, including what customers are saying about the product. Marketing benefits by efficiently segmenting their customer base, as well as monitoring what competitors are doing from a brand awareness and promotional perspective.

Customer & Competitor Insights

The Social Business Analyst provides research tools for businesses to gather customer feedback and perform sentiment analysis to understand customer reactions to products, which enables them to adjust, change, and improve the product.

The results are accessible from a single environment on the cloud, delivering a centralized view to all stakeholders. With Social Business Analyst, you can share real-time insights, competitive analysis, and marketing data with the entire organization.

With tracked topics, you can collect real-time information about competitors to understand how they are doing business and identify opportunities or potential risks for your business. Important articles and feeds can be automated and pushed to individuals via email or to the entire team using collaborative communities, so everyone is up to date on the latest information.

Data Crawls

The Social Business Analyst performs automated web crawls across social, news, images, videos, and forums. Save content to customized libraries. Share content with 3DEXPERIENCE platform members by publishing it to 3DSWYM communities. Or create push emails that automatically share the relevant content to the users you select. You can also set up automatic alerts for new content, then publish it directly to a 3DSWYM community, email it directly to yourself, or push emails to other members.

The Social Business Analyst will enable you to better understand market opportunities to develop the right products, using customer feedback and market intelligence to enhance products at each stage of development. Contact your local reseller for more information regarding the Social Business Analyst or check out this page.

Author information

Salih Alani
Salih Alani
Graduate of the University of Technology , Iraq - Baghdad with BS in Mechanical Engineering , graduate of Northeastern University with a Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering, specializing in mechanics and design - 6+ Years in SOLIDWORKS ®Technical Support team - Focused on core SOLIDWORKS , DraftSight , licensing (Online Licensing), Lead Technical Support of 3D CONTENTCENTRAL® , Technical Support Account Manager for Enterprise Subscription Services (ESS) customer account and lead organizer for VAR Performance Tuning Workshop in Dassault Systemes Waltham - Certifications: - 3DEXPERIENCE® Platform Explorer – Associate - CSWA, CSWP, CSWP-Drawing Tools, CSWP-Weldment, CSWP-Sheet Metal

The post Why Your Perfect Product is Failing? appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Salih Alani at September 02, 2020 12:00 PM

September 01, 2020

The Javelin Blog

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2021 Virtual Event

Attend our SOLIDWORKS 2021 What’s New Virtual Event on October 6, 2020 at 11:00 AM ET to learn about the latest SOLIDWORKS release.

The What’s New session is part of our Virtual Tech Conference where there are additional sessions for you to learn about:

  • SOLIDWORKS Additive Manufacturing
  • SOLIDWORKS Cloud Collaboration
  • SOLIDWORKS Data Management
  • SOLIDWORKS Digital Transformation
  • SOLIDWORKS Skills Development

About SOLIDWORKS 2021

SOLIDWORKS 2021 enhances the capabilities and workflows you use every day for design, documentation, data management, validation, and more. And it delivers the performance you demand so you can get your work done faster. You can also expand your capabilities by connecting to the 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS portfolio to tackle more challenges and accelerate innovation together.

The SOLIDWORKS® 2021 and 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS Portfolio releases focus on the following areas:

  • Expanded Functionality and Performance — Improvements in large assemblies and improved simulation. Enhancements in system performance and faster data management workflows
  • Staying Connected — Improved connections to the 3DEXPERIENCE® WORKS portfolio provide integrated collaboration, cloud-based data management, and advanced simulation. With the 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS portfolio, you and your team have access to real-time information to get products to market faster and improve business outcomes.

Reserve your place today for our SOLIDWORKS 2021 What’s New Event:

  • Learn more about enhancements and new workflows to improve productivity
  • Engage with Javelin SOLIDWORKS experts and learn about the new capabilities
  • Discover the latest best practices for SOLIDWORKS

 

The post What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2021 Virtual Event appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at September 01, 2020 07:16 PM

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: Smartphone Stabilizer [Up Yo’ TikTok Game!]

How do all those selfie-shootin’ video pros snag that smooth video? Well, outside a tripod or a wall and roll of duct tape, they’re likely using a fancy gimble device to steady their on-screen antics. While you can find a few in the $120 price range, you could also just make your own.

*gasp!* Yes, but don’t worry, Louis Desmarchelier (aka Loud3D) has the perfect setup that (if you already have a 3D printer) will only cost a small amount of time, material, and support removal to achieve stable, multi-axis, video shootin’ bliss.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">3D printed smartphone stabilizer</figure>

The smartphone stabilizer design is a pretty standard multi-axis gimble with a handle and a threaded rod for counter-balance weights or hardware. For this design, standard M20 nuts are used as the counter-balance.

There are four parts in total with a large (70mm) and small (58mm) phone support version. Louis recommends a layer of 0.15mm and infill of 20% with supports for a better quality print. The only mod I would recommend is a more ergonomic handle.

Any ABS/PLA 3D printer could be used but highly recommend the Anycubic Mega-S as well as the Anycubic filiment.

You can download the model on Cults 3D. [Bonus! Louis is a rollerblader – check out his 3D printed skateboard coping (for real!) design and his #bladelife on Instagram.]

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Model of the Week: Smartphone Stabilizer [Up Yo’ TikTok Game!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 01, 2020 06:48 PM

A Plastic Turtle Made From Recycled Ocean Waste

We love well-designed toys here at SolidSmack but still, you may be thinking, “This is just a plastic turtle”. Well, believe it or not, this wee plastic turtle is a toy… and a bit of a dark, foreboding, guilt-laden memorial to all the marine life killed off by mindless waste disposal. But more than that, it’s turning waste into a beloved turtle toy for a child or your own collection of turtle memorabilia.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">Greta The Great<figcaption>A turtle made of plastic to remind you of a turtle killed by plastic.</figcaption></figure>

Shaken by the number of animal deaths caused by oceanic waste and the theory that, in 2050, there could be more plastic in the oceans than fish, Claire Matthews created Greta The Great – a plastic turtle made from discarded fishing nets and other discarded waste.

Where does the plastic come from? Unwanted or discarded plastic maritime industry materials such as old nets and ropes (that make up about 10% of ocean plastic pollution) are collected from shores and ports all over the world. The waste is then sorted and tested for toxic chemicals before it is processed to be made into the muted green or coral turtle designs you see before you.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">Greta The Great</figure>

The quality assurance doesn’t stop there. Since the turtles are made with toddlers in mind, they undergo another round of testing for bisphenol A (BPA) and heavy metals after manufacturing. The twice-tested Gretas are then packaged in biodegradable boxes and sent out to all the budding young ecologists and conservationists around the world.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">Greta The Great</figure>

If you’re wondering why the turtle has a mildly appealing modern design, even to adults, it’s because they were designed by Tim Rundle, an industrial designer whose talents lie in the furniture, lighting, and interior product design industry, who applied his minimalistic appeal to the toy design.

The idea was to have a toy which wasn’t just fun for kids but also nice to look at anywhere in the house. Like people who leave their nets in the sea, kids don’t like cleaning up after themselves, so having a pleasant-looking, recycled plastic turtle laying on the living room floor makes it more acceptable while serving as another stark reminder to put plastics in their place.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">Greta The Great</figure>

Greta the Great is currently live on Kickstarter and just about to hit their funding goal. You can snag one for about $20 and have it in time for Christmas 2020. If you liked well-designed toys as well and want to turn plastic waste into a nice memento for your kiddos, give this recycled plastic turtle a shot.

The post A Plastic Turtle Made From Recycled Ocean Waste appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 01, 2020 03:57 PM

Engineers Create Bomb-Sniffing Locust Biorobots

locust biorobots

It may sound like a movie plot starring you and Tom Selleck, but a team of engineers at The Washington University in St. Louis, led by associate professor of biomedical engineering, Baranidharan Raman, has spent the last few years developing cyborg insects.

A $750,000 grant, which was given to the team in 2016 from the Office of Naval Research (ONR), has since been used to study the extraordinary olfactory senses found in locusts to sniff out certain chemicals. Yes, like a bomb-sniffing dog, but smaller and with a tendency to devour crop fields.

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</figure>

The idea behind the study was not to invent a new method of uncovering explosives but to use the innate sensory apparatus of an insect to our advantage (MWAHAHA). Fact is, biological sensory systems outclass our weak, man-made efforts in many ways. This is evident with dogs that are trained for such duties and became evident to the research team after observing a locusts’ neural activity when exposed to certain environmental stimuli.

But you might be wondering, why locusts and not dogs?

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">locust biorobots</figure>

Well, there are two reasons.

First, an insect’s antennae have thousands of sensors capable of detecting all matter of chemicals and conditions. While locusts have nowhere near the same sense of smell as dogs, they detect many things much faster. By attaching a small plasmonic patch to a locust’s thorax, the engineers were able to collect data about various elements in the location where the locust was deployed.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">locust biorobots</figure>

The second reason: mind control.

It takes a lot of time and effort to train bomb-sniffing dogs and even then who could stand to lose man’s best friend out in the field?

With the same technology, a smaller plasmonic “tattoo” could be applied to generate heat in specific areas on the locusts’ wings to steer it toward areas to scout. The locusts are directed to the area, scouting it out naturally with their antennae, then guided back for data retreival. Locusts: cheap, expendable, and tasty fried up with a dash of cayenne pepper.

The grant was set for three years, so this research concluded in 2019 but other researchers involved in the project have continued research in remote control of insects, neural circuit dynamics, and more. If you’ve got your own cyborg insect plans, the team’s studies have been posted online.

The post Engineers Create Bomb-Sniffing Locust Biorobots appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 01, 2020 12:16 PM

August 31, 2020

SolidSmack

Unique Spice Jar Cap Design to Measure Your Spices

cass caps

Anyone who has spent any amount of time baking/cooking/experimenting will know the tedium of measuring ingredients but outside of pre-measured packets what could make it easier?

Cass Caps work much like your ordinary measuring cups, only instead of a key ring of clinking metal cups, you have a specially designed cap-of-sorts that screws onto your spice jar. Say what? It’s true. Have a look.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-QtV0BcPr_c?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

You set the caps to one of two options: either at ¼ tsp or ½ tsp. Once you’ve set the measurement, you just turn the bottle over, give the cap a twist, and you’re done.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">cass caps</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">cass caps</figure>

Need more than that? Just twist it multiple times for larger amounts – let’s hope your fractional measurement multiplying skills are up to snuff. Outside of the functionality it provides, the design is somewhat interesting.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">cass caps</figure>

Cass Caps took over two years to create with, during that time, over 100 different designs and 150 3D printed models made and tested before arriving at the final solution you see today. The caps are made from FDA compliant, BPA free polypropylene and 100% recyclable, as is the glass jars.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">cass caps</figure>

Does it actually make measuring easier? Over 1100 people seem to think so. They’ve hit their $10,000 funding goal, have design and patent in place with manufacturing ready to spin up in October. A two jar/cap pack starts at $24 and up to a 12 jar/cap pack for $69. Delivery is set for December 2020.

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by Carlos Zotomayor at August 31, 2020 10:08 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

How to Create My Very Own Dashboard On the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform

What is a Dashboard?

A dashboard is a tool that provides visual representation of key performance indicators (KPIs) and other metrics. The information can be in the form of graphs, charts, or maps and with option for users to further drill down the data.

In today’s business world dash boards are everywhere. They can be displayed in a variety of ways. You may have seen them proudly displayed in a public area so the staff as well as prospective clients can see the production ratings, safety stats, and a variety of delivery percentages. They are used to communicate information, and some dashboards are updated daily, or twice a day. As productivity increases or decreases in today’s modern manufacturing facilities, these dashboards are digital and will create competition, between teams and provide the team’s performance level for all to see. They also provide management a means to see the state of the company daily.

 

No team wants to be the lowest performer. So, this creates more incentive to produce, improve quality, deliver on time, and avoid safety incidents. Employees and clients stop by, and look at their department production levels, and see if their rates are falling behind. If so, they can motivate their teams and get their performance back up to maximum output.

This also helps when trying to impress prospective clients. They can see how proficient your company is, and how reliable your deliveries are. It can help remove the fears typically experienced when looking for a quality supplier or partner. This is one reason why ISO certified companies are so popular. They took the time to document their process, instill discipline to follow those processes, and when they need improvement, their processes are updated. Metrics are maintained and performance levels are monitored daily. Dashboards typically provide a fast and easy way to communicate this information.

Dashboards created on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform have taken dashboards to a whole new level. Displaying metrics and analytics are still possible, but the 3DEXPERIENCE platform allows for much more than metrics and stats. The 3DEXPERIENCE platform dashboards brings data to life, by connecting people to not only view, but share and collaborate with one another on one platform.

 

Gone are the days of using disjointed software solutions that do not work seamlessly together. When you create your very own dashboard you can build it to your liking. The freedom to create a dashboard that is customized for your department, empowers leaders to take advantage of technology, be more efficient and helps frees them from their silos. Marketing Professionals, Production Managers, Accountants, Engineers, Designers, and Shipping personnel can all create their own custom dashboards that meets their unique requirements. They can even access 3D Viewers and review amazing designs, mark them up and collaborate with their internal and external stakeholders around the world, this can all be done from any device, from anywhere and at any time.

During this blog, I will show you how to easily create a dashboard, and customize it for your department, or your personal use. You can share your dashboard with others, or just use it as your main source to access everything you need, all on one platform. You can access as much, or as little information as needed to help you be more productive and help keep your teams moving forward with ever-expanding new technologies. Just like the apps on your cell phone, dashboards provide you easy access to more information than we have ever had before, with faster and more impressive results. Lets’ get started!!

How can I get access to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform and create my very own dashboard?

First, you must have access to a web browser. Many of them work well, I am partial to Google Chrome, but Firefox or other web browsers should work fine.

The next step is to log into the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. To gain access to the platform you must be invited by someone who already has access, or your company must purchase space on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. Your company administrator will invite you to their Dashboard, assign you the roles that are applicable to you and your department. If you have not been invited and you would like to gain access to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform visit our web site at:  https://www.tpm.com/ or contact your local SOLIDWORKS valued added reseller. https://www.solidworks.com/sw/purchase/varlocator.htm

Once you have an account just log in. You will be greeted by a welcome message.

 

How to create a new Dashboard.

There is an assortment of icons available at the top right of the welcome page. The Plus sign will provide a drop-down menu that will allow you to add a Tab at the top of this page or add a Dashboard, or a Story.

Click on the Dashboard option and the Create Dashboard window will appear. You have the option to create an empty dashboard or Create a dashboard from a pre-formatted template. Both options work well, and both can be customized. For this example, I will select Create Empty Dashboard and hit the blue Create button at the bottom of the window.

The left Pane window will open and reflect the New Dashboard as well as any other dashboards you may have access to. You have the option to relocate dashboards from the My Dashboards section into the Favorites Dashboards area for easy access. To do this just drag and drop the dashboard into the favorites area.

 

 

You are now in your new Dashboard!

A New Tab is automatically created. You can rename it by clicking on the New Tab text.

The Dashboard can also be renamed. To rename the Dashboard, select the downward arrow just to the right of the name and select Edit.  I will name this dashboard “Design and SWYM with TPM”. You have the option to enter a description as well. Hit OK to confirm the changes.

From here the rest is easy…

Now all I need to do is see what Roles and Apps are available to me. To do this, I must click on the 3DEXPERIENCE Logo. It is the round blue icon in the top left corner.

Click on the 3DEXPERIENCE Logo. The Logo will remain highlighted and display My Roles, My Favorite Apps, and all my Apps.

The roles have been purchased and granted to you will be shown on the left side of your screen. To see what apps are available under each role just click on the role and the apps provided under that role will be displayed.

For Example, if I click on 3D Creator this is what is available for this role:

 

 

 

 

 

How to add Apps to your Dashboard.

There are many roles available on this Dashboard. I will start with the Collaborative Business Innovator Role. Wow! Look at all the Apps that are provided. The first one I would like to add to my dashboard is the Web Page Reader. I will drag and drop it onto my dashboard on the right. Other favorites are 3DSWYM and 3DPlay. 3DPlay will allow me to view, edit and mark up files. A dashed outline appears as I drag the App to the right, I will drag and drop the Web Page Reader App into the dashed box. I can relocate it at any time.

 

Here I will enter my most frequently used web sites for quick and easy access. I will copy and paste the URL https://www.solidworks.com/ into the website field and hit the add button.

The web page is displayed and I can resize it by dragging the corner as desired.

I will drag another Web Page Reader onto my dashboard and place the URL Link into it and hit the add button and then close the Roles and Apps window by hitting the X on the top right of the left windowpane. I will hit Ctrl + Shift +B to hide my bookmarks. From here I can access these sites, log in and work on each of them as I see fit. You can choose any site you desire for quick and easy access.

We can create as many tabs as we like and add as many apps as we desire. Repeat this process and customize each tab as you see fit. When complete, you can invite others to share your Dashboard. Below are examples of additional tabs that can be created with different apps.

This is a tab where I added Quick Links App on the left and the Project Planning App on the right. Here I can assign Tasks and monitor their progress.

Here I added a tab with the xDesign App on the left and the 3DSpace App on the right. The 3DSpace app allows easy access to my files. I can maximize the xDesign window at any time and work on my project.

Below I added an App called 3DSWYM. This App allows me to collaborate with others and get access to a variety of communities. I have a variety of additional apps I can choose from to build my dashboard to my liking.

Lastly, I added an App called 3DSWYM. This App allows me to collaborate with others and get access to a variety of communities. I have a variety of additional apps I can choose from to build my dashboard to my liking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I can even add a tab to capture analytics and post live data and graphs, from a variety of sources with the NETVIBES App.

Now you know how to create a custom dashboard for your department.

You can share it with your team members or other stake holders within your organization. Just go to the drop-down arrow and select share. Follow the prompts and you are done.

 

Let us recap…

We obtained access to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, determined what roles and apps I had at my disposal, and created a new Dashboard.

If you would like to create your own custom dashboard, reach out to us and we can help you connect your team members to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform!  https://www.tpm.com/about-us/our-mission/

 

Warren McCray, Technical Solutions Consultant, TPM Inc.

Author information

TPM
TPM, Inc. is the Carolina’s largest 3D CAD provider and a leading technology company proud of its reputation of providing cutting-edge solutions to the engineering and design community for the past 40 years. Founded in 1973, TPM Inc. serves more than 3,000 customers across the Southeast each year. Inspired by our founder, Jerry Cooper, we are committed to offering our clients the best: 3D Design Software, 3D Printing and Scanning Options, Data and Document Management Solutions, Large-Format Graphics, Wide-Format Plotters and Office Equipment, and Reprographics.

The post How to Create My Very Own Dashboard On the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by TPM at August 31, 2020 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

How to Improve SOLIDWORKS Designs Even More with Structural FEA

The 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS Simulation portfolio provides a comprehensive structural analysis solution for evaluating how your product may behave in real life. Optimize your product to increase its performance or use simulation for guiding engineering decisions throughout the design process—all while saving the time and expense of building prototypes.

To participate in the simulation training class, just log on to MySolidWorks.com (subscription required). The class introduces the basics of the 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS simulation portfolio, especially structural FEA applications, and how they interact with SOLIDWORKS on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

Learn how to

  • Transfer a model from a SOLIDWORKS desktop onto the 3DEXPERIENCE platform
  •  Set up simulation studies in 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS
  •  Perform a simulation of a buckle using structural FEA
  •  Organize files on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform
  •  Present and share simulation results with others on the platform
  •  And much more …

 

Step by Step Guidance

The simulation Assistant allows you to set up structural simulations quickly and efficiently. The Assistant shows the progress of the simulation setup as well as any errors that may occur during the process. You choose whether to use the Assistant to drive the simulation setup or use it as a reference for when steps are completed. New users may find the step-by-step process helps to learn the application better.

Compare and Share

You can also compare simulation results across various cases and simulations. Quickly share them with co-workers and managers on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. Simulation helps you answer critical questions about your project, including

  •         Is my design overbuilt?
  •         How will physical forces affect its operation?
  •         Where can I optimize my design to make it stronger and lighter?

Image: Comparison of Von Mises stress results of two different column design alternatives

Take advantage of this training opportunity to learn more about the powerful simulation capabilities available in the 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS simulation portfolio, which enables you to easily work from home, at the office, or on the road. Feel free to contact your local reseller with any product-related questions.

Find more information about 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS Simulation here: https://www.solidworks.com/product/simuliaworks.

 

 

Author information

Nicolas Tillet
Nicolas Tillet
Product Portfolio Manager at DS SOLIDWORKS Corp.
Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS Simulation

The post How to Improve SOLIDWORKS Designs Even More with Structural FEA appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Nicolas Tillet at August 31, 2020 01:48 PM

The Javelin Blog

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Customer Adoption Program

Javelin can help you to deploy 3DEXPERIENCE® SOLIDWORKS® into your business environment quickly and successfully following the best-practices-driven implementation methodology at the heart of the Customer Success Startup and Adoption program.

Overview

The first step in utilizing 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS to get products to market faster and at lower cost is to choose the 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS offer that meets your organization’s requirements. After you have selected the right solution for your business, establishing an effective plan for immediate implementation is critically important to your long-term success. The 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Customer Success Startup and Adoption program offers pre-validated guidelines and tools for implementing 3DEXPERIENCE platform solutions.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Startup Program

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Adoption Program

Best practices driven implementation

The program’s industry-standard best practices enable your company to implement your platform solution smoothly and efficiently so you can realize the benefits of the 3DEXPERIENCE platform in the shortest amount of time.
The Customer Success program includes these steps:

  • Initial on-boarding
  • Platform setup
  • Configuring attributes
  • Creating and saving parts and assemblies
  • Uploading assemblies
  • Naming content
  • Searching your data
  • Exploring products
  • Creating and managing tasks
  • Pilot project kickoff
3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Implementation

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Implementation

Implement 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS in a matter of days

The Customer Success program can take as little as three days. Additional time may be required for planning, acquiring hardware, training and rolling out enhanced capabilities.

Collaboration Ready from Day One

Connect your people, data and processes in one place—the largest product development platform in the cloud—and leverage everyone’s knowledge and know how. Securely collaborate in real time with your entire business ecosystem, including team members, customers and suppliers, from any device.

Accelerate Return on your 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Investment

Follow the Customer Success program’s proven methodology to generate a fast return on investment (ROI) on your 3DEXPERIENCE platform purchase. The program is fully customizable so you can start realizing ROI immediately and add more functionality over time. Once you have the platform up and running, you can gain additional efficiencies through:

  • Standard Parts and Components
  • Design Configurations
  • Issue and route management
  • Change action management
  • And more…

Produce effective 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Implementation Plan

Javelin will work with you to help plan and coordinate the resources required for the successful use of the Customer Success program.

3DEXPERIENCE Implementation Plan

3DEXPERIENCE Implementation Plan

Interested in 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS?

Choose from the existing 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Offers and start collaborating on your product designs in the cloud with help from Javelin.

The post 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Customer Adoption Program appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at August 31, 2020 12:00 PM

August 28, 2020

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Silver Razor Haze [Best Links of the Week!]

I apologize for not publishing a Friday Smackdown in so long! What happened??W! Well, I took a little break over the summer and got carried away with the laziness. Do keep sending exciting and interesting things you see throughout the week and I’ll wrap it up with the best inspiration, art, music, photography, and more I’ve found as well. On to the smackdown.

Clouds of a silver razor haze settled over the timber’s edge. The strength of their small band was buffered with sticks and logs, hibiscus pools, and old stump wood stools. They could fasten the cords to its base, lift it to steady its legs, but it would take all the raw, liquid excess of these links.

Kamila Szutenberg – Absolutely massive scenes of jagged mountains, bustling space ports, cloudy sea skies and more.

3D Rooms – An illustration project from Amrit Pal Singh of small, cubicle rooms that can be used as backgrounds for computer or Zoom.

AnimeGAN – The output from an open-source program that turns images/video into various anime styles.

Reality Check – Google AR brings everything from dinosaurs to the Mona Lisa. Animals, Space, History, Art, and more right in your own home.

Input – Instagram follow of the week. Various forms of analog wonder for optimal sensory experience.

Big Sky – Like the beach? Even if you don’t, you may like these paintings by Krista Schumacher. From smooth and muted to bright and chunky.

LEGO + IKEA – It was only a matter of time wasn’t it? LEGO and IKEA join forces to bring four LEGO compatible boxes.

Bob Ross Monopoly – I’m torn. I mean, Bob Ross had a monopoly on landscape painting but building a cabin empire with Happy Bucks? Pre-order here.

KOSmusic – Fabulous recreations of 80’s TV show theme songs like, Chips, Airwolf, Knight Rider, and more.

Circle Guitar – that is really more of a step sequencer and guitar in one and an entirely interesting combo-instrument created by Anthony Dickens.

<script type="text/javascript"> amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "solid0a-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Deals We Love"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "5c4317507acdb4ffa21bfb2f06dc5347"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B07R3HYDVW,B07MFTD2YS,B00NNMB3KS,B07XT694Y4"; </script> <script src="http://z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>

Last Amen – If you hadn’t heard, Chegall Guvara is putting out a new studio album. Here they are live at Greenbelt in 1991.

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</figure>

The post Friday Smackdown: Silver Razor Haze [Best Links of the Week!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at August 28, 2020 08:45 PM

This Epic Coffee Grinder is Designed For The Outdoors

While I’m not much of a coffee drinker (the drink I’m holding in my picture is actually tea), I know some people can’t start the day without a good cup o’ Joe. Easy when you’re at home but, when outdoors, it can be challenging to brew a solid pot of coffee. So how can you elevate your outdoor coffee experience?

Great outdoor coffee is what VSSL JAVA (“Vessel Java”) specializes in. Instead of using instant coffee or pre-ground coffee, the JAVA allows you to hand grind your coffee beans to create an ideal cup of coffee outdoors or wherever you may be.

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</figure>

Ultimate Travel Coffee Grinder

The aircraft-grade aluminum body keeps the JAVA and your coffee from getting banged up while traversing the great outdoors, but it’s the parts which grind the coffee that really stand out:

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">VSSL JAVA</figure>

For instance, the handle which is used to attach the canister to your bag flips back for use as a hand grinder. You don’t have to dismantle it for use either, so you’re less likely to lose your grinder.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">VSSL JAVA</figure>

A snap dial inside the JAVA lets you customize your brew from coarse to fine. Once you’ve chosen from the 30 different types of grinds, a stainless steel burr grinder lets you make your blend with ease.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">VSSL JAVA</figure>

From adding your beans to sipping your coffee, coffee brewing with the JAVA should not take more than a minute. There’s also a quick release top which lets you easily pour in your beans, a grind latch which can be attached to the hand grinder for a better grip, and mini radial ball bearing sets to help evenly grind your beans.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">VSSL JAVA</figure>

The main driving force behind the VSSL JAVA was to be able to consistently create good coffee even while outdoors. Since the best coffee is made by grinding your own coffee beans, it made sense to create a portable hand grinder made from high quality materials.

With the number of coffee lovers on this planet, it comes as no surprise that the VSSL JAVA is already fully funded on Kickstarter. You don’t even have to be outdoors to use it, all you need is some beans and hot water and you’re ready to start grinding!

They’ve hit their $19,000 goal raising over $150,000 to date with plenty of time to go. Options start at $100 with delivery expected February 2021.

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post This Epic Coffee Grinder is Designed For The Outdoors appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 28, 2020 06:23 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

The Magic of a Reflection: Part II

This is the second part of a two-part blog that investigates the power of SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS Visualize to accurately model and render illusions created by mirrors. In the first part, we created the illusion of disappearance and in the second part we will see if we can create a hologram.

Part 2: A visible illusion

Since Visualize did SUCH a good job handling the mirror box illusion, I thought I would try something a bit trickier – a mirascope. I originally saw this illusion in a video of a Squirrel Obstacle Course and, since we have a coin shortage at the moment, I thought it would be appropriate to try and make a coin appear.

The concept behind a mirascope is fairly simple. All we need to do is model two identical parabolic mirrors (one with a hole on top at the vertex) such that the focal point of each mirror is the vertex of the other. The opening allows us to place a small object at the lower focal point and view it at the upper focal point – floating in space! I’ve created an illustration below for clarification.

To calculate the precise dimensions of the mirascope, we could use a formula to get to our answer, or we could get close, create a design table, and let the combined power of SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS Visualize do the rest of the work for us. I’ll let you guess which route I decided to take!

OK, so time to create a model! This was one of the easiest objects I’ve ever created – possibly in my life. All we have to do is sketch a cross-section of our mirascope, add a few dimensions to capture design intent, and complete a single revolve. I just started by modeling the top half, mirrored it down, and created a second revolve for the base, but I could have completed it all in one sketch. If we want to get fancy, we can add a couple of fillets, but functionally all that is needed is a single revolve and our design is complete. Below you can see what our original sketch looks like with the relevant dimensions applied.


The top hole was cut with a diameter of 1.5 inches and the base was added with an arbitrary radius of 2.5 inches just so that the mirascope can stand on its own.

After getting the basic geometry in place, I went ahead and applied a plastic black appearance to everything except for the inside parabolic faces. For the inside faces, I applied the Mirror (Appearances > Glass > Gloss > Mirror) appearance.

Finally, we need to model an object at the lower focal point that we want to make appear. For this, I chose a penny. Again, this is a simple revolve. I applied the Copper (Appearances > Metal > Copper > Cast Copper) appearance and I applied a Decal for extra flare.

To apply a new Decal, I first searched for an image. One trick I like to use here is to do a Google Image Search and select Tools > Color > Transparent. This will almost always give me a .png file with a transparent background, making it easy to apply to our part once we get into SOLIDWORKS.

After picking and saving an image, we jump back into SOLIDWORKS, head over to the Display Manager > View Decals, and right-click the background > Add Decal

 

This allows us to select the previously saved image from Browse… and we can simply specify Use decal image alpha channel under Mask Image to take advantage of the transparency already in the file.

Note: If we couldn’t find an image with a transparent background, we could have also selected Selective color mask under Mask Image to get rid of the background.

Finally, we go to the Mapping tab and select the top round face of the penny to apply the Decal.

At this point, we’re 95% done – there’s just one step left! Since we didn’t do the math, we need to give ourselves options by configuring the height of the mirascope. Once we’re in Visualize, we should be able to quickly pick the configuration that creates the best illusion. To do this, we can quickly double-click our model to bring up dimensions, Right-click the dimension corresponding to the height, and select Configure Dimension.

From here, we can add new configurations and new dimensions for these configurations. I added a few different options – each just a tenth of an inch from each other.

Modeling: Done! Here’s what it looks like in SOLIDWORKS so far.

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Now all we need to do is check our work and select a configuration in SOLIDWORKS Visualize. To do this, we first need to make sure we have the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Add-In enabled from Tools > Add-Ins > Visualize. Then we can select Export Advanced to jump directly into SOLIDWORKS Visualize and check our work.

After export, to check each configuration, all we need to do is jump over to SOLIDWORKS, activate the configuration we want to check, rebuild, save, and jump back to SOLIDWORKS Visualize. From here, we are prompted to update our model – Easy peasy!

Here’s our first try – the penny is not showing up! Oh no!

As we flip through our configurations, however, the penny slowly comes into view…

… until it is just right!

IT WORKS! I’m so incredibly impressed with SOLIDWORKS Visualize and the way it handles mirrors. Not only were we able to make items disappear with our mirror box, but we were also able to literally make a coin appear with our mirascope illusion. The best part? If someone goes to snatch your coin from the top of the mirascope they will be BAMBOOZLED and your precious coin will be safe!

Anyway, thanks for following along! I hope you enjoyed this mini-series as much as I enjoyed making it. Until next time, stay safe and have fun!

 

 

Content

The Magic of a Reflection: Part II Loretta Stiurca's avatar' Loretta Stiurca

Author information

Loretta Stiurca
Loretta Stiurca
Loretta is a mom, a wife, and an engineer. She is a CSWE and has been using SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS Electrical for more than 6 years. In her free time, she enjoys hiking with the puppy, playing Dungeons and Dragons, thinking up crazy inventions, learning magic tricks, juggling, making her baby girl laugh, and going on adventures.

The post The Magic of a Reflection: Part II appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Loretta Stiurca at August 28, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Solutions

3DEXPERIENCE WORKS includes ENOVIAworks which is a portfolio of cloud-based SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Apps that work seamlessly together and with SOLIDWORKS to provide data and product lifecycle management and collaboration capabilities.

Using ENOVIAworks for product design collaboration enables users to:

  • Securely access data from anywhere
  • Manage product designs and documents without leaving the desktop authoring application
  • Maintain revision control
  • Perform lifecycle operations
  • Navigate product structures
  • Manage projects
  • Automatically optimize activities and resources to meet key milestones and delivery dates.

The ENOVIAworks collaboration tools empower teams to instantly share data, collect feedback, iterate on designs and make informed decisions faster. There is no need for data translation, migration or additional infrastructure.

Unlike existing PDM/PLM systems, SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM solutions unlock design data for direct use in applications across disciplines resulting in higher user productivity and greater business agility.

Watch the following on-demand webinar below to learn how SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Solutions will accelerate your product design:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tRTHDR_N7s4?feature=oembed" title="Accelerate Product Design with Cloud-Based Collaboration - Webinar - SOLIDWORKS" width="500"></iframe>

SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM benefits for your business

Using the SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE Cloud-based PLM Apps will accelerate your business to leverage a cloud based data and lifecycle management solution. Some of the key benefits for a business include:

Improved productivity

Effective task management enables you to maximize efficiency and ensure that your projects complete on time. ENOVIAworks provides a simple yet powerful app that facilitates your organization of tasks. Easily create personal to-do-lists and team tasks. Assigning and notifying users is automated.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/aEvrP4UOc0Q?feature=oembed" title="Task Management for Individuals and Teams - SOLIDWORKS" width="500"></iframe>

Management of your projects

In this time of uncertainty and remote working mandates, imagine having immediate access to project teams, tasks, changes, communications, design reviews, and more, regardless of where your team members are physically located. Connect SOLIDWORKS data with specific tasks and assigned team members via a familiar, browser-based interface. Now, everyone can see how his or her tasks affect other deliverables.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4iqd5Fin59I?feature=oembed" title="Project Management on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform - SOLIDWORKS" width="500"></iframe>

Collaborate more effectively

Improve your team’s ability to collaborate by leveraging Communities on the 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS platform. Share ideas, organize their evolution, ask questions and share answers to quickly build a knowledge base that is available to everyone on your team. Helping to foster innovation that results in better products and higher sales

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PWGXF3DsjT4?feature=oembed" title="Creating Communities on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform - SOLIDWORKS" width="500"></iframe>

Reduced complexity

improve business agility by making the 3DEXPERIENCE platform your one stop shop for managing CAD and non-CAD data. Learn how you can release, revise, branch, move, and delete product data directly from your web browser with the Collaborative Lifecycle App:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Z47Ih6WMs_k?feature=oembed" title="Design Revisions, Branches and Ownership - SOLIDWORKS" width="500"></iframe>

SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Roles

ENOVIAWORKS is a portfolio of browser-based applications that cover the three fundamental phases of product development:

  • Plan: Leverage tasks, issues, and projects to create executable plans and ensure the right things are done at the right time by the right people
  • Develop: Benefit from a collaborative environment that manages cross-discipline design IP and web editing of structures outside CAD.
  • Release: Perform the final validation of product engineering definition using powerful markup and change management.

ENOVIAworks roles currently available include:

Collaborative Designer for SOLIDWORKS

Connect and reveal SOLIDWORKS Intellectual Property in ONE click. The connector enables the following features:

  • Visualize and explore multi-CAD product structures within a web-browser
  • Easily navigate product structures to visualize designs and related changes
  • Create web-based 3D digital mockups and conduct design reviews
  • Modify product designs under the governance of a change process
  • Implement design changes in accordance with specific product configurations
  • Measure and section 3D for quick analysis
  • Compare revision and duplication of products to highlight changed areas
  • Explore related objects and load specific products in the context of a full assembly

Learn More »

Collaborative Industry Innovator

A scalable, online environment for managing product design, multi-physics simulation and manufacturing process planning

  • Enable efficient team collaboration through secured concurrent access to data and lifecycle management.
  • One single source of truth for all your product content including multi CAD design data.
  • Enable hybrid data and model-based driven engineering as enabler of end to end digital continuity.
  • Natural support of collaborative 3D validation scenario in a hybrid CAD environment.
  • Easily organize, optimize, access and execute work through tasks.
  • Access and start navigate product digital mock-ups of large designs from any device.
  • Compliance to standard enterprise business processes (Change, Project, Quality)
  • Provides mobility and security via the Cloud.

Learn More »

Product Release Engineer

Manage the engineering definition of a product from early definition to the final validation and release to production in collaboration with multi-discipline designers

  • Simple and efficient multi-discipline product definition saves time while maximizing data reuse
  • Easy engineering responsibility assignment and tracking enables accelerated development process
  • Engineering item dashboard enables quick finding of engineering item(s) of interest
  • Built in 3D visualization and cross highlighting capabilities reduces design and engineering validation time and effort

Learn More »

Project Planner

Simple and assisted iterative planning, execution and monitoring for all business users

  • Define project scope, min-max duration, dependencies and milestones
  • Automatically schedule and optimize project to meet key milestones
  • Invite team members to collaborate with ad-hoc access rights
  • Keep up with the progress and work to be done from anywhere with real time notifications

Learn more » 

3D Product Architect

Quickly access and focus on selected 3D components to easily build in context design working session

  • Edit multi-CAD product structure mockup in a single context
  • Design and assemble existing multi-CAD with smart position recognition components
  • 3D Volume Query Product Filtering
  • Multi-CAD Product Structure composition
  • Visualize, explore and edit multi-CAD product structures within a web-browser
  • Easily navigate product structures to visualize designs and related changes
  • Create web-based 3D digital mockups and conduct design reviews
  • Modify product structures under the governance of a change process
  • Implement design changes in accordance with specific product configurations
  • Build mockup sessions to load into design through volume query
  • Measure and section 3D for quick analysis
  • Compare revisions and duplications of products to highlight changed areas
  • Explore related objects and load specific products in the context of a full assembly

Learn More »

Summary

SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM solutions are available and accessible anytime, anywhere from any device; offering flexibility and choice so that SOLIDWORKS teams can take advantage of the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

The post SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE PLM Solutions appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at August 28, 2020 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Nerding Out With GPUs, Visualize, and YouTube’s Linus Tech Tips

It’s summer and here in Pennsylvania, we’ve had some blazing hot days. And, in some of their recent videos, Linus Tech Tips has showcased blazing fast renderings while testing powerful GPUs using SOLIDWORKS Visualize.

No, I didn’t just write this article for the purpose of writing out that intro. But if I had, would you really blame me?

Our friends at Linus Tech Tips are back using SOLIDWORKS products to explore a topic I can assure you that SOLIDWORKS users like myself love to geek out over. Namely: GPUs! Last time we checked in with them on the SOLIDWORKS Blog, we talked about how Linus and SOLIDWORKS Champion Alex Clark were busy using SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation to perform transient analyses on cooling mods to an 8K camera.

This time, they’re using SOLIDWORKS Visualize – their go-to in this area – to test, at a side-by-side level, the relative power of several GPU configurations on different engineering laptops.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-TWj-biXpLo?start=228&amp;feature=oembed" title="This $10,000 laptop ISN'T overpriced..." width="1140"></iframe>

Here’s the video, started at the point where SOLIDWORKS Visualize is introduced prior to Alex performing a basic ‘race to rendering’ test, with three separate machines seated next to one another hosting three different NVIDIA GPUs.

If you’ve used SOLIDWORKS Visualize for its beautiful, lifelike raytracing rendering capabilities in the past, you know that there are many, many factors that can influence the speed at which an image (or an animation) renders for us. Factors may include: output image size, DPI, number of passes, etc.

Of course, another factor is the source media. In other words: what are you rendering?!

In the interest of performing a more uniform test, Alex equalized the source project and the settings within Visualize across the board. The source project in this case was a nifty ’69 Camaro, which is probably a fileset you’re used to if you’ve ever opened Visualize. It’s right on the home screen!

Here, you can see me using SOLIDWORKS Visualize Connected (incl. in the new 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Offers), connected to the cloud so that anyone in your company can store and access 3D data for renderings via the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. And hey, there’s that ’69 Camaro!

 

Spoiler alert if you haven’t watched the video embedded above yet: the fastest time to render was under 2 minutes! And with it doing 1000 passes for an image sized 2560×1440, that’s a pretty high fidelity output for a lifelike looking image that you’re good to go with for your next pitch deck or product catalog in not even a couple of minutes.

Think about how many things you can do in under 2 minutes. In terms of productivity, getting an amazing look at your products has to rank very high on this imaginary list.

Funny enough, this isn’t the first time Linus Tech Tips has used SOLIDWORKS products to test select GPUs. In fact, earlier this summer, the team leveraged this intensely awesome Millennium Falcon replica model (by Ryan Cole of GoEngineer!) for testing purposes.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dc766aW5OZo?start=384&amp;feature=oembed" title="A Wake-Up Call for Microsoft - Surface Book 3" width="1140"></iframe>

While these videos are hugely entertaining, I also want to note that there are many ways to ensure you’re working on a technically supported workstation configuration when it comes to SOLIDWORKS Visualize. One of the best ways is to check out this site, which contains recommended drivers for many popular cards from several manufacturers.

Stay cool, and stay rendering!

Author information

Sean O'Neill
I'm a Community and User Advocacy Manager here at SOLIDWORKS. As a longtime SOLIDWORKS user myself, I love meeting with users and hearing about all the interesting things they're doing in the SOLIDWORKS community!

The post Nerding Out With GPUs, Visualize, and YouTube’s Linus Tech Tips appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Sean O'Neill at August 28, 2020 12:00 PM

A Little Range Wouldn’t Hurt You

It has been a while since I’ve posted anything, and there’s a reason for that. Not a good one, really, but it’s a reason. I’ve been working on subdivision modeling.…

by matt at August 28, 2020 02:30 AM

August 27, 2020

SolidSmack

Origami Paddler Is A Foldable, Portable Kayak + Paddleboard

origami paddler

If you’ve ever tried to kayak before, you’ll know the real predators aren’t the ones you find in the water; they’re the ones hiding out in rental stores. Renting a kayak can cost you an arm and a leg, but what can you do? Even if you happen to have your own kayak, transporting it isn’t exactly easy.

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</figure>

The Foldable Kayak

The Origami Paddler by Tim Niemier isn’t cheap by any means (it costs a little less than $300), but it’s cheaper than many options, plus it doubles as a paddleboard and helps solve the problem of kayak transportation.

Instead of straping a bulky oblong watercraft to the roof of your vehicle, the Origami Paddler folds down into a nice, square suitcase-size blcok you can store in the trunk of your car. Once you reach the water, you unfold the 9-foot stand-up paddleboard and kayak to the disdain of onlooking kayak renters.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">origami paddler</figure>

This three-piece foldable kayak is made of recycled, eco-friendly materials and comes with some of the standard kayaking features. You have kick-up twin fins, stand-up paddleboarding footwells (those giant footprints in the middle of the craft), a collapsible seat, and a storage space for a collapsible paddle.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">origami paddler</figure>

When unfolded, the Origami Paddler measures 9 feet long and 32 inches wide. It holds up to 230 lbs too, so you won’t need a perfect beach body to take this baby out for a swim.

Collapsing the kayak reduces its measurements to 35.5 inches long, 32 inches wide, and 13.5 inches high. And the weight? The Origami Paddler weighs a total of 45 lbs. folded or unfolded (without any accessories).

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">origami paddler</figure>

The Origami Paddler has seen many iterations since the first version was introduced back in 2012. Some versions only allowed for stand-up paddleboarding (SUP) and were less sturdy. This newest version combines a full-fledged kayak with stand-up paddleboarding and is a heck of a lot more durable than before.

You can find more on this folding kayak on Kickstarter, where it has met the $25,000 funding goal, pushing past $3,000,000. The Kickstarter exclusive starts at $329 with a scheduled delivery of March 2021.

The post Origami Paddler Is A Foldable, Portable Kayak + Paddleboard appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 27, 2020 06:49 PM

Creality is Developing a Belt-Driven Desktop 3D Printer

creality-cr-30-belt-drive-3d-printer-00

It seems that Creality is developing a belt-driven 3D printer, and that has several implications.

Creality is well-known for producing several very popular and inexpensive desktop 3D printers that have gained lasting places in the community. The CR-10 was perhaps their first big hit, followed by the immensely successful Ender 3. Most recently they updated that machine with the Ender 3 V2, which seems destined for similar successes.

Now the company is leaking information about an entirely new 3D printer with a radically different design. The apparently upcoming CR-30 differs from previous models in that it uses a belt-driven design.

Belt-Driven 3D Printing

The concept of belt-driven 3D printing is not entirely new; it has been pursued by a couple of companies in the past few years. Specifically I’d point to Blackbelt, White Knight, Robot Factory, PowerBelt3D, Printrbot (when they were still active), and even MakerBot years ago.

The idea here is that instead of building the object vertically as is typically done in almost every 3D printer, instead the building is done on an angle while the bed shifts. This shifting bed is achieved by using a conveyor belt that slowly turns while printing takes place.

There are a number of very interesting properties that come from this design.

First, it allows continuous 3D printing. As the belt moves, it deposits completed objects in a catch basket at the end of the conveyor. The machine can produce objects, identical or different, as long as there is filament available. Essentially it turns the 3D printer into a small continuous manufacturing device.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Oversized 3D print made on the CR-30 [Source: Creality]</figcaption></figure>

The second capability is that large objects can be 3D printed. While most 3D printers are limited to a fixed print volume, a belt-driven 3D printer can, in theory, print a very, very long object, as long as filament is supplied and someone or something can support the lengthy object peeling off the belt.

Creality CR-30

Now Creality is set to join the belt-club with the upcoming introduction of the new CR-30. There isn’t a lot of information about this device, as it hasn’t yet been released. However, Creality has published a short video showing a prototype device in operation, and it appears to work well. data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==

In the video Creality states some of the CR-30’s specifications, at least for this prototype:

  • Marlin firmware
  • 0.200mm layer height
  • 0.4mm nozzle diameter
  • Print speed of 40mm/second

The print samples shown in the video look pretty good, too.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Print sample made on the CR-30 [Source: Creality]</figcaption></figure>

From my inspection of the video, we can further say about the CR-30:

  • Build volume close to or over 200mm x 250mm x infinity
  • Single extruder, Bowden-style
  • Possible ability to hold larger-sized spools
  • Rigid pyramidal frame design
  • Filament-out sensor
  • Blade to peel off sticky parts from the bed
  • What appears to be knobs for easy tightening of the main belt-bed

This looks like a very interesting machine, and perhaps the first belt-driven 3D printer from an Asian manufacturer that could appear in the West.

We don’t yet know pricing, availability dates or much else about this mysterious machine.

Creality CR-30 Implications

There are some implications here.

First, it’s likely Creality will offer the CR-30 at a very good price, as they have always done for all of their products. This could bode ill for other belt-driven 3D printer manufacturers whose products carry premium pricing.

Secondly, this could popularize the concept of small-scale manufacturing in a way previously unattainable for anyone. Most 3D printers require human intervention between prints, but a belt system does not. I’m not sure what types of business models could result from this, but they will certainly be interesting.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Creality is Developing a Belt-Driven Desktop 3D Printer appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at August 27, 2020 06:36 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Changes in SOLIDWORKS 2020 SP3

SOLIDWORKS service pack releases contain critical fixes and enhancements to deliver a better user experience.  You may not immediately be aware of subtle changes so we’ve listed some of our favourites here:

User Interface

 

Help Menu

Some of you may have noticed that the user interface looked slightly different when you first opened SOLIDWORKS 2020 SP3, and it has. One commonly used button that has relocated is the Help menu.

In previous versions of SOLIDWORKS, many of us would have been familiar with accessing the Help menu from the menu bar alongside File, View, Tools, etc. However, we could also have accessed it by clicking the small arrow to the right of the Online Help button.

In SP3, the Help Menu and the Online Help buttons have now been consolidated into one. So, if you’ve been looking to manage your licenses or check your serial number, but found yourself wondering where the Help menu had disappeared to, look no further than the circled question mark in the top right of your screen.

Quick Access Tools

Another area of the user interface that has had a bit of a makeover is the quick access tools. These tools would normally appear in the menu bar, if you have upgraded from an existing version of SOLIDWORKS, they will still be there.

 

If, however, you have a fresh install of SP3, you will now find these tools in the Command Manager.

If you do have a fresh install of SP3 and would like your quick access tools back in the old spot, or if you would like to try out the new location, you can right-click anywhere in the Command Manager, click Customize, and choose between the two options shown below.

Release Notes

Below we have some selections from the release notes for SOLIDWORKS 2020 SP3.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation

  • Simulation data sensors are enhanced to track strain component results. You can track any strain component available in strain result plots (elemental values).

SOLIDWORKS Visualize

  • A new option, Allow denoiser from pass, in Tools > Options > 3D Viewport > Denoiser, lets you specify at what pass your scene starts using the Denoiser.
  • Added functionality to support the 3DEXPERIENCE Connector for Visualize when it becomes available on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.
  • Resolved a problem for general instability of the Queue application.
  • Added support for sorting MDL appearances in Palette.

SOLIDWORKS Plastics

  • New Multi-Material Overmolding Injection Process
    • A new multi-material overmolding injection process is available for parts you design with two-shot or multi-shot overmolding injections processes. When creating a new Plastics study, for Injection Process, select Multi Material Overmolding.
    • Within one injection cycle, you can inject sequentially a maximum of 6 polymer materials into the various cavities of your multi-material overmolding design (one material per cavity).
  • Updates for the Plastics Material Library
    • Added new material grades from SABIC Innovative Plastics and Asahi Kasei Plastics North America.
    • Reclassified a Chevron Phillips grade from HDPE to MDPE.
    • Renamed grades from Trinseo (formerly Dow Chemical and Dow Chemical Europe).
    • Removed obsolete grades from Trinseo and RadiciGroup.
    • Removed duplicate grade Generic PET+30%GF.

Click here to see the release notes in full.

Fixed SPRs

There is also a vast number of SPRs that have been fixed for SOLIDWORKS 2020 SP3. The full list of fixed SPRs can be found here, where you can search and filter to find what you’re looking for.

***

Scott Hope is an Applications Engineer at TMS CADCentre, a SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller in Scotland.

You can read more from Scott on the TMS CADCentre blog

Author information

TMS CADCentre
TMS CADCentre is a SOLIDWORKS Reseller based in Scotland providing CAD Design Software, analysis software & product data management software. Founded in 1981, TMS CADCentre is the only UK SOLIDWORKS Reseller based and funded within Scotland and have been providing SOLIDWORKS software, training and support since 1996 when the product was first launched in the UK.

The post Changes in SOLIDWORKS 2020 SP3 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by TMS CADCentre at August 27, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Using 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Software for Industrial Design

Growing your company’s market share is inextricably linked to product innovation and a strong brand identity, which requires the adoption of modern industrial design.

In an increasingly competitive global market, product development companies need flexible industrial design tools that allows you to express your creativity, talent, and passion, as well as synchronize design communication with customers, suppliers, and engineering in a collaborative, interactive way to accelerate time-to-market and build effective product differentiation.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS software provides the visual, collaborative, and social-enabled design environment that today’s industrial designers need to develop innovative, distinctive concepts which seamlessly integrate with downstream product development processes and incorporate greater input from key product development partners.

Take a look at 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS below:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/lBNHPwZIcRg?feature=oembed" title="First Look 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS" width="500"></iframe>

Designed for Industrial Designers

How will an integrated, collaborative design platform help you improve your performance as an industrial designer? By facilitating best practices for industrial design and enhancing the overall value, impact, and contribution of industrial design to the product development and manufacturing enterprise.

Industrial design does not take place in a vacuum, nor is it relegated merely to the initial stages of product development. To be successful, industrial design needs to be threaded throughout the three primary pillars of product development:

  • Product Planning and Strategy
  • Design and Engineering
  • Prototyping and Tooling

Industrial design plays a vital role throughout each of these stages, with the ultimate goal of carrying a design’s look, feel, and personality all the way to market. That’s the common characteristic of good design practices: the ability to create and maintain a product’s design aesthetics, brand identify, and market differentiation throughout the entire development process—from initial concept development through production preparation—in an integrated fashion, precluding rework and duplicated effort.

Planning and Strategy

The responsibility for transforming an amorphous product idea into a tangible design concept for further development rests with you, the industrial designer. In order for you to create design concepts that spark an emotional response from consumers, convey a consistent brand identify, provide solutions to actual customer needs, and meet engineering and manufacturing requirements, you need to obtain as much insight into the potential product’s use, consumers, and market as you can. The following best practices help industrial designers synthesize consumer, product, and market intelligence into workable ideas, so you can tap your creativity to produce compelling design concepts.

  • Analyze Market Research
  • Define Product Scope
  • Establish Design Parameters
  • Create Look and Feel – Brand Identity
  • Develop Concept Sketches
  • Produce Concept Images
3DEXPERIENCE Concept and Collaboration

3DEXPERIENCE Concept and Collaboration

Design and Engineering

Once you’ve created a range of possible industrial design concepts, it’s time to select one particular approach for further development and engineering as a manufactured product. While some may believe that the hand-off of an industrial design concept to mechanical designers and engineers constitutes the end of industrial design—and some product development organizations operate this way—design continues to have a role to play in ensuring that design modifications required to meet performance and manufacturing requirements do not obscure or ruin industrial design aesthetics. The following best practices allow industrial designers to continue to make critically important contributions to product development and engineering, particularly when integrated, social-connected solutions facilitate iterations with mechanical designers and engineers.

  • Create Surface Geometry
  • Apply Surface Geometry to 3D Solid Model
  • Conduct Design Reviews
  • Address Performance/Manufacturability Issues
3DEXPERIENCE Surface Model

3DEXPERIENCE Sub-d Surface Model

Prototyping and Tooling

After completion of the mechanical design and engineering of a product, industrial design continues to serve an important purpose during production planning prior to manufacturing. Fully appreciating industrial design aesthetics—accounting for both the tactile response and intangible aspects of an actual 3D shape—usually requires the production of an actual physical prototype. Evaluations of rapid prototypes, as well as manufacturability issues, often result in the need for design modifications, which can also affect changes to the original design concept. The following best practices enable industrial designers to continue to maintain design aesthetics all the way through manufacturing. By using an integrated design package, changes required as a result of prototyping and/or manufacturability concerns can be made more quickly, because you won’t have to start over and can output optimized design concepts in formats that support rapid prototyping, tooling development, and actual production.

  • Rapid Prototyping
  • Output Production Data (BOMs, Quality Control Documentation)
  • Tooling Design

With an integrated, social-enabled design solution, you can more efficiently perform these best practices and maintain the industrial design elements that elicit emotional responses from consumers, build product satisfaction, and generate brand loyalty.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Output Design

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Output Design

Downstream design

In addition to utilizing design tools that help you balance the interplay of form, scale, and feel, SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE software lets you collaborate with downstream functions in an integrated manner, which facilitates refinement of initial ideas into viable product concepts by outputting industrial design data in a format that has utility for downstream design, engineering, and manufacturing systems.

The post Using 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Software for Industrial Design appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at August 27, 2020 12:00 PM

August 26, 2020

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Optimize Your Blade Design

What a year it’s been! Kids are running around with boxes on their heads and writing on walls. Great White sharks are confusing us for seals at an alarming rate, and we now are storing large quantities of fertilizer in Tupperware…..oh, and did I mention a virus?

Here at TPM, it seems our engineering challenges of 2020 have been just as mind boggling as the rest of the events in the world. Take for instance, Composite Airfoil Blades. They perform one task. They move fluid molecules from point A to point B, while capturing and directing the energy along the way. As engineers, we must do this as efficiently as possible.

To calculate all the inducible factors that go into this in a single study would be maddening! AF (Axial Force), Cd (Drag), Cl (Lift), and all the other rotational forces that occur. Recall, the space shape of an airfoil is a complex three-dimensional object.

To achieve this in today’s high-performance turbine/propeller designs, we have adopted use of Blade Element & Moment Theory. This “2D” approach allows me to optimize the span wise 3D shape by dividing the blade into smaller sections, or elements along the span of the airfoil. Chord Length (C), and twist (Angle of Attack or Alpha), are in turn calculated at each element or section. This is then transposed to be used in calculating the energy efficiency coefficient for that particular element. This can be accomplished in many programs, such as matlab, etc. See below Figures 1&2: Mathematical Modeling & Explanation of Terms.

 

Figure 1

 

Figure 2

 

In preparation for importing this data into SOLIDWORKS, some formatting is required. Remember, we now have a bunch of discrete two-dimensional points that are present in any NACA airfoil. I will typically run these elements through a coordinate transformation to generate the “Z” or 3D discrete points locations. This is then exported through .txt file and imported into SOLIDWORKS for further refinement and analysis. See Figures 3&4: Raw Data. See Figure 5: Displacement Distribution and Figure 6: Transpose Data.

 

Figure 3

 

Figure 4

 

Figure 5 

 

 

Figure 6

 

Now that the pre-processing has been accomplished, we can begin to utilize the SOLIDWORKS Simulation suite to further understand our conceptual design. For this airfoil, we were interested in capturing the pressure profile as seen on the leading edge and trailing surfaces. We went about setting up our goals and environment in SOLIDWORKS Flow. See Figure 7: Test Parameters.

Figure 7

 

As with any Simulation study, I would approach the results with the question “Why does this make sense?” Interrogate the surface quality, look for weak points in your meshing and be sure to understand what the colors are telling you. Many times, I will confirm results simply by looking at other types of plots. For instance, does temperature, velocity and pressure coincide with each other? In this example I have an Iso plot combined with pressure gradients. See Figure 8: SOLIDWORKS CFD.

Figure 8

 

As I mentioned earlier, this airfoil may work, but is it the best design? Further refinement is usually required. However, I now have a deep understanding of how the blade reacts to the air. I can now make small changes to my blade element parameters in Matlab and repeat the process. When I begin to diverge from my goals, I take a step back, and will most likely utilize the last iteration. Following this workflow can provide a quick, reliable means to designing not only a blade that works, but a shape that is extremely efficient, suitable for its environment and will last for years…unless fatigue gets you…but that’s another blog post!

In conclusion and slightly off topic, I want to give all my American manufacturing buddies a pat on the back. During an unprecedented time, manufacturing never wavered. We kept creating and building no matter what obstacle we ran into (with very little complaining). You all…. are a very impressive group of individuals indeed! Please let us know here at TPM how we can help you achieve your goals!

 

By: Rob Stoklosa, Technical Solutions Consultant, TPM Inc.

Author information

TPM
TPM

The post Optimize Your Blade Design appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by TPM at August 26, 2020 06:15 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS Certification Program Q&A

The SOLIDWORKS Certification program has been in existence since 1998 when we first introduced the CSWP exam – Certified SOLIDWORKS Professional. Today, it is a worldwide-recognized certification program used as an industry benchmark to measure your knowledge and competency with SOLIDWORKS software. It consists of over 20 exams available to users and students around the globe. In this blog, we answer the most frequently asked questions about the SOLIDWORKS Certification Program.

Q: What is the value of being SOLIDWORKS Certified?

A: If you are looking for a job, being SOLIDWORKS certified helps you stand out from the crowd and improves your chances of getting in the door, and getting that job interview. If you are already employed, it is a great way to demonstrate your willingness to learn more, to be more productive at your job, and showcase your skillset. For students, SOLIDWORKS Certification proves their skills, and makes them more marketable once they graduate.

Q: I am a student, how can I get certified?

A: If your school is a part of the Academic Certification Provider Program, you may be able to take some exams for free. The school needs to be on active subscription and have the minimum of 60 SOLIDWORKS licenses, which varies per region. If your school is not an Academic Certification Provider, you can purchase a student edition of SOLIDWORKS at solidworks.com/StudentStore. The student edition comes with a one-year term license, and certification vouchers for CSWA and CSWP. You also get free access to my.solidworks.com. New this year – you receive one year of free access to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

Q: Do certificates expire?

A: No, there is no official expiration date for SOLIDWORKS certificates for customers and students. However, updated versions of the exams become available as the software gets upgraded.

Q: How and where can I take a certification exam?

A: You can purchase any exam you’d like to take via our web store on solidworks.com/certification. All you need is a PC-based computer with internet connection, SOLIDWORKS software (2017 or newer) and an exam voucher purchased online. If you are a student, you can get a free certification voucher from your school, if the school is an Academic Certification Provider, on active subscription, and meets minimum license requirements. Every year, we host a certification day at our annual 3DEXPERIENCE World event, where hundreds of users also have an ability to take exams.

Q: How much does a certification exam cost?

A: The price varies depending on which exam you would like to take. All the pricing is available in our web store.

Q: How can I take a certification exam for free?

A: Stay tuned for social promotions on our social media channels – Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and our blog. You can also follow our certification program manager @MikePuckett on Twitter to stay up to date. By attending conferences like 3DEXPERIENCE World, and other partner events like Solid Professor Virtual Summit, you can get CSWA and CSWP vouchers in your digital swag bag. Sometimes we also run promotions at SOLIDWORKS user groups. Being actively engaged with our community is where opportunities for free exams come from. If you are a customer on active subscription, for every seat of SOLIDWORKS you can receive vouchers for some of our certification exams. Vouchers can be created twice a year – from January 1st through June 30th and then from July 1st through December 31st.  Once created, the vouchers remain valid for 180 from the date of creation. So if you have 20 seats of SOLIDWORKS, you can get up to 40 redemptions in a year. Learn more at solidworks.com/SubscriptionExamOffer. Finally, if you are a student, you may get a free certification from your school.

Q: How to best prepare for taking an exam? What preparation resources are available?

A: We have training courses for every exam except expert on my.solidworks.com. Solid Professor is our partner who also has a lot of content on SOLIDWORKS Certifications. We are starting to collaborate with some YouTube creators for approved certification exam prep content.

Q: How many attempts do I have to re-take the exam if I failed it the first time? Is there a waiting period before I can re-take the exam?

A: The number of attempts to re-take an exam is not limited. However, there is a 14-day waiting period before you can re-take an exam after a failed attempt for all of our exams except for the Expert level. There is a 90-day waiting period for Expert-level exams.

Q: Are there prerequisites for taking any of the exams?

A: There are no prerequisites for taking any of the Associate or Professional level exams. For Mechanical Design Expert (CSWE-MD) you need to pass CSWP, as well as a number of Advanced Professional level exams. For the Simulation Expert (CSWE-SIM) You also need to pass some additional exams.  Please visit the website for current details.

Watch the replay of the SOLIDWORKS Live event about our certification program to get more information:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Wn1cmFfmvHw?feature=oembed" title="SOLIDWORKS Certification Program - SOLIDWORKS Live" width="1140"></iframe>

To learn more about our certification program and browse the exam catalog, please visit solidworks.com/certification. If you have already taken an exam and need to print out a certificate, please visit 3dexperience.virtualtester.com

 

 

Author information

Olga Bai
Olga Bai
Olga Bai is a Digital Marketing Manager at SOLIDWORKS in charge of the brand’s social media channels and other digital initiatives.

The post SOLIDWORKS Certification Program Q&A appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Olga Bai at August 26, 2020 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to run SOLIDWORKS on a Mac

How to run SOLIDWORKS on a Mac? This is a question we receive on a regular basis and while not impossible it was a challenge in the past to get it running on a Mac. But with the new 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS Design Roles, SOLIDWORKS 3D Creator for mechanical design, and SOLIDWORKS 3D Sculptor for industrial design, you can now design your products on a Mac via your web browser.

That is probably the biggest advantage with the 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Cloud-based Apps…you just need a web browser (with a decent internet connection), allowing you to design anywhere and on any device.

Confused about Platform, Roles, and Apps? Have a look at this 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS post for an explanation of the new design roles and what all these terms mean »

SOLIDWORKS Mac Requirements

Using a SOLIDWORKS App (such as xDesign) on a Mac is the same as a PC. The only requirement is that you run the App in a Mac web browser, Google Chrome is probably the best for performance. The user interface, look, and feel, is exactly the same as the PC version, you just happen to be working on a Mac.

SOLIDWORKS on a Mac

SOLIDWORKS 3D Creator Role with xDesign App on a Mac

SOLIDWORKS Design Roles/Apps to choose from for your Mac

3DEXPERIENCE WORKS is expanding and new roles/apps are being added all the time. At this time there are four distinct design roles to choose from depending on what type of product design you want to create on your Mac:

  • SOLIDWORKS 3D Creator, which provides access to a parametric modeling app known as SOLIDWORKS xDesign.
  • SOLIDWORKS 3D Sculptor, which provides access to a surfacing sub-d modeling app known as SOLIDWORKS xShape.
  • SOLIDWORKS Drafter, enables you to quickly create and detail 2D drawings, and communicate how your design must be manufactured.
  • SOLIDWORKS 3D SheetMetal Creator is an intuitive, browser-based solution that offers associative parametric sheet metal design capabilities to build components, assemblies and enclosures.
SOLIDWORKS Mac Design App

SOLIDWORKS Mac Design App

Editing and sharing with users on different devices

In a design environment where you are working with other people in your company they could use a PC or a Mac and be able to access your model (.sldxml) and make changes using a SOLIDWORKS App. Working between different devices, PCs, Macs, is seamless as you save your models to the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform. You don’t have to worry about file extensions, or file types as the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform takes care of all that for you making it a pain free experience (in 3D!).

But if required you can share a model as IGES or STEP for other 3D apps such as Autodesk Fusion 360 or OnShape, the SOLIDWORKS Design Roles/Apps have export capabilities as shown in the screenshot below. But if everyone in your company is using 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS then you won’t need to worry about that.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Export Options

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Export Options

Sharing with Connected SOLIDWORKS Desktop PC users

Users on a PC that are running 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS (the latest desktop version of SOLIDWORKS that is connected to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform) would be able to access your model and use it as reference for assemblies, or build on it by applying features etc. But the desktop version of SOLIDWORKS and the cloud apps are not fully compatible at this time.

Connected SOLIDWORKS desktop user on a PC

Connected SOLIDWORKS desktop user on a PC

Are you interested in running SOLIDWORKS on a Mac?

If you are a Mac user and want SOLIDWORKS cloud design tools then please contact us or take a look at 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS.

Also if you have the traditional desktop version of SOLIDWORKS (old and new releases) and want to run them on the cloud then take a look at our latest SOLIDWORKS Cloud services.

The post How to run SOLIDWORKS on a Mac appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at August 26, 2020 12:00 PM

August 25, 2020

The Javelin Blog

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by Rod Mackay at August 25, 2020 08:40 PM

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PWGXF3DsjT4?feature=oembed" title="Creating Communities on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform - SOLIDWORKS" width="500"></iframe>

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by Rod Mackay at August 25, 2020 08:37 PM

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/aEvrP4UOc0Q?feature=oembed" title="Task Management for Individuals and Teams - SOLIDWORKS" width="500"></iframe>

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by Rod Mackay at August 25, 2020 08:29 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools: Amprobe Battery Tester [Must Have]

Best Battery Tester

There are a handful of tools I’d put in the absolute must-have category. One of those is a battery tester. I’ve had the Amprobe BAT-200 Battery Tester for the last seven years and it has saved its meager cost in time and batteries saved.

If you’re a parent or someone who goes through batteries and have a lot of different types of batteries flowing through the home, a single tester that takes them all on and doesn’t require another battery or electricity to operate is essential. And this best part, it’s good quality and CHEAP.

Amprobe Battery Tester – $5.45

Admittedly, I wasn’t expecting much from such a inexpensive gadget but realizing that we’ve had it for seven years now and still performs like new makes it completely worth every penny.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

Amprobe Battery Tester Features:

  • Easy-to-read color-coded display: “Good”, “Low”, “Replace/Recharge” indicators
  • Test standard and rechargeable batteries: 9V, AA, AAA, C, D, 1.5V Button Type
  • Compact and ergonomic design
  • No batteries required to operate

Have a cool tool you love and think should be featured? Contact us here to share it with us.

This post features affiliate links that help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

The post Cool Tools: Amprobe Battery Tester [Must Have] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at August 25, 2020 06:55 PM

The Javelin Blog

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by Rod Mackay at August 25, 2020 05:43 PM

SolidSmack

Attach a DSLR Lens to a Game Boy Camera With This 3D Printed Mod

gameboy camera mod

While most people remember the Nintendo Game Boy as one of the first portable game devices, they tend to forget the number of peripherals you could attach to it: a modded backlight to illuminate the screen, a Game Link Cable to connect two or more Game Boys together, the list of accessories goes on and on.

Possibly one of the oddest attachments of the original Game Boy is its officially licensed camera. Compatible with all versions of the Game Boy excluding the Game Boy Micro, this 128×128 pixel camera shot greyscale photo you could edit and print using thermal paper.

The camera was used to print selfies or drawings created using the Game Boy Camera’s attached software. While it may have been ahead of its time back in 1998, the photographs look about like QR codes you see around today. But that won’t stop the mods.

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</figure>

To help bring the Game Boy Camera into the 21st century, Sam McKenzie 3D printed a mod that allows the Game Boy Camera to be attached to a modern DLSR lens. Exhibit A:

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">gameboy camera mod</figure>

The mod in question is made by one Andreas Gack (see more shots on his Instagram). With it, the original Game Boy Camera is upgraded to shoot retro photos with a 70-200mm lens. This results in an estimated focal length of 3,000 mm and a crop factor of 7.64.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">gameboy camera mod</figure>

Using Gack’s blueprints, McKenzie 3D printed the camera mod and used it to take some photos. Once taken, they were printed onto a canvas and, I think you’ll agree, would stand out on any wall. The image quality hasn’t changed but the result has an archival, old-school beauty to it that you would need five Photoshop filters and a bottle of sulfuric acid to achieve today.  

If you happen to still have your old Game Boy and Camera laying around, you can download Gack’s mod after downloading the model on Thingiverse.

The post Attach a DSLR Lens to a Game Boy Camera With This 3D Printed Mod appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 25, 2020 04:24 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Cool Robots That Inspire Future Engineers

BattleBots’ Team Witch Doctor is a fan favorite, thanks to a robot with personality and a team with pizzazz that encourages interest in engineering. Team leaders Andrea and Michael Gellatly have built and competed with robots for about 17 years.

Andrea spearheads the team’s initiatives to inspire future engineers. Team Witch Doctor partnered with BattleBots to publish B is for BattleBots, a book designed to inspire the next generation of robotics engineers. In addition, in June 2020 the team began publishing Witch Doctor magazine via its website, and it has created a series of how-to videos for beginners on building small robots that is accessible through MakeMIA Makerspace.

Faced with a short development cycle for the first season of BattleBots, the natural choice was to use familiar design and engineering tools. Michael uses SOLIDWORKS® in his engineering work, and Andrea has used SOLIDWORKS 3D design tools since high school. “SOLIDWORKS is really good for designing parts and assemblies, and conducting engineering assessments of a design,” Michael stresses.

Iterating 20 Versions While Working Remotely  

SOLIDWORKS solutions via its team sponsorship from Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS enable the eight-member Team Witch Doctor to re-design and rebuild new, improved versions of their robot for each BattleBots season, working collaboratively and iteratively to improve performance.

“Mike works on the overall design and other team members contribute their specific part of the robot,” Andrea points out. “We work remotely, so we share our screen and conduct a bunch of design reviews to continually refine our design.”

“We improve our robot every year,” Michael adds. “For example, we used SOLIDWORKS multi-body sheet-metal tools to develop the rib cage, a signature Witch Doctor trait. We came up with roughly 20 ways to do the ribs before settling on our final version. With SOLIDWORKS, we can iterate quickly and continue to iterate until our application is accepted and it’s time to build the robot.” The process definitely works, as Team Witch Doctor made it to the final match in the 2019 BattleBots competition.

Balancing Strength, Stiffness, and Weight with Topology Studies

To avoid being overweight and having to sacrifice pieces after arriving at the competition as they did last season, Team Witch Doctor plans to use topology optimization on the next version of its robot to better balance the relationships between weight, strength, and stiffness. “With SOLIDWORKS Simulation topology optimization tools, we learn where we can cut material and weight that not only doesn’t sacrifice strength and stiffness but actually improves both. We’ve cut five pounds from our current design while strengthening the robot in key areas,” says Michael.

Before topology optimization

After topology optimization

In addition to keen attention to performance, Team Witch Doctor uses SOLIDWORKS tools to create aesthetic designs with a distinct personality, which they believe help expand support among the public for competitive robotics, build excitement around the team, and inspire young people to pursue careers in robotics engineering.

To learn more about SOLIWORKS 3D CAD, Simulation, or SOLIDWORKS Visualize, contact your local reseller.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Cool Robots That Inspire Future Engineers appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at August 25, 2020 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to Change Units in SOLIDWORKS

SOLIDWORKS Change Units is a common term that is searched for on our blog, so here is a quick tech tip on three different methods of changing your units in a SOLIDWORKS Part Document:

Using the Unit Quick Select

If you currently have a Part file open and want to quickly change system units then you can easily pick the Quick Select Unit option in the bottom right-hand corner of the status bar:

SOLIDWORKS Change Units

SOLIDWORKS Change Units

Select the units you want to be applied to the document, Metric MKS/CGS/MMGS or English IPS.

If you want to access the full unit settings in document properties then select Edit Document Units… and the dialog box will be displayed:

SOLIDWORKS Document Units

SOLIDWORKS Document Units

Setting default units in a Part Template

If you would like to have the selected units applied to new documents that you create then you simply create a part template with the required units already set:

  1. Start a New Part using the default Part Template
  2. Set the required units using the method above
  3. Save the part document as a template:
    1. Select File > Save As
    2. Choose Part Templates (*.prtdot) as the save as type
    3. When the file type is chosen SOLIDWORKS will select your default template location (C:\ProgramData\SOLIDWORKS\templates) but you can chose another location if you like
    4. Enter a file name such as IPS Part
    5. Select Save
Save As SOLIDWORKS Part Template

Save As SOLIDWORKS Part Template

NOTE: You could overwrite the default Part.PRTDOT template if you are going to be using those units all the time in your template

Using the Part Template

To use your newly created part template you just need to pick it from the New SOLIDWORKS document dialog:

  1. Select File > New
  2. Select the Advanced button in the bottom left-hand corner of the template to access a full list of templates
  3. Select your new template and pick OK
Select Part Template

Select Part Template

NOTE: If you don’t see your part template listed because you saved it to a different file location than the default then just add the file location to SOLIDWORKS options so it can be found: Tools > Options > File Locations, select Add and pick the file location where you saved the template.

SOLIDWORKS Change Units on the fly

Within the SOLIDWORKS interface you can easily enter values that are different to the current document units when entering dimensions or adding values in a Property Manager. For instance If you wanted to enter a dimension in millimeters when your units are currently set to inches then SOLIDWORKS will allow you to do that without having to change the document units.

For example if I am editing a sketch and I want to apply a size of 200mm instead of 7.87in I would just type 200 in the dimension box and then select the units option below it to pick the required units:

Unit dimension selection

Unit dimension selection

Alternatively I can just enter 200mm and hit return and the dimension will be applied without me having to pick the units from the menu.

Learn more in an Essentials course

These essential SOLIDWORKS tips and tricks are covered in our SOLIDWORKS Essentials course which you can take live online. Check our schedule for upcoming online classes »

The post How to Change Units in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at August 25, 2020 12:00 PM

August 24, 2020

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Back to the Future with SOLIDWORKS Electrical Snapshots

 

The 80’s blockbuster Back to the Future has stood the test of time (pun intended). And as the years have passed, it has also had some uncanny predictions, including the Cubs World Series (Why couldn’t Spielberg have predicted MY favorite team, the Brewers!?!?), our current president, video drones, wearable tech, hoverboards (kind of) and baseball scandals (some things never change).

In some ways we’re surrounded with technology that far surpasses the trilogy (autonomous vehicles and machines, the internet as we know it, smart phones) and in other ways we’re still woefully short, namely flying cars and the crux of the movie…time travel. Well maybe that last one we have an answer for…

While you could follow in Doc Browns’ footsteps and get to work building your own DeLorean time machine, starting with this world famous FLUX CAPACITOR, why not make it easy in SOLIDWORKS Electrical?

Revisiting Your Project’s Previous State

Each time I run training on this intelligent schematic program, I get the hand raised followed by a question…”how do I save my project”. To which I always respond “you don’t need to save a project, with the SQL architecture, every action you take in the interface is immediately captured by the database.” And for the most part that’s a FANTASTIC thing, you no longer lose information if (when) Windows goes belly up, or if you simply forgot to save your work.

But sometimes underlying that question is… “how do I go back”. What if you wanted to undo some of your work? Revisit the project in a previous state? Or have a consistent starting point while you test out a new feature? Enter Snapshots. No need to procure some radioactive fuel from the Libyan terrorists. No need to find a stretch of road where you can reach 88 mph, you can just right click on your project and take a snapshot!

The Beauty of Snapshots

Your snapshot captures the project in its current state, think of it as a “save as” button, a fallback point. Down the road if needed, you can recover the project at that point in time as a NEW project (leaving the running project as is so you don’t lose your work should you choose to go back!).

For Experimentation of Data Transfers

I use this feature often for a few specific scenarios.

First, if I’m doing some experimentation as I learn a new feature after upgrading to the latest service pack, or if I’m pasting large chunks of project data via Macros, I simply take a snapshot of the project, and use the snapshot to fall back if I need a few reps to work out the kinks or figure out the specifics.

For Capturing Revisions

Snapshots can be automatically created anytime you approve a “revision”. Captured revisions can then be revisited with a right click on the project, and access the list of snapshots, choosing the revision you’d like to revisit.

For Archiving Older Project States

Finally, take those snapshots with you anytime you Archive a project! Your project archive will include those snapshots in the proj.tewzip file so you can navigate to those older project states anywhere, anytime.

So spare yourself the agony of lost time, and give yourself the power (1.21 Gigawatts to be exact) to travel back in time to correct the mistakes of the past in your next electrical project!

Contact Us

Did you like this tutorial? There’s more where this comes from. Find other blogs by Evan or more on our YouTube Tech Tip videos.

Have a question? We’re always available to talk over the phone, for you to leave a message, or for you to submit a request – just contact us.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

GSC’s Evan Stanek has over 10 years of experience as an Electrical Applications Engineer. Prior to GSC, he worked as an engineer in the broadcasting field designing panel layouts and schematics/installations for transmitter control systems, as well as network and control layouts for radio studios. Evan is a certified SOLIDWORKS Electrical Trainer and Electrical Applications Engineer (CSWE).

Author information

GSC
GSC fuels customer success with 3D engineering solutions for design, simulation, data management, electrical schematics, PCB, technical documentation, and 3D printing, as well as the most comprehensive consulting, technical support, and training in the industry. As a leading provider of SOLIDWORKS solutions, HP, and Markforged 3D printing technologies, GSC’s world-class team of dedicated professionals have helped numerous companies innovate and increase productivity by leveraging advanced technologies to drive 3D business success. Founded in 1989, GSC is headquartered in Germantown, WI. For more information about GSC, please visit www.gsc-3d.com.

The post Back to the Future with SOLIDWORKS Electrical Snapshots appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GSC at August 24, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Comparing SOLIDWORKS PDM/Manage to ENOVIAworks

Dassault Systèmes has recently released ENOVIAworks which is a new cloud-based data management solution for SOLIDWORKS customers. There are now two distinct data management solutions to choose from that will manage your SOLIDWORKS data:  SOLIDWORKS PDM/Manage and ENOVIAworks.

SOLIDWORKS PDM/Manage vs ENOVIAworks

ENOVIAworks

The main difference between the two DS solutions is SOLIDWORKS PDM/Manage is an on-premise highly configurable solution whereas ENOVIAworks is a turnkey cloud-based solution.

Here is a quick comparison of the two solutions to help you decide which DS solution is right for your business:

On-premise Solution: SOLIDWORKS PDM/Manage

The existing SOLIDWORKS PDM and SOLIDWORKS Manage solutions are a good choice for businesses that want to manage their own data. SOLIDWORKS PDM provides an easy way for your team to work on product designs without worrying about version control or losing model files. Simply store CAD models and any supporting electronic documents in an indexed central repository that tracks versions and automates workflows to eliminate time spent searching and duplication of efforts.

SOLIDWORKS Manage is an upgrade to SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional providing customers with a set of advanced data management tools. SOLIDWORKS Manage builds upon the file management capabilities and ease of use of SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional while adding powerful project, process, and item management capabilities. Critical product development decisions are simplified with interactive dashboards and reports that help track project progress, resource allocation and quality performance.

Advantages:

  • The ability to manage your own infrastructure with internal IT staff.
  • The system can be designed around your specific company processes.
  • Provide a high degree of configurability and customization.
  • SOLDWORKS Manage includes project, process, and item management capabilities.

Disadvantages:

  • Need to purchase server hardware and a location to store your data.
  • Need an IT staff to maintain and manage the system.
  • Need to upgrade the system when new versions of SOLIDWORKS are released.
  • There is web access for users but the system is not a true cloud-based solution.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7oMKDTm7Z24?feature=oembed" title="SOLIDWORKS Manage" width="500"></iframe>

Cloud-based Solution: ENOVIAworks

ENOVIAworks delivers design, engineering and business services on the cloud. ENOVIAworks runs on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform and offers flexibility, capability and scalability with its wide portfolio of solutions and apps. It enables businesses of any size to seamlessly manage all stages of product development – plan, develop, and release – on the cloud with reduced infrastructure costs and less IT overhead. ENOVIAworks solutions provide digital continuity and empower team members to collaborate from anywhere, at any time and on any device.

Advantages:

  • ENOVIAworks is a turnkey solution that allows companies to quickly start using an advanced PDM system.
  • No need to purchase hardware or install software.
  • No dependency on IT staff for system maintenance and upgrade.
  • Includes basic lifecycle management, BOM management, project management, and change management.
  • Able to be used with just a web browser.

Disadvantages:

  • Not as configurable as SOLIDWORKS PDM/Manage
  • Less functions and capabilities compared to SOLIDWORKS PDM/Manage
  • Limited to best practices governed by ENOVIAworks.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YmysmjTDyzE?feature=oembed" title="Cloud-Based Data Management for SOLIDWORKS Users" width="500"></iframe>

Summary

If you are just starting out with PDM and want a turnkey cloud-based system that is easy to configure and implement then ENOVIAworks is the best choice for you.

If your business wants a more configurable system that you want to manage completely by yourselves then we would recommend a SOLIDWORKS PDM/Manage solution.

The post Comparing SOLIDWORKS PDM/Manage to ENOVIAworks appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at August 24, 2020 12:00 PM

August 21, 2020

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Dolls House Furniture Part 1 – Tutorial

In part 1 of this 2-part SOLIDWORKS tutorial we created a furniture set for a dolls house lounge, this includes a fireplace, coffee table, sofa and plant. The tutorial uses a range of 3d tools, and sketch tools to design them. The furniture is 1:12 scale or the 1-inch scale as it’s also known for dolls houses, so if you’re modelling dolls house furniture based on your own furniture, remember to scale it down based on this. The cottage dolls house created in another SOLIDWORKS tutorial is perfect for this scale furniture. Visit the SOLIDWORKS blog to see this.

 

The tutorial involves creating the individual furniture parts, each piece of furniture that is created is built up of separate bodies, this is to mimic how the furniture would be created in real life circumstances. In the toy industry most pieces of furniture are made with 6mm thick wooden sheets and are reinforced by other wood thicknesses and are constructed using glue and slotted features. Painted parts are usually reinforced MDF, whereas unpainted wood is plywood or rubber wood for a nicer finish.

To create the furniture, a range of tools were used to speed up the modeling including dynamic mirror features, linear patterns and mirror bodies. Linear pattern is used to create the slatted pattern seen on the coffee table and sofa, and mirror bodies is used on the coffee table legs and sofa arms to quickly copy over the design.

As seen in the below rendering done in SOLIDWORKS visualize, there is also some furniture for the Dolls house rooms upstairs which are available to download Dolls House Furniture Extras. If you would like to download and see how they were created, there are also some extra accessories in there too, but they aren’t necessary for the tutorial.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="641" id="video-27158-1" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Dolls-House-Furniture-Teaser.mp4?_=1" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Dolls-House-Furniture-Teaser.mp4</video>

As the furniture pieces are modeled in the tutorial, decals and/or appearances are added before saving and closing the part, but this is not part of the tutorial. You may choose to add your own decals or appearances, or you can download the decals used Dolls House Furniture Decals if you wish.

Author information

mmoore
mmoore

The post Dolls House Furniture Part 1 – Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by mmoore at August 21, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Mass Overrides with Simulation

In some situations, the mass of a component may not match the real world value.  This would be caused by either an improper mass density of the material assigned, or the volumetric geometry is not identical to the physical component.  The most common source is from imported geometry that is missing components or detail.

Within SOLIDWORKS, a mass override can be defined to explicitly give a component a custom mass.  This can help with mass calculations of assemblies.

SOLIDWORKS Mass Override

However when creating a Simulation study, it is very important to realize that these mass overrides are NOT applied to the study.  Simulation is highly dependent on proper materials and geometry defined.  To see the actual mass of the Simulation study, you can use the Simulation Mass Properties.  Here you’ll notice the mass is not the same as the override.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Mass Properties

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Mass Properties

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Evaluated Mass

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Evaluated Mass

If you wish to change the mass of a component in the Simulation study, obviously the best solution is to modify the geometry for accurate representation of the physical component.  This would ensure the center of mass is correct.  Another method is to create a custom material and define a density value based on the volume to reach the desired mass.

The Remote Load/Mass feature can be used if the geometry itself does not require analysis, but rather the effects of its mass on other components.  Here you can enter a specific mass value and location of center of mass.

The post SOLIDWORKS Mass Overrides with Simulation appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at August 21, 2020 12:34 PM

August 20, 2020

SolidSmack

3D on the Web Heats Up

3D across the web, devices, screens, and reality has been ramping up considerably over the last few years. 2020, however, has brought more 3D capability to the web with browsers boosting device support for both WebVR and WebXR APIs and <model-viewer> hitting API stability. This means one thing – there will be more 3D on the web. From Khronos Group:

<model-viewer> is an open source web component that brings glTF™-based interactive, accessible 3D content to your website with a single line of HTML, including AR placement on both Android and iOS. New with v1.1 of <model-viewer> is a scene-graph API that allows basic access to the glTF model source, enabling simple edits to be made to 3D assets with just a few lines of JavaScript.

<script src="https://unpkg.com/@google/model-viewer/dist/model-viewer.min.js" type="module"></script> <script nomodule="nomodule" src="https://unpkg.com/@google/model-viewer/dist/model-viewer-legacy.js"></script> <model-viewer alt="A 3D model of an shishkebab" auto-rotate="auto-rotate" camera-controls="camera-controls" src="https://www.solidsmack.com/wp-content/uploads/models/shishkebab.glb" style="width: 100%; height: 600px;"></model-viewer>
Shiskebab 3D added with a single line of code. Example from modelviewer.dev

The example above was added with a single line of code and sized to fit the desired width/height. Granted you have the two lines of <model-viewer> javascript loaded, that line of code displays your 3D model (.glb or .gltf format) right away. And that is just the beginning. <model-viewer> has a load of attributes, css properties, methods, and events that allow you to extend the 3D interaction.

At the forefront, is the ability to load 3D models in AR from mobile devices (available with the Chrome 83 release earlier in 2020). It works for iOS as well, however, a USDZ version of the model is needed. If you’re viewing this on a mobile device, you’ll see a “View in Your Space” on the example above.

Along with all the new support is the ability to edit glb/glTF assets in the web browser and AR. If you have a glTF model or access to one, you can try out the model viewer editor here (or load the astronaut example). Here’s a quick video from Khronos Group showing the core functionality of the editor.

<figure class="wp-block-video"><video controls="controls" src="https://www.solidsmack.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/model-viewer1-1.mp4"></video></figure>

Be on the lookout for more 3D on the web and, while you’re waiting, check out the examples at modelviewer.dev and give it a go yourself.

The post 3D on the Web Heats Up appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at August 20, 2020 06:24 PM

MakerBot Announces CloudPrint for Collab and 3D Printer Sharing

Makerbot Cloudprint

MakerBot announced a new service called MakerBot CloudPrint, which is intended to deliver a seamless 3D printing experience to clients.

MakerBot Print

Up to now MakerBot 3D printer operators would use MakerBot Print to prepare and schedule jobs for attached MakerBot devices. That tool has been around for several years, and it’s proven to be quite useful. When I tested it on the Replicator+ I found the experience using a networked slicing tool to be transformational.

Instead of tediously loading prints onto a stick or card and walking it over to the 3D printer, it was then as simple as pressing “Print” in MakerBot Print, and the file would be sent via network directly to the device. I didn’t have to get out of my chair, which is clearly a good thing.

To accomplish that feat, MakerBot had to establish some elements of the service in the cloud to which MakerBot Print would connect.

MakerBot Cloud

MakerBot took the cloud concept a bit farther when they introduced MakerBot Cloud. This was a browser version of MakerBot Print, which allowed a lot more flexibility for deployment, particularly in group settings. Instead of chasing around individual computers with new versions of software, a cloud system was directly used.

MakerBot Cloud allowed participants to easily slice, queue, print and monitor 3D print jobs regardless of the participant’s location. The company also provided a means to upload CAD file formats directly, rather than first having to convert them into mesh files like STL. Files made in SOLIDWORKS, Autodesk Fusion 360, Autodesk Inventor and Onshape could be loaded directly. This saved some steps and allowed more sophisticated slicing.

MakerBot CloudPrint

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>MakerBot CloudPrint queues [Source: MakerBot]</figcaption></figure>

Now, it seems that the new MakerBot CloudPrint takes that concept a whole lot farther. It appears that MakerBot has done quite a bit of observation of their clients’ activities and then reworked MakerBot Cloud significantly to make life easier. Along the way, they’ve renamed the product “MakerBot CloudPrint”, too.

It is not a coincidence that MakerBot CloudPrint arrives just as many people are forced to work from home during the pandemic. Like many workers, those using MakerBot equipment have had their workflow notably disturbed by working remotely. In fact, I understand that MakerBot staff themselves have been working at home for months now, likely gaining significant insight into these issues.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>MakerBot CloudPrint groups [Source: MakerBot]</figcaption></figure>

What’s so different about MakerBot CloudPrint? MakerBot CEO Nadav Goshen said:

MakerBot CloudPrint aims to easily adapt to your workflow, no matter how many printers you have. This solution was built with productivity in mind, and we plan to continuously improve the fastest CAD-to-part benefits of the METHOD platform.”

Evidently MakerBot has encountered a number of workflow scenarios in the past while. This is likely due to the appearance of their new MakerBot METHOD line, which is quite attractive to industry. While the company began with individual buyers, now their major client is in fact businesses, and some of them are actually doing production work on the devices. For them very specific workflows will be required, and that, I believe, is the purpose of MakerBot CloudPrint.

They say:

The new workflow software has been designed to overcome common challenges associated with 3D printing, such as optimizing utilization, managing print jobs, and collaborating with team members. MakerBot CloudPrint provides a faster and more advanced print preparation and management solution to enable users to be more productive. The solution gives users more visibility into and control over their print jobs, from mass production to team projects to individually queued jobs. MakerBot CloudPrint allows users to prioritize print jobs by project or reorder the print queue based on shifting priorities. With MakerBot CloudPrint, teams can easily share access to connected MakerBot 3D printers even when working remotely. MakerBot CloudPrint is also integrated with Google products, allowing users to access MakerBot applications with familiar tools.”

There’s also this:

MakerBot CloudPrint also reduces the time-consuming process of printer maintenance with remote control access for automated material handling, build plate leveling, extruder calibration, and more.”

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>MakerBot CloudPrint view of devices [Source: MakerBot]</figcaption></figure>

This is perhaps the first time I’ve heard of such functions being able to be done remotely. Normally one has to be physically present at the device in order to perform these calibrations, but it seems that MakerBot has designed their equipment to allow for remote calibration.

MakerBot intends to update the features and capabilities within MakerBot CloudPrint in the future. That’s no doubt made a lot easier as it is a browser-based tool, and they’re going to take full advantage of it.

The post MakerBot Announces CloudPrint for Collab and 3D Printer Sharing appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at August 20, 2020 04:47 PM

Run Against Your 3D Avatar with These Mixed Reality Glasses

ghost pacer

I personally love running long distance but like many others who don’t, I somehow do better when I’m paced against someone else. It may just be a competitive nature but seeing someone trying to outrun me makes me want to one-up them instead.

The Ghost Pacer by engineer Abdur Bhatti is made for those who are motivated by another runner but even more for runners who desire someone to pace them to improve their run and strengthen their body. Only, instead of going up against a real person, you’re running against your holographic 3D avatar.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wKEW_c6NEIU?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Your Personal Running Coach

The Ghost Pacer device is a 90-gram, mixed reality headset which fits like a pair of nifty shades and connects with your smartphone to help create your ideal running routine. You set your route and ideal speed using your phone’s GPS and the headset creates an avatar that runs according to your specifications.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">ghost pacer</figure>

Now don’t think this untiring, unyielding avatar is uncatchable. Though it isn’t human, this holo runner (let’s call him “Bob” from now on) accounts for elevation, distance, and your own fitness level. Bob runs at a realistic pace which you can keep up with, overtake, or fall behind depending on your mood for the day.

One-Up The Comeptition

If you get tired of running the same routes and want to get a little more competitive, you can link the Ghost Pacer to the Strava running and cycling network. You can view the runs of your friends or other runners, download their Bobs into your headset, and see for yourself if you can beat their best times. Once beat, you upload your best time to Strava and see if others can beat it. And so the endless cycle of one-upping goes on.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">ghost pacer</figure>

To help keep track of your performance as you run, the Ghost pacer also has a heads-up display which shows information like the distance you’ve traveled, distance to go, and other key statistics. There’s even a Ghost Pacer Pro app which provides customized workouts and syncs with most smartwatches to provide you with heart rate info.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2knokHvEMx0?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Years of design and refinement helped reduce the Ghost Pacer from a 5-pound headset to a pair of lightweight shades. It combines a traditional GPS sensor with an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) to create a realistic moving avatar and to accurately track your location as you run. Couple this with the Ghost Pacer’s processor and optical system and you’ll never lose sight of your Bob/avatar (unless you outrun him or fall behind, that is).

Other folks on the street might not see your running buddy, but the sense of accomplishment you get when you beat him is in no way diminished.

Due to man’s competitive nature, the Ghost Pacer has already been fully-funded on Kickstarter pushing past the $25,000 goal, breaking $100,000, and heading up. Earlybird options are still available starting at $229 with a July 2021 delivery date.

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Run Against Your 3D Avatar with These Mixed Reality Glasses appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 20, 2020 04:13 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

New Addition to Thicken Command in SOLIDWORKS 2020: Defining Thicken Direction

SOLIDWORKS 2020 adds a very nice option to one of my favorite surface-to-solid tools, Thicken.

Thicken takes a surface body (which has zero thickness) and makes it a solid (making it a volume) by specifying a thickness value and side to thicken. Until now, the calculation was based on surface normal, which is often what you want. Now, though, we can specify a direction for the offset created by the Thicken command.

Consider the default behavior shown here:

You can see in the preview that the thickness surface being created is normal to the faces of the surface we are thickening.

Now look at the preview we get when we specify a direction vector:

You can see in this preview the offset surface being made, but the Thicken command is normal to the selected planar face on the solid part (purple highlight), affecting both faces being offset from the surface body. This gives us a different solid than the default settings.

What if we select a different face of the solid to set the Thicken direction? We would get this:

How about if we select a line from a sketch to be the Thicken direction vector?

The examples above show a surface body with two planar faces. Here are a few examples of the same option when thickening a spline surface body:

Thicken may not be a command you use every day, but when you need it, it is a valuable tool. While thickening normal to the surface selected is often the desired result, the option we now have to specify a direction vector adds even more power. Do you use Thicken? If so, drop me a line at john.setzer@gsc-3d.com. I’d love to hear from you about how you use it!

 


 

Read other blogs by John, or find more videos on our YouTube Channel including more Tips and Tricks.

Want More on 3D CAD?

If you’re interested in SOLIDWORKS CAD and other resources:

Author

John SetzerThis blog is authored by John Setzer, GSC’s Training Product Manager. John discovered his love of teaching early in life. He worked his way through college as a youth coach, umpire, and referee before earning his bachelor’s degree in education. As Training Manager at GSC, he has been sharing his SOLIDWORKS wisdom with GSC customers ever since – over 20 years! John is a Certified SOLIDWORKS Expert (CSWE), a Certified SOLIDWORKS Instructor, and a Certified SOLIDWORKS Technician. As the only CSWE with a state certification in teaching, John is well-versed is teaching all types of learning styles. John is a regular contributor to the GSC blog, available at www.gsc-3d.com/blog.

Author information

GSC
GSC fuels customer success with 3D engineering solutions for design, simulation, data management, electrical schematics, PCB, technical documentation, and 3D printing, as well as the most comprehensive consulting, technical support, and training in the industry. As a leading provider of SOLIDWORKS solutions, HP, and Markforged 3D printing technologies, GSC’s world-class team of dedicated professionals have helped numerous companies innovate and increase productivity by leveraging advanced technologies to drive 3D business success. Founded in 1989, GSC is headquartered in Germantown, WI. For more information about GSC, please visit www.gsc-3d.com.

The post New Addition to Thicken Command in SOLIDWORKS 2020: Defining Thicken Direction appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GSC at August 20, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Specifying a New License Manager Server Location for SOLIDWORKS PDM

When server components are moved, in particular, the SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager, the path to the new location may need to be defined. This is done from the SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration.  To do this, double-click the License node to open it.

PDM License Node

In the server list, add the new server and remove the old one. Be sure to specify the new server by port@server name. The default port for the SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager is 25734.

Defining Server and Port Number

As well as defining the SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager server, license usage can be monitored from the License node of SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration, by selecting the License Usage tab.

License Usage

The post Specifying a New License Manager Server Location for SOLIDWORKS PDM appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at August 20, 2020 12:12 PM

August 19, 2020

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: Tokamak Fusion Reactor [Fusion Power!]

I know you’ve got a special place in your heart for the ol’ dry cell battery but I think we can all agree that a torus of hot plasma heated to millions of degrees Celsius is absolutely ideal for all our personal energy needs.

Unfortunately, personal fusion power is quite possible yet with, ya know, decades-long research and builds of massive fusion reactors around the world yet to hit the megawatt breakeven point. But, you know what is possible? You’re very own scale model of largest tokamak in the world, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER).

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vYvhxqTjAsg?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The 3D Printed ITER Tokamak is a 1:100 scale version of the experimental fusion reactor in Southern France. The model was created by Tamás Szabolics and Márton Vavrik from the Hungarian Centre for Energy Research, simplified and sized for 3D printing.

Each major component of the system is included with the zip file – a large 841 MB of 3D fusion reactor bliss. The team has included a user’s guide as well that breaks down the recommendations for printing the 56 parts.

A Creality CR-10 V2 was used for the colorful test print but any printer with a 30x30x30 cm or larger build volume will do. Fillumentum PLA Extrafill filament was used for the print. I’d recommend a finer resolution than the one used in the test print but with this many parts you’re looking at a sizable print time (approx. 4 weeks for the test print).

You can download the files on the ITER website and snag the instruction and filament documents as well as hundreds of photos of the test print. [Bonus! Be sure to check out the videos that show more about the ITER assembly and how fusion power works!]

A big thanks to Ion for sending this in and helping with our “things that are torus shaped” 3D print collection.

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Model of the Week: Tokamak Fusion Reactor [Fusion Power!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at August 19, 2020 10:03 PM

Cut Better: Herring Blade is a Stylish, Low-Profile Utility Knife

At first glance, the Herring Blade by Che-Wei Wang and Taylor Levy (also known as CW&T) looks like your typical box cutter. You slide it up to extend the blade, swipe it back to retract, and the rest is up to your very careful hands. But upon closer inspection, you’ll see how this blade is much more simple and way more stylish:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FdgEtOmQhus?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Instead of a plastic stopper or positive thumb stop in other cutters, the Herring Blade uses a combination of a neodymium magnet and a precision-machined latch to keep its blade in place and smooth, simple, one-handed operation.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">herring blade</figure>

To extend the blade, all you do is press your thumb onto the side of the blade’s surface and push it forward. The pressure unlocks the blade from the latch with an audible click and allows you to adjust its length. Once you’ve chosen the blade’s length, all you have to do is release your thumb from the side of the blade and the magnet locks it into place.

Retracting the blade works similarly. Just press the side of the blade, slide it back, and the latch reactivates once it is fully inside the casing. If you’re familiar with neodymium magnets, you know they’re strong and they seem to hold just fine when cutting plastics and other hard materials.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">herring blade</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">herring blade</figure>

One of the biggest advantages of having a magnetic-latch mechanism is how it allows you to use the Herring Blade with one hand. Instead of messing with a blade that sticks or needs to be tightened down to lock, the mechanism allows you to activate the cutter with your free hand while the other one holds whatever you’re cutting in place.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">herring blade</figure>

The other distinguishing feature of the Herring Blade is its compatibility with standard snap-off blades.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">herring blade</figure>

Instead of completely replacing the blade when it goes dull, you simply snap off the dull segments and extend the sharper ones. Once all segments have been duly dulled, you slide out the rest of the blade and install a new one.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">herring blade</figure>

Another unique aspect of the Herring Blade is that a left-handed version is available, taking into account the meager 10% of us who are left-handed. Thank you.

If you’re a lefty like me who has to live in a world where right-handed cutting apparatus are the norm, you jump at any chance to make your life easier. The left-handed Herring Blade lets lefties slide and cut with the blade using their dominant hands (plus it’s nice to show off your left handedness in any way you can).

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">herring blade</figure>

Before arriving at the final design, CW&T created almost 30 different designs. Early prototypes were 3D printed in resin, with some of them using embedded magnets. Other designs were CNC milled from aluminum. All were fairly minimal, but not as sleek as the design they finally arrived at.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">herring blade</figure>

The Herring Blade is already fully funded on Kickstarter with multiple options available for the aluminum and titanium versions (right or left handed) starting at $65 and an expected November 2020 delivery.

The post Cut Better: Herring Blade is a Stylish, Low-Profile Utility Knife appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 19, 2020 05:55 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to perform a synchronization between SOLIDWORKS PDM and SOLIDWORKS Manage

Within SOLIDWORKS Manage, there are scenarios (upgrading, etc) where a manual synchronization of the PDM object is required to ensure everything is up to date between SOLIDWORKS Manage and PDM.

How to run a synchronization of a SOLIDWORKS ‘PDM’ object

  • Within SOLIDWORKS Manage;
    • Options > Administrative Options
SOLIDWORKS Manage Administrative Options

SOLIDWORKS Manage Administrative Options

  • Structures > Documents & Records
    • Select the PDM Object RMB Edit
Edit ManageVault PDM Object

Edit ManageVault PDM Object

  • Within the SOLIDWORKS PDM Configuration Wizard via the drop-down jump to the Completed page and select Finish
Process Complete

Process Complete

  • Within the Synchronization details dialog select Synchronize
Synchronize

Synchronize

  • When complete we can close the Synchronization details dialog and the SOLIDWORKS PDM Configuration Wizard
Synchronize complete

Synchronize complete

On some specific occasions, it may be required to include all the PDM documents in a synchronization.  These generally take a lot longer depending on the size of the vault, so should only be performed when necessary.

How to include document folders in a Synchronization

  • Edit the PDM Object (see above) and within the SOLIDWORKS PDM Configuration Wizard jump to the Connection page
    • Within the Connection page select Enable Synchronization and get all PDM Objects
Enable Synchronization and get all PDM Objects

Enable Synchronization and get all PDM Objects

  • This will perform the same sync as above, but also include all the PDM Document Folders
Include all the PDM Document Folders

Include all the PDM Document Folders

As mentioned previously, this may take some time to complete.  If a sync of all PDM files isn’t required, we can limit this to specific folders

How to limit a Synchronization to specific folders

  • Within the Synchronization details dialog
    • Uncheck Update Document Folders then expand and select the desired folders to synchronize
Uncheck Update Document Folders

Uncheck Update Document Folders

The post How to perform a synchronization between SOLIDWORKS PDM and SOLIDWORKS Manage appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at August 19, 2020 12:10 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Guided Simulation with Structural Performance Engineer

For new users, setting up simulations can require a bit of a learning curve. For more experienced users, knowing when all required steps have been successfully completed can help ensure a simulation is ready to be solved, thereby increasing efficiency.

The Structural Performance Engineer role (part of the 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS simulation portfolio) provides structural simulation with advanced linear, non-linear static, transient and modal dynamic, quasi-static, frequency, buckling, thermal simulation and thermal-structural simulation capabilities for the product designer/engineer. These types of simulations enable studying the effects of external influences on designs, such as external forces, temperature, wear and tear, and harmonic response, and provide valuable feedback for refining the product design.

Help Along the Way

To assist with the set-up of these types of simulations the Structural Scenario Creation application includes an Assistant Panel that guides you through the process and provides step-by-step feedback. You are first asked to select the type of simulation you wish to perform (see Figure 1). This selection ensures a smooth experience by filtering the activities, so only those appropriate for the simulation type are presented.

Figure 1 – Selecting the simulation type

 

The Simulation Assistant (see Figure 2) provides a list of the most common set-up actions you can undertake to easily set up a typical simulation.

Figure 2 – Structural Scenario Creation app with the Simulation Assistant and Action Bar

 

Some of the actions are required for a successful simulation definition, whereas others are optional. The status indicator to the left of the action indicates if the action is complete, incomplete, contains an error, or is optional. See Figure 3 for status definitions.

Figure 3 – Action statuses

 

The Action Bar

Select an action in the Assistant to trigger a set of commands that can be used to fulfill the action. These commands are used to set up the simulation features required to model the physical environment for a simulation. Select a command to launch a particular operation. You can also activate each command through the Action Bar (see Figure 2) at the bottom of the screen. The action’s list of commands is a shortcut to the same command within the Action Bar. This subset of commands allows you to easily find the most common set of commands without having to search through the Action Bar’s exhaustive list.

To limit the number of commands you need to work with and to make the experience intuitive, only the most-used commands are listed in the Assistant. If you need a command not listed, you can find the appropriate command in the Action Bar. You can choose between the commands from the Assistant or the Action Bar: they are interchangeable and work in concert with one another. The statuses in the Assistant update even if the commands are launched from the Action Bar.

As required commands are completed for an action, the status of that action changes to reflect the results of the operations. Figure 4 shows the status of the Setup action changes to completed to reflect that the Finite Element Mode and Static Step commands have successfully completed, thus fulfilling the requirements for that action. Notice also that subsequent action statuses change from Not Available to updated statuses after the Setup action has been completed.

Figure 4 – Action status changes

 

Quick and Efficient Set-up

The Simulation Assistant walks you through each action until all statuses are completed (green).  This allows you to launch the simulation with the Simulate action.

When you hover a mouse cursor over an action status you bring up a Tool Tip (see Figure 5) that provides additional information on the status. If you select a particular action, the Commands section of the Assistant provides information on the state of the action. Press F1 at any time to bring up the User Assistance Panel inside the Assistant to obtain additional information on the action or active command. The User Assistance Panel may have additional links that access online help for even more in-depth documentation.

Figure 5 – Action status tool tip

 

The Simulation Assistant allows you to set up structural simulations quickly and efficiently. The Assistant shows the progress of the simulation setup as well as any errors that may occur during the process. It provides quick access to the most commonly used commands while allowing for access to more advanced, less-frequently used commands via the Action Bar.

You choose whether to use the Assistant to drive the simulation set-up, use it as a reference for when steps are completed, or completely hide it from view. New users may find the step-by-step process helps them better learn the application, whereas more advanced users may use only the status indicators to monitor progress as they dynamically set up simulations using tools in the Action Bar. Both modes are fully supported and they complement each other.

The 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS simulation products are on the cloud with tools that make it easy to keep everyone connected and on the same page during the development process. If you have more questions about Structural Performance Engineer, check out the SIMULIA web page or contact your local reseller for more information.

 

Author information

Steve Grace
Steve Grace
is an Operations Excellence Expert, Mainstream Portfolio for SIMULIA focused on providing simulation capabilities to the mainstream user.

The post Guided Simulation with Structural Performance Engineer appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Steve Grace at August 19, 2020 12:00 PM

August 18, 2020

SolidSmack

Thangs is the Hot, New Thang for 3D Model Search and Share

When you’re bakin’ up 3D models daily, you’ve likely got your standards and purchase parts modeled up and ready to go, a system in place to create them, or a snarky intern with an old set of calipers ready to do your bidding. We’ve gone past thinking it could be found at an online model repo but, if Thangs has their way, that may soon change.

Thangs is a new search engine from deep learning 3D geometry search developers Physna. Founded in 2015, they’ve spent the last several years wranglin’ their very own deep learning data tech that’s set to take 3D search beyond the attempts we’ve seen over the past two decades.

It’s a 3D Search Thang

On the surface, Thangs is a simple 3D search engine interface that includes search by text or model upload. With their launch, they have more than one million 3D models with plans to continuously add more.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

Models include those native to the platform, along with other 3D models aggregated from sites like Thingiverse, Parker, McMaster-Carr (my fav), and others.

General search and search by model do not require an account but viewing a model does. With an account, features include the ability to (for models native to the search engine) like, download, version, and comment on models. Uploading models to search or version are limited to 250MB but supported formats include common native CAD formats as well as neutral formats. Models may be viewed in 3D with solid, wireframe, and transparent model modes and edge/face color options.

Each person with an account has a profile. You can choose to follow them and also view models they’ve uploaded and liked. On your own personal profile, you can create folders to organize your model or create a team folder to collaborate on models.

Overall, the platform is pretty fresh, basic in capabilities with the power under the hood that will become more evident with more models added and more searches performed. With search as the primary use, I’d like to see more emphasis on search capability with categories, filtering, and advanced search options. For models, I’d like to see more viewing options, format/meta info, and differentiating between versioned and geometrically similar. Profiles and teams could have some interesting aspects and there’s obviously an argument for integration with 3D software which may start proprietary data spasms for some.

Physna All Up Inya (Model) Face

Underneath Thangs is Physna‘s “proprietary algorithms and advanced geometric deep learning technology” that “codifies 3D models into detailed data that is understandable by software applications.” Their enterprise options bring this in-house to help companies sort and sift the endless bounty of 3D data in their massive CAD and PLM systems.

You can read more about the features of Physna’s technology but to sum it up, it includes:

Geometry Search
Search models with 3D model, partial model, geometric measurements or model data. Physna’s AI finds more model matches by predicting descriptions, classifications, cost, materials and more.

Model Analysis
View differences between model geometry and model specifications in 3D, without need to install or use the originating CAD system.

Artificial Intelligence
Learns from existing models through meta data and information searching for models based on AI predictions, capable of production, cost, material, manufacturing, supplier prediction.

In turn, Thangs delivers this tech to the wide array of public models across the web. A single site to consolidate and streamline the online model mayhem seems daunting so it’s going to be interesting to see how the platform grows and if it could be the model search to end all model search… or to start it… improve it? You know what I mean.

An account that allows complete and unlimited use, download, and upload is free, so hop over to thangs.com, check it out, and let me know what you think of the new 3D model search.

The post Thangs is the Hot, New Thang for 3D Model Search and Share appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at August 18, 2020 08:51 PM

How to Make a Real-Life Obsidian Minecraft Block

obsidian resin block

For those who are only familiar with its Minecraft counterpart, obsidian is a volcanic glass formed when lava cools so quickly that a crystalline structure is unable to form.

It isn’t terribly hard to find either, so maker Patrick Adair decided to combine his love of Minecraft with his love of making things to craft his own real-life obsidian block (diamond pickaxe not required).

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</figure>

Now, you may be thinking, I’ve never seen the purple vein obsidian like the type in Minecraft, so how did he make it? Well, Patrick’s block is actually created with a combination of obsidian, purple glow powder, and purple pigment (to give it that iconic Minecraft obsidian texture), and a hefty dose of his very own Astro Tech resin.

Let’s break it down:

1. OBSIDIAN SMASH!

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">obsidian resin block</figure>

To start off, Patrick breaks down his obsidian into workable chunks. These obsidian pieces should be able to fit his cube-shaped container to mix in the other materials.

2. Mix The Resin

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">obsidian resin block</figure>

To give the resin its purple color, he mixes two separate batches: one with purple pigment and glow powder, the other with only the pigment and resin. Since the resin he’s working with takes about 30 minutes to harden, he can take his time and experiment with the amount of pigment and glow powder in each mixture. Both batches of resin look light right now but will darken once mixed with the obsidian chunks.

3. Pour On The Layers

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">obsidian resin block</figure>

Patrick pours his resin in layers to avoid any bubbles, swapping between the translucent and opaque mixtures while working from the bottom of the container up. As he adds the resin layers, he makes sure to mix in lots of obsidian chunks to make the obsidian stand out and the resin to fill the space in between the rock.

4. Clean Up With A Blowtorch

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">obsidian resin block</figure>

Patrick puts a final layer of translucent resin on top of the cube container before using a blowtorch to heat away any bubbles that rise to the surface.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">obsidian resin block</figure>

After the resin hardens and dries, the finished product looks (almost) exactly like an obsidian block you would find during your escapades in Minecraft. The heavy purple color of the resin has mixed with the darker shade of the obsidian chunks but you can still see the volcanic glass just below the surface.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">obsidian resin block</figure>

Even better, Patrick’s addition of the glow powder takes it to the next level. Set this block in the dark and it lights up with an ominous blue hue, as if it’s waiting for you to just break it apart and construct a Nether Portal.

Along with the specialty resin, he sells a kit to make this very block and can find more of his experiments on YouTube channel, Patrick Adair Designs. Though his claim to fame is his unique ring designs, he sometimes comes up with these awesome pieces which have nothing to do with hand jewelry.

The post How to Make a Real-Life Obsidian Minecraft Block appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 18, 2020 05:51 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Sharing Your 360-VR Experience from SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional

 

You may have seen this previous Tech Blog post on creating 360 images from SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional and wondered how to share this exciting, immersive content with others? Well look no further; this blog post will show you how to take a set of 360 images rendered from Visualize and easily share it through social media – include Virtual Reality (VR) playback on a $15 Google Cardboard!

The first step is to convert your 360 image (or images) into a video. You can use any video editor, but make sure that it can export up to the resolution of your 360 image (minimum 4K). I will be using Camtasia 9.1, though the process will be similar on any video editor.

Before you import your images into Camtasia make sure to set your document to the correct resolution. Right click on the preview window and select “project size”. Select “custom” from the drop down and enter the correct resolution of your 360 image, in this case 4096 x 2048.

 

 

Next you’ll need to import the images that you want in your video. This is as simple as clicking and dragging them into the timeline or your media bin. Arrange them in the order that you want and extend their duration – ten seconds per image is a good amount of time, but you can enter however long you wish.

 

 

In VR any kind of jarring change is amplified, so it is important to give your images a smooth transition. For this video, I’ve selected the “Fade” transition. I find that it is the smoothest when in VR, even more so than “Fade Through Black.”

 

When you’re happy with your video it’s time to export it. Select “Share” and export it as a “Local File.” If you aren’t using Camtasia you may be ready to upload your video to YouTube. However, only certain programs are capable of exporting for VR playback and Camtasia is not one of them.

 

 

Right now, all you have is a regular video. It needs some metadata added to it so that video viewers will recognize it as a 360 video for VR playback. This is fairly simple, just download this 360-spatial metadata injector (there are other programs that work, if you have a preference). Scroll to the bottom of the link and click “360.Video.Metadata.Tool.win.zip” for either Windows or Mac. Once it downloads, run it, open your video, and select the “My video is spherical (360)” option. Then click “Inject metadata” and save your video with a suffix to tell it apart from the non-360 video. With that, you now have a 360 video that is ready for VR playback.

 

 

[Please note: SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional allows you to create 360 videos without having to go back and inject the 360 spatial metadata. This extra metadata step is required since we exported the .MP4 from Camtasia.]

The most exciting part is getting to see the fruits of your labor. On Windows 10 you can open 360 videos using the ‘Movies and TV’ app, though if you want to share it you’ll need to send a large video file. Also, if it’s on a 2-D computer screen, what’s the point of making it in VR? The best thing to do with a 360-VR video is to upload it to YouTube so that it can be easily linked and viewed on any smartphone. Also, because of products like the $15 Google Cardboard, you can easily turn any smartphone into a VR device! You can view my 360-VR video this way by opening the video on your smartphone using the YouTube app. Best way is to email yourself the link. Once opened in the YouTube app, tap the “VR goggle” icon at the bottom of the player to split the eyes. If you don’t have a Google Cardboard you can still view 360 videos on your phone, it’s just not as immersive of an experience.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1FKq94OFdV0" width="560"></iframe> 
If you’re concerned about keeping your video private, you can set your video to “private” during upload, so that only approved people can view it, or “unlisted” so that only people with the exact link can view it.

Imagine being able to share immersive 360-VR content with anyone in your office using just a link! You could even send the YouTube link to your own clients to receive design approval or to potential customers interested in buying your products. Virtual Reality is more accessible than ever and with SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional you can unlock its full potential to improve your business.

 

Author information

Jonathan Delaney
Jonathan Delaney
Jonathan Delaney is a third year industrial design student from the University of Cincinnati currently working as an intern with the SOLIDWORKS Visualize team. He has used 3D visualization extensively throughout his education and is passionate about creating the best rendered images possible. Previously, he created promotional materials for Thyssenkrupp Bilstein and designed corrugated cardboard displays at Pratt Industries.

The post Sharing Your 360-VR Experience from SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Jonathan Delaney at August 18, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Managing Revision Attributes Order in SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Most of our customers ask this question about the revision attributes order. When the title block is modified, you will notice that even though Revision attributes are placed as REV0, REV1, REV2 and so on, in ascending order (from top to bottom), but when the title block is closed and we look into the drawing, the first revision will show on the bottom-most attribute and next revision will be added above the first revision and so on.

This is the default setting in SOLIDWORKS Electrical and can be changed to see the revisions in ascending or descending order.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Revision Order

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Revision Order

Revision Attribute Order can be managed through > Project Tab > Configuration Tab > This launches configuration manager > General Tab > Under Revision numbering section > Fill attribute for recent revision

Project configuration manage revision attributes

Project configuration manage revision attributes

Fill attribute for recent revision filed has two different options:

  • ‘Always fill lower index attributes’: This option forces the display of the revision index on the bottom of the revision grid, without taking account of the index number of the attributes.

Always Fill lower Index attribute first

Always Fill lower Index attribute first

  • ‘Fill attributes from index’: This option allows you to insert the revision index into the corresponding attributes. For example, if the attribute with the index number -0 (current revision) is inserted on the top of the revision grid, the current revision index will be inserted on the top of the revision grid.

Fill attributes from index

Fill attributes from index

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Electrical training course live online. For more information about electrical software and training solutions call 1-877-219-6757.

The post Managing Revision Attributes Order in SOLIDWORKS Electrical appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at August 18, 2020 12:11 PM

August 17, 2020

The Javelin Blog

DELMIAworks ERP & MES Overview

What is ERP and MES? Why do you need them? During this on-demand webinar you will get a first look at DELMIAworks (formerly IQMS) and learn how an effective Enterprise Resource Planning system will accurately process orders and fulfillment, while also providing efficient and timely scheduling and planning.

Keeping inventory costs low and maximizing plant floor throughput with the reduced costs associated with poor quality products, rejects and scrap.

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Featured in this webinar:

Digital transformation is being accelerated in 2020

In usual times, there is a small slice of time when a manufacturer is considering adding or changing an ERP or MES. Given the challenges of 2020 however, it is the perfect opportunity to look for efficiencies and new ways of working.

Digital transformation is being accelerated. Manufacturers may be facing lost margins and looking for savings. Now is the time to reduce rework and waste. And if you happen to be a bit slower than usual, you’ll have time to carefully list the needs and wants of each department.

What makes DELMIAworks different?

The overarching differentiator for DELMIAworks is the unique combination of factory floor process control and monitoring coupled with ERP functionality. Most systems are either Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) or a Manufacturing Execution System (MES); with DELMIAworks, these systems are integrated as one native solution. This integration provides a true, real-time vision and record of the shop floor.

DELMIAworks is for manufacturers looking to quickly accelerate their growth. If you are growing beyond the limitations of your entry-level ERP or your QuickBooks-like systems, DELMIAworks is the solution you need.

Meet Javelin’s DELMIAworks ERP & MES Experts:

DELMIAworks Certified Partner

Rob Hauser – System Architect, CSPP

Rob has over 35 years of Engineering and IT leadership experience. Rob creates system architectures that combine SolidWorks, PDM vaulting and various Engineering Resource Planning systems, to produce a very cohesive and useful enterprise level systems. He was the first person in the World to complete the DELMIAWORKS ERP technical certification.

John Mignardi – ERP Specialist

Over two decades of experience helping hundreds of businesses find design to manufacturing solutions using SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD, CPQ and Design Automation, Data Management Systems and ERP.

The post DELMIAworks ERP & MES Overview appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at August 17, 2020 03:29 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

DELIGHTING COLLECTIONS OF SOLIDWORKS USER INTERFACE- PART 2

Our previous blog explored a few interesting features of the SOLIDWORKS User Interface. In continuation, we shall move forward for still more tools to experience a rich experience.

With respect to that, the first highlight is creating Folders in the Feature Manager Design Tree [introduced in 2016]. This enhances the user experience to work stress free while designing. Simply create a new folder or drag and drop the additional items that you want to be grouped, thereby reducing the length of the feature manager design tree and then leads to organized design features and components.

Features

Components

Following the previous post, SOLIDWORKS continues to add features at a moving pace. Now addition to the creating Folders in Feature Manager Design Tree, we are able to have COLOR CODED FOLDERS [2018 Whats New]. This enhancement is really helpful for indicating hidden or suppressed items in the folder referencing the Top-Level Assembly. It’s really awesome to have this well-formed structured design interface.Comp 1

Comp 2

A third point, we shall focus on the Assembly Mates workaround. In general, SOLIDWORKS 2017 had a difficulty in mating between the hidden surfaces. From 2018 onward, the challenge was eliminated. SOLIDWORKS sped up the workaround allowing us to hide the surface temporarily by simply using ALT KEY while choosing the hidden surfaces for Mating.

If you wish to mate the burner to the below body surface, instead of rotating the whole model for picking the internal [hidden] surface, simply press ALT key to select the hidden surface and to mate to the body face easily.

Surface 1

Surface 2

 

The last glimpse is at a tool in SOLIDWORKS Breadcrumbs. Usually, the user opts to have common selection tools at the tip of his/her finger. This Breadcrumb tool helps the user to see what he needs much better.

SOLIDWORKS enables the user to have a clear cut idea about “Context based representation of the Items”. In the Top Level Assembly or Part, the Breadcrumbs helps to access the hierarchical chain selected from the item. It improves the speed of  understanding design intents.

Assembly

part

 

On the whole, SOLIDWORKS User Interface always keeps the user engaged with design focus intuitively. I recommend every user to have experience with the above tools to stay productive. Will catch you in Part 3.

Author information

EGS India
E G S Computers India Private Limited, since 1993, has been in the forefront of delivering solutions to customers in the areas of Product Design and Development with SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD,Remaining Life Calculations, Validation using Finite Element Analysis, Customization of Engineering activities and Training in advanced engineering functions relating to design and development. EGS India - Authorized Reseller for SOLIDWORKS Solutions in India - Chennai, Coimbatore, Trichy, Madurai - Tamil Nadu, Pondicherry. For any queries on SOLIDWORKS Solutions contact @ 9445424704 | mktg@egs.co.in | Website - www.egsindia.com

The post DELIGHTING COLLECTIONS OF SOLIDWORKS USER INTERFACE- PART 2 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by EGS India at August 17, 2020 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Young Entrepreneurs Making a Difference [Podcast]

Born to Design Podcast Ep 30 - Lucas Crupi

“For me it was never about money, but solving problems for the future of humanity.”

– Elon Musk

What does it take to make a good entrepreneur? I think that is a longer discussion, but one thing is for sure, it takes passion. In my previous discussions with young mentors and entrepreneurs (such as Danielle Boyer & Aidan Aird), they all mention their PASSION. It is a passion to help others learn about technology and make the world a better place, in general. The same was true here in my interview with Lucas Crupi, who had a passion to be the youngest certified SOLIDWORKS Expert, which he achieved at 15 years old.  For those interested in STEM, and who isn’t, Lucas has a lot of wisdom and great advice to share.

Listen to my full interview with Lucas in the latest Born to Design Podcast:

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Be sure to check out all of the Born to Design podcasts, and subscribe below so you will never miss an episode:

Soundcloud  Subscribe to Solidworks Podcast on Spotify iTunes Stitcher Listen on Google Play Music TuneIn - Solidworks Podcast Page Subscribe to Solidworks Podcast on CastBox  Subscribe to Solidworks Podcast on Overcast

If there are any students who want to learn, or are currently learning SOLIDWORKS, but lack the resources in their community or school, please reach out to Lucas.  He is a true mentor and willing to help anyone get started.  You can connect with Lucas here:

Author information

Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling is a Senior Marketing Manager at SolidWorks and the host for the Born to Design Podcast.

The post Young Entrepreneurs Making a Difference [Podcast] appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Cliff Medling at August 17, 2020 12:30 PM