Planet SolidWorks

August 06, 2020

SolidSmack

DIY Teachable Sorter Recognizes and Sorts Your Favorite Marshmellow Cereal [3D Files]

teachable-machine-sorter-corral-google-00

Coral is a range of products from Google Research that allows you to create your own AI projects for prototype or production products. They share occasional projects they’ve cooked up in the lab, publishing most recently a teachable sorter project that uses machine learning to sort objects, specifically marshmellow cereal.

Gautam Bose and Lucas Ochoa created the contraption to sort their favorite cereal, separating the marshmellows bits from the icky non-marshmellow bits. Overall, it’s a pretty clever (and simple) bit of AI mechanism making.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ydzJPeeMiMI?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

There are four components to the device: the Singulator (where all the bits to sort are separated into each item), the Decider (that views each item and determines what it is), the Tippything (that sends the item one way or the other), and Start! (that starts the training or sorting).

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

After the build is complete, they trained the sorter using the Teachable Machine website, a web-based tool to create and export machine learning models. A collection of images of each item to sort were taken then collated into a model that is uploaded to the Coral sensing module used as the inference engine for the sorter. The module is completely off-line that helps the Decider run very fast, tell the Tippything what to do, and sort until your sorting desires are met.

Before you start your own build, you’ll need a Coral USB Accelorator ($59.99), a Raspberry Pi ($60) and power supply ($10), and a 1/2″ rod (they used acrylic). Lucas and Gautum provide all the system hardware details (with links), the STL files for modding/3D printing, and step-by-step instructions to complete the build yourself.

Have a project you’ve built or find interesting? Share it with us here!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post DIY Teachable Sorter Recognizes and Sorts Your Favorite Marshmellow Cereal [3D Files] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at August 06, 2020 09:04 PM

First LIDAR 3D Scanning Apps Appear

There’s now at least one new app that takes advantage of Apple’s new LIDAR capability.

A few months ago Apple unexpectedly announced a new iPad Pro model equipped with LIDAR. LIDAR is a range-sensing technology that is often used in high-end equipment for 3D scanning, particularly for landscapes. Seeing it appear in an affordable consumer tablet was quite a shock.

Apple’s intention was to provide additional sensor information to aid their Augmented Reality operations. In other words, when you’re pasting that virtual IKEA couch in your living room view, the couch is positioned more accurately.

LiDAR 3D Scanning App

However, the presence of a new 3D scanning sensor in an iPad obviously hints that someone would, sooner or later, develop a specialized 3D scanning app to make good use of it.

That now seems to have happened, with startup SiteScape now beta-testing just such an app. SiteScape is indeed a startup, having registered their domain only three weeks ago! They say:

Game-changing mapping tech. Map anything, anywhere. Join our free beta to start creating and using scale-accurate 3D maps with SiteScape.”

There’s not much information about the company or app, aside from this short video and a near-empty website:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-4-3 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HMA9sg2KpNE?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

One thing you’ll immediately notice in the video is a view that shows the scanning taking place, and also seen in the image at top. There you’ll see a rather sparse array of LIDAR dots illuminating the surface. This array is really not particularly dense, so it may be a bit confusing as to how a 3D scan could be captured properly.

First, realize that Apple’s purpose here is primarily to capture distance data for their AR system, not to capture detailed 3D scans. The sparse array should be more than adequate for that purpose.

But for capturing a 3D scan remember that it’s not a “single image” process. This array is being swept across the subject, repeatedly. As the dots pass over each square centimeter of the subject, more data is captured. So by putting the array in motion, there are far more data points being collected. That said, it likely results in somewhat lower resolution and the capture may take longer to complete.

The resulting 3D models seem pretty decent, although they appear to be point clouds that will have to be converted into mesh formats to enable 3D printing. That’s easily done with several tools, including the free MeshLab, but there will likely be a lot of 3D model cleanup and tweaking required.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>[Source: SiteScape]</figcaption></figure>

Here’s an example of such a capture, stored on SketchFab. You can actually find a number of SiteScape-captured 3D models on that site.

<figure><iframe height="450" src="data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==" width="800"></iframe></figure>

Unfortunately I am not able to perform any testing of this app, as I don’t happen to have a brand-new iPad Pro with the LIDAR feature. However, if any readers happen to have one, we’d be happy to work with you on doing so.

[UPDATE] It seems there is another LIDAR app example that’s just come out: Scandy, a long-running 3D scanning app. Here’s their video showing how it works:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0XjQB2SMw3k?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post First LIDAR 3D Scanning Apps Appear appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at August 06, 2020 05:54 PM

ArborLift Transports Massive Trees with Unique Air Bladder Design

If you’ve ever seen a renovation or construction in progress, you’ll know one of the biggest problems is working around large trees. Unlike shrubs or grass, it’s more difficult to pick up and replant a tree. This usually leads to one of two solutions: either work around the tree or cut it down.

But the folks at Environmental Design have come up with a third solution by asking a simple question: “Why not just move the tree?”

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/D3iLRJ1QyPw?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Large Tree Transport

For years, the company has used their patented ArborLift process to transport large trees to more ideal locations. Instead of using cranes and heavy supports, the ArborLift uses a series of inflatable pneumatic bladders which help roll the tree to its intended replanting location or onto a truck for transport.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RioYCJmZTjs?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Before any rolling can take place however, the tree is carefully removed along with its root ball (a process in itself). Once that has been complete, the tree is raised along with a good amount of soil, and placed onto a rigid platform for transport, around the block or across the nation.

For shorter distance transport, a number of deflated pneumatic bladders are placed between the platform and the ground. These bladders are then inflated while a series of excavators and crewmen help push it down a row of more inflated bladders to its destination.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hWMyji38TOA?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Once the tree has reached its new resting home, the bladders are slowly deflated, the platform is removed, and the tree is properly replanted. The ArborLift method is used to relocate trees weighing up to a million pounds with 36’ root balls. Massive.

Use of the ArborLift is a lot cheaper than having to use a crane or heavy transport (at least for a nearby move), plus it ensures the tree is damaged as little as possible. This isn’t just good for tree lovers; it is also especially important in areas with ordinances which seek to abolish the cutting of heritage trees.

You can find out more on the ArborLift method on the Environmental Design webpage, and if you want to see more of their tree moving videos, their YouTube channel is chock-full of them.

The post ArborLift Transports Massive Trees with Unique Air Bladder Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 06, 2020 03:18 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Dabbling in Dimensions- Part 2: Instant2D & Instant3D

In “Dabbling in Dimensions – Part 1” I briefly covered the “Modify” dimension box, or “the classic look” as i called it.

In this blog post I will cover the Instant version of the dimensions.

Within SOLIDWORKS you have 2 types of instant dimension, Instant2D and Instant3D. Both of them are very strong tools once you get used to using them.

Defining the Dimension

To switch on the Instant2D or the Instant3D you need to activate it in SOLIDWORKS.

The buttons can be found in your toolbar:

 

Instant 2D in Toolbar

Instant3D in toolbar

 

If you often switch between the standard dimension box and the Instant version, you can setup a keyboard shortcut.

This will make it much easier to switch between the two dimension tools.

 

Instant 2D (introduced in SOLIDWORKS 2016)

The Instant 2D is a sketch feature that allows you to quickly modify your dimensions in a more organic way, than the standard “Modify box.

When using the instant 2D you have 2 options for modifying your dimensions: Insert the dimension and drag the dimension to the desired location.

The “Instant dimension box” however has its limitations.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="622" id="video-26849-1" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/singleclick.mp4?_=1" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/singleclick.mp4</video>

 

As you can see, you do not have the same options in the instant version as you have in the “Modify” version.

This is not the only option you have when using Instant2D.

You also have the possibility to drag your measurement, quite precise to the desired location.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="622" id="video-26849-2" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Instant2dDrag-and-drop.mp4?_=2" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Instant2dDrag-and-drop.mp4</video>

 

Just left click and hold on the edge of the dimension arrow and you can drag the dimension into place.

As you can see you have an on screen ruler, that becomes more precise the more you zoom in.

If you drag it past “0” the dimension adapts.

Also note if you double click on the tip of the dimension arrow you access the “Modify” dimension box.

Instant 3D (introduced in SOLIDWORKS 2011)

The Instant 3D is a very similar to the instant2D version, but a much more advanced modeling tool, that allows you to shape your model in a more intuitive way that using the “modify box”.

The tool has several different uses, and can be used on  parts, assemblies and weldment parts.

Modify

You can modify the your existing 2D and 3D dimensions in the same way as you can when using Instant2D. One thing to remember is to rebuild the part if the “modify” box has been used.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="622" id="video-26849-3" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Instant3D-modfy-dimenisons.mp4?_=3" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Instant3D-modfy-dimenisons.mp4</video>

Create Extrusions or Cuts

You can uses existing sketches to create extrusions or cuts in your model.

Simply click on the sketch and drag the arrow in the desired direction. You can even change an extrude to a cut and vice versa (of this is possible in according to the model)

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="622" id="video-26849-4" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Instant3DCusts-and-extrusions.mp4?_=4" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Instant3DCusts-and-extrusions.mp4</video>

Edit Live Section Plane

The Instant3D feature is also used to modify Live section planes.

These are very useful when you want to edit some of the features of your design that is not easily accessible

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="622" id="video-26849-5" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/instant3Dsection-planes.mp4?_=5" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/instant3Dsection-planes.mp4</video>

 

Simply insert the plane using “insert”->”Reference Geometry”-> “Live Section Plane”.

Now you need to place it, using the tools in instant3D.

Once the plane is in the desired location, you can activate it and modify the features that is intersected with the plane

Bonus: Mirrored Features

You can use the Instant 3D functionality to edit mirrored features.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="622" id="video-26849-6" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/mirrored-features.mp4?_=6" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/mirrored-features.mp4</video>

 

Note that when manipulating the original feature you get the dimensions of the feature.

No dimension is visible when manipulating the mirrored feature.

This is all I have for now regarding dimension boxes.

If you have any requests on a an in-depth look of SOLIDWORKS features, please let me know and i will look into it.

 

 

 

Author information

Lennart Tinndahl
I started working with CAD systems in 2003, and have since 2012 worked solely with SOLIDWORKS. I am a certified Technical support specialist as well as a SOLIDWORKS Certified Professional and is currently in the process to become a SOLIDWORKS Certified Expert. Since 2016 I have helped PLM Group customers to work smarter, not harder. The inspiration for most of my posts comes from the support cases i work on. When writing blogpost I try to focus on the everyday use of SOLIDWORKS.

The post Dabbling in Dimensions- Part 2: Instant2D & Instant3D appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Lennart Tinndahl at August 06, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Heat Flux Singularities in SOLIDWORKS Simulation

Stress singularities are an inherent part of all FEA analyses and they are inevitable in the case of sharp re-entrant corners and edges as well as loads and fixtures that are applied to entities with zero surface area (such as edges and vertices).

In such locations, due to mathematical errors, the value of stress increase infinitely and therefore, the stresses cannot be read at the locations of stress singularity.

To get more information about stress singularity and methods to work around them, please see our following blog articles on Mesh Refinement for Stress Singularities Hot Spot Diagnostic and Locate Singularities by Detecting Hot Spots.

The same concept of singularity applies to the thermal simulations. A singularity can be created in the heat flux distribution plots at similar locations such as sharp re-entrant corners of the model.

A direct analogy between heat fluxes and stresses can be helpful in conceptualizing heat flux singularity. Similar to the fact that a model with sharp re-entrant edge in a structural stress analysis cannot have stress solution over the edge, a thermal analysis is unable to solve the heat flux solution in the sharp re-entrant edge. Instead of infinite values for heat flux, due to discretization errors, the FEA software show finite values for the heat flux distribution. However, the values of heat flux is only dependent on the element size at the vicinity of heat flux singularity and would increase by refining the mesh.

An example of heat flux singularity can be seen in the attached picture. A thermal simulation has been run and the distribution of heat flux is plotted. As seen in the picture, in this study the hot spot locations of heat flux coincide with the sharp re-entrant edges, and they appear to be caused by singularity. Therefore, the value of these stresses is meaningless.

Heat Flux Distribution Plot Showing Hot Spot Locations for Heat Flux

Heat Flux Distribution Plot Showing Hot Spot Locations for Heat Flux

The work-around for heat flux singularity is similar to stress singularity. The heat flux singularity only affect near by elements, therefore by reading the heat flux at a few elements away from the source of singularity, correct values of heat flux can be obtained. Another work-around is to remove the source of singularity, for example eliminating the sharp re-entrant edge by adding a fillet.

The post Heat Flux Singularities in SOLIDWORKS Simulation appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at August 06, 2020 12:00 PM

August 05, 2020

The Javelin Blog

Working with Imported Geometry in SOLIDWORKS 2020

Do you work with multiple CAD systems? Do you reference or modify imported geometry in your SOLIDWORKS designs? Then this webinar is for you!

Join CSWE, Jamie Hill, as he presents 3 key considerations that will allow for better incorporation of imported geometry in to your SOLIDWORKS designs.

Working with Imported Geometry in SOLIDWORKS 2020

  1. Methods to RELIABLY import and repair geometry during the DATA TRANSLATION process.
    • This section looks at file formats, the Import Diagnostics tool, and 3D Interconnect functionality.
  2. Ensure MANUAL REPAIR techniques are done SAFELY so the original design is not disrupted.
    • This section includes checking, patching, and replicating your imported geometry.
  3. Techniques to QUICKLY apply REVISIONS to your imported models.
    • This section discusses reloading options, comparative tools, and 3D Interconnect capabilities.

The post Working with Imported Geometry in SOLIDWORKS 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at August 05, 2020 08:13 PM

How to enable “Update drawings” when printing SOLIDWORKS Electrical Drawings

When the Drawings or reports in SOLIDWORKS Electrical are printed, it provides a dialog box to update the drawings, if any changes have been made to the reports and drawings they get updated.

What if we accidentally click on the “Do not show again for this project” checkbox and then click “Update drawings”, accidentally when the Update drawings dialog box pops up. As we are so used to dismissing pop-up messages to save a few seconds.

Update drawings dismissed

How the Update drawings dismiss

Now, next time when we go and print the drawings again, the Update drawings options get grayed out and doesn’t update any changes made in the drawings and report when we would like to print them.

This option of “Update drawings” doesn’t show up again even if the electrical user interface is reset or even if the registry is reset.

Update drawings grayed out

Update drawings grayed out

Enabling Update Drawings Option

Follow the steps below to enable the update drawings message, so that all the reports and drawings are updated when we print them:

  1. Open the project you would like to print > Go to Project Tab > Configuration > This launches the Project Configuration dialog box.
  2. On the General Tab, Scroll to the bottom
  3. Under options section > Update generated drawings > Select “Ask me” from the drop-down list
  4. Doing so next time the drawings/reports are printed we should be able to click the “Update drawings” option, it will no longer be grayed out.
Ask me to update generated drawings

Ask me to update generated drawings

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Electrical training course live online. For more information about electrical software and training solutions call 1-877-219-6757.

The post How to enable “Update drawings” when printing SOLIDWORKS Electrical Drawings appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at August 05, 2020 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Students Experiment with the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform

To check out the collaboration features of the 3DEXPERIENCE® platform, Nathan, Wallace, and I, three interns at Dassault Systèmes  SOLIDWORKS®, devised and created a robotic arm that could play four different sports.

We used Project Planner to create an overall plan and assigned precise tasks for each of us. My main task was to sketch how we wanted this robot to look, while Nathan calculated the constraints the robot would need to actually function.

Once we completed our tasks, we moved them to the Done column simply by dragging and dropping the task card in the web-browser, which helped keep us on track with what was being done and what needed to be done. The Project Planner live dashboard view is great to see the current status of the project at any point in time.

We then uploaded our documents into a collaborative space that all of us could access, which allowed us to share any additional components. I also uploaded my hand sketches to the 3DSWYM community, where people could leave comments and pick which sketch was their favorite.

That was so much easier than trying to collate feedback via email!

When the design was chosen, we got going on making the parts in 3D Creator and 3D Sculptor. Nathan started by using Design Guidance to see what kind of structure would work with the forces the robot arm would endure while playing different sports. He first created the joints that enabled the robot to move. Design Guidance then “grew” an optimal shape between them. Since he was working in the collaborative space, I was instantly able to access them.

Using Nathan’s simulation-driven Design Guidance output as a guide, I used 3D Sculptor’s subdivision modeling to enclose the design and finalize the smooth aesthetic form. Nathan had given me a full assembly of the robot arm using the optimized design. The single modeling environment on the platform meant I didn’t need to worry about assembly structures or adding new part files or anything; I could just design and worry about that other stuff later. All I needed to do was make sure everything fit together and didn’t overlap. Interference detection in 3D Creator made this a breeze.

When I completed the subdivision modeling for the arm, I posted it to the community and requested feedback on the design so we could move on to 3D printing. I fixed what I needed to per Nathan and Wallace’s feedback, and we were all set.

We decided to use an Ultimaker with dissolvable supports because our robot arm had a complex structure. This helped create a smoother looking arm. We shared the first print with the communities to show off our exploration into the collaboration of the platform.

This article is authored by student intern Isabel Thelen who worked in the 3DEXPERIENCE® lab under the guidance of Mark Rushton, Product Portfolio Manager at Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS.

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Students Experiment with the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at August 05, 2020 12:00 PM

August 04, 2020

SolidSmack

Cool Tools: GearLight LED Headlamp

best headlamp gearlight

What do horror, romance, and desert island movies have in common? 

Not a lot, except the idea that at any time, people can get stranded in the wilderness. Or a cave in the middle of a storm. No cell service, just the clothes on their back, and maybe a pocket knife and a moldy cracker for survival.

In these situations, what’s more reliable than a handy light source for slogging through dark forest floors?

The only correct answer is a hands-free light source. And that’s where the GearLight headlamp comes in.

<figure class="aligncenter size-full"><figcaption>One is nice, but two is twice as nice.</figcaption></figure>

GearLight LED Headlamp – $13.99

Admittedly, there are many non-life-threatening situations where you might need a sturdy headlamp. But since the GearLight comes with red beams and an SOS lighting mode, it’s hard not to imagine it as a doomsday pack essential.

It even comes in packs of two, retailing at $7 per headlamp, so it’s a more economical purchase in the unlikely event that the world’s plunged into a dystopian narrative. 

<figure class="aligncenter size-full"></figure>

But, steering past the mostly-fictional, you can use the headlamp for a number of real-world applications. It’s waterproof, which means it can withstand a few drops from stalactites when you go spelunking. 

It also pivots on a 45-degree angle for close-up, intricately detailed craftwork. Or so you don’t have to squint to read labels during a blackout. 

<figure class="aligncenter size-full"></figure>

GearLight LED Headlamp Features:

  • Super bright with a maximum output of 586 lumens
  • Includes an adjustable headband to fit adults and children
  • Weighs a total of 3-4 oz. to avoid neck strain during use
  • Has 7 lighting modes to match any activity

Have a cool tool you love and think should be featured? Contact us here to share it with us.

This post features affiliate links that help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

The post Cool Tools: GearLight LED Headlamp appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at August 04, 2020 06:48 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip – Using a 360 Camera to Create Custom HDRs

In this week’s Visualize Quick Tip, we learn the process of creating an HDR environment from a Visualize scene. Yes – this hidden workflow is actually possible! AND very powerful. By using the new 360 camera available in Visualize Professional, you can turn any scene into an HDR environment and use it to light any other Visualize project! HDR environments are far better than using geometry for reflections because they are easier to set up and allow for more accurate control of lighting. They are also far less computationally intensive and can significantly decrease render times.

Besides the terrain example covered in this Quick Tip video, another example of this workflow would be if you had a 3D model of your store retail space where your product will live. You could then use this cool workflow to take all that 3D geometry and lighting and turn it into your very own custom HDR to use in other Visualize projects! All simply done by using the new 360 camera and rendering a 360 image.

Enjoy the infinite lighting possibilities you can now create!

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Qk3y02hKkO0?feature=oembed" title="SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip - Using a 360 Camera to Create Custom HDRs" width="1140"></iframe>

 

Check out this YouTube playlist more helpful Visualize videos!

USE THE VISUALIZE FORUM to connect with the global Visualize Community for self-help support with common questions. Don’t forget to share your Visualize images and animations on this Forum thread!

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip – Using a 360 Camera to Create Custom HDRs appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at August 04, 2020 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

New ‘Cuphead’ Trailer Uses 1930s Stop Motion Techniques To Bring Characters To Life

cuphead stop motion

For those of you who don’t have the free time to play them, Cuphead is a side-scrolling, run-and-gun videogame created by StudioMDHR for the Xbox One and PC back in 2017. Heavily inspired by old 1930s cartoons, the game is famous for its hand-drawn animations, authentic watercolor backgrounds, and jazz music.

To commemorate the game’s 2020 release on the PlayStation 4, the Toronto-based Stop Motion Department worked in collaboration with the game’s creators to produce a launch trailer worthy of the game’s unique aesthetic:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bE6ZeClM6uI?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The whole trailer just oozes 1930s nostalgia – from the puppets to the stop motion animation… even the heavy film grain effects seem straight out of a time when TVs only projected colors in black and white.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cuphead stop motion</figure>

Starting with the main characters, puppet makers Kareen Valleu and Lauren Craig created puppet versions of King Dice and Cuphead using wooded heads, heavy leather hands, and yes, lots and lots of stuffing.

To emulate old 1930s toys, they used primary shapes for the heads, hands, arms, and legs, While the methods they used were different, the final puppets harken back to a time when toys were made by hand.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cuphead stop motion</figure>

Once the puppets were done, they were positioned manually using drawn-out charts and metal gauges to hold their positions.

Unlike modern stop motion animation, no computers were used. This means the final video shows all the placement imperfections, from the bodies all the way to the different mouths used to make the characters talk (you may even notice some inconsistencies between what the character says and how their mouth is angled).

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cuphead stop motion</figure>

Lastly, the video was shot using C-mount lenses, which are old 1930s camera lenses that deliver a vintage look by blowing out the picture. To make the footage as authentic as possible, no post-editing was implemented (which is pretty intense for day and age).

If you’ve seen any old-timey cartoons which feature characters with creepy faces and drawn out smiles, you’ll know this is exactly what they were going for. Top it all off with some jazz and a catchy jingle and you have a commercial which would make any grandparent smile and any grandchild cry.

The post New ‘Cuphead’ Trailer Uses 1930s Stop Motion Techniques To Bring Characters To Life appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 04, 2020 02:13 PM

The Javelin Blog

Creating a Story for 3DEXPERIENCE Dashboards

Stories facilitate navigating a 3DEXPERIENCE Dashboard by providing a description for a dashboard, tab and widget. You can add a story to provide the users of your dashboard a quick overview of its content. The Dashboard creator/editor decides where to add a Story and the contents of the Story.

Stories can be added by clicking on the “+” sign of the Top Bar and selecting Story from the menu.

Adding a 3DEXPERIENCE Story

Adding a 3DEXPERIENCE Story

Each Story will have a Title and Description.

  • Enter a story title containing up to 50 characters.
  • Enter a story description containing up to 500 characters.
Creating a Story

Creating a Story

Clicking on the “+’ at the top right corner will allow the addition of a Step.

Adding a Step

The first Story will be applied to the Dashboard. Adding a Step will add a Story to the Tab. Selecting to add an additional Step will add a Story to a selected app.

Adding a Story to an App using a Step

The story will show up the next time a member opens the dashboard.

The post Creating a Story for 3DEXPERIENCE Dashboards appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at August 04, 2020 12:37 PM

August 03, 2020

The Javelin Blog

How to salvage imported sheet metal data the easy way in SOLIDWORKS

What if you receive an imported sheet metal model with weird abnormalities, like jagged edges or crazy surface shapes?

SOLIDWORKS Imported Sheet Metal Service

SOLIDWORKS Imported Sheet Metal

Maybe it’s not even a solid, due to these issues.  I’ve seen a few such models while working in the sheet metal industry, where it was so “not right” that it defies trying to put into pictures, as I’m not even sure how to model such stuff.  Flattening such a model might be impossible unless/until you manage to capture just the intended design while eliminating the weird stuff.  So here is a very efficient way:

  1. Decide which side is closer to the intended design: the inside or the outside.
  2. Right-click that side and choose Select Tangency, assuming that the model has round bends.  The entire model should now be selected, on just the one side.  If the model has sharp bends, then you will need to Ctrl-select all the faces on the chosen side.
  3. Do an Offset Surface of zero distance.  This will copy the entire side of the model as a surface body.  You can find Offset Surface on the Surfaces tab of the Command Manager or by doing a Command Search.
  4. Thicken the new surface body to the correct sheet metal thickness and to the correct direction.  You should now have an exact or almost exact replica of the original design, without the geometric oddities.  I said “almost exact” because before you delete the original solid body, you will want to take note of any geometry that is different between the inside and outside faces, such as countersinks.  You will want to ensure that those get carried across to the new solid body.
  5. Insert Bends to apply sheet metal properties and the flat pattern.

How cool is that?  😀

The post How to salvage imported sheet metal data the easy way in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWE at August 03, 2020 05:54 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

HP Smartstream 3D Build Manager: Simple Journey from Design to Printed Model

Like many of you, I love the idea of 3D printing. I used to be skeptical of its large-scale applications and ease of use. Well…that did not last long! The journey today will outline my route from concept to finished production parts, highlighting the ease of setup using Smartstream for the HP Multi Jet Fusion printers. On this trip, I will bring along SOLIDWORKS, my trusted parametric 3D computer aided design software used by millions of users around the world. My background as a CAD designer, instructor and troubleshooter creates a firm foundation for the understanding of how the 3D world operates. For what I don’t know, there are countless forums and user groups that can help me learn and improve.

So, what happens when an idea becomes a CAD model and asks to become a physical model, or hundreds of physical models, all in the span of a few days?

Sometimes, the CAD design comes from a customer, is downloaded from a 3D printing sharing site such as GrabCAD, or other times I design it myself. If it’s my own design, I generally follow a simple process, but first, I have to answer some questions:

  1. What does the model need to do?

  2. How will it be manufactured?

  3. What kind of material am I using to make the part and what are its limitations?

  4. How can it fail and where?

  5. Can I analyze the failure? – think SOLIDWORKS Simulation

Once I answer these questions and create my model, I export it in one of three file formats: STL, 3MF or VRML. Today, I am using STL, for simplicity and ease of use. If the model sent from another user is in one of these formats, I can use it directly. If not, I can open it in SOLIDWORKS and save it as needed.

IMPORTANT:

When I save a model from my CAD platform, I check for some very important file format items:

  • Output Units – use same units as per design

  • Resolution grade: Deviation and Angular tolerance – a fine resolution works best

  • File format type – if applicable

  • Any other save options the by software might have available for the file format

 

STL Figure 1

3MF Figure 2

VRML Figure 3

Binary STL is sufficient, as ASCII brings unnecessary information and increases the file size. For VRML, version 97 is the best option, as Version 1 is older and does not work with some slicing software.

SETUP

Now it is time to setup my print job!

HP’s Smartstream 3D Build Manager is a very simple, robust and easy to use tool that many use for their printing needs. It can be downloaded from the HP website, here or by navigating to:

www.hp.com > Support: Software and Drivers > Printers > search Multi Jet Fusion > select HP software > expand Application-Solutions

This software is FREE! Yes, free and there are no license requirements. Now of course, it only works for the HP Multi Jet Fusion, the HP 4200/5200 series and 300/500 series printers, but I can have as many copies on as many computers as I need. It is very light, occupying little space on my hard drive and does not use a lot of system resources.

At times, the model is not well meshed and the surfaces are not water tight. That creates a problem for slicing software in determining where to place material. Smartstream has an integrated Repair tool. It analyzes, kits and re-meshes the surfaces of the model without altering the geometry. A single click starts the process and it requires no knowledge of CAD or meshing on the part of the user… me. 😊

Now that my model is loaded, here are some of the options I have to adjust and prepare my print:

  • Move – one part at a time or in groups

  • Scale – percentage scale or per xyz dimension

  • Rotate – 3 degrees of freedom (xyz +/-)

  • Duplicate – select and multiply parts as needed

  • Move to Bed – for ease of brining model within build area

  • Add color – VRML color scheme comes with the part; otherwise this option allows color

  • Adjust color Hue, Lightness and Saturation – general adjustments

  • Hollow model – select shell wall thickness and accuracy

To view my results, I have tools such as pan view, zoom, cut-away, orthographic views and orbit.

Prior to printing the part or parts, I can run a wall thickness analysis to determine if the model has any areas likely to fail. This can save me A LOT of time in reprinting. Since the Smartstream software is specifically tuned to the HP Multi Jet printers, the high accuracy of this analysis is to be expected.

Then, I can add more parts and auto pack them or arrange them by hand.

For administrative purposes, I can also run a report and see my parts’ dimensions and other necessary information. This is in PDF format and easy to print out.

A special feature of Smartstream is the Caging option. This allows me to create a cage around my small parts so they do not get lost during the cleaning process. Below, you see 32 gears and the caging parameters I used on the right side.

Then, I can connect to my printer using the IP address and send the job.

At the intersection of simplicity, reliability and performance, HP’s Smartstream 3D Build Manager is a great tool to have available. If more tools are needed, such as internal latticing, manual file repair, or topology optimization, third party software such as Materialize Magics or NetFabb have plug-ins specific for the HP Multi Jet Fusion. These software packages are license-based and must be purchased or leased. For the large majority of users, Smartstream is very adequate.

 

THE PRINTER

The user interface is very simple and similar to the HP wide format printers, thus making it very user friendly. I select the job and press print.

 

*I will note here that the printer is already ready by having enough Nylon 12, Nylon 11, or TPU powder material available and fusing, detailing and color agents*

Once it starts, I will have an accurate reading of how long the job will take. The HP 500/300 series printers have built in material processing, printing, and cooling. The 4200/5200 series has a separate processing station, which requires the build chamber be moved. This adds a step, but also allows a second job to print while the first one is cooling, increasing production capacity!

I look forward to using this printer every time someone needs parts printed. The ability to produce hundreds of parts per day is amazing! 3D printing has come a long way and is only getting better so be on the lookout for more innovative printers from the HP Multi Jet Fusion line.

For more on product design, validating, producing and management, check out this 3-part webinar series by our TPM team on Collaborative Manufacturing Design.

Cheers!

Cris Ivan, Technical Solutions Consultant, TPM Inc.

Author information

TPM
TPM, Inc. is the Carolina’s largest 3D CAD provider and a leading technology company proud of its reputation of providing cutting-edge solutions to the engineering and design community for the past 40 years. Founded in 1973, TPM Inc. serves more than 3,000 customers across the Southeast each year. Inspired by our founder, Jerry Cooper, we are committed to offering our clients the best: 3D Design Software, 3D Printing and Scanning Options, Data and Document Management Solutions, Large-Format Graphics, Wide-Format Plotters and Office Equipment, and Reprographics.

The post HP Smartstream 3D Build Manager: Simple Journey from Design to Printed Model appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by TPM at August 03, 2020 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Team HyperShock Optimizes Robot Designs for Functionality, Efficiency, and Mojo with SOLIDWORKS

Will Bales and Tyler Bond built their first battling robot when they met the minimum requirement of 12 years of age for BattleBots IQ. Their 15-pound, full-body spinner robot made from an upside-down wok was named HeiferBot for its black-and-white pattern. They won their first battle and were hooked.

Bales and Bond continued building and battling robots throughout high school, but the end of BattleBots IQ and the start of college put their participation in robotic battles on hiatus for several years. Bales was working at Syntheon, a surgical robotics company, when he received a call from BattleBots CEO Trey Roski.

“Trey said he’d just signed a deal with ABC to reboot the series,” Bales recalls. “He said he needed cool fighting robots super quick and asked if I was interested … and even though I was very busy, I jumped at the chance, and HyperShock LLC was born.”

Design a Robot in One Month

The BattleBots schedule allows teams roughly one month to complete the design work to meet production deadlines. Under time pressure to build the first HyperShock robot (each year’s rendition has been a different version of a vertical disc spinner), Bales knew the team needed to use the SOLIDWORKS® design platform. “I had been using SOLIDWORKS for a long time—ever since I learned how to use the software in middle school—and still use the software in my day job at Syntheon,” Bales recounts.

“It was a no-brainer to use SOLIDWORKS because it lets us iterate and communicate efficiently,” Bales stresses. “Since building the first HyperShock robot, we’ve been fortunate in obtaining a SOLIDWORKS sponsorship, which provides additional simulation and visualization tools that are accelerating our robot development efforts.”

“Every version of the HyperShock robot has been designed in SOLIDWORKS,” Bales continues. “In addition to the design speed that we have realized using the software, SOLIDWORKS is truly an industry standard data format that our vendors and suppliers work with regularly, which helps to minimize delays in production and assembly.”

Handsome and Tough

Durability and toughness are the most essential traits of a successful battling robot, and Team HyperShock leverages SOLIDWORKS Simulation capabilities to optimize designs for strength and weight. However, the team does not stop at ruggedness.

“Creating a fighting robot that looks good is a part of our team dynamic and aesthetic. The robot design has to be unique, interesting looking, and a tough fighter. SOLIDWORKS helps us achieve those goals.”

Check out HyperShock’s Facebook page for more information on the team. For a complete version of this story, click here. And, if you’d like to learn more about SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD, Simulation, Visualize, or other tools, please contact your local reseller.

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Team HyperShock Optimizes Robot Designs for Functionality, Efficiency, and Mojo with SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at August 03, 2020 12:00 PM

July 31, 2020

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

The Magic of a Reflection

This is a two-part blog that investigates the power of SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS Visualize to accurately model and render illusions created by mirrors. In the first part we will create the illusion of disappearance and in the second part we will see if we can create a hologram.

Part 1: Thinking INSIDE of the box
Our goal today is to create a box that will make things disappear. More specifically, we want to create a box that to which we can put something inside and it will look empty, no matter where we sit around it.

The concept behind this trick is simple – we create a box and insert a mirror at a 45 degree angle such that it reflects the floor of the box and tricks our eyes into thinking that the box is empty. This mirror also creates a pocket in the box that we can hide all kinds of things in. For example, your mini hand sanitizer or that roll of toilet paper that your coworker keeps stealing!

Let’s get started. I began by creating a simple box, shelling it, and then adding another body for the mirror at a 45 degree angle. I then dragged the Mirror appearance over from the task pane (Appearances > Glass > Gloss > Mirror) and applied it to the newly created mirror body.

Here’s what it looks like in SOLIDWORKS:

So far, pretty simple, but it’s hard to tell if the trick will work. I needed something to help me visualize the result (especially the reflection from the mirror), so I activated my SOLIDWORKS Visualize Add-In and selected Export Advanced to quickly port my design over and check that my design was on track.

Note: I used Export Advanced instead of Export Simple because I knew I would be iterating my design. This option enables the Monitor File feature in Visualize, making updating the picture in Visualize almost automatic as I work on my model in SOLIDWORKS CAD.
First attempt: THE LINE IS VISIBLE

Whoops! Thank goodness I was able to check my design in SOLIDWORKS Visualize. We can see here that we need something to make the parting line less obvious.

Let’s disguise it by adding some stripes using Split Line and quickly Rebuild, Save, and pop back over to Visualize to check our work.

When we do this, Visualize pops up with a handy dandy window asking if we want to re-import our data.

As soon as we select Yes, we get the following result.

Second attempt: SUCCESS!

INCREDIBLY better! I’ll take it. Also, can I say that I’m seriously impressed with how well Visualize renders mirrors? I’m seriously impressed.

Ok next step: Let’s quickly add some finishing touches (doors, hinges, knobs), export our multi-body Part to an Assembly using the Save Bodies command, apply mates, and then check out how it looks from different angles using the Turntable feature in Visualize.

To activate the Turntable function, all we need to do is click the power button after hovering over the feature in the heads-up toolbar.

Then we can click on the play button to see what our model looks like from various angles. I went ahead and took it one step further so that I could share this result with all of you – I exported a video (Output Tools > Turntable)!

Check out the video below:

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="912" id="video-26976-7" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Mirror-Box-Final-VIDEO-1.mp4?_=7" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/Mirror-Box-Final-VIDEO-1.mp4</video>

I love it! It works from everywhere in the audience and we’re completely fooled. There’s just one step left to finish our design.

Let’s check to see how much we can fit in the pocket created by the mirror! To do this, I quickly simplified the model and used the Intersect command, making sure to select Create Internal Regions. I then got rid of unnecessary bodies and quickly looked at Mass Properties on the Evaluate tab.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="924" id="video-26976-8" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/MirrorBox2.mp4?_=8" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/MirrorBox2.mp4</video>

Here’s our result:

So… the ultimate question: Will our essential items fit inside?

Based on the volume of our toilet paper roll and our mini hand sanitizer, this should work! Let’s try it out!

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="924" id="video-26976-9" preload="metadata" width="1140"><source src="http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/EssentialItems.mp4?_=9" type="video/mp4">http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/EssentialItems.mp4</video>

Fantastic! It works! Thanks to the power of SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS Visualize, our essential items are now safe from the general public.

Thanks for tuning in. This was a ton of fun for me, so be sure to check back in for Part 2 of this blog where we use mirrors to make a hologram appear!

Author information

Loretta Stiurca
Loretta Stiurca
Loretta is a mom, a wife, and an engineer. She is a CSWE and has been using SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS Electrical for more than 6 years. In her free time, she enjoys hiking with the puppy, playing Dungeons and Dragons, thinking up crazy inventions, learning magic tricks, juggling, making her baby girl laugh, and going on adventures.

The post The Magic of a Reflection appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Loretta Stiurca at July 31, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM Custom Revision Table Columns

This article builds on an excellent one posted by my colleague Justin Williams. In his article, Justin explained how to link SOLIDWORKS PDM variables to a SOLIDWORKS revision table. In this article, I will look at how to add additional columns to a SOLIDWORKS Revision Table and link these to PDM.

I will first add the columns that I want in my SOLIDWORKS Revision Table. This is done by right-clicking on the header row of the Revision Table and selecting Insert Column.

Insert Column

Insert Column

I will then define the Column Property as Custom and enter a Title for the Property. The Title of the Property is important as it must match the PDM Attribute I will be creating later.

Column Properties

Now that I added the Custom Column I want, I will right-click on the Revision Table and save it.

Save Revision Table

After I have configured and saved my Revision Table, I will launch SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration, to continue with the set-up. With PDM Revisions configured as outlined by Justin, I will now add the additional variables I want to show in my Revision Table. I do this by manually entering the Attribute name. It is crucial that the Attribute name is identical to the SOLIDWORKS Revision Table Title.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Variable

SOLIDWORKS PDM Variable

With the PDM Variable configured correctly, I need to populate the value for my variable. There are two ways I can do this. One is through a Transition action.

Transition Action

The other is through a Control in a Data Card.

Data Card Control

 

Setting the Variable Value through a Transition Action automates the process, but works best where values are available to be pulled from. these are usually environmental variables such as Date, Full Name, Initials, Version Comment and Date.

Environmental Variables

In situations where the Variable Value requires user input beyond Version Comment, the Data Card option is likely the best.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Custom Revision Table Columns appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at July 31, 2020 12:00 PM

July 30, 2020

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Visualize Quick Tips – Sunlight Environments Part 2

In this second Quick Tip video on Sunlight environments, we’ll show you how to create powerful Sun Studies from your Sunlight Environment you set up in Part 1. If you missed Part 1 of this Quick Tip, where we cover the Sunlight Environment settings, you can find it here. No product exists only during one time of day, and for anything that will live outdoors, it’s important for it to look good throughout the entire day. Some examples of this are (obviously cars) architecture and interior design, exterior shading like pergolas, garage structures or even just patio furniture and BBQ grilles. In SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional, you can recreate the sun’s real life position at any time or place on the planet and then animate the sun showing how it moves throughout the entire day – in full photo-realism!

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jnaJFpWjieo" width="560"></iframe>
<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AwbcABMq5Wo" width="560"></iframe> 
 

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SNqbjOjh-pE" width="560"></iframe>
Check out this YouTube playlist more helpful Visualize videos!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Visualize Quick Tips – Sunlight Environments Part 2 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at July 30, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to rename the BOM column heading in SOLIDWORKS Composer

In SOLIDWORKS Composer the BOM columns can be configured and various properties and meta-properties can be added as new columns in the Bill of Material.

The existing property names can also be renamed, by following the steps below:

Step 1:

Firstly, make sure the BOM tab is shown on the left-hand side pane of the composer user interface, right beside the assembly, collaboration and Views tabs.

To toggle ON the BOM Tab go to > Window Tab on top > Check on BOM Tree

Step 2:

Once the BOM ID’s are generated and BOM is displayed within the viewport, now click on the Configure BOM columns Icon > This opens the Configure Columns dialogue box.

BOM Tree Checkbox

Step 3:

Now, click on the name of the property under displayed properties section > Click on Rename Icon and type in the new name.

Rename the BOM Field name

Rename the BOM Field name

Step 4:

Now see below the BOM column field is renamed.

solidworks composer bom heading

Before and after the BOM column is renamed

Learn more about Composer

To learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer attend our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training course live online.

The post How to rename the BOM column heading in SOLIDWORKS Composer appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at July 30, 2020 12:00 PM

July 29, 2020

SolidSmack

Loop Mount Is A Phone Holder Made Specifically For Handlebars

loop mount

We all enjoy a good bike ride, and with modern smartphones providing you with a handheld GPS, it’s hard to get lost in a city or out in the wilderness. And with the dawn of 3D printed e-bikes with onboard GPS, who has to worry?

But even with all the advances in technology, it’s still a bother to have to trust your smart-cycle or look at your phone to see where you’re going. While you can turn on your GPS’s voice aid, you still need somewhere to place your phone while on your bike, scooter, or… Segway?? Why not. Surely there’s a simpler solution.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nYuJQTdp-Zk?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The Loop Mount is a simple – perhaps the simplest – most minimal phone holder made especially for transportation with handlebars. Unlike other holders that use a plastic arm sticking out of the front of the handlebar, this cylinder is made to integrate subtly with your ride.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">loop mount</figure>

The round body is CNC-machined aluminum that fits all handlebar diameters from 7/8 to 1 ¼ of an inch. One mounted to your bike, industrial-strength springs clamp your phone in place, ensuring it doesn’t fall out.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">loop mount</figure>

According to the creators, the Loop Mount went through 200 hours of rigorous testing on bumpy roads, stairs, and all kinds of uneven terrain with a phone attached to it. This was done to ensure that anything short of a full-on wipeout would not displace your phone from the holder.

Despite some serious clamping ability, it won’t crush your phone under the pressure. Installing and removing your phone from the Loop Mount was meant to be easy so you can focus on where you’re going instead of your phone (which we all know is pretty important).

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">loop mount</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">loop mount</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">loop mount</figure>

A whole year was spent designing the Loop Mount to make it look like a part of any handlebar imaginable. After sketching and ideation, SOLIDWORKS was used for the design and engineering before hundreds of prototypes were made and tested.

Surprisingly, the Loop Mount has well exceeded its Kickstarter goal of $25,685. It currently has funding of over $360,000, which is a heck of a lot more than what it needed. You can find more on the Loop Mount’s simplistic design and features on its Kickstarter page.

The post Loop Mount Is A Phone Holder Made Specifically For Handlebars appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 29, 2020 07:00 PM

cadasio: Create Interactive Technical Illustrations of your 3D CAD Data

cadasio-pocket-knife-00

You’ve got some options when you need to create graphics for assembly instructions and technical documents but when you need to create animated assembly or service instructions your options narrow quite a bit. And, if you prefer a web-based option, cadasio is the only option that offers the features to make you more mobile.

Why Product Assembly Instructions?

You and your team have spent weeks on models and drawings – it looks splendid in all its chromatic 3D CAD glory. You can even spin it around for others, ya know, if they’re there, standing over your shoulder. But what’s the next step to turn that CAD data into product assembly illustrations you can share with anyone?

This is the problem cadasio is aiming to solve with a online user interface that allows you to create shareable, interactive visuals of your 3D data.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XzqakjQqaQU?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The cadasio platform includes a default Toolbox and the ability to add custom toolboxes that include all the components you want to add to your 3D view. Toolboxes provide the components that allow you to add checklists, navigation, labels, balloons, text, arrows, exploded view lines, or include parts lists, detail views, and images.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

Perhaps best of all, they have a number of plugins for 3D modeling software, including SOLIDWORKS, Fusion 360, Inventor, Solid Edge, and Onshape. If you have another 3D software they also support direct import of neutral formats, STEP or OBJ.

You can get a taste of what’s currently possible in their showcase that 1) provides a range of visual style examples and 2) demonstrates how you can share the visuals online.

They are currently in early access with options for a Free account (limited projects), a Professional account (billed annually at $600/yr), and a Corporate account with more project, priority support, and feature request (contact for price).

They also have a forum that includes getting started guides and additional resources.

The post cadasio: Create Interactive Technical Illustrations of your 3D CAD Data appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 29, 2020 06:56 PM

The Javelin Blog

What is the difference between DraftSight and 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight?

3DEXPERIENCE® DraftSight® is a new professional DWG-based 2D and 3D drafting offering from Dassault Systemes. Users can easily migrate from AutoCAD® to DraftSight with the familiar interfaces and workflows. But what is the difference between DraftSight and 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight?

3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight provides time-saving productivity tools and APIs, based on the popular DraftSight desktop application enjoyed by millions of users. The platform addresses the popular needs for collaboration and management, especially for large-scale projects, check out the demo below to learn more:

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Desktop 2D CAD Managed in the cloud

3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight specializes in handling DWG format drawings. It’s not an associative 2D drawing tool for 3D modeling roles such as 3D Creator or 3D Sculptor. It requires a local desktop installation from the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, it is not a browser-based drawing application. Essentially 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight allows you to manage and share your DWG files with your team on the cloud. But the application runs on your desktop machine with a unique workflow:

  • Integrated directly into DraftSight, the 3DEXPERIENCE Desktop Add-in allows you to access all of your information from the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform right from within DraftSight.
  • This workflow allows you to combine the power of DraftSight to quickly create and edit your engineering drawings, with the collaborative features of the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform.

3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight is based on DraftSight Premium

3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight is based on the top tier DraftSight package, DraftSight Premium, which features 3D modeling capabilities and constraints to control entities parametrically, in addition to the features included with DraftSight Standard and Professional. You can find a comparison table on our website to see which features are included with DraftSight Premium.

  • There is no functional difference between the desktop DraftSight Premium version and 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight.
  • 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight is windows only and does not work on a mac.
  • 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight installs and licenses a thick client application on the desktop from the platform, it is a named user license rather than standalone or network license like regular DraftSight.

Can 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight be installed along with other versions of DraftSight on the same computer?

No. DraftSight does not support multiple versions on the same computer. 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight is based on DraftSight 2020 SP1 or later, so it cannot be installed on a computer with DraftSight 2020 or other releases.

What is the workflow with 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight?

The workflow feels very similar to the familiar desktop DraftSight product. In addition, it provides cloud collaboration and management capabilities to answer multiple common business challenges.

  1. You can view, edit and print drawings.
  2. Search, open and save drawings on the platform via the integrated 3DEXPERIENCE task pane.
  3. Manage drawings with convenient data management tools such as Reserve/Unreserve, assign Maturity States or create New Revisions.
  4. Collaborate with others on the platform. For example, share data with easy controls over the digital access.
3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight Data Management

3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight Data Management

Store on the cloud

In conjunction with the Collaborative Business Innovator role you can secure data and product lifecycle management on a cloud-based platform

  • Store all your drawings in a centralized, secure location and manage them from any device without any installation.
  • Manage the lifecycle of DWG and DXF™ files, simulation models and documentation across disciplines and CAD applications.
  • Track issues, changes and routes, and reduce conflicting edits with revision control.

Multi-discipline collaboration across your entire business ecosystem

Using the 3DEXPERIENCE platform connect to DraftSight for centralized team collaboration:

  • Locate relevant drawings quickly by keywords, file formats, attributes and tags.
  • Preview drawings. Zoom, pan and mark up drawings with multi-touch gestures directly in the browser.
  • Create dashboards for personalized views into information from all sources and set alerts for data feeds.
  • Share unstructured and structured content through activity streams, chat, video and user-tagged comments.

Learn more about 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight on our website and get a quote for the product.

The post What is the difference between DraftSight and 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at July 29, 2020 04:26 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

How SIMULIAworks Can Benefit SOLIDWORKS Users

SIMULIAworks was announced at 3DEXPERIENCE World earlier this year. It provides comprehensive and robust simulation capabilities for three roles for SOLIDWORKS® users on the 3DEXPERIENCE® platform.

Here’s what you can expect.

The initial offering is focusing on structural simulations from basic stress analysis to advanced nonlinear analysis (impact and drop test type of simulations). Currently the SIMULIAworks portfolio contains three complementary roles on the cloud:

  1.       Structural Performance Engineer
  2.       Structural Mechanics Engineer
  3.       Simulation Collaborator

These roles offer strong associativity with SOLIDWORKS for efficient what-if scenarios. Let’s take a brief tour of the SIMULIAworks portfolio.

3DEXPERIENCE Platform

The 3DEXPERIENCE platform includes a dashboard interface along with tools that enable reviewing simulation setup and results within a browser without having to open the full simulation. This helps facilitate collaboration and review of design alternatives, whether you are working from the office, in a meeting, traveling, or at home. All you need is an internet connection and access to a standard browser.

Simulation results review within a browser

 

The 3DEXPERIENCE platform provides a large cloud compute environment that can facilitate solving complex simulations on large models in less time than would be possible on an individual workstation. The IT infrastructure is managed via the cloud, thus providing enterprise capabilities without overhead costs. Now companies of any size can perform large-scale simulations.

Additionally, with the Collaborative Designer for SOLIDWORKS role, SOLIDWORKS contains embedded capabilities that tightly integrate the desktop environment with the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. This allows the user to manage their data on the platform through an interface that is part of the SOLIDWORKS desktop. In addition, the embedded interface allows the user to launch the SIMULIAworks applications directly from SOLIDWORKS.

Because the product data is stored in the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, there is full associativity between the SOLIDWORKS geometry and the SIMULIA simulations performed against the geometry. Any changes to the original part and assembly files are updated in the simulation models.

Structural Performance Engineer

Structural Performance Engineer enables comprehensive structural nonlinear static, frequency, buckling, and structural thermal simulations to assess the performance of products during the design engineering process to help guide design decisions. Coupled with the Collaborative Designer for SOLIDWORKS, associativity is maintained between the 3DEXPERIENCE simulation setup and the SOLIDWORKS geometry to ensure any changes in the design are reflected appropriately within the simulation results.

Example simulations using the Structural Performance Engineer role

 

The key features and capabilities for SOLIDWORKS users include:

  •         Market-leading Abaqus technology to provide robust and accurate results
  •         Ability to solve advanced nonlinear problems for large displacements and large strain analysis, plastic deformation, hyperelasticity, and other simulations that cannot be solved with linear analysis
  •         Unique and robust General contact to set up (in 1-click) the contact of any large models
  •         Advanced meshing (including quadrilateral shells and hexahedral solid elements) so any geometry can be tested virtually
  •         Linear and advanced nonlinear material options, including engineering plasticity for metals and hyperelasticity for rubber (elastomers) to accurately simulate product behavior
  •         Seamless associativity/integration with geometry
  •         Unique engineering workflows and robust simulation technology within an intuitive interface
  •         Multi-step structural scenarios for product performance and quality testing
  •         Accelerated structural performance simulation with automated model creation for large assemblies
  •         High-performance results visualization, particularly useful for very large models
  •         Local compute for up to four cores

Structural Mechanics Engineer

Structural Mechanics Engineer enables the designer to solve complex engineering problems using superior mechanical simulation methodologies to predict, validate, and improve product behavior.

Impact simulation of a mower into a barrier.

 

This role extends the capabilities in Structural Performance Engineer by providing the following additional capabilities:

  • Offers explicit dynamics for solving drop test and impact types of problems
  • Allows for material calibration to synchronize material performance behavior with test results
  • Enables simplification and geometry validity checks and repair with geometry prep tool
  • Includes local compute up to four cores

Simulation Collaborator

The Simulation Collaborator makes it easy for a designer to share simulations via a browser-based interface on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. You can review and compare results with your team whether in the office, at home, or on the road.

Performance Trade-Off widget provides browser-enabled results comparison

 

A useful tool in the Simulation Collaborator role is the Performance Trade Off widget, which can be included in a 3DEXPERIENCE dashboard to provide simulation results comparison. The results can be compared visually and key performance indicators, as defined by the user, can also be compared. Such indicators can determine valid criteria, including maximum stress and acceptable deflection. A table view then illustrates which design alternatives meet the criteria and shows which ones best meet the conditions defined.

What’s Next

In future releases SIMULIAworks will go beyond these structural and review offerings to provide simulation capabilities such as fluids, plastics, and other domains. Check out the SIMULIA web page or contact your local reseller for more information.

 

Author information

Steve Grace
Steve Grace
is an Operations Excellence Expert, Mainstream Portfolio for SIMULIA focused on providing simulation capabilities to the mainstream user.

The post How SIMULIAworks Can Benefit SOLIDWORKS Users appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Steve Grace at July 29, 2020 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Customization of user interface in SOLIDWORKS Electrical!

Are you aware of settings in SOLIDWORKS Electrical that allow you to change quite a few things in the user interface, just like we make modifications in SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD? Do you prefer the mouse wheel to be reversed for zoom direction? Maybe a darker theme? Or a larger cross-hair than the default size?

In addition to what I mentioned above, there are a lot more settings that can be controlled through the Electrical Interface configuration tool.

How to access Electrical Interface configuration tool?

Go to Tools Tab > Interface Configuration > This launches the Interface Configuration dialogue box.

Below is a list of few important items that can be changed in the electrical interface:

  • Cross Hair – Use the drag bar to control the percentage to select a preferred crosshair size for your screen.
  • Reverse Zoom direction – Toggle the checkbox ON or OFF to prefer specific zoom in and out direction.
  • Zoom speed- Default Zoom speed is 100 %, it can be reduced or increased using the drag bar.
  • Change the marker/cursor colour
  • Change the drawing background theme
  • Control the Tabs colour as well their position
  • Change the tabs/ribbons font height
  • Select default dimension units

All the settings that are changed in this user interface dialogue box can be reverted so quickly just by clicking on Reset all interfaces.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Interface Configuration

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Interface Configuration

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Electrical training course either live online. For more information about electrical software and training solutions call 1-877-219-6757.

The post Customization of user interface in SOLIDWORKS Electrical! appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at July 29, 2020 12:00 PM

July 28, 2020

SolidSmack

Here’s A Guitar Made From 1,200 Colored Pencils

colored pencil guitar

Take a glimpse at the Burls Art YouTube channel and you’ll see just how crazy the creator is about making guitars. A savant in what he aptly calls “guitart”, he has made guitars out of nearly anything imaginable: from paper all the way to jawbreakers.

Some of the channel’s most famous builds are the guitars made from colored pencils. Counting the unique bass guitar, there are not one, not two, but four guitar build videos that go into detail on how to make a musical instrument out of the multi-colored art pencils.

For now though, let’s focus on the newest version of the colored pencil guitar – the Colored Pencil Guitar 3.0, made from 1200 colored pencils:

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</figure>

1. Make The Pencil Guitar Body Outline

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">colored pencil guitar</figure>

Like the past versions, the body of the guitar is made by pouring epoxy resin over layers of colored pencils. Wooden planks are set on top of the pencils to keep them from floating during the pouring process.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">colored pencil guitar</figure>

Once the resin has dried, both sides are flattened and planed with another layer of resin before being cut out into a guitar shape.

According to the maker, the hard part about working with colored pencils is sealing them after any cut to prevent color bleed. It’s an arduous task which he normally doesn’t do with his other guitar builds but is pretty much a requirement for the colored pencil guitars.

2. Drill Holes For The Other Parts

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">colored pencil guitar</figure>

To make room for the other parts of the guitar such as the fretboard and pickups, various holes are drilled into the body in the front and back. Just as with cutting the body outline, the guitar is sealed as soon as any hole is drilled into it.

3. Craft The Fretboard

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">colored pencil guitar</figure>

In order to play any guitar, you need a neck with a proper fretboard. A specialized saw blade is used to get the right fret marks onto the neck.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">colored pencil guitar</figure>

Most electric guitars have a curve to their fretboard which helps with hand positioning so Burls Art adds a piece of sandpaper to a radius block and begins sanding the fretboard down.

After the sanding is finished he fine tunes the fretboard cuts with a small blade.

4. Add The Guitar Neck And Head

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">colored pencil guitar</figure>

With the fretboard complete, he can now affix it to a properly sized guitar neck and head.

Hours are spent cutting, gluing, and sanding the right shapes onto a single piece of wood. Curves on the neck, holes in the guitar head for the tuning pins, and even the marks on the fretboard are all meticulously added in to make sure the guitar will look and play just as good as any other. He even adds metal inlays into the cuts of the fretboard once he’s finished the wood parts to make finding the right notes easier.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">colored pencil guitar</figure>

5. Install Binding Onto The Sides

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">colored pencil guitar</figure>

One new thing Burls Art adds to this newest version of the colored pencil guitar is binding around the perimeter of the body. This not only makes the guitar look cleaner, but it also protects the resin casing from outside elements (i.e. dropping it).

6. Add The Rest of The Parts And Some Finishing Touches

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">colored pencil guitar</figure>

With the main body, neck, and head complete, Burls Art can start adding the electronic parts of the electric guitar. Tuning pegs, pickups, and knobs are fitted onto the guitar before he applies a good deal of wood polish and varnish on the wooden parts.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">colored pencil guitar</figure>

Unlike his past colored pencil guitars, the vertical orientation of the pencils makes this build a lot stronger and, may we say, prettier? Ok, cooler. Musically, the three pickups give it a wide range of sound and it plays as good as any guitar.

Burls Art’s YouTube channel is all about making guitars from the weirdest materials, so be sure to check it out if you want something to see something unique you can play music on.

The post Here’s A Guitar Made From 1,200 Colored Pencils appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 28, 2020 08:20 PM

Model of the Week: Water-Resistant Storage Box [Chilly Bin!]

3d-printed-water-proof-storage-box-chilly-bin-00

It’s days like these where you’re in your speedboat zipping from port to port with bags of frozen melon balls ready to hand out and bless everyone’s day with sweet, icy goodness. Yet, how do you keep those melon balls from getting drenched by the mad wakes you’re frothing up in the bay?

I know what you’re thinking. A BIN? But why spend time and very little money to buy one in a store, when you could use it as yet another excuse to fire up that 3D printer and print yourself a few melon ball-certified chilly bins. YOU’RE WELCOME.

Thingiverse user, muddymaker (Tony Sim), has just the solution in a stylish little waterproof storage design inspired by others that have come before. His version has eight parts (including seal, plus an MMU, single-color, and no logo version) with an inner dimension big enough to hold an iPhone 11, fat wallet, and keys… or a bag of ice-cold melon balls.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

For the print, he used a Prusa I3 MKS3 3D Printer and various colors of Prusament filament (PLA, ASA and TPU types), printing at a 15-30% infill and 0.2mm resolution with no rafts or supports. You will also need 8x M3x20mm bolts with 8x M3 Nyloc nuts for the hinge and latches.

The Chilly Bin is a remix of the Frog Box which is a remix of the Rugged Waterproof Box and can be downloaded on Thingiverse or MyMiniFactory.

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Model of the Week: Water-Resistant Storage Box [Chilly Bin!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 28, 2020 03:41 PM

Modeling Example Added to Episodes Site

I’ve had a number of projects going on, mostly writing, but I’ve added a section to the Episodes subscription site on modeling this hand held device from ID sketches. The…

by matt at July 28, 2020 02:30 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Can You Really Trust Your Data in the Cloud?

As more and more software is deployed on the cloud, many might question how secure these cloud-based applications really are compared with traditional on-premise software. To some, “the cloud” sounds like data is magically jettisoned to some nebulous place in the atmosphere—and all that data is now floating out there (securely, somehow) in the sky.

In actuality, the biggest difference in cloud computing is the physical location of servers. You still control access to all your data. You still control who has access and at what permission level. You still control what applications to use. And so on.

But, let’s face it: You can’t see your servers, so it feels unsafe. However, the reality is quite different.

Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS has placed security at the heart of its application development process whether for desktop or applications on the cloud-based the 3DEXPERIENCE® platform. Let’s take a look at some of the safeguards that have been put in place to keep you and your valuable IP safe.

Data Protection on the Platform

Safeguarding data is essential to ensuring availability, integrity, and confidentiality of the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS deploys industry best practices for authentication, access control, encryption, injection detection and prevention, auditing, and server hardening. Standards include MITRE’s Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE™) and many approaches refined by the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP).

Secure and More Inclusive Design Reviews

You can safely conduct real-time digital mock-up reviews accessible to everyone on your team, including those without CAD knowledge, which enables all non-engineers, such as marketing, sales, and management to easily participate in the product development cycle. No more managing tons of project emails and attachments, which can potentially open the door to serious security issues or expose IP to hackers.

Disagreements among co-workers, managers, or clients are readily resolved by reviewing communication threads within the project community from a single secure platform. This makes it easy to solve differing recollections over what was communicated—or not communicated—in the past without the frustration of digging through countless emails. More importantly, you always have full control over who sees what data and when so valuable IP is always protected.

Authentication

3DPassport provides authentication and authorization services while supporting two-factor authentication and single sign-on (SSO) capabilities within the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. Users are fully authenticated and assigned specific licenses and policies. Events and actions remain traceable. Certificates are managed by a certificate authority and key stores. A strong password policy and sound user policy for access control lists serve to protect the 3DEXPERIENCE platform against brute force, privilege escalations, and session hijacking.

Confidentiality and Integrity

Access to data is restricted via access lists. Only the authorized roles, organizations, or collaborative spaces can access data stored in the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. Authorization is implemented through business logic and database layers to ensure data integrity and strict confidentiality throughout the data lifecycle.

Encryption

Primary defenses are implemented to prevent attacks and control access. Robust encryption algorithms protect data in transit and strong access controls ensure data is stored securely (see Confidentiality and Integrity, above). File transfers on the cloud are secured via HTTPS/TLS.

Injection, Scripting, and Parser Hardening

The 3DEXPERIENCE platform was designed to be resilient to attacks like SQL, Parameter, Commands, and OS Injections. Protective measures employ several layers to guard against cross-site scripting (XSS). XML parsers are hardened using best practices to prevent XXE attacks. The software architecture embeds input validation and the use of a parameterized interface is encouraged and monitored for compliance.

Convenience and Security

Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS leverages industry-leading practices and is actively involved with the OWASP as a part of continuous efforts to minimize risk and protect customer data. Our security programs put particular emphasis on the secure software development life cycle (SDLC) approach used to build the 3DEXPERIENCE platform and applications.

To learn more about Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS and the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, please contact your local reseller.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Can You Really Trust Your Data in the Cloud? appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at July 28, 2020 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Fastener Comparison: Toolbox vs Custom Made vs Downloaded

Growing up my dad had a bucket of screws, bolts, nuts and washers. His father had the same. Sometimes I was called upon to find a nut for “this” particular bolt. Cliché’ – needle in a haystack. There is a time and place for SOLIDWORKS Toolbox, Custom and Downloaded Fasteners. Let’s discuss the top pros and cons of each.

SOLIDWORKS Fastener Comparison

SOLIDWORKS Fastener Comparison

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox, aka: Smart Fasteners

Pros:
  • Most common fasteners are present
  • Come defeatured for faster performance
  • Can be shared over network or PDM
Cons:
  • Requires a medium amount of setup on each machine
  • Much discipline, maintenance and backup is needed
  • There are known bugs with Toolbox

Custom Made Fasteners

Pros:
  • Unique custom fasteners can be made to suit various needs
  • Many files can be created to maximize performance and minimize drag
  • Custom properties like materials, part numbers and even appearances are all designed
Cons:
  • Requires significant setup and know-how to do so efficiently
  • Updates to parts or different versions of SOLIDWORKS is challenging
  • They are easily editable causing issues with many assemblies

Downloaded Fasteners

Pros:
  • Websites like McMaster-Carr, GrabCad and  3DContentCentral most likely have what you need
  • Doesn’t require much setup because a file is already created
  • Some websites have fastener packages to download
Cons:
  • Most sites have fasteners with thread, decreasing performance
  • Be careful of what you download from the internet
  • Double check of every fasteners’ dimensions is required

Conclusion

After looking at the lists above you should ask yourself how much time you want to put in with setup, how many types of fasteners do you need, how important is performance, how important is maintenance and are you needing custom items? That will really answer what one of the three categories you should go with. From experience I have found needs for all versions. In later articles I will show you proper techniques on how to create your own fasteners and in a separate article how to download and modify for performance.

You can learn more about Managing SOLIDWORKS Toolbox with PDM and downloaded fastener tips.

The post SOLIDWORKS Fastener Comparison: Toolbox vs Custom Made vs Downloaded appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at July 28, 2020 12:00 PM

July 27, 2020

SolidSmack

Superstrata: A Unibody, 3D Printed, Custom-Fit Bike Design

Superstrata Electric Bike

The world would be a much better place if, outside of everyone’s front door, there’s a scenic route, primed and ready for brisk walking, jogging, and – of course – cycling.

You can avoid so many tricky logistics like fitting or strapping your mountain bike onto your tiny car. Or what to do with a brand new mountain bike when you already have a favorite bike for casual use. And you’re rarely in the mountains.

Self-proclaimed “master of all terrains”, the Superstrata bike covers most of them in its frontend options. And with an array of promised features, it confidently claims itself as “the last bike you’ll ever need. If nothing else, that could really save you some garage space.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">Superstrata Electric Bike</figure>

Custom 3D Print for Comfort

To be the last bike you’ll need, the product must be durable, comfortable, and adaptable. Superstrata backs that large claim up with its most significant selling point: this bike is entirely 3D printed (minus the components). No, more than that, it’s 3D printed with your measurements in mind. 

The unibody frame alone sets it above the cut. It’s made of a carbon fiber composite that makes it incredibly light (less than 1.3kg or 2.9 lbs) and leagues stronger than steel. This very same composite forms the chassis and outer body of the bike, molded into one. So, you can expect its ability to bulldoze through rough terrain with minimum damage. 

<figure class="aligncenter size-full"></figure>

But Superstrata manages to avoid the pitfalls of mass production by printing each component according to your specific build. It takes 18 measurements, your height included, and keeps these in mind as they print layer by layer. 

With this, you avoid (often costly) DIY adjustments, like chopping the posts, that could leave your bike feeling worse than it did when it was not the right size.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-full"></figure>

Customizable to an Extent

Beyond promising a bike that fits your frame – and, let’s be fair here, that’s a big deal and saves you a lot of butt pain – there are various options you can take to make your Superstrata the perfect fit. 

First off, there are two versions of the bike: the classic Superstrata C and the electric-powered Superstrata E. Both offer custom measured components for the frame down to the saddle. Both come with either black or white frames. 

<figure class="aligncenter size-full"></figure>

The difference is the Superstrata E comes with a battery squeezed into the frame. This primarily powers pedal-assist technology that reaches a speed of 32kph. Further down the line, you can equip your bike with gadgets – GPS, phone charging dock, power sensors, etc. – to match your daily use. 

Judging by everything it has in store, Superstrata really is made for you.

<figure class="aligncenter size-full"></figure>

The Superstrata bike project has exceeded its campaign goal by a mile. However, you can still snag the Early Bird and IGG perks for discounts (up to 50% and 30% off, respectively) during the campaign period with ship date set for December 2020. You have just a little while longer to back this project with a handful of early bird specials left so check it out soon!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Superstrata: A Unibody, 3D Printed, Custom-Fit Bike Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 27, 2020 06:47 PM

Tour: TinkerMill Makerspace in Longmont, Colorado

The tour of this makerspace just outside Denver and Boulder, Colorado took place in September 2019, long before COVID-19 flipped spaces like these on their heads. However, as of today, TinkerMill is open for business, albeit with several precautions in place.

Take a peek inside this massive, and well-equipped space in the video below with our delightful and most excellent tour guide, Joe Augustaitus.

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<figcaption>Video of the full tour of TinkerMill!</figcaption></figure>

I’m very sad to report that Joe unexpectedly passed away March 9 of this year. More on him can be found at the end of this article.

COVID-19 Restrictions

For the most up-to-date information on precautionary measures surrounding the coronavirus, you can check this page. As of today, some of these rules include wearing a fabric face-covering and maintaining 6 feet of separation from others at all times.

It’s so incredibly important that everyone do their part with isolation, social distancing, and mask wearing. I’m so proud of all the TinkerMillians who have pulled together to keep our community safe.

Ron Thomas, Executive Director of TinkerMill

Tours

In-person tours are back on, although with a very limited capacity and with the new COVID rules applying to all participants. However, for the most up-to-date information, it’s probably best to drop them a line here before stopping by.

Now, onto the good stuff.

Toys

I’ve been to quite a few makerspaces and fablabs around the world, and TinkerMill is definitely one of the most impressive. They have all the typical tools you’d expect. Plus, if you have an urgent need to do some glass-blowing or to forge a metal sword, as we all do at times, they have you covered.

3D Printers

Filament for the 3D printers is supplied by TinkerMill and users weigh what they’ll use and pay by the gram.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">One of several 3D printers available at TinkerMill.<figcaption>One of several 3D printers available at TinkerMill.</figcaption></figure>

The current list of available machines includes the following:

  • Da Vinci 1.0 -2 units
  • Flashforge Creator Pro – 2 Units
  • Flashforge Creator (Makerbot Clone)- 1 unit
  • SeeMeCNC Rostock Max Delta Arm- 1 unit

HAM Radio

Those with an amateur FCC radio license can get approval to come into the “HAM Shack” and use it at any time. The site at Tinkermill is registered and has its own call letters, which has been used to make contact with over 70 countries.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Here's a peek at some of the places TinkerMill's HAM radio reached.<figcaption>Here’s a peek at some of the places TinkerMill’s HAM radio reached.</figcaption></figure>

You can find out more on the Wiki page here.

Photoshop

Here, you’ll find 2 photo printers with a color-corrected display screen. You can also develop old-timey black-and-white film at TinkerMill, capture the negatives digitally and produce prints from those negatives. Plus, Adobe Photoshop is available on the computer in this space.

Electronics and Robotics Lab

Basic electronics fabrication gear like soldering irons and oscilloscopes can be found here.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">One of the DIY self-driving cars built in the electronics lab at TinkerMill to race on the course across the street.<figcaption>One of the DIY self-driving cars built in the electronics lab at TinkerMill to race on the course across the street.</figcaption></figure>

In a separate building, there’s also a pick-and-place machine if you want to assemble a bunch of boards. Additionally, you might find their very active robotics group skunkworks-ing it up in the lab.

Laser Cutter & Engraver

The 80W laser cutter is one of the more highly-used pieces of equipment.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">80W CO2 laser for cutting and engraving at TinkerMill.<figcaption>80W CO2 laser for cutting and engraving at TinkerMill.</figcaption></figure>

Time can be reserved on this machine in 4-hour blocks, but if you need to use it right before Christmastime, you might be out of luck. Joe told us he didn’t think it ever stopped during that season.

Glass Blowing

Torches are available and members pay for the oxygen used during their session.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Examples of glass-blown art created at TinkerMill.<figcaption>Examples of glass-blown art created at TinkerMill.</figcaption></figure>

If stained glass making is more your bag, there’s a separate workshop for that.

Woodshop

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Some of the heavy-duty wood shop equipment inside TinkerMill.<figcaption>Some of the heavy-duty wood shop equipment inside TinkerMill.</figcaption></figure>
  • SawStop Table Saw
  • Miter Saw
  • Bandsaw
  • Router Table
  • Sanders
  • Small Drill Press
  • Joiner/Planer
  • Numerous hand tools and materials

There’s all that and a bag of: 8-foot x 4-foot PRS Alpha ShopBot. On the TinkerMill site, it’s described as “…a gantry-based, industrial-strength CNC milling machine for cutting, drilling, carving and machining.  Spindle speeds of up to 1800 inches per minute with cutting speeds of up to 600 inches per minute.  It’s capable of milling wood, plastics, aluminum, and other materials.”

Textiles and Fabrics Shop

  • Industrial Straight Stitch Sewing Machine
  • Embroidery Machine
  • Serger
  • Materials
  • Several Standard Sewing Machines

Welding Shop

  • MIG Welder
  • TIG Welder
  • Oxygen-Acetylene Torch

Metal and Machine Shop

Joe advised us to bring our own drill index and bits, as the one you’ll need will likely be the only one missing. Otherwise, this space is packed with goodies!

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Inside the metal and machine shop at TinkerMill.<figcaption>Inside the metal and machine shop at TinkerMill.</figcaption></figure>
  • Mitek CNC Mill
  • Bridgeport Mill
  • Nardini Lathe x2
  • Drill Press
  • Vertical Bandsaw
  • 20 Ton Air/Hydraulic Shop Press
  • Gauge Table and Measuring Tools
  • Sheet Metal Brake/Roll/Shear

Pottery Studio

This space is in a trailer in back of the main TinkerMill building. Joe mentioned a periodic drop-in class that will get you some clay and couple kiln firings for about $20. Glazes, a variety of small tools and a couple of electric wheels are available. More information can be found here.

Kitchen

This might be one of the areas that has some additional ‘Rona restrictions, but at the time I visited, this full kitchen was open for all to use.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Full kitchen available for all inside TinkerMill.<figcaption>Full kitchen available for all inside TinkerMill.</figcaption></figure>

There was even a community beer section in the fridge for all those of-age, funded by separate donations.

Classes

Classes and meetings can be found on TinkerMill’s MeetUp page. There, you can find safety courses on using the available equipment as well as classes to pick up new skillsets. Below is just a taste of some of the classes you can find.

Robotics/Self-driving Bots: our tour guide mentioned there are self-driving bot races in a lot across the street! You can find more on that including the course diagram on the TinkerMill Wiki page here.

Glass-blowing: how many makerspaces do you know of that will teach you about this?!

Blacksmithing: again, as with the glassblowing class, how cool is this?!

Advanced 3D-Printing: if you want to turbo-boost your 3D printing skills, I guess this is the class for you.

Dogs

TinkerMill had one robotic gadget I’ve never seen before — a self-driving mop! Or maybe it was a dog. I don’t know; it was getting my ankles wet. OK, it was probably a dog.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Doggo #1 at TinkerMill.<figcaption>Doggo #1 at TinkerMill.</figcaption></figure>

Yeah, and here’s another one. So, I guess they’re dog-friendly!

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Doggo #2: watch your step at TinkerMill!<figcaption>Doggo #2: watch your step at TinkerMill!</figcaption></figure>

How the Space is Run

TinkerMill is a member-run, 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, with $50/month membership fees as of today. In true community-spirit fashion, everyone is expected to help out wherever they can, clean up after themselves, and adhere to the honor system. You can find more on membership here.

I was also told when I visited that you can pretty much do whatever you want as long as you don’t: 1. discuss politics, 2. discuss religion, and 3. sleep there overnight. Sounds pretty straightforward to me.

Some of the more dangerous tools are protected by special locks. Members are given RFID key fabs that are only encoded with the ability to unlock machines after the member passes a safety course for that tool.

Board meetings where all members are usually invited happen once a month. These events help to let all members be a part of building and maintaining the organization.

More About Joe Augustaitus

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Joe Augustaitus, our warm and witty tour guide for the video, is sadly missed by the TinkerMill community.<figcaption>Joe Augustaitus, our warm and witty tour guide for the video, is sadly missed by the TinkerMill community.</figcaption></figure>

Ron Thomas, Executive Director of TinkerMill had this to say about the late Joe Augustaitus:

Joe was deeply involved with TinkerMill even before there was a TinkerMill. He was one of the five people at the very first Meetup that Scott Converse, our original founder, held in 2013 to feel out if Longmont was ready for a makerspace. He was incredibly generous with his time; always eager to help anyone at any time. He helped host nearly all of our Sunday open houses and gave tours to thousands of visitors. He served on the board of directors since 2017 and was always walking around the space taking care of important little things like refilling the soap and paper towel dispensers, printing blank waivers and membership agreements, and even did the vast majority of the data entry for completed new member agreements. Joe personally impacted nearly every TinkerMillian in one way or another and we’ll all miss him terribly.

In Joe’s obituary, suggested contributions made in his name included those going to the American Heart Association or to TinkerMill, here.

The post Tour: TinkerMill Makerspace in Longmont, Colorado appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at July 27, 2020 04:59 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Advanced SOLIDWORKS Electrical BOM Customization

Anyone who has been in the industry long enough, knows how important Bill of Materials (BOM) really are. When it comes to customization of the table, not many software applications out there give you the freedom to set it up the way you want to. This is where SOLIDWORKS Electrical comes in.

With SOLIDWORKS Electrical Schematics Professional, not only can you edit the format of the table by changing the width, height, columns etc, you can also generate the reports by a specific variable such as by Manufacturer or location. On top of this, using simple SQL code you can reference any project information in your BOM.

We will start with the basics, let us say our project is completed, our single and multi-line schematics have been documented. Now within your project, all your components have been assigned a manufacturer’s part and we would like to create a BOM table grouped by Manufacturer. From the get-go, we have numerous default options to have multiple variations to group our BOM from within the Project Configurations, but for now, let us stick with grouped by Manufacturer.

To do this, simply go to the Project tab, followed by Reports.

A new window for Report Manager will open up and show the preview of the reports we can generate within this project. Here, select the Bill of Materials grouped by Manufacturer option and hit Generate drawings.

Another window will pop-up “Report drawing destination”, ensure we have selected the Bill of Materials grouped by Manufacturer and hit OK. Once done, close the Report Manager window.

We should now see the newly generated documents, including Bill of Materials under our Document Tree. In the BOM, each manufacturer will be alphabetically listed with their components. There are numerous columns including Quantity and Location.

Now that we have our BOM ready, what if we wanted to make a change? What if, instead of BOM grouped by Manufacturer, we want to group it by location? This can be done in a few simple steps.

Under the Project tab, click the Drop-down for Configurations, followed by Report

This should pop up a new window for Report configurations management. From here, we can either Duplicate or Edit an existing report. For now, we will edit this BOM by selecting Properties. This should bring up the Report configuration edition window. Here, you may change the Description to read Bill of Materials grouped by Location in our case.

The Sort and break tab is where we want to go now. Here, you can decide how you want to group your BOM by selection of breaks and sorting the order of the Columns. By default, it would have the BOM manufacturer on top with a break. Rearrange the order and bring our Location above with breaks.

By rearranging the columns and bringing up our Location and adding breaks, we will have successfully made the changes for our BOM to be grouped by Location. You may first check the preview if this is what you wanted, if you are happy with it, just hit Apply and then Close.

Initially when you open the Bill of Materials in the Document Tree, they will be the older versions, just right-click on the Bill of Materials and select Update report drawings for the edited table to appear

And there we have it. A brief insight on how such changes can be made and implemented inside SOLIDWORKS Electrical Schematics Professional.

Customizations for ADVANCED Users only**

The power of SOLIDWORKS Electrical is in its customizability. It is often asked how to add extra custom columns in our BOM, One common request is location of each component, specifically showing the row number, column number and page number for that component – once it’s printed, we can use the BOM to determine exactly which page/row/column the components are on.

To do this, we must Activate expert mode in the BOM Properties. You’ll find it on the bottom left of the window (see image below). This is where we need to agree with the warning message, if you’re not sure what you’re doing please don’t change values, as you may have to rebuild the BOM again.

How important Bill of Materials (BOM)

As soon as you enable the Expert mode, you will see a new tab named SQL Query, within it you will see our SQL query on the left panel and the available options you can reference on the right panel. To make any changes though, you need to click on Edit.

In the right panel, locate the data variable you wish to reference, in this case we are looking for sym_columnmark (Column number where the component symbol is placed). Once you have located the required name, it’s as simple as following the same syntax as the previous line – you can just copy and paste an existing line (including the comma) and change the text to match the variable we determined on the right panel – see example below.

Original copied line – “ , vew_manufacturerparts_ex.bom_manufacturer AS bom_manufacturer”

Modified new line – “ , vew_manufacturerparts_ex.sym_columnmark AS sym_columnmark”.

*repeat process to add any extra variables, like sym_rowmark, etc.

How important Bill of Materials (BOM)

Now we must test it to verify if it is giving us what we actually need, to do this click “Test”, or if you just hit Apply, it will automatically pop up a window asking you to test since the SQL query has been changed.

If your new SQL query worked then you should see a new column with the variable we just added and it’s values, we can just hit OK then close to accept. Now let’s add a column to the BOM, We’ll fill in the required Description (BOM column Header). Once the details have been filled, click the formula “fx” button.

How important Bill of Materials (BOM)

This will open the Formula manager. Select “Variables and simple function” tab and locate our newly created sym_columnmark, followed by “Add a simple formula” (alternatively, you can double click on the formula to add it). Hit OK to close the window.

Coming back to our Columns tab, we can see the newly added column and the preview just above to confirm. You may now change the dimensions if you wish, otherwise just hit Apply and close the window.

How important Bill of Materials (BOM)

Coming back and updating our BOMs, we will see the newly added Column Mark column.

How important Bill of Materials (BOM)

With this fully customized Bill of Materials, one of the most important deliverables for the collaboration of the design team and the manufacturing team, you will be able to have all the information you need to get the job done efficiently. With the help of SOLIDWORKS Electrical Schematics Professional, you can now own your BOM and not have to be restricted by defaults. Your company can have customized tables, with easy to use interface and even more options through the expert mode and use of SQL queries. Enjoy your new found advanced Electrical Tips!

If you need an Electrical Schematic software that provides a powerful design solution for electrical systems please do not hesitate to reach out to our team at CADspace. We have over 20 years of combined experience with SOLIDWORKS and in the CAD industry and look forward to help answer your questions.

By Raza Khalil, CADspace, Applications Engineer

Author information

CADspace
CADspace is a dedicated SOLIDWORKS Reseller in Australia, partnered with SOLIDWORKS early in 2013 and since that time we have grown rapidly into a full-service provider to our clients. Over the years we have built trusted relationships based on honesty and outstanding service levels from the most dedicated support and sales team in the country.

The post Advanced SOLIDWORKS Electrical BOM Customization appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CADspace at July 27, 2020 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS Certification Offer for Subscription Service Customers

SOLIDWORKS certifications are a great way to show off your mastery of SOLIDWORKS at different levels and different areas of the software.   We offer exams from the Associate to the Professional and even Expert level.  The exam subjects include core SOLIDWORKS, Simulation, advanced areas such as Sheet Metal, Surfacing, Additive Manufacturing, and PDM to name a few.  These certifications are a great way to get your resume noticed by prospective employers or to let your management know that you are progressing in experience with SOLIDWORKS.

The cost of the exams range from $19.95 USD for the advanced exams to $99 USD for the core exams and $150 USD for the Expert exams.  If you work for a company that owns a license of SOLIDWORKS under Subscription Service contract, you can take advantage of our special offer and receive complimentary exams every 6 months.

Our team occasionally gets questions from both customers and reseller AE’s alike regarding the Subscription Services Certification Offers and the rules governing them.  If your SOLIDWORKS license is on a current Subscription Service contract, you can take advantage of the SOLIDWORKS Certification offers.  Click here for more information regarding the SOLIDWORKS Certification Subscription Service offer and how to claim your complimentary vouchers.

Here are a few things to help understand the offer:

  • Don’t think of getting complimentary vouchers twice a year (though technically this happens).  Think of it as getting one set of vouchers every semester.  The two redemption periods per year per SOLIDWORKS ID are from Jan 1 to June 30 and then from July 1 to Dec 31.  You can think of it as resetting every Jan 1 and July 1.  Only one set of vouchers is given per SOLIDWORKS ID per semester.  If the user does not claim the vouchers in a semester, they lose them.
  • One set of vouchers consists of one core exam (CSWA or CSWP), one advanced exam (Sheet Metal, Surfacing, Drawing Tools, Mold Making and Weldments) and one specialty exam (Simulation exams, MBD, CPPA, etc.).  This means that you can potentially claim more than $300 worth of vouchers every year.
  • Every redemption needs a unique SOLIDWORKS ID.  So if a company has, for example, 30 licenses, up to 30 different SOLIDWORKS ID’s can claim one set of vouchers each per semester (Jan to June and then July to Dec) as long as that SOLIDWORKS ID is linked to the company SOLIDWORKS serial number or numbers properly.  You can create your SOLIDWORKS ID here.  If you have any difficulties creating your account or do not know your SOLIDWORKS serial number, please  contact your SOLIDWORKS reseller.  Unfortunately, our team doesn’t have any visibility into the SOLIDWORKS ID system.
  • Any vouchers claimed can be shared.  For example, if user1 with SOLIDWORKS ID1 gets a set of vouchers and then user2 with SOLIDWORKS ID2 gets a second set of vouchers, those two users can use the vouchers however they see fit.  They can use the vouchers themselves, trade them with the other user, or give them away to someone else if they wish.
  • This offer is only open to commercial SOLIDWORKS customers on active Subscription Service.

To learn more about what other benefits are included with your Subscription Service, Click Here.

Thank you for your interest in the SOLIDWORKS Certification program.  If you have any questions, please email our team at certification@solidworks.com.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Certification Offer for Subscription Service Customers appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at July 27, 2020 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

3DEXPERIENCE Platform Dashboard

Dashboards are the interface that users interact with when accessing the 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS Platform. The Dashboard is populated with Widgets that allow access to apps and links. Dashboards can be associated with a Role or custom created.

All Dashboards contain the same common elements. These are:

  1. The Compass, which provides access to related apps and links and these are grouped as follows
    • North – Social and collaborative
    • East – Information intelligence
    • South – Simulation
    • West – 3D Modeling
  2. The Top Bar, which contains various tools for interfacing with the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform.
  3. Tabs for organizing Widgets

The fourth common element is the action bar which contains tools specific to each app.

Action Bar

App-Specific Action Bar

Users can have access to multiple dashboards based on the Roles they hold, as well as Dashboards created by them or other members of their platform. If a Role is selected, the apps belonging to the role are displayed. Selecting an app will display the Dashboard associated with that app.

3DEXPERIENCE Dashboard

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS xDesign App Dashboard

To learn more about Dashboards, read my article on Engineers Rule: Welcome to the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform: Dashboards.

The post 3DEXPERIENCE Platform Dashboard appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at July 27, 2020 12:00 PM

July 25, 2020

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Spring Dog

Spring Dog: New to SOLIDWORKS 2020 is a unique component that acts “flexible” in an assembly and each instance of the component can take on a different shape. Think of a flexible hose, cable, or spring that the same flexible part is used in multiple locations and different shapes throughout the assembly. You could create an entire litter of spring dogs all in one assembly, all with different relative positions between the multiple instances of Dog Head and Dog Tail. You could constrain each dog tail or head with any mates that partially remove degrees of freedom (like Limit mates), or just leave them floating.

But wait, there’s more; you could create an endless number of additional assemblies, each with multiple instances of the spring inserted and “flexible”. Open up the “Flex spring for dog” part individually to review all the features comments and instructions on how to create this assembly as shown.

Features: Sweep,Surface Cut, In-Context Planes, and In-Context Sketches

Complexity: Moderate

Download: spring dog components–  which contains the following: puck for flex spring construction.sldprt, flex spring for dog.sldprt, flex spring construction.sldasm, dog head.sldprt, dog tail.sldprt, spring dog.sldasm.

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Spring Dog appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at July 25, 2020 03:00 PM

July 24, 2020

SolidSmack

Gravity Sketch VR Launches CoCreation Beta

Good news from the folks a Gravity Sketch. As if sketching in virtual space was not already cool enough, their development team has gone and made it possible to co-create geometry at the same time, in the same virtual space! Not believing this to be kicked enough, they’ve obliterated the need to share a common physical locale. Yep, now when I don my VR headset and step into the new virtual space, I can be here in the good old US-of-A and share in real-time a virtual co-creative session with a mate a world away in the land down under! I’ve signed up for the co-creation beta and am excited to host my first co-creation session.

In the meantime let’s have a quick look at what co-creation has to offer and the basic workflow.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nrgeXJ-wK-Q?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
<figcaption>Co-Create live work session</figcaption></figure>

Co-Creation Workflow

Joining a co-creation session appears to be pretty straightforward. The action appears to be very much the same steps required to launch a personal session except you have the option to choose a “room” to enter. I imagine as everyone arrives you’d experience the “I see you.” or “What’s up? An more than likely the momentary “Hmm?” Once everyone is up and running it’s simply time to get busy!

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

Types of Activities

The great thing about a co-creation session is that it enables all the key stakeholders on a project to participate regardless of their artist or technical capabilities. As such designs can be created from sketch, iterated on, or modifications made on the fly as each person weighs in. Additionally, marketing can review the project even experiencing the product in the context of a virtual point-of-purchase (POP) environment.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Virtual POP Display</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Floating icons and VR goggles are the visual indicators of who’s in the Co-creation session.</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Collaborative Design + Review</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Marketing Review</figcaption></figure>

Co-creation beta looks to be an excellent opportunity to test the waters of virtual project creation and collaboration. This post is a basic heads-up. If you want to see some of the really cool content being created using Gravity Sketch hop over to Instagram and explore #gravitysketch!

The post Gravity Sketch VR Launches CoCreation Beta appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at July 24, 2020 09:36 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to manually install the SOLIDWORKS PDM Microsoft Office Add-in

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional includes a Microsoft Office Add-in for Excel, Word and PowerPoint that allows you to perform vault operations on documents opened in the Office application.

Microsoft Office Add-in

Microsoft Office Add-in

Normally you would select the Microsoft Office add-in (Microsoft Office Integration) option during the client installation if Office is detected on the system.

Microsoft Office Add-in Integration

Microsoft Office Integration

If for some reason you were not able to select the option via the install wizard, you can manually install the Microsoft Office add-in as follows:

  1. First verify if your Office version is 32-bit or 64-bit. The best method is to open the Office application and
    go to File, Help, and view the About information. It should state if the application is 32-bit or 64-bit.

    About Word

  2. An alternate method is to start the Office application and view the process details for the application. If it
    shows 32 next to the process name, the application is 32-bit. Otherwise it is 64-bit.

    • 64-bit Word Process

      64-bit Word Process

    • 32-bit Word Process

      32-bit Word Process

  3. Browse to ..\SWPDMClient\ folder on the install media and locate the Office add-in .CAB files.

    Office add-in .CAB files

    • Open Office.cab for 32-bit Office. Extract epdmlib.dll and office.dll into the SOLIDWORKS
      PDM 32-bit program folder location (c:\Program Files (x86)\SolidWorks PDM).

      c:\Program Files (x86)\SolidWorks PDM

      c:\Program Files (x86)\SolidWorks PDM

    • Open Office64.cab for 64-bit Office. Extract epdmlib.dll1 and office.dll1 into the Enterprise
      PDM install folder (c:\Program Files\SolidWorks Enterprise PDM)

      c:\Program Files\SolidWorks Enterprise PDM

      c:\Program Files\SolidWorks Enterprise PDM

    • Rename the files to epdmlib.dll and office.dll.
  4. Start a command prompt using the Run as Administrator option.

    Command Prompt

    Command Prompt

  5. Step into the install folder where the two files were extracted and type the following commands (followed by Enter keystroke):
    • regsvr32 epdmlib.dll
    • regsvr32 office.dll

      Administrator Command Prompt

      Administrator Command Prompt

  6. Start the Office application and the SOLIDWORKS PDM add-in tab should now show up.

    SOLIDWORKS PDM

    SOLIDWORKS PDM

  7. If it does not show, go to File, Options, Add-Ins, Manage COM Add-ins and press Go…

    Enable SOLIDWORKS PDM Add-in

    Enable SOLIDWORKS PDM Add-in

Make sure the SOLIDWORKS PDM integration add-in is listed and enabled. If it is not listed, try starting the Office application using the “run as administrator” option, then use the Add… option in the COM Add-Ins dialog to locate and load the office.dll file.

Microsoft Office Add-in for Word

Select Word SOLIDWORKS PDM Integration

NOTE: If the SOLIDWORKS PDM tab still does not load, try restarting the system.

The post How to manually install the SOLIDWORKS PDM Microsoft Office Add-in appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at July 24, 2020 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Improving Productivity with Simulation

Last week, we wrapped up the simulation webinar series. The webinar topic was on Topology Optimization displaying the technology available on SOLIDWORKS Simulation Desktop as well as showing a collaborative workflow with the cloud-based solutions for subdivision modeling (Sub-D) as well as for design guidance! All in the context of exploring the Additive Manufacturing Space!

Here is a quick recap of the webinar:

We started the discussion around some SOLIDWORKS Evaluation tools such as Interference Detection, Clearance Detection and Print 3D that help fine tune designs before Additively Manufacturing them. Below is a sample screenshot of the Print 3D feature.

 

Next traditional optimization tools such as Shape Optimization techniques were discussed. In this process, a pre-defined shape in the product like a cut out is automatically driven to an optimal shape, light weighting the design. A Holmatro Arm example was used to illustrate this as shown below. Several design dimensions in the pocket highlighted were driven to make the pocket a little wider and deeper and thinner as well!

Next Topology Optimization was introduced to help overcome the challenges of Shape Optimization such as:

1. What if you do not have a pre-defined shape?

2. What if you want to further lightweight the arm?

With Topology Optimization, a block shape is used as a baseline volume of material to work with. You can not only define the physics like loads and boundary conditions but also have goals and restraints (such as best stiffness to weight ratio) plus enforce manufacturing constraints. The result is a shape as shown below on the right side!

This shape can then be further pushed out to the cloud in a collaborative way so the appropriate tools can be used to make the shape smoother. The screenshot below shows the SOLIDWORKS Connector that connects the SOLIDWORKS Desktop to the 3DEXPERIENCE Cloud Platform. Once the SOLIDWORKS file is available on the cloud, any user, anywhere can access it on any device!

In the webinar, we showed a couple of things. One is, a user loading the file from the Cloud on SOLIDWORKS Desktop to show Mesh Modeling tools such as how to create an axis from mesh, how to create a surface from a mesh etc. The second scenario was to open the SOLIDWORKS file in the browser based App called xShape that uses advanced Sub-D modeling techniques to quickly create a more usable, smoother and organic shape as shown below.

This shape can be saved and pushed back into SOLIDWORKS seamlessly to create additional parametric features as well. See screenshot below.

We covered the final part by highlighting xDesign, which is another powerful tool on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. While it offers parametric CAD on any device, the primary focus of the webinar was to showcase the built in design guidance tool which is advanced topology optimization on the cloud.  The screenshot below shows an example of the mounting bracket that was fully setup and solved on the cloud using xDesign!

You can watch this webinar for full details as well as watch the entire simulation series here.

 

Author information

Ramesh Lakshmipathy
Ramesh Lakshmipathy
Senior Territory Technical Manager at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post Improving Productivity with Simulation appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Ramesh Lakshmipathy at July 24, 2020 12:00 PM

July 23, 2020

SolidSmack

Make Your Own See Through Cave Table

cave table

One day after spending too much time on YouTube searching for random videos, furniture maker and former NFL lineman John Malecki stumbled upon a video by Slovenian Woodworker which shared how to create a ‘floating cave table’ using epoxy and acrylic.

Eager to put his own spin on the project, he upped the ante and crafted a larger coffee-table version with cave-like edges around each side of the design. The process is a bit more complex than you might think but no less interested to see how it comes together:

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WUwjq1zZCis?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

 1. Make the Table Top and Bottom

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cave table</figure>

To make the cave table’s top and bottom, Malecki cuts a LOT of wood strips, glues them together to form a solid slab, and cuts them again to form the top and base he needs. He makes two 34-inch ‘cutting boards’ using a similar method for the sides.

2. Craft The Table Edges

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cave table</figure>

In order for the table to resemble a cave, you’ve got to add the appearance of stalagmites and stalactites. Malecki does this by cutting and hand gluing wood strips of varying lengths, spraying each bit edge with some Cyanoacrylate (CA) glue to serve as a clamp as he complete the glue-up of each side. Once the adhesives take hold, he uses clamps and allows them to cure.

3. Glue The Cave Parts And Add Some Flair

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cave table</figure>

Right now, the stalagmites and stalactites look little more than glued slabs of uneven wood. But once Malecki glues these babies onto the edges of the two cutting boards, he starts marking and cutting them into bonafide cave decorations.

After trimming the edges with a Skillsaw, he takes an angle grinder, his ‘power carving tool’, and goes to work shaping the top and bottom of the cave table to look as natural as possible.

Just to make sure the edges are nice and smooth, he sands down the whole thing with a 100-grit sander. Finally, he completes the wood build with some polish and finish.

4. Install In The Acrylic Supports

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cave table</figure>

Up until now, the top portion of the table was held by four makeshift wood legs. To make this cave table look like an actual cave without any visible walls, Malecki bought acrylic sheet which he heavily sands before applying heat to turn the sheets crystal clear. He then installs them in between the top and bottom sections of the table.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cave table</figure>

And there you have it, a cave table with a crystal clear look inside it. Unlike the coffee table it was based on, this is a hefty table with a lot more space on top for books, TV remotes, or just for propping your legs (though I wouldn’t recommend putting your full weight on an acrylic table).

If you like watching videos of furniture being made, John Malecki’s YouTube channel is full of them.

The post Make Your Own See Through Cave Table appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 23, 2020 05:54 PM

Swarm 3D Printing: Deploying Mobile Robot Crew for Autonomous Manufacturing

Arkansas-based AMBOTS is developing a concept called “Swarm 3D Printing”, describing themselves as “an advanced manufacturing company with a focus on swarm 3D printing and assembly” that will bring us “the next manufacturing revolution.”

“This technology aims to automate manufacturing with a swarm of smart and autonomous mobile robots, from everyday products to houses and infrastructures. Just like how a swarm of bees or wasps would work together to build their nests, the swarm of smart mobile robots can work together to print and assemble products based on digital models on demand. AMBOTS stands for Autonomous Mobile roBOTS and Advanced Manufacturing roBOTS.”

Swarm 3D Printing

How does swarm 3D printing work? You will gain understanding by examining their most recent video shared on their Twitter profile, in which they show a prototype system 3D printing a 1000 x 350 mm object:

<figure><iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="" src="https://platform.twitter.com/embed/index.html?dnt=true&amp;embedId=twitter-widget-0&amp;frame=false&amp;hideCard=false&amp;hideThread=false&amp;id=1283793592897679360&amp;lang=en&amp;origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fabbaloo.com%2Fblog%2F2020%2F7%2F19%2Fswarm-3d-printing&amp;theme=light&amp;widgetsVersion=9066bb2%3A1593540614199&amp;width=550px"></iframe></figure>

AMBOTS are a kind of mobile robotic 3D printing using independent 3D printers deplyed to specific locations on a grid. From these locations, the devices print within a controlled zone (which AMBOTS calls a “Chunk”).

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

After completing a layer of a chunk, a mobile robot picks up each 3D printer and moves them to another spot on the grid where they can then print another chunk. By moving the 3D printers repeatedly through a series of access points they are able to build the entire structure — without interfering with each other.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>The “tractor” that moves 3D printers along a defined “printing grid” [Source: AMBOTS]</figcaption></figure>

Beyond the Build Volume

You might not be particularly impressed by the prototype’s ability to 3D print a 1000 x 350 mm object, as there are several 3D printers available today that can produce the same type of object and in fact there are even hobbyists who have built 3D printers with sufficient build volume for that print job.

However, the AMBOTS concept is different, and let me tell you a way to instantly understand it: ask yourself “what is the build volume of the AMBOTS device?”

The answer is, well, as big as it needs to be. Or, as large as the printing grid.

Make sense? It doesn’t HAVE a build volume. It is as large as you want, and as fast as possible by simply adding more robots and 3D printers. Extending the build grid on which the equipment rests should be a very simple matter.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

By scaling up the concept one would achieve a different kind of parallel 3D printing, one in which (potentially) a single large object could be built (as opposed to many separate objects). That’s a unique capability in the world of 3D printing, as up to now only single devices could 3D print large objects.

There have been attempts at larger-scale robotic 3D printing in which the robot is relocated periodically to build new “chunks” by others, but in those cases there wasn’t the systematic grid system as used by AMBOTS.

Should they be successful in the swarm concept, it could lead to some very unusual developments. Remember that the 3D printers being used in the prototype could easily be replaced by 3D printers with different material capabilities. For example, continuous carbon fiber could be part of the future. If that’s the case, then one could see giant carbon fiber girders being produced, and they’ve be of optimal weight due to generative design techniques. This could lead to a revolution in the construction industry, for example.

Another possibility for the future here is to add a third dimension to the printing grid. Not only would the printers be moved horizontally, but they could also be moved vertically. This could be as simple as cranking up the printing grid step-by-step to higher level, or a more complex scheme in which machines are moved to irregular levels depending on the model geometry.

With such a capability one could envision entire buildings being produced — and they’d be utterly different from the concrete construction 3D printers of today that are severely limited by the slumpy qualities of wet concrete. Overhangs would easily be possible, for example.

I think AMBOTS is on to something here.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Swarm 3D Printing: Deploying Mobile Robot Crew for Autonomous Manufacturing appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at July 23, 2020 05:15 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to use Thermal Radiation in SOLIDWORKS Simulation

Thermal radiation is the emission of thermal energy from bodies due to their temperature. This energy is transferred as electromagnetic waves and is emitted by all bodies that have a temperature above absolute zero. Radiation is very significant at high temperatures as the amount of radiated power is proportional to the fourth power of the absolute temperature of bodies.

In SOLIDWORKS Simulation, radiation is defined by an emissivity of the surface and the ambient temperature of the surrounding environment.

In the below example, the bulb of the light assembly is made of glass and due to its temperature it radiates power to the surrounding bodies. A new simulation study is created and “thermal” simulation is selected from the type of analysis.

Bulb Radiating Due to Its Temperature

Bulb Radiating Due to Its Temperature

The radiation condition can be accessed from the “Thermal loads” menu.

Radiation Condition from Thermal Loads Menu

Radiation Condition from Thermal Loads Menu

Radiation command manager, the “surface to surface” or “surface to ambient” type of radiation can be selected. The “surface to surface” radiates the energy from one surface to other surfaces in the model. In the “surface to ambient” radiation usually there are no surfaces near the radiating surface. (as an example, the case of sun radiating at a car can be mentioned)

The “open system” option, accounts for the fact that some heat can be radiated directly to space rather than other surfaces in the model. This option needs to be unchecked for fully closed systems where all the radiated energy is transferred to the surfaces of the model.

In the next boxes the temperature of the radiating body and its emissivity needs to be entered.

Radiation Property Manager

Radiation Property Manager

The post How to use Thermal Radiation in SOLIDWORKS Simulation appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at July 23, 2020 12:00 PM

July 22, 2020

SolidSmack

RadioGlobe: Spin and Search Over 2000 Radio Stations [Open-Source DIY]

Your radio with its little knobs and its local area frequency range is so first-half of 2020. You need a radio that captures all the hopes and dreams of THE FUTURE… and over 2000 radio stations from AROUND THE ENTIRE WORLD.

In what we would list at the top of ‘projects of the year’, Jude Pullen has extracted the rich pulp of his ingenuity to create the RadioGlobe, a desktop globe that summons the power of internet radio to play a station in the targeted area.

It’s a build that combines 3D printing, PCB and Electronics, Mechanical Assembly, Wiring and Programming to bring a little more interest, a little more context, and perhaps a bit of a geography lesson for those who use it.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

The project is a massive 74-step Instructable (the most detailed I’ve ever seen) that takes you through every aspect. Jude has included all the project details to build your own RadioGlobe, divulging all the parts, diagrams, code, making it completely open-source for others to adapt and improve upon (one person has already planned to build the desired Shazam button).

The project is also part of the Instructables Maps Challenge, one of 114, that is (in our opinion) the absolute best. He’s looking for feedback on the project, so go on over, favorite it, and vote and comment to let him know what you think!

And if you want even more, Jude has posted the complete ‘making of’ over at DesignSpark in celebration of awesome things… oh, and their 10th birthday. He has provided all the details behind the project from concept to wiring and more. Here’s a quick introduction:

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</figure>

The post RadioGlobe: Spin and Search Over 2000 Radio Stations [Open-Source DIY] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 22, 2020 08:10 PM

This Triangular Pillow Is Designed for Ultimate Comfort

trangel pillow

When you think of pillows, the first thing that comes to mind is lying down for a good snooze. A massive pillow fight is likely a close second. Pillow design, however, isn’t something that even seen necessary – stuffing, foam, or feathers sewn up in a sack, right? Yet, this pillow is design with ultimate comfort in mind for sleeping or even sitting.

At first glance, it may seem odd that the Trangel pillow caters to the less popular idea of using a pillow as a sitting aid. I mean, it’s just a pillow shaped like a right triangle. But upon closer inspection, you can see just how useful this design choice is.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-4-3 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6Kq767Skqpw?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Created by Norwegian product designer Vanessa Glemby who based it on traditional Scandanavian aesthetics, the Trangel came about as a way for her to cope with her pregnancy. Since she couldn’t find a pillow which supported her back in a number of weird sitting positions, she decided to make her own.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">trangel pillow</figure>

The end result is a sitting pillow made especially for pregnant women. And while it definitely helps mothers with breastfeeding and sitting down with a round belly, it can definitely be used by non-pregnant folk who just like to sit while doing their everyday activities like working on their laptop or reading a book.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">trangel pillow</figure>

The main material is polyurethane foam which, apart from being soft and comfy, keeps its shape over time. This is especially useful for back pillows as it can be used over and over whilst still providing the proper back support you need.

This foam is covered in an inner and outer cover, both of which are soft, triangularly-shaped, and most importantly, easily washable. When fully covered, the Trangel measures 50cm wide, 40cm high, 27 cm long, and has a weight of 1.5kg.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">trangel pillow</figure>

Prior to making the Trangel public, Vanessa, her family, and her friends were the first testers of this triangular pillow. Once they saw how useful it was, demand skyrocketed and soon people she did not know started to ask if they could buy a Trangel for themselves.

Now the Trangel is live on Kickstarter and is looking for folks who need proper lumbar support to fund it with a meager $7158 goal, but this could change over the course of the campaign. If you like sitting on your back while doing your work, be sure to check it out!

The post This Triangular Pillow Is Designed for Ultimate Comfort appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 22, 2020 05:54 PM

The Javelin Blog

Participate in the annual 3D Post-printing Survey by PostProcess

PostProcess is the only data-driven solution for 3D post-printing. In 2019, PostProcess Technologies conducted the first-ever Additive Manufacturing Post-Printing survey.

It’s time for the annual additive post-printing trends survey

Join the only 3D printing industry survey addressing trends and insights for the third step of additive manufacturing, post-printing. The annual report provides an in-depth look at the industry’s most reported challenges, what methods are most commonly used and how post-printing fits into the 3D printing process. It covers many industries, 3D printing technologies and applications. The results from the survey will be summarized and published in an annual report at the beginning of September.

Be a part of this year’s survey to contribute to the report. Take the annual post-printing survey. 

About PostProcess Technologies

A comprehensive system of software, hardware and additive formulated chemistry work together to remove the bottleneck in the post-printing step of additive manufacturing.

Below are examples of parts that were cleaned using a PostProcess system. Automating the post-printing process allows users to save time and money in labour intensive tasks.

FDM 3D printed chain before and after post processing Polyjet part post process results

To learn more about the survey, check out the Annual Additive Post-Printing Survey: Trends Report 2019

The post Participate in the annual 3D Post-printing Survey by PostProcess appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Kelly Clancy at July 22, 2020 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

DraftSight Connected to the Cloud

DraftSight Beta, a powerful and intuitive way to create, edit, and view DWG files, was launched in June 2010. Nine months and over 400,000 downloads later, the product moved to general availability in February 2011.

Today DraftSight has been downloaded millions of times and customers continue to switch to DraftSight from legacy CAD packages. One of the reasons for DraftSight’s popularity is its commitment to its community and improving the product based on user feedback. However, there has not been a complete end-to-end option for collaboration and data management for DraftSight customers until now.

The 3DEXPERIENCE® Collaborative Designer for DraftSight role will connect DraftSight CAD software data to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, which provides always-on, secure access from any location—home, work, or on the road.

Built-in Platform Capabilities

Through customer research, DraftSight discovered that users want more project management tools, collaborative drawing reviews, and live product status updates, among other things.

Has this ever happened to you? “Which version is the good version? MasterGoodGoodFinal or FinalMasterGood?”

 

The 3DEXPERIENCE platform addresses many of these needs, and more. For one, the platform allows you to store all your drawings in a centralized, secure location from any device without any installation. Users simply log in to their account with a unique 3DEXPERIENCE ID.

The platform enables you to manage the lifecycle of DWG and DXF files, simulation models, and documentation across disciplines and CAD applications.

Project/task management apps help you to easily track issues, changes, and routes (workflows), including the ability to provide real-time updates to your team. Key team members can preview drawings using zoom, pan, and mark up functions with instinctive multi-touch gestures all directly accessed from within your web browser—even non-CAD users can participate in the review process.

Collaborative Tasks provide everything you and your team need to organize projects of any size. Open a task to add comments, upload file attachments, add labels, due dates, and more.

 

Community Matters

With the new capabilities offered on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, DraftSight users can always be confident that clients and colleagues get the right drawing (not an obsolete version). Also, it is easy to reuse libraries of drawings and block resources. The platform simplifies your work because all the tools you need are within the system.

Create the communities that matter to you

 

 DraftSight continues to rely on its valued community of users to continue its legacy of solving customer problems. We are very excited about connecting with the 3DEXPERIENCE platform as it fulfills many of our users’ enhancement requests—and more. Bobst, a DraftSight customer, recently stated: Dassault Systèmes has invested in development in light of these trends in order to provide value to our customers.

We are proud to announce the 3DEXPERIENCE for DraftSight role to meet our enterprise customer’s needs.

Leave a comment, or connect with our team by visiting the DraftSight web page to learn more.

 

 

Author information

Eli Mather
Eli Mather
Eli is DraftSight Online Strategy & Business Development Senior Manager at SOLIDWORKS. He has many years of experience in management across manufacturing and online communities. He enjoys being outdoors with family and friends and sharing ideas and creations including his cooperatively produced wine.

The post DraftSight Connected to the Cloud appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Eli Mather at July 22, 2020 12:00 PM

July 21, 2020

SolidSmack

Cool Tools: ANYCUBIC Photon S 3D Printer [Best sub-$500 UV Light Printer]

anycubic-resin-dlp-3d-printer-00

Since it became relatively accessible in the halcyon days of 2009-2017, give or take, 3D printing has been lauded as revolutionary tech – and for a good reason. Even excluding specialized machines that might solve homelessness from the equation, you’ve still got a hefty bit of creative power within reach.

When it’s not geared towards sustainable development goals, 3D printing finds use at home. For everything from manifesting a child’s wildest imagination to creating prototypes for further technological innovations.

Noble goals accounted for, exactly how much does it cost to give shape to something as abstract as ~dreams~?

Well, according to ANYCUBIC, all you need is some technical know-how and a spare $351. Considering that a quality FDM 3D printer can reach beyond $1000, a sub-$500 UV light printer is, honestly, a steal.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-full"></figure>

ANYCUBIC Photon S 3D Printer – $351

The successor to an already popular product, this printer’s primary competition is its previous self.

Among the most noticeable changes is that it now has a– fairly divisive– sleek, plastic body that’s more compact. Much like getting bangs after a breakup, you might like this purely aesthetic change. Or you might have friends who’ll look at you sadly. Then, as in now, we’d like to argue that looks aren’t as important as what’s inside.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-full"></figure>

And inside is a Z-axis reinforced with dual linear rails, one with a smooth rod and the other threaded. Thus, allowing you greater stability when it comes to printing tall objects with fine details. 

The Photon S, like the preceding Photon, is an LCD resin printer. This means it uses LED lights to shape each layer. The corresponding UV then cures your resin and solidifies the layer. Your main takeaway here is that this process allows for faster printing speeds, with the Photon S clocking at 20mm/h, double that of the original Photon.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-full"></figure>

ANYCUBIC Photon S 3D Printer – Features:

  • Equipped with matrix UV lighting and a screen resolution of 2560×1440 for greater print quality
  • Reduces odor with activated carbon air filtration and dual fans
  • Comes with a USB drive for off-line printing
  • With a responsive touch screen display and sanded aluminum platform
  • Boasts an active online support system with 7,000 members, including easy access to the manufacturer

Have a cool tool you love and think should be featured? Contact us here to share it with us.

This post features affiliate links that help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

The post Cool Tools: ANYCUBIC Photon S 3D Printer [Best sub-$500 UV Light Printer] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 21, 2020 06:41 PM

Take A Look Inside The Making of The Jeep Gladiator

jeep gladiator

When it comes to offroad vehicles, few manufacturers have the staying power and impact as the original Jeep. So when something new comes out of their factories, like say their 2020 midsize Gladiator pickup truck, people tend to jump at the chance to drive one – we’re anxious to do so here. So, when Jeep released a video showing how these dirt-kickers are produced, gotta admit, we were a bit excited.

Jeep Gladiator Assembly Line

Built in the south plant of the Toledo Assembly Complex which has been making Jeeps since the 1940s, the 2020 Gladiator is the company’s first pickup truck since the ultra-hip Comanche was discontinued in 1992. In fact, if you’re a Jeep fan, you may have had a double take when a Gladiator drove by thinking it was a new Comanche. Here’s the video. Tell us what you first notice about it.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dED2C2HA6sg?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Ahhhh, the sound of the factory floor. Notice anything interesting? It details every step of the process to create this magnificent vehicle. From the fitting of the chassis to the installation of the electronics and engine, you can see how man and machine each play an integral part in the assembly.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">jeep gladiator</figure>

Even if you’re someone who doesn’t know much about cars, you can still appreciate the slew of mechanical arms working in unison to install, fit, and paint the Gladiator. When the machines have done their part, and some… more gentle attention is needed, humans step in to lend a hand, often with the aid of a robot counterpart.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">jeep gladiator</figure>

What truly stands out, especially if you compare this assembly line to assembly lines of yester-year is the amount of work that is done by robots. Yet, while much of the work is done by robots, humans are there for the finer installations of inner panels, quality checks, and checks of the suspension and engine. A lot of it may be done on a computer but there is always someone physically present at each step of the process.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">jeep gladiator</figure>

Once the inner workings are all checked and running, the frame is installed, the seats set in, and a new set of wheels fitted before it is driven out into the wild.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">jeep gladiator</figure>

Production of the 2020 Jeep Gladiator began in Q1 of 2019 with the current year model available for configuration on the jeep.com website. Is it your favorite Jeep to date? I’ve gotta admit, the build video makes me like it even more.

The post Take A Look Inside The Making of The Jeep Gladiator appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 21, 2020 03:02 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip – How a CG Artist Uses Visualize and Photoshop

This week’s Visualize Quick Tip is a special one! It’s a longer video showing a full end-to-end workflow using Visualize and Photoshop – just as a typical CGI artist uses to composite that beautiful marketing image. Watch as power-user Carlos Mendez shows us how he uses Visualize in his regular workflow, including the use of handy Render Passes for final compositing and adjusting! We’ll learn how he sets up his final renders with output settings and then uses Photoshop to combine the outputs to create a stunning final image.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BKuJbk7O8-k" width="560"></iframe>
Check out this YouTube playlist more helpful Visualize videos!

USE THE VISUALIZE FORUM to connect with the global Visualize Community for self-help support with common questions. Don’t forget to share your Visualize images and animations on this Forum thread!

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip – How a CG Artist Uses Visualize and Photoshop appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at July 21, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Using SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation to design a safe face shield

Javelin Technologies is partnering with Canadian hospitals to collaborate, develop, manufacture, and rapidly deploy personal protective equipment to front-line workers across Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic. Safety is the highest priority. We are focused on making sure the face shields are sterilizable, reusable, and compliant with regulatory requirements. SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation is the first step.

There are many ways to design a face shield, but how do we know with confidence, which is the safest model? Let’s take a look at how visually simulating flow characteristics using SOLIDWORKS Flow, can help us make effective design choices when working on a face shield for front-line healthcare workers.

Using SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation to design a safe face shield

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JNmHM9JKeoQ?feature=oembed" title="Using SOLIDWORKS Flow to design a safe face shield" width="500"></iframe>

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation – not just for medical

In this demonstration, the target audience is front-line medical workers in the healthcare industry. However, SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation can be used in a variety of applications across different industries.

Product engineers and CFD experts alike, armed with the power of SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation, can predict flow fields, mixing processes, and heat transfer, and directly determine pressure drop, comfort parameters, fluid forces, and fluid structure interaction during design.

Flow Simulation Applications

HVAC Applications Module

The HVAC Applications Module extends the functionality of SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation software to provide industry specific tools and methodologies that deliver unrivaled ease of use, power, and productivity for modeling complex heating, ventilation, and cooling systems.

Electronic Cooling Module 

The Electronic Cooling Module for SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation evaluates thermal properties and cooling requirements for standard components. The module includes both analysis productivity capability and enhanced simulation functionality, giving designers and engineers a great toolset to tackle the tough challenges of electronic packaging.

Benefits of SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation

Study and compare designs

Utilize section or surface plots to study the distribution of resultant values, including; velocity, pressure, vorticity, temperature, and mass fraction. Compare the Fluid Flow results for various configurations with the Compare Mode.

Optimize your design 

Instantly determine how a design will react to fluid flow and simulate how gas, heat, air, and steam will move through pipes and nozzles. For engines and motors, the software reveals how fluids will react internally and externally. Based on these tests—along with pressure and thermal simulations—you’ll be able to optimize your designs for the flow of any fluid.

Shorten time-to-market

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation software takes the complexity out of flow analysis and enables engineers to easily simulate fluid flow, heat transfer, and fluid forces so engineers can investigate the impact of a liquid or gas flow on product performance.

Interested in what SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation can do?

Contact us for a complimentary demonstration with a certified SOLIDWORKS expert.

The post Using SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation to design a safe face shield appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Erin Elliott at July 21, 2020 02:48 PM

How to dimension a spline in SOLIDWORKS

What if in SOLIDWORKS you need to model a wire, tube, or other path that has a predetermined length but you’re not sure exactly what shape it will take?  A spline might be the way to go, in preparation for a sweep, but did you know that you can dimension a spline’s length?  You can, and it’s just as easy as dropping a Smart Dimension onto the spline just as you would with a line.  This trick went unknown to me for years, until needing to apply it in the middle of an exam.  Then it was a matter of trying it out to see if it would work.

Just drop a Smart Dimension on the spline and set the length

Just drop a Smart Dimension on the spline and set the length

Need to change the length?  Go right ahead and edit the dimension value:

Edit the dimension, and the spline changes length

Edit the dimension, and the spline changes length

For tube or wire, try setting the start and end location, direction, and tangency, and then removing all other spline points.  With the length set, it’s one way to fully define the spline.  A style spline is another way.

Spline defined

Spline fully defined

The post How to dimension a spline in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWE at July 21, 2020 11:36 AM

July 20, 2020

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: 3D Printed Clock [Escapements, Unite!]

Ya know, a lot of people are impressed by a 70″ flat screen as the centerpiece of the living room. But what if that massive monitor was instead a massive 3D printed clock? Yes, endless hours of entertainment AND so much better as a focal point for your home.

Now, this week’s ‘model of the week’ isn’t exactly the size of a flat-screen TV but I have no doubt you could make one as large, chuck that TV, and have your clock playing 24-7. Created by Jacques Favre, ‘The First Clock’ is a remake of his very first 3D printed clock designed two years ago.

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</figure>

My first fascination with mechanisms was an old cuckoo clock and this 3D printed clock is no less fascinating. With only 21 parts, it shows the mechanical function of a clock and includes parts that are interchangeable with his other designs.

This one features a recoil escapement to add some variety. Many parts are compatible with the Clock One and can be combined. Use the rewind ratchet or the face with seconds, even the graham escapement can be combined with this clock. Eventually, I will add the grasshopper escapement too!

I imagine this clock printed in different colors to highlight the inner workings and, yes, printed 4x as large.

Jacques modeled the pieces using Fusion 360 and provides STL formats for all the 3D model files. He is continuously updating and improving the design, keeping a video journal of everything on his YouTube channel.

Once you see the thought put into this and how simple the print is, I’m sure you’ll be hooked on creating a 3D printed clock as well. You can download the model files at MyMiniFactory. [Bonus! Check out Clock One, his original 3D printed clock design!]

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

The post Model of the Week: 3D Printed Clock [Escapements, Unite!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 20, 2020 07:35 PM

Colony Cleanup Is A Trail Bag Designed For Storing and Dumping Trash

Colony Cleanup

If you like to go on leisurely hikes outdoors, chances are you’ve brought along some snacks for the trip. And while that’s by no means a bad thing, it always becomes a problem when you’ve finished said snacks and have no place to throw your trash.

Some good Samaritans keep their trash in their bags and dispose of it properly. Others simply dump their garbage on the nature trail without a second thought.

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</figure>

The Colony Cleanup bag was created to make cleaning up after yourself easier. Unlike plastic grocery bags often reused to hold trash, this nylon pack was made especially for packing, storing, and eventually disposing of your waste.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Colony Cleanup</figure>

It starts at the top, where a magnetic opening allows you to pack in a biodegradable liner bag so your trash doesn’t make contact with the Colony Cleanup bag itself.

Once the liner is added, the magnetic opening allows you to store your trash without too much effort; all you need to do is snap it open, dump your waste, and let the opening snap close. You can even store multiple liner bags inside the Colony Cleanup to make sorting easier.

Elastic straps and bands located on the top and bottom of the bag allow you to expand the Colony Cleanup, in case you have more trash than intended or stumble upon someone else’s litter on the trail.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Colony Cleanup</figure>

The bag’s true distinguishing feature unveils itself once you’ve reached a proper disposal bin. After placing the bag over a bin, you can unzip the Colony Cleanup’s bottom zipper to dispose of all the stored trash, liner bag and all, without having to touch any of it.

The bottom zipper not only prevents you from touching the trash, but helps you avoid smelling it as well. It’s a simple design that gets the job done.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Colony Cleanup</figure>

Apart from being a reusable bag that holds trash liners, the Colony Cleanup also has a lined front pocket which allows you to hold small belongings like your wallet or smartphone (backup liner bags are stored in a built-in dispenser). When not in use, the bag is folded down to the size of a small purse that hangs on your shoulder or stays in your backpack.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

It took around a year to conceptualize, design, and create the final prototype for the Colony Cleanup. The project is currently live on Kickstarter and has met its $22,001 goal, with an expected delivery date of November 2020. If you love hiking like us and want to see greener trails, be sure to check it out!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Colony Cleanup Is A Trail Bag Designed For Storing and Dumping Trash appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 20, 2020 06:36 PM

Ground-Penetrating Radar Used to 3D Map Entire Roman City, Falerii Novi

Let’s talk about history for a bit.

Just last June, archeologists from Cambridge and Ghent produced a revolutionary bit of research for the journal, Antiquity. In it, they described some problems and placed them against the immense possibilities that might come from the use of ground-penetrating radar surveys (GRS) on archeological sites.

Here’s where it gets revolutionary. They were also able to map out a large chunk of the buried Roman city of Falerii Novi without any digging. 

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

GRS vs. Excavations

Instead, they had a quad bike and wheeled around their GRS equipment to survey the city. Like a bat, GRS uses radio signals and sends them underground. The echoes that come back let archeologists determine depth and anomalies, which they then analyze and illustrate into a map.

If you’ve seen any media that follows an archeologist (sure, Raider counts), you’ll know that digging is an essential part of the work description. And, usually, the primary source of archeological information. 

The problem with traditional modes of excavation is that they’re time-consuming and costly. That doesn’t even factor in that they’re intrusive. Meaning that if you’re not careful, you might destroy and weather artifacts as you find them. 

On the other hand, while GRS isn’t cheap, it’s certainly non-intrusive and significantly more efficient. In 1829, previous excavations of Farelii Novi showed a theatre housing statues of Augustus, the first Roman emperor, and his family.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

Monumental Discovery of Monument, Baths, Etc.

But with GRS? 

Archeologists were able to find bath structures and other public buildings like temples and markets. Evidently, there are water pipes that run beneath the city blocks that provide strong evidence for previous, thoughtful urban planning. Plus, a possibly-religious covered pathway that led to a 200-foot long monument.

To put this technology into perspective, Pompeii, one of the most investigated sites, began excavation in 1748. The site and the city itself spread throughout 66 hectares. Today, they’ve excavated about 49 of those hectares. 

In contrast, large-scale GRS work started in Farelii Novi, a city of 30.5 hectares, in 2015. It takes more than 20 hours to survey each hectare. Researchers involved in this project expect to finish surveying the entire area as early as 2021.

Of course, it doesn’t offer a complete picture of the city. Notably, shop units that appear in a different data collection set don’t show up in the GRS results. But considering the scale of data they were able to gather in such a short amount of time? It’s truly ground-breaking work, ironic pun very much intended.

The post Ground-Penetrating Radar Used to 3D Map Entire Roman City, Falerii Novi appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 20, 2020 06:22 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Turning Your Passion into Your Job [podcast]

3Daeroventures - Born to Design Podcast ep 29

“The secret of getting ahead is getting started.”

– Mark Twain

In this episode of the Born to Design Podcast, I had a chance to sit down and speak with Eric Haddad.  If you do not know Eric yet (there are several SOLIDWORKS blog articles about Eric), let me introduce you:  Eric took his hobby of designing and building R/C aircraft and started his own YouTube page, which now has hundreds of thousands of views.

Eric is someone who can say that he took the plunge into his hobby and made it a success, turning need to touch the sky into a new business.  It has been a fascinating journey (or flight), which he shares in this interview.  I think we are all interested in the “what if” scenario in which we take that one great idea and take off with it (sorry, I cannot stop the airplane puns).

Listen to my full interview with Eric in the latest Born to Design Podcast:

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Be sure to check out all of the Born to Design podcasts, and subscribe below so you will never miss an episode:

Soundcloud  Subscribe to Solidworks Podcast on Spotify iTunes Stitcher Listen on Google Play Music TuneIn - Solidworks Podcast Page Subscribe to Solidworks Podcast on CastBox  Subscribe to Solidworks Podcast on Overcast

 

Here is one of Eric’s many videos for 3DAeroventures:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6WEmHC24Q_I" width="560"></iframe>

To learn more about Eric Haddad, 3Daeroventures and more, check out these links:

Author information

Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling is a Senior Marketing Manager at SolidWorks and the host for the Born to Design Podcast.

The post Turning Your Passion into Your Job [podcast] appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Cliff Medling at July 20, 2020 12:31 PM

The Javelin Blog

What is the best method to open a SOLIDWORKS model in Revit?

SOLIDWORKS models can be quickly opened up in Autodesk Revit. Here are the steps to do so:

Step 1 – Export from SOLIDWORKS:

Open the 3d model in SolidWorks. Now save the model as either IFC 4 (.*ifc) or IFC 2×3 (.*ifc) through File > Save as > select the type as one of the IFC file types (.*ifc).

You can use save as type as IFC 4 or IFC (2X3).  IFC (2X3) works for older versions of Revit and IFC 4 works for newer versions of REVIT. If one doesn’t work try another one.

Step 2 – Select Export options for IFC file types:

Click on Options > this launches the system options dialog box and select the various output options to export the IFC file with custom properties that include the IFC metadata along with other properties.

Export IFC file from SOLIDWORKS

Export IFC file from SOLIDWORKS

Step 3 – To open the file in Revit:

Go to File > Open > Click on IFC option > browse and open the file and you should see the 3d model will open in REVIT, as shown in image below.

Open IFC file in REVIT

Open IFC file in REVIT

The post What is the best method to open a SOLIDWORKS model in Revit? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at July 20, 2020 12:00 PM

July 18, 2020

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Shimmy Gripples

Drenched from the light of an ice-coated moon, the grass of the thousand field marsh split each side of a sliver wind. A top it rode Shimmy Gripples, eyes blazing, hand of ice and the other of fire gripping the reins of these links.

Tomàs Barceló – A sculptor since he was a child, Tomàs creates busts and more with a sci-fi/fantasy twist that

The Far Side Returns – Gary Larson, yes, the creator of The Far Side strip, is back… Well, not back, he’s doing ‘new stuff’ – DIGITAL stuff. And it’s amazing.

Jeep Gladiator – Assembled by FCA since the beginning of 2019, this shows the assembly line process of the newest Jeep, the Jeep Gladiator.

2020 Audubon – The winners of the 2020 Audubon Photography Awards. And video of winner, Joanna Lentini, discussing her winning shot and gear.

LEGO Millennium Falcon – I was just saying, stop motion LEGO builds would be really cool to do. This is Lego my Legos doing just that for the fastest Star Wars ship.

LEGO Nintendo – And while we’re on the topic, the LEGO Nintendo with Super Mario on the TV is available on August 1st.

Apollo 16 60 FPS – The original footage of the Apollo 16 mission’s moon exploration interpolated to 60 FPS and colorized, plus synced with audio.

Scoring the Mandalorian – Composer Ludwig Göransson performs the theme from the Mandalorian on a number of instruments.

BFFs – Bill and Ted. Ren and Stimpy. Calvin and Hobbs. Illustrations from Dave Perillo and Tom Whalen of pivotal besties from the 1980s/90s and beyond.

Kamp-Rite Double Cot/Tent – It’s a tent and a cot. For those who like to sleep out doors but not on the rocky ground.

<script type="text/javascript"> amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "solid0a-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Deals We Love"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "53d052b8e6c696fa432be02a83ecd373"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B0761W736Z,B0776JH663,B071JL6LLL,B07RY6NSL8"; </script> <script src="http://z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>

Under Pressure – Marc Martel and Ultimate Queen Celebration do a work-from-home cover of Queen’s classic.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/V-_Y5sCaLpE?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Friday Smackdown: Shimmy Gripples appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 18, 2020 12:28 AM

July 17, 2020

SolidSmack

Are You a Professional Thinking of Vanlife? Caution!

Right now, an NYT article on the #vanlife business boom is trending on LinkedIn. It looks like a lot of professionals are dumping cash into glamping vans with so many of us barred from offices during these lockdown times. You’re geographically free! Might as well travel the country and live in a van, right?

Hold on there, partner. Before you dump $100k into a lifestyle the late Chris Farley famously mocked, please hear out some cautions. Why listen to warnings from me, though? Because I bought a van for vanlife — or at least to turn into a mobile office — before all the other engineers thought it was cool. Her name is Beverly.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Inside Beverly The Van before I began to rip her to pieces.<figcaption>Inside Beverly The Van before I began to rip her to pieces.</figcaption></figure>

Building out a vanlife van is a daunting task to begin with. However, there are additional caveats you should consider. Counterintuitively, the unpredictability that COVID-19 reactions brought makes this lifestyle more difficult than usual. You can watch the video here to learn about these main points:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tT4U7d4HXwU?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Why I Made the Leap (Or Tried To)

I have a legal residence, but for most intents and purposes, I am homeless. In 2015, I stuffed what belongings I couldn’t sell into a storage locker and took off. From then until the Fall of 2019, I backpacked the world. This wasn’t for fun so much as for necessity. I quickly realized physical, in-person networking was an absolute requirement for building my engineering business. Also, a lot of the cool tech things I got to cover for Solid Smack came from people and places I traveled to meet.

After a while, having to toss out things I needed because they didn’t fit in my backpack took its toll. Not being able to bring key textbooks with me was another bummer. I also started to accumulate prototype samples from clients and those can’t be canned! Real estate for my personal belongings was shrinking.

Additionally, I wanted more time to work. I’d been shoe-stringing my business and travel expenses by house sitting everywhere I went. This put the squeeze on both my schedule and my sanity. Having to be back to your accommodations by exactly 5:15 pm to make sure a pit bull doesn’t pee on the carpet, or up every morning at 5:30 AM to feed a rabid, wall-climbing cat are tough to be cool with after a while. In September, when I got knocked in the face by a Great Dane and lost a tooth, I was done.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">This horse-sized puppy would get so excited to see me! Too excited.<figcaption>This horse-sized puppy would get so excited to see me! Too excited.</figcaption></figure>

Having to come up with thousands of dollars to repair my chompers revealed to me housesitting wasn’t even economical anymore.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Bought my dentist another house last year. Worth it. Thanks, Drs. Mesh!<figcaption>Bought my dentist another house last year. Worth it. Thanks, Drs. Mesh!</figcaption></figure>

I would buy a van and travel everywhere in that instead! It was a great idea. All year, I’d been learning about van builds and #vanlife on YouTube out of sheer curiosity. Now, it seemed like a prudent life path.

Hidden Expenses

As is always the case in all physical product development, there were “gotcha” costs and time delays with this project, too.

Vehicle Costs

For several weeks, I scoured the interwebs for the perfect van. I wanted to be able to stand inside, so I searched for a high-top, aka “turtle top”. I also wanted one with extended length; it would be my office, after all, and I needed room to work. This narrowed the pool down quite a bit, but eventually, I found Beverly, a slightly beaten-up extended 2006 Ford E-350 with a high-top in Ohio. The dealer and I settled on $2,900, which was a bit beyond my original budget.

Insuring Your Monster Wagon

Insurance was another issue. If I registered the vehicle in New York City, my legal personal residence, insurance quotes came back between $1,300 to over $3,000 per year. This was in part because I haven’t owned a car in many years. If I registered it under my business name in Tennessee, it wasn’t much better. These costs would render the whole vanlife idea infeasible, so in desperation, I reached out to a group on Facebook for women doing the vanlife thing solo. One suggested I look into registering in Vermont as she’d heard insurance was much cheaper there, and Vermont doesn’t care if your address is out-of-state. Turned out she was right! Currently, I pay about $115 every 6 months for insurance.

If you’re like me and have been getting by with public transportation in big cities for the past several years, this one might surprise you, too! Make sure to shop around between both insurance companies and geographic regions where you’re legally able to register your vehicle.

Nickle-and-Dime Repairs

The biggest obstacle to registering the vehicle in Vermont would be the tougher rust inspection regulations. That’s why, on my way to that state, I had to stop in New York to touch up some gaping rust holes in the body. Luckily, a gearhead friend of mine in Rochester, NY “knew a guy” and S & T Finishing Touch performed this magic trick, below.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Some of the only repair work I outsourced was to S & T Finishing Touch who made these gaping rust eyesores disappear.<figcaption>Some of the only repair work I outsourced was to S & T Finishing Touch who made these gaping rust eyesores disappear.</figcaption></figure>

There were some other minor things that needed repair or upgrades that I was able to do myself. Even though they were small issues, they did start to rack up. Old windshield wipers, several shorted switches, a boat battery with inadequate Cold Cranking Amps (CCA) and missing rubber around multiple doors were on the list. For some of those, I was able to go wild at a junkyard and cannibalize a few of Beverly’s departed relatives.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">I might have gone a little ham pulling van parts at the junkyard.<figcaption>I might have gone a little ham pulling van parts at Sparta, I mean, the junkyard.</figcaption></figure>

The Build

Everything I covered so far hasn’t even touched the tricky parts of living and working out of a van. Also, if you’re like me and need to work on a laptop or computer and beat the living daylights out of its processor for long periods of time, you have even more points to consider over a typical vanlifer. My work uses 3D rendering and raytracing to do optical simulation and design, and also video editing. If you’re reading Solid Smack, chances are high you’re doing some 3D modelling which similarly takes some computer muscle power.

Power and The Internets

If you’re an engineer or designer and intend to work from the road, 2 of the top things you might be concerned about are: 1. powering your pc, and 2. connectivity.

Planning a Solar Power System

To keep my electronics juiced, I was originally thinking of building a custom solar system. I wanted the battery to hold enough power to last my specific devices several days off-grid. I also wanted to maximize the available surface area of Beverly’s strange roof shape.

In the end, when other hiccups squeezed my time and monetary budget for solar, I opted for 3 flexible solar panels of 100 W each and a solar power station. The power station included both the battery and inverter. These components just needed simple wiring to connect it all up, so the brainpower expended was minimal here.

The number of Watts you get for solar panels tells you how fast you can get solar energy. In my case, that would be 300 Watts total. I would have liked more, but I was going with the minimum to get on the road.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">This was the flexible solar panel I ended up buying 3 of, and ultimately returning -- through no fault of Rich Solar.<figcaption>This was the flexible solar panel I ended up buying 3 of, and ultimately returning — through no fault of Rich Solar.</figcaption></figure>

One thing you have to consider in choosing solar panel wattage is how sunny it will be where you intend to go. Also keep in mind how many hours of daylight you can expect during the time of year you go. I expected to spend most of the winter in Nevada, Arizona and California, so I figured I could squeeze by OK with the 300 W.

The battery Watt-hours tells you how much power you have to run your devices if you fill it up; it’s the size of your “tank”. Then, the inverter gets you from DC to AC. For that part, you need to make sure your devices won’t suck a higher surge power than the inverter can put out. Pro tip: if you want to bring any device that gets hot or cold, those are at higher risk of breaking your system because they suck a lot of power. Be sure to check that your inverter or AC output power can handle your specific electronics!

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">This Bluetti solar generator is the one I purchased, and also ultimately returned through no fault of MAXOAK.<figcaption>This Bluetti solar generator is the one I purchased, and also ultimately returned through no fault of MAXOAK.</figcaption></figure>

If you’d like to learn more about building your own, I highly recommend you check out the YouTube Channel DIY Solar Power with Will Prowse.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Check out Will Prowse's YouTube channel for excellent DIY solar tips and instruction.<figcaption>Check out Will Prowse’s YouTube channel for excellent DIY solar tips and instruction.</figcaption></figure>

Prowse does experiments to compare different brands of products. Additionally, he offers tutorials on how to design your own solar solutions. His reviews are also what led me to choose the above solar generator and solar panels.

Back-up Plan

I didn’t have any bright ideas for getting extra data on the road. Instead, I figured, when I was in a pinch, I could stop by any local coffee shop offering free wifi. Then, I’d simply turn it into my office for a few hours. This was the same solution I planned to use when I needed more electricity than my squeezing-by solar system could yield.

As you might have guessed, these are no longer reliable options! With many states and cities shutting down access to these types of places at random times now in the pandemic, this isn’t a fall-back you can count on.

Climate Control

Staying Cool

My brain doesn’t work too well when it’s hot out, but my computer does far worse. Even when I’d stay at expensive homes in the San Francisco Bay Area, I’d encounter living environments that didn’t have A/C and my laptop would sometimes completely shut down in the middle of a several-day long ray trace — more than once!

Unfortunately, this is one of the more difficult situations to avoid when working inside a very large toaster oven. Cooling requires a huge amount of power, and for that reason, it’s rare to see solar-powered air conditioning units in vans. Here, again, my fallback when the weather required it was going to be the now unreliable coffee shop option.

Keeping Warm

On the other side of the climate coin is staying toasty. The cold is something your pc might handle OK, but I, for one, experience soul-crushing bitterness when the frost sets in.

Originally, I only budgeted for $50-70 for a used propane convection heater. Later, when I started digging more into the subject, I learned that long-term exposure to even very low levels of carbon monoxide could potentially cause health problems.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">This Harvard Health article talks about potential health risks from exposure to carbon monoxide.<figcaption>This Harvard Health article talks about potential health risks from exposure to carbon monoxide.</figcaption></figure>

I decided I needed to splurge instead on a catalytic heater which is more efficient and should therefore theoretically produce less carbon monoxide. This Olympian Wave-6 heater is what I purchased instead.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">This Olympian Wave-6 catalytic heater was the upgraded version I intended to go with.<figcaption>This Olympian Wave-6 catalytic heater was the upgraded version I intended to go with.</figcaption></figure>

Even with the upgrade, however, I didn’t feel comfortable living fulltime in a van for a long time. Vanlife would still need to be my very temporary bootstrapping solution to canvas the US for clients and subcontractors.

Consumables

There are 2 things you still may need to rely on the rest of the modern world for if you’re roughing it on the cheap, and those have been hard to come by lately. First on the list is toilet paper. I don’t think I need to mention that the supply chain for this good in particular has seen perilous interruptions this year. Unless your build includes a bidet, any future supply disruption might make vanlife tougher than normal.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">If The Year of 2020 had an entry in an encyclopedia, here is my nomination for the image. The toilet paper wars were real.<figcaption>If The Year of 2020 had an entry in an encyclopedia, here is my nomination for the image. The toilet paper wars were real.</figcaption></figure>

Remember how limited storage space is in a van! It’s tough to stock up on any consumable.

The other very important good you need to consider is water. While it’s true that you can get a large water tank and probably be alright with topping off at RV filling stations, you might not be able to afford the cost or space of a large tank. In that case, it may not be safe to rely on being able to pick up additional gallon jugs on an as-needed basis. This was my original plan in addition to a small, less than 5-gallon water container, but in March of this year, I experienced a long shortage of bottled water.

While t.p. and bottled water are back in good supply now, it’s quite possible shortages will happen again in the future. Normally, neither of these products is a worry if you want to do the #vanlife thing, but times have changed.

Time Constraints

Once you start using solar panels, the clock is ticking. Word on the street has it that within 6 months of beginning to use solar panels, they start to noticeably use efficiency. So, if you’re doing a build with just-enough solar panel wattage to power your work electronics, you might be hurting before a year has passed. For the same reason, it’s also best not to install them until you’re ready to hit the road.

The other time constraint you should consider is: how long can you work on the build? Do you have to be out of your big city rental by a certain amount of time? Do you need to be using the van at a certain place by a certain date?

Van builds are no different from anything else you build: it’s probably going to take a lot longer than you’d reasonably expect. Life is full of surprises.

Structural Damage

For me, those surprises included rust holes in the flooring I discovered after I pulled up some chipboard covering.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>This was my breaking point. Discovering a tissue-paper-thin layer of rust in the van’s bed when I was already out of time was the last nail.</figcaption></figure>

There were also leaks in the doors and ceiling. I couldn’t add any permanent flooring, insulation, or paneling until I made those repairs, and I found these issues too late in the game to get them done. Fixing it all would have also put me even farther beyond my monetary budget.

Unscheduled Work-Type Work

The other devastating surprise to my schedule was a bunch of last-minute, panicked, house-on-fire requests from multiple engineering clients during the time I set aside to exclusively work on the van. With what time I had left, it wasn’t even feasible to throw together a super-rough, makeshift solution without jeopardizing my safety.

These jack-in-the-box SNAFUs ended up being catastrophic. Ultimately, I had to return all the build equipment that was returnable. It didn’t make sense to install the solar panels if I wouldn’ t be able to use them while they were new and still working well. It was also a wasted exercise to build any internal structures if the shell of the van was ruined. I’d eventually have to re-do it all.

I very sadly had to admit defeat, but let it be a lesson to you! Fight to hold onto every minute you set aside for your build and, if possible, budget for significant delays.

Where to Stay

Another huge coronavirus-related problem with vanlife has to do with where you park your vehicle. If you planned to hang out in state parks for the majority of your travels, did you know many have seen sporadic shut downs? Did you hear that many campers got kicked out of campsites unexpectedly from COVID reactionary measures?

This is an especially important point because even before the pandemic, it was challenging to find places to park each night if you lived in your van fulltime. There are a couple apps you can use to help find unofficial spots. When on long road trips, I still use my van to sleep in. I found iOverlander to be a good resource to find places on the fly.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large is-resized">Check out this app, iOverlander, for reviewed and sometimes unofficial spots to snooze in your van.<figcaption>Check out this app, iOverlander, for crowd-reviewed and sometimes unofficial spots to snooze in your van.</figcaption></figure>

Alternatives

A workaround to some of the aforementioned problems is to spend gobs of money. If you’re planning on handing over a brand new Sprinter van to a company to do a luxury build 100% for you, you may not experience some of these issues. However, you might also spend over $200k doing it that way.

Otherwise, keeping to camping sites with water and power hookups might ease some burdens. However, these can be surprisingly expensive with many charging upwards of $35/night.

If you just want to get away from the city, consider that perhaps a discounted Airbnb makes more sense. It might even be cheaper! I’m currently staying in one in a tiny town. It has A/C, wifi, a dishwasher and a real bed for under $25/night. The current decline in travel nationwide influenced many rental properties to offer steep discounts.

What’s Next

For Beverly, her vanlife build is on hold. I’ve considered selling her, but for now, I’m delaying deciding what to do. Right now, I can’t travel to meet with clients in-person anyways, so it doesn’t make much business sense. Maybe I’ll pick it all back up in the future. In the meantime, I’m still driving her around the country with some bare minimum furnishings for random apartments I find. At least buying her wasn’t a total waste. If you see us out there, say “hi”!

The post Are You a Professional Thinking of Vanlife? Caution! appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at July 17, 2020 04:07 PM

Solid Edge 2021 Adds SubD Modeling

Solid Edge 2021 was presented in a What’s New show yesterday. There was of course a lot of new stuff across a wide range of topics. Even their hour long…

by matt at July 17, 2020 02:00 AM

July 16, 2020

SolidSmack

Holographic 3D Printing With Multiple Lasers

Researchers at the University of Cambridge have developed a method of using holography in 3D printing.

Holography is an optical method of producing and recording a three-dimensional light field by using multiple light sources to create an interference field. You’ve likely seen holograms from time to time; they are those strange images that suddenly burst into apparent full 3D when properly illuminated.

What’s happening is that the illumination allows the recording to reproduce something close to the original interference pattern, and thus the original 3D image becomes visible.

What on Earth would this have to do with 3D printing, you ask? I did too, but it seems there are some very interesting uses for the technology, particularly when performing powder bed fusion (PBF).

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

PBF and SLA Issues

PBF is a common 3D printing process in which high energy, typically from a powerful laser, illuminates a tiny spot on a flat bed of fine powder or resin. The energy melts that spot, and an entire layer is eventually traced by the laser. More material is applied and the process repeats.

The problem is that in order to achieve prints with optimally formed internal microstructures one has to engage highly precise control over all elements of the printing process, including ambient temperature, oxygen percentage, powder quality, and laser illumination. It’s easy to produce 3D prints that are inferior in strength to those manufactured with conventional making processes, so this is a significant barrier to 3D printing adoption.

As a result many 3D printer manufacturers have spent considerable time and effort to refine their PBF and SLA process to ensure the best quality 3D print. However, there’s always room for improvement, and that’s just what the holographic research might do.

3D Laser 3D Printing

The holographic method allows for far better control of the illumination. UC explains:

“However, computer-generated holograms can help bring the distribution of this energy under control in three dimensions rather than two, as a result of optical diffraction (the bending of light waves around an obstacle). The melt process can then be monitored in real time and the hologram can be recalculated in order to control the shape, quality and material of the AM process.”

This overcomes the issue of variances in the material that cause inconsistent solidification. In theory this can be monitored and controlled, and that could mean, for example, much stronger metal 3D prints. This approach would also work for polymer PBF and SLA systems.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-nNjc5BLV90?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

All-Layer PBF?

There’s another very dramatic possibility with this new form of laser illumination: simultaneous production of an entire layer at once. Team member and Ultra Precision Engineering PhD student Peter Christopher explains:

“The aim is to melt an entire layer of metal powder simultaneously, thereby improving the speed of manufacture, as well as removing many of the thermal-related issues experienced in current approaches.”

If I understand this correctly, it means the holographic technique could potentially create a light field corresponding to the necessary illumination for an entire PBF layer, for both metal and polymer environments. If sufficient energy reaches each pixel of the print surface, this could mean an extremely significant increase in PBF print speeds, which are among the slowest in the world of 3D printing.

Of course, this is mere research at this point, but I believe the potential is massive and thus we may see this type of laser system appear in commercial 3D printers of the future.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Holographic 3D Printing With Multiple Lasers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at July 16, 2020 06:16 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to manage dimensional tolerances in 3D printing

In this article we are going to discuss some of the most common errors we often see from customers using FDM technology and how to manage dimensional tolerances.

3D printing is a great manufacturing tool that can produce near-net shape geometry without multiple operations. For producing complex geometries which would typically involve multiple setups and stages with traditional machining or forming methods, 3D printing can allow you to go from digital asset (3D CAD) to finished part (or almost finished part) in a single step. However, no manufacturing technology is perfect for every application. Most commercially available 3D printing technologies has yet to offer the precision and accuracy of machining processes. Having said that, just like working with any other manufacturing methods, we can work around the shortcomings once we understand the limitations of the technology.

Ways to manage dimensional tolerances

Resolution (slice height) vs Accuracy

Many users often get the misconception about the relationship between resolution and accuracy. Using higher resolution ( equals thinner slice) will provide the ability to produce finer details and smoother surface finish if the geometry profile is dominantly in the vertical plane but it does not always improve the dimensional accuracy. To some degree, using thinner slice also allows the minimum toolpath width to be narrower and you can therefore put material in tighter spaces on the XY plane as well – but again, it does not affect the dimensional tolerance in XY axes.

The bigger issue here is when the height of critical geometries in Z axis does not divide evenly by the slice height. Let’s dig into an example.

We are about to 3D print this electronics enclosure shown below. Take note of the Z axis dimensions of the trapezoid cutout on the front face.

3D printed electronics enclosure 3D printed electronic part

 

Now let’s put this file in the slicer and process it in two different resolutions – 0.010” and 0.007”. As you can see in the comparisons below, slicing at 0.010” yielded in its net shape without any error. On the other hand, slicing at 0.007” (which is the higher resolution), it ended up shifting the position of the cutout up by 0.005” and making the cutout taller by another 0.001”. Isn’t higher resolution the better? No, not in this case. This enclosure was simply not designed to be 3D printed in 0.007” The next option would be printing in 0.005”, which will result in the perfect net shape but it sure is an overkill – the printing time nearly quadruples going from 0.010” to 0.005” without any meaningful functional advantage of the final product.

The important lesson here is that your design intent must include the resolution you want to use when 3D printing that part. Even if you are using the coarsest resolution at 0.013”, the part could have very good accuracy if your dimensions were made to fit that resolution. A good designer always has the manufacturing method in mind.

 

3D part sliced at 0.007" 3D part sliced at 0.010"

Seams

A seam in 3D printing is the point where the extrusion toolpath begins and ends. As the start of the extrusion creates a little blob at the beginning of the toolpath (imagine drawing a line with a glue gun) the part surface will end up with a line of these blobs once the part is finished. In many cases, the slicing software such as Insight or GrabCAD Print will do a decent job of ‘hiding’ the seam by placing the toolpath start/end point to a sharp corner from its ability to analyze the vectors.

seam in 3D printing

Example of a seam in a 3D printed part

For rounded features that have no sharp corners where the seam can’t be hidden, this can be a problem and throw you a curve ball in terms of the fit of the part into an assembly. A popular scenario is where the part has close-fit holes for mounting bolts or other fasteners.

One easy workaround for this problem is adding a ‘corner’ into the ID of the hole. If this hole is a clearance hold, a slight alteration wouldn’t be an issue – no further post processing required.

managing dimensional tolerances: workaround for seam in 3D printing to improve accuracy

Workaround for a seam in 3D printing to improve accuracy

However, if this is supposed to be a hole for something with more precise fit, say a locator pin or a dowel, then we will need to undersize this hole slightly (approx. 0.015” in diameter) and chase it with a reamer to get the perfect surface inside the hole. The user must not forget to increase the contour counts (i.e. wall thickness in GrabCAD Print) to ensure there is enough material to cut without getting too close to the raster fill.

Going further, using features such as Avoid Seam in GrabCAD Print can help reducing the size of the seam quite effectively but it will not completely remove it without risking the integrity of the part. For Stratasys Fortus systems and F370 users, using Insight software can help with this situation even further. First, by using custom groups the user can reduce the toolpath width of the contour on the inner diameter. Narrower toolpath decreases the overall size of the seam as the print head does not need to compensate for potential under extrusion as much as it did for wider toolpath. Secondly, enabling Link Contours (it is the same feature as Avoid Seam in GC Print) will either tuck away either of the start point or the end point of the toolpath. This is not the magic cure for removing seam lines but it certainly helps with the overall finish of the part. Keep in mind that the size of the seam also depends on the type of material you use. For example, ABS tends to produce larger seams than ASA (about 30-50% difference depending on the build parameters and machine types).

managing dimensional tolerances: reducing seams in 3D printing

Reducing seams in 3D printing

Corners

Like any machinery with a moving load, the printer does not like rapid accelerations. On a CNC cutter, the spindle speed can remain relatively constant for a given toolpath. However, the issue becomes a little more complicated for a 3D printer because the extruder speed must be precisely synchronized with the head movement. A sharp 90-degree corner can create what is best described as ‘chatter marks’ as the head tries to ramp-up / slowdown but the acceleration / deceleration of filament extrusion is ever-so-slightly out of sync. This was a lesser problem when the 3D printers operated at much slower speeds. It is a small trade-off we get by nearly doubling the overall printing speed with similar build parameters.

chatter marks from abrupt deceleration

Chatter marks from abrupt deceleration

A good way for getting around this is adding fillets (R .100” or larger) to provide the intermittent step to slow down in one axis and the step to ramp up in another.

If adding a fillet is not an option due to geometry restrictions, reduction of the contour width (approx. 20% from the default setting) along with contour-to-contour airgap of 0.001” – 0.002” also helps with reducing the chatter mark on critical surfaces.

Additionally, on belt driven systems such as Fortus 450/400/380/360 and F-series printers, dirty pulleys and worn out belts can cause surface chatters as well. So keep an eye out if you have not cleaned your 3D printer for a while. A clean printer runs better – no surprises there!

Thermal Stress

Believe it or not, a large chunk of dimensional error in X or Y axis for parts printed with FDM technology comes from the thermal stress of the material from uneven shrinkage. We found that this is generally insignificant for small to medium sized parts that can fit inside 6”x6”x6” envelope. Once the part becomes larger, there could be random spots that will not shrink correctly and result in parts oversized by as much as 0.5%. The best way to avoid this is designing the part to be a shell form rather than a block and maintaining the wall thickness as uniform as possible throughout the part. If shelling the part is not feasible, adding a small raster-to-raster (or adjacent raster) airgap of 0.001” can help mitigate the issue.

 

 

 

The post How to manage dimensional tolerances in 3D printing appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joseph Yang at July 16, 2020 05:33 PM

SolidSmack

The New Intel RealSense Depth Camera Widens its View

As they say, “distance makes the heart grow fonder.”

Not quite limited to love between people, some things undoubtedly get better with some time or space apart. When you come back to a book you loved in high school, it can feel exciting, like reading it for the first time. If you limit your trips to your favorite restaurant every other month, like a special treat, you’re more likely to savor each visit. 

If, in the Intel® RealSense™ Depth Camera D455, you widen the gap between the sensors to 95 mm, a considerable increase compared to the D435’s total length of 90 mm, then you get equally exciting results.

<figure class="aligncenter size-full"></figure>

A Baseline of 95 mm for a Maximum Range of 20 m

Setting the depth sensors further apart isn’t the only change in the D455, but it is, in every sense, the biggest. 

This importance boils down to how depth cameras operate. In addition to the RGB values, depth cameras, especially those in Intel’s D400 series, measure depth through stereo vision. 

In the same way your eyes and brain work together to form one detailed view full of information, stereo vision shares the same basic concept. The two depth sensors capture disparate images, the differences between which help estimate an object’s position relative to the camera. 

<figure class="aligncenter size-full"></figure>

Here’s a quick exercise for those who aren’t too familiar with computer vision. Point a finger skyward then touch it to your nose. Now, close one eye and alternate with the other. Notice how it moves from each end of your periphery? Do this a few times while you bring your finger farther away. See how the gap between the two “images” shrinks as it moves away from you. 

Close objects take big steps, distant objects barely move. That’s the general idea behind stereo depth. 

Widening the distance between sensors is directly proportional to expanding the camera’s “periphery” or field of vision. The D455 has a maximum range of 20 m and an optimal range of 6 m. This increased scope comes in handy in a few ways.

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Wider Range, Wider Application

Unsurprisingly, a greater field of vision offers the same advantages to drones as it does to humans. One of the more advertised pulls of the D455 is its more accurate collision avoidance capabilities. 

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

A wider view and an integrated IMU allows for faster responses to obstacles in a robot’s path, making it safer to leave on auto-pilot should it need the option. 

In touch-averse and socially-distanced 2020, the greater depth awareness could let developers employ touch-free controls, effective even at longer distances, to their products. 

Combine this with a better global shutter to the RGB sensor, and you can get a powerful 3D scanner that could potentially pave the way for printing fully-functional objects.

You can pre-order your Intel® RealSense™ Depth Camera D455 now for $239. Products are expected to ship out by the second week of August.

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post The New Intel RealSense Depth Camera Widens its View appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 16, 2020 05:26 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Do It Yourself with 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS

We all love making things. Do-it-yourself (DIY) culture goes hand in hand with designers, engineers, and anyone who likes to take on a project deemed difficult for a non-professional. DIY is great for those of us who like a challenge, but it is also a good way to save money: why buy something when you can make it yourself?

With the design and organizational tools offered by 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, do-it-yourself projects are easy. You can use the browser-based tools on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform from any device, anywhere, so it is easy to work from home and tinker with both your digital design online and real-world parts in the garage. All you need is an internet connection: you can use the platform on any device, PC, Mac, tablet, or smartphone.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WA3b5VkjbMQ?feature=oembed" title="DIY with 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS" width="1140"></iframe>

If you want to see 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS and DIY in action, take a look at what Industry Process Consultant John Martorano III made. Part of John’s job is making videos, and he is always trying to up his production quality. He may be an amateur videographer, but he’s an expert 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS user, so he decided to put his skills to the test and create a homemade, DIY camera slider using 3D Creator, a parametric modeling tool in the 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS portfolio, and parts he had lying around his house.

John was able to design and build a camera slider that gives him buttery smooth shots for a fraction of the cost. With the measuring tools, exploded views, and other capabilities available on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, he was able to check and see if the materials he had available would be enough for his DIY camera slider—no second guessing or waste.

With the freedom provided by 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS, both with the multitude of design tools at your disposal and the ability to use digital design tools anywhere at any time, you have a DIYer’s dream at your fingertips.

Why try 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS? Because it works! Work from anywhere and make anything the way you want. Start your free trial today.

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Do It Yourself with 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at July 16, 2020 12:00 PM

July 15, 2020

SolidSmack

Skydio Announces X2 3D Scan Drone, Advances Autonomous AI Drone Tech

skydio-x2-3d-scan-inspection-00

It’s wasn’t too many years ago that inspecting a bridge, evaluating safe passage, or planning a route took a brave soul to volunteer or a less brave soul to draw the short straw. Now, we just send a robot or, better yet, a drone to scope the area and if 2020 will be remembered for anything… *ahem*, on such a list will be advancements in drone technology.

Skydio has been one leading the charge in advanced drone capabilities. Today, they announced the Skydio X2 drones, along with new apps and a new $100M Series C funding round. It is the culmination of 10+ years of autonomous drone R&D to address concerns and issues with traditional manual drones.

The Skydio X2 drone has ‘360° situational awareness’ with a 360° Superzoom color camera, a FLIR thermal camera (360×256), 180° vertical view capability and a 3.9 mile (6.2km) range on 35 minutes of battery life.

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Along with this, the drone uses Skydio Autonomy, their AI technology that uses six 4K camera to build a real-time 3-dimensional area map passed through deep learning algorithms to extrapolate objects, location, action, and avoidance. With this, it provides a drone that is easier to control for beginners and more capability for experienced operators.

Skydio 3D Scan sis a ‘first of its kind’ digital scanning software that is designed to inspect bridges, buildings, infrastructure, and other complex industrial structures, reconstructing the scene in real-time. Skydio explains:

Unlike inspection conducted with manual drones, Skydio 3D Scan enables a fully automated, structure-agnostic process that does not require any prior knowledge of the inspected structure and can operate in GPS-denied environments or without internet connection. Operators can specify the area or volume to inspect, pick a desired imaging resolution, and the AI-powered Skydio 3D Scan does the rest, autonomously imaging all surfaces with precision by dynamically building a real-time map as the drone flies. The resulting imagery has no gaps in captured data, and is optimized to ensure effective photogrammetry.

Though it has some mainstream appeal, Skydio is aimed at enterprise, defense, first-response, and government customers who can take advantage of the capabilities for safety, inspection, and reconnaissance.

Currently, the Skydio X2D (defense) and the Skydio X2E (enterprise) drones are planned to be available in Q4 2020.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

The post Skydio Announces X2 3D Scan Drone, Advances Autonomous AI Drone Tech appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 15, 2020 08:47 PM

Lumos Ultra Helmet Light Design Illuminates Bike Safety, Funded in 4 Minutes

lumos helmet

While the idea of an illuminated helmet is as common as brakes and pedals on a bike, not all lighted helmets are the same when it comes to safety.

For instance, it’s a bit surprising but very few helmets have front lights to help oncoming vehicles see their riders. Some have reflectors that reflect light but do very little if a vehicle has a busted headlight or little visibility.

Frontline visibility is just one of the problems the Lumos Ultra helmet aims to solve. By marketing itself as the new standard for bike helmets, it ticks out a lot of issues bike riders have when it comes to safety.

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Visibility in Light Design

The biggest problem the Lumos Ultra addresses is visibility. Clicking the switch at the back of your helmet activates three bright LED lights.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">lumos helmet</figure>

The first LED light is located at the front of the helmet. Apart from letting oncoming traffic know you’re there, it illuminates the road in front of you so you see where you’re going. It also adjusts to put out a solid stream of illumination or flickers on-and-off for added attention.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

The other two LED lights are red, located on the back quarters of the helmet which, like the rear lights of a vehicle, signal your presence to those behind you.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">lumos helmet</figure>

The most unique aspect of the rear lights is how they are used as turn signals. Using either the included handlebar remote or a downloadable Apple Watch app, you signal your intentions to drivers.

A mentioned, the lights adjust manually, track the distance you’ve travelled, and check the remaining battery left all through the smartphone app (you can’t use your smartphone to make turn signals though).

With the lights on, the Lumos Ultra’s battery lasts up to 10 hours before a charge is needed via the USB-C charging port located at the back of the helmet.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">lumos helmet</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">lumos helmet</figure>

The Lumos Ultra improves on a lot of things the original Lumos helmet pioneered. It’s lighter (370 grams, to be exact), is compatible with more accessories like sun visors, has more ventilation, and most importantly, is a heck of a lot cheaper than the $179 Lumos (the Lumos Ultra costs $99).

The Lumos Ultra hit $60,000 funding goal on Kickstarter in four minutes and they’re heading toward $2.5MM. It’s already fully-funded, so if you want to check out this customizable illuminating bike helmet, visit the Lumos Ultra Kickstarter page.

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Lumos Ultra Helmet Light Design Illuminates Bike Safety, Funded in 4 Minutes appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 15, 2020 06:52 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Reduce Admin Burden with Centralized License Management

The roles (solutions) of 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS combine the ease of using SOLIDWORKS® with the power and breadth of the 3DEXPERIENCE® platform. Users can easily collaborate with internal and external teams and all data is securely managed—and accessible—on the platform. With an internet connection and a web browser the platform makes it easy to work from anywhere.

CAD administrators will especially appreciate 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS as the overall license administration burden is significantly reduced, and licensing monitoring and management is simplified. Here are a few reasons administrators will be excited.

Administration Simplified

Typically, you install and activate SOLIDWORKS using a serial number, and the license is locked to your workstation.

If an admin needs to move a license from one machine to another—perhaps to a new laptop—that license must be deactivated on one machine and activated on the new one. An Excel spreadsheet is often used to keep track of who is using what and where the license is activated, but that is a cumbersome way to keep track of licenses, especially considering frequent employee turnover and technology upgrades within a company.

Happily, all roles (solutions) on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform are managed through an easy and innovative license management system. Admins function as platform administrators, which gives them access to several admin capabilities, including the Member Control Center.

The Member Control Dashboard allows admins to monitor and manage users and their licenses. Through this intuitive interface, admins can easily track how many licenses are available and consumed, who is using the license, and easily grant or remove a license to one or multiple users. It is also easy to alter licenses of existing users or remove users who leave the company—with one click.

Automated Tracking

All licenses are based on the named user (unique 3DEXPERIENCE ID), so no more tracking of serial numbers or worrying about their misuse. This translates to flexibility for users. Licenses are no longer locked to machines.

Use any machine, anywhere, without deactivating and activating licenses.

Learn More

Roles on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform are managed through a simple and innovative license management system. Critical updates to the software happen automatically on the cloud-based 3DEXPERIENCE platform, further reducing install or upgrade issues for CAD admins.

If you want more information about how to simplify license deployment and installation, check out the new 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS roles. Or, you can contact your local reseller to learn more. Please feel free to add your comments or questions below. Thank you.

 

 

Author information

Divi Lohiya
Divi Lohiya
Divi is a Senior Manager, Product Portfolio Management at SOLIDWORKS. He is passionate about how new technologies are coming together to change the way how products are designed, made and sold and engaging/teaching kids in STEM activities. Divi graduated from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Bombay with a dual degree in Mechanical Engineering and a Masters degree in Engineering from University of Texas at Austin.

The post Reduce Admin Burden with Centralized License Management appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Divi Lohiya at July 15, 2020 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Parametric Flat Pattern of Bent Rod/Tube in SOLIDWORKS

SOLIDWORKS Sheet Metal tools provide the ability to obtain the flat shape from a bent part.  The flat length of each bend is based on defined parameters.  This can be defined with K-factors, Bend Allowance or Bend Deduction.  For more information on Sheet Metal calculations, check out the following articles:

When it comes to bent pipes or rods, Sheet Metal tools cannot be used as it’s no longer uniform thickness through the bend.  The use of SOLIDWORKS Weldments or Routing provides an easy way to generate the design and determine the total length of each piece.

While it’s not common to show the flattened state of a pipe or rod, this could be accomplished with a sweep feature that is parametrically linked to the original shape.  If needed, we could specify a “bend factor” similar to a K-factor to define the neutral location of the bend.  Then the arc length can be used to define the length of each bend section.

Take a paperclip as an example.

Paperclip example model

Paperclip example model

We can define a bend factor as a global variable and multiple this by the size of the profile to get the position of the neutral axis, in this case a factor of 0.5 with a profile size of 1mm.  An offset from the inside of each bend with this dimension gives an arc.  The length of this arc gives the final length of the bent region.

SOLIDWORKS Equation for Arc Position

SOLIDWORKS Equation for Arc Position

SOLIDWORKS Reference Dimension of Arc Length

SOLIDWORKS Reference Dimension of Arc Length

Create a new sweep feature made up of sketch segments for each region.  The straight sections are linked as equal to the original geometry.  The length of the bent regions are linked to the reference arc length dimensions.

SOLIDWORKS Flat Pattern Bend Length

Create separate configurations for the original body features and the flat pattern sweep to obtain a fully parametric model that updates the length as the geometry changes.  A drawing view can be created with centerlines defined between edges of the bent regions.

SOLIDWORKS Flat Pattern

SOLIDWORKS Flat Pattern

SOLIDWORKS Flat Drawing View

SOLIDWORKS Flat Drawing View

If the dimensions and locations of each bent regions are not important, you could obtain the overall path length and then simply reference this dimension for the length of the new sweep feature.

SOLIDWORKS Path Length Dimension

SOLIDWORKS Path Length Dimension

The post Parametric Flat Pattern of Bent Rod/Tube in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at July 15, 2020 12:00 PM

July 14, 2020

SolidSmack

ThinkStation P620: Lenovo Launches First 64-Core AMD Threadripper Pro Workstation

thinkstation-p620-threadripper-pro-adventure-time-00

If you’ve been waiting for the new line of AMD Threadripper processors, your wait is (almost) over. The new Ryzen Threadripper PRO will launch exclusively in the new ThinkStation P620 workstation from Lenovo this September.

Today, Lenovo and AMD announced the new chips and the new workstation in a 1-2 punch to send power-hungry tech-heads spinnin’. The rig will be the first 64-core workstation, featuring the new Threadripper PRO 3000WX series processors.

Other dual-socket Lenovo workstations max-out with dual 28-core Intel CPUs (or 56 cores) while the new Threadripper PRO 64-core systems will house a single CPU with AMD heat sink and tool-free design pushing ‘up to 37% higher graphics performance’ (SPECviewperf) than the dual-socket 56 cores systems.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/V0nV816_D6k?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

ThinkStation P620 Specs

The P620 is roughly the same size as the ThinkStation P520 (See our review here) with a lot of upgrades and some extras missing. Complete specs are available here.

Lenovo ThinkStation P620 Workstation
Category Spec
Size 17.3 inches x 6.5 inches x 18.1 inches
(440 mm x 165 mm x 460 mm)
OS Windows 10 Pro (64-bit) or Linux
Processor Up to AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ Pro 3995WX (2.7GHz, 64 Cores, 256MB Cache)
RAM Up to 64GB DDR4 3200MHz ECC
Storage Up to 6 total drives (Max:2x 2TB M.2, 4x 4TB 3.5″); Onboard M.2 0/1; SATA 0/1/5/10
Graphics NVIDIA Quadro P-series, Quadro RTX-series, or Quadro GV100
Port options Front: 2x USB 3.2 (Gen2, Type-A), 2x USB 3.2 (Gen2, Type C), Mic/Headphone, Optional: Media Card Reader
Back: 4x USD 3.2 (Gen2, Type A), 2x USB 2.0, 2x PS/2, 1x RJ45 10GB Ethernet, 1x Audio Line-in, Line-out, Mic
Wireless Optional: WiFi Card With BT HP External Antenna Kit
Power Supply 1000W 92% efficient
Price Starting at $4599 Lenovo | Amazon

AMD Threadripper PRO Specs

While the previous generation Ryzen Threadripper CPUs are available to consumers for their own builds and upgrades, the Threadripper PRO family-o-four will only be available in systems through OEMs, starting with Lenovo and the ThinkStation P620.

The new Threadripper PRO CPUs are… well, they’re BEASTS. The lower-core chips (12 and 16-core) have higher frequencies in the 4.0GHz range. And the higher-core chips (32 and 64-core) boast a boost frequency up to 4.2GHz.

Each CPU includes new 8-channel DDR4 memory subsystem for a max memory of up to 2TB, and doubles the PCIe lanes from 64 (in Ryzen Threadripper CPUs) to an astounding 128 PCIe lanes, previously only expected for AMD’s Gen 4 Zen 2 architecture (rumored for a late 2020 launch).

Full specs for the AMD Threadripper PRO line can be seen here.

Spec 3995WX 3975WX 3955WX 3945WX
CPU Cores 64 32 16 12
Threads 128 64 32 24
Base Clock 2.7GHz 3.5GHz 3.9GHz 4.0GHz
Max Boost Clock Up to 4.2GHz Up to 4.2GHz Up to 4.3GHz Up to 4.3GHz
Total Cache (L2+L3) 288 MB 144 MB 72 MB 70 MB
PCIe Lanes 128 128 128 128
TDP 280W 280W 280W 280W
Memory 8-channel DDR4 8-channel DDR4 8-channel DDR4 8-channel DDR4

The ThinkStation P620 will be available in September 2020 from Lenovo. The base configuration sporting the AMD Threadripper Pro W3945W (12 core/24 thread), 16GB RAM, 256GB M.2 PCIe 3×4 SSD, and an NVIDIA Quadro P620 GPU will ring in at an MSRP of USD $4,599.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

The post ThinkStation P620: Lenovo Launches First 64-Core AMD Threadripper Pro Workstation appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 14, 2020 06:55 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to properly maintain your Stratasys Polyjet print head

Properly maintaining a Stratasys polyjet print head, not only increases the life of the print heads, but also keeps you from having down time and keeps your parts looking new. The head cleaning wizard takes less than 20 minutes and can save you hours, if not days as well as materials.

How to properly clean a polyjet print head

Print Heads should be cleaned after every print job, this is done by using the suede cloth soaked in iso propanol alcohol. You start at the middle of the print head and gently wipe to the back and then from the middle of the head to the front. Never scrub the print heads, this can cause delamination of the print heads meaning premature failure.

pattern test with two print heads missing more than 5 nozzles Delamination

In the images above, you can see the pattern test with two print heads missing more than five nozzles in case S1 and M2.  Once we have five or more nozzles missing in a row or 10 or more missing on one print head, then the effects of this will be evident in your parts. It is recommended once many nozzles are missing to replace the print head to eliminate this from being an issue.

Poor maintenance of print heads cause bad part quality

Neglecting to clean polyjet print heads will cause a build up of resin on and in between the print heads. This will cause premature failure of print heads; nozzles will become blocked/caked with a build up of resin. In more extreme cases this will also make it more difficult to remove print heads when it is time to replace them as they will be ‘glued’ together with resin.

caked print head

Build up of resin in between the print heads.

Having “bad print heads” can cause bad part quality. It will cause under jetting in some areas, this means you will get dips or waves in your part rendering it a useless part. This causes wasted time and material.

example of under jetting

Example of a bad quality part caused by uncleaned print heads

This part was printed with the same print heads used for the pattern test above. You can see that there is a big dip in the part where those nozzles were unable to put down enough material. As mentioned before this causes a lot of down time and wasted material since this part is now useless and they need to be replaced. Replacing the print heads is costly.

Below is the head cleaning procedure from the user guide itself. This guide is given with every machine and has accurate step by step instructions on maintaining your machine.

cleaning the print heads and the roller Print head cleaning guide Print head cleaning guide

The post How to properly maintain your Stratasys Polyjet print head appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Moe Younis at July 14, 2020 02:27 PM

SolidSmack

The J5 Project Brings The Cinematic Robot To Life

If you were around during the late 1980s (or if you just love old movies like I do), you might have heard of a little film called Short Circuit. In it, a military robot called Number 5 is struck by lightning and gains sentience.

Short Circuit and its sequel, Short Circuit 2, chronicle the adventures of Number 5 (who renames himself “Johnny 5”) as he comes to grips with his newfound intelligence amidst those who would seek to use him for their own nefarious purposes.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1MI0Xuh-U4c?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

For more than a decade, the guys at Input-Inc. have been attempting to create an army of working Johnny 5 robots (possibly also for their own nefarious purposes). Utilizing full-size 3D CAD plans they made themselves, they plan on making a 1:1 recreation with the same strengths and capabilities as the fictional Johnny 5.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HYwcEu2gCt4?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Contrary to what you might think, just because the plans are in 3D CAD doesn’t mean the parts are all 3D printed. In fact, only heavy custom parts such as the head, fingers, and outer coverings which are too difficult to fabricate with home shop machinery are 3D printed. The rest of the robot’s body is made old-school, using the same shop machinery to cut, shape, and weld everything together.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RDxYcx5boPY?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The insides of the Johnny 5 are no joke, either. Two drive motors are crafted out of a BaneBots BB-150 16:1 gearbox connected to a 3.25:1 dual-motor input stage and two RS-775 motors. Combined with a 24V or 6V electrical system and lead acid, LiFePO4, or NiMH batteries powering it, and you have a crazy amount of power in a tank-like robot.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/51q2zJmatzY?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Speaking of tank-like, the treads are Rexnord TableTop Chain D821K7-1/2G tracks. They, along with the moving arms and neck, run on a mix of Hitec and Wingxine ASME-04B 380KG servos.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
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</figure>

As for the head parts, the neck is made from Fabco K-5-X cylinders while the iconic Johnny 5 eyes are modified Wollensak Raptar 209mm lenses.

When fully assembled, the Johnny 5 should weigh about 350lbs and can lug a van around without any problems. While majority of the robot’s functions are overseen by hand and computer controls, the plan is to have a small form factor computer onboard the Johnny 5 in order for it to have semi-autonomous control (just like in the movies).

Considering it takes roughly $15,000 to produce just one Johnny 5, you would expect it to do everything the cinematic robot can do in the movies sans the questionable artificial intelligence.

You can follow the team’s efforts as they reach the project’s completion over on the Input-Inc. webpage. To see the fabrication of the parts and the robot test runs, the J5GURU YouTube channel is the place to be. With just a little more time and effort, hopefully they will be the ones to make Johnny 5 alive.

The post The J5 Project Brings The Cinematic Robot To Life appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 14, 2020 02:08 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Join Us for SOLIDWORKS Live to Hear about 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Offers

On Thursday, July 16th @ 11AM EST we will be hosting an exciting SOLIDWORKS Live event to introduce 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS. This new set of design-focused solutions will enable design teams to collaborate with key stakeholders in real time so they can quickly gain the insight needed to get innovative products to market faster.

If this year has taught us anything, it is this: Staying connected, wherever you and your design team and key stakeholders are located, is more critical than ever. During this live event, you will see first-hand how cloud-based design solutions can help you remain connected to your real-time data, as well as your design teams, to keep productivity going and design cycles moving.

SOLIDWORKS CEO Gian Paolo Bassi  will kick things off by introducing 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS solutions and discussing the importance of staying connected today.

“I am very excited to introduce these new offers, because they bring a seamless combination of the SOLIDWORKS that you know and love with the productivity and collaborative features of the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform,” says Gian Paolo Bassi. “On top of that, the offers include the ability to work anywhere and on any device with 3DCreator and 3DSculptor with innovations like design guidance and organic shape modeling that simply run in any browser.”

Next up, a team of SOLIDWORKS technical experts will explain and demonstrate the technical capabilities of this exciting new portfolio using a data set from BioAdapt, a SOLIDWORKS customer that utilizes both SOLIDWORKS and the 3DEXPERIENCE platform to create high-performance lower limb prosthetics.

You will see how this unified, design-centric environment takes the CAD software you know and love, and combines it with best-in-class, cloud-based tools. Everyone involved in product development will be able to collaborate on real-time data so you can efficiently gain the insights needed to create truly innovative products.

The demonstration will be highlighting how users can take advantage of:

o   Data always saved in the cloud

o   Streamlined collaboration tools

o   Project management tools

o   Baked-in data management and revision control with no IT overhead

o   Access to next-generation design tools

After this demonstration, we will hold a Q&A session. We encourage you to ask questions, and we will answer as many as we possibly can. If you have additional questions or are interested in learning more, click on the banner below or visit this page for more information on 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Offers.

Join us for SOLIDWORKS Live here and get ready to take your first step onto the design platform of the future.

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Join Us for SOLIDWORKS Live to Hear about 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Offers appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at July 14, 2020 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to access SolidPractices SOLIDWORKS Guides through MySolidWorks

SOLIDWORKS users with an active software subscription now have access to a powerful library of SolidPractices best practice documents available through their my.solidworks.com account.

There are currently over two dozen SolidPractices Guides available for download in the Support section of MySolidWorks.  These guides have been developed by software experts and contain in depth explanations on advanced topics and techniques, particularly regarding PDM Vault administration.

SolidPractices in MySolidWorks

SolidPractices in MySolidWorks

If you do yet have access to my.solidworks.com, you can follow the steps MySolidWorks registration steps here to gain access.

The post How to access SolidPractices SOLIDWORKS Guides through MySolidWorks appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at July 14, 2020 12:00 PM

July 13, 2020

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: Mist-Making Succulent Planter [or Fountain!]

humidifier-succulent-planter-3d-printed-00

If there’s one plant you can grow in your workspace with very little sunlight, weekends without water, and the occasional sneer from a co-worker with an aversion to plant-life, it’s a succulent.

There is, however, one thing it does need. Warm, moist, humid-erifically, moist air. I’m fascinated by large water feature fountain and atrium designs that incorporate humidifiers/misters/foggers. But, how do you match that look and feel on your own desk or countertop?

Create a Misty Desktop Garden or Fountain

Well, there a few options for indoor fountain misters but it’s really easy to make your own and this week’s model is a design that incorporates a mister into a planter for your very own super classy succulent garden.

<figure class="aligncenter size-full is-resized">3d printed Fountain mist garden</figure>

In his first project, MyMiniFactory user ‘Hander’ shares his planter design that combines six hexagon-shaped columns with a center column that houses water and a DIY mist maker. There are nine provided parts that allow for various combinations of posts around the outside of the planter.

For the mister, you need two components, an Ultrasonic Mist Atomizer and a 40mm x 10mm fan (USB powered version here), powered by a 12V power adapter that plugs into the atomizer power port. Depending on the height you mount the atomizer, you may not need a fan. I would recommend a variable control for the fan as well. The atomizer is the same OD as the ID of a 1/2-inch PVC fitting which makes it really easy to mount and position.

You can download the model on MyMiniFactory. [Bonus! Check out this ‘Active Volcano’ model for another application of your ultrasonic mister!]

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Model of the Week: Mist-Making Succulent Planter [or Fountain!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 13, 2020 08:31 PM

The UPstage180 Speaker Combines Aesthetics with Two Audio Design Innovations

upstage180-speaker

Anxiety over recent events – and the pressure of having to work during said events – has caused us to turn a wide variety of spaces into a classy home-office. However, there’s one critical item to complete any work-intensive space. A speaker that provides just the right amount of ambient music to keep you concentrating

Level10’s UPstage180 speaker promises precisely this ability to complete your home office with class, style, and high-end audio. There a bit of innovative tech in this tiny speaker that makes it uniquely designed for indoor spaces that even the most dedicated audiophiles can get excited about.

<figure class="aligncenter size-full"></figure>

Equipped with Two Twoofers and One Woofer

The UPstage180 houses two design “firsts”, both of which relate to upgrades in the bass speaker. 

First, from Soundmatters, an industry leader in micro-acoustic engineering, they have access to the Linear Magnetic Drive Twoofer. 

It’s so named for the combined output of the woofer and tweeter into a single device. Made from carbon fiber, the “twoofer” provides both high-frequency and low-frequency sounds from a teeny 0.2mm diaphragm.

<figure class="aligncenter size-full"></figure>

Right along with this, the UPstage180 is also the first speaker to use a “high-power, flat glass woofer” sourced from BDNC. How high-powered, you might ask? Despite its size – which measures a mere 0.2mm thick glass diaphragm – it achieves bass of 60Hz.

See the pattern yet? Ultimately, the UPstage180 aims for hi-res and pure quality sound, all in a very tiny package.

In layman’s terms: it’s a powerful speaker with a compact aesthetic.

<figure class="aligncenter size-full"></figure>

Level10 UPstage180 Speaker Features:

  • The choice between a wall mount or table stand
  • App control that automatically adjusts right and left channels in the case of multiple speakers in a room
  • Wireless Concert Technology and seamless Bluetooth connection for full home use, so you never have to press pause
  • Ambiance sound effects for every need; white noise for meditation, relaxation, and deep sleep
  • Adjustable warm light with three different operating modes
  • Available in four colors: Ponder Black, Classic Blue, Rhodium Silver, and Living Coral
<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

There’s no more need to find room in your minimal home for a bulky speaker just to get decent audio. And even less need to carry that weight around from room to room as you go about your day. Instead, the additional features that come with Level10’s new speaker encourage treating it as decoration, just another portrait on the wall.

This product is fully funded on Kickstarter and has far surpassed its original pledge goal of $20,000 with 181 backers. There is still time to support the development of Level10’s UPstage180 speakers, with some Early Bird Bundle pledges still available and an estimated delivery date of October 2020.

The post The UPstage180 Speaker Combines Aesthetics with Two Audio Design Innovations appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at July 13, 2020 06:53 PM

The Instafloss is a Unique Multi-Water Jet Design To Floss Your Teeth

instafloss-multi-jet-water-flossing-design-00

We all know brushing your teeth is basic piehole cleanin’ hygiene. However, most of us forget one important part: flossing. And while rubbing a piece of string between your teeth may not hit the top of the fun charts, flossing is essential if you want your mouth to be free of the cavities, gingivitis, and those natsy bits of plaque.

Flossing is easy to skip and usually done too fast. How can floss design be improved? The folks at Instafloss took on the challenge, creating a multi-jet flosser that uses water to clean your teeth in ten seconds flat.

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</figure>

Multi-Jet Water Floss Design

Located at the end of the Instafloss is a two-pronged mouthpiece that you place in between your upper and lower teeth. Turning on the flosser activates multi-water jets that clean your pearly whites, including the front, sides, and back of each tooth, opposed to string flossing that only cleans between your teeth.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">instafloss</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">instafloss</figure>

The anti-bacterial silicone mouthpiece adjusts itself as you pass from one side of your mouth to the other. It may look simple, but it was designed to be be angled at a dentist-recommended 90°. On top of that, the mouthpiece works for 98% of people, including those with braces, crooked teeth, or any other tooth irregularities.

Considering the Instafloss is undoubtedly more expensive than your run-of-the-mill dental floss, they created separate mouth pieces for multiple users which swap with the main flosser. Each mouth piece comes with a color band, so you won’t have to worry about which mouth piece belongs to whom.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">instafloss</figure>

Apart from turning the Instafloss on and off, the only thing needed is adding tap water to the reservoir. Once topped off, you floss to your heart’s content by adjusting the water pressure valve located on the side of the reservoir.

Folks must really hate flossing the old fashioned way because the Instafloss acieved funding of over 6500 backers and $800,000 on Kickstarter (with only a $20,000 goal). Though the campaign is over , you can pre-order via Indiegogo with The Instafloss starting at $129 and a February 2021 delivery. Check out more about this water-fueled flosser on their Kickstarter page or on the Instafloss webpage.

The post The Instafloss is a Unique Multi-Water Jet Design To Floss Your Teeth appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 13, 2020 06:10 PM

The Javelin Blog

Installing SOLIDWORKS without the Toolbox Data

Starting with SOLIDWORKS 2020, when deploying SOLIDWORKS using an Administrative Image, you can choose not to install the SOLIDWORKS Toolbox data files.

This is useful if your SOLIDWORKS Toolbox is located in a central location such as the SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault or network drive.  Previously, especially if you were using PDM, this was a trickier process as each client install would want to either install a fresh SOLIDWORKS Data or upgrade an exiting one.

To control this option:

  1. Open the Administrative Image Option Editor and click Change to modify the Image.
  2. Go to the Toolbox/Hole Wizard Options section and under “Do you want this client to install/upgrade the Toolbox files?” question, select No, install the Toolbox software without including the data files.
SOLIDWORKS Administrative Image Toolbox Settings

SOLIDWORKS Administrative Image Toolbox Settings

This option greatly simplifies administering the Toolbox, especially if it is located in the PDM Vault, and it can speed up the deployment process as well.

At some point, either before or after the deployment to the clients, the Administrator will need to upgrade the Toolbox.  Depending on how the Toolbox is stored, the process will be slightly different.

The post Installing SOLIDWORKS without the Toolbox Data appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at July 13, 2020 12:00 PM

July 11, 2020

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Keg

This is a wooden beer keg complete with staves, heads, hoops, bung holes and a spigot. The Intersect command is used to help create the barrel shaped using surfaces as the cutting tool. This part implements the use of shared sketches to make the part creation more efficient and easier to modify.

Features: Extrude, Surface Revolve, Intersect, Split, Mirror, Move/Copy Bodies, Chamfer, Revolve, Surface Cut, Draft, Move Face, Wrap, Fillet

Complexity: Moderate

Download this moderate file to discover more about about the components of a traditional wooden barrel and a working spigot. Want to learn more? You can view the full list of previous Part Reviewer Tutorials here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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by SOLIDWORKS at July 11, 2020 03:00 PM

July 10, 2020

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Toy Diner Kitchen – Part 1 – Tutorial

I see many people these days designing and creating their own Wooden Toy Kitchens for their children, and if I were creating one, I would want to plan/design ahead in SOLIDWORKS first. It would allow me to work out dimensions, material thickness, and how to construct it best, so I thought it could be useful. In Part 1 of this tutorial you will need to download the DXF files from here. These are used as the mainframe for all the features and guided me for all the panel placement and thicknesses.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2jEuXuqCIKs" width="560"></iframe>
 

I designed my kitchen in a vector-based program first, called Corel Draw, this allows me to create my custom decals and DXF files, while also working out the overall size of the kitchen. The DXF files can be exported in your chosen units, but for this tutorial I exported in millimetres. DXF Tip: if you change sketch outlines to a dashed line in your vector program, when it is imported into SOLIDWORKS it will come in as construction lines.

The tutorial is really simple to follow, and involves basic modelling features like boss extrude, cut extrude, fillet and dome. I will also show you how to import a DXF file onto a plane and onto an extruded face. DXF files can be so useful in guiding a models size, adding complex sketch details quickly or mapping out a large part. No screws or fastenings are added to the model, the tutorial is purely visual, but if fastenings where added, dowels, wooden screws and glue could be used, or some parts could be modeled to hold together by a slotting join, needing no fastenings. Door hinges will be added to the part in part 2 of the tutorial to show how the doors would attach and open.

In Part 2 of this tutorial, we will finish up the kitchen’s counter top details adding hobs, a griddle, coffee pot stand, sink and tap. We will also be adding hinge parts to the doors, some custom decals, and there are accessory parts available to create a fun assembly.

Author information

Jade Crompton
I am a 3D Designer and Solidworks Blog Contributor from the UK. I am a self taught Solidworks user, and have been using it to inform and create my designs since 2012. I specialise in the design of Ceramics, Home Accessories and Wooden Toy Design.

The post Toy Diner Kitchen – Part 1 – Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Jade Crompton at July 10, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Customize your SOLIDWORKS model background!

Ever wanted a SOLIDWORKS model background that’s more pleasing to the eye?  Here’s how!

There is a collection of .png image files of such backgrounds that gets installed with SOLIDWORKS.  The trick is to know where they are located and then point to them in System Options > Colors > Background appearances > Image file

The image below uses SOLIDWORKS 2020 as an example, but you will want to change that to the year of your installed version.  Here is the path for 2020 so you can paste it into the path field when browsing, or change the year to the appropriate year version you are modifying.

C:\Program Files\SOLIDWORKS 2020\SOLIDWORKS\data\Images\textures\background
Workflow for pointing to the background appearance image files

Workflow for pointing to the background appearance image files

Ensure to set the file type filter to Portable Network Graphics File (*.png), otherwise you’ll see other images that are somewhat busier, and may distract from the modeling experience.  From my testing, I’ve found that simply selecting the desired .png file does not actually stick in the settings.  To work around that, simply type the file name and its extension into the Image file field.  The image below shows what it looks like when parchment.png is applied.  Happy customizing!

SOLIDWORKS Model Background parchment.png is applied

parchment.png is applied

The post Customize your SOLIDWORKS model background! appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWE at July 10, 2020 12:00 PM

July 08, 2020

SolidSmack

Bricker Turns Your 3D Blender Models Into LEGO Designs

bricker

Wouldn’t it be fun to live in a world made of LEGOs?

Apart from the excruciating pain of stepping on anything LEGO, the ability to build whatever you think of at a moment’s notice would open up a world of vlocky possibility.

While we may never live in such a world, the Bricker add-on for Blender may be the next best thing. Created by Bricks Brought to Life, Bricker converts your 3D Blender models into bonafide LEGO models. Whether it be a static object or one in motion, you can use the add-on to generate an accurate LEGO representation of your work.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EkugDLHyQ44?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Once you have Bricker installed, clicking on the Properties panel and then the Bricker option opens up an option to create a New Brick Model.

With it comes a whole library of possibilities. There are the usual suspects, such as the ability to adjust Brick Height and Brick Type, but you also have some pretty useful options as well.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

For instance, the Split Model function makes it so each individual brick is its own model; allowing you to pick and adjust each piece as you see fit. Legal Bricks Only is another one; it makes sure your LEGO CAD is composed of bricks which are based off of real ones. These are just a few of the options in Bricker’s wide Model Settings panel.

Detailing is another panel which deserves special mention. It focuses on each LEGO brick’s properties, from their hollowed undersides to the tiny LEGO logos on the studs. If you want an intricately detailed LEGO model or just a simple digitized block rendition, this is the section of Bricker you want to check out.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">bricker</figure>

You can even use Bricker as a LEGO sculpting simulator (which means you don’t need to have the 3D model beforehand). You just set the parameters for the LEGO model, such as the maximum brick size, thickness of the outer brick shell, internal supports, and generate the model.

When combined with AssemblMe, another Blender add-on, you can even create a stop motion animation that will help you assemble your LEGO model. Once you’re satisfied with your build, you can export it using LDraw Exporter and download the instructions so you can assemble your model using real LEGO bricks!

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">bricker</figure>

But arguably, Bricker’s coolest feature is its ability to effortlessly convert Blender animations and simulations into LEGO. It renders body physics, smoke, water, fire, and many other animations into a LEGO animated sculpture which either be rendered or constructed.

Thanks to optimization methods and a background processor, the creators of Bricker managed to reduce render times for both static and animated LEGO models. It takes less than a second, in many cases, to generate a model on a Mac laptop, so you can expect it to be just as quick on a PC workstation built for modeling or animation.

You can find Bricker on BlenderMarket for $65. If you’re even mildly intrigued at the thought of turning your 3D models into LEGO models, be sure to check it out. The add-on has a constant stream of updates, so you’ll always stay up to date in the world of LEGO 3D CAD rendering.

The post Bricker Turns Your 3D Blender Models Into LEGO Designs appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 08, 2020 06:47 PM

Cool Tools: Telescoping Magnetic Pick-up Tool

Let’s settle a debate: Magneto is the best character in X-Men. 

He’s suave, he’s broody from a rich backstory, and he does more exciting things with technology than Batman could ever hope for. It’s beautiful work to pull out excess iron from inside someone’s blood and body. And who doesn’t want to lift metal beams with a flick of a wrist?

This tool won’t give you that per se, but it does offer a minuscule taste of what it’s like to have Magneto’s inherent magnetism. Heh.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

SE’s Telescoping Magnetic Pick-up Tool

This handy, little tool is fairly straightforward. As its name suggests, it is a tool with a magnet on one end that lets you pick-up small metal items. It features an extendable rod too, for when you can’t leave your chair, and that’s the closest we’ll get to magno-telekinesis. For now.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

This comes in handy when you’ve lost your keys to the tenth circle of hell that is the underside of your couch. Or when you’re in that particular stage of IKEA furniture set-up where everything’s strewn about and you can’t, for the life of you, find that one weird three-pointed screw among the clutter. 

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

SE Telescoping Magnetic Pick-up Tool – Features:

  • It’s compact and extendable, with a 7” length and 30” length when extended.
  • The magnet can hold a weight up to 15 lbs.
  • Has a stainless steel rod, capable of handling a hot environment.
  • It has a black cushion grip on the handle for your comfort.
  • 1-pack or 2-pack options.

Have a cool tool you love and think should be featured? Contact us here to share it with us.

This post features affiliate links that help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

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by SolidSmack at July 08, 2020 02:41 PM

The Javelin Blog

Tips on Stratasys 3D Printer Tip Calibration

At Javelin Technologies, we have trained thousands of customers on how to use their brand-new Stratasys dual extruder 3D printers and the mechanics of tip calibration is always one of the trickiest parts to explain and demonstrate. In this article we are going to talk everything about tip calibration on Stratasys dual extruder printers such as Stratasys Fortus and F-series.

What is Stratasys tip calibration?

Tip calibration is nothing more than a process of telling the printer where the two tip nozzles (model & support) are relative to each other. The more accurate term for it would be relative tip offset distance calibration. Like everything else in the world, there are manufacturing tolerances in the components of the 3D printers. Although the printer knows the theoretical offset distances between the two tip nozzles, there are positional errors that typically occur in the range of +/- 0.010”, and sometimes as much as 0.020”. By performing a Stratasys tip calibration, we are looking to reduce the error down to +/- 0.002” or +/- 0.004” (depends on the printer model) in X-Y axes and +/- 0.0005” in Z axis.

OK, but why is this important?

The first reason behind the importance of tip offset calibration is to avoid model – support interference in X-Y axes. If you are printing parts that require support structures to run alongside of the model, you should notice that the air gap between the part and the support structure can be as little as 0.005”. If your tip is not calibrated correctly, the support structure could be too far, or too close. If they are too close, you will end up with a print that has witness marks of the support structure all over the surface. Worst case scenario, your print job will fail.

Secondly, correctly calibrated tip offset values promote good adhesion at the interfacing layer, where the top of the support structure and the model layer are touched. This keeps the build not only stable, but also affects the Z axis tolerance to some degree. When the Z axis tip offset is too close, the support base layer can be very difficult to peel off – which results in dissolving the part in the cleaning tank, which can take up to hours.

importance of stratasys tip offset calibration

Importance of tip offset calibration

When do I have to run the Stratasys tip calibration?

The operator must calibrate the tip offset every time one of the tips (or print heads for F-series) have been unmounted. This of course includes changing the tips or print heads on an F-series printer.

How does one correctly calibrate the tips?

For the general procedures, refer to your user manual supplied with the printer. If you do not have a copy, please call or email our technical support to obtain a copy. In this article, we would like to focus on the information that is not discussed in the manual and something that could improve your day-to-day operation with Stratasys FDM printers.

Stratasys 3D Printer Promotion

Stratasys F370 Promotion

Purchase a Stratasys F370 and receive a Stratasys F120 desktop 3D printer at no cost. A saving of US$11,999

Offer ends September 30, 2020

For Fortus 900 / 450 / 400 / 380 / 360 printers:

These printers go through 2 stages of tip calibration. The first is the automatic tip-to-tip calibration, then manually tweaking the values by reading the calibration box it prints.

During the automatic tip-to-tip calibration, it only measures Z axis offset. This is done by raising the platen up, letting the model and support tips to touch the ‘cone sensor’ – a simple on/off switch – while the printer monitors the Z axis encoder value and records it when each tip touches the cone. This way the printer can calculate the Z axis offset between the two nozzles. However, this measurement is only good for bringing the calibration value to a ball park figure and it can still be off by +/- 0.002” (sometimes more for certain materials such as Nylon) while the ideal tolerance is 0 to -0.0005”.

Cone sensor

Cone sensor

While this is all nice and easy if everything goes as described in the manual, some odd situations will rise time to time.

Case#1: the support material layer measurement does not respond to the changes made to “Material thickness” value from the calibration adjustment page.

This typically happens when the Z axis offset between the model and the support tips are way out of range. The very root cause of this behavior is the foreign material interfering with the cone sensor measurement during the automatic tip-to-tip calibration stage. This is somewhat common with materials that are hydrophilic (Nylon or Ultem based). High moisture content in the material filament causes excessive oozing of the material and it can lead to a false reading of the Z axis tip-to-tip offset.

Cross section profile

Cross section profile

To fight this, the printer will purge & clean the tips right before letting them touch the cone sensor but the material could still ooze again very rapidly or not get cleaned properly after the purging cycle. When this happens, it is important to check the cross section profile of the support layer that you peeled off from the calibration box. If the profile looks like the illustration below, it can be lead you to the completely wrong direction for making the offset adjustments.

Correct reading False reading
Case #2: the X-Y calibration is completely out of bound.

This could happen sometimes after a tip change. The maximum range displayed on the calibration box is +/- 0.008” which isn’t a whole lot. If the tip physical offset is more than that, the calibration line will be out of bound and you may be lost in terms of which direction you need to change the values to. In cases like that, the diagram below will help you determine which direction (+X, -X, +Y or -Y) to move the values. Since you need to make adjustments in a large increment past 0.008” range, you can do so by unchecking ‘build calibration part’ when you enter the Stratasys tip calibration wizard and repeat adjusting the XY values until you reached the desired value.

X-Y offset indicator line is out of bound

X-Y offset indicator line is out of bound

Tip calibration

Tip calibration

For F-series 370 / 270 / 170 / 120 printers:

The automatic Stratasys tip calibration on F-series printer has gone through many improvements over the years and we’re at the point where it gets it right pretty close to the acceptable values about 90% of the time. However, it is always recommended to run at least one manual calibration box to confirm the automatic tip calibration has been done correctly.

Case #1: Automatic Stratasys tip calibration is far from being useful.

If your printer is running on firmware version older than 2.0, we highly recommend that you update the printer firmware to the latest. The automatic tip calibration process has been improved quite a lot since the very first release.

Once you have confirmed you have the latest firmware, we recommended to run the auto tip calibration while the materials are unloaded. The way these printers measure the tip offset values is by physically dragging the tip on the stainless steel Z axis platform around the ‘+’ crosshair cutout until the tip ‘drops’ into the cutout. This is sensed by a plunger sensor integrated to the print head design. Any interference (i.e. material oozing out of the nozzle) between the tip nozzle and the Z axis platform will lead to false measurement. By unloading the materials, you are eliminating the chance of getting oozed material from the nozzle. Additionally, it is always a good practice to visually inspect the nozzle area and make sure it is clean and free of any buildup.

F series automatic tip calibration crosshairs

F series automatic tip calibration crosshairs

Case #2: Stratasys Tip calibration values are confusing. Why is there a discrepancy between X1 and X2 (or Y1 and Y2) values?

These printers, like every piece of machinery, have some level of backlash in the gantry system. To mitigate the negative effect the backlash could have on the tip calibration, it moves the head from two different directions along the same axis (hence two readings per axis). So if your calibration reads +3 on X1 and -1 on X2, it means there is approximately 0.004” backlash and the true offset error is +0.001”, which is the average value between X1 and X2. As long as the true offset error is within +/- 0.002” range, the calibration is acceptable. The backlash error is automatically compensated by the printer’s motion controller – nothing for you to worry about.

Discrepancy between X1 and X2 or Y1 and Y2 values

Discrepancy between X1 and X2 or Y1 and Y2 values

The post Tips on Stratasys 3D Printer Tip Calibration appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joseph Yang at July 08, 2020 02:32 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – July 2020

Hello to all,

Welcome to the new edition of the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News!  This monthly news blog is co-authored by members of the SOLIDWORKS Technical Support teams worldwide.

We are committed to support you while working from home due to COVID-19

The world is facing an unprecedented challenge due the ongoing pandemic and many of our SOLIDWORKS users are having to work from home. SOLIDWORKS Technical Support is very committed to support all our users and community during this difficult time.

During last couple of months, we have written some blogs as well as KB articles which enlist various best practices while using our products like SOLIDWORKS CAD, PDM, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, 3DEXPERIENCE platform, etc.

Here are some of the blogs which have been published so far:

  • Maintaining SOLIDWORKS Design and Data Efficiency While Working from Home: You can visit this blog to find out how you can work with SOLIDWORKS CAD and PDM.

https://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2020/04/maintaining-solidworks-design-and-data-efficiency-while-working-from-home.html

  • Navigating all Your Work-from-Home SOLIDWORKS Options: You can visit this blog to manage all the aspects like Download, Installation, Licensing, etc.

https://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2020/03/navigating-all-your-work-from-home-solidworks-options.html

  • Working from Home Successfully with SOLIDWORKS Electrical: You can visit this blog to find out how you can manage Single user and multi user environment in SOLIDWORKS Electrical.

https://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2020/04/working-from-home-successfully-with-solidworks-electrical.html

  • The Easy Way to Work from Home with your SOLIDWORKS Team: You can visit this blog to find out how you can use The Collaborative Business Innovator, which resides on the cloud-based 3DEXPERIENCE® platform and has the necessary apps to get the job done conveniently from your home office

https://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2020/05/the-easy-way-to-work-from-home-with-your-solidworks-team.html

 

We understand that things are changing quickly in today’s world and that all of this can be a lot to handle on top of your already busy and hectic schedule.  Just remember we are here to help you navigate through these tough times. You can always reach out to your local VAR for a more in-depth discussion as to what it will take to keep you and your company successful when working from home. You can also comment in this blog to start a discussion with us.

SOLIDWORKS 2021 Beta is Here…What Are You Waiting For?

By Julien Boissat

The SOLIDWORKS Beta Program is your opportunity to work as a team with SOLIDWORKS R&D to ensure that the upcoming products provide the quality, performance, and user experience you expect. Sure, we want you to test drive new features to get a first look at what to expect from the next release, but we want more! We want you to stress test the software with your workflows and models to ensure that everything works smoothly for you and your organization. Yes, there are prizes you can win, but what we really want most from you are your bugscriticisms, and irritations!

How do I participate?

Go to the SOLIDWORKS Beta page. No sign up is required!

Access to the Beta software is automatically available for all SOLIDWORKS subscription service customers. If you are currently on subscription, and your SOLIDWORKS serial number is registered in  your SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal account, the Beta software will be available for you to download, or to run online from a supported web browser.

The Beta period will run until mid-September.

Once logged in, you will have exclusive access to:

  • Test-drive new and enhanced products
  • Share feedback directly with the SOLIDWORKS Beta team
  • Connect with the SOLIDWORKS Beta community and interact with the R&D team
  • Win over 100 prizes!

Do I need to Install the Beta version?

Absolutely not! Beta testers can either download and install the SOLIDWORKS 2021 Beta software, or run the SOLIDWORKS 2021 Beta Online version for anywhere, anytime testing through the use of a supported browser. There is no need to download, install or activate any software!

 

Noteworthy Solutions from the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base

 

icon - SW When I select or hover over a file in the ‘File’ > ‘Open’ dialog box, why does the SOLIDWORKS® application stop functioning?
This behavior occurs because of a null or corrupted date in the ‘Created’, ‘Modified’, or ‘Accessed’ date file properties. To learn about possible workarounds and solutions, see Solution Id: S-077964.

icon - SW In the SOLIDWORKS® 2020 software, why does the ‘Replace Model’ option for drawing views crash for some files?
This behavior might occur because of a fault in SOLIDWORKS® 2020 SP1 or SP2 depending on the name of the file being replaced. To resolve this issue, download and run the attached hotfix file in Solution Id: S-077705.

Icon - EPDM Is there a SolidPractice available on the topic of “SQL Server Performance”?
The SolidPractice document attached to Solution Id: S-077687 describes various factors that influence the performance of Microsoft® SQL Server® as a component of a SOLIDWORKS® PDM environment. The document discusses aspects that you can influence when configuring and maintaining a SQL Server installation (a SQL Server), and the best ways to identify and address performance problems.

Is there a SolidPractice available on the topic of “Meshing for Flow Analysis”?
The SolidPractice document attached to Solution Id: S-077802 provides an overview of the tools available to assess the mesh quality. It is the responsibility of the user to understand and master these tools to build a high quality mesh for an application.


That’s it for this month. Thanks for reading this edition of SOLIDWORKS Support News. If you need additional help with these issues or any others, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller.

 

Comments and suggestions are always welcome. You can enter them below.

Author information

Nicole Phillips
Technical Customer Support Engineer, SOLIDWORKS, Americas at DS SolidWorks Corp.
I have been with DS SOLIDWORKS as a Technical Support Engineer since 2013. I provide support for our SOLIDWORKS PDM products. I also handle the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News blog.

The post SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – July 2020 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Nicole Phillips at July 08, 2020 12:57 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Collaborate and Manage Your Drawings with 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight

Just for fun, compared to the rolls and boxes of drawings (for a preliminary design of an airport terminal shown in Figures 1 and 2), how does the volume of printouts from your projects compare? Please feel free to leave your comments in the comment area below.

Figure 1. Drawing printouts of an airport terminal preliminary design.

Figure 2. Boxes of drawing printouts ready for shipping.

 

The small portion of the preliminary drawings shown (the efforts of five architects over two months) already looks overwhelming, doesn’t it? As you know, 2D drawings are still the default standard communication vehicle in many industries around the globe.

How do designers collaborate and manage drawings for similarly large projects? Some common questions that I’m sure you are familiar with include:

  • How does the team track the massive amount of data?
  • Where can I quickly find the one drawing I need in this ocean of drawings?
  • How can I tell if a set of drawings is ready for signatures, a building permit application, electric wiring, HVAC, inspection, etc.?
  • How can I share the drawings quickly and securely?

These challenges are beyond drafting. As you know, DraftSight is very good at drafting and has been trusted by millions of users worldwide. However, to further serve its users and respond to the needs beyond drafting, DraftSight has introduced a new role called 3DEXPERIENCE® DraftSight, shown in Figure 3.

Figure 3. Checking in and checking out a drawing in 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight.

 

As you can see, 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight looks very similar to DraftSight with the addition of a new task pane that interacts directly with the 3DEXPERIENCE platform inside the application. In the task pane you can search for keywords, quickly locate a drawing on the platform, check files in and out to avoid conflicting edits, save a new drawing revision, replace a local version with a platform revision, and set a drawing maturity stage so your team can learn the latest status and determine the corresponding actions.

Once a drawing is checked in to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, you can securely share it with others. For example, from a browser you can control whether a recipient can view or edit the drawing. You can even decide whether a recipient can share it with others, as shown in Figure 4. In addition, the drawing can also be shared as a link that your collaborators can access directly, as shown in Figure 5.

Figure 4. Sharing a drawing with community members in a browser.

 

Figure 5. Sharing a drawing as a link in a browser.

 

Looking back, DraftSight has come a long way. Ten years ago, DraftSight embarked on a mission to empower users with professional and affordable 2D communications. It has gained the trust of millions of users.

Looking forward, now the world is more interconnected, online, complex, and collaborative. With the trust and guidance of millions of users, DraftSight is going further to serve the imperative needs for online collaboration and data management.

How have your projects grown in complexity? How about the demands of virtually collaborating with internal and external members? What can DraftSight do to help with your challenges? Please leave your comments and visit the product page for more details of 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight.

Author information

Oboe Wu
Oboe Wu
Product portfolio manager of SOLIDWORKS MBD, passionate about smart manufacturing opportunities, Keen listener to customer challenges, Sharp problem solver with 20 years of experiences in engineering, Sleepless father trying best to take care of a baby daughter.

The post Collaborate and Manage Your Drawings with 3DEXPERIENCE DraftSight appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Oboe Wu at July 08, 2020 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Material Favourites for easy access in SOLIDWORKS

Adding materials to all of your SOLIDWORKS parts is important.  Not only is this useful for reference in Bill of Materials or Title Blocks, but you must have the proper density values applied to the model for accurate mass properties. Learn how using a SOLIDWORKS Material Favourite will save you time when assigning a material to your part.

If no material is assigned to a part file, a default density value is applied.  This value is defined under Tools > Options > System Options > Document Properties > Material Properties within a given file.  The default SOLIDWORKS templates have a density of 1000 kg/m^3 (0.036 lb/in^3).

SOLIDWORKS Default Density Value with No Material Assigned

SOLIDWORKS Default Density Value with No Material Assigned

To ensure your model mass will be correct, verify that the material assigned has the proper density value.  The volume of the solid body geometry in the part is multiplied by the density value of the material.  A custom material may need to be defined if the density differs than those of the default SOLIDWORKS material database.

The SOLIDWORKS 2020 material search field is a new enhancement that makes finding a required material easier.  Though more often than not you’ll use only a select few.  This is where Material Favourites can save some time.

Right-clicking on Material from the FeatureManager Design Tree provides a menu with a list of common materials.  The list can be modified and set with your own personal favourites by selecting Manage Favourites.

SOLIDWORKS Manage Favourites

SOLIDWORKS Manage Favourites

The Material dialog opens and the Favourites tab is selected.  Choose a material from the left panel and click Add.  Or select a material from the list of favourites and Remove.

SOLIDWORKS Favourite Materials

SOLIDWORKS Favourite Materials

If you want to go one step further, you could create multiple part templates each with its own material.  Then the new part already has the defined material.

SOLIDWORKS Part Template Defined

SOLIDWORKS Part Template with Material Defined

The post Material Favourites for easy access in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at July 08, 2020 11:51 AM

July 07, 2020

SolidSmack

ProtoSpray Mixes 3D Printing and Electroluminescent Paint To Create Objects That Light Up

protospray

“If you want something to stand out, the best way to do so is to light it up like a Christmas tree.”

Creators Ollie Hanton, Michael Wessely, Stefanie Mueller, Mike Fraser, and Anne Roudaut have taken this idea to heart and crafted a method to add light on any surface using a unique electroluminescent coating.

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</figure>

ProtoSpray combines multi-material 3D printing and the application of electroluminescent materials to create interactive touch-sensitive light displays on any shape.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">protospray</figure>

The process starts very similarly to how you would normally 3D print an object. During the design process, the base electrode area is printed with a conductive PLA (e.g. Proto-Pasta Conductive PLA), each having a thin channel where an electrode connects while the unlit substrate material is printed in an insulating PLA (e.g. Hatchbox Filament).

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">protospray</figure>

Once you’ve printed your multi-material model, you begin spraying the area that will be lit with three layers of electro-activating materials.

  • Dielectric material layer
  • Electroluminescent material layer
  • Transparent conductive electrode material layer

According to Ollie Hanton’s tutorial, spray two thin coats each of PEDOT:PSS (a transparent conductive polymer), electroluminescent phosphor-based paint, and clear lacquer; making sure to give each layer ample time to dry before moving on to the next.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">protospray</figure>

With the parts printed and sprayed, attach the electrodes and set up the control panel. Each luminous part needs to be connected to an EL inverter and the top electrode (which you sprayed earlier). In the case of Ollie Hanton and his team, they ran the bottom electrodes through a set of relays so they could be controlled remotely with an Arduino Nano.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">protospray</figure>

The process is slightly different for each object depending on its geometry, size, and which areas you want to light up. If you want an in-depth tutorial on how to make your 3D printed objects light up, be sure to check out Ollie Hanton’s Instructables tutorial.

You can also check out the group’s entire paper on the ProtoSpray here.

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post ProtoSpray Mixes 3D Printing and Electroluminescent Paint To Create Objects That Light Up appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 07, 2020 06:57 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Don’t Miss Out on the 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Offers!

It is time.  The 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Offers are finally here and knocking on our door!  It has only been a few months since SOLIDWORKS CEO Gian Paolo Bassi teased us with a glimpse of these amazing offers in the 3DEXPERIENCE World General Session but it seems like eternity as the excitement has been mounting.

It doesn’t get better than this – the SOLIDWORKS desktop product you know and love, combined with the powerful 3DEXPERIENCE Platform all fully integrated as never before!  Add in robust, safe and secure PDM, Project Management, CAD in the Cloud, a Sub-D surface modeler and Simulation, and you have three amazing offers to entice you to take that step onto the Platform. Let’s take a look at the many benefits of a cloud-based product development platform.

Baked-in IT and data management

Have you ever worked on an outdated file, spent so long looking for a part you could have redrawn it, or wondered who made a modification to an assembly when you weren’t looking?  Is it difficult managing your various SOLIDWORKS’ users and licenses?  Do you love it when a new release of SOLIDWORKS comes out – but detest the dreaded install process? Then you are going to love the easy-to-use, practically transparent Data Management tools that come with the 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Offers.

No need to make a large investment in IT or expensive servers – we have the 3DEXPERIENCE platform to thank for that!  SOLIDWORKS updates are lighter, automatic and more frequent so you get the new features as soon as possible. It’s easy to manage and scale your business by adding or subtracting licenses when needed, and you now have one single source of truth, alleviating the pain that comes when working without PDM.  What will you do with all that time on your hands since you won’t be recreating models, searching for valuable data, or working on outdated files?

Proactive product management

We all work on projects as we design and develop products – how are you managing these projects?  The 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS offers come with easy PLM and Project Management tools for all projects, large or small, that will keep your teams’ tasks organized and on schedule.  Assign tasks and set key milestones and reminders to keep projects on track. Stakeholders have transparent access to the timeline where they can check the status, run reports and manage design changes.

With this new normal – many of us are working remotely (or sometimes even far apart in our offices).  With the offers, you also get the powerful 3DEXPERIENCE platform collaboration tools that help solve design problems faster, foster innovation and encourage discussions that improve processes.  It’s easy to share your SOLIDWORKS design data with others – anytime, anywhere and on any device. Mark-ups are simple and can easily be fed back into the project.  Need more convincing on the power of collaboration for Product Design and Development?  Check out my article on Engineering.com.

Or maybe you need to work from home but forgot to borrow your SOLIDWORKS license when you were in the office.  No problem at all because you access your SOLIDWORKS from anywhere just by logging into the 3DEXPERIENCE platform (that would have come in handy during those stay-at-home orders!)

Of course you can buy many disparate collaboration, PDM, and project management tools from multiple sources that don’t fully understand the product design and development industry.  Or you can buy one total solution from the company that brings you the SOLIDWORKS you have come to depend on.  No company understands your processes better than Dassault Systèmes! The 3DEXPERIENCE Platform is a secure collaborative one-stop-shop for everyone in the Design and Manufacturing eco-system.

The 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS offers are all priced to please your budget, with little (or in some cases no) additional cost over SOLIDWORKS desktop alone.  When you add in the value of the robust PDM tools, the full 3DEXPERIENCE platform integration, as well as CAD in the Cloud with 3D Creator – the 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Standard Offer is tough to pass up for sure!  If you’re also looking for a friendly yet powerful Sub-D surface modeler, you can go with 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Professional.  If you want Simulation on top of everything else – you can go with the Premium Offer.  Your business needs are unique so the choice is yours.

Note:  All of these offers are SAS (Software as a Service), which means you pay as you go.

A day in the life on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform

How will you start your day with the 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS offers?  You can either create a Desktop Shortcut that launches SOLIDWORKS – much like before, except it will route you through the platform or you can log onto the 3DEXPERIENCE platform and launch it from within.  Simple.  If you are part of a project and have tasks assigned to you – you might see friendly reminders in the platform.  Of course, as with all things CLOUD, an internet connection is required.  You will be saving all of your data up in the cloud for safe, secure and speedy access and you won’t look back!

It is time to take the next step in your CAD journey and move to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.  These offers are the perfect entry point to make the move and reap the many rewards.  Contact your local reseller today for more information about the 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS offers and see for yourself!

Author information

Lynn Allen
Lynn Allen
In her 20+ year career as a Technology Evangelist, first for Autodesk and now at Dassault Systèmes, Lynn Allen has spoken to more than a half million professionals at events in over 50 countries. Her online presentations and videos have easily reached over five million individuals. Her passion and strength is connecting with users, helping them embrace change and shining a light on new technology. For over 20 years she wrote a column for Cadalyst magazine, and was the voice behind their popular videos –“Tips with Lynn Allen”. The author of three technology books - Lynn has over 21,000 followers on Twitter (Lynn_Allen) with over a quarter million impressions every month.

The post Don’t Miss Out on the 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Offers! appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Lynn Allen at July 07, 2020 12:00 PM

July 06, 2020

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: Xbox One Gyro Snack Bowl [Jump In… TO A SNACK]

No matter how much you may be winning your latest video game, there’s no winnin’ when your snacks are out of reach. You have options like placing multiple bags and bowls within arms reach but what if you could have a bowl attached to your controller? And what if it had a gimbal design to keep your snacks stationary? …excluding the occasional tossing of the controller across the room, of course.

In perhaps our most almost-practical model of the week, Noycebru presents his ultra-innovative controller attachment to keep a sizeable snack load within a double jump of your nubs.

This is a gyro snack bowl mount for your Xbox one controller. The bowl (not included, can be purchased on Amazon or Walmart) moves with your controllers so you won’t spill your snacks while gaming! It also comes with a towel rod on the back to hold your wet wipe so you won’t get your controller greasy!

The gyro snack bowl (designed for wee babes learning to eat), pretty cool in itself, could likely be modeled and printed but is readily available online. The 3D printed portion is the extension that extends from where it clips to the front of the Xbox One controller up approximately 6-inches to the cradle where the bowl is attached.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

He used Fusion 360 to design the controller attachment and a Creality Ender 3 to 3D print the piece. Files provided come in F3D, GCODE, and STL formats.

Download the 3D model on Cults3D or Thingiverse. [Bonus! Check out his other creation at noycebru.com!]

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Model of the Week: Xbox One Gyro Snack Bowl [Jump In… TO A SNACK] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at July 06, 2020 06:57 PM

The Gemini Is A Divider, Whiteboard, and Cabinet All-In-One Design

gemini

It’s always nice when a product’s design lends itself to multiple functions. Not only is it more versatile, but saves a ton of space by doing what two or more things do. And, if you think the room/cubicle divider couldn’t be innovated any further, Stone Designs is out to prove you wrong.

Their Gemini divider, designed in collaboration with Glimakra, is a furniture piece which looks like a head-height whiteboard on one side, a divider on another, with a full-on storage area in between. It’s one furniture piece with three specific functions.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">gemini</figure>

The Gemini works just as well at home as it does plopped between you and a fellow co-worker. In the home, it divides a larger room. In the office, one person has the whiteboard to jot down ideas while the other has the privacy of a sound-absorbing divider to work.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">gemini</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">gemini</figure>

With the design incorporating caster wheels, either side is easily switched or repositioned given the need or situation.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">gemini</figure>

With three oak inner shelves, partially revealing an upholstered partition area, the divider provides additional organization space to accommodates belongings, books, tools, pictures, papers, and more.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">gemini</figure>

The Gemini recently won a 2020 Red Dot Award in Product Design, making it internationally recognized as an achievement in product design. Find out more on this multi-functional furniture piece over on the Stone Designs webpage.

The post The Gemini Is A Divider, Whiteboard, and Cabinet All-In-One Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 06, 2020 05:44 PM

The Javelin Blog

Diran 410MF07 Material Series Part Two: Machine Upgrade FAQs

Stratasys has recently released Diran material for the Stratasys F370 3D printer; this material is a nylon-based thermoplastic with 7% mineral fill by weight. In the second of this three part series, we will discuss material application examples and upgrade FAQ’s. Read part one to learn the material characteristics and properties of Diran.

What problems does Diran 410MF07 solve?

Jigs and fixtures produced using traditional production methods or existing additive manufacturing solutions are typically:

  • heavy, which can be unwieldy and cumbersome
  • time consuming due to the required assembly
  • not durable and break when dropped
  • limited in functionality
  • expensive and require a long turn around when customized. Design freedom is limited
  • damage products by marking paint/finish on fine detailed products.

Diran provides the ability to:

  • reduce weight, lead time and cost in the production of manufacturing aids without the risk of marking the product (high lubricity).
  • enhance durability, strength, and wear properties over existing AM solutions.
  • consolidate/combine parts and improve tooling functionality and ergonomics.

Diran 410MF07 has been developed specifically to address these issues, it has been formulated to withstand the rigorous demands of the factory floor.

Examples of Diran used in tooling and shop floor applications:

Diran robot end effector Diran spline tool Processing aid printed in diran Assembly aid printed in diran

Upgrade FAQs

What printer is Diran material available on?

Today, Diran 410MF07 material can be printed on the Stratasys F370 only.

Does the upgrade require any additional parts or modification to the printer?

No, aside from a material license update, Diran can be printed with a standard ABS F123 print head and requires no additional parts or modification to the printer.

How does the support material work?

Diran must be printed with SUP4000B break away support due to a difference in the CTE (Coefficient of thermal expansion) between the two materials. The bulk of the support structures are printed with model material and support material is used in the interface between the actual model/part and the support structures. The support material is printed in such a way that it can be ‘broken off’ or ‘peeled away’ from the model. SUP4000B can be printed with a standard F123 support head.

What slice heights are available?

Diran can be printed in 0.007”, 0.010” and 0.013” layer heights.

Stratasys 3D Printer Promotion

Stratasys F370 Promotion

Purchase a Stratasys F370 and receive a Stratasys F120 desktop 3D printer at no cost. A saving of US$11,999

Offer ends September 30, 2020

What about the build tray?

Diran builds at a higher temperature than ABS, so to prevent warping, a high temperature build tray is required. The high temperature build tray is orange in colour vs. the standard build tray which is black.

How can I order DIRAN 410MF07?

All material can be ordered via email (material.order@javelin-tech.com) or telephone (1-877-219-6757). Diran and other best selling materials can also be purchased directly through our web store.

Diran printed part significantly reduces lead time 

nVent Manifold use case with Diran 410MF07

nVent Manifold use case with Diran 410MF07

Stay tuned for the final blog in the Diran Material series, where we will talk about how to print with Diran and material best practices.

The post Diran 410MF07 Material Series Part Two: Machine Upgrade FAQs appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Pierre Hart at July 06, 2020 05:20 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip – The Formation Tool

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional makes it incredibly easy to lay out copies of your product using the handy Formation Tool. In only a few clicks, Visualize will place your models into a variety of patterns (circular, line, diagonal, vee, etc) allowing for quick and easy display of design iterations or product variants like different colors. In this week’s Visualize Quick Tip, we’ll show you how to use the Formation Tool to rapidly arrange several models in a single Visualize project.

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Check out this YouTube playlist more helpful Visualize videos!

USE THE VISUALIZE FORUM to connect with the global Visualize Community for self-help support with common questions. Don’t forget to share your Visualize images and animations on this Forum thread!

 

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip – The Formation Tool appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at July 06, 2020 03:00 PM