Planet SolidWorks

October 23, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Showing Global Min and Max Values of Results in Flow Simulation

This week a customer asked me a simple question about Flow Simulation:

“How do I know where the minimum and maximum values are on my model?”

This is a good question as it can be very useful to see exactly where the extreme values are located.

For instance, the max temperature hot spot in a heated electronic enclosure or the max velocity point of a liquid through a valve would be useful to know.

Let’s take the example of a racing car front wing …

We can see that there are a range of possible max and min pressure locations, but where are the extremes?

You could right mouse button click on the Results folder and pick ‘Min/Max Table’ but that does not show where the extremes occur – just the numerical values.

The trick is to use the drop-down menus and navigate to …

Tools > Flow Simulation > Results > Display, and then pick the ‘Global Min/Max’ option

This creates 2 small graphical spheres and a new Legend with the numerical values:

  • The BLUE sphere is the location of the MINIMUM value
  • The RED sphere is the value of the MAXIMUM value

In the image below, the minimum pressure is just under the lower wing and the max pressure is on the front / top of one of the upper winglets.

A Cut Plot makes it clear why the Min and Max pressure are at these locations …

I suspect very few people know that this can be done since the setting to reveal the Global Min/Max is not enabled by default – the user has to switch it on.

Hopefully this little tip will save you time when you are searching for extreme result values.

By Andy Fulcher

Group Technical Director

Author information

Solid Solutions Technical Team
Solid Solutions commenced business as a SolidWorks Training and SolidWorks Support provider in 1998 and has consistently achieved strong growth year-on-year to become the UK’s leading SolidWorks 3D CAD reseller. Growth has been completely organic and has been consistently driven by a focus on recruiting the best from academia and industry and by delivering high quality services to more than 4,000 customers. Our customers range widely in size and are drawn from a broad spectrum of industry sectors. SolidWorks software is used by over 2 million engineers and designers across the world. As a company we are dedicated and focused at providing first class training and support to help you realise the best return on your investment.

The post Showing Global Min and Max Values of Results in Flow Simulation appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Solid Solutions Technical Team at October 23, 2018 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Three SOLIDWORKS Video Issues and how to solve them

Experiencing SOLIDWORKS Video issues? Here are three common issues and how to solve them:

Assembly or part disappears

You are working away on your model and POW it disappears completely.

SOLIDWORKS Video Issues

SOLIDWORKS Video Issues

You zoom to fit, nothing. You zoom extents, nothing. You zoom to a component, nothing. You do a Ctrl-Q, nothing. You close the file and re-open it, nothing. All the component/features are listed and can be edited but the graphics area is blank.

The problem might be a glitch in the file that reset the bounding box of the model to be outside of the model space.

Try resetting your bounding box to see if it restores your model:

  1. Hit space to bring up the “View Palette.”
  2. Double click “Isometric.”
  3. Type CTRL-Q.
  4. Then save the assembly.

Model disappears when editing a feature

When editing a feature your model disappears leaving you with a sketch and nothing to reference. All is not lost, while editing the feature locate and expand the Solid Bodies folder in the feature tree. Hide then Show the Solid Bodies. Now, you should be back in business with a model that will not vanish when editing. Save the file.

Assembly components move and appear misaligned when rotating the model

This display issue causes the assembly components to shake, move when rotating an Assembly and appear misaligned when static. This can happen when changing the base mates in your Assembly on order to re-align the model. Simply position the Assembly in one of the predefined views. Hit the space bar to bring up the View palette select a predefined view and save the file. The model should now rotate normally.

NOTE: Always remember to always use a certified SOLIDWORKS Video Driver.

The post Three SOLIDWORKS Video Issues and how to solve them appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Shawn McEachern at October 23, 2018 12:00 PM

October 22, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Select Other Tool

Have you ever heard of the ‘Select Other’ tool in SOLIDWORKS? You may have forgotten about this useful little tool that will help save time on your selections. ‘Select Other’ is a tool that can be used to select entities that are hidden by other geometry within a part or assembly document, without having to reorient it!

Selecting the bottom, inner face of this ratchet head without using the mouse or mouse gestures to rotate it has never been easier. All we’ll need to do is right-click on the face that is blocking the inner face (highlighted in orange), and click ‘Select Other’ from the toolbar that appears.

The face closest to the cursor will be hidden, and any faces that are behind the hidden face will be selectable by simply clicking on the name of the face from the list that pops up. In this case, there is only one face or entity behind the now hidden face, which is why there is only one selection to choose from within the window. Additionally, we can still left-click within the graphics area and select the entities that way as well.

The same can be done for this hand truck assembly example. If we wanted to select the tire of the hand truck, just right-click on the entities blocking the tire and choose the ‘Select Other’ tool. The ‘Select Other’ tool window emerges and the entities that we’d like to choose from can be selected.

Also, right-clicking on the model will hide more faces and reveal other entities behind it to be shown, and ease the pain set on by not having to rotate the assembly. This is just another way to prevent you from ever using your middle mouse button again!

Author information

CADimensions
We are an authorized SOLIDWORKS and Stratasys reseller with certified training & support centers located in New York and Pennsylvania, USA. We are 100% focused on living a CADLIFE and have our vendor's unconditional endorsement in the sales and support of their products.

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by CADimensions at October 22, 2018 02:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

How SOLIDWORKS Turned Ernesto Mosqueda’s Life Around

Ernesto Mosqueda

Some people do not realize what they’re truly passionate about until much later in their lives. You might think you want to be in a certain industry or field for the rest of your life, until that back fires and you start to loathe your occupation. Fortunately for Ernesto Mosqueda, he found his passion for SOLIDWORKS as an adult, changed his profession, and now has new aspirations on what he wants to do for the rest of his life.

Starting at the ages of seven and eight, Ernesto Mosqueda would help his father assemble automotive parts in his garage. “Before I could go out and play, I had to put in a couple of hours helping out in the garage,” Ernesto stated in an interview with Cadalyst.com. He learned important life lessons in this garage, as his father taught him to never give up when he was struggling with a problem. He also taught Ernesto to value the importance of working his way up from the bottom, as that shows a persistent work ethic. These life lessons would eventually come into play for Ernesto.

Ernesto’s first experience with 3D design started when he was working as a self-employed designer for food processing equipment. That is where he learned how to draw first-hand in 3D and understand dimensions; however, there were a lot of difficulties he ran into that could not be solved on paper, such as seeing clearances and conducting motion studies.

Ernesto would finally be introduced to CAD software when he started working for Day-Lee Foods. “I saw my boss using SOLIDWORKS to design a conveyor system that would roll tortillas to make frozen taquitos… I had to know more about it. I was really curious about the software and its abilities.” After asking his boss if he could practice using it, Ernesto immediately became intimidated by SOLIDWORKS. Although he began to struggle using the software, his interest in the program propelled him to look up training courses on SolidProfessor.

“Within the first hour of watching the SolidProfessor courses, I was amazed to find out that I was actually able to draw a basic sketch, extrude the sketch and then rotate it… It was so simple and easy to follow that I proceeded to purchase the SolidProfessor membership,” Ernesto stated. After becoming more familiar with SOLIDWORKS, Ernesto started designing parts for his boss, then would eventually have to make drawings of different building parts for him.

After one year of training with the software, Ernesto was able to design a conveyor belt that transfers one gallon metal cans from room to room for labeling and packaging. Ernesto claimed that, “Before the conveyor was installed, the employees were doing double the work: loading the cans into a steel basket by hand, then moving them via forklift. We eliminated the forklift traffic, as well as the need for two or three people to handle each load.”

Even as he became proficient in SOLIDWORKS, he kept looking through SolidProfessor training courses to gain more than just an intermediate understanding of the software. Due to his continued persistence to improve his application skills, he was able to land a new job opportunity as a maintenance manager for Del Real Foods, in 2008. Right away, Ernesto started to modify the designs of the equipment that the company would use. “I came up with an alternative design… drew it by hand first, then asked the company owner to invest in SOLIDWORKS so we could create a digital drawing and send it to an outside machine shop for manufacture. The new cylinder lasted at least three years, and is probably on the machine today,” Ernesto stated.

Ernesto is now an outside machinist at Disneyland, working on restructuring current rides that need adjustments. He one day hopes to become involved with the Imagineering department at Disneyland, which deals with creating structures for new rides and attractions.

In the meantime, Ernesto is now working on his newest innovation in SOLIDWORKS; a lightweight exoskeleton. Ernesto explains the reasoning behind his design. “…My mother-in-law suffers from rheumatoid arthritis… So, I’ve started designing this exoskeleton glove that will help her to straighten her fingers and allow her to be able to grip simple things like a broom, a dust pan, or a chair. That’s something that one day I can finish and give her, so that she can use the function in her hand again.”

Ernesto has truly lived his life based off the advice his father gave him as a young child. Ernesto continued to progress his skills in SOLIDWORKS, as he would constantly look at training courses in SolidProfessor. He started as a food equipment designer, but eventually made his way to a maintenance manager position, and then on to Disneyland as a machinist. Now, Ernesto has bigger goals set in mind; and with his passion and work ethic, there is no reason why he can’t accomplish these goals. Ernesto is a perfect example of what it takes to work hard, and display courage by venturing out to explore new passions. We wish Ernesto the best of luck on his future endeavors!

Source:

Author information

Connor Burke
Connor Burke
Brand and User Advocacy Intern at Solidworks Corporation
I am a Brand and User Advocacy Intern for SOLIDWORKS Corporation. I currently reside in Westford, Massachusetts and also attend Syracuse University. I aspire to receive my Communication & Rhetorical Studies degree by May of 2019.

The post How SOLIDWORKS Turned Ernesto Mosqueda’s Life Around appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Connor Burke at October 22, 2018 01:41 PM

The Javelin Blog

Test the life of your models with SOLIDWORKS Simulation Fatigue Module

How do you know your models will last? Is there a warranty in place? What happens when you need to apply a cyclic load SOLIDWORKS has the tool to do exactly that! The SOLIDWORKS Simulation Fatigue Module is available with Simulation Standard and is included in every SOLIDWORKS Simulation package.

The fatigue module is a powerful tool but is simple and user friendly like the rest of the Simulation suite of modules, and is directly integrated:

Fatigue integrated into SOLIDWORKS

Fatigue integrated into SOLIDWORKS

With a fatigue study set up (static study, number of cycles), the results are presented and are clear and easy to read! We can see where the maximum damage will be:

Fatigue results: Maximum Damage

Fatigue results: Maximum Damage

We can also see how long certain areas of the model will last:

How long the model will last

How long the model will last

With this great module located in SOLIDWORKS Simulation Standard, it is easy and cost effective to find the life of the model!

Watch how the life of this bike pedal is optimized!

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For more information or if you have any questions please feel free to contact us.

The post Test the life of your models with SOLIDWORKS Simulation Fatigue Module appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Sam Sharkawi at October 22, 2018 12:00 PM

October 21, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

PDM: Versions and the exclamation mark

In this article we will discuss several notifications we see when using the PDM add-in in SOLIDWORKS. These revolve around versions and how each version is used in assemblies or sub-assemblies. During customer support I notice that this question comes up every now and then for different level PDM users. This article intents to give insight into what versions are and how they are used.  We will not discusses revisions.

Versions

To talk about a version is to talk about the basic working principle of PDM. Files are stored on the archive server, when you check out a file a local copy is made on your system. When you check in a file, your local file is copied the archive server. This copy is a called a version; each time you check out a file, make a change and check in, a new version is created.

In the PDM explorer you can see which version is in the vault and which version you have on your local system. In the figure underneath we see the Main Assembly has version 3 on the server and no local version.

We now check out the files Main Assembly and Switch and see 3/3 which indicates we have the versions local. In SOLIDWORKS we make a change to the Switch. The edit icon appears  and we save our change. The local file is now newer than the file on the server and this icon  appears. We now check in both the Main Assembly and the Switch. We see that the version on the server is increased to 4: the local file is copied to the archive server.

In general it is always advisable to work with the latest version of files. The PDM administrator can set this option for users and groups in the User Settings:

The exclamation mark

The exclamation mark is seen in the SOLIDWORKS PDM add-in and alerts the user when a newer version exists. In short, this indicates that the assembly is referencing an older version of a Part. We will discuss an example, consider the following scenario:

A colleague changed the switch of the flashlight to be round and red. He only checked out the part, made a change and checked it back in. The switch is now version 3/3.

We open the main assembly in SOLIDWORKS and see the following situation:

The used switch is version 3/3 in the assembly tree (1), which means on our local system we have the latest version and we see the red switch in SOLIDWORKS (2). But version 4 of the Main Assembly does not have the red switch as we can see in the preview (3). It still uses version 1. This is why PDM alerts us with the exclamation mark, we can check this on the Contains tab in the PDM Explorer (4).

To create an assembly which uses the red switch we need to do a check out of the assembly, save it and check in. We have created a version 5 of the assembly, which contains version 3 of the switch.

Overwrite previous and get version

It is possible to overwrite the latest version. Your PDM admin can enable this function in the administration tool and you will see this option during a check in. When you overwrite the latest version, the old version is removed and replaced with the new version. In our previous example if we would check in the red switch and use overwrite, version 2 would be used in the assembly.

We can also enable the command Get Version, this enables us to see and use previous versions. For example, the red switch our colleague made is not correct and we want to use the original version 1.  We check out the files and use the Get Version option. Each version is a copy of the file so we can use this.

We get a notification that warns us that we are overwriting our local check out version 7 with version 1 from the server, this notification is a final warning. We’ll now destroy our local version, all unsaved work in that file is lost. We want this to happen, so accept yes. We check the file back in and version 10 is created with version 1.

Both of these functions should only be used when you are familiar with version and can oversee what the consequences are on other files when overwriting and removing previous versions.

Conclusion

SOLIDWORKS PDM provides the tools to see and re-use version of files you make, versions are all stored on the server. On your workstation you have 1 local version. In this article we discussed a hands on example of how a change to a part influences an assembly and that if you want a change to be in the assembly you should check-out the assemblies tree the part is used in. In this situation we did not take into account revisions and workflow statuses, these influence when you can make a change.

 

Author information

CAD2M
CAD2M is certified reseller of SOLIDWORKS, SolidCAM, DriveWorks and our private label dddrop 3D printer. The CAD2M approach integrates this range of products into an all-in-one solution that covers the complete product development process. Take the full advantage of working in 3D with our advice, training and expertise. For more information, visit www.cad2m.nl.

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by CAD2M at October 21, 2018 02:00 PM

October 20, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Solidworks Electrical – The Journey To Excel Automation Part 1

In this month’s Tech Blog we are going to be kicking off a new series that tracks our journey to implementing Excel automation into our design workflow.  I am sure at some point you have all seen previews or demos of the Excel Automation feature of SOLIDWORKS Electrical, however, these demos are usually represented within a very controlled data set that may or may not reflect your industry or design.  Due to the fact that the demos are usually very generic, it may be hard to translate how this tool might benefit your company and add efficiency to your workflow.

What exactly is Excel Automation??? SOLIDWORKS describes the tool as follow; this feature allows users to generate schematic drawings from data contained within an Excel file.  So basically what they are saying is that users can create and customize an Excel file based off of a standard design and then generate new designs based off of that configuration.  Once the Excel file is created users can modify data in Excel as project data changes and have those modifications updated for new projects within SOLIDWORKS Electrical. Excel Automation can be used to create books, folders, and drawing files.

This all sounds pretty cool but what does it actually take to create the Excel file in regards to time and effort.  Also when exactly does it make sense to go down this route?  These are the questions we aim to answer in this blog series.

First, let’s look at when it makes sense to take advantage of Excel Automation.  Because the process of creating the Excel file and configuring items within SOLIDWORKS Electrical is not for the faint of heart, you need to ensure that the benefits outweigh the time and effort required to set it all up.  The best candidates for Excel Automation are those who have design projects that are similar in nature and utilized frequently.  

Next, let’s take a look at what level of effort is required to actually create and use Excel Automation.  The basic procedure is as follows:

  1. Create all required Macros with SOLIDWORKS Electrical.
  2. Create the Excel file from the file template provided with the software.
  3. Import the Excel file into SOLIDWORKS Electrical using the Excel Automation feature.

Sounds pretty easy huh?  Well, let’s see exactly how easy it really is.

Step one states to create all required Macros, are we talking about component macros, project macros? The types of Macros that can be used within the Excel Automation feature are Scheme Macros, Line Diagram Macros, and Mixed Scheme Macros. When creating your macros there are two items that must be defined:

  1. Insertion Point – (X, Y Coordinates) Exist within the macro. Used to place macro within new drawing create with Excel Automation.
  2. Variables – For the macros that will be used for Excel Automation variables are the means of pushing data into the macros.  This data can include symbol mark, manufacturer content, component description, and translatable data.  When you create the macros you input the variables where you normally enter the specific component information.  By placing the variables within the macro you allow the information from Excel to propagate into the macro.

Manufacturer Part Variables

 

Decription and Translatable Data Variables

 

After you have created your macros and defined your variables then the next step is to configure the Excel file.  This process involves inputting the project data into the appropriate fields within Excel.  To help with this process there are Excel template files provided with SOLIDWORKS Electrical.

Excel Automation Template

Now that we have outlined what all is involved with Excel Automation the next step is to put it all into action.  In our next blog, we will outline the actual process of creating the macros, defining variables and configuring the Excel file for one of our designs.  We will walk through the process in detail, not only discussing the steps required but also the amount of time that it took to generate.

Author information

Thomas Smith
Thomas Smith, a Senior Consultant, serves diverse industries across the nation and specializes in Controls and Electrical Design for Spark. While his daily focus revolves around Solidworks software, application training and individual consulting for the manufacturing industry; his niche includes Electrical via Solidworks Electrical and 3D product design via Solidworks. With Spark, Thomas teaches regularly in the classroom, remotely with Sparks’s state-of-the-art Virtual Classroom and on-site to ensure user compatibility and knowledge of product software. Thomas has been working with and consulting on Controls Design for many years and served in the industry as a Controls Designer. He now travels around the US assisting customers and implementing their electrical software to optimize their design process. Thomas has acquired knowledge and understanding through his years of hands-on experience in industry, continuous education in manufacturing and technology with an emphasis on personal interactions among clients proving himself as a “Top Rated” Electrical Consultant. Spark, a Veteran Owned & Operated business, is the Nation’s premier provider of consulting and training services for the Electrical design industry. Spark is located in a small suburb of Denver, Colorado but operates nationwide. At Spark our mission is simple, “Help our customer to be more efficient, profitable and ultimately more successful”

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by Thomas Smith at October 20, 2018 08:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2019 Topology Study Constraints

Topology studies in SOLIDWORKS Simulation give you insight to help determine the best design for a set of constraints (included in SOLIDWORKS Simulation Professional and Premium packages).  SOLIDWORKS 2019 now adds SOLIDWORKS Simulation Topology Study Constraints to achieve the desired results.  You can control the Frequencyand Stress/Factor of Safety.

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Frequency Constraint

Frequency constraints can specify the lower/upper limits or range of permissible frequencies for mode shapes.  You can add multiple mode shapes to ensure all scenarios are covered.  Be sure to run a standard Frequency Study on the original model (before topology iterations) to ensure it starts off in the permissible frequencies.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2019 Topology Frequency Constraint

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2019 Topology Frequency Constraint

The option for Mode Tracking determines if the mode shape order is relevant after each iteration.  When Mode Tracking is cleared, the constraint will always apply to the mode number for each iteration even if the mode shape changes order.  When Mode Tracking is selected, the constraint will always apply to the original mode shape regardless of a possible change in order (i.e. Mode 1 in the original model becomes Mode 3 in the iteration, but constraints will then apply to this same shape as Mode 3).

Stress/Factor of Safety Constraint

When you require the maximum stress to be a certain value or you must keep a minimum factor of safety, this constraint optimizes the shape based on stress results for each iteration.  The Stress option allows you to add a specific max Von Mises stress allowed or the max stress based a factor (in %) of the material’s yield strength.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2019 Topology Max Stress Constraint

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2019 Topology Max Stress Constraint

 

The Factor of Safety (FOS) option provides an input for the minimum allowed FOS based on the maximum Von Mises stress vs the material’s yield strength.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2019 Topology Factor of Safety Constraint

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2019 Topology Factor of Safety Constraint

Author information

Javelin Technologies
Javelin Technologies is a provider of technology solutions since 1997. We are experts in 3D design and have helped thousands of companies with solutions for mechanical design, electrical design and 3D printing. Large or small, we have the skills, experience, and services to propel your organization to new heights so you can aim high.

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by Javelin Technologies at October 20, 2018 02:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Keeping track of External Relations in SOLIDWORKS 2019 is now easier than keeping track of your relatives?!

Keeping track of SOLIDWORKS External Relations in a model has been simplified in SOLIDWORKS 2019! It might be impossible to remember all the names of your cousins and what job they’re working, the links created between parts and features is clear and simple.

Let’s take a look at the model for this plastic injection mold tool as it contains many external references.

Mold Design training file rendered in SOLIDWORKS Visualize

Mold Design training file rendered in SOLIDWORKS Visualize

In the 2019 release of SOLIDWORKS, the external references dialog has been completely re-imagined at the top level of an assembly to list exactly which feature or sketch contains external references, what file they are referencing, and even what type of entity it is! This is a major development which will simplify finding external references and ensuring a quick understanding of any externally referenced parts, right from the top level of an assembly.

Updated 2019 Assembly External References dialog box

Updated 2019 Assembly External References dialog box

Previous Assembly External References dialog box

Previous Assembly External References dialog box

The previous 2018 External reference dialog contained any parts with external references, but not much more information until you dove down to the part level and looked at the external references separately for each individual part. This made it difficult to control the external references in an assembly.

Can I view individual References?

With the new 2019 External reference dialog, all of the information is available right at the top level assembly which gives simple granular control over managing the relations. When selected, individual referenced entities are even shown in the graphics area to ensure you are modifying the correct one.

Selecting a reference will highlight it in the display

Selecting a reference will highlight it in the display

This intuitive interface exists at the part level now, and makes it easier to understand exactly what changes are being made.

 

Could it get any better?

Along with the external reference dialog change, the Dynamic Reference Visualization also received an update in 2019 to include the ability to quickly break and lock external references between parts in an assembly.

Left click on the 'dot' of the dynamic reference to edit references

Left click on the ‘dot’ of the dynamic reference to edit references

One last update to References

While this enhancement is a little more subtle, it serves to show if the reference is to a feature, or the sketch hidden underneath it. The feature now shows the states of all sketches being referenced externally, whether broken, locked, or connected.

Stay tuned for even more enhancements for 2019

Enjoy browsing through the other exciting enhancements to the SOLIDWORKS 2019 release as highlighted by the Javelin Bloggers!

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by Bryan Sprange, CSWE at October 20, 2018 12:00 PM

October 19, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Composer Using Markers and Milestones

Markers and Milestones

SOLIDWORKS Composer has some great tools to help create animations among which are Markers and Milestones. These two tools allow you to flag significant points on the timeline in your animations. Markers and/or milestones can be used to organize the timeline, help make interactive content and create image output. Let’s focus on using markers and milestones to produce images from key points on the animation timeline.

Introduction to Markers and Milestones

Markers are used to flag significant points in an animation. Markers are created by clicking on the marker bar at the desired point on the timeline. You can change the text of the marker when it’s created, or you can rename it later by right-clicking on it and choosing “Rename Marker”. You can also move markers on the timeline by dragging them to the desired point. Animation blocks can be moved with the marker by holding Alt as you drag, and animation blocks and standard animation keys can be moved by holding Shift + Alt as you drag the marker.

Milestones are used to identify key moments in the timeline and can then be used to produce images of the scene at that point. Milestones are created by right-clicking on the marker bar at the desired point on the timeline and choosing “Create Milestone”. They are represented by a blue dot on the timeline. Unlike markers, they cannot be renamed but can be moved just like milestones with that same Alt and Shift + Alt modifiers used for markers.

Once they are created, markers and milestones can also be managed in the Markers pane.

TIP: Markers can also be used to control an animation. Ex.  An animation can be played to the next marker by clicking on it in the Markers pane or by using a playmarkersequence:// event link.

Using Markers and Milestones

Both markers and milestones can be utilized to create images of the scene at any given moment on the timeline through the High Resolution or Technical Illustration workshop. In these workshops, an image can be generated for each marker or milestone, or both.

To use markers or milestones in the High Resolution or Technical Illustration workshop:
  1. Create markers and/or milestones on the timeline
  2. Open Workshops >> High-Resolution Image or Workshops >> Technical Illustration
  3. On the Multiple tab, click the checkbox for Markers and/or Milestones to enable the creation of an image for each instance of a marker or milestone on the timeline
    1. Adjust the File-name template as necessary (see images on the following page)
  4. Click Save As and choose a folder to save all of the images to
Example:

In the timeline shown here, there are 4 markers and 4 milestones. If the boxes for both markers and milestones are checked in the High-Resolution Image workshop, then a total of 8 images will be created that represent the scene at that point in time using the settings in the workshop.

Make Markers and Milestones Work for You

Using Markers and Milestones can help organize the timeline, create interactive content through event links, and save a lot of time when you need to create a lot of images quickly from an animation. Give them a shot in your next project!

Author:

Ron Grover is an Applications Engineer based in Salt Lake City, Utah. He has over 18 years of experience as a design and mechanical drafter and has worked in the foam (EPS) fabrication, architectural building products, pre-cast stone and concrete, and oil and gas industries. He has used SOLIDWORKS for over 8 years and is working towards achieving the Elite AE status. He is also a Certified Enterprise PDM Administrator. Ron has a BS degree in Technology Management and is Green Belt certified in Six Sigma. He also plays on the GoEngineer roller hockey team.

 

Author information

GoEngineer
GoEngineer delivers software, technology and expertise that enable companies to unlock design innovation and deliver better products faster. With more than 30 years experience and thousands of customers in high tech, medical, machine design, energy and other industries, GoEngineer provides best-in-class design solutions from SOLIDWORKS, Stratasys, CAMWorks, Altium and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM). For more information, visit goengineer.com.

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by GoEngineer at October 19, 2018 02:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Crash Support Guides

SOLIDWORKS crashing a lot?  We feel your pain!

Over the years, we have seen many things that cause SOLIDWORKS to crash repeatedly.  In an effort to get some useful tips out there, we present the following set of guides.  These SOLIDWORKS Crash Support Guides are not all-inclusive, as there is always more to learn.

  • Part 1 lists some easy steps that we often overlook but can make all the difference.
  • Part 2 goes a bit more in-depth, focusing on graphics cards and unleashing the power of SOLIDWORKS Rx.
  • Part 3 deals with root causes that lie beyond SOLIDWORKS itself, such as in the Windows environment and the hard drive.

Happy reading, and may your crashing issues soon be resolved!

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by John Lee, CSWP at October 19, 2018 12:00 PM

October 18, 2018

SolidSmack

The Complex Matter of 3D Printing Color Figurines

One of the hardest tasks in 3D printing is the production of highly complex figurines in color material.

3D printing of figurines has long been a popular activity among desktop 3D printing enthusiasts, and particularly among gamers. Very often you will see game pieces being 3D printed, either original or stock designs.

The first problem is in the method of obtaining the 3D model for the figurine. While some are easily obtained through online sales, very few enthusiasts have the 3D CAD skills and tools to properly design the desired figurine themselves.

An increasingly popular source for figurine designs is from within virtual reality games, where professional artists have created elements that are sometimes mixed together to create unique, personalized 3D characters or objects. In some cases these are unique to the player, who then has significant affinity to them. The issue is obtaining the 3D model from the game, which in many cases is near impossible.

Some games and third party plugins or utilities do allow export of 3D content, but this is not always encouraged by the content owners. Once the 3D model is in hand, it potentially could then be 3D printed.

But there is another problem: the geometry of these figurines is often highly complex, as they were designed by the original artist for visual use without regard to the printability of the item. This results in 3D models that include many pathological features, such as thin unsupported swords, numerous small overhangs, poor structural integrity and even discontiguous elements.

3D printing these is quite challenging on any equipment. While many enthusiasts use the more commonly available extrusion-based desktop 3D printing equipment, some have switched to the higher-resolution SLA-style devices at extra cost.

But while SLA equipment provides superior resolution, the nature of the process usually requires a considerable amount of support structure, which must be painfully removed in a tedious post-print step.

SLS-style 3D printing could be a better solution, as the powder used in the process provides an automatic support mechanism, eliminating the need for support structures entirely. However, the cost of SLS equipment is out of range for almost all enthusiasts, unless used through a 3D print service.

If all this wasn’t sufficiently complex, it gets far worse if you want to 3D print the figurine in full color, which in most cases is desired due to the design of the character or object.

First, color 3D printing equipment is still quite rare and secondly it is often very expensive to use. Current full-color 3D printing equipment is mostly restricted to those using the Stratasys J750, Mimaki equipment or Mcor Technologies’ Arke. The costs of these are well beyond the cost of any enthusiast and even some smaller 3D print service bureaus.

One solution to this dilemma I’ve recently run across is GamePrint. It’s a new venture started by Mixed Dimensions, the same folks who are behind the increasingly popular MakePrintable 3D model repair service.

GamePrint is an optimized 3D print service specializing in highly complex 3D gaming pieces. They explain:

“GamePrint combines our proprietary 3D printing technology with an artisanal approach to production, allowing gamers to create, capture and order collectibles featuring their personal gameplay moments (incl. characters, vehicles and dioramas) resulting in the highest quality 3D printed one-of-a-kind collectibles, GamePrint is our vision to disrupt merchandising utilizing 3D Printing.”

This seems to be a good match, as Mixed Dimensions’ comprehensive 3D model repair technologies would be well suited to taken on the sometimes pathologically incorrect 3D models sometimes exported by virtual reality systems.

GamePrint can accomplish feats of color 3D printing that are astonishing. Here we see an actual full-color 3D print of an item with geometry so complex I cannot imagine attempting a 3D print of it on any equipment. I don’t know what they are doing to reliably produce such prints, but color me impressed.

So far it seems that GamePrint is marketed through third party gaming sites offering 3D prints at their online stores. In this way the gaming companies can retain their intellectual property, as the 3D model travels between the game company and GamePrint only. Currently they list connections with Star Trek Online and Ubisoft’s Assassin’s Creed: Origins.

They also offer a plugin for DAZ Studio, a 3D CAD tool specializing in 3D character design, so it is also possible for the public to design a figurine and get it 3D printed through GamePrint.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post The Complex Matter of 3D Printing Color Figurines appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at October 18, 2018 07:41 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Illustrations, Instructions, and Product Manuals They’re Everywhere!

To do them right requires the proper tool–that’s SOLIDWORKS Composer. It’s easy to use and produces spectacular content that you really can’t–and shouldn’t try to do in CAD. For all the technical documentation you need to create, such as illustrations, work instructions, product manuals, or even interactive online content, Composer 2019 has many exciting enhancements to help you delight your customers.

Key dimensions and manufacturing information often need to be displayed even in technical illustrations. Users now have the option to include model based Product Manufacturing Information (PMI) when exporting from SOLIDWORKS or importing to Composer. All the DimXpert dimensions, annotation views and 3D views carry right over, and no longer have to be recreated in Composer. This means manufacturing intent is preserved directly from the source CAD model where it belongs.

PMI Gif

The user interface in Composer 2019 has been modernized to be consistent with other SOLIDWORKS products and to support future scalability of high-res monitors. Existing users don’t need to worry though. Everything in the command ribbon is still in the same place. Also, Command Search is no longer buried in the user preferences. It’s right across the top of the menu bar, so even a casual user has a quick way to locate less-frequently used commands.

2 GIF

Accidental updates are no longer an issue with the Lock Views command.

LOCK VIEWS GIF

The new Select Adjacent Parts command speeds up the process of picking parts that are connected to each other…like this group of components that need to explode together.

ADJACENT GIF

Another nice convenience: the Status Bar now lists how many items are selected.

 

Composer 2019 also works great with PDM Professional, with a new dedicated tab in the ribbon bar for common data management tasks such as searching, check in, check out and changing state. This is the initial rollout of a large development project, so expect more PDM functionality to be added in future releases.

All this recent development attention in SOLIDWORKS Composer is thanks to Product Manager, Mohit Daga.

MOHIT GIF

“When I took over Product Management for SOLIDWORKS Composer in 2017, one of the first things I noticed was that SOLIDWORKS Composer and CATIA Composer were being developed as if they were the same product, but that’s just not the case. SOLIDWORKS users have different needs and expectations, so we addressed that by adding experts to the team specializing in User Experience, R&D, Quality and Localization. The result has been quicker and more focused development. Every enhancement to Composer is customer driven, and for 2019, we think we’ve delivered something for everyone.”

 

URBE GIF

If you’re an existing Composer user, remember, there are no backward compatibility issues between SOLIDWORKS and Composer. This means you can upgrade to Composer 2019 right away–even if you’re required to stay on a prior version of SOLIDWORKS. If you’re just now hearing about SOLIDWORKS Composer, it’s a perfect time to learn more by visiting My.SolidWorks.com or by contacting your Value Added Reseller.

*Images and models courtesy of URB-E

 

Brad Williamson is a Senior Technical Manager with Dassault Systemes who has been helping customers learn, use and succeed with SOLIDWORKS since 1996. Based in the Music City, if he’s not designing in SOLIDWORKS, you’ll find him out playing drums in the Nashville music and theatre scene.

Author information

Brad Williamson
Brad Williamson is a Senior Technical Manager, and has been helping customers learn and use SOLIDWORKS since 1996. He played drums and toured with original rock band, Abby SomeOne, for several years, and even had a few songs on the radio that you probably never heard. He continues to play actively in the Nashville music scene when not working on the latest SOLIDWORKS demo.

The post Illustrations, Instructions, and Product Manuals They’re Everywhere! appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Brad Williamson at October 18, 2018 06:00 PM

SolidSmack

Innovate Like a Renegade

It’s when I entered middle school that I started to excel in math. Maybe excel is too strong a word. I was a good math student, but I wasn’t the best. I worked really hard at it. The award I publicly got at Parent’s Night was “Most Improved”.

Middle school is also when I was first exposed to shop class. I loved everything about it.

The tools, the smell, the potential danger, the way the shop class teacher was like no one else in the building. He was gruff in a way that was different even from the PE teachers. I loved that I could make things my way. My head had always been full of ideas. This opened the door to being able to take those ideas and make them into useful things. Our last project of the class was a competition. Presumably, to see how we could combine all the skills we had learned over the year.

As we learned in Lord of the Flies, only good things can come from pitting predominantly young teenaged boys against one another. The competition was this. There was a magnet track about 20 feet in length. Each student was given the same set of materials. Magnets, batteries, an electric motor, a set of popsicle sticks, and a general set of guidelines of what additional materials could be acquired to design and build a magnetic floating vehicle. The vehicle that could propel itself down the track the fastest would win. Everyone got to work building miniature airboat style vehicles.

While the others were experimenting with the number and angle of popsicle sticks to move the most air and also drawing on flames and other speed accelerating graphics, I didn’t jump to action as quickly. I just kept reading and rereading the rules. Then I set out to clandestinely build my craft. The day of the race arrived. One student at a time would place their vehicle on the track and we would all watch.

Like a 1981 Toyota Tercel trying to go faster than 80 MPH, they violently shook and wobbled down the track, taking minutes to get to the finish, if they made it at all. Everyone knew who the best students in the class were and it showed through in their designs. Their vehicles were composed of triangles for strength, which allowed them to be lightweight. The craftsmanship was meticulous for balance. The propeller design had been derived from scientific and systematic experimentation. The graphics crisp, cool, and fast.

It was my turn.

I set up the vehicle at the start of the track. My design looked blockish and heavy. At the end of the track, I set up the battery, motor, and switch. The motor had a wheel on the shaft with string around it. I pulled the string down the track and connected it to my vehicle. I went back to the end and flipped the switch. The string wound around the wheel and it whipped down the track in seconds.

I proudly smiled and looked around. Nobody else was pleased. The other students began to comment.

“Nobody else did it that way.”

“That doesn’t count.”

“I would have done it that way if I had known we could.”

I am a rule follower. To the extreme. I am an Eagle Scout and hold those values in my heart. I pay on time and I pick up litter. Nowhere in the rules did it say you couldn’t do what I did. I am also a renegade. Mr. Goss, the teacher, was also not pleased. He gave me a brief reprimand about the “spirit” of competition, but I was too high on my landslide record-breaking time. That was a watershed moment. Where everyone else took a path of mostly stirring air with some movement, I pulled with maximum force.

Incremental improvements often aren’t enough to solve big problems. I challenge myself to continue to live up to the gusto and ethos of that young person. My goal has changed from winning to designing products that add tremendous value to others. To paradigm shift the way I look at and solve problems and then face the inevitable “resistance”. I won and that year they changed the rules. I have been the cause of changing rulebooks ever since.

Do you have a story where you had the guts to innovate like a renegade? If it’s awesome we’ll share it and help to inspire, share the message and call to action.

The post Innovate Like a Renegade appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Dan Slaski at October 18, 2018 03:37 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Milling about with SOLIDWORKS Visualize

At SolidSolutions we run training courses for a large variety of manufacturing solutions such as SolidCAM, SWOOD and SigmaNEST alongside the newly introduced SOLIDWORKS CAM. To help make our training courses easier to understand and more relatable to real life working situations we have purchased a 5 axis milling machine to demonstrate the outputs from these programs in action. Not only is this machine versatile in its output, it is also quiet and portable, making it suitable for demonstrations. This machine will be featuring at our upcoming SOLIDWORKS 2019 U.K. launch events. So if you’re interested in seeing what it’s capable of, or wish to discuss your manufacturing needs then click here to sign up to a launch event in your area.

If you can’t wait until then though, we have created an animation using SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional. We used the motion manager in SOLIDWORKS 2018 to define the path of the moving parts, then exported the model and motion information to SOLIDWORKS Visualize. In Visualize we added the dynamic camera changes and created the final render of the animation.

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If you want to display your own SOLIDWORKS Visualize skills then we are running a competition through September and October with a chance to win an Apple iPad. For full competition details, a full list of prizes and how to enter see our blog here. The deadline is midnight Wednesday 31st October 2018, good luck!!

Author information

Cadtek Systems UK - Elite SOLIDWORKS Training & Support
Cadtek has been established for over 27 years. Based in the UK, we have unrivalled experience in providing design solutions for designers and engineers. We work across all disciplines and multiple industries. An award winning Elite Reseller we can help you understand and choose the right 3D CAD solution. Call 0800 804 7766 to speak to an account manager. For more information, visit cadtek.com.

The post Milling about with SOLIDWORKS Visualize appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Cadtek Systems UK - Elite SOLIDWORKS Training &#38; Support at October 18, 2018 02:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Can I get a new revision number for a file in SOLIDWORKS PDM prior to making my changes?

A common question that we are asked during SOLIDWORKS PDM implementations is what the correct transitions in the workflow are to increment the revision number of CAD files; should the SOLIDWORKS PDM revision number be created before or after the modification is done?

SOLIDWORKS PDM Default Workflow

As an example, let’s examine the Default Workflow that comes with the Default predefined configuration. This workflow will increment the revision number whenever a file is sent to the Approved state, through one of the highlighted transitions. This means the revision number is generated after the modification has been made and reviewed.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Default Workflow

SOLIDWORKS PDM Default Workflow

The example below is the history of a part that followed this workflow. Notice that the revision A is set to version 3 (three). Before this version, neither the history nor the data card showed a revision number. Likewise, revision B is only set to version 5 (five). This means that while the part was being changed in version 4 (four), the revision shown was still the old one, revision A.

History of a file with two revisions

History of a file with two revisions

This is how SOLIDWORKS PDM is intended to handle revision numbers. Several built-in functionalities are meant to work with revision numbers in this way, as we will see later.

A different SOLIDWORKS PDM revision number workflow approach

Some engineering departments prefer to work in a different way. Those in favor of the alternative that follows argue that, if a designer starts changing a part that has been previously released as revision A, he or she is already working on a revision B, so the revision entry (on the data card, drawing title block and history) should reflect this since the beginning, that is, when the change is requested or started.

The SOLIDWORKS PDM revision number workflow below is an example of this possible setup. Note that an extra state is required here. We are also using an automatic transition – a functionality that is only available in the Professional edition. This way, files will get a revision number as soon as they are checked in for the first time.

A modified workflow

A modified SOLIDWORKS PDM revision number workflow

The history of a file going through this workflow will look like this:

History of a file - now with revision numbers generated prior to the approval

History of a file – now with revision numbers generated prior to the approval

In the end, the data card looks like this – exactly the same as the first example.

Data card of a file on revision B

Data card of a file on revision B

While the result – when looking to the data card or to the drawing’s title block – may look correct, from the history point of view this is inconsistent, and we can verify this in several parts of the client and the Administration tool.

Why this technique could be a problem

  1. The Get Version menu is now misleading
Get Version menu

Get Version menu

  1. The permission Show working versions of files will not work as expected. This permission is typically not granted to any non-designer groups (e.g. Manufacturing, Procurement) so those users can only see approved versions, and not any work in progress. In this example, they would see version 5 (five) of the part, created prior to the actual change, and not the approved version, 7 (seven).
'Show working versions of files' permission

“Show working versions of files” permission

  1. The option Never move versions with revisions to cold storage, that can be set to any new or existing cold storage schemas, will also consider the wrong version as the released one.
Cold storage schema

Cold storage schema

In this case, we recommend that this entire functionality is not used at all, because there is no way to avoid that released revisions be moved or permanently deleted (if using the option Delete archive files). This could lead to data loss and compliance issues – for instance, if your ISO systems requires all revisions of items to be kept.

The answer…

As we have seen, the answer to the question that opened this article is yes, you can increment the SOLIDWORKS PDM revision number of your files at any point of your workflow. However, you must consider all unintended consequences of an unorthodox setup if that is your case.

The post Can I get a new revision number for a file in SOLIDWORKS PDM prior to making my changes? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Samir Lohmann at October 18, 2018 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Will It Blend?: YouTube Channel Tests the Durability of Gadgets in a High-Speed Blender

iPhone Blender

It’s always fun to see how products are made, but sometimes you need a dose of some good old-fashioned product destruction for stress relief, too.

Ever since 1975, Utah-based blender company Blendtec has been making blenders that shred, maim, and well… blend ingredients into an easily digestible mush. Fast forward to 2006 and the rise of the internet, the company found that the best way to showcase just how solid their blenders are is through a series of YouTube videos. Enter Will It Blend?, Blendtec’s own viral marketing YouTube channel that sees founder Tom Dickson talk about the latest smartphone or other gadget technology before dumping it into one of his blenders and seeing the resulting carnage.

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While there are video libraries dedicated to traditional blender recipes involving traditional food, it’s the wanton destruction caused by throwing an Amazon Echo into a Blendtec blender which really gives the channel its bold edge and, well, views.

Starting with a video featuring a blended box of matches, Will it Blend? has been up and running for a solid 12 years now (which, by internet standards, makes it practically ancient and timeless).

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/R6WfSZzi4_Y?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/t4WKFwl56nQ?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fY8MqWBIHvo?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Tom has blended every iPhone ever released, markers, a pool cue, and has even given viewers a first-hand look inside a working blender by tossing in a video camera. The blenders themselves are the stars of the show. Instead of cutting its contents with sharp blades, Blendtec blenders feature blunt blades which pulverize anything it comes into contact with. Combined with a high-speed motor, and it’s pretty clear how the blenders can disintegrate everything thrown at them.

Head over to Will It Blend? to view the full video library and experience an afternoon of well-curated stress-reducing videos.

The post Will It Blend?: YouTube Channel Tests the Durability of Gadgets in a High-Speed Blender appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at October 18, 2018 11:28 AM

Start Here! Launch Your Side Project with This Business Launching Bundle

3D Printed Design

When it comes to side projects, hours become days, days become weeks, and weeks can often become months or years. But what if getting a minimum viable product created could happen on a Saturday…assuming you aren’t building a flying car?

Many successful entrepreneurs have been touting the benefits of the 1-Day MVP—a one-day, all-out sprint to go from fresh idea to app or hardware prototype. Sure, some projects may take a little more energy and time than others, but having the process and infrastructure in place to successfully glide ideas along is what counts the most.

Which is exactly the premise behind the 1-Day MVP 2.0 online training course; one of seven courses bundled in Evan Kimbrell’s Business Launching Bundle.

From validating ideas to outsourcing menial tasks leading up to launch, the bundle covers just about everything you need to get that side project up and out the door. And for just the next 3 days, SolidSmack readers can save 95% off the retail price of $1,213 — that’s just $49 for the entire bundle.

Evan Kimbrell’s Business Launching Bundle

From Concept to Launch: Score an Amazing Mentor in This Silicon Valley Exec & Get 104 Hours of Guidance for Launching Your Business

Included Courses:

  • Intro to Entrepreneurship
  • Outsource Your Idea
  • Idea Validation
  • How to Come Up With Killer Business Ideas
  • 1-Day MVP 2.0: Go From Idea to Minimum Viable Product in One Day
  • Master Outsourcing
  • The Complete Guide to Running a Mobile App Development Biz

PURCHASE HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale!

Find more deals here:
StackSocial Amazon

The post Start Here! Launch Your Side Project with This Business Launching Bundle appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 18, 2018 11:20 AM

Cool Books of Doom: ‘The Measure of Man and Woman’ by Henry Dreyfuss

Anthropometry

Since its release in 1959, Henry Dreyfuss’ The Measure of Man and Woman: Human Factors in Design has been an invaluable resource for designers, engineers, architects, and anybody else responsible for shaping the manufactured world around us.

The indispensable resource, which contains thorough and accurate measurements for children, teenagers, adult men and women, and those with physical handicaps, has allowed designers to accurately define the dimensions of their products to suit the immediate needs of their users. Additional data guidelines for the visually and hearing-impaired, as well as other differently abled individuals, have helped shape the standards for numerous government-defined disability acts. Suffice to say, this book is the real deal; it belongs on the desktop of every designer and engineer.

In this updated and expanded edition of the original print, Henry Dreyfuss Associates have updated the information to better reflect common issues in the digital workplace and support for ErgoForms CAD-ready sample figures.

The Measure of Man and Woman: Human Factors in Design — $59.32

Features:

  • More than 200 anthropometric diagrams fully detailing “the measure of man and woman” from childhood to old age
  • Covers the needs of the differently abled in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act
  • Human factors data on temperature, noise, radiation, lighting, and other environmental conditions
  • Includes website with ErgoForms demo and CAD-ready sample figures

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Books of Doom: ‘The Measure of Man and Woman’ by Henry Dreyfuss appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 18, 2018 11:10 AM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Creating Ergonomic Baby Essentials with SOLIDWORKS

Ergonomic products are often designed for adults and while that is already tough enough to perfect, baby products are an even more elusive challenge for many product designers. How would one design products for those who are still learning and refining their motor skills?

Monique Filer and Danielle Michaels reimagined every baby product they could think of with SOLIDWORKS

 

On a flight to New Zealand, Dannielle Michaels found changing her newborn’s diaper to be what she describes as “mission impossible.” After a clumsy and awkward experience, she chatted with best friend Monique Filer about what the ideal solution would look like. An all-in-one essential baby box was born out of the brainstorm and thus, the duo began their journey to reimagine every baby product they could think of. B.Box was born.

The freedom to reimagine, again and again

Due to the intensive prototyping process, the designers chose SOLIDWORKS to ensure that the product functionality and ergonomics are suitable for the target group

 

Reimagining baby essentials is no easy task, requiring one to not only think about how the product will be initially used by babies, but also how they will continue to use it accounting for their constantly growing bodies and changing habits. These demands result in a very specific set of design needs that product designers must consider in order create a useful product for their very young clientele.

B.Box addresses these challenges by using a combination of observational research and iterative modelling. First, the design team directly observes the behavior of babies in realistic settings. With the collected information, they begin the shaping of mock-ups through 3D modelling, prototyping, and testing to ensure that the product functionality and ergonomics are suitable for the target group. A pediatric occupational therapist was also consulted all throughout this process before taking the products to market.

The intensive prototyping process meant that B.Box needed a proven platform like SOLIDWORKS to design its products. With SOLIDWORKS, designers can use 3D files for prototyping while also building, analyzing, and effectively communicating the design for molding and production purposes. A highly visual design process helps to bridge the product designers with the rest of the production team. The ability to quickly model prototypes visually also results in a more efficient feedback process.

Bringing innovation to life

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B.Box’s patented toddler cutlery set is a unique, user-centered take on children’s cutlery

A particularly interesting innovation as a result of the 3D modelling process is B.Box’s patented toddler cutlery set. The set is a unique, user-centered take on children’s cutlery, encompassing a round flower-shaped “flork” fork design with a shovel-like spoon. Used together, the utensils empower children to eat independently while introducing the concept of using two utensils.

The round shape of “flork” considers how a child, at this stage of development, naturally opens their mouth in an “O”-shape, ensuring that no matter what angle or orientation the child holds the cutlery, the food will always find their mouth. The rounded prongs are soft on baby gums and teeth while the sharper center prongs helps to pierce food, but is lower set to prevent injury.

The large shovel-spoon, on the other hand, enables the child to scoop up and push their food onto the fork by using a unique-angled design. The deep scoop helps to hold more food; versus a standard, flatter spoon that children often have difficulty using with liquid or “balancing” food.

The brainstorm never ends

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B.Box’s award-winning silicone lids are the result of the highly imaginative and visually tangible design process enabled by SOLIDWORKS.

The result of the highly imaginative and visually tangible design process enabled by SOLIDWORKS is a whole series of award-winning products launched into the very competitive baby essentials market. These products range from drinking bottles and insulated food jars to spout cups and silicone lids. B.Box has since extended the use of SOLIDWORKS for its new products in production to tap on the proven and advantageous benefits of the software.

10 years since the launch of their first product, the diaper wallet, B.Box has expanded into 20 products sold in 800 stores Australia-wide and in over 35 countries. They were recently ranked #52 in the Financial Times 1000: High-Growth Companies Asia-Pacific and won the 2017 Smart Company Top Exporter of the Year, as well as the 2016 Telstra Victorian Small Business of The Year.

For B.Box, this is just the start of their journey. The team is always brainstorming for new ideas. Together with SOLIDWORKS, their creative and innovative spirit can be fully translated into reality. For more information on b.box, please visit their websiteFor more information on Dassault Systèmes® SOLIDWORKS, please visit: http://www.solidworks.com/ 

B.Box worked with NCCS, a SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller based in Melbourne, Australia, offering CAD/CAM and manufacturing solutions to a wide range of customers throughout Australia and New Zealand. For more information on NCCS, please visit: https://www.nccs.com.au/

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Creating Ergonomic Baby Essentials with SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at October 18, 2018 11:00 AM

October 17, 2018

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Manage 2019 Update PDM Variables

In SOLIDWORKS Manage 2019, we can update PDM variables within Manage, giving us full control of our documents in one place.

How to update SOLIDWORKS Manage PDM Variables

  • Start Manage and open the Administration Options
Administration Options

Administration Options

  • Structures > Documents & Records
    • Select the PDM Object > Edit
PDM Object > Edit

PDM Object > Edit

  • From the SOLIDWORKS PDM Configuration Wizard select the Fields screen
SOLIDWORKS PDM Configuration Wizard

SOLIDWORKS PDM Configuration Wizard

  • Select the Field you’d like to drive the Variable and select Edit
SOLIDWORKS Manage PDM Variables

Edit Field

  • Select Updates PDM Variable
    • Note: The Manage field type and PDM variable must be compatible data types.
Update PDM Variable

Update PDM Variable

  • Select Finish
    • Save and close the SOLIDWORKS PDM Configuration Wizard

Wrap Up…

After these customizations, users will only need to update a value via Manage and the appropriate PDM values will be updated automatically…Making SOLIDWORKS Manage a ‘One Stop Shop’ for all your data management needs.

The post SOLIDWORKS Manage 2019 Update PDM Variables appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at October 17, 2018 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Top 10 Tips & Tricks for Working With Large Assemblies

1) Use the Large Assembly and Lightweight Modes for Assemblies/Drawings

Large assembly mode will automatically triggersome set of performance improving options based on a user defined component threshold. Lightweight components have improved opening, rebuild, and closing times. Primarily the graphical information and reference geometry are loaded into memory, but the features that define the part are not loaded into memory. These cannot be edited or shown in the feature manager design tree.

  • Resolved – Parts, Assemblies and Drawings: In resolved mode, all components are fully loaded in memory.
  • Quick viewParts: It opens the part only for viewing. You can able to select the configuration, but not the display state. You can move, scale, or rotate the model, but you cannot make changes. If any changes needed means switch to edit mode by the right-click in the graphics area and select the Edit command.
  • Quick viewDrawings: It opens only a simplified representation of the drawing. For multi-sheet drawings, you can open one or more sheets in Quick view.
  • LightweightAssemblies, Drawings : Loads only a subset of model data into memory. The remaining model data loads on need basis. Opening in light weight mode improves the performance of assemblies and drawings.
  • Large Assembly ModeAssemblies: It contains a collection of settings that improves the performance of large assemblies.
  • Large Design ReviewAssemblies: It opens very large assemblies quickly, So whenever we need to open the entire assembly with all the components and measurements you do not need to open up the entire assembly through fully resolved mode.
  • Use SpeedPak (Available with assemblies in Resolved, Lightweight, or Large Assembly Mode): While working with large, complex assemblies open a model using SpeedPak configurations to improve performance.
  • References: It shows a list of files which is referenced by the selected assembly or drawing. You can also edit the locations of the listed files.

2) Creating Sub-Assemblies

Splitting our top level assemblies into multiple sub-assemblies and encourages design teams to divide and conquer. Sub-assemblies are smaller and less compare to work with the top level assemblies. This will also minimize top level mates and features which leads to faster solving. Wherever possible, minimize the use of flexible assemblies unless absolutely necessary.

3) In Context Features

This is one of the great way for creating a part within our assembly. An assembly with many in context features is going to experience slower performance.

4) Use SpeedPak Configurations

Only the mating faces or bodies that are required are loaded into memory. In this example, there is only three surfaces. The other features will just show graphical information and that is not selectable. This kind of practice helps us to improve our large assembly performance.

5) Make Simple Configurations of Parts and Assemblies

Performance evaluation helps and suggests some possibilities to work faster with assemblies

Small details of parts such as fillets and chamfers should be suppressed for a simplified model. Just be sure that we maintain our important features that are used for mating and boundary surfaces. When only the appearance will be affected we can use display states instead of configurations. This can work great when we want to hide all of our hardware components.

6) Use Patterns

The pattern allows repeating the selected features in a particular direction or shape based on your component placement with pattern driven commands. You can save your time five times fast. Instead of mates, we can use patterns for rebuilding number of instances.

7) Limit the use of Helical Sweeps and Threads

In our simple bolt example, Thread feature will consume 87% of our rebuild time. Revolve thread feature will also consume 75% of our rebuild time.

8) Save Files to the Latest Version

When working with files from an earlier version of SOLIDWORKS, they often take longer time to open and rebuild. So while working with these files, it’s recommended to save to the latest version. Use Task Scheduler for converting to latest versions.

Which will help you to do that conversion process quickly?

9) System Options and Document Properties

SOLIDWORKS contains various performance options to handle large assemblies even faster. There is an option called verification on rebuild, with this option SOLIDWORKS checks every new or modified feature against all existing faces. When this is turned off, new and modified features will be checked against adjacent surfaces.

While handling Large Assemblies, ensure you have enabled the below options.

In Assembly settings, Points to Remember

1. Checkmark your system option > Assemblies > Do not rebuild when switching to assembly window.

2. Checkmark your system option > Performances > Level of detail (Less)

3. Checkmark your system option > Performances > automatically load components light weight.

4. Checkmark your system option > Performances > No preview during open (faster)

5. Set your system option > Performances >Rebuild assembly on load to “Prompt”.

6. Checkmark your system option > External References > Allow multiple context for part when editing in assembly.

7. Set your system option > External References documents to “Prompt”.

8. Set your Document Properties > Image quality > Shaded and draft quality (Low) & Wireframe High quality HLR/HLV Resolution (Low) for faster performances.

Similar to the performance options, under Document Properties image quality can have a large effect on our models. Higher quality images are going to take more time to process. When working with assemblies, the image quality can be set to a common resolution for each part by selecting “apply to all referenced part documents”.

10) Hardware and Software

Ensure our system specifications meet SOLIDWORKS minimum requirements.

Always keep system updated with suitable graphics card and system drivers.

For Checking system & Graphics card requirements, click here

  1. http://www.solidworks.in/sw/support/SystemRequirements.html

  2. http://www.solidworks.in/sw/support/videocardtesting.html

Author information

EGS India
E G S Computers India Private Limited, since 1993, has been in the forefront of delivering solutions to customers in the areas of Product Design and Development with SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD,Remaining Life Calculations, Validation using Finite Element Analysis, Customization of Engineering activities and Training in advanced engineering functions relating to design and development. EGS India - Authorized Reseller for SOLIDWORKS Solutions in India - Chennai, Coimbatore, Trichy, Madurai - Tamil Nadu, Pondicherry. For any queries on SOLIDWORKS Solutions contact @ 9445424704 | mktg@egs.co.in | Website - www.egsindia.com

The post Top 10 Tips & Tricks for Working With Large Assemblies appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by EGS India at October 17, 2018 01:45 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to convert a SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Thickness to a Gauge Value

A common practice in industry when working with SOLIDWORKS sheet metal is to show thickness as gauge value.

For example, 20 gauge equals 0.0359 in.

SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Gauge Parameters

SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Gauge Parameters

We will accomplish this using an equation, and IF statements to convert the values.

Here is an example. This condition indicates that if the value is 0.0359, it is desired to display “20” as a result.

Gauge_Number = IIF(“Thickness” LIKE 0.0359, 20, IIF(“Thickness” LIKE 0.0598, 16, IIF(“Thickness” LIKE 0.1345, 10, 1000)))
SOLIDWORKS Equation

SOLIDWORKS Equation

Add extra IIF statements to the equation to show the desired gauge value.

Create a custom property to use in your layout.

The post How to convert a SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal Thickness to a Gauge Value appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Shawn McEachern at October 17, 2018 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | Gravity // Geometry (Powered by Spotify)

SolidSmack Radio

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’ll get the groove going with the all-new “Shadow” from the ever-awesome Chromatics before diving into some killer classic tracks from David Bowie, The Rolling Stones, The Pixies and others before wrapping up with “Defenders of the Glam” from the always groovy Morabeza Tobacco. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/3ZYgtuRQ3t5kQAsqAILFi2" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | Gravity // Geometry (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 17, 2018 11:22 AM

Cool Tools of Doom: Field Notes Pocket Sketchbooks

Field Notes Sketchbooks

When it comes to being at the right place at the right time, nothing beats that old saying, “the best camera is the camera you have with you.” Perhaps the same can be said for sketchbooks—the best sketchbook is the one you have with you when inspiration strikes.

Which is why the pocket-sized Field Notes have always been a favorite for designers and engineers. At just over $3 a pop, these no-fuss 48-page memo books are perfect for laying down rough ideas without worrying about wasting precious paper in a leather hardcover book. Plus, they’re the perfect size for throwing in a shoebox to keep a record of all those great ideas.

Field Notes Kraft Ruled 3-Pack — $9.95

Features:

  • Ruled Paper 48-page memo book
  • 3 Books per pack – banded and shrink-wrapped
  • Three great memo books worth fillin’ up with good information
  • Made in the USA

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: Field Notes Pocket Sketchbooks appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 17, 2018 10:36 AM

This Guy Built His Own Iron Man Arc Reactor to Charge His Smart Phone

real life arc reactor

Even though he’s the most plausible superhero of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Iron Man’s abilities are still the stuff of good old science fiction. How can one man fly around in a heavy suit of armor powered by an arc reactor which generates enough energy to light up a Christmas tree a million times over?

As explained by YouTube channel the Hacksmith, it just isn’t feasible to create a machine that generates more energy thaen it uses. Nevertheless, the Hacksmith takes a stab at building his own miniature arc reactor.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pxf7YkF0iN0?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

After doing some serious math, he concludes it will take 723,900 volts of electricity to power an arc reactor with a circumference of 24.1cm. Using ten transformers, each producing about 80,000 volts each, a real-life arc reactor connected to a power source might actually be doable.

real life arc reactor

Sticking the electrical wires close to each other is a necessity; otherwise, the voltage passing through them won’t arc together (hence the “arc” part of the arc reactor). This generates a lot of heat from the transformers as well as the components that direct the electricity.

real life arc reactor real life arc reactor real life arc reactor real life arc reactor

It takes ten of these homemade modules to power the machine, all of them connected to a relay bank which controls their voltage via an Arduino microcontroller. A lithium polymer battery then supplies the power.

real life arc reactor real life arc reactor

Though it sounds simple, connecting all the modules to the Arduino and then to the arc reactor takes a lot of wiring. But after sorting through all the electrical components, it turns out the reactor is a working (and noisy) success.

real life arc reactor real life arc reactor real life arc reactor

Now it’s just a matter of making the working product look nice. Next, they craft the final shell of the arc reactor to house all of the electrical components.

real life arc reactor

The finished arc reactor has a power output of 20 amps which… might be enough to keep shrapnel from entering a person’s heart but is insufficient to power a high-tech suit of armor. Turning on this miniature electricity generator also makes the room sound like someone stepped on a beehive, as you can barely hear above the noise.

real life arc reactor real life arc reactor

To finish things off, the guys put the arc reactor in a portable case that allows it to slowly power small devices such as phones, tablets, and an electric razor. It might not make great strides in the field of sustainable energy, but at least it works!

The Hacksmith YouTube channel has tons more videos in which they try to recreate your favorite geeky tech. Be sure to check them out!

The post This Guy Built His Own Iron Man Arc Reactor to Charge His Smart Phone appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at October 17, 2018 10:22 AM

October 16, 2018

SolidSmack

What I’ve Made So Far Using Autodesk Generative Design

It’s 3am. Visions of green and red shapes are swirling through your mind. Was it a bad batch of kombucha? No – it’s Autodesk Generative Design.

Autodesk Generative Design provides a surprisingly addictive mix of novelty, somewhat mysterious results, and interesting shapes. If you can justify the cost – try it!

Before I dive in, I need to comment on pricing. I wrote this piece before I knew what Autodesk’s new pricing structure would be as of October 7th, 2018. I assumed that all Fusion 360 subscribers would not only have access to Autodesk Generative Design (AGD), but would be given a handful of cloud credits with their subscription. Unfortunately, as of October 11th, 2018, that is not the case. You start with no credits and must buy them $100 for 100 credits. Thus, you can’t try AGD without up-front investment. I think that’s a mistake on Autodesk’s part, but that’s not what this post is about. Update: In the Fusion 360 October Update, Autodesk has updated their Cloud credit allocation, stating, “Trial users get 300 CC for the duration of the trial.” and “Initial Subscribers are allocated 100 CC” with a note that, “The first purchase of any subscription, for any product, receives a one-time grant of 100 cloud credits. These cloud credits do not have an expiry expiration date.”

You should know that as a Fusion 360 early adopter I pay $300 annually and receive what was previously an Ultimate subscription and 1000 cloud credits. That bank of cloud credits is what I’ve used to learn and work in ADG. To date, I have spent 650 credits in ADG and feel like I have about a 60% expertise in the software. OK, that’s enough of that!

Learning Autodesk Generative Design is Fun

First comes the thrill of learning a new design language. Gone are the splines, the extrusions, and the shells. Hello preserve geometry, obstacles, and convergence. In constructing a physical object with generative design one must think about the design in a fundamentally different way. That kind of stretching as an engineer/designer is what it’s all about! I attended an in-person training at Autodesk’s office in Portland. It was very helpful, and if you have a seminar near you I would recommend attending. Spend their cloud credits, not yours!

Since the seminar, I’ve worked on a half dozen different generative projects, all of which are violin parts. Over the last couple months, and in part to support my generative efforts, I designed the open source Modular Fiddle.

autodesk generative design example

Any part of this violin can be swapped out in about 10 minutes, which makes testing variations ridiculously easy. The goal of the Modular Fiddle project is to use 3D printing and digital design to push innovation in violin sound and design. For example — what can generative design techniques do for an acoustic violin? Let’s take a look at the two parts I designed using ADG that have actually become physical objects.

First Project – a Violin Bridge

My first project was a simple violin bridge (the part that supports the strings). In total, I spent 150 cloud credits to get to the finished part.

Forces on a violin bridge are very straightforward. So my setup in AGD is, too. In AGD, geometry you want to keep (preserve geometry) is green. Geometry that represents a keepout (obstacle geometry) is red.

autodesk generative design example

Strings go here, push down with this much force, and you need feet here. Let’s see what we get!

autodesk generative design example

I like looking through the range of geometries, and scrolling iterations to see how the algorithm got there – it gives me ideas. ADG is a great tool for ideation, which I’ve heard Autodesk (at least informally) say is the intended use. But I want to use one for real! Let’s pony up and drop some cloud credits to bring this into Fusion 360.

autodesk generative design example

In Fusion 360 I cut a flat plane on the back of the bridge for a print surface and added material to a few thin sections. I also added a strut across the lower legs of the bridge for additional support. With those changes in place – it’s ready to print.

As it turns out – this thing works! In fact, it gives the violin a very different sound. You can hear it in the video, below, in which the red violin has the generative bridge.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0sXDPzzKffs?version=3&amp;rel=0&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="560"></iframe>

Level Up – Adding Complexity

At first AGD hooked me with a new design language that was fun to learn. Once I had that figured out, I experienced the joy of seeing novel solutions appear before my eyes. Then I tried some more complex generations and got poor results. I won’t go into detail, but if you’re interested you can read through a forum thread I started.

autodesk generative design example

Let’s look at something more complex. This time I’ll take a stab at generating a solution for the Modular Fiddle’s Pegbox, shown above. The Pegbox is the 3D printed part at the head of the instrument that supports the tuners. In total, I spent 200 cloud credits to get to this final result.

Here’s an early setup and one of the results (I ran a total of four generations):

autodesk generative design example
autodesk generative design example

It’s pretty clear that this part would break. This fragile result is due primarily to an improperly applied fixed constraint. I can also see that I need to add more obstacle geometry. My fourth generation, shown below, creates some parts that look usable.

autodesk generative design example
autodesk generative design example

I exported a SAT file of the above design and printed it without making any modifications. It’s officially 30% lighter (weighs 19 grams) and 175% more badass than the original.

autodesk generative design example

autodesk generative design example

autodesk generative design example

In summary – Autodesk Generative Design is fun to use, gives interesting results, and can make real stuff.

Forget the marketing talk about the future of design. Try it because it’s fun and you get to learn something new. Setting up the problems in AGD requires thinking about your design differently, which by itself has value. After setup, combing through the results is enlightening. Whether you’re looking to use the results for ideation or want to export usable solid geometry out of AGD, it’s worth your time to set up and run a few generations. Is it worth your money? That I don’t know.

If you need a project idea, let me know, I have some violin parts you can work on. 🙂

Images courtesy of OpenFab PDX.

The post What I’ve Made So Far Using Autodesk Generative Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by David Perry at October 16, 2018 05:01 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Manage 2019 Change PDM State Process

In SOLIDWORKS Manage 2019 we can initiate a PDM transition of a file via a process within Manage, giving us full control of our documents in one place.

How to create a SOLIDWORKS Manage Change PDM State Process

  • Start Manage and open the Administration Options
Administration Options

Administration Options

  • Structures > Processes
    • Select the process to modify and select Edit
SOLIDWORKS Manage Change PDM State Process

Edit process

  • From the Process Management Wizard select the Workflow Properties screen
Workflow Properties

Workflow Properties

  • Select the Output Node
    • Select Outputs Tab > New
      • In the status output dialog choose; Change PDM State then Save
Change PDM State

Change PDM State

  • From the Change State Output dialog, select New
    • Within the PDM Workflow State change options dialog select the appropriate PDM Object, Workflow, From State, and Transition from the lists
      • Save and Close
PDM Workflow State change options

PDM Workflow State change options

  • Save and close the Process Wizard
Close the Process Wizard

Close the Process Wizard

Wrap Up…

After a SOLIDWORKS Manage Change PDM State Process has been applied, users will only need to promote a file through a Manage process output and the appropriate PDM transitions will occur, initiating related transition tasks, such as; PDF conversion, Revision Numbering etc. Making SOLIDWORKS Manage a ‘One Stop Shop’ for all your data management needs.

The post SOLIDWORKS Manage 2019 Change PDM State Process appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at October 16, 2018 04:00 PM

Restoring a Dismissed SOLIDWORKS Composer Message

In SOLIDWORKS, dismissed messages can be re-enabled individually.  In SOLIDWORKS Composer, it is possible to restore them, without the option to select individual messages. A SOLIDWORKS Composer message is dismissed by selecting the option ‘Don’t ask this question again.’:

SOLIDWORKS Composer Message

Don’t ask this question again option

The next option selected in the same dialog (Update, Save or Don’t Save) remains in effect for future operations of the same type.  When the selected option/command is no longer desired, or if the prompt has been dismissed in error, it is possible to restore all dismissed messages:  File > Preferences > General > Reset Prompts.

Reset Prompts

Reset Prompts

The post Restoring a Dismissed SOLIDWORKS Composer Message appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Sanja Srzic at October 16, 2018 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Hands On: Luna Display Turns Any iPad into a Second Monitor — and It’s Great!

Luna Display App

Just over a year ago, SolidSmack reported that Astropad creators Astro HQ had successfully funded their latest project — Luna Display — on Kickstarter, having raised over $645,000 to bring the project to life. The (minimal) hardware and accompanying app claimed to seamlessly turn any iPad into a second display.

Well, now it’s here; we tried it, and it’s freakin’ awesome.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="400" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/278196832" width="800"></iframe>

The magic behind the platform comes from its ability to source power directly from an existing graphics card—as opposed to “hacking” it to power a simulated display like similar apps on the market. Frankly, if you’re used to working on two displays, then you know the drill. But as a surprisingly easy-to-set-up experience for designers and productivity ninjas on-the-go, having the ability to essentially pack your two-monitor setup into the back sleeve of a backpack feels unnatural (in a good way) and surprisingly powerful.

Luna Display

For our test, we used an iPad Pro as the second display to a MacBook Air. The setup experience took less than 3 minutes and involved downloading (free) apps to each hardware device—with the tiny pink Chiclet-sized dongle (available in USB-C or Mini Displayport) connecting to the MacBook Air—and connecting both over WiFi. From there, dragging a processor-heavy Photoshop CC window back and forth between the screens was comparable (both in latency and picture quality) to dragging the same window between the two Cinema Displays behind it. Except, with Luna Display, I could actually fit the two-monitor workflow setup inside of a backpack and still have room for some IPAs and a sandwich.

Luna Display

“We developed Luna because we knew there was a better solution than relying on software to turn an iPad into a second display,” explain Astro HQ founders Matt Ronge & Giovanni Donelli, who previously worked as engineers at Apple.

“Software apps literally hack your graphics card, delivering a glitchy and unreliable picture. Software tricks your Mac into thinking a display is attached, when in fact they get no benefit of graphics acceleration or Metal GPU support. It’s like buying a car and only using half the engine. So unlike software apps, Luna harnesses the raw power of your graphics card, giving you the full benefit of its graphics acceleration — delivering a stunning second monitor that’s 100% wire free.”

Luna Display

Today Luna is available to the public for $79.99. Each purchase includes the Luna hardware unit (USB-C or Mini DisplayPort) along with access to the free Luna Display Mac and iPad apps. And for those wondering; yes, Luna fully integrates with Astropad, the company’s drawing software that turns the iPad into a graphics tablet for Mac.

The post Hands On: Luna Display Turns Any iPad into a Second Monitor — and It’s Great! appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at October 16, 2018 11:20 AM

Cool Tools of Doom: Copic Industrial Design Sketching Markers

industrial-design-sketching

When it comes to sketching and communicating your ideas well, nothing beats a good old-fashioned pencil and a keen sense of perspective. That said, adding depth to your form sketches with light and shadow is a natural next step in taking your sketches to the next level.

And when it comes time to cranking ideas out fast, our favorite go-to is a fistful of 2-3 Sketching Grays from Copic that give us great contrast. These ultra-blendable, low odor, alcohol-based inks deliver rich and smooth strokes that are ideal for quickly communicating product concepts. And unlike water-based inks, which tend to pill and oversoak paper while blending, Copics mix on the surface fast and easy-like.

While there are plenty of Copic marker sets out there, we recommend sticking to this compact six-pack of Sketching Grays for maximum versatility. If you want to get extra-fancy, try adding a single bright ‘pop’ color for your arrows, callouts, and anytime you want a callout to really stand out. And don’t forget that marker paper pad, too!

Copic Sketch Set of 6 Markers – Sketching Grays $29.70

Features:

  • Packaged in a clear plastic case, a sketch set is the ideal way to begin or add to a marker collection
  • Refillable markers and replaceable nibs, compatible with Copic air brush system
  • Alcohol-based ink is permanent and non-toxic, dries acid free

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

Feature image via Reid Schlegel/Behance

The post Cool Tools of Doom: Copic Industrial Design Sketching Markers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 16, 2018 11:05 AM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

How Technology is Changing the Beverage Industry

The beverage industry spills over with ways to wet your whistle. For the discerning customer there’s more choice available than ever before. The explosion of craft beers, the never-ending range of sodas and rise in popularity of energy drinks has seen consumption and profit surge over the last decade, in spite of harsh economics.

Technology has enabled this thirst-quenching journey. How? Pour yourself a tall glass and settle in.

Brewer’s soup

The food and beverage industry are determined to reduce waste. Environmental concern is high on the agenda and priority number one in production. One way an innovative brewer has addressed this is to turn waste into power. Colorado’s Avery Brewing has developed a method of turning their beer run-off into fuel for lithium-ion batteries. Collating their weakened wort that can’t be turned into beer during the process, the brewery worked with local researchers to deliver the fluid in lieu of expensive and wasteful drainage. A pint that packs power? That’s progress.


Bespoke beer by the brewery load

Brewing the perfect pint is something Mystic Brewery knows all about. This beverage manufacturer was brought to fruition by none other than a fermentation scientist in 2009. As such, they’re a brewery that is particularly particular about their product.

The emergent craft beer market is big business. Consumers are increasingly avoiding cookie cutter uniformity in search of more individual and angular tastes. As such the demand for drinks that cater to a more refined palate is soaring.

Key to Mystic Brewery products’ unique hoppy taste is the fermentation process. The team built and designed their distilleries and automated bottling with SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD software. Ever the perfectionists, Mystic Brewery were able to tweak their designs in the software, making sure their final product attained its distinctive flavour once brewed.

With pin-sharp precision and accurate stress-testing, the craft beer makers were able to cut down packaging times exponentially with an automated bottling system created right there in SOLIDWORKS. Through its ease of use and reduced cost in manufacturing, SOLIDWORKS brought large-scale ambition to small-scale production.


Bioplastic fantastic

It’s not just alcohol that’s leading the tech front either. With the furore over disposable cup refuse, Smart Cups thinks it has the perfect answer. Made from bioplastic that degrades, Smart Cup drinks are lined with printed flavour that dissolves with water, providing the drinker with an instant beverage to quaff on the go – and no waste. It doesn’t even need stirring! From coffee to juice drinks and flavour-packed energy boosts, the company boasts it can turn its cup to anything.


Supplying the sup

The manufacturing of the drinks isn’t the only thing taking the industry to the next evolutionary stage, so is the packaging Smart labelling that stores more than just nutritional details, but end-to-end supply chain information, making identification and recalls swifter and more secure than ever before. As well as product information and source of manufacture, drinks companies are keener than ever to engage and inspire brand loyalty with their consumers, with innovations that connect with your mobile phone. Diet Coke with no sugar but added connectivity? It’s just around the corner.


Raise a glass to the future…

The diverse world of the modern beverage industry has just started its next phase into quenching thirst. We’ll raise a glass to that.

 

You may also be interested in:

>> Fresh fields, yields and smart farming: agriculture’s techy future
>> Plantscrapers and robotic bees: is this the future of food?

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post How Technology is Changing the Beverage Industry appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS UK at October 16, 2018 11:00 AM

SolidSmack

iPads Are Getting The Full Version of Adobe Photoshop In 2019

adobe photoshop on ipad

You know what’s cool? Having the power of a PC in the palm of your hand.

You know what isn’t cool? Not having the ability to use Photoshop when you have downtime on your travels. Well, this is about to change; iPad devices are about to get the FULL Photoshop experience.

That’s right — you no longer have to worry about carrying that behemoth workstation with you to the beach:

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ccSBlU8YB90?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

According to a report by Bloomberg, this is the first part of Adobe’s new master plan to make their programs compatible across as many platforms as possible. Unlike most apps with a mobile port, the company is planning on bringing a “full version” of the software to mobile devices, complete with a full rework of the interface to make it more accessible to touchscreen users.

This isn’t to mean your expertise of the classic interface will be put to waste. In addition to the reworked touchpad interface, Adobe has also included the traditional Photoshop interface which lets photo editors hone their muscle memory and get into the swing of things without losing a stride. Users who are already subscribed to the Adobe’s Creative Cloud will now have more use of the service on their devices.

The company is planning to announce the mobile rework of Photoshop this October at their Adobe MAX conference this month, with a foreseeable release sometime in 2019. Seeing as the big gap left by Adobe’s absence on mobile devices is about to be filled by the company itself, competing apps better watch out!

The post iPads Are Getting The Full Version of Adobe Photoshop In 2019 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at October 16, 2018 10:22 AM

October 15, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – October 2018

Hello to all,

Welcome to this new edition of the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News, co-authored by members of the SOLIDWORKS Technical Support teams worldwide.

Key Areas to Consider When Designing a Disaster Recovery Plan for a Business IT Infrastructure

By Tim Kwong

Restoring data and applications on other servers are routine tasks that most companies can perform in a matter of minutes or hours. But what happens when it is not possible to obtain the necessary hardware, infrastructure, and personnel to restore the data and applications? Trying to come up and execute a recovery plan after disaster hits can seriously affect the health of a company and the ability to stay in business. The survival of company is dependent on how fast it can bounce back from a disaster.

All companies need to plan, invest, and implement a disaster recovery strategy for their business-critical data and applications. Below highlights key areas that should be considered when formulating a disaster recovery and response plan.

 

Key Areas:

  • Upper Management: Must have full support and commitment from upper management or owner. It is difficult for any individual or IT department to successfully accomplish this critical and often forgotten aspect of business operation, especially for small businesses.
  • Stakeholders: Identify internal departments and data needed to get the company going after a disaster strikes. Engage with the department stakeholders and understand what they are the critical elements for them to have the business running.
  • Existing Plans: Collect and review any existing recovery plans. If plans exist, they may be able to just update and merge them.
  • Risk Assessment: Understand current operation which includes facility, infrastructure, and key components of the business.
  • Facility: Consider building location and accessibility. It is possible the building is not accessible or destroyed.
  • Infrastructure and Hardware: Understand utility and network/Internet availability and options to switch to secondary sources such as co-hosting location or branch office. Ensure standby hardware has the capacity to handle the workload.
  • Key Personnel: Create an emergency response team. The team will responsible for executing the plan when called upon.
  • Training: Determine and provide the training needed for the response team. Also, there is a need to cross-train people on different areas so there is built-in redundancy in the team.
  • Resources: Ensure the response team has the proper resources to execute the plan.
  • Testing: Periodic testing ensure everyone knows their responsibility when the disaster hits.

 

SOLIDWORKS 2019 SP0 has been released

By Brad Phillips

SOLIDWORKS® 2019 SP0 officially has been released as of 12:57 PM EST October 9th, 2018!

This release is packed with amazing new features. Here is a list of the Top Enhancements of SOLIDWORKS 2019 found in the SOLIDWORKS Help documentation.

If you are a customer on active subscription you can download SOLIDWORKS 2019 by logging into the Customer Portal and selecting the Downloads and Updates section.

 

Can SOLIDWORKS Help You Win at Roller Bowler?

By Brad Phillips

The Woodland Hills Technical Support team last summer had 4 interns compete in a SOLIDWORKS Internship Design Challenge. The design, build and competition phases of this challenge were filmed and compiled in a video that is now featured on the SOLIDWORKS Youtube Channel.

Here is a link to the video “Can SOLIDWORKS Help You Win at Roller Bowler?”

Noteworthy Solutions from the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base

icon - SW When I change machine-license activation to online licensing, why do I see the error ‘Activation type cannot be changed because more than 1 user is assigned to this Product.’?
The purpose of online licensing is to accommodate an individual user who has more than one device. An online license can only be assigned to one user, see Solution Id: S-074581.

In SOLIDWORKS®2017 SP5, when using custom templates for parts and assemblies, how can I collaborate with SOLIDWORKS PCB 2017 SP5?
For more information, see Solution Id: S-075005.

Icon - EPDM When I log in to the SOLIDWORKS® PDM local view, why do see the error ‘Could not load file or assembly [File path]\AddRenamer_x64.dll or one of its dependencies. The module was expected to contain an assembly manifest.’?
To resolve this issue, follow the steps in Solution Id: S-074508.

In SOLIDWORKS® Simulation, is it possible to offload studies from multiple coordinator systems to the same worker agent system at the same time as using the Offloaded Simulation functionality?
See Solution Id: S-074537.

In SOLIDWORKS® Flow Simulation, which applications are most suitable for use with the free surface functionality?
For more information, see Solution Id: S-074515.


That’s it for this month. Thanks for reading this edition of SOLIDWORKS Support News. If you need additional help with these issues or any others, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller.

Also, comments and suggestions are welcome. You can enter them below.

Author information

Bradley Phillips
Sr. Technical Customer Support Engineer, SolidWorks, NAM at DS SolidWorks Corp.
I have been a Tech Support engineer for SOLIDWORKS products since 2013. I now handle the SolidWorks Support Monthly News blog.

The post SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – October 2018 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Bradley Phillips at October 15, 2018 02:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Problems when changing SOLIDWORKS Electrical Application Settings from Local to Server Setup

As a SOLIDWORKS Electrical Technical Support Expert I come across a lot of cases when electrical users change their SOLIDWORKS Electrical Application Settings from the Local Setup to the Server Setup and vice versa.

  • For a Local Setup the electrical projects are saved on the local machine and the SQL instance is also installed locally.
  • However, for the Server Setup, all the electrical users save their projects on the server machine and they use the SQL instance that is installed on the server. Server setup is used in case of larger companies with large number of electrical users.
SOLIDWORKS Electrical Application Settings

Application settings – Server Setup

In some cases, on the client machine changing the application settings from the local to server always reverts back to local, when the end user machine is restarted or even the SOLIDWORKS electrical schematic window is closed and relaunched. This only happens in some cases not always.

If one electrical user already has his/her machine connected to the server, the SOLIDWORKS Electrical Application Settings Windows registry key from the working machine can be exported and ran on another client machine.

How to resolve SOLIDWORKS Electrical Application Settings issues

  1. Open the Registry Editor Window through Windows search > Type Regedit > Right-click and run as an administrator.
  2. On the working machine, browse to Computer\HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Trace Software
  3. Right click on the Trace Software > Export > Save as *.reg file.

Export the Trace software Key

  1. Now save the .reg file on the desktop of the non-working machine.
  2. Double click and run the registry file.
  3. Click yes once you receive the message with the warning (below) and if you wish to continue. Now launch SOLIDWORKS Electrical Schematic > Tools > Application settings. The application settings will be permanently set to the server setup.

 

Confirmation message

The post Problems when changing SOLIDWORKS Electrical Application Settings from Local to Server Setup appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at October 15, 2018 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Monday List 42.18 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

SolidSmack Monday List

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

How Much Power Do ‘Millennials’ Actually Have?

Millennials, clearly, are not living the lives of easy abundance bestowed on generations past — no fighting over the check at Outback Steakhouse, no need (or budget) for a station wagon.

How Much Power Do ‘Millennials’ Actually Have?

Betterment’s Low-Fee Evangelist Has a Retirement Algorithm for You

The platform’s radical simplicity is gaining followers, and the old guard wants in.

Betterment App

The Big Hack: How China Used a Tiny Chip to Infiltrate U.S. Companies

The attack by Chinese spies reached almost 30 U.S. companies, including Amazon and Apple, by compromising America’s technology supply chain, according to extensive interviews with government and corporate sources.

Chinese Hacking

How Do You Take a Picture of a Black Hole? With a Telescope as Big as the Earth

A planet-spanning virtual observatory, years in the making, could change how we think about space, time and the nature of reality. Will it work?

Black Hole

Thoughts on Olympic Skateboarding from Tony Hawk

In less than two years, skateboarding will be in the Olympics. I spent my weekend at the Youth Olympic Games in Buenos Aires to get a better perspective of how that will work and my potential role in the process.

Skateboarding Olympics

Elon Musk Will Never Change

The Tesla CEO’s brush with the SEC won’t cause him to reevaluate his actions

Elon Musk

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 42.18 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 15, 2018 11:39 AM

Cool Tools of Doom: The 3Dconnexion SpaceMouse Wireless 3D Mouse

3D Mouse

Long considered an indispensable asset for anybody working in CAD, the 3D mouse is a quintessential tool that belongs on the desktop of any industrial designer or engineer.

Within a 3D application such as SolidWorks, Rhino, Fusion 360, or Keyshot, the directional, zoom and rotate functions provide an intuitive extension of the users’ design intent. To put it quite simply, a 3D mouse helps get rid of those annoying repetitive keystrokes and allows the designer to come as close to possible to holding their digital 3D design in the physical world.

As pioneers of the 3D mouse territory, 3Dconnexion has blazed a trail with their SpaceMouse collection. And when it comes to the perfect balance of price, performance, and portability, we’re big fans of the company’s SpaceNavigator 3D Mouse.

Utilizing the company’s patented 6-Degrees-of-Freedom (6DoF) sensor, the intuitive 3D mouse also includes two buttons for accessing radial control menus to drive commands from directly within your applications. And with a wireless connection, you can be sure that this won’t be just another desktop peripheral clogging your desk with obnoxious wires.

SpaceMouse 3D Mouse

The 3Dconnexion SpaceMouse Wireless 3D Mouse — $149.00

Features:

  • Superior 3D Navigation – Intuitively and precisely navigate digital models or viewports in 3D space.
  • Wireless Freedom – 3Dconnexion 2.4GHz Wireless technology ensures a reliable, real-time connection to your 3D content.
  • Easy to Use – Each SpaceMouse Wireless button opens its own radial menu providing convenient mouse-click access to four application commands.
  • Flexible Recharging – Supplied micro-USB cable handles re-charging and data at the same time. Just connect and continue working, Stylish Design – small footprint, elegant brushed steel base, two buttons.

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The 3Dconnexion SpaceMouse Wireless 3D Mouse appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 15, 2018 11:30 AM

Scribit Sketches Impressive Designs On Your Walls; Puts Your Kids Out of The Job

All of us were told off from drawing on the walls as children for a lot of reasons. Maybe it’s because we couldn’t reach high enough for our parents to appreciate our work. Or perhaps they couldn’t see art if it was right in front of their faces. Or it could just be the uncleanable, horrible mess it left afterward.

It’s ironic the Scribit does exactly the same thing we did as kids, only on a slightly elevated level and with a more professional eye for art.

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The wall-clinging robot, designed by MIT professor Carlo Ratti, draws virtually any image found online on any surface it’s attached to. Just hang the Scribit by a nail, plug it into an electrical socket, connect it to your laptop or mobile device, and watch it beautifully vandalize whatever smooth surface it’s attached to.

Scribit Wall Drawing Robot Scribit Wall Drawing Robot

The way the machine draws and erases scribbles on your walls is quite impressive. You can stick up to four different Scribit markers into the machine at once, and it will choose which color is appropriate for your chosen drawing. Scribit will then run along the wall on two side wheels and complete the image while you leave it be and make a sandwich or something.

Scribit Wall Drawing Robot

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The erasing process is even cooler… or should I say hotter? Once you’re tired of an old drawing, Scribit erases it via a tiny pod eraser which heats up to 65°C (149 °F) and runs along the areas which were drawn on. Since the drawing is still in the robot’s memory, it merely follows where it has been and evaporates any marker traces, leaving the surface free for another work of art.


Scribit Wall Drawing Robot Scribit Wall Drawing Robot

You can have Scribit draw images, but you can also let it sketch reminders such as your to-do lists, weather forecasts, and even your Twitter feed. A small LED located over the markers tells you if Scribit is currently drawing, loading a new drawing, or slacking off.

Scribit Wall Drawing Robot Scribit Wall Drawing Robot

The robot measures 6.6 inches by 3.15 inches and is made up of an aluminum outer shell. This shell protects the rotative shell which changes the markers used and switches the Scribit from standby to writing mode. And those two “ears” on the side? Those are the wheels which move Scribit along the wall as it taps into its artistic side.

Scribit Wall Drawing Robot Scribit Wall Drawing Robot Scribit Wall Drawing Robot

Earlier iterations of the Scribit used to look a lot blockier and more like a traditional robot, but with a few design tweaks, it now has the iconic round shape it has today.

Scribit’s crowdfunding campaign was a massive success ($3.7 million raised over an initial goal of $50K) and is now on its way to becoming a fully-developed graffiti robot. You can read more on the project over on the Scribit webpage, Kickstarter, or Indiegogo.

The post Scribit Sketches Impressive Designs On Your Walls; Puts Your Kids Out of The Job appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at October 15, 2018 11:12 AM

October 14, 2018

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Measure Tool can remain On Screen for all Tools

The Measure tool is one of those features that you always need around.  So why not keep it open as you work?  SOLIDWORKS 2019 enhances the Measure tool so it can remain open while working in other tools.  This applies to any tool in Part, Assembly or Drawing environments!

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Measure Tool Available when Creating Part Features

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Measure Tool Available when Creating Part Features

With another tool open, the Evaluate tab will now show Measure is available.  You can keep the Measure window open when switching between tools, features, parts/assemblies/drawings and it remains accessible.

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Measure Tool Available when adding Mates

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Measure Tool Available when adding Mates

If you have the Measure tool open on screen and want to perform other tasks, like right-click on components to open, it may try to keep measuring items.  No worries, just right-click and choose ‘Select’.  This will make the Measure window inactive until you click it again.

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Deactivate Measure Tool Dialog

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Deactivate Measure Tool Dialog

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Activate Measure Tool Dialog

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Activate Measure Tool Dialog

The post SOLIDWORKS 2019 Measure Tool can remain On Screen for all Tools appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at October 14, 2018 12:00 PM

October 13, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Importing Sheet Metal

Introduction

SolidSolutions has recently welcomed another 11 Technical Interns to the team, they are currently being put through a 12 week induction and as part of this they’ll be blogging about what they’ve learned. Having recently sat on the SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal training course we asked our Sheffield Trio – Will, Alex & Jordan – to explain how to turn imported files into fully functional SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal.

So let’s start with Alex’s explanation of the Convert to Sheet Metal tool.

Convert to sheet metal

“Convert to Sheet Metal” allows the user to quickly convert parts into sheet metal models, from there a flat pattern can be automatically created. This is a useful tool if the initial part has been created using standard part modeling features such as extrudes and lofts. The tool also works well on imported Sheet Metal files, to use it simply follow these steps.

  1. Define the desired thickness and bend radius either by selecting a gauge table or by entering it manually. In this example, I have used a sample table for steel and selected 14 gauge with a 2.54mm bend radius.
  2. Select a fixed face, here I have selected the bottom face has been selected as the fixed entity. This decides which face the remaining faces are bent from.
  3. Select required “Bend Edges” to define the bends in the sheet metal part. SOLIDWORKS will then automatically select “Rip Edges” which create cuts in the sheet metal body.
  4. Due to the structure of this component it is impossible to bend the fourth edge to complete the shape, so we’ll need to use a “Rip Sketch”. A “Rip Sketch” will cause a “Rip Edge” to be added at a chosen location based on the geometry of the sketch.
  5. Where two edges meet the gap and type of corner; Open Butt, Overlap, Underlap, can be selected for all or individually. For this example, I have selected an Open Butt corner type with a 1mm gap
  6. The part is now converted to sheet metal and can be viewed as a folded or flattened part.

Want to know more?

Visit the SolidSolutions blog to view more methods for working with Sheet Metal parts from our new engineers Jordan and Will.

 

Author information

NT CADCAM
NT CADCAM is the UK's most established SolidWorks reseller in England, Scotland and Wales. Offering a fully supported CAD and CAM product portfolio and high levels of expertise internally, makes NT CADCAM unique within the SolidWorks community, giving customers the confidence and assurance they need that their support issues will be dealt with both promptly and efficiently. As a SolidWorks Certified Training Centre, NT CADCAM provides clients with fully certified and accredited trainers who are experienced engineers.

The post Importing Sheet Metal appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by NT CADCAM at October 13, 2018 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Make your Tables Pop with the Cell Border Thickness Feature in SOLIDWORKS 2019

When it comes time to create drawing documentation for large and complex assemblies, we are often met with SOLIDWORKS tables that reflects that. So, it can be daunting for end users to sift through drawings trying to find corresponding part information. That is why with the launch of SOLIDWORKS 2019, there is a new SOLIDWORKS Table Cell Border thickness feature. Let’s see how it works!

Setting Up Line Thickness for your SOLIDWORKS Tables

Once we have generated our SOLIDWORKS tables, it’s time to customize the cell thickness.

  1. We will start by highlighting the cells where we want to apply the line thickness.
  2. We then select the Border Edit button located in the formatting ribbon.
  3. From here we can move the mouse over the lines we want to edit, then click to get the drop down menu.
Borders have never looked this good in Solidworks Tables!

Steps for Formatting Cell Border Thickness

After a bit of editing, we have a table that is much easier to read. Thicker lines are a great way of providing visual queues that will have your colleagues thanking you for making it easier to navigate those SOLIDWORKS tables.

SOLIDWORKS Table Cell Border applied

An example of a Table that Utilizes the Line Thickness

The SOLIDWORKS Table Cell Border thickness feature in SOLIDWORKS 2019 is a great way of organizing information, and provides visual queues that can guide a reader’s eye when looking through long tables.

For other tips on making your SOLIDWORKS Tables pop you can check out:

The post Make your Tables Pop with the Cell Border Thickness Feature in SOLIDWORKS 2019 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at October 13, 2018 12:00 PM

October 12, 2018

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Manage 2019 Thumbnail Images

It’s even easier in SOLIDWORKS Manage 2019, to find the files you’re looking for with the addition of SOLIDWORKS Manage Thumbnail Images.  These previews include all SOLIDWORKS file types (sldprt, slddrw and sldasm) and have been added to key locations such as the main grid and BOM view within manage.

SOLIDWORKS Manage Thumbnail Images in the Main Grid

SOLIDWORKS Manage Thumbnail Images in the Main Grid

SOLIDWORKS Manage Thumbnail Images in the Main Grid

Thumbnail Images in the BOM View

Within the view settings select Show Images:

Show Images

Show Images

Then the thumbnail previews are shown:

SOLIDWORKS Manage Thumbnail Images in the BOM View

Thumbnail images in the BOM View

NOTE: These preview images are created from checked in files within the SOLIDWORKS PDM vault and are configuration specific, based off the last activated configuration saved within SOLIDWORKS.

The post SOLIDWORKS Manage 2019 Thumbnail Images appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at October 12, 2018 04:00 PM

How to Suppress/Disable Equations in different SOLIDWORKS Configurations

The ability to configure equations was introduced in SOLIDWORKS 2014.  This change removed the previous simplified functionality of only suppress/unsuppress equations in different configurations.  SOLIDWORKS 2017 introduced disable/enable equations, however this can only be applied to all configurations at once.  So the question is how can we configure SOLIDWORKS Equations in order to suppress/disable/ignore an equation in another configuration?

The Equation manager allows you to set different equations/values for each configuration.  Use the dropdown beside the expression for ‘this configuration’.  This is useful as configurations may require varying equations.

Configure SOLIDWORKS Equations

Configure SOLIDWORKS Equations

If you want a configuration that won’t be affected by the equation, you could set the value/equation to be a static number (i.e. 100mm) in this configuration.  In this example, changing D2@Sketch4 would no longer affect D1@Sketch1.  However this will still show the dimension is linked to an equation of ‘=100’.

SOLIDWORKS Equation linked to static value

SOLIDWORKS Equation linked to static value

To completely remove the linked equation in another configuration, edit the dimension dialog and delete the entire equation syntax for ‘this configuration’.  Now one configuration will have the equation syntax and the other will not.  This will in turn make the equation disappear from the Equation dialog when viewing the ‘No Equation’ configuration.

SOLIDWORKS Equation Removed

SOLIDWORKS Equation Removed

SOLIDWORKS Linked Equation

SOLIDWORKS Linked Equation

The post How to Suppress/Disable Equations in different SOLIDWORKS Configurations appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at October 12, 2018 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

What to Look for When Hiring a SOLIDWORKS Engineer or Designer

Engineering Hires

With the economy picking up in the Gulf Coast region as well as in other parts of the country, we’ve received many questions from companies that use SOLIDWORKS, wanting to know how to find and hire the right engineers and designers to feed their growing demand. SOLIDWORKS, like any other tool, is only as good as the person using it. So, how do you know the engineer standing in front of you, resume in hand, is the right person to maximize the return on your SOLIDWORKS investment?

Traits to look for in a Candidate

 
The first step in any search is identifying what you are looking for. If you have been in a management position for any length of time, you have likely noticed a trend among your best-performing team members: they embody what it is to be considered a craftsman. True craftsmen are excited by the tools of their trade and are more likely to find success using them. Whether it’s the mechanic who sprints to the MAC tool truck when it pulls into the parking lot like a kid running after an ice cream truck, or the machinist that never misses a chance to quiz the local Mazak or Haas rep, these top performers fully immerse themselves in their trade. These are the kinds of team members who like to discover new and innovative methods for getting their job done faster, better, and cheaper. The same rules apply for engineers and designers

How to find the right Candidate

 
Now that you know the kind of employee you’re looking for; the next step becomes how to find them. Where do you find candidates that fit the criteria we have established? Start by contacting your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller (VAR). Due to your local rep’s proximity to the design and engineering sphere, they will be able to provide you with valuable pointers and resources for your search. Your SOLIDWORKS VAR can also provide you with access to a database, managed by SOLIDWORKS, of certified SOLIDWORKS users. Next, reach out to your local SOLIDWORKS User Group. These User Groups meet on a regular basis and are a great place to network with users (this is the same advice we give to users seeking opportunities). Finally, when you are reviewing resumes you receive, look for experience in the advanced SOLIDWORKS tools like PDM, Composer, Inspection, Model Based Definition or others. An experience like this tells you the candidate is motivated and constantly seeks out tools and methods to improve his or her performance. Don’t simply settle for the “experienced with SOLIDWORKS” resume line.

Questions to ask during the interview

 
Once you find that perfect candidate(s), it’s time for an interview. What kind of questions do you ask to ensure they fit your need? We have already discussed how experience with advanced SOLIDWORKS tools on the resume is an indication you might have a great candidate on your hands. Even if it doesn’t pertain to your specific processes, probe them about that experience. How did the interviewee come to learn SOLIDWORKS Model Based Definition? If the answer is anything along the lines of “After seeing a demo at a user group event, I presented the functionality and how I thought it would benefit our current process to our management team. They approved and put me in charge of implementation,” you know you are dealing with a motivated candidate.

Ask them about their hobbies outside of work. Look for activities in the sphere of Computer-Aided Design. Ask them if they own a license of SOLIDWORKS. All of the inquiries will give you context beyond what appears on their resume. Finally, don’t be afraid to ask the candidate to take a practical exam. Give them a simple example of a part you produce and ask them to reproduce it in SOLIDWORKS. If you are not sure of what an appropriate exam might look like, your local SOLIDWORKS VAR can provide you with some guidance.

To summarize, we have identified the traits inherent in a motivated, innovative designer or engineer, how to find candidates with those traits, and the types of questions to ask during an interview to validate your candidate is the right fit. Now, is it reasonable to expect this type of candidate for every position on your engineering and design team? Probably not, especially in today’s market. However, by following these steps, your company can hire the right person capable of providing direction for your Design and Engineering teams and ensure you get the maximum return possible on your SOLIDWORKS investment.

Author information

MLC CAD Systems
Celebrating Three Decades of Unbeatable Service! MLC CAD System's mission is to help design and manufacturing companies, entrepreneurs, creative individuals, research institutions and other organizations put their ideas and products into production using the industry's best software technologies including SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD, Mastercam, 3D Systems' & Markforged 3D printers well as other leading CAD and CAM technologies.

The post What to Look for When Hiring a SOLIDWORKS Engineer or Designer appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by MLC CAD Systems at October 12, 2018 12:00 PM

October 11, 2018

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Be Part of the Growing Community Testing SOLIDWORKS xDesign

Every week we’ve been sharing blog posts about SOLIDWORKS xDesign showcasing some of the projects our interns and Hackathon participants developed with the software. Now it’s your chance … the public Lighthouse program for xDesign is underway.

What can you do with xDesign?

  •          Create CAD models in a browser from anywhere
  •          Exchange ideas and innovate in a secure environment
  •          Define tasks to track and organize activities
  •          Let the software help you determine shapes with Design Guidance

 Why should you participate?

Joining the Lighthouse program provides you with early access to xDesign. When you get your hands on the product, you can provide feedback and influence the product roadmap. You will also be able to participate in fun contests with the possibility to win prizes.

Once you create your models, you have an opportunity to share your content and experience with the SOLIDWORKS community on the website or at events.

What does it cost?

During the Lighthouse program you get free access to the software. We provide a dedicated private tenant for use in production environment for each reference customer. You also receive training and support from SOLIDWORKS experts.

How do you join?

Become part of the growing community of users riding the next wave of technological innovations by filling out the form on the website: https://www.solidworks.com/how-to-buy/join-xdesign-lighthouse-program

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Be Part of the Growing Community Testing SOLIDWORKS xDesign appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at October 11, 2018 05:15 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Manage 2019 List of Recent Documents

New for SOLIDWORKS 2019 release, SOLIDWORKS Manage Recent Documents are now listed in the Dashboard and Shortcuts Panel making it easier to access all your favorite documents

SOLIDWORKS Manage Recent Documents in the Dashboard

The Dashboard panel provides a list of the recent documents as shown in the figure below:

SOLIDWORKS Manage Recent Documents in the Dashboard

SOLIDWORKS Manage Dashboard

SOLIDWORKS Manage Recent Documents in the Shortcuts Panel

The shortcuts panel is available from any screen within SOLIDWORKS Manage, on the right side:

SOLIDWORKS Manage Shortcuts Panel

SOLIDWORKS Manage Shortcuts Panel

With these SOLIDWORKS 2019 enhancements we can navigate between recent documents within SOLIDWORKS Manage much quicker and easier.

The post SOLIDWORKS Manage 2019 List of Recent Documents appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at October 11, 2018 04:00 PM

How to Upgrade SOLIDWORKS Toolbox to a Newer Version

After upgrading SOLIDWORKS to a newer major release, you may see a warning that the Hole Wizard and Advance Hole database is not the expected version.  This indicates that the Hole Wizard/Toolbox database has not been properly updated to the same version. You will need to upgrade SOLIDWORKS Toolbox to the newer version.

Upgrade SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Warning

SOLIDWORKS Hole Wizard/Toolbox Warning

If your database is stored locally (default is C:\SOLIDWORKS Data) then an upgrade of SOLIDWORKS will automatically perform the update.  Typically this behaviour is seen with a shared Toolbox on a network drive.

NOTE: The warning will also be seen with a Toolbox stored in SOLIDWORKS PDM, but this requires additional steps of searching for others with files checked out and then checking out the entire Toolbox.

Upgrade SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Option 1: Manual Process

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox can be updated using a manual process, however there is a very specific workflow to take and steps can be missed that will cause it to fail.  Another disadvantage of the manual upgrade is that the ToolboxVersion.dat file within the main directory will not be refreshed.  If you open this .DAT file in Notepad, it will indicate the version and service pack.  However the manual update process does not change this .DAT file so it no longer represents the actual version of the Toolbox folder (though this will not affect its functionality).

Upgrade SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Option 2: Run a SOLIDWORKS Installation Repair

The most robust and encompassing update is to run a Repair of the newer SOLIDWORKS installation while pointing its options to the older Toolbox.  This will automatically upgrade the database and all files, including the ToolboxVersion.dat.

  1. Make a copy of the entire Toolbox folder to the local machine
  2. Open SOLIDWORKS and go to Tools > Options > System Options > Hole Wizard/Toolbox
  3. Change the path to the copied local Toolbox folder
  4. The same warning will be given that its the unexpected version.  Browse to the same local path a second time and it should stick to show the path*
  5. After verifying the options are correctly pointing the local folder, close SOLIDWORKS and run a Repair of the installation
  6. Open SOLIDWORKS and test with the updated local Toolbox
  7. Copy the upgraded Toolbox back to the server.  Don’t overwrite the older Toolbox folder.  Rename it so you still have a backup of your Toolbox in the older version.
  8. Point the SOLIDWORKS options to the newer Toolbox folder on the server

*If you have difficulties pointing the options to the local Toolbox in Step 4, you can manually change the path in the Windows Registry under:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Solidworks\SOLIDWORKS 20YY\General\Toolbox Data Location

NOTE: Both of the methods above can be performed directly over a network path if Full Control permissions are given to the Toolbox folder.  However it would be recommended to copy the Toolbox locally to perform the upgrade and then copy back to the server location.  This would avoid problems caused by other users accessing the Toolbox during the upgrade and potential network connection data loss.

The post How to Upgrade SOLIDWORKS Toolbox to a Newer Version appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at October 11, 2018 12:00 PM

October 10, 2018

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Interference Detection on Multibody Parts

The SOLIDWORKS 2019 Interference Detection tool can be used directly on a multibody part.  This is very useful to check weldment parts (or multibody sheet metal parts) for any potential interferences that need to be reviewed.  Previous versions required other solutions such as combine or inserting into an assembly.

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Multibody Interference Detection

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Multibody Interference Detection

This is also useful when running Simulation studies on multibody parts.  Simulation studies will fail with any interference of bodies.  This tool will help locate the problematic regions.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Interference Detected

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Interference Detected

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Interference Detection for Simulation Studies

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Interference Detection for Simulation Studies

The Options are similar to assembly Interference Detection.  There is an option to ‘Skip interferences inside inserted parts’.  If you insert another part into this part, any interferences contained within the inserted part is ignored.  However if the inserted overall part has interference with your component, this will still show up.

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Multibody Interference Detection Options

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Multibody Interference Detection Options

The post SOLIDWORKS 2019 Interference Detection on Multibody Parts appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at October 10, 2018 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Using SOLIDWORKS and 3D Printing to Breathe New Life into Broken Toys

1. Uncovering a childhood memory at the thrift store!

I love thrift stores. There’s something magical about walking into one of these places and uncovering a treasure or seeing something from your childhood resurface. The latter is what happened to me when I went to my local thrift store last weekend. The thing that caught my eye this time was Guitar Hero.

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Guitar Hero
</figure>

Guitar Hero was a video game released by RedOctane back in 2005. The main goal of the game is to use this plastic guitar controller to hit colorful notes that would fly at you on the screen. It was all the rage back in the day. Memories flooded of me hanging out with my friends, enjoying music from Aerosmith to Coldplay to Metallica in a new interactive way! I had to have it. And for four dollars, the price was right!

But before I could reconnect with my childhood, there was a problem: The Whammy bar was broken. The Whammy Bar is the metal rod that sticks out the base of the guitar. It is supposed to stick up, and you can press it down repeatedly to “bend” the pitch of notes in the game, which earned you extra points (and was always super fun to wail on!) Well, the whammy bar that came with my controller was a little bit more…. Sad. Take a look:

<iframe allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sSe1l46aHzY?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

We can deduce that there is a spring in there that is not doing its job. Maybe the spring dislodged? Perhaps something else is broken in there? Only one way to find out. Let’s open it up! I did just that by removing a handful of screws, and then the problem was immediately apparent. Pictured below is the whammy bar extracted from the body of the guitar, as seen from the back. The problem area is circled in red. There is a little white plastic tab that is supposed to interface with the levers holding the spring. The plastic has yielded to the point of failure, no doubt from intense (fun) use.

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Whammy Bar Extracted From Guitar Body
</figure>

In my opinion, this is poor design. The plastic tab was molded with almost no radius on the inside corners. This coupled with a kid’s soda-fueled punishing of the mechanism, probably lead to a very high stress concentration on the tab, causing it to fail. After that analysis, another realization dawned on me.

This is unfixable.

If I was a kid back in 2007 facing this problem, what could I possibly do to repair it? That plastic tab is part of the piece of plastic that the whammy bar inserts into. They didn’t exactly sell that in any store. Some of you may be thinking “Super Glue”. It’s a valiant effort, but I will give anyone $100 if they can glue that back on straight so that it fits in the mechanism. Remember, the plastic has yielded and deformed, at this point its practically impossible. Still, let’s say by some miracle, you were able to do that and take my money. I bet you another $100 that it wouldn’t even last a day. A super glue joint will be nowhere near as strong as the original part. You’d put it back together only to have it snap after trying out the whammy bar a few times. I’ll take my money back now.

The only option (if you wanted the whammy bar functionality) is to buy a new guitar. That leaves this old guitar to be thrown in the closet, given away, or worse yet, landfilled. This guitar had no chance of being played again…

Until now!

It’s 10 years later. I have a mechanical engineering degree, expert certification in SOLIDWORKS, and some 3D printers in the DesignPoint office. Let’s see what we can do.

2. Modeling a replacement in SOLIDWORKS

As we discussed, the plastic part has no chance of being repaired so let’s just make a new one! First thing we need to do is model it in SOLIDWORKS. Since the part is very prismatic in nature, using calipers to measure it all over is the simplest method.

<figure class="wpb_wrapper vc_figure">
SOLIDWORKS Model of Replacement Whammy Bar Component
</figure>

I start with the base semi-circular prism, and then add features that I can easily measure. Most of the measurements are good enough as approximates, but there are a couple of critical fits that I need to be cautious of. One one hand, there is the hole that is the axis of rotation of the whammy bar (shown in blue in the image below). This needs to be a slip fit. If it is too tight, the mechanism may bind even with the spring applying a force. On the other hand, the hole shown in red is what accepts the metal whammy bar itself. It should be able to rotate in the hole if you turn it manually but stay where it is placed when a force is not applied. Therefore, a slight interference fit is most appropriate.

<figure class="wpb_wrapper vc_figure">
Interfacing Components
</figure>

I measure the interfacing components’ outer diameters (a potentiometer for the blue face, and the whammy bar itself for the red, and add 0.008 inch to the diameter for the blue face and 0.001 inch for the red face.) The nice thing about 3D printing is that if this needs to be adjusted, it isn’t expensive to print out another prototype (and of course, we can very quickly modify the dimension(s) in SOLIDWORKS!)

Now that I have the base part, it’s time to add the pièce de résistance: the tab. Remember the tab is what transfers the force between furious Guitar Hero players and the spring, so we can use this as a chance to beef up the design.

<figure class="wpb_wrapper vc_figure">
Cantilever Tab Connected To Larger Boss
</figure>

Shown here in gray is an approximation of the original design. We can see that it consists of a cantilever type tab connected to the larger boss. I mentioned earlier, the problem here is that the fillets (pointed out in red) are very small, which leads to high stress concentrations and failure.

<figure class="wpb_wrapper vc_figure">
Cantilever with Doubly Supported Overhanging Design
</figure>

Contrast this with some of the design changes I made, shown here in teal. I changed the cantilever design to a doubly-supported overhanging design, which should give it better resistance to the bending moment that it experiences during use. NOTE: this would make it very difficult to mold without the use of side cores, but since we are 3D printing, we have that design flexibility!

The size of the fillets were also changed. The fillets pointed out in orange are sized very generously to handle the shear stresses induced during use. The fillet in purple was also made larger, but not to the degree that the orange ones were. The tab has a pretty close fit with this mechanism, so making the fillet any larger would likely interfere and propose a problem. I’m confident that the other changes make up for it though.

With these changes done, it is time to print!

3. 3D Printing and testing

I set to print this on our Markforged printer. The Onyx plastic that it uses is very strong and has a very beautiful deep black finish. After sending the print and waiting, this is what I got:

<figure class="wpb_wrapper vc_figure">
Markforged Onyx Plastic Part
</figure>

All the features came out great and it is time for a test fit! The slip fits that I mentioned earlier were nailed perfectly, so no problems there. The interference fit too, however, it is a little bit too tight. I add 0.002 inch to the diameter of the hole, give it another try and the fit is perfect the second time around!

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New Whammy Bar with 3D Printed Component
</figure>

Here is a picture of the whammy bar installed in the brand-new part. Looks slick!

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New Whammy Bar Installed in Guitar
</figure>

Here is another picture of the new part installed in the guitar. You can see the new black tab fits perfectly into the hole left by the two white levers with the spring. When the whammy bar is used, the tab pulls the levers and stretches the spring, which give the upwards force. Clever!

All that is left to do is close it back up and give it a spin! Check it out!

<iframe allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rUQjVAwv0SI?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

As a final deed, I also gave the guitar a good cleaning and removed all the stickers and decals…. Looks like it just came right out of the box!

 

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Old Guitar Hero Alongside The Fixed and Cleaned Version
</figure>

Within a day, I was able to turn thrift store junk into hours of amusement using the power of SOLIDWORKS combined with the power of Markforged! Now, let’s see if I can beat my old high scores…

Check out more blogs like this one here. You’ll find helpful articles and educational videos on a wide range of engineering and manufacturing topics to help you maximize efficiency in your job role!

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Author: Robert Maldonado, Application Engineer at DesignPoint

Author information

DesignPoint
DesignPoint is passionate about building solutions that help product design, engineering and manufacturing companies maximize their potential. By developing trusted partnerships, we help our customers achieve game-changing results and support them in their journey as they strive for more. With DesignPoint, More is Possible.® Our solutions include SOLIDWORKS 3D software, 3D Systems and MarkForged 3D printers, technical support, training and more. Contact us today at design-point.com!

The post Using SOLIDWORKS and 3D Printing to Breathe New Life into Broken Toys appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by DesignPoint at October 10, 2018 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Get Advice from the Experts at the CAD Manager’s Boot Camp at SOLIDWORKS World 2019

Are you a CAD manager? It’s a tough job. We know. That’s why we will be bringing together the most experienced SOLIDWORKS Technical Support Engineers for the CAD Manager’s Boot Camp on Sunday, February 10th, 2019. During this informative session, which will run from 1:00-5:00PM, you’ll hear from these experts who will share their advice for successfully administering SOLIDWORKS software.

This year’s presenters include:

Tor Iveroth – Expert Technical Customer Support Engineer, SOLIDWORKS PDM
Jennifer Tashiro – Expert Technical Customer Support Engineer, SOLIDWORKS
Jeremy Wilkes – Expert Technical Customer Support Engineer, SOLIDWORKS

All these presenters have 10+ years of experience with SOLIDWORKS and helping people just like you so come armed with tough questions that you need answers to. We dare you to stump these experts!

Sunday also kicks off the first day of SOLIDWORKS World 2019, which this year takes place at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center in Dallas, Texas, February 10-13. Register soon to take advantages of special discounts for you and your team. Take your whole team. If you register by October 19th, you can bring three people and save over $400 on each full-conference pass. Click here for more info.

Why should I attend?

The CAD Manager’s Boot Camp is the place to come for answers to your tough questions and where you’ll learn best practices that will help your design team efficiently use SOLIDWORKS. These best practices will cover:

  • How to choose the right workstations
  • How to deploy SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS PDM software on multiple computers
  • How to optimize workflows for better performance
  • How to get training and certification
  • How to find help to get your SOLIDWORKS questions answered

 

You’ll also get advice on your next SOLIDWORKS deployment or upgrade and find out how CAD administrators can take advantage of the new tools and functionality in SOLIDWORKS 2019. These experts will also share how to make the most of your time at SOLIDWORKS World as an administrator.

The SOLIDWORKS team will share lots of information, so come prepared to take lots of notes (or pictures). Whether you attend the CAD Manager’s Boot Camp every year or are attending for the first time, you’re guaranteed to take away something new to try and share with your team.

Also, don’t forget to enter the SOLIDWORKS WORLD T-Shirt Design contest and show off your best work! Create a design for the front of a t-shirt. Show us a design that embodies the SOLIDWORKS World Conference. Remember, the conference is in Dallas, TX; let it be BIG and BOLD! You may submit unlimited entries, but each must be a completely new design. The contest submission deadline is October 29, 2018 11:59pm ET.  For more information, go to: SOLIDWORKS WORLD T-Shirt Design contest or simply click on the banner below.

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Get Advice from the Experts at the CAD Manager’s Boot Camp at SOLIDWORKS World 2019 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at October 10, 2018 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Crash Troubleshooting Guide (Part 3 of 3)

Part 3 of our SOLIDWORKS Crash Troubleshooting Guide offers steps relating to Windows and hardware. We recommend testing after each step to determine whether it resolved the problem before moving on to another step.

  1. Are there any Windows updates pending?  Sometimes implementing them solves the problem.  This can also be undone if needed…keep reading for how to do that.
  2. Try restoring to an earlier point in Windows.  This can typically take over half an hour for your computer to complete.
  3. Try creating a new Windows user account.
  4. Test for mechanical damage to the hard drive.  If there are damaged sectors from which your computer is trying to read or write data, it can cause crashing.  For a SSD (solid-state drive), these types of drives are less prone to mechanical damage and often have their own drive controller that will automatically find and fix this issue automatically.  For an older-style HDD (hard disk drive) that spins, run the Windows hard drive checking utility chkdsk /r.  This command, when run with the /r option, attempts to fix errors on the disk, locate bad sectors, and recover readable information.  It also detects physical damage to the disk (bad sectors) and attempts to move the data onto good sectors and isolate the bad sectors so that Windows does not use them again.  To execute, launch the command prompt (Start->type “cmd“) and then run chkdsk /r C: (or replace “C” with your drive letter) from the command prompt.  You may need to run the Command Prompt in Administrator mode if you are initially denied permission to run the utility.   It can take hours to run this step.  If chkdsk reports damage that cannot be isolated, you may want to consider replacement of the drive.
SOLIDWORKS Crash Troubleshooting Guide

Running the Windows check disk utility with repair option

If none of these steps resolve the crashing, and you are on active subscription, then contact your SOLIDWORKS reseller for assistance.  Send along a SOLIDWORKS Rx problem capture report.

This will provide your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller (VAR) with your SOLIDWORKS settings, visually illustrate how to reproduce the issue, provide system specs, and gather the log and registry files they need to investigate this problem. This will ultimately save time by reducing requests for additional information.

For Javelin customers, where the zip file is under 10 MB, then you can attach the zip file to a new support case. If larger than 10 MB, please request a link to upload the file to our file share site.

If the problem persists, check our related articles. You can subscribe to our blog to receive daily SOLIDWORKS tips and tricks via email.

The post SOLIDWORKS Crash Troubleshooting Guide (Part 3 of 3) appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at October 10, 2018 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Vintage Race Cars Inspired This New Watch Collection on Kickstarter

vintage porsche

It doesn’t necessarily take a car nut to stop and stare at a cool vintage car. In fact, it can easily become an instant conversation-starter; a timeless way to break the ice. This attraction to the classics is exactly what watchmaker Willer Chronometers is going for.

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Inspired by old-school sportscars and the Mile Miglia open-road motorsport races, these timepieces look like they were made during a time when exhaust emissions and high gas prices were issues for future generations to worry about.

Willer Watches

At its core, this watch is a revamped Seiko NH35 with automotive decals. There are design patterns on the dial which look like brake distance traces and a red area on the lower right which mimics the area on the speedometer you should never—at least, in crowded areas— bring the needle to. The shell is car-inspired as well; with the outer rim of the case looking like a tire wheel and the setting dial on the side resembling a tire rim.

Willer Watches

What will really get people to notice that this piece is sportscar-inspired are the Italian leather straps which have the red and black colors of a typical speedster car. It’s a subtle design choice, but one which makes a big difference when it comes to aesthetics. Additional features include a green lume, which provides illumination in low light areas, volume indexes styles in a retro font, and a butterfly clasp.

Willer Watches

It seems folks really dig this old-time aesthetic, as the WIller watches have already exceeded their Kickstarter goal of $23,140. As of writing, the project currently has funding of $55,652 with well over a month to go in the campaign. You can find out more on this timeless timepiece over on the Willer Kickstarter page.

The post Vintage Race Cars Inspired This New Watch Collection on Kickstarter appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at October 10, 2018 11:39 AM

This is What Happens When You Run Over a Golf Ball with a Steamroller

Golf Ball in Grass

Even though I don’t play golf, I certainly appreciate how downright sturdy and impressive the design of golf balls are. Measuring at least 1.680 inches in diameter and weighing no more than 45.93 grams, these balls made from rubber and hardened plastic feature anywhere from 250-400 dimples to make them more aerodynamic and generally take a lot more punishment than something that size should.

While getting hit with a golf club or falling tens of feet from a height is the norm for most balls, YouTube channel Crush has decided to up the ante by taking a number of golf balls and running them over with a steamroller. What happens is nothing short of extraordinary.

Pitting an 8-ton steamroller against a 1.5-ounce golf ball may seem a bit unfair, and it is… for the steamroller:

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Two passes of the steamroller show the balls are pretty much unscathed. Since the balls are so symmetrical and are packed so tightly, they can withstand the pressure exerted on them by an 8-ton industrial machine.

Steamroller vs golf balls Steamroller vs golf balls

Never the ones to give up, the guys continue steamrolling over the golf balls until they break. It takes eight passes for the balls to crack under pressure, revealing their dense rubber centers.

The Crush YouTube channel has more videos of objects getting run over by steamrollers, with most of the victims not being quite so lucky as these golf balls.

The post This is What Happens When You Run Over a Golf Ball with a Steamroller appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at October 10, 2018 11:20 AM

Cool Tools of Doom: Trusco Metal Toolboxes

Metal Toolbox

Founded in 1959 as a professional tool manufacturer to support Japan’s burgeoning manufacturing industry, Trusco—a combination of the words “Trust” and “Company”—is still manufacturing some of the best toolboxes, today.

While their stripped-down design makes them a must-have for many design aficionados, the pressed steel boxes are ridiculously useful for just about anything—tools or not.

Still manufactured in Fukui, Japan, Trusco toolboxes now come in more sizes than ever—capable of whatever storage challenges you throw at them.

Trusco Toolboxes (Various Sizes – Prices Vary)

Features:

  • Steel body, formed for extra strength
  • Versatile sizing for specific storage solutions
  • Double-hinged construction for smooth opening
  • Dividers included
  • Equally useful in the home, office, or the shop

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: Trusco Metal Toolboxes appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 10, 2018 10:20 AM

October 09, 2018

SolidSmack

Ask an Engineer #5: Management Wants to be “Apple” of Our Industry. How Can I Deliver on That?

ask an engineer

Welcome to our “Ask An Engineer” series, where Dan Slaski addresses questions that have you losing sleep or staring off into space during important meetings. Have a question for Dan? Send it in.

Question: Management keeps saying they want us to be the “Apple” of our industry. How can I deliver on that?

Dear Massively Mandated, and Iconically Instructed,

Doesn’t every company want to have a massive loyal following they can upsell to? But wishing doesn’t equate to reality by any means.”

First, I hope you aren’t in the personal computer, smartphone, or watch industries. Most companies I worked for have made the same outlandish decree. And why wouldn’t they? Doesn’t every company want to have a massive loyal following they can upsell to? But wishing doesn’t equate to reality by any means.

I want to be the Dwayne Johnson of muscles and the Paul Rudd of charisma but, alas, I am the Dan of whatever exactly it is I do. What management is essentially saying is that they want to have a reputation of differentiation through things like reliability, simplicity, and appearance. What we are universally learning is that customers are willing to pay significant markups for the added value of devices that reduce frustration or are viewed as a status symbol.

So, let’s chisel down what that means in the context of what we do.

We designers want to make great things that add value. Great. Now we are starting to get somewhere. But how do we deliver on this? A lot of the value in Apple’s products comes from their incredible attention to detail.

The Pareto Principle states that the first 80 percent of a project takes 20 percent of the time and last 20 percent takes 80 percent of the time. Another way of saying that is that “the devil is in the details” or “small details can consume huge resources”.

Is it quality that management wants to deliver on or do they just want to have an enclosure for your products that is a rectangular box with rounded corners? Maybe it is just the enclosure, that’s doable. Ask if improved quality is what your organization is after. This could be for altruistic reasons or because they are tired of the associated cost and time associated with poor quality.

Quality comes from the top down. It comes from a culture of quality that is disciplined in applying methodologies and necessary resources.”

I once had an owner/manager who asked us all at our weekly meeting with a straight face “why don’t we have quality”? As if “quality” wasn’t a concept but a tangible item one could hold like wishing for a roll of toilet paper when you’ve just run out. Quality comes from the top down. It comes from a culture of quality that is disciplined in applying methodologies and necessary resources.

Call a meeting titled the “Apple quality directive brainstorming session”. Encourage all the attendees to arrive with ideas on ways to improve quality. Attendees will show up with lots of ideas because we are all natural problem solvers who want to provide awesomeness. They will have ideas they haven’t been authorized or empowered to act on and are excited to share. Then you will have a huge list and management will realize the staggering effort required to try to retroactively incorporate quality.

So, to answer your question. White rounded rectangular cuboids with minimal ports.

The post Ask an Engineer #5: Management Wants to be “Apple” of Our Industry. How Can I Deliver on That? appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Dan Slaski at October 09, 2018 03:41 PM

Schmitz Mittz Protect Your Hands from Bullets, Blades, and Heavy-Duty Machinery

Schmitz Mittz Glove

Despite advances in the field of helmets and head protection, few safety gear companies give as much attention to another critical part of the body for getting work done: the hands. Sure—your head is the brains of the outfit (literally), but without fully-functional digits, getting manual work done is next to impossible.

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While many gloves are designed to protect your hands from accidental burns and cuts, Schmitz Mittz gloves protect your hands from threats that aim to cause damage from the get-go; knife slashes, crushing machinery, and even bullets.

Schmitz Mittz Glove Schmitz Mittz Glove

Their strongest variant, the Ulta-Mittz Water Proof Safety Gloves, are made for industrial workers who seem to enjoy getting into fights just as much as they love their job.

Schmitz Mittz Glove

The outer layer of the gloves are made from Armortex Kevlar and are water, chemical, and fluid-resistant. Apart from keeping liquids out, it also has a cut-resistant level 3 outer shell and is abrasion and puncture resistant to protect your hands from accidental (and sometimes intentional) encounters with blades.

Schmitz Mittz Glove

This is usually more than enough protection for “normal” dangerous work conditions, but Schmitz Mittz went overboard by adding an extra level 5 cut resistant AND waterproof inner layer.

Schmitz Mittz Glove

Since they couldn’t add much to the inner without sacrificing comfort and mobility, they added carbon fiber protection to the knuckles, wrist, thumb, and fingers of the gloves on the outside instead. Add this to the double Kevlar stitching, and you have a pair of protective gloves which can keep your mitts cozy while being burned with a blowtorch.

Schmitz Mittz Glove

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All Schmitz Mittz gloves are hand-tested to make sure each pair is waterproof and protects the user from diseases by way of a liquid seal test (don’t ask us who volunteers to be the tester). After this, they’re put through various hazardous situations to ensure they meet the company’s high-quality standards.

The gloves will set you back USD 79.95—but that’s a heck of a lot better alternative than not having a working hand. More details can be found on the Schmitz Mittz webpage.

The post Schmitz Mittz Protect Your Hands from Bullets, Blades, and Heavy-Duty Machinery appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at October 09, 2018 12:23 PM

SolidSmack Radio | Ripcord Topology (Powered by Spotify)

Spotify Playlist

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’ll get the groove going with the all-new “Gravity” from Clams Casino before diving into fresh tracks from Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Pixies, Gorillaz, Bob Dylan, and others before wrapping up with “Yesterday’s Wake” from the always groovy Son Lux. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

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The post SolidSmack Radio | Ripcord Topology (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 09, 2018 12:11 PM

The Javelin Blog

What is the difference between ‘Paste’ and ‘Paste shared’ in SOLIDWORKS PDM?

In SOLIDWORKS PDM, when you ‘Copy’ and ‘Paste’ a file to another folder, the two files are independent of each other even though the copy would have the same name and physical content. There is no link between the source file and its copy. The files will each have a unique record in the database (Document ID) and have a separate file history.

If you ‘Copy’ and then select ‘Paste Shared’ to a new folder instead, the copied file be ‘Shared’ to the new folder.

Paste Shared Option

Paste Shared Option

A shared file is shown with a plus-sign next to the file icon. A shared file will have same record in the database (Document ID) but share version history with the other instances of the shared copy.

Denotes a shared file

Denotes a shared file

To see which folders a file is shared between, right-click the file, select Properties and view the Links tab:

Show the folders sharing the file

Show the folders sharing the file

Benefits of a Shared File

  • You can cache individual versions of a shared file to the different folders it is shared between, but the Workflow state will be the same for all shared instances of the file.
  • If you check out a shared file, the physical local copy in the folder where you checked the file out will be writable and all other shared instances of the file will be marked as checked out to the same user and workstation.
  • Shared file instances may use different data cards depending on what card is active in the folder where the instance is shared, however the variable values would be the same across all instances of the shared file.

NOTE: Shared files should primarily be used for non-CAD files or files having no reference structures. Read more about this in the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base S-066219.

Need SOLIDWORKS PDM Training?

Learn more about our SOLIDWORKS PDM training courses for users and administrators.

The post What is the difference between ‘Paste’ and ‘Paste shared’ in SOLIDWORKS PDM? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at October 09, 2018 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: General Tools Cordless Power Precision Screwdriver

Cordless Screwdriver

When it comes to precision assemblies and repairs, no two screwdrivers are alike. And while you may have an entire tool caddy loaded with precision screwdrivers for whatever job comes at you, you’re still not doing your wrist any favors.

WIth a 100+ RPM motor with both forward and reverse controls, the first-of-its-kind General Tools 500 Cordless Power Precision Screwdriver is a must for effortless work sessions—be it assembling your latest prototype or simply swapping out batteries on your favorite device.

The quick-change chuck allows for effortless swapping between 1/8-inch slotted, Phillips and Torx bits while an ergonomic handle design provides multiple grip positions to accommodate a variety of working situations in computer, electronics, and industrial applications.

Seriously — what’s not to like??

The General Tools 500 Cordless Power Precision Screwdriver — $16.12

Features:

  • Super-Torque drive applies more than 100 rpm through a single forward/reverse toggle switch
  • Comes with six popular bits: Phillips #0 and #1; Slotted 1/8 and 1/16 in.; and Torx T5 and T6
  • The quick-change chuck is compatible with all micro (4mm) bits
  • Includes two AAA batteries that provide more than eight hours of power

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: General Tools Cordless Power Precision Screwdriver appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 09, 2018 10:23 AM

October 08, 2018

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Podcast with BattleBots Champion 2018

SPOILER ALERT!

If you didn’t watch the BattleBots finals this past Friday, you may want to before reading this blog…

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This past Friday night, I watched the BattleBots final four battle it out for the 2018 BattleBots Championship at the WPI University Watch Party supporting Team Bite Force.  There were four local Teams with their robots present for the night: HUGE, Valkyrie, Saw Blaze, and Bite Force.  And, by the way, HUGE, was a really HUGE robot!

WPI BattleBots 2018

Q&A with BattleBots team leaders. Left to Right: WPI President (and Host) Laurie Leshin, Leanne Cushing (Valkyrie), Jamison Go (Saw Blaze), Jonathan Schultz (HUGE), and Paul Ventimiglia (Bite Force).

 

WPI Battlebots 2018 Bots

Robots left to Right: HUGE, Valkyrie, Saw Blaze, and Bite Force.

 

We watched the final four Bots fight it out, and while it was hard to root for a favorite—as all final four bots were designed in SOLIDWORKS—we were all there supporting team Team Bite Force.

The Q&A was great, as there was a lot of great insights into why robot designs were chosen and what happens behind the scenes.  My favorite question came from one young fan who asked which robot they all liked best (besides their own).

Big cheers came from the crowd as Bite Force took apart Whiplash in the semi-finals, then again against Minotaur in the finals.  In the end, Team Bite Force won their second Giant Nut and became the 2018 Champion.

I had a chance to talk with Paul, for an in-depth interview in the latest Episode of the Born to Design Podcast here:

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I don’t want to share too much detail about me interview now, but it’s all in the podcast.  If you’re a BattleBots fan like me, or interested in how they design fighting robots, I think you will want to hear more about all of the excitement from outside and inside the arena.  Paul also talks about how he designs robots for his job, and how he mentors other robotics teams.

Be sure to subscribe and don’t miss any inspiring stories from the Born to Design Podcast.

To learn more about Paul, his company Aptyx Designs, and BiteForce, please follow him on Facebook here…

Also, learn more about BattleBots here, and on the Discovery Channel here…

 

Transcript

Paul Ventimiglia 0:04
How could you possibly fight you know robot like that

Cliff 0:08
haha

Paul Ventimiglia 0:08
otherwise in general tombstone is not fun to fight huge is one of the hardest ones Bronco is hard to face Witchdoctor our hyper shot or end game because any one good flip that yet can be the end of the match for you

Cliff 0:20
Hi there this is the SOLIDWORKS Born to Design podcast a podcast of inspiring stories about those who create build event and transform new ideas into actual new products and by the way they all use SOLIDWORKS. I’m your host Cliff Medling in this episode is titled, kicking bot and taking names. And Today I’ll be speaking with Paul Ventimiglia, who is the battlebots team leader for team fight force. Paul has been building robots since he was 14, and is now a three time battlebots champion. He also works building robots in the high tech industry. Let’s jump right into my interview with Paul.

I’m really excited today about this interview with Paul bit Amelia. He’s the battlebots team leader for Team bite force. And I really want to talk about how you got into robotics and how you first started hearing about battlebots. But I I felt like it had to first start off by congratulating you, your second giant not that’s got to be pretty exciting. So congratulations. How’s that feel?

Paul Ventimiglia 1:18
Thank you. It feels amazing. It’s it’s really unbelievable. In the sense that it’s been about 18 years since I’ve started working on combat robots in general. And back then the idea of winning was so far away.

Cliff 1:31
I know, I can’t even believe 18 years. You’re not even that old. So it’s, it’s amazing that you’ve been doing this long.

Paul Ventimiglia 1:37
Yeah, I was 14 at my first robotics competition and built the robot when I was 13. And it’s been a long, long journey to get to where I am now. We’re very comfortable building robots in very short time.

Cliff 1:50
That’s great. And I mean, what, what got you started 13 building your own robot?

Paul Ventimiglia 1:54
So it’s a common question. And I think the answer I always give it it’s true is I was really interested wanting to build animatronics for movies and TV shows. So sort of the things that were most exciting to me. We had watched some movie like Jurassic Park, or Star Wars, or Terminator. And I wanted to build the actual puppets, the robots and the animatronics that were in the movies. So when I would see like a behind the scenes special or something on TV, that was the coolest thing ever to me, and to see how they’re real machines that were looking interesting and being cool. I don’t know why that was just very interesting to me. And I was always interested also in RC cars and toys. And one of my cousins started working at an RC car shop that was a little bit more professional, and better. And so as opposed to the RC cars, you can get at Toys R Us or Walmart, this was going to the real RC cars were much more impressive, and engineering in their power. And that was the real starting point for robotics is a lot of the same parts of us in small robots are the same thing as the high quality parts from the RC car industry.

Cliff 2:56
You can see a lot of the battlebots are you know, they’re good drivers always talk about being you had to be a good driver as well. Not just a good designer of a attack robot, right?

Paul Ventimiglia 3:06
Yeah, that’s driving comes up a lot. And my answer to that usually is that I think, uh, well driven robot, like a good looking driver is largely due to the robot design. So. And when I see what appears to be a good driver, I think it’s largely attributed to the robot by that is, if you have, let’s say, a long robot with four, six wheels and you tell to go straight, it’s probably going to go straight pretty well. If you have, for example, a two wheel drive robot, though it’s a lot harder to control, even just going in a straight line. So a lot less traction, and there may be dragging some part of the robot. And so when I see a robot that, you know, looks awfully driven, it’s often just because it’s two wheel drive. And that’s a squirrelly type of robots to drive around. And so there are certainly good drivers and bad drivers in the sport. But I think the engineering of the robot has a lot more to do with it.

Cliff 3:54
That’s interesting. So I have to ask, you know, with this year’s competition, you know, to stone one last year, but what are the biggest feared battlebots for you, which ones are the ones you a little bit more nervous about competition?

Paul Ventimiglia 4:09
Well, there’s, there’s a lot actually, and tombstone is one of them. But Tim stone is easy to prepare for. It’s not fun to fight. But my method of operation for our team is just slap on all the armor we have for our sort of low wedge mode. And one of the primary things we designed for is finding a robot like tombstone. So we have a pretty easy armor configuration for that it’s sometimes a lot harder to prepare for, for example, the our first opponent in the tournament was huge, which has been making a lot of headlines this year, and a lot of excitement because their design is so unique and different. And it looks like they’re sort of a really fun team and robot. And they are and so they’re out there to have a good time. But their robot has really hard to actually face from a strategy because they have giant in a 40 inch diameter wheels. Whereas our wheels are five inches, for example, they’re spending weapon is 20 inches in the air. And it tells part of our robot is even only 16 or 17 inches off the ground. And so they’re spending weapon is so high up, it’s in their body is so high up, it’s hard to actually hit them besides these flexible plastic wheels, right.

Cliff 5:16
And that was huge, right was it?

Paul Ventimiglia 5:18
Yes. So against huge, we actually had also the least amount of time repair. So what happens is they try to give you you know, as TV show, they want to give you preparation time. So if they can tell you the night before how you’re going to face this robot in the morning. That’s great for everyone. Everyone has a little bit more time a few extra hours to get your parts together to prepare for the start of the tournament. We were one of the first matches from the time they announced it till time we thought was only a few hours. And most of that time they want you sort of lined up and ready to go. So you really only have a couple hours to do any changes to the robot. So certainly not enough time to go out to a store and buy some material and bolted on. So at that point, it’s seeing what or if we can do it the pit for this unique opponent. And my teammate JJ I remember what started the event before we knew about the bracket who are facing he like how could you possibly fight you know, robot like that? I didn’t have a good answer. No, none of us really had a good answer. And they certainly almost beat us to and that was that was a really surprising match. And we’re lucky we sort of outlasted them. But otherwise their their weapon really took ours out and causes some big problems.

Cliff 6:25
Yeah, that did well this year. That was definitely a unique design. So yeah, that that’s fun.

Paul Ventimiglia 6:30
So he just one of the hardest ones. Otherwise, in general Bronco is sort of hard to face because any one good flip they get can be the end of the match for you.

Cliff 6:38
Right

Paul Ventimiglia 6:39
there so low to the ground. And it’s really hard to face in general vertical spinners with fork like attachments. And that’s sort of the same thing that we have. And so it’s hard to face a robot like witch doctor or hyper shock or end game anything that’s trying to be for scraping and the vertical spinner

Cliff 6:56
that’s fine. Yeah. So so many good raw lights in the in this competition this year on Discovery Channel. That was great. You know, I’m a big fan of battlebots before I even met you. And I watched the show with with my sons. And I actually told my son, I said, Hey, I’m talking to Paul from Bite Force today. I said, What? What would you like to know? And he had a great question. He said, What advice would you give for somebody getting started? Like, what’s the first step? How do you even come up with your original design? He just gets out somebody. So what’s that? How do you jump in and get started?

Paul Ventimiglia 7:26
That’s a good question as two different ways of answering one that people ask is, how do you build a Balibar for the show I’m answer for that is very simple. It’s focused on sort of your whole team package, and the robot matters less. But then in terms of how to build a fighting robot, or combat robot in general, it’s, it’s go out there and go on the internet and start searching for what you can find, and watch a lot of YouTube videos, buildit websites. So when I, when I started, when I was a kid, it was dial up modem. And people had these sort of handcrafted websites where somewhere sites are pretty good, some are pretty bad. But the few good ones were filled with so much information and writing and pictures and sort of build diaries that it was a great resource for learning how to build something that I’d never done before. And the reason was, a lot of those people had also never built a robot before. So they were documenting it from a sort of new person perspective, where they’re like, learning about what kind of motors to use. And they post pictures saying, This motor works really well, here’s why this motor burnt out in two seconds, I would never buy it. So they sort of would do this testing for you. And now there’s so much information on people’s websites and on Facebook pages, and on YouTube videos of people showing how to wire up certain speed controllers, and what kind of batteries to use. So there’s tons of information out there. And there’s a few companies that build little kits actually made by sort of robot competitors, for robot competitors. And for beginners, that are pretty useful to us. Like one of them. For example, finger tech robotics, it’s sort of the driver of lucky as you see this season curtain, here’s a kit that’s a couple hundred dollars gets you an entire one pound fighting robot ready to go with everything you need. And that’s a great method for, for starting out. And you could enter that in a competition that you find nearby. Or you could modify it and make it better. Or you could just learn to use it as a tool to practice driving, or learn about some different components.

Cliff 9:20
You mentioned so often how much this is a community, like when you’re fighting other robots, it’s your robots are fighting that you guys don’t have a grudge against each other, well, maybe there’s some grudges out there. But But you said it’s such a community, everybody helps each other out.

Paul Ventimiglia 9:35
It’s it’s a great community in battlebots, and fighting and robotics in general also mentioned the high school kids and FIRST Robotics and it’s the same kind of feelings in the pits. And so at battlebots, for example, you have all these different teams that have worked so hard to their machines, and they all get to the event. And pretty much everyone is not ready by meaning they’re not sitting back comfortably waiting for a match to be start now, everyone either really not ready like the hair still both in the robot together for the first time and song and drilling parts, or they, you know, they feel pretty good, but they don’t have a lot of practice time. And so because of that tons of things break or don’t work. And we’re constantly scrambling quickly to find a solution. And your best resource is just asking another team who’s right next to you, who is probably an expert in the sense that they just solve that same problem, you know, hours ago, or days ago, or they’re using the exact same component as you. So it’s pretty cool at the event to be able to just walk 20 feet away and find someone who says, Oh, yeah, no problem. I’ve done that before. Or here’s the part that you just broke, I’ve got a spare one right here.

Cliff 10:40
Yeah, it’s got to be fun. Because when you’re at the event, it’s it’s a lot of like minded people who love robots and love what they’re doing. So it’s gonna be a fun time, even though you’re worried about the next competition. So we talked a little bit about community I know, and I know you’re doing a lot with your local robotics teams and mentoring, I’d love for you to just elaborate on that a little bit, what you’re doing and, and how you’re helping the community in the next generation of robot engineers,

Paul Ventimiglia 11:06
engineers. In general, I hope I hope it’s, I’ve been a mentor OF THE FIRST Robotics first is an acronym or for Inspiration and Recognition of science and technology. And that was created by Dean Kaman in the early 90s, but I learned about it when I was a mentor of the program at WPI. Because a lot of the people in the same lab I was building robots in are saying, Hey, we have this team, we work with these high school students, you should, you know, help out join our team as a mentor. And I got sort of hooked in that, because it’s a great program in terms of competition, robotics, and using engineering in a competitive way, I think is a great way to learn a lot really quickly, and teach a really broad spectrum of skills in terms of design and brainstorming, initially doing detailed work, in SOLIDWORKS, for example, detailed designs, and then actually getting those parts made by yourself, and by external shops all within days, and not months, and then testing out your ideas. And then at the event, you’re learning about how to work with other teams, and people how to fix things quickly, under sort of stressful situations. And if you’re like myself, and you weren’t really into a lot of other sports, then it’s a great outlet to have all the sport benefits. Also just rooting for a team working together, trusting your teammates. So that’s all really big.

Cliff 12:25
That’s great. And, you know, we talked a lot about STEM, I just think, especially with the drones these days, and the robots in the battlebots, it’s a great way to introduce, um, you know, younger people to engineering because we still need a lot of engineers. So with that, you know, what, what, what, what’s the future, in your opinion, for robotics? What’s your vision for the future of robotics?

Paul Ventimiglia 12:45
Yes, it’s really exciting stuff. I mean, so I’m thinking back to when I was a kid. And sort of the only throw bot kit and parts I could have were the original Lego Mindstorms kit, which, which was great, but we didn’t even have a computer that could program it, and all sorts of limitations and problems. And now those kids that are 11, 12, 13 have things like the Vex robotics kit, which is like real metal parts, real motors, and gears and real programming, you know, they buy those kits at home, or having the classroom and there between the ages of 8 to 15, they’re becoming sort of robotics, programming experts, and learning about torque, and motors. And so for the future, I have some pretty high hopes. I think a lot of young engineers, when they’re, you know, age 20 to 25 get most of their work done in sort of all history, going back into thousands of years, it’s been a lot of those people do their most impressive work. And so by having more tools in the hands of kids in their younger, I think, is going to start producing even more stuff really soon, because those when those kids are turning 20, and 25, and they’re working really hard. They’re just that much ahead of the curve. And I work as my day job and sort of a robotics um, startup where we’re still Robbie technologies. And we’re delivering packages or groceries with sidewalk delivery robots. And the goal is, you know, full autonomy. And so right now, it’s, it’s sort of this game of finding all of the sensors off the shelf, and then seeing which ones you have to make cut for custom sensors that aren’t available yet. And trying to make all those components work together. And that’s still a big part of robotics today is just making a system of parts work together. And a lot of finding those parts. And so each year, there becomes more companies making more sensors and better computers and parts and more easily available, where you can actually just click it and buy it at a good price. And it arrives soon, and it works out of the box. And we’re still not to that point yet. And we’re getting there soon. But still, it’s a lot of being able to find the right components. And then right when you go to plug it in, and it magically doesn’t work and you’re trying to figure out why. And if you have to write something custom to modify it, or make your own sensor or your own program to talk to that sensor. And so we’re still not there. And I think that means there’s a lot of opportunity for the future or when those things get better.

Cliff 15:01
It’s it’s, it’s exciting stuff. I agree. Paul, I have to ask you this one question. Because I think it’s interesting. You won in 2015 won the giant nut and then as soon as you won, you immediately just decided on designing a new design that was that was that just because you just love robots and you love building them, you want to try something new, or uh?

Paul Ventimiglia 15:21
So it’s a little interesting, actually, with an official battlebots competition. They held this one in 2009, which never made it to TV airing, it was supposed to be on something like CBS, or CBS Sports, you and I had a 220 pound robot, which then was sort of their heavyweight class with a different robot called brutality. And that robot actually won that event. But basically, nobody knew. And we couldn’t really talk about it, because it was still under all the same contractual obligations about not being able to reveal the outcome and event and after many months of me begging and pleading to battle boss to say, if you’re not going to air it, can you at least release, you know, the footage of of our matching the final so that we can at least tell some people that we built a robot and exist and it did well, and it took a while to get that out. But I think when they realize it wouldn’t sell as a package, they’re willing to do that. And so now it sort of feels like having one three times, which is even crazier. But so what some people have pointed out to me is that I was one of the first people do it with three different robots. And so it was not even just a different version of the robot, but really a different robot. So the first version brutality was an overhead bar spinner, similar to the old battle about hazard. The second one first version of byte force, it had the clamping Jaws, the tank treads. And on this third version, now, that sort of new the main battle about that I’ve been running is bite forest with the vertical spinning weapon. And that is the robot that I wanted to compete with in 2015. But that application process was very quick and not really in a lot of the competitors control. And so for that event, they had very little time to put together an event. And they had to make sure it was with robots and teams that would be sure to deliver they worked with before and could sort of keep everything secret and build quickly and build some It looks good, they couldn’t have a lot of no shows or new competitors. So they sort of hand picked this list of 24 competitors. And for our team we actually did not get in. So we’re one of the alternate selections. And we were told to make a design that was really cool looking and could be imagine like a kid’s toy, and just be have something interesting about some type of theme or style or personality, because I first proposed a vertical spinning weapon. And they basically said, we have ones like that, we don’t want that. And I was sort of led into, I think, falling for that and making the different design, which they still only selected as an alternate. And then by the time about three weeks before the event came around, I modified the robot to look like what you saw on TV, which was the tank treads and the the jaws that was my sort of simplified version of that robot. That was one where it was what I could build quickly without too much financial risk to myself. And so that’s how I sort of came to be. And only nine days before the event to be find out, we were bumped up to one of the official slots. So at that point, we already had to take the plunge buying all the expensive parts. And I was between jobs. So it was perfect timing. One of my teammates was also between jobs that time, and that’s the only reason we got the robot done. We worked on it for about two weeks, straight full time. So for once we won, we knew that would be a little different for the next year, because battlebots basically said, We want you know, returning championship team. So it will be hard to not accept you with a new design, and so already submitted them to design it was sort of no problem. And that’s the vertical spending weapon. And I’d seen a lot of other robots with vertical spinners do really well, but I’d never seen it on sort of the heavyweight level until there was a robot called Electric Boogaloo. And that robot sort of worked so well I want to scale it similarly I designed a lot of the weapon system based off of that robot and sort of the the rest was history I guess

Cliff 19:01
I’d never heard that story that’s interesting as I thought bite force was the original design away from there that’s that’s interesting. more insight into the battle behind Yeah, I was just gonna say, you know, there’s definitely a lot of vertical spinners these days. I think they’re doing realizing their do pretty well.

Paul Ventimiglia 19:17
Yeah, so now there’s a lot of vertical spinners and there are probably be some pushback, it says, sort of easy to designed to do well, because there’s, you don’t need as much horsepower and stored energy in the weapon to cause a lot of damage, because you’re using the floor to react again. So when you hit, someone pushes yourself into the floor, you’re already on the floor. And it puts all that energy and opponent pretty perfectly, as opposed to, if you’re a horizontal spinning weapon, like a tombstone or a gigabyte, then you’re pushing yourself away equally. So you have to sort of share the energy absorption and vertical spinners are really common in the small weight classes I used to have 15 years ago, at the 12 pound weight class. But we haven’t seen them as much in the big robots for some reason. And now there’s a whole ton.

Cliff 20:02
right? Well, they got to be fun, because they flipped things up in the air, right?

Paul Ventimiglia 20:05
That the design in which you can get a cross between offensive and defensive. So the front of by force, we have a bunch of different sort of plows and wedges and attachments. And the idea is that if you put a big sort of plow in the back of your robot, and you use the idea of trying to stop them, and then turn around and use your weapon on them, that’s not going to look good. And all the judging rubrics you’ve had recently. So in many cases, that could count against you, because you’re not using your weapon when you’re attacking, or you’re not using your weapon to try to control and so if you can put the wedge and the weapon together, then it’s a lot better if it comes down to the judge’s decision.

Cliff 20:44
That’s great, Paul. It’s really all I had. I feel like I could ask a couple more questions. I just wanted to ask about the one match that you had where you lost power for a little bit there.

Paul Ventimiglia 20:53
Yeah,

Cliff 20:53
I could want it. I was so nervous watching on TV. I thought you were done. I thought you’re out of competition. Yeah,

Paul Ventimiglia 20:58
Yeah, that was pretty darn scary. I’ve never had something exactly like that happen. And I really never seen it work to come out of it so well. So what happened was, we know we’re up there as the big hit, I knew immediately the robot was unresponsive. And there’s really only one possible source in that case, there’s one power switch that controls everything. And then there’s one radio receiver, every type of other failure you’d have would be independent. And so for the whole robot to go down, it had to either be that main power switch, or the receiver as much more likely to be the receiver just because of how they’re built and the construction of them. And so one thing I tried was sort of restarting the transmitter. And I never thought to try that again. And what that would do is only would fix like a certain situation, which would be in case the transmitter had been over saturated with too much radio signal from all of the production equipment in that room. There’s lots of 2.4 gigahertz, like Wi Fi, and microphones, and lights, and all sorts of wires, this things in the arena. So if the channel has become saturated, maybe turning it back on, again, it caught a Clear Channel would be the thing to do it. And that appeared to work. The reality is, we’ll never know exactly what it was that made it work. So it’s also vaguely possible that the power switch sort of metal contact, how to do it on it, and the shock it came and resettled on or the receiver, you know, similarly had some of weird boot up, and when I restarted the transmitter, it may be helped connect again, there’s really no way to know. But uh.

Cliff 22:31
it takes a little luck sometimes, too win. Yeah so.

Paul Ventimiglia 22:33
And so we had a big discussion after that Master, I want to do about that receiver. And we actually left it in for the rest of the tournament. And some people might say that stupid. But the discussion we had in our team was, this was weird as a fluke. But in reality testing, a new one is sort of equally likely to have an issue. And it’s worked really well, for the last dozen or 15 matches, I’ve used that receiver in

Cliff 22:56
right,

Paul Ventimiglia 22:57
and they’re all isn’t the same receiver as season one and Season Two so far. And we do shock on everything really well. We have sort of rubber oscillators and additional sort of foam, and all strain relief connections and glue and epoxy reinforced electronics. And we ended up sticking with it. And it turned out to be an okay and right decision because we were worried that we would put a new one in, it looks okay, but there’s no way to really test that in the box. And so if you get like a bad cold solder joint or something, which appears to work fine in the bench, but in the arena, it shows a problem, then there’s no way to have any testing time on that. And so similarly, we made a big change during the event, which happened after the end game match. And before bombshell, sort of our last match of the pre qualifying matches, and we changed the whole weapon motor system to use all four mag motors as opposed to the one big motor we had before. And we wanted to get real box time on testing that new part out. And so that was a big deal to put that in a match before the tournament and use it in a way that we stressed it really hard. So I think we show an extra level of aggression against bombshell because we’re trying to really test out that weapon system and sort of break it and we wanted to break it before the tournament.

Cliff 24:09
oh interesting, that’s one way to do it but, yeah. Thanks for clarification on that, I was watching, I was uh I was getting a little nervous for you, Paul. So yeah,

Paul Ventimiglia 24:18
Against huge I was more nervous and more assured that we had lost because against end game when we died for a second it was all over really fast. I think the TV even made it look a little bit longer and how they edited it but against huge they took out our weapon on one of those first hits. And even though we had a sort of chain garden cover over it was three quarter inch thick uhw plastic Bent on into the chain and sort of destroyed our weapons sprocket. And so we had no chance but to knock them out. Because once a robot knocks out your sort of main weapon, it’s very hard to win the rest of the match or the judge’s decision and we couldn’t really get them out of the arena because they’re just so big and hard to move around. And so eventually the hits were so big that of us coming together and the power of their weapon and us sort of absorbing a lot of that weapon power and the way we kept smashing them eventually they fell apart in the arena and so that was when from one of the lowest points where I couldn’t believe we had made it so far we got into the tournament we had a good bracket good ranking we would lose on the first match to a pretty new robot we pretty embarrassing so instead you know when they fell apart and it showed that robot was more durable and survived the battle I felt really good to get that result

Cliff 25:30
that’s awesome. I haven’t actually seen that one yet. So look for that, so spoiler alerts if you haven’t watched the whole season I’ve been taping them on Discovery Channel So Paul This is great thanks for your time today I could talk for another hour about battlebots but maybe that’s just me but I think there’s a lot of SOLIDWORKS users who are definitely tied into battle but it’s an interest for them as well so.

Paul Ventimiglia 25:53
Yeah thank you because it’s always fun to talk to you about it and I know is knew from the start that how you how into your so it’s is really cool when someone is both into it and a supporter of our team so it’s really thank you Cliff.

Cliff 26:05
Thanks for listening today and remember that if you are interested in robotics smart products and mechanics like Paul is learn more about building your electromechanical products at solidworks.com/mechatronics thats solidworks.com/mechatronics. And hey, we’ll be back again soon with more great born to design podcast stories at solidworks.com/podcast or wherever podcasts are readily available. Until then, keep innovating!

Author information

Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling is a Senior Marketing Manager at SolidWorks and the host for the Born to Design Podcast.

The post Podcast with BattleBots Champion 2018 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Cliff Medling at October 08, 2018 02:05 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

How to deal with SOLIDWORKS Resource Running Low

SOLIDWORKS Resource Running Low

SOLIDWORKS Resource Monitor

Some SOLIDWORKS users tend to encounter this issue. Factor such as limited RAM space and many running programs at one time can be considered as the major caused.

For resolution, you may refer the to 2 options below.

  1. Virtual Memory Setting
  2. Registry modification

The cause of the Resource Monitor warning message is due to the GDI Objects limit of your Window OS. GDI object limit for a single process to be 10,000 by default. However, it has the maximum allowed up to 16384. By increasing the limit, each application will be in a comfort zone.

We will always suggest user to upgade the custom size in the Virtual Memory first instead of modifying the registry settings. If this resolved, no modification of the registry settings is required.

In the event, that this doesnt resolve, then you will need to modify the registry settings.

There are no guarantee that problems resulting from modifications to the registry can be solved at one time. There are risk in modifying the window registry which eventually cause Window operating system error. Reinstall of your operating system is required in this case.

 

Method 1: The Virtual Memory Settings

1. Go to Control Panel> System > Advanced System Settings

Advanced system setting

2. Advanced (Tab) > Settings

3. Advanced > Change

Advanced > Change

4. Uncheck “Automatically manage paging file size for all drives”.Choose the Driver which you would prefer to utilise the virtual memory.

5. Under Custom size, enter the value double the size of the amount of physical RAM installed in your PC. (If you have 16GB, type in 32000MB)

6. Enter the Initial size value of 2 times the amount of physical RAM installed in your system (eg. If you have 16GB, type in 32000MB.)

7. Click on ‘Set’.

8. Restart your workstation.

Monitoring

You may monitor this through the Task Manager. This solution will involve editing the Windows Registry.

  1. Open Task Manager (right click on start bar > Task Manager OR through CTRL+ALT+DEL)
  2. Click on ‘Details’ Tab
  3. Right-click on one of the columns and click  ‘Select Columns’
  4. Tick the GDI objects

Method 2: The Registry Settings

  1. Open Regedit (via Run > type ‘regedit’)
  2. Locate to the key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE> SOFTWARE> Microsoft> Windows NT> CurrentVersion> Windows>  GDIProcessHandleQuota
  3. Right click on the ‘GDIProcessHandleQuota’ and click ‘Modify’.
  4. Change the registry key to the maximum process limit 16,384; set the BASE to DECIMAL.

**Take note that altering Window registry can cause Window OS malfunction.

Alternatively, if you just wish to dismiss the message, you always have the option to do so from the Window Toolbar Notification area.

 

Author information

ateworks
From our humble beginnings in 2008, ATE has grown from a single-office reseller into a powerhouse of engineering solution provider, with 5 office locations in Singapore and Malaysia, with a 70-strong workforce that can provide localized support and services to our customers. Today, we provide unrivalled 3D engineering solutions as an premium reseller of Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS. Along the journey, we have also added Altair and SolidCAM, together with many other world-class technology partners, with the single focus on extracting the best return on technology investment for our customers.

The post How to deal with SOLIDWORKS Resource Running Low appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by ateworks at October 08, 2018 02:04 PM

The Javelin Blog

Install SOLIDWORKS PDM Server Components without using the Installation Manager

Starting with SOLIDWORKS 2016, the SOLIDWORKS PDM file set was incorporated into the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager. This makes for a convenient one stop location to install all SOLIDWORKS products. Unfortunately, this also makes for a large installation file-set, that can be cumbersome to move around.

There are good reason for using the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager though. Outside of installing the selected products, the Installation Manger will also install any required prerequisites. When installing SOLIDWORKS or any of the products intended for the end user, I would recommend using the Installation Manager.

For Server Products, though, using that products installer may be more efficient. For example, the PDM Server Installation is approximately 500 MB, which is far smaller then full SOLIDWORKS Installation, which is around 14 GB. This makes the PDM Server Installation, much more portable. This also, makes downloading the PDM Server Installation, much faster.

If you have already downloaded the full SOLIDWORKS Installation, you will find the PDM Server Installation file-set in a folder called ‘swpdmserver’. You can copy this file to server or a portable drive, so that you can take the file-set, to the location where you need to install PDM Server. You can also choose to download only certain components, such as PDM Server. The process for doing this, is explained in my article: Manually Downloading SOLIDWORKS Components. Also, from this area, you can download any required prerequisites. Using the PDM Server Installation file-set works well for updates, but I would recommend using the SOLIDWORKS Installation file-set, for the initial installation of the PDM Server.

If you do decide to install SOLIDWORKS PDM Server Components manually then the rest of this article will walk you through the installation.

How to Install SOLIDWORKS PDM Server Components Manually

The PDM Server installation is launched by executing the SOLIDWORKS PDM Server.msi. This will be located either in the ‘swpdmserver’ folder, of SOLIDWORKS Installation file-set, or from the downloaded PDM Server Installation file-set.

SOLIDWORKS PDM File Set

SOLIDWORKS PDM File Set

After clicking on Next, on the Welcome screen, accepting the License Agreement, and providing the installation path, you will be asked if you want to install SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard or Professional.

Choose the PDM Service Installation type

Choose the PDM Service Installation type

You will then be asked what components you wish to install.

Install SOLIDWORKS PDM Server Components

Components to Install

If you chose to install the Client, as I did in this example, you will be asked to choose a Product Type.

 

 

Having the Client installed in the same as the PDM Archive, can be useful when troubleshooting connection issues.

Again, if the Client is being installed, you will prompted to install any Add-ins.

Installing Add-ins

Installing Add-ins

The remainder of the installation deals strictly with server components. You will first be asked to identify the location of SQL and the default password that was defined for the Conisio Master database.

Select SQL Server Login

Select SQL Server Login

The post Install SOLIDWORKS PDM Server Components without using the Installation Manager appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at October 08, 2018 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Interview: Take a Tour of Former Autodesk CEO Carl Bass’s Wood and Metal Shops

What happens when a business leader with the core of a true maker and engineer gets his hands on the resources to build whatever he wants? No, I’m not talking about Elon — I said, “true maker and engineer”. We’re talking about Carl Bass and his wood and metal shops. They’re stocked for projects requiring some serious heavy lifting.  See the video below for the tour of both!

Note about the video: apologies for the wonky camera angles. If it looks like a tiny, chimp-like creature was trying and failing at working a giant into a shot, that’s because it was that exactly. Carl is a very big man, and I am a rather small woman.

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What “Retirement” from Autodesk Looks Like

Carl Bass did the 9-to-5 thing for decades in various leadership positions at AutoDesk, including CEO . . . or whatever hours a CEO pulls to run a company successfully.  Autodesk is, of course, the company behind AutoCAD, the technical drawing software most engineers have had to at least touch at some point in their career.

Last year, he stepped down as CEO, but he didn’t slow down at all. While other former executives might spend their retirement golfing at a resort, Bass decided to pack his free time with even more work. He tells me the most significant difference in his life now is the flexibility of his schedule. Bass now has the freedom to apply himself to what he wants whenever he wants.

Some of Bass’s activities outside metal and woodworking are serving as an advisor to every freaking company and organization I seem to come across lately. Remember Circuit Launch? That was the electronics hardware coworking space we recently toured HERE. Yep, Carl is an advisor. The self-driving car company, Zoox, was in the news lately, and Carl stepped up to give them some guidance, too. Bass was particularly happy about his involvement with Planet, the company that launches its satellites to provide a kind of live Google Earth. The products coming from this company are pretty neat, but I think Carl really liked that rocket launches were a part of it all; rockets are cool.

In all these advising activities, Bass is rarely given a chance to get his hands dirty. In spite of his technical background that includes software, physical design, and bridging the two worlds, he guides different machines in his advising. Engineering the invisible gears of a company itself and tricky people dynamics as companies scale are more likely topics.

Luckily, Carl built his own metal and woodshop playgrounds, so he can still play in the dirt all he likes.

Metal Shop

Carl Bass’s shops are more than just places for him to build neat physical objects. He also continues to play around with invention there. This was apparent with the first project he showed us: a MIG welder turned 3D printer. Whut?

MIG Welder 3D-Printer

Looking at the expensive metal 3D printers coming out now, which use processes like laser metal sintering, Bass thought he could put together a cheaper method. He described the realization of this invention simply as throwing together a MIG-welder, some sensors, and a neural network. Easy peasy. I’m sure it was a bit more complicated than he made it sound.

Here’s an example of the 3D MIG print/welding:

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_98080" style="width: 474px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Mad scientist, Carl Bass’s 3D-Printed MIG-welded parts.</figcaption></figure>

Demonstrating the most massive scale object he’s created with the MIG-welding 3D printer is this polished chair. This was 3d-printed. Unbelievable.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_98084" style="width: 468px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Carl’s sweet 3D-printed metal chair.</figcaption></figure>

Other toys include a water jet and a press brake which he built his stairs with. Every cart in the shop was also built in the shop.

Autonomous Go-Kart Because Why Not

When Carl’s son wanted to build a go-kart, he decided to crank it to 11 with some other people and make it autonomous. His son wasn’t too impressed, because the fun part of a go-kart is being able to drive it. What’s important, though, is that all the other fathers must have been super jealous.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_98081" style="width: 464px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The go-kart turned autonomous go-kart Carl Bass and his son built.</figcaption></figure>

Electric Cobra Kit Car

A Cobra kit car which Carl decided to redesign as electric was in progress at the shop. They’re currently figuring out where to stick all the non-combustion components, machining a bell housing, and fabricating heat sinks and battery boxes.

 

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_98083" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Carl Bass’s all-electric Cobra.</figcaption></figure>

One of the adjustments beyond the drive was extending the space for the driver so he could fit in the thing. As mentioned, he’s a pretty big dude, and Cobras are tiny cars. This will be fun to see Bass driving around the Bay area one day, and also the track, I’m told! He’s hoping for something like 0-60 mph in a few seconds.

Woodshop

A short drive from Carl’s Metal Shop is his wood shop. Here, we got to see the in-progress canoe he’s building with his son.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_98086" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Canoe being built from scratch by Carl Bass and his son.</figcaption></figure>

Carl played around with a new way of aligning the individual planks of the canoe when forming the shape. He told me traditionally, you fit the ends of each strip to a larger piece when you’re trying to put them all together. Then, that larger piece needs to be, kind of, whittled on the fly to get it all to connect well. It’s tricky because the angle each plank needs to end at on that large piece is different.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_98088" style="width: 471px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Digitally designed piece for canoe building.</figcaption></figure>

Instead of hacking away at it by hand inch-by-inch this time, he tried to model that connector piece and cut it beforehand digitally. Luckily, he knows a little bit about 3D modeling. It turned out to be a big success, which Carl says isn’t always the case when you try to do something digitally that’s normally done by hand. Those planks laid down like butter, and it made the whole process much faster than the last time he built a canoe, 40-ish years ago.

5-Axis CNC Machine

Most of the tools in the woodshop are your typical woodworking gadgets, but the gargantuan 5-axis CNC machine was noteworthy. I asked if one could build a dinosaur with this thing, and Carl confirmed that yes, yes you can.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_98087" style="width: 560px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Gigantic 5-axis CNC in the woodshop.</figcaption></figure>

The downside to working with this big guy is just about each thing you cut also needs a big, custom fixture to be built to hold your part. That’s what makes up the storehouse of wooden shapes you see behind the CNC.

Sanding Robot?

Carl loves making new things, but like most humans, he gets bored of the routine tasks involved in that work which don’t require creativity. Sanding wood is one of those tasks. It’s also time-consuming and hard physical labor. That’s why it’s on his automation hitlist! Hopefully, we’ll see news from Carl Bass of a robot that sands wood in the future.

See What Carl Makes!

Carl created a bunch of gifts for friends and family over the years, and he’s getting around now to displaying them on his website, CarlBass.com. The website is one of the 3 million projects he’s working on, and might always be a work in progress. So, don’t judge, but do check out his works! He’s shy to consider himself an artist, but as you’ll see, Carl’s work is strikingly beautiful.

I’m hoping in the future he’ll consider adding knowledge to his site, too. His inventions for metal and woodworking are certainly interesting. He also sometimes geeks out on craftsmanship, too. For example, when Bass came across a woodworking process where multiple techniques were touted as “the best” he decided to buy each tool for each method and compare them all. That would all make for a valuable read! Please encourage him if you agree. (Carl, if you haven’t the time to write these things up . . . call your other friends or me at SolidSmack.)

For other, more frequently updated peeks into these projects, you can check out Bass’s Instagram handle: carl.bass

The post Interview: Take a Tour of Former Autodesk CEO Carl Bass’s Wood and Metal Shops appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at October 08, 2018 11:49 AM

Cool Books of Doom: ‘Sketching’ by Koos Eissen and Roselien Steur

Industrial Design Sketching

While there used to be a painful shortage of inspirational design sketching books out there, these days, design students and those looking to refresh their skill set may, in fact, have too many to choose from. The good news is, there’s something different to learn from each—so go ahead and build out that library.

Among other design sketching book favorites, we love the broad variety of sketching styles presented in Sketching.

While the book is ideal for any design student or classroom, many professionals and design studios will also likely learn a thing or two from the wide variety of sketching styles and form examples presented within the book’s 256 pages.

Sketching (12th printing): Drawing Techniques for Product Designers by Koos Eissen and Roselien Steur — $36.49

About the Authors:

Koos Eissen is an associate professor and head of the Design Drawing Techniques staff (TU Delft, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, in the Netherlands). He is at present guest-lecturer at the Royal Academy of Arts in The Hague. Roselien Steur is a free-lance visualizer, and lecturer at the HKU/Utrecht School of the Arts, The Faculty of Visual Arts and Design in the Netherlands.

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!


Feature Image via Spencer Nugent
.

The post Cool Books of Doom: ‘Sketching’ by Koos Eissen and Roselien Steur appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 08, 2018 10:02 AM

Russian Rifle Company Kalashnikov Is Coming out with a New… Electric Car?

Kalashnikov car concept

You didn’t read the title wrong. Whenever you hear of Russian company Kalashnikov Concern, it usually has to do with the myriad of rifles they have been making since 1807. What doesn’t come to mind is the same company working on an environmentally-friendly electric car.

Unveiled during the ARMY-2018 military trade show, a prototype concept based on an old 1973 Russian-made IZh 2125 is going to be Kalashnikov’s bet against the electric car behemoth which is Tesla.

Kalashnikov car concept

Despite its retro appearance, the proposed car is said to go from 0-60 miles per hour in six seconds; all this power is coming from a rechargeable battery which can go up to a little more than 200 miles on a single charge.

Details on the project are scarce, but for what it’s worth, this could be their version of a Bond car: fully-electric with hidden compartments for housing a mini-arsenal.

The post Russian Rifle Company Kalashnikov Is Coming out with a New… Electric Car? appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at October 08, 2018 10:00 AM

October 06, 2018

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: A Thimble of Puchaungle

15 million water spouts dripped against a noticeable stench rising out of the eroded interior of the last great Puchaungle warrior’s shell. Hollow, crumbles of metal flakes fought floating against the drops and every once in a while the sounds all came together like a song, a song sifting a course, asking for these links.

Stefan Misirdzhiev – Schooled in traditional art techniques with the abilty to drop creatures shots and incredible concept ships like nobody’s business.

Share Textures – Free 4k textures for any use. Thousands. From abstract and animals to wall and wood.

Sans forgetica – An free, aptly named, font that is “scientifically designed to help you remember your study notes.” A nifty making of video and a Chrome browser extension to boot.

Changeling Blossom – The sculptures of Amy Sol. Hauntingly calm both human and animal.

Porsche 70th – The 70th Anniversary Auction of RM | Sotheby’s and the 372 pages of all things Porsche that will be auctioned off at the end of October.

Star Wars Toys – Photographer Felix Hernandez snagged some Infinity Star Wars characters and shot some dreamy film-style shots of the crew.

Snowbasin – Pretty much want to go to Utah now. Justin McFarland’s drone footage of the fall colors over Ogden Valley, Utah.

everything that could have been but wasn’t, now is – Paper? Nope, aluminum.

The Kolakoski Sequence – a string of 1s and 2s that writes itself based on the premise that each block of numbers will be a successive iteration of the previous.

“Random” color harmonies – A wonderful codepen by David A. that provides a group of six randomly generated colors that play quite well together.
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by Josh Mings at October 06, 2018 03:06 AM

October 05, 2018

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Crash Troubleshooting Guide (Part 2 of 3)

Part 2 of my SOLIDWORKS Crash Troubleshooting Guide includes recommendations for graphics cards and utilizing SOLIDWORKS Rx. Catch up on part 1 of the guide.

  1. Ensure that your graphics driver is certified.  This does not mean the latest driver.  The latest driver is not necessarily the greatest!  You can prevent automatic updates of the driver per this article.  If your graphics card is not in the list of cards with certified drivers, then you may wish to download the latest driver from the manufacturer’s website.
  2. Try a SOLIDWORKS Rx Reliability Report and Reboot Check.
  3. Try running SOLIDWORKS in the two different RX safe modes to rule out the graphics card or SOLIDWORKS settings as the cause of the issue.  Close SOLIDWORKS prior to commencing safe mode testing.  If running in OpenGL mode (uses central processing unit [CPU] instead of graphics processing unit [GPU]) and SOLIDWORKS does not crash, then it indicates an issue with whatever graphics card/chip (a.k.a. Display Adapter) or its driver that SOLIDWORKS is normally using.
  4. What graphics hardware is SOLIDWORKS normally trying to use?
    • You can find that out in SOLIDWORKS Rx->Diagnostics tab->Card Model.  Is it trying to use the Intel or equivalent basic chip, and yet you know you have something more SOLIDWORKS-capable such as Nvidia or AMD hardware in the computer?
    • If Intel is being used instead of the high-performance hardware, check your graphics card settings.  For Nvidia graphics processors, to access the control panel: right-click on desktop->NVIDIA Control Panel->Manage 3D Settings.  Check which graphics processor is set under Global or program-specific settings, and change if necessary.
    • We do not recommend disabling your basic graphics processor in Windows Control Panel->Device Manager, lest it lead to unforseen consequences (to reference a certain video game)!  If your graphics card/chip Control Panel doesn’t match closely to the images below, fear not…there may be other ways to set your computer to use the high-performance card.  Keep reading for details…
      SOLIDWORKS Crash Troubleshooting Selecting graphics processor in Nvidia Control Panel

      Selecting graphics processor in Nvidia Control Panel

      Selecting graphics processor in AMD FirePro Advanced Settings

      Selecting graphics processor in AMD FirePro Advanced Settings

  5. If using a workstation with multiple monitors, and Nvidia Control Panel (or AMD equivalent) cannot be used to select which graphics processor to use, confirm which monitor is connected to which video port on the computer.  If one of those ports is the motherboard (likely running an Intel or equivalent basic graphics processor), that may explain the crashing.  Try minimizing all apps (Windows+D), right-click on your desktop, and choose Display Settings.  Check which display is set as your main display.  If the main display is the one connected to the motherboard, try changing that setting so that the other monitor is the main, or try swapping the connections to the video ports if the plug style will allow that.  Once the main display is the one connected to your high performance graphics port (Nvidia or AMD), re-test in SOLIDWORKS Rx to confirm that the high performance graphics processor is the one being used by SOLIDWORKS.
  6. If using a single monitor, to which graphics port is it connected on the computer?  For workstations, the Nvidia or AMD port is recommended, otherwise if plugged into the motherboard then it will likely limit graphics processing to the basic processor on that board, instead of the high-performance processor on the installed graphics card.  For laptops, the port(s) will likely allow either processor to be used, and Nvidia/AMD control panel software should be used to select which processor.
  7. If using an AMD FirePro Graphics Card, review this article

If the problem persists, check out part 3 of our SOLIDWORKS Crash Troubleshooting Guide coming soon; subscribe to our blog to receive daily tips and tricks via email.

The post SOLIDWORKS Crash Troubleshooting Guide (Part 2 of 3) appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at October 05, 2018 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Beginning of The End of STL – Ultimaker Cura Goes Full 3MF

Ultimaker has released Cura version 3.5.

The Netherlands-based 3D printer manufacturer has been supplying the open source 3D print slicing and printer management system for many years, providing periodic updates that add functionality and quality to both the software and the prints generated with it.

Now they’ve released version 3.5 and it includes a number of new features that I am quite interested in trying out.

The major feature, however, is the shift to 3MF. 3D models being worked on in Cura have always been “saved” in two ways: as an exported 3D model in a specific format, or as a project file that saves the printer and plate settings. That’s changing. Ultimaker explains what’s new:

3MF project files. We’ve retired the ‘.curaproject’ extension. Project files now use a 3MF extension, for better compatibility between other 3D software applications.

They’ve also clarified how this is done by changing the behavior of “Save” to mean “save the project” (in 3MF format, of course) and “Export” to mean “making a copy in a specific 3D file format”. This should make things a bit clearer to new users.

3MF, if you are not familiar, is an upcoming 3D file format that provides significantly more information than the de facto standard (prehistoric) .STL file format. A growing consortium of leading hardware and software companies backs the format, and it is slowly gaining acceptance among other participants in the 3D printing ecosystem.

The announcement from Ultimaker is yet another step towards the universal use of 3MF.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_98237" style="width: 720px">Cura 3.5 showing .3mf file access [Source: Ultimaker]<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Cura 3.5 showing .3mf file access [Source: Ultimaker]</figcaption></figure>Aside from the file format changes, Cura 3.5 includes many other fixes and improvements, which are far too lengthy to list here. To see all of them, visit the Ultimaker description page at the bottom.

That said, there were several very intriguing improvements that I wish to bring forward as I believe them to be of interest.

“Improved overhang wall processing. Overhang walls are automatically detected and printed with varying speed, and perimeters will not start on an overhanging wall. Printing overhang walls at a different speed gives higher-quality and more reliable results.”

This is a problem that has plagued me from time to time, where you have a pathological overhang that slicing engines don’t understand. You can see the printer about to make a horrible mistake and think “why doesn’t it go that way!” Now, it does.

“Initial layer support line distance. This setting enables the user to reduce or increase the density of the support initial layer in order to reduce or increase adhesion to the build plate and the overall strength.”

In spite of countless ways to increase the reliability of first layer adhesion, it is still a frequent problem for many users of almost all extrusion-based 3D printer equipment. Thus, anything that attempts to make it more reliable is a Good Thing in my book.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_98238" style="width: 720px">A dramatic change in the prime pillar concept in Cura 3.5 [Source: Ultimaker]<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">A dramatic change in the prime pillar concept in Cura 3.5 [Source: Ultimaker]</figcaption></figure>

“Prime tower reliability. Printing with two materials that don’t adhere well could cause the prime tower to fail during a print, so we have repurposed the prime tower to create a shell of one material and use it as a purge bin for a second material, giving it significantly more strength and reliability than before.”

The availability of dual extruder 3D printers has launched a kind of materials exploration event in which operators are trying many combinations. Some of these, as Ultimaker explains, don’t mix well, so they changed the prime pillar approach entirely. This is a very good thing, as the initial prime pillar concept was really for crisp changing of colors, not changing material types.

“Support infill line direction. Support infill lines can now be rotated to increase the supporting capabilities and reduce artifacts on the model. This setting rotates existing patterns, like triangle support infill.”

Strength of parts in extrusion-based 3D printers depends utterly on the direction of the extrusion, as the layer adhesion is usually the weakest part of the print. This feature suggests that one could tweak the internal direction of the support structure material and make the sometimes-spindly supports stronger.

And of course Ultimaker Cura 3.5 adds support for a number of new third party 3D printers, as it usually does in each new release. This release includes profiles for the TiZYX, Winbo, Tevo Tornado, Creality CR-10S, and Wanhao Duplicator 3D printers.

While this release is immediately usable by anyone, even those not using Ultimaker equipment, Cura is also used as base software by several other 3D printer manufacturers through customizations. As a result of the release of version 3.5, we will soon see updates to these customized versions of Cura as the changes cascade on down.

Good job, Ultimaker!

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Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Beginning of The End of STL – Ultimaker Cura Goes Full 3MF appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at October 05, 2018 05:28 AM

October 04, 2018

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Become a Superhero with SOLIDWORKS xDesign

We all aspire to be Superheroes. They save the world and amaze everyone around them. Sometimes being an engineer and designing a new product feels like being a Superhero. We engineers balance fit, form & function while choosing materials that will stand up to the environment—all while managing the project data, revisions, and timeline. It’s a LOT.

 

Every CAD tool has time-saving and productivity-enhancing tools, which helps to become a Superhero, but I’m “super” excited about xDesign for its Design Guidance. What is Design Guidance, you ask? It is a thinking-outside-the-box innovative idea where the user defines parameters about the strength they need their product to withstand, and the software automatically builds the model based on the strength it needs to have. Amazing, right?

Traditionally, engineers design a model, then simulate the environment around that model to see how it reacts, and whether it will withstand the forces upon it. If the result is that the model will fail, the engineer will tweak a dimension or change the material and try again. Same thing if the product is overdesigned, and the engineer wants to reduce material.

 

Design Guidance

With SOLIDWORKS xDesign, the engineer has the freedom to look at things from the other side. Rather than making an educated guess at the design, and then testing it, they simply put the desired parameters into the software using Design Guidance, and let xDesign do the work for them! It’s like design optimization on steroids!

A shape will emerge that will withstand the loading parameters that the engineer defines, and what could have taken several design iterations in traditional CAD/CAE tools is done in a fraction of the time and effort.

Take a look at how easy Design Guidance is to use in the video below. This video was created by Eric Beatty, one of our longest customers, who has been using SOLIDWORKS since March 1996 as an educator at North Seattle Community College, where he founded SASPUG, the very first SOLIDWORKS user group. Eric is currently a Senior Mechanical Designer for Omax Corporation, a leading manufacturer of CNC abrasive waterjet machining centers, and has recently returned to the leadership role in SASPUG. He unabashedly describes himself as a “3D CAD/CAM nerd.” Later this year, I’ll be publishing another blog on Eric Beatty’s xDesign experiences. He was an xDesign challenge winner, and went to Milan Italy in April 2018! Congratulations Eric!

<iframe allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/iJvQBWe7FUI?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

Due to the Superhero status that Design Guidance gives to engineers, it is one of my favorite features in xDesign. However, there are other beneficial features too. These include:

  • Design Guidance
  • Cloud-Based
  • Data Management
  • Social Collaboration
  • Mass Reduction for Manufacturing
  • Project Management

Cloud-Based
The software is cloud-based, which means you can design on any device since you’re logging in via a browser, and you never have to worry about configuring or managing your installation. It stays up to date with the latest version automatically.

Data Management
No one enjoys managing data, it’s a high-burden, low-appreciative job. That’s another reason why xDesign is so attractive. Data management is built in. You can save, version, and share your designs as you see fit. There is also a “branch and merge” feature that enables you to merge your design with someone else’s design and retain both of your edits. No more “last to save wins” – you can both win! You can also link to Dropbox and Google Drive… very handy.

Social Collaboration
Here’s where things get interesting. More and more engineers graduate from colleges around the world every year – people love to design great products. What would happen if you could effectively team up with others to brainstorm and create an EVEN BETTER product? No I’m not talking about lengthy weekly meetings in a bored-room, err, I mean boardroom. I’m talking about really and truly working together. You can work with internal team members, or external contributors, through secure and safe communities, have complete control over file access and sharing, lightweight visualization, and product review.

Mass Reduction for Manufacturing
Mass reduction is an automated way to make your model lighter, and hence less expensive. Yes, xDesign will help you to reduce your project budget! As with Design Guidance, you set the parameters, and xDesign will automatically analyze at your model and look for places that can be reduced without affecting the integrity of your design. It will still have enough strength for the job it’s designed for, but it will be lighter. This means less material is required, and also when it comes time to ship the product to the customer, the shipping charges will be less.

Project Management
We all need to manage our time. I’m notorious for procrastinating and leaving a project until the last minute, then stress about getting it done on time. What if we had a tool that could help us plan our time better? Say no more. xDesign gives you the flexibility to create collaborative tasks, and assign and link those tasks to the models you’re working on. You can manage the tasks and monitor the progress with a handy dashboard to see where your project stands in real time.

So if you want to become a Superhero (and frankly who doesn’t), then look into SOLIDWORKS xDesign. Design your products faster and automatically using Design Guidance!

Check out xDesign HERE to see how you can improve your engineering and design experience, and become a Superhero! For more information about xDesign and how it can help you and your team, please contact your Value-Added Reseller.

Author information

Jenn Doerksen
Jenn Doerksen
Jenn Doerksen works for Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS, as a Territory Technical Manager. She has been part of the SOLIDWORKS community since early 1997, when she bought her first license of SOLIDWORKS while working at the BCIT Technology Center. Since then, she has worked for a local Value-Added Reseller, presenting, teaching and supporting SOLIDWORKS for several years, and has worked for SOLIDWORKS directly since early 2005. She has a Bachelor’s of Engineering from the University of Victoria and lives with her husband and three dogs in Vancouver BC, Canada.

The post Become a Superhero with SOLIDWORKS xDesign appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Jenn Doerksen at October 04, 2018 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Using the Foreshorten View SOLIDWORKS Drawing Option

Creating Aligned Views in SOLIDWORKS can have different results, depending on the geometry of the model being sectioned and the settings selected in the process of creating the Section View. The SOLIDWORKS Foreshorten view option that appears during creation of Aligned Views makes a big difference in the view projection.

The two images below show the effect of the option ‘Foreshorten view,’ which is only available during view creation.  Note the difference in the resulting height and the placement of the ‘thru’ hole in the section view.  Both options are valid – different users will have different preferences, practices and requirements for creating aligned section views.

SOLIDWORKS Foreshorten view disabled

Foreshorten view disabled

SOLIDWORKS Foreshorten view enabled

Foreshorten view enabled

The post Using the Foreshorten View SOLIDWORKS Drawing Option appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Sanja Srzic at October 04, 2018 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Nu:Ro Is an Analog Watch Which Tells Time Through a Minimalist Hourglass

NURO analog watch

Some people say a design is at its best when it’s at its simplest, but I’m pretty sure the statement doesn’t apply to everything.

Take the NU:RO for example. Created by Anton Repponen of the Anton & Irene New York Studio, the analog watch is a heaven sent for minimalists but may be a bit troublesome to read for others.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/antonandirene/nu-ro-minimalist-analog-watch/widget/video.html" width="800"> </iframe>

But I’m getting ahead of myself; no matter how you look at it, this timepiece is bound to catch people’s eyes. While the 20mm wide leather (or steel mesh) straps are nothing to write home about, it’s the way this watch tells time which makes it unique.

NURO analog watch

Two dials make up the NU:RO. The upper dial denotes hours while the lower one shows minutes. Each dial rotates independently, meaning you’ll have to set both of them to get the proper time. The numbers within the hourglass show you how late you are to your morning meeting.

It’s an excellent design for sure, but what’s a tad worrying is how the watch shows time. Though it does have the same 5-minute intervals as a regular watch, the rather wide “waist” of the hourglass makes it hard to tell if it’s either 10:41 am or 10:43 am. Apart from this, the numbers on the dials appear quite small, making it hard to decipher even without the hourglass.

NURO analog watch NURO analog watch

Small nitpick aside, this looks like an impressive timepiece to confuse those people who ask you what time it is. A lot of effort was put into the minimalist nature of the dials and hourglass, and it definitely is a unique take on the classic watch.

The NU:RO is currently live on Kickstarter and had achieved just under $20,000 out of its $65,000 goal.

The post The Nu:Ro Is an Analog Watch Which Tells Time Through a Minimalist Hourglass appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at October 04, 2018 11:42 AM

Amazon’s New Toolkit Allows Developers To Make Their Own Alexa-Compatible Devices

Amazon Alexa

Ever since Amazon’s Alexa was released back in November 2014, I’ve been afraid of inanimate objects suddenly greeting me or setting my schedules. It’s gotten so bad I’ve decided never to name any future pets or daughters ‘Alexa’, for fear I might suddenly activate a bystanding Alexa-enabled device.

This is only going to get harder now that Amazon has released the Beta of their Alexa Gadgets Toolkit, which developers to create their own Alexa-powered gadgets and connect them to an Echo-enabled device.

Using self-service APIs, which include tech documentation and sample code to oversee the connection between the Echo device and paired gadgets, the Alexa Gadgets Toolkit comes with many gadget interfaces that increase the range of machines Alexa can plug herself into.

amazon alexa gadgets toolkit

You’ll have cuckoo clocks which turn their head whenever you say “Alexa”. There will be Furbies which, if they weren’t creepy before, can now mimic Alexa’s spoken words. Alarms will be more creative, allowing for timers which can activate dog food dispensers or medicine cabinets. Depending on how creative developers get, an untold number of gadgets can help make everyday life more comfortable (or at the very least, a lot more interesting).

Many dancing plush toys and an animatronic Big Mouth Billy Bass using the new Alexa Gadgets Toolkit will be made available later this year. A full list of the gadget interfaces can be found on the developer blog on Amazon webpage.

What would you add Alexa to?

The post Amazon’s New Toolkit Allows Developers To Make Their Own Alexa-Compatible Devices appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at October 04, 2018 11:36 AM

Self-Build Your Next Workstation with This Ultimate Computer Building Course

Hard Drive

These days, you can get just about any computer rig designed to your exact specifications. Whether you’re a RAM-hogging SolidWorks user, or simply just want a powerful workstation, there’s something for everybody. But no standardized hardware mod will ever replace the satisfaction of building your own rig from scratch.

If you’ve ever wanted to create your own custom-built PC but didn’t know where to start, boy do we have great news for you.

The How to Build a Computer Bundle consolidates five intensive online courses (a total of 126 individual lessons) ranging from how to create a blueprint for your desired desktop or laptop setup to how to overclock CPU processor functions to speed up rendering times.

How to Build a Computer Bundle — $374 $19.00 (94% off)

Topics Covered Include:

  • Learn about the basic functions of a computer system
  • Pick out appropriate hardware for your build
  • Assemble all hardware needed for a fully functional computer
  • Wire everything within the case like an expert
  • Cover the most effective method of CPI cooling: closed-loop liquid cooling
  • Upgrade to a higher capacity storage device
  • Improve your RAM chip(s)
  • Clean & refresh your CPU cooling unit
  • Swap in an SSD
  • Learn about the various tricky aspects about RAID setups
  • Understand how to increase data read/write speeds & prepare your computer for a drive crash

Get It!

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Self-Build Your Next Workstation with This Ultimate Computer Building Course appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 04, 2018 11:31 AM

Cool Tools of Doom: The Hide & Drink Waterproof Waxed Canvas Tool Roll

Canvas Tool Roll

When it comes to functional workspaces, proper tool organization cannot be stressed enough. After all, does anybody enjoy having to bounce from drawer to drawer looking for that one special screwdriver?

We didn’t think so.

While it may not organize every took in your shop, the handmade Waterproof Waxed Canvas Tool Rool from Hide & Drink is still one of our favorites. In fact, we like that we can bundle specific tools for specific tasks in different rolls—making it easy to grab and go when the time comes. In total, each roll includes slots for six different tools (or a variety of small tools). Not to mention, the waxed canvas and hand-hammered metal rivets are a nice touch.

The Hide & Drink Waterproof Waxed Canvas Tool Roll — $22.99

Features:

  • Hand-cut and sewn from waxed canvas
  • Hand-hammered metal rivets and hand-cut belt for easy open and close
  • 6 tool slots
  • Simple and functional design
  • Designed to be handed down over generations

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The Hide & Drink Waterproof Waxed Canvas Tool Roll appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 04, 2018 11:30 AM

October 03, 2018

The Javelin Blog

Changing Reference Configuration in Inserted Parts and Mirrored or Patterned Instances

In SOLIDWORKS, instances of mirrored or patterned assembly components are not limited to the current configuration of the original part or sub-assembly.  As for any other component, the SOLIDWORKS Reference Configuration of a patterned or mirrored instance can be changed using the Quick Configurations toolbar or Component Properties.

Changing a SOLIDWORKS Reference Configuration

Changing a SOLIDWORKS Reference Configuration

When a part is inserted into another part, its configuration can also be changed:  right-click on the inserted part, select ‘List External Refs…’ and use the pull-down menu to select the required configuration.

Changing configuration of an inserted part

Changing SOLIDWORKS Reference configuration of an inserted part

The post Changing Reference Configuration in Inserted Parts and Mirrored or Patterned Instances appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Sanja Srzic at October 03, 2018 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Four SOLIDWORKS-Designed Bots Duke it Out in BattleBots Final

I cannot imagine that you are not already aware, but the 2018 Season of BattleBots is coming to an end.  The Final Four will be fighting it out this Friday on the Discovery Channel.  I know I’m excited, as I have been following this event for many years now, however, this year is especially exciting as we have an ALL-SOLIDWORKS Final four.  All four bots were designed using SOLIDWORKS:  Lock-Jaw, Bite Force, Whiplash and Minotaur.

Listen In: Born to Design Podcast interview with Paul Ventimiglia:  Team Bite Force and 2015 and 2018 Giant Nut Champion.  [www.solidworks.com/podcast]

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Winning the Giant Nut at a BattleBots tournament requires a tough robot, a skilled driver, and sometimes a little luck.  I interviewed one of the final four, Paul Ventimiglia (Biteforce team leader), during this year’s event, and he opened up about what happens behind the scenes as well as some other interesting insights about BattleBots.

Paul is a long-time roboticist and contender in BattleBots, and I had the opportunity to meet him years ago.  We have stayed in touch, and I had a chance to ask him some questions about competing this year with Team BiteForce. I don’t want to share too much detail about my interview now, but it’s all in the podcast.

If you’re a BattleBots fan like me, or interested in how they design fighting robots, I think you will want to hear more about all of the excitement from outside and inside the arena.  Paul also talks about how he designs robots for his career and mentoring other robotics teams.

Be sure to subscribe and listen to the podcast on Monday, October 8th

Until the podcast is released on Monday, take a look at a video with Paul discussing how he uses SOLIDWORKS to turn his ideas into battling robots:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7bKYueGHGio" width="560"></iframe>

Be sure to watch the BattleBots finale on Friday, October 5th on the Discovery Channel.

To learn more about Paul, his company Aptyx Designs, and BiteForce, please follow him on Facebook here.

Also, learn more about BattleBots here on the Discovery Channel here

SOLIDWORKS Engineers Handbook eBook

Author information

Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling is a Senior Marketing Manager at SolidWorks and the host for the Born to Design Podcast.

The post Four SOLIDWORKS-Designed Bots Duke it Out in BattleBots Final appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Cliff Medling at October 03, 2018 12:00 PM

October 02, 2018

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Enhanced Material Support for Visualize 2019

One of the major enhancements in Visualize 2019 is the enhanced support for materials, available in both Visualize Standard & Professional. If we break down the enhanced material support further, we can talk about 3 different types of materials or workflows supported; NVIDIA MDL, PBR & Allegorithmic Substance Designer. Let’s take a few minutes to describe them further and see what’s what.

NVIDIA MDL (Material Definition Language) Materials

NVIDIA MDL, is a proprietary language used to create and define textures, and is now quickly becoming an industry standard.  Because the textures are “programmed”, and are not based on images, the benefit is consistency between various applications like CAD modeling, rendering and animation packages. Using MDL, materials look the same across applications. Think of it like how we use neutral files, like STEP to exchange between CAD packages, but for rendering applications. This alone is of huge benefit to customers that uses a number of different rendering applications in their workflow. This is particularly true for the automotive, aerospace and architectural sectors, huge users of advanced materials and textures.

Using MDL in 2019 is very easy… simply drag and drop the the MDL material from Windows Explorer onto your Visualize model. Currently, MDL is supported as read-only for 2019, but the plan is to expose some of those controls via sliders in future releases. For example, you could change the color shifts, or amount of scratches, or depth of the scratch, etc. As you initially drop the MDL onto the part, Visualize will expose all the various colors contained in the MDL, if more than one exists. From this point on, you can change the color needed. To change the texture mapping, simply choose the desired Texture Mapping Mode within the Appearances Tab. You can also create your own Visualize appearance using any of the MDL color variants of the texture imported, simply by exporting (saving) the Appearance from within the Appearance Tab.

NVIDIA has made accessible a collection of MDL materials anyone can download called vMaterials Catalog. To get your own copy, just send a request from the NVIDIA website here:

https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/design-visualization/technologies/vmaterials/

 

 

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="641" id="video-21969-2" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="https://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Applying-MDL-Materials.mp4?_=2" type="video/mp4">https://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Applying-MDL-Materials.mp4</video>

PBR (Physically-Based Rendering) Materials

Although the name “Physically-Based Rendering” is a bit misleading, PBR materials use images or “texture maps” to create the majority of the appearance’s look and feel.  They are not “programmed” like MDLs are. Instead, PBR materials use a combination of the Texture Maps and settings/sliders typical of a normal Visualize appearance, to adjust settings like Clearcoat, Transparency, Roughness, etc. PBR Materials also allow more  texture banks (7 to 8) compared to MDL (only 4). PBR Materials are perfect for adding surface imperfections, like fingerprints, smudges, scratches, dust and more.

PBR textures can be classified into 2 workflows or categories: Metallic/Roughness or Specular/Glossiness (most popular) and allows customization once added to Visualize.

To learn more about PBR materials, watch this quick video:

https://www.poliigon.com/#video

Applying PBR textures can be done one of 2 ways. First, you can simply drag and drop from Windows Explorer, like you would a MDL material. When doing so, once you drop the texture map onto the part, Visualize will prompt which of the texture maps you wish to use, giving designers flexibility over what map they want applied to their model. The second method is by creating a new appearance, and then importing the texture maps. This method offers the major benefit of being able to import all available maps automatically when selecting the first one. Since the texture map naming convention is not standardized and can vary, this can be a huge time-saver!

Even though PBRs are more recent then MDL, one of the benefits of PBR textures is that they are widely available from various sources like Poliigon. In fact, by creating a free account on Poliigon, you can download over 50 free textures to add to your own library.

 

 

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="641" id="video-21969-3" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="https://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Applying-PBR-Materials.mp4?_=3" type="video/mp4">https://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Applying-PBR-Materials.mp4</video>

Allegorithmic Substance Designer

High-end users of rendering tools may also be creating their own materials and textures. One of the most popular tools is Allegorithmic Substance Designer. This tool is widely used in automotive, AEC and industrial design and is simply amazing.

For those users, Visualize offers a live link between both applications. Changes and updates created in Allegorithmic Substance Designer can be applied instantly into Visualize to see the rendered result. First export your textures from Substance Designer as PNGs, create a new PBR material in Visualize, then add those PNGs to your texture maps. Then as changes are made in Substance Designer, re-export the new PNGs (by saving over the exact same filenames) and Visualize will automatically instantly update them!

 

 

Author information

Michel Cloutier
Senior Territory Technical Manager at DS SOLIDWORKS
Mechanical designer by trade & CAD enthusiast for the last 15 years. I love new tech, gadgets and cars (especially Mustangs).

The post Enhanced Material Support for Visualize 2019 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Michel Cloutier at October 02, 2018 09:00 PM

SolidSmack

KeyShot 8 Arrives Today with an Emphasis on Tightening Your Rendering Workflow

Shock Rendering

It was only back on August 23rd when the master 3D rendering virtuosos at Luxion teased us with a drool-worthy highlight reel capturing what’s to come with the much-anticipated KeyShot 8.

And tease us they did—with stunning rendering work featuring everybody from Peter Gill and Esben Oxholm to Dries Vervoort:

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Y6CPCm3kdlU?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Well, the time is upon us ladies and gents—for today, KeyShot 8 is finally LIVE!

So what’s new?

According to the official release notes, KeyShot 8 wants to deliver you a tighter workflow with an emphasis on “(more) flow and less work.”

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Without a doubt, one of the new features delivering “more flow” is the new Image Styles. For many users, their rendering workflow consisted of creating the initial image in KeyShot—then tweaking it in Photoshop or another image editor not unlike a traditional photography workflow. However, with KeyShot 8, Luxion aims to eliminate that step of the process altogether by bringing in some of those key image editing tools directly into the KeyShot Studio. Yes—this means that everything from Curve Control to Tone-Mapping can be done to a KeyShot scene prior to or after rendering with the ultimate goal of saving you a step altogether.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_98153" style="width: 3333px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Image styles in KeyShot 8</figcaption></figure>

The new Cutaway material feature is sure to bring a new level of delight for those who like to get more conceptual with their rendering styles. The material allows users to add and define Cutaway Caps as a shaded color in the same material as the object being cut or another custom material. If you’ve ever wanted to show off the internals of a product without resorting to a cookie-cutter exploded view, this just might be your shiny new toy.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_98154" style="width: 4000px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Cutaway Feature in KeyShot 8</figcaption></figure>

For those aiming to present their concepts with a bit more of an artistic edge, KeyShot 8 is one of the more notable releases in the past few years. Among other updates include more geometry shaders (for modifying an object with displacement, bubbles, or flakes) and the new Scattering Medium Material Type for simulating particle scattering when visualizing light sources including smoke and fog.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_98155" style="width: 1200px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Geometry Displacement in KeyShot 8</figcaption></figure>

And of course, nothing beats sharing that hard-earned rendering work to your team or a client. Again, KeyShot stepped it up here as well to bring the updates full circle. With the KeyShot Viewer application, users can open, view, and interact with a KeyShot scene in real-time using a variety of input devices (for those on-the-go tablet meetings, perhaps?) to change materials and lighting or otherwise explore a scene without being tethered to a workstation.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BWhIksyqksY?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

“KeyShot 8 is a milestone release that expands the capabilities for KeyShot users and increases stability to both streamline the 3D rendering process and the 3D rendered results,” says Claus Wann Jensen, Co-founder and CEO of Luxion. “The involvement from hundreds of amazing KeyShot users has helped set the foundation for the new capabilities in KeyShot 8 and for the improvements to come.”

Take KeyShot 8 for a spin with a trial version by heading over to KeyShot.

The post KeyShot 8 Arrives Today with an Emphasis on Tightening Your Rendering Workflow appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at October 02, 2018 05:30 PM

Cardboard Modeling Basics

Cardboard Basics Banner

Seeing one’s ideas come to life right before you is a thrill! That’s what can happen when you set out to explore your creativity by making stuff. You may have questions such as “Where do I start?” Or, “What materials and tools do I use to construct my idea?” Look no further (at least for the moment) because today’s post features another how-to tutorial by Eric Strebel. For some, Cardboard Basics should be a welcome refresher. But for all you newbies to the world of 3D model construction, this tutorial will be just the ticket you need to get off to a good start.

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Craftmanship

Eric opens this tutorial with several questioned, all with the aim to highlight the importance of cultivating craftmanship. His basic point is the tools and materials you use will either help or hinder the construction process. More importantly, poor craftsmanship in terms of crooked lines, excessive glue, tape, and distorted objects all services to diminish the actual or perceived value of the object you are creating. Poor craftmanship disrupts your ability to showcase the aesthetics and/or functional qualities of the model that you’ve labored so hard to make.

Tools Of The Trade

There are two major things that greatly influence your ability to construct a well-crafted mock-up. One is YOU. Don’t be in a hurry. Take your time and carefully follow any instructions and techniques as closely as possible to how they were conveyed. Learn from those who have command of the subject first, then branch out afterward. The other influencer is TOOLS. In every category of creative pursuit, there are tools-of-the-trade. Eric describes and demonstrates several tools he uses that enable him to consistently and efficiently construct high-quality mock-ups.

Cardboard Basics -tools-02Cardboard Basics -glue_bottleCardboard Basics -materials

Construction

Now the fun part! Eric is pretty thorough in showing the process step by step. Watch and listen carefully and glean out the nuggets of model building wisdom. I’ve highlighted a few images of the construction process that stood out to me.

Using a metal straight edge is key for cutting the multiple stripes evenly and repeatedly.

In order to assure alignment of pieces and to make the construction process easier low tack painters tape was used. The spacing of each piece was spot on. After the glue dried the tape is simply peeled away.
A mitred square and weigh is used to make sure the sidewall are square, that is 90-degree angles between faces. The glue bottle with fine tip worked perfectly for applying small amounts of glue to prevent seepage. Thin cardstock was used in the second example. Trimming is a bit easier with an X-acto knife as the material is thin.

The same assembly process was used on the chipboard. One neat trick for constructing the notched out area on the cube was to first install a subfloor inside the vertical walls.

Though the construction materials may vary according to your needs, the techniques remain the same.
Cardboard Basics Banner

Eric is planning a series of tutorials for those of us who are chomping at the bit for more. Stay tuned!

 

The post Cardboard Modeling Basics appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at October 02, 2018 03:08 PM

Tearing down a Magic Leap One Mixed Reality Headset Is Magical in Its Own Way

magic leap

AR, VR, and “Mixed Reality” headsets may take us to unexplored and fascinating worlds, but at the end of the day, these machines are still just hunks of metal, plastic, and circuity we cover our eyes with.

If you’ve ever wanted to know what kind of magic happens inside, the guys over at iFixit.com recently opened up a Magic Leap One mixed reality headset to bare the machine’s guts for all to see.

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The Magic Leap One platform consists of three parts: a headset, a controller, and the Lightpack which powers them.

Starting with the headset, the lenses use four IR LEDs to project images and a waveguide made of six laminated layers. It also has a small EM sensor on the side of the glasses which acts as a sensor for the controller. The front of the lenses houses a ton of IR sensors, cameras, and an optical system which projects light through the waveguide.


Magic Leap One headset teardown Magic Leap One headset teardown Magic Leap One headset teardown

This all works thanks to two sets of LEDs generating the light source. This light is directed onto a liquid crystal on silicon display which reflects the light to project a virtual image. The image is sent to the lenses which focus the image onto a waveguide. This waveguide is what directs the image onto the person’s eyes, projecting an image which isn’t really there.


Magic Leap One headset teardown

As for the rest of the headset, the headband houses the speakers, the EM sensor on the side, and the two upper ends of the device’s built-in cable.

Magic Leap One headset teardown

The controller is a lot simpler, as it houses an 8.4Wh battery, some copper shielding, and a trackpad with some LEDs (along with the circuit board which controls the whole thing).

Magic Leap One headset teardown Magic Leap One headset teardown

Taking apart the Lightpack reveals a cooling fan, the motherboard, and many chips which power the Magic Leap one. You have two Samsung K3RG5G50MM-FGCJ 32 Gb LPDDR4 DRAMs, a NVIDIA Tegra X2 “Parker” SoC, with NVIDIA Pascal GPU, a Maxim Semiconductor MAX77620M power management IC and Parade Technologies 8713A bidirectional USB 3.0 redriver, an Altera 10M08 MAX 10 field programmable gate array, a battery charger, a Nordic Semiconductor, and a Murata 1KL all stored in the front.

Magic Leap One headset teardown

At the back, you have a Spansion FS128S 128 Mb quad SPI NOR flash memory, a Texas Instruments TPS65982 USB Type-C and USB power delivery controller, a Texas Instruments INA3221 bi-directional voltage monitor, a UPI Semiconductor uP1666Q 2 phase buck controller, and finally a Toshiba THGAF4T0N8LBAIR 128 GB NAND universal flash storage. All of this is powered by a single twin-cell battery which runs at 3.83 V.

Magic Leap One headset teardown

It’s a lot to take in for sure, but you can’t create virtual objects using the real world as a backdrop with only a few parts. IFixit’s teardown of the Magic Leap One gets more technical—of course, going so far as to see how repairable the headset is. Find out more over at iFixit .

The post Tearing down a Magic Leap One Mixed Reality Headset Is Magical in Its Own Way appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at October 02, 2018 01:14 PM

SolidSmack Radio | Crossfade Fillet Overdrive (Powered by Spotify)

Spotify Playlist

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’ll get the groove going with the super chill “Ultimate Painting” from Ultimate Painting before diving into fresh tracks from Small Black, Whitney, SALES, Wild Nothing, and others before wrapping up with the classic “White Gloves” from Khruangbin. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/0LGSDuK7sC9w83ORMoWWZb" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | Crossfade Fillet Overdrive (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 02, 2018 01:02 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: Copic Industrial Design Sketching Markers

design sketching

When it comes to sketching and communicating your ideas well, nothing beats a good old-fashioned pencil and a keen sense of perspective. That said, adding depth to your form sketches with light and shadow is a natural next step in taking your sketches to the next level.

And when it comes time to cranking ideas out fast, our favorite go-to is a fistful of 2-3 Sketching Grays from Copic that give us great contrast. These ultra-blendable, low odor, alcohol-based inks deliver rich and smooth strokes that are ideal for quickly communicating product concepts. And unlike water-based inks, which tend to pill and oversoak paper while blending, Copics mix on the surface fast and easy-like.

While there are plenty of Copic marker sets out there, we recommend sticking to this compact six-pack of Sketching Grays for maximum versatility. If you want to get extra-fancy, try adding a single bright ‘pop’ color for your arrows, callouts, and anytime you want a callout to really stand out. And don’t forget that marker paper pad, too!

Copic Sketch Set of 6 Markers – Sketching Grays $31.47

Features:

  • Packaged in a clear plastic case, a sketch set is the ideal way to begin or add to a marker collection
  • Refillable markers and replaceable nibs, compatible with Copic air brush system
  • Alcohol-based ink is permanent and non-toxic, dries acid free

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: Copic Industrial Design Sketching Markers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 02, 2018 01:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Update SOLIDWORKS Decal in multiple models by renaming the source image file

SOLIDWORKS keeps a reference of the location and file names of images used to create decals.  When multiple SOLIDWORKS files need to be updated with a new version of a decal, one option is to rename the old image and apply the original name to the new image.

In the following example, a decal named ‘Barcode’ has been added to a part file.

SOLIDWORKS Decal attached

SOLIDWORKS Decal attached

An updated image that displays the word ‘SolidWorks’ below the barcode is placed in the folder of the current decal image:

New decal image in folder

New decal image in folder

Pretending that in multiple files that reference D:\Tutorials\Decals\Barcode.bmp the image needs to be replaced with SOLIDWORKS Barcode.bmp, the original file has been renamed and the original name ‘Barcode’ has been applied to the new image:

Rename old file

Rename the old and new image file

Next time the part file referencing D:\Tutorials\Decals\Barcode.bmp is opened, the model will include the update SOLIDWORKS decal:

Update SOLIDWORKS decal

New decal image file attached to the model

The post Update SOLIDWORKS Decal in multiple models by renaming the source image file appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Sanja Srzic at October 02, 2018 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

How Technology Continues to Revolutionise the Film Industry

FILM_10_2018_1

Cinema might be over a century old. But it’s showing no sign of slowing down. Even a quick glance through its history tells its own filmic story of technology’s progress through the decades. From humble, silent monochrome beginnings, through to the lush, colourful expanse of CinemaScope, 3D and today’s jaw-dropping digital effects, film has both pushed and chronicled the latest in technology for audiences worldwide.

The silver screen’s sparkle is showing no sign of dimming just yet, and it’s technology that pushes the multi-billion dollar film industry to the next generation of movie-goers. So, how is film doing this, and what can audiences look forward to?

FILM_10_2018_1
Into the third dimension…and beyond!

Stereoscopy has been adding literal layers to movies for decades. Its drop in interest of late however has signalled that audiences want something more. Step forward MIT, who are currently working towards glasses-free technology. Doing away with the extra cost and clunk of flimsy plastic specs, the company are fine-tuning their new automultiscopic technology ready for James Cameron’s much-anticipated Avatar 2, arriving 2020.

3D doesn’t just stop at the end product. Long before screenings are booked and popcorn prepped, filmmakers are turning to another type of 3D to get their product made: 3D printing. Making films is an expensive and time-consuming business. Constructing screen-ready props that convince and inspire takes patience and budget. Small wonder then that filmmakers are increasingly turning to 3D printing to carve out centrepieces for director’s visions. From blockbuster Marvel fare such as Avengers and Guardians of the Galaxy, to stunt-driven thrill spectacles like Fast & the Furious 6 (for which they printed an entire tank), prop makers have been using the printed tech to produce ultra-realistic models for the screen.

The CADMobile

Where design is realised before it hits the printer is, of course, in 3D CAD software. Many filmmakers of some instantly recognisable classics have brought to cinematic life iconic creations, created using our very own SOLIDWORKS. The box office shattering might of films such as Transformers, Tron:Legacy, and Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice, were all brought to celluloid via the aid of our virtual testing design software. Using our program’s pin-sharp material recreation and stress-testing, movie art designer Joseph Hiuara was able to consult with the director and studio on the fly. This meant any last-minute changes could be made before production, with no time lost or expense spent. Joe used SOLIDWORKS Visualise to create photorealistic renderings of film props and characters, from the Batmobile to the hulking great Transformer robots.

FILM_10_2018_2

Of course, the cinematic language of shots and composition has altered dramatically over the years. Take the humble mobile phone. Just fifteen years ago, we couldn’t take pictures on one. Today, entire movies are shot on them. Renowned filmmaker Steven Soderbergh recently released psychological thriller Unsane, filmed using only an iPhone. This demonstrates both the ease and speed of such technology, but also its greater accessible reach. Thanks to the digital age, anyone with a smartphone can edit their own film or movie, and even add in some visual effects for good measure too.

Up!

Lighter, more portable tech has also filtered through to more affordable filmmaking. Prohibitively expensive rigging and cranes to achieve stunning birds’ eye views were previously only the preserve of major Hollywood studios. These days, thanks to 4k GoPro cameras and lightweight drone technology, aspiring directors and visual storytellers are hampered only by their imagination, rather than the tools available to them.

It’s this democratisation of the medium, along with more high-end tech such as augmented reality and VR, that look set to shape the films of tomorrow. With the spread of affordable technology where the creative limits are near-endless, cinema’s next revolution is being driven by discovery’s evolution.


You may also be interested in:

>> 3D printing: what comes next?
>> Is augmented reality the future of surgery?
>> SOLIDWORKS on song for premium hi-fi manufacturer

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post How Technology Continues to Revolutionise the Film Industry appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS UK at October 02, 2018 11:00 AM

October 01, 2018

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 Redesigned in SOLIDWORKS 2019

SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 has undergone a complete redesign for SOLIDWORKS 2019, creating an enhanced more responsive system, with a focus on improved user experience resulting in the most powerful version of the tool yet.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 2019 vs 2018

SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 2019 vs 2018

Some of my favorite new enhancements are:

Navigation Bar

The navigation bar allows users to quickly access different folders using breadcrumbs;

New PDM Web2 navigation bar

New PDM Web2 navigation bar

Action Bar

The Change State, Check Out/Undo Check OutDownload and Delete, commands are all easily accessible via the action bar;

New SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 Action Bar

New SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 Action Bar

Upload and Check In

Via explorer; drag and drop files to upload and check in:

Drag and drop files to Check In

Drag and drop files to Check In

Search Bar

Take control of your searches by specifying the location between Current folder, Current & Subfolders and All Folders;

New SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 Search

New SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 Search

Additional enhancements include:

  • Enhanced file list
    • The file list is a continuous scrolling list that lets users browse the vault directory content.  Previously, the file list was paginated so users had to navigate through multiple pages.
  • Choose column
    • Select or clear the columns to appear in the file list. When you add a column, its width adjusts automatically.
  • Resize and sort column
    • Resize the columns on pages with a column view including the Where Used and Contains tabs.
  • User Interface Improvements
    • Web2 is now more adaptive with responsiveness to various device sizes and browser window sizes for the:
      • Log In Screen
      • File List
      • File Preview

Wrap Up…

All these enhancements provide more functionality to external users not connected to the network, allowing them to continue their work while offsite or on the road.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 Redesigned in SOLIDWORKS 2019 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at October 01, 2018 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Go BIG and BOLD! Enter the SOLIDWORKS WORLD T-Shirt Design contest!

Are you an avid SOLIDWORKS user? Are you creative? Do you want to see your very own design worn by the thousands of attendees at SOLIDWORKS WORLD 2019? Then enter the SOLIDWORKS WORLD T-Shirt Design contest and show off your best work!

How to enter

Create a design for the front of a t-shirt. Show us a design that you feel embodies the SOLIDWORKS World Conference. Remember, the conference is in Dallas, TX; let it be BIG and BOLD! You may submit unlimited entries, but each must be a completely new design. The submission deadline is October 29, 2018 11:59pm ET.

 

SOLIDWORKS will choose the top design submissions that best represent the SOLIDWORKS World event. Next, SOLIDWORKS will open up the voting to everyone – YOU (and everyone you know) can then vote on your favorite design! Voting will take place between November 1, 2018 and November 26, 2018. Your votes will decide the final three winners whose designs will be printed on the t-shirts to be distributed at SOLIDWORKS WORLD 2019 for all to wear!

Click on the banner below to learn about the full design requirements so you can submit your design. Need inspiration?  Take a look at the winners from SOLIDWORKS World 2018 and SOLIDWORKS World 2017.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Go BIG and BOLD! Enter the SOLIDWORKS WORLD T-Shirt Design contest! appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at October 01, 2018 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Exploded View Enhancements

With the updates to SOLIDWORKS 2019 Exploded View, it is now easier than ever to make the highly informative views to which you are accustomed. To explore the enhancements I’m going to update the exploded view for this cable hoist:

The existing exploded view for my cable hoist design needs updating

The existing exploded view for my cable hoist design needs updating

Rollback bar for Exploded Views?!

The first update is adding a rollback bar to both the configuration manager display of the exploded view, and the property manager while creating or editing. The rollback bar functions just like in the feature manager allowing me to travel through time to easily see the exploded view step by step, and add or change steps based on the current display!

The new rollback bar in exploded views lets me time travel within the model!

Reorder without editing

I can even change the order of my explode steps easily without having to edit the exploded view, just like moving a feature in the feature manager.

Exploded View

I can even change the order of my exploded view without going in and editing!

Name explode steps on creation

When adding a new explosion step, the capability to name the step while it is being created means that I can input clarity to my exploded view as I develop it, and the new step will be placed directly above the rollback bar just like I’m used to in the feature manager. I also noticed that the rollback bar stays in place when I switch from the Configuration manager to the property manager.

Giving each step a name on creation adds clarity

Suppress Explosion steps

The final update is that I can suppress and unsuppress explosion steps. Similar to the rollback bar, I can do this in the property manager or the configuration manager and SOLIDWORKS lets me work as I would in the part modelling environment.

Suppress and Unsuppress explosion steps

Why is the addition of an Exploded View Rollback Bar important?

It is seemingly simple updates like the ones to exploded views in 2019 which really help with productivity by keeping the user interface consistent through features, and making subtle tweaks that I find really drive the ease of use for SOLIDWORKS. Having a rollback bar both in the editing environment, and when simply viewing your model in the exploded state also streamlines the process of checking your exploded views, and stepping through the process of assembling or dismantling a model.

Make sure to pay attention to the Javelin Blog for other fantastic enhancements to the Assembly modelling environment and all other areas of SOLIDWORKS!

The post SOLIDWORKS 2019 Exploded View Enhancements appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Bryan Sprange, CSWE at October 01, 2018 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Kano Adds the Sense of Touch to Their Latest DIY Computer Kit

Last year, Kano debuted a complete DIY desktop computer kit based around the Raspberry Pi as a way to get kids interested in computing. The unforeseen problem, however, is most kids today prefer to interact with touchscreen mobile devices—such as smartphones and tablets—rather than a desktop PC. Kano took notice and has launched an updated version of the kit that now includes a 10-inch touchscreen. This effectively now allows kids to navigate and program using the company’s custom OS with just a swipe of a finger—their computing method of choice.

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The company’s Computer Kit Touch includes a custom Raspberry Pi 3 SBC (1.2GHz quad-core Cortex A53), an updated display driver board, a power board, a USB board, a touchscreen, cables, and more. Most of the components have bright pastel colors, which correspond with a build process outlined in an instruction book—similar to a LEGO set.

Once the build process is complete, you can use the machine for coding challenges using a drag-and-drop GUI or launch pre-installed apps such as Google Chromium, Drive, YouTube, LibreOffice, and Wikipedia. Kano also provides an app store on their website where you can download additional tools and apps, including Code Academy, Song Maker, TUX Paint, and more.

Alongside Kano’s DIY computer kit, the company has additional DIY kits that were designed with education in mind, including the Kano Coding Kit, which uses an official Harry Potter magic wand to program different spells inspired by the favorite books and movies. Kano is also offering a motion sensor kit and a DIY Pixel light board, all of which are compatible with the computer kit. Those looking to get the Computer Kit touch ($279) or any of the add-on kits, can visit Kano’s website found here.

The post Kano Adds the Sense of Touch to Their Latest DIY Computer Kit appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at October 01, 2018 11:23 AM

Cool Tools of Doom: The Uni Kuru Toga Rotating Lead Mechanical Pencil

mechanical pencil

Those of you who know us well know of our longstanding love for the iconic rOtring 800 Mechanical Pencil. But heck, it isn’t the only great mechanical pencil to have on your desktop.

For those who are particular about sharp lead points — AT ALL TIMES — the brilliant engineering behind writing tool manufacturer Uni’s Kuru Toga mechanical pencil just might be the best thing for you since, well, sliced bread.

Ideal for sketching, writing, engineering linework, or just about anything else that requires a nice bit of lead to the paper, the Kuru Toga features a mechanism that rotates the lead ever-so-slightly each time it’s lifted from the page—meaning, you’re always presented with a sharp edge for each new stroke. Similar to other professional-quality mechanical pencils, the Kuru Toga comes in a weighty metal body and makes use of a universal knurled grip to accommodate a variety of sketching styles. Best of all, however, the dang thing is less than ten bucks.

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Uni Kuru Toga Mechanical Pencil — $8.11

Features:

  • Kuru Toga lead rotating technology
  • 0.5mm lead
  • Gun metallic body
  • Made in Japan

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The Uni Kuru Toga Rotating Lead Mechanical Pencil appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 01, 2018 11:17 AM

The SolidSmack Monday List 40.18 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

Costco

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Listen to the World – An Interactive Online Experience

What if we chose to travel based on sound?

Desert

Tech Giants Spend $80 Billion to Make Sure No One Else Can Compete

Companies that deal in data are some of America’s biggest buyers of equipment.

Tech Giants Spend $80 Billion to Make Sure No One Else Can Compete

The Big Payoff From Working a Few Extra Years

Postponing retirement can plump up savings and bolster Social Security checks.

The Big Payoff From Working a Few Extra Years

25 Years of WIRED Predictions: Why the Future Never Arrives

To write the history of how our culture thinks about tomorrow, one obsessed academic read every issue of WIRED in chronological order. Here are his findings.

25 Years of WIRED Predictions: Why the Future Never Arrives

The Resilience of Costco (PDF)

How and why this big box store became the second-largest retailer in the world.

Costco

t’s Getting Harder for International STEM Students to Find Work After Graduation

Apple’s old HQ holds stories of pizza ovens, iPhone secrets, baseball bats, and what happened to Steve Jobs’ office.

STEM Students

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 40.18 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at October 01, 2018 11:15 AM