Planet SolidWorks

September 23, 2017

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 38.17

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee, and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top ten stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

This Polymer Skateboard Deck Pops Higher and Lasts a Lifetime

Though skateboarders have been blessed with a variety of upgrades to the traditional skateboard (such as a smart electric skateboard with a built-in A.I. and a one-wheeled, all-terrain variant), traditional boards are built of maple plys that’ll snap as soon as you land on it wrong.

Nike Makers’ Experience Lets Users Generate Their Own Custom Shoe Design

For sneakerheads who would happily sell their offspring for a chance at exclusively designed shoes, listen up: You won’t have to!

The Secret to Making Dippin’ Dots Ice Cream? Liquid Nitrogen!

All this talk of innovations that haven’t come out yet and we end up forgetting the ones we already have.

MX3D Reveals First Section of 3D Printed Steel Bridge

Recently, we talked about MX3D getting all giant metal 3d printing robot on us and printing the 3D structures of the future. If you’re familiar with the company, you know they’ve been busy the last few years on a mission to build the first functional 3D printed bridge across the Oudezijds Achterburgwal canal in the De Wallen (red light) district of Amsterdam. They’ve now completed the first section at the MX3D warehouse and it’s now you’ll start to get a better realization of just how massive the 12 meter bridge will be.

Google Glass and Skylight Could Mean Big Advancements for 3D CAD Design

When Google Glass was released to the public in 2014, a lot of controversy ensued over privacy and safety concerns. When a piece of hardware obstructs your view with the data of strangers you share a sidewalk with, it isn’t hard to see how the device can feel a bit creepy to passersby. Thankfully, the prototype was discontinued by Google and brought back to the drawing board.

Top 3 Onshape Updates: Variable Fillet, Sheet Metal Tab, Bend Relief Size

Wel, well, well. Onshape features this year to date? A buck 0′ two. That’s right, Onshape has passed the 100 mark with a small nod and rumors of cookie dough ice cream for all Onshape employees over the next month on everyday that ends in ‘Y’.

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 38.17 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 23, 2017 12:46 PM

September 22, 2017

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Bottle of Tentacles

The bottles opened on their own. Not like you might think. The caps peeled themselves off slowly, cracking and grinding, the bottle content overflowing. Then the veins. Oh, the veins. Barely visible through the glass at first, but pressing, spreading up and out, forming the flapping tentacles of these links.

Elijah McNeal – Oh, how I love this style. Those lines. And the detail! Loads of it in mechs, ships, weapons and more. Interview here.

Kunstglaser – The life of a glasscutter, not as an artist, but as a outlet for artists to explore their work in the medium of glass.

Isle of Dogs – Could this be the new Wes Anderson movie trailer. Yes, yes I believe it is. Stop-motion. Symmetry. Bill Murray.

Old English Herbal – Cotton MS Vitellius C III is a composite illustrated manual on plant pharmacology dating to the 9th century containing many interesting entries for natural remedies.

Firstage – An AR music app that lets you view performances using a printed stage or by finding another. First in a line of performance art AR apps? Me thinks so.

Drone vs Rollercoaster – Because drone racing and rollercoasters are the perfect matchup I guess. Still, awesome.

Skies – The amazing photography of Mikko Lagerstedt. Worlds, waters, reflections and more.

Behaviour Morphe – Light mapping collaboration between Zaha Hadid Architects and computer science researchers Andy Lomas and Mubbasir Kapadia with musician Max Cooper.
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Distance / Daunting – A somber track, but lovely visuals and colors in a story told quite creatively with an important moral.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MD-HqwYKW_U?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

The post Friday Smackdown: Bottle of Tentacles appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 22, 2017 04:19 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Mirror Part now includes Material and Visual Properties

SOLIDWORKS 2018 provides a variety of new enhancements. One of the new enhancements is the ability to include the material and the visual appearance of the parent part in the derived part when using the SOLIDWORKS Mirror Part command (Insert -> Mirror Part). If you see that the Mirror Part command is greyed out that is because you should pre-select the mirror face or plane.

The Material checkbox in the Mirror Components PropertyManager is selected by default and lets you propagate the material of the mirrored part from the parent part. Also, the Propagate from original part option in the Visual Properties section can be used to transfer colour assignments from the parent part to the derived part.

SOLIDWORKS Mirror Part PropertyManager

SOLIDWORKS Mirror Part PropertyManager

The Material and Propagate from original part options are available only when you mirror a part or when you insert a part into another part for the first time. These options are not available when you edit the mirror feature or the inserted part. Also, the material and visual properties of the derived part are not linked to the parent so if you change those properties for the parent part, the derived part doesn’t change.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2018 Mirror Part now includes Material and Visual Properties appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Saeed Mojarad (CSWE) at September 22, 2017 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Troubleshoot Meshing with SOLIDWORKS Geometry Analysis Tool

One of the most frustrating parts of the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) world is when a geometry won’t mesh no matter what you do. What’s even more frustrating is when you don’t know what to do about it! Luckily, I’ve found you can use the Geometry Analysis tool to investigate areas of your geometry that may cause your mesher problems. It’s such a helpful tool, I wanted to share it with everyone!

Goodbye, Frustration!

Often times, the main cause of mesh failure is due to very small geometry within a model. In those situations, the size of the mesh just can’t fit an element into that space, thus the mesh fails. The trick is to determine where that troublesome geometry is located in your model, especially as the design becomes more and more intricate. The Geometry Analysis tool does just that.

The tool analyzes the model and locates the very small features within the model. Once we have located the potential trouble areas, the combination of adjusting the mesh size and cleaning the geometry will help fix our meshing problems.

SOLIDWORKS Geometry Analysis tool in action

Geometry Analysis can be found under the Tools menu in SOLIDWORKS. It will ask you to specify a tolerance value for sharp angles and insignificant geometry.

In order to determine the insignificant geometry tolerance, think about the shortest significant edge in the model. This could be the edge of a fillet, wall thickness, hole size, etc. Take this size, divide it by 2, and use the result as your tolerance value. A default of five for sharp angles usually works well.

SOLIDWORKS Geometry Analysis Results
After the analysis, it will report all short edges, small faces, and sliver faces. You can expand the analysis to determine where each is located on the model.

Now that you know where they are located, you can either clean up the geometry for easier meshing in that area or try to apply mesh controls in those areas. Usually, that’s all you need to do successfully resolve a lot of your meshing problems!

Author information

GSC
GSC fuels customer success with 3D engineering solutions for design, simulation, data management, technical documentation, and 3D printing, as well as the most comprehensive consulting, technical support, and training in the industry. As a leading provider of SOLIDWORKS solutions and Stratasys 3D printing technologies, GSC’s world-class team of dedicated professionals have helped numerous companies innovate and increase productivity by leveraging advanced technologies to drive 3D business success. Founded in 1989, GSC is headquartered in Germantown, WI. For more information about GSC, please visit www.gsc-3d.com.

The post Troubleshoot Meshing with SOLIDWORKS Geometry Analysis Tool appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GSC at September 22, 2017 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

Every 3D Polyhedron You’d Ever Want to Construct, Render or 3D Print

Examples of a few 3D polyhedron that can be generated by Stella

Stella, a “Polyhedron Navigator” provides a way to very quickly view and generate almost any type of 3D polyhedron you can imagine.

What’s a 3D polyhedron? While you may bump into them in real life constantly, it’s a geometric concept that encompasses a broad set of possible objects. Wikipedia defines them as:

In geometry, a polyhedron (plural polyhedra or polyhedrons) is a solid in three dimensions with flat polygonal faces, straight edges and sharp corners or vertices. The word polyhedron comes from the Classical Greek πολύεδρον, as poly- (stem of πολύς, “many”) + -hedron (form of ἕδρα, “base” or “seat”).

A convex polyhedron is the convex hull of finitely many points, not all on the same plane. Cubes and pyramids are examples of convex polyhedra.

It turns out there are a great many types of 3D polyhedron, as they have been studied in geometry for centuries, such as the Tetrahedron, Icosidodecahedron or Rhombic triacontahedron.

Sometimes it is useful to include such objects within a 3D model, but it can be challenging to develop such structures on your own, aside from simple ones such as a cube, pyramid or similar. The more intricate polyhedrons are essentially impossible to design by hand.

If only there was a way to generate them.

Turns out there is a very powerful tool to do so, called “Stella”, by developer Robert Webb of Software3D.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_89652" style="width: 855px">Examples of a few 3D polyhedron that can be generated by Stella<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Examples of a few of the polyhedra that can be generated by Stella</figcaption></figure>

The main purpose of this software is to produce 2D “unfolded” versions of the polyhedra (polyhedral nets), which you can print on paper, cut out and fold up into the object. It can get quite complex, as you can see here in this completed fold-up of a Cantitruncated Tesseract:

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_89651" style="width: 1024px">A 3D polyhedron you may not have heard of before: the Cantitruncated Tesseract<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">A defined shape you may not have heard of before: the Cantitruncated Tesseract</figcaption></figure>

You can also apply a color texture to the surfaces of the faces for developing unusual art pieces.

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While the main purpose of the software is for paper construction, some versions of Stella can also export an STL 3D model suitable for 3D printing or OBJ for 3D rendering.

Stella comes in three different versions, with some odd product names:

Small Stella” contains a pre-made – but comprehensive – of many polyhedra you can examine and download. Priced at USD$14. This version DOES NOT permit exporting of 3D models.

Great Stella” is more comprehensive and allows manipulation of the polyhedra to create more unique forms in some rather complex ways. Priced at USD$45.

Stella4D” includes all known polyhedra and has 4D capability (that’s the geometric 4D, not the 3D print 4D meaning). Priced at USD $67 for non-commercial use, and USD$120 for commercial use. In fact, this is the only license from Software3D that provides for commercial use.

The Windows-only software is available for download and purchase now, and appears to have been continuously supported for many years.

Need a polyhedron in your 3D model? Check out Stella.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Every 3D Polyhedron You’d Ever Want to Construct, Render or 3D Print appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at September 22, 2017 02:58 PM

Pencil+ Is an All-in-One Sharpen and Pencil Holder/Extender

pencil+ sharpener extender all-in-one

Even with the numerous advantages of mechanical pencils, there are still those who love the old school feel of wooden pencils. And Andrew Pyza’s love for traditional pencils spurred him to create Pencil+, a pencil holder which extends the life of your pencil while providing a built-in sharpener.

The origin story of the Pencil+ is too funny not to share.

“[While] drawing in my sketchbook, my pencil breaks. I honestly looked for a sharpener for twenty minutes, I could not find one, even though I knew I owned three. So I resorted to sharpening my pencil with a knife. By that point though, I had lost my focus on what I was drawing.”

Been there? Many have. Andrew realized it’s a problem and that others may feel the same–the seed was planted. A couple sketches and a few years later, he was finally able to make the pencil holder + sharpener + extender of his dreams.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_89647" style="width: 1080px">Pencil+ sharpen and pencil extender in one<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Original sketch of the Pencil+ sharpener/holder/extender</figcaption></figure>

The initial design was short-listed for the coveted Braunprize in 2015 and received the comment from legendary designer, Deiter Rams, who said, “It’s a good design.”

The goal of the Pencil+ is to remove the hassle of using a pencil – to, in a sense, always stay connected to your pencil. I don’t mean this in a WiFi sort of way; I mean this in a physical way. Because pencil sharpeners are never attached to the pencils themselves, they have a potential to go missing. Since the Pencil+ holds your writing apparatus at all times, this solves the problem naturally.

Pencil+ sharpen and pencil extender in one

Another feature is the pencil extender – which consists of a clasp that keeps a pencil in place. When holding a short or stubby pencil, this makes it possible to use it all the way to its final piece of lead. Once a person is done drawing, they can reverse the pencil and store it within the pencil holder.

Pencil+ sharpen and pencil extender in one

It’s a bit more complicated to use than a mechanical pencil, but if you prefer traditional pencils, this will provide the longevity you need and reduce waste along the way. Along with using up the entire pencil and onboard sharpening, the sharpener’s blades can also be replaced when they get dull.

Pencil+ sharpen and pencil extender in one

The entire package is well-designed with the thought Andrew put into each detail very apparent. Even down to the packaging. While the pencil holder is made of aluminum, its test tube-like packaging is composed of glass and a cork which has a magnet that keeps the Pencil+ in place.

Andrew plans to sell the Pencil+ at €50 ($60 USD) each. The Kickstarter campaign will be live soon but until then you can see the Pencil+’s features, animated visuals and origin story on the website.

The post Pencil+ Is an All-in-One Sharpen and Pencil Holder/Extender appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 22, 2017 02:32 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Temporarily Hiding Faces when Selecting Mates

SOLIDWORKS 2018 now allows you to hide faces temporarily when adding mates.  This helps to make selections of faces and edges that are not visible.  Previously we would need to rotate components or use Select Other for the non-visible selections.

When in the Mate tool, use the Alt key when hovering over faces to hide.  You can keep using the Alt key to hide additional faces.  This is temporary until you make your selection, then all faces will be visible again.

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Mates using Alt Key to Hide Faces

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Mates using Alt Key to Hide Faces

If you keep your cursor over a hidden face, you can press Shift+Alt and it will show the face again.  Also holding Ctrl+Shift+Alt will show a preview of hidden faces that can be selected to be shown again.

See the functionality in action in the video below (at the 0:25 second mark):

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3-KjdLlbG6g?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The functionality is very similar to how you can quickly hide and show bodies and components using the Tab key.  See our blog posts to see this functionality that was introduced in SOLIDWORKS 2016.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2018 Temporarily Hiding Faces when Selecting Mates appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at September 22, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: How to Draw by Scott Robertson

With over two decades of experience teaching how to design, draw, and render at the highest college level, concept designer Scott Robertson knows a thing or two about what it takes to make concepts ‘stick’ for his students. And as one of the most widely-recognized design sketching masters, he’s proven these concepts in his own practice through and through.

In How to Draw: drawing and sketching objects and environments from your imagination, the Art Center educator consolidates years of design sketching knowledge—from thumbnail sketches and perspective grids to shaded renderings—into a digestible self-study program that can take anybody’s sketching ability to the next level. Frankly, if you’re even remotely serious about design sketching, this book is an absolute necessity.

Let’s just let the man himself give us a breakdown:

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pNkG5HN4bgY?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

How to Draw by Scott Robertson — $29.29

Features:

  • Supplementary Video Lessons Included
  • In-Depth Perpsective Drawing Lessons
  • Focus on Drawing from Imagination
  • Written for the Novice, the Student, and the Professional
  • Ideal for Designers, Engineers, Artists, and Architects

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The post Cool Tools of Doom: <em>How to Draw</em> by Scott Robertson appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 22, 2017 12:50 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Comparing Drawing-based and Model-based Workflows at Aker Solutions

Aker Solutions is a global provider of products, systems and services to the oil and gas industry located in Norway. The company creates solutions to unlock energy safely and sustainably for future generations and is comprised of a team of 14,000 employees in 20 countries and 46 locations with 175 years of experience.

Shigeo Kimura is a senior design engineer at Aker Solutions. He has been driving the Model-Based Definition (MBD) implementation at Aker along with a team of engineers in the past several years. Shigeo focuses on the 3D annotations and potential benefits, especially in the manufacturing processes.

In this blog post, Shigeo shares his observations in regards to Aker Solutions’ MBD implementation and how the company has experimented with 3D annotations and summarized the differences between the drawing-based and model-based workflows across multiple phases in an effort to cut overall project time at Aker Solutions.

MBD at Aker Solutions

When it comes to manufacturing, we always look forward to new technologies to serve customers better. For example, we have realized paperless manufacturing processes to improve the operation efficiency. All the manufacturing shops are equipped with personal computers to support the digital information flow.

 

The recent development of model-based definition (MBD) certainly caught our attention. Today, one of the most time-consuming manufacturing activities is the process centered around 2D drawings. In order to cut the overall project time, we experimented with 3D annotations and summarized the differences between the drawing-based and model-based workflows across multiple phases.


Despite the above advantages, a successful MBD implementation requires multiple steps. It can’t happen overnight, and we need a gradual transition. The new enhancement in SOLIDWORKS MBD 2018 to reuse MBD views in drawings will help us build a solid step during the transition. It will allow us to shift the focus from 2D detailing to 3D annotations and 3D views. Then the 3D content can be easily reused in 2D when drawings are needed.

We look forward to our MBD rollouts and would love to hear your comments as well.

Author information

Shigeo Kimura
Shigeo is a design engineer at Aker Solutions, a global provider of products, systems and services to the oil and gas industry. Its engineering, design and technology bring discoveries into production and maximize recovery.

The post Comparing Drawing-based and Model-based Workflows at Aker Solutions appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Shigeo Kimura at September 22, 2017 12:00 PM

September 21, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

DriveWorks Hierarchical Control – Part Two

In this DriveWorks Tech Tips blog post we continue from part one to look at ways to use DriveWorks Hierarchical Properties to build our forms more quickly and make them smarter. In the video below we show the creation of a more responsive table out of labels, which once setup, can be quickly expanded to any required size as the rule is self-aware.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DNc5UXTkvQI?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The DriveWorks hierarchical properties we will be using here are:

Height ControlName .Height
Left ControlName .Left
Top ControlName .Top
Width ControlName .Width

 

These are the main properties we will be using, but there are many more available. You can get a complete list of them here: http://docs.driveworkspro.com/Topic/HowToControlProperties

In today’s example we will use labels to create a more dynamic and adjustable version of a table. This idea comes up quite frequently as companies often want to show a summary of items or properties at the end of a configuration process.  

The image below shows the labels we are starting with. Note that all the names contain a number at the end. This is a critical feature when creating smart control quickly because when you copy and paste a control with a number on the end, DriveWorks will automatically name it to the next available increment.

DriveWorks Hierarchical Properties and Labels

DriveWorks Hierarchical Control Labels

To take advantage of this, we need to be able to bring the name of the control itself inside our DriveWorks rule. To do this we will use a function called MyName which will bring the name of the control and sub property into our rule.

Find out more about MyName in the Driveworks Pro Help File: http://docs.driveworkspro.com/Topic/MyName?terms=myname

An example of this in action would look like this:

DriveWorks Hierarchical Control

And would result in this:

DriveWorks Hierarchical Control

As you can see, we get the Item2 name and the sub property of that control as well in the return.

Next, we want to be able to pull out various pieces of this return in our rule. In this case, we want the number at the end of the control. To do this we use a function called ExtractNumber.

Find out more about ExtractNumber in the Driveworks Pro Help File – http://docs.driveworkspro.com/Topic/ExtractNumber?terms=extract%20number

ExtractNumber essentially looks at a piece of text, dynamic or static, and goes through it looking for numbers. It allows users to easily pull out numbers from anywhere in the text. It also allows users to pull out different numbers if the string has multiple numbers in it.

For example:

ExtractNumber(Item2.top,1) = 2

This would result in 2, since 2 is the first (and only) number in the string.

If we had multiple numbers in the string we would do the following:

ExtractNumber(Item2_1.top,2) = 1 

This results in 1 because we asked for the second number that appears in the string.

Don’t forget to download the example files here.

There are other functions that we commonly use with the MyName function, look for those in upcoming DriveWorks Tech Tip blog posts!

The post DriveWorks Hierarchical Control – Part Two appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Lee Herron at September 21, 2017 07:49 PM

Transformer Simulation: How to perform open and short circuit tests easily inside SOLIDWORKS

A transformer is a static electrical machine that transfers electrical energy between 2 or more circuits through the principle of electromagnetic induction. As shown in Figure 1, the transformer consists of a core (usually laminated steel), a primary winding and a secondary winding. A time varying current in the primary coil produces a time varying magnetic field. This time varying magnetic field induces a voltage in the secondary coil. This is due to the principle of Faraday’s law of induction. So, power can be easily transferred from one circuit to the other without physical contact. So why is this important.

single phase transformer

Figure 1: A single phase transformer

Applications of transformers

Transformers find useful application in electric power industry. In electric power applications, transformers are used to increase or decrease the AC voltage. Since the adoption of AC power, transformers have become ubiquitous in electrical power transmission and distribution industry. Transformers are also used in electronic and RF industry and hence they vary in size. The smallest transformers used in RF industry is of the order of few cubic centimeters and high power transformers used to interconnect power grids can be in the order of few cubic meters and can weight several tons.

Losses in transformers

There are two main kinds of losses in a transformer that are useful for engineers.

  1. Core loss
  2. Winding loss

The objective of a good design is to reduce the losses in the transformer. Once a transformer is designed, engineers build a prototype and then measure the losses using open circuit and short circuit tests. Also, these tests enable engineers to create an equivalent circuit of a transformer. Once you have the equivalent circuit of a transformer it is very easy to replace the transformer by its equivalent circuit and perform system level simulation.

Open circuit test

The open circuit test, as shown in Figure 2 by its connection diagram, is used to determine the core loss in a transformer. As the name suggests, there is no load in one of the windings (usually the high voltage side of the transformer). The voltage in the low voltage winding is gradually increased till it is equal to the rated voltage of the low voltage circuit. The wattmeter that is connected to the low voltage circuit is used to measure the input power and this value is taken to be the core loss in the transformer.

Open circuit test

Figure 2: Open circuit test

Short circuit test

Figure 3 shows the connection diagram of the short circuit test. The low voltage side of the transformer is short circuited. Now in the high voltage side, the voltage is gradually increased till the current reaches the rated current of the high voltage side. The wattmeter reading can be approximated as the copper loss in the transformer. So the short circuit test is used to determine the copper loss in the transformer.

Short circuit test

Figure 3: Short circuit test

Open circuit test and short circuit test simulation

The interesting feature about simulation in EMS is the ability to perform both the above-mentioned tests virtually inside SOLIDWORKS. For the open circuit test, the following inputs are required:

  1. Material property of the core – the B-H curve of the steel material, lamination details, Core loss curve for the laminate (P-B curve)
  2. Rated voltage in the Low Voltage side must be applied to the low voltage winding
  3. The high voltage side must be kept open i.e. a current equal to 0 Amps must be applied to the high voltage winding

Once the simulation is completed, EMS gives the core loss as an output. Once can also get the Low Voltage side current from EMS.

To perform short circuit test simulation the following inputs are required.

  1. The low voltage side must be shorted. Hence, we apply a 0 voltage across the low voltage winding.
  2. In the high voltage winding we apply different voltages and measure the current till we get the current equal to rated current in the high voltage side. This can be performed using the Parametric simulation in EMS where the applied voltage can be varied and the current can be measured. Then we take the value of the voltage that gives the rated current and perform the short circuit simulation.

Once the simulation is completed, EMS gives the value of the copper loss, leakage inductance and the winding resistance. The results from both the open circuit and short circuit tests is used to create the equivalent circuit of the transformer.

Discussion of results including equivalent circuit

In this section, I will show you briefly the modeling inside EMS and discuss the obtained results.

Figure 4 shows the SOLIDWORKS model used for the Transformer simulation.

Single phase transformer simulated in EMS

Figure 4: Single phase transformer simulated in EMS

Figure 5 shows the material used for the laminate.

material used for laminates

Figure 5: Material used for laminates

Figure 6 shows the coil definition inside EMS. The results are obtained for both the open and short circuit simulations. In EMS, each test is performed as a separate study.

Coil definition inside EMS

Figure 6: Coil definition inside EMS

Figure 7 shows the Result table.

Result table

Figure 7: Result table contains all the results including the Core Loss

Figure 8 shows the section plot of the magnetic flux density for the open circuit test.

Transformer Simulation Section plot of the magnetic flux density

Figure 8: Section plot of the magnetic flux density

Conclusion

EMS for SOLIDWORKS is a very efficient and handy simulation software where engineers can create 3D geometry of their transformers and simulate both open and short circuit tests. The core loss computed by the open circuit test was 11 Watts and the copper loss computed by the short circuit test were about 188 and 200 W in the primary and secondary coils respectively. Figure 9 shows the final equivalent circuit for the transformer.

Equivalent circuit of the transformer

Figure 9: Equivalent circuit of the transformer

Watch the webinar on transformer simulation

To watch EMS in action and see how to simulate both open and short circuit studies in EMS click below to watch the webinar on transformer simulation:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OkANSuYcFMI?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

<iframe frameborder="0" height="900" scrolling="no" src="http://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2016-02-29/5shpfs" style="border: 0;" width="100%"></iframe>

The post Transformer Simulation: How to perform open and short circuit tests easily inside SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Arvind Krishnan at September 21, 2017 03:06 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

How to Create Custom Weldment Profiles in SOLIDWORKS

If you have ever worked with SOLIDWORKS there has undoubtedly come a time when you couldn’t find the the weldment profile you need for a given job. As a result, you are required to enter each and every part parameter individually in order to move forward. Inevitably eating up time, and money.

In this Alignex video blog, we sit down and show you how to create your own custom weldment profiles for any job, speeding up any custom projects you may be doing in the future.

View the video transcription below.

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[Begin Transcription]

Welcome to this edition of the Alignex video blog, my name is Same Oanes and today I will be demonstrating how to create a custom weldment profile in SOLIDWORKS. 

SOLIDWORKS does come pre-loaded with a set of standard weldment profile, but if needed we can add to this library when we require something more specialized. I will use this functionality to create standard lumber profiles so I can design my next home improvement project.

Since I know the nominal sizes of standard lumber, I can start saving them as custom profiles. To start, we simply open a new part. Next, we sketch our profile. Keep in mind here that the origin will be the default pierce point on the path segment. We can also select any vertex or sketch point as an alternate pierce point. 

With the sketch drawn and dimensioned out, I am now ready to save the profile. We select the sketch from our feature manager design tree and go to save as. In the save as type drop down, we choose library feature part. We can save our profile in the default location which holds the standard weldment profiles, but we can also save the profile to some other location such as the documents folder, a shared drive or a PDM vault. I will place mine in a new folder. 

 Custom Weldment Profiles in SOLIDWORKS

The file name that we choose is what will appear in the size list of our obstructural member property manager. The folder structure is also important.The folder holding the library feature part file will correspond to the type selection in our property manager. The next folder up will correspond with the standard selection. To keep things nicely organized, I want my standard to be dimensional lumber and my type to be nominal standard. If I wanted to create non-standard profiles, I could nest folders under my dimensional lumber folder. 

I finished the rest of the standard profiles and I am now ready to start using them. But first, since I saved my profiles in a different folder location then the standard, I will have to map SOLIDWORKS to look at this new folder location in my system options. 

To do this, go to file locations and select weldment profiles from the drop down menu. Hit add, and select your folder from the browse window. SOLIDWORKS is now looking in this folder for custom weldment profiles. And now I am ready to get to work on designing my new deck. Using these new lumber profiles, I will know exactly how much lumber I will need to buy from the store. 

Thanks for stopping by our blog! Stay tuned with Alignex for more tech tips and great ways to improve your productivity in SOLIDWORKS.  

[End Transcription]

If you are interested in learning more, sign up for one of the many training courses we have to offer here at Alignex or check out our Alignex support documents available on our website.

Also, make sure to subscribe to the Alignex Blog to always stay up-to-date in the world of SOLIDWORKS.

Author information

Alignex, Inc.
Alignex, Inc. is the premier provider of SOLIDWORKS software and partner products to the mechanical engineering industry in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, Colorado and Wyoming. With more than 25 years of technical experience, Alignex offers consulting services, training and support for SOLIDWORKS as well as support for partner products. For more information, visit alignex.com.

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by Alignex, Inc. at September 21, 2017 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

Learn to Code This Fall With This Pay-What-You-Want Coding Course Bundle

Code. You don’t have to be a computer science hotshot to take the deep dive—heck, some people are up and running with their first project in a matter of weeks. But knowing where and how to enter can be half of the battle.

The Learn How to Code 2017 Bundle is the perfect entry point and includes over 156 Hours of premium coding instruction, from Python to Ruby & everything in between.

Consisting of ten courses in total, the ‘Pay What You Want’ bundle covers not just specific code languages, but also how and why you may decide to choose one over another depending on the project at hand.

Pay What You Want: Learn to Code 2017 Bundle

A Price You Pick Gets You 156 Hours of Premium Coding Instruction, From Python to Ruby & Everything In Between

Included Courses:

  • Learn How To Code: Google’s Go Programming Language ($249 Value)
  • The Complete Python Course: Beginner to Advanced! ($195 Value)
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  • Projects in Programming Languages: Ruby, Python, Java ($150 Value)
  • Learn Angular 2 from Beginner to Advanced ($195 Value)
  • How to Make a Freaking iPhone App: iOS 10 and Swift 3 ($200 Value)
  • The Complete Web Developer Masterclass: Beginner To Advanced ($195 Value)
  • Git Complete Mastery With GitHub: 100% Hands-on Git Guide ($200 Value)
  • Professional Rails Code Along ($40 Value)
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PURCHASE HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale!

Find more deals here:
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by SolidSmack at September 21, 2017 01:54 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

An Alternative Method to Restore SOLIDWORKS File Associations

Are you experiencing issues with SOLIDWORKS file associations when accessing SOLIDWORKS files by clicking on File > Open? The open dialog allows access to Windows File explorer, by default file type is set to “All files”. However, some customers have the default file type set to Inventor, CATIA, or another software.

This can be annoying and a waste of time; as you have to manually select the “all file” type option to open your particular SOLIDWORKS file. What to do in this case?

Default File Type

Default File Type

Follow the steps below to set default file type to “All Files”:

Step 1:

In Windows > Control Panel > Default Programs > Set Associations/Associate a file type or just search Associate files in Start menu.

Default Programs

Default Programs

Step 2:

Make sure all .sld files are set to SOLIDWORKS Launcher as shown in the image below. In this case all SOLIDWORKS Part, Assembly and Drawings have SOLIDWORKS launcher selected as default app

Associate a file

Associate a file

STEP 3:

What if .sld file type is not selected as SOLIDWORKS Launcher ? Click on that particular .sld file > Change program > Click on More apps >Select SOLIDWORKS Launcher.

 

Restore SOLIDWORKS File Associations

Set Associations with Change Program

The result

When completed, selecting SOLIDWORKS > File > Open will allow access to SOLIDWORKS files by default rather than CATIA or Autodesk Inventor files.

For additional Information related to Restoring SOLIDWORKS File associations Check this video blog article: Restore File Associations in SOLIDWORKS

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by Vipanjot Kaur at September 21, 2017 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Meet the HP Z2 Mini Workstation

The world’s smallest workstation weaves feats of engineering with industrial design panache, incorporating workstation power and reliability without a single visual compromise.

Some SOLIDWORKS users are using consumer-class PCs — computers not configured to support 3D CAD software and not engineered to be reliable under demanding use over time. With an eye to improving the 3D CAD experience for these users, HP set out to develop a product to address their unique pain points. The result is unlike anything the market had seen before: the HP Z2 Mini, the world’s first miniature workstation.

Measuring a mere 8.5” x 8.5” x 2.3”, the HP Z2 Mini is ten times smaller than a traditional tower workstation. Yet the system is twice as powerful and 63 percent quieter than the similarly sized HP business-class mini PC — all in a uniquely attractive “space gray” housing accented with black chrome.

The Vision

HP customer research revealed that when it came to hardware, engineers and designers often lack performance, flexibility, and inspiration. Office spaces are shrinking dramatically, but the amount of office clutter is not, making it increasingly challenging to accommodate full-size computers. And the very people who have a keen eye for design, who draw inspiration from the environment around them, are using computers that by and large are boxy and black.

Sean Young, HP Worldwide Product Development Segment Manager, said, “Those were the three main things that led us to say there is going to be a place for a new category of workstation. It has to be small but it can’t compromise performance, and we’re going to do it in a way that is beautiful without compromising function. That was our vision for this product category.”

The Z2 Mini performs: Equipped with Intel® Xeon® E3-1200v5 or Intel® Core® i3/i5/i7 processors, up to 32 GB RAM and 1.5 TB storage, the HP Z Turbo Drive for large-file handling, and optional NVIDA® Quadro® M620 GPU, it hits the sweet spot for 2D and entry-level 3D CAD work. It is flexible: You can mount it behind a monitor, on a wall, or under a desk — or display it on even the smallest of work surfaces. And it is inspirational: On top of being an engineering triumph, the Z2 Mini is exceptional in its industrial design elements that convey performance, professionalism, and a premium look and feel.

Continuing reading the article here.

Learn more about HP and SOLIDWORKS.

HP and SOLIDWORKS announce the Ultimate SOLIDWORKS Bundle: SOLIDWORKS Premium + Z2 Mini, Big Performance at a small price.
Details on this special promotion can be found here.

Learn More about the HP Z2 Mini by watching the video below.

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Author information

HP
HP
Accelerate your SOLIDWORKS Workflows with HP Z Workstations. Stay ahead of the curve with the innovation, high performance, expandability, and extreme reliability you need to accelerate your SOLIDWORKS design, engineering, and simulation workflows. HP Workstations powered by Intel® Xeon® and Intel® Core™ processors are designed for tool-free, easy maintenance and include HP Performance Advisor and HP Remote Graphics Software.

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by HP at September 21, 2017 12:00 PM

September 20, 2017

SolidSmack

Nike Makers’ Experience Lets Users Generate Their Own Custom Shoe Design

For sneakerheads who would happily sell their offspring for a chance at exclusively designed shoes, listen up: You won’t have to!

Nike recently opened its Nike Makers’ Experience at the Nike By You Studio at 45 Grand in New York which will allows users to create their own one-of-a-kind pair of shoes. If you thought having one pair of $200 shoes was stylishly badass, making a shoe exclusively for you may sound even better.

The project is a result of combining digital design and footwear manufacturing. As the user enters the experience, he/she can use their past Nike heritage or utter a set of phrases to bring up a variety of graphic options. While bringing up your shoe history sounds cool in its own right, customizing your shoes with phrases seems to be where it’s at.

These phrases range from a person’s favorite color, birthday, name, childhood pet and more. Patterns associated with the uttered phrases then show up on the chosen shoe the design will be printed on.

The shoes you see here are the Nike Presto X, a profile created exclusively for the Nike Makers’ Experience. These sneakers come in two flavors: the traditional Presto X and a slip-on variant. No matter which type you choose, object tracking allows the studio to adjust the design based on the shoe’s outline.

According to Mark Smith, the VP of Innovation Special Projects at Nike, users of the experience tend to spend more time choosing their design than the time it takes for Nike to make them (which is roughly 90 minutes for a pair of Presto Xs).

The Nike Makers’ Experience is initially limited to Nike employees, their friends and family, and select Nike+ members, but will be made available to the public at a future date. Better start that Nike+ membership, oh, and .

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by Carlos Zotomayor at September 20, 2017 05:20 PM

The Secret to Making Dippin’ Dots Ice Cream? Liquid Nitrogen!

All this talk of innovations that haven’t come out yet and we end up forgetting the ones we already have.

For instance, have you ever stopped to wonder about how Dippin’ Dots ice cream got its unique beaded shape? You know, those tiny clusters of circular ice cream which could be a potential hazard if spooned into the nostrils? The secret is more obvious than you might think.

One of the older videos in Food Network’s YouTube channel details the process by which these edible dots are made:

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Just like your run-of-the-mill ice cream, Dippin’ Dots start out life in a cold production plant in Paducah, Kentucky. More specifically, production begins in the mixing room.

Each of the 200 gallon vats hold a different flavor, which is thoroughly mixed before being sent to the cryogenic processor.

This is where the similarities between normal ice cream and Dippin’ Dots end. Instead of pumping the flavor mixtures into individual containers, the makers of Dippin’ Dots drip their concoctions into a reserve of liquid nitrogen.

Under the −320 °F temperatures, the drops of ice cream freeze instantaneously, creating beads of frozen delight too cold for your tongue to touch. The beads are then stored in a climate controlled room before being shipped to stores worldwide.

The concept of bite-sized ice cream came from Curt Jones, a microbiologist who used his scientific know-how from a biotechnology company to create something which could be appreciated by a wider audience. After all, who doesn’t love ice cream?

The factory creates up to 2.2 billion Dippin’ Dots per day, with new flavors being introduced regularly.

If you want to see more videos about how your favorite quirky foods are made, Food Network’s YouTube channel has more than enough to get you hungry. Oh, and if you want to try making it yourself, the CrazyRussianHacker shows how he made some on his coffee table.

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by Carlos Zotomayor at September 20, 2017 04:27 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Composer Quick Start Guide #7: High Resolution Images

Hello and welcome to the seventh post in a new SOLIDWORKS Composer tutorial series called the SOLIDWORKS Composer Quick Start Guide! This guide is intended to orient new users in SOLIDWORKS Composer and walk them though the basic features of the software. In this post, we’re going to walk through the High Resolution Image Workshop and how it can be used to create great-looking photos of your assemblies.

Once you’re in the High Resolution Image Workshop, creating a detailed image of your assembly is simple. Creating an image is just a click away, but you have a significant degree of flexibility in choosing how your image ends up looking. You can modify the resolution of the created image, the desired file size, printer DPI, and more. Anti-aliasing and alpha channel effects are available as well. The exact anti-aliasing techniques used can be adjusted in the workshop as needed. This workshop isn’t just for the creation of JPGs; it is also capable of creating detailed views that remain in the viewport, much like the “Create 2D Image” tool used by the digger. An advanced use case of the High Resolution Image workshop is to create high quality animations by getting multiple high quality images based on desired quality needs.

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That’s all for another episode of the SOLIDWORKS Composer Quick Start Guide. If you want to stay updated with the newest videos in this series, subscribe to the SOLIDWORKS Composer YouTube playlist, and feel free to check out the SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog and SOLIDWORKS Composer Forums for more great Composer content.

Author information

Mohit Daga
Mohit Daga
Mohit is a Senior Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS Composer. Tables Tennis Champion, Vegetarian foodie and avid kickballer!

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by Mohit Daga at September 20, 2017 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Unveiled: See it Live on September 26th

SOLIDWORKS 2018 is here and the new release features more than 200 new enhancements created with the goal of enabling you to bring your products to market faster, more efficiently, and at a lower cost.

On Tuesday, September 26 from 10:00am to 12:00pm EST, you can experience what’s new during the SOLIDWORKS 2018 live launch event. During the broadcast, you’ll get a first look at the new user-generated updates created based on your feedback and experience an integrated design-to-manufacturing workflow that provides a complete solution for bringing your ideas to reality in record time.

SOLIDWORKS CEO Gian Paolo Bassi will provide an introduction to the new release and share the SOLIDWORKS vision for bringing powerful product design capabilities to the masses. Kurt Anliker, SOLIDWORKS Director of Product Introduction, will walk through key enhancements in SOLIDWORKS 2018. Kishore Boyalakuntla, Vice President Portfolio Management Brand UX Leader, will discuss how SOLIDWORKS 2018 provides the flexibility to address the evolving nature of product design.

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Click here to sign up today and learn how the complete SOLIDWORKS 2018 portfolio can help you drive innovation to build your next great design.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2018 Unveiled: See it Live on September 26th appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at September 20, 2017 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Rotate about Scene Floor SOLIDWORKS view option

If a SOLIDWORKS model does not rotate in all directions and there is an axis in the middle of the standard rotation icon, it means that Rotate about Scene Floor is currently enabled.  This option allows the model to rotate about the axis perpendicular to the standard Top plane, as if it is sitting on a floor.

The option Rotate about Scene Floor can be accessed from the View > Modify menu, or by right-clicking on the graphics area of the model.

Rotate About Scene Floor option

Rotate About Scene Floor option

 

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by Sanja Srzic at September 20, 2017 12:00 PM

September 19, 2017

SolidSmack

MX3D Reveals First Section of 3D Printed Steel Bridge

MX3D 3d printed bridge

Recently, we talked about MX3D getting all giant metal 3d printing robot on us and printing the 3D structures of the future. If you’re familiar with the company, you know they’ve been busy the last few years on a mission to build the first functional 3D printed bridge across the Oudezijds Achterburgwal canal in the De Wallen (red light) district of Amsterdam. They’ve now completed the first section at the MX3D warehouse and it’s now you’ll start to get a better realization of just how massive the 12 meter bridge will be.

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Prior to the bridge they’ve created a number of proof-of-concept installations from dragon benches to decorative facades with the bridge itself a functional proof-of-concept for larger structures.

The company created intelligent software that transforms a robot and a welding machine into a large scale printer, enabling 3D printing of metals on an architectural scale. The technique greatly extends the form freedom for architects and engineers and has huge potential to reduce the amount of material needed to make large structures.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_89580" style="width: 1100px">MX3D 3D printed bridge<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The MX3D ABB industrial robots in action.</figcaption></figure>

The bridge has gone through several design updates as safety and material are understood better, and technical capabilities improved. The final design by Joris Laarman Lab is a drastic contrast to the first iteration and testament to how far the project has come.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_89574" style="width: 1100px">Previous design iteration of the MX3D Bridge<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Previous design iteration of the MX3D Bridge by Joris Laarman Lab.</figcaption></figure>

 

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_89575" style="width: 1100px">Current design iteration of the MX3D Bridge<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Current design iteration of the MX3D Bridge by Joris Laarman Lab.</figcaption></figure>

The bridge is being completed in collaboration with Autodesk and Heijmans, and supported by Lenovo, ABB Robotics and Air Liquide and sponsored by STV, Oerlikon and Plymovent with public support from TU Delft, the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Studies and the Municipality of Amsterdam. That’s A LOT of interested parties.

Currently they’re on schedule to complete the bridge in early 2018 after a canal reinforcement renovation. Those in Amsterdam can also stop by to visit the MX3D visitor center to learn more about the process and to support and see the bridge building progress.

You can keep up to date on the bridge progress at their website, on Twitter and on their Facebook page.

MX3D 3d printed bridge

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by Josh Mings at September 19, 2017 10:24 PM

Google Glass and Skylight Could Mean Big Advancements for 3D CAD Design

When Google Glass was released to the public in 2014, a lot of controversy ensued over privacy and safety concerns. When a piece of hardware obstructs your view with the data of strangers you share a sidewalk with, it isn’t hard to see how the device can feel a bit creepy to passersby. Thankfully, the prototype was discontinued by Google and brought back to the drawing board.

Fast forward to 2017 where the company has announced the brand new Google Glass Enterprise Edition. Unlike the classic version, this one is meant for companies to help with their employees’ everyday workflow.

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Take Sutter Health, for example. Their doctors use Google Glass and a solution provided by Augmedix to bring up a patient’s entire medical history and jot down notes as a medical session is going on. This leaves the doctor more time to take care of their patients.

While it does seem weird when a doctor occasionally talks to an otherwise invisible interface, this might be preferable to patients who would like their doctors to spend more time with them rather than with a computer.

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Another company that makes use of Google Glass is the express mail service company DHL.

To help with their traditional “order picking” process, employees wear the device combined with a software solution from Ubimax. This makes it easier for them to visually pick out which shelves products are located in and quickens the overall shipping process. To add to this faster, more efficient work ethic, it has also become easier for new employees to get up to speed due to the intuitive nature of the device.

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But by far one of the most useful applications of the device comes from General Electric (GE). Partnering with AR company Upskill, they use a workflow software called Skylight which connects workers to the information they need to complete their tasks.

This is more than just a simple grocery list you tick off. Skylight allows users to see the step-by-step process in completing each task, complete with in-depth tutorials, data about the task at hand, and connection to experts who know what you should be doing. It streamlines everything a worker does, and should reduce confusion, prevent accidents, and increase productivity.

Now, put the above applications in context of the product development process and 3D CAD design. The applications abound, from task and program management and design reviews to 3D CAD software integration, process management and end user product visualization. This is a wide open market and though Google Glass failed on the consumer level before, enterprise applications make it all the more promising, particular with growing interest in AR/MR that gets rid of the big, blocky VR visor.

How do you think this could apply to product development?

The post Google Glass and Skylight Could Mean Big Advancements for 3D CAD Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 19, 2017 03:31 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

What’s New SOLIDWORKS 2018: Bounding Box

The bounding box is an indispensable piece of reference geometry in SOLIDWORKS, representing the smallest area or volume in which a design can fit. While available in weldment and sheet metal models for many years, creating a bounding box for a standard part has required convoluted workarounds – until now. New in SOLIDWORKS 2018, bounding boxes can be created for standard parts with just a few clicks, enabling you to quickly find the maximum dimensions of your design and use the automatically-generated file properties as needed. To emphasize the utility of the bounding box, an organic shape will be used.

Figure 1 – Standard SOLIDWORKS Part with Organic Geometry

Finding the maximum extents of the design shown above would be an exceptionally difficult task without the use of a bounding box. To create one, simply navigate to Insert -> Reference Geometry -> Bounding Box in the dropdown menus. In the PropertyManager, you’ll find two methods for creating a bounding box. While both methods result in the creation of a 3D sketch and file properties, Best Fit will generate the absolute smallest box in which the design can fit, regardless of orientation, while the Custom Plane option allows for the selection of a planar element to define one of the directions of the box. Additional options allow for a preview of the bounding box, and inclusion of hidden bodies and/or surfaces.

Figure 2 – Best Fit versus Custom Plane Bounding Box (Bottom Face Used for Custom Plane)

Once created, the bounding box exists as a feature in the Design Tree, and can be edited, suppressed, or hidden like any traditional feature. As changes are made to the model, the bounding box will update parametrically while preserving the original settings, but beware when using the Custom Plane option, as model changes may result in a missing reference.

Creating a bounding box for a part also generates a number of file properties automatically, which can be linked to drawings, or otherwise used just like manually-added properties. Click File Properties in the standard toolbar, then the Configuration Specific tab to view these new properties, which include the length, width, height, and even volume of the bounding box.

Figure 3 – Automatically-Generated File Properties for Bounding Boxes

It should be noted that for multibody parts, creating a bounding box using this method will include all bodies (unless hidden). As such, it’s not currently possible to create separate bounding boxes for each body individually using the new Bounding Box command. However, there are multiple workarounds available to accomplish this, including saving the bodies to discrete part files, leveraging configurations/display states to show a single body at a time, or following the established workaround for creating bounding boxes prior to 2018. Please see our video on this workaround for more information.

Figure 4 – Bounding Box Created for a Multibody Part

As seen here, SOLIDWORKS 2018 allows for the creation of a bounding box and file properties for standard parts in just a few clicks, and this capability is just one of many exciting new enhancements this year. Be sure to check out our What’s New series for additional blogs and videos on all the new features included in SOLIDWORKS 2018. For more information, check out our YouTube channel, get a SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD quote or contact us at Hawk Ridge Systems today. And don’t forget to attend one of our SOLIDWORKS 2018 Launch Events! Thanks for reading!

Author information

Hawk Ridge Systems
From design to production, Hawk Ridge Systems delivers best-in-class solutions in 3D design, CAM software, and 3D printing.

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by Hawk Ridge Systems at September 19, 2017 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

Top 3 Onshape Updates: Variable Fillet, Sheet Metal Tab, Bend Relief Size

Wel, well, well. Onshape features this year to date? A buck 0′ two. That’s right, Onshape has passed the 100 mark with a small nod and rumors of cookie dough ice cream for all Onshape employees over the next month on everyday that ends in ‘Y’.

It’s a modest update, a modest update of MASSIVE SHEET METAL AND VARIABLE FILLET ENORMITY with a splash of toolbar customization thrown in to make all us static toolbar haters happy. High-fives.

You can see the past update history and catch the latest on the Onshape What’s New page.

Here, we pick our ‘Top 3 Onshape Updates’ and provide a quick overview of each. To see our previous picks, visit our New Onshape Features page. Tell us which one you like the best, which need work, or if we picked the completely wrong features!

The Stats:
Total Updates: 7
Total Updates YTD: 102

Top 3 Onshape Updates (09.08.17)

Sheet Meta Tab – Create tabs in sheet metal parts.  You can create multiple tabs with a single feature and you can define a subtraction scope for subtracting tabs from other sheet metal parts.

Variable Fillet – A new option in the Fillet command now allows you to create a fillet with a variable radius.

Sheet  Metal Corner/Bend Relief Size – You can now specify a size for sheet metal corner and bend reliefs. In the past, this was limited to a scale factor.

Other updates

Customize Toolbar – You can now customize the toolbars in the Part Studio, Assembly, and Feature Studio environments.

Note Improvements – The Note command in Onshape Drawings can now be used to create both a normal Note and a Note with Leader.

Phantom Tangent Edges – You can now show tangent edges in drawing views as “Phantom” edges.

Drawing View Section Performance – Section Views in Onshape Drawings will now be cached. This should improve section view performance and lead to a noticeable decrease in load times of drawings with section views.

 

You can see videos and screenshots that breakdown each new features here. We’ll be keeping a closer eye on what Onshape is releasing with each update, so let us know what features you’re watching for or want to see the most!

Ask questions and talk about Onshape on SmackTalk!  Our new community site!

The post Top 3 Onshape Updates: Variable Fillet, Sheet Metal Tab, Bend Relief Size appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 19, 2017 02:46 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

DriveWorks Hierarchical Control

In this Tech Tip video we look at the basics of DriveWorks Hierarchical Control properties of form controls. In this simple example, we look at how to use these properties on your forms to help make your forms more dynamic and responsive to the type of device your customers are viewing DriveWorks on.

In this video, we use three simple boxes that could represent controls or frame on a DriveWorks project and then proceed to use the control properties to assist in form layout.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZxsMpIpQJTY?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The hierarchical control properties we will be using here are:

Height ControlName .Height
Left ControlName .Left
Top ControlName .Top
Width ControlName .Width

 

These are the main properties we will be using but there are many more available. You can get a complete list of them here: http://docs.driveworkspro.com/Topic/HowToControlProperties

Typically, the first thing you want to do when laying out your forms is align the controls to one another. We can use the ControlName.Top property to align all the controls to the top of the first one. This can be very useful when creating a large group of controls that you might want to move around or have shift dynamically based on screen width. Linking all the controls together allows them to move as one.

DriveWorks Hierarchical Control

Box 1 Control

Next, we start to connect the text boxes together horizontally. To do this we will link the header label to width of our web page using DWFormContainerWidth variable.

DWFormContainerWidth variable

DWFormContainerWidth variable

Now you can see the header goes all the way across the screen and is linked to the actual width of the page.

Boxes linked

Boxes linked

Next, we can start linking the three boxes together so they are all right up against each other. Starting with Box2:

Before

Formula: Box1.Left+Box1.width

After

Now we do the same for Box3:

driveworks tech tip

Before

Formula (same as before only we switch to using box2): Box2.Left+Box2.width

driveworks tech tip

After

Now that all three boxes are linked together we can start to build rules for their individual widths. These rules can be whatever we want them to be, but in this example, they will be linked back to width.

The rules for the three boxes are as follows:

Box1 width = 250 (Static Value)

Box2 width = (DWFormContainerWidth-Box1.width)/2

Box3 width = (DWFormContainerWidth-Box1.width)/2

And the result looks like this:

driveworks tech tip

And if we drag the windows smaller the red box stays static at 250 with the blue and green split the difference with the remaining form width.

driveworks tech tip

Don’t forget to download the example files here. This is an introduction DriveWorks Tech Tip, which we will be building on in future DriveWorks Tech Tips videos and blog posts. Stay tuned!

The post DriveWorks Hierarchical Control appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Lee Herron at September 19, 2017 02:20 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The Early Sketches

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll get the groove going with “Orange Blossom” from Gardens & Villa before diving into sweet melodies from Amanaz, My Morning Jacket, Spooky Mansion, Floating Action, and others before wrapping up with “Wintersong” from Blake Mills. Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/2jqnLEOvjLVmnz4cuZwG4O" width="100%"></iframe>

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by SolidSmack at September 19, 2017 12:51 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How do I install the same version of eDrawings as SOLIDWORKS?

In some cases, when you download and install SOLIDWORKS and try to launch eDrawings from the start menu, it doesn’t show up. This means that even though the latest version of SOLIDWORKS was installed you still need to install the latest release of eDrawings.

To download and install the same version of eDrawings as that of SOLIDWORKS follow these steps:

Step 1: Launch SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager

Locate SOLIDWORKS 2017 installation file set > Select setup.exe > Right click on setup.exe > Select run as an administrator (for all admin rights).This will launch SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager.

SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager can also be launched from Start > Control panel > Programs and Features > SOLIDWORKS 2017 > Right click  > Change.

Step 2: Modify Installation

Now, select Modify the individual installation and click next.

Modify the individual installation

Modify the individual installation

STEP 3: Product Selection

Click Next on Serial Number page as you already have serial number added. On product selection page select eDrawings as shown.

Install eDrawings Product Selection

Install eDrawings Product Selection

Step 4: Install eDrawings

Accept the terms and conditions on summary page and click Modify now. This will install eDrawings 2017 on your machine.

Accept the terms and conditions

Accept the terms and conditions

Step 5: Launch eDrawings

Launch eDrawings 2017 from the start menu.

The post How do I install the same version of eDrawings as SOLIDWORKS? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Vipanjot Kaur at September 19, 2017 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

The Engineering of Paralympic Sports Technology

The Engineering of Paralympic Sports Technology 5

Here’s a question for you. What do deer antlers, fighter pilot helmets and elite sports cars have in common? The answer – because you give up, right? – is that they have all been used to inspire the next generation of Paralympic sports equipment. Here’s the story.


Time was that the Paralympics were a low-publicised footnote to the Olympic Games. Today the Paralympic movement has surged in popularity, with athletes who have achieved star status. As well as an enhanced profile, Paralympic athletes are also enjoying the benefits of increasingly sophisticated sports equipment – from wheelchairs designed by elite sports car manufacturers to prosthetics inspired by deer antlers. Make no mistake. The Paralympics have become a fertile seedbed for engineering innovation.

Engineering brains add brawn to wheelchair basketball

The engineering of Paralympian sports technology 1

Image courtesy of BBC

Wheelchair basketball: fast, furious, often brutal. Player’s wheelchairs must be speedy, balanced and agile, as well as strong enough to withstand powerful collisions. Lots of them. That’s why Team GB’s 2012 wheelchair basketball team were grateful for the engineering chops of wheelchair manufacturer RGK, who joined forces with BMW and Loughborough University to create a revolutionary design specifically for the rigours of wheelchair basketball.

True innovation rarely comes from tweaking the tried and tested. RGK went right back to the drawing board with its wheelchair design, starting from scratch in CAD and iterating its new design based on rigorous automated stress analysis. By building each chair’s frame from aerospace-grade aluminium, the team improved the shock resistance of Team GB’s wheelchairs while reducing weight by around 2kg. Each chair was also made-to-measure, with personalised seats based on 3D scans of the players’ physical dimensions and biomechanics.

The result: wheelchairs that were more comfortable, more manoeuvrable and more stable.

Fighter pilot engineers join wheelchair racing’s need for speed

The Engineering of Paralympic Sports Technology 2

Image Courtesy of BAE Systems

Of course, when you swap the basketball court for the race track, speed matters more than strength. Just ask BAE Systems, who formed a partnership with UK Sport’s wheelchair programme and donated £1.5m of engineering services. Part of that included thorough requirement-capture analysis – the same process BAE use to develop fighter pilot helmets. Cue extensive interviews with Team GB’s wheelchair athletes, which revealed a huge amount about how the individual athletes interfaced with their chairs and some of the limitations they faced.

The Engineering of Paralympic Sports Technology 3

In a first for Paralympic sport, BAE also gave Team GB’s athletes access to their wind tunnel – used with famous prevalence by Team GB’s gold rush cyclists. The results from these wind tunnel tests helped to calculate the optimum posture and position for wheelchair racing athletes to promote comfort and speed. This contributed to the development of the first British wheelchair with a chassis made entirely from carbon fibre. It’s six times stiffer than conventional aluminium racing chairs, which reduces drag and increases speed.

Do deer antlers hold the secret to the future of sprinting?

Perhaps the image most synonymous with modern Paralympics is that of the blade runners hurtling towards the finish line. Already an engineering marvel, each blade must be tailored to the unique biomechanics and weight of each runner in terms of energy stored and returned. This is achieved by tweaking the shape of the blade as well as the layers of composite to provide the perfect balance of spring and absorption.

The Engineering of Paralympic Sports Technology 4

Image Courtesy of The Food Champions

Now manufacturers are looking to innovate further by improving the interface between the stump and the prosthetic. Challenges include spreading pressure evenly, reducing heat and friction and avoiding the build-up of sweat – all of which can lead to tissue damage and bacterial growth. To help overcome this, prosthetic manufacturer Blatchford has developed a silicon socket that can be laser drilled to drain sweat from the interface. Meanwhile, blade manufacturer Össur has been developing an interface that integrates more directly with the stump, pushing the remaining muscle through holes in the socket to improve control.

But the ultimate future interface could come in the form of osseointegration, where the prosthesis connects directly to the bone via an implant. The challenge of course with an implant that breaks the skin is keeping the site free from infection. Though, back in 2006, University College London completed research that mimics the way the protrusion of a deer’s antlers are protected by soft tissue to prevent infection and maintain the integrity of the skin as a defensive barrier. Fascinating stuff.

The Paralympics: a hotbed of engineering innovation

As with many sports disciplines, the smallest competitive gains can be the difference between going for gold and going home empty handed. Add in the strict parameters governing the design and function of Paralympic equipment and it’s clear that the trend of major innovation isn’t set to stall anytime soon. Future disability sports technology will be increasingly customised for its user – enabling the next generation of Paralympians to go harder, faster, stronger and push the limits of what’s possible within the Paralympic movement.
You may also be interested in:

>> Project Nevada: Plymouth University goes for land speed record in Nevada

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post The Engineering of Paralympic Sports Technology appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS UK at September 19, 2017 11:00 AM

September 18, 2017

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: Assyrian Pin Lock [Oldest Design Ever!]

ancient assyrian pin lock

When you’ve got five kinds of soup stored away in your desk drawer for safe keeping, along with that box of emergency chocolate chips, only the most advanced form of security will do. Facial recognition and eye scan technology wasn’t around in 2000 BCE, but they did have a type of pin lock that isn’t too different in concept from modern locks and could likely be used to confuse those after your soups.

Angus Deveson runs the popular Youtube channel Maker’s Muse. One of his latest projects discusses an ancient pin lock design dated to somewhere in the span of 2500 BCE to 1800 BCE. The design however seems less ancient than a skeleton key lock and all the more an engineering marvel to explore.

Angus developed two demonstration models, one basic and one more complex mixing in some modern updates. The mechanism breaks down like so. You have the body, the pins, the bolt and the key. The key slides into the bolt area, engages the pins–pushing them up away from the bolt, so the bolt can easily slide out.

ancient assyrian pin lock

Obviously, this is for demonstration purpose only, but is a great project to show a simple mechanism that inspired future iterations of lock designs to this day. With that, Angus, shows his own iteration on this design, moving the pins out of colinear position, chamfering the pins and using a dovetail bolt design. Quite a number of ways you can take this to create a lock of your own!

modified assyrian pin lock

You can download the basic version and the modified complex version on his Gumroad page, and view the overview above or on Youtube. (Bonus! Check out the Learning Resource on the Maker’s Muse website!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

The post Model of the Week: Assyrian Pin Lock [Oldest Design Ever!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 18, 2017 10:07 PM

Musvalk is Tiny EDC Keychain Knife Made From Spacecraft Materials

Musvalk EDC keychain knife

Ever since man first learned to slice something with a blade, there have been countless designs and re-designs of the  traditional every day carry (EDC) knife. There are knives which can be customized to fit your design needs, knives that stick to the fridge, those the size of a man’s arm (and cut one off, at that) and even many a keychain knife. However, this new take on knife design is one directly inspired by the space age.

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The Musvalk (Dutch name for a tiny bird of prey) is a small EDC keychain knife with inspirations in space travel. Because the designer, Sander Bakker, lives in a small town near the Mojave Desert, north-east of Los Angeles, California, and because Virgin Galactic is doing their first test flights there, he is part of a community whose daily routine consists of talking about space and life outside planet Earth. Taking it upon himself to put some of the culture into the knife, he uses the exact same materials found in spacecrafts.

Musvalk EDC keychain knife

The handle and sheathe are made out of 2mm twill weaved carbon fiber, with the sheathe housing a Zytel lock to keep the knife secure. These are fastened together using custom titanium bolts.

The blade isn’t made out of everyday stainless steel, either (which, let’s face it, isn’t really ‘stain-impossible’). Its composition consists of zirconium dioxide ceramic, also known as Zirconia. This makes the knife’s hardness closer to a diamond than a bendable piece of metal. If this wasn’t stylish enough, the blade also comes in a wide variety of colors which result from heating the Zirconia at different temperatures, with the gold variant having a titanium nitride coating.

Musvalk EDC keychain knife

The knife’s shape takes its design from the Lockheed F117 Nighthawk stealth fighter jet, which ISN’T a spacecraft (I guess certain compromises had to be made). For its style, material and size, you can’t deny the knife has a very sleek, unique look worthy of cutting through your next rope, sandwich or frustrating package design.

The project has already reached its funding goals on both Kickstarter and Indiegogo, with the knives still available for pre-order at $44 apiece. You can learn more about these portable knives (and get a look at the upcoming blue and matte black-colored blades) on the splinterseed.com website.

The post Musvalk is Tiny EDC Keychain Knife Made From Spacecraft Materials appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 18, 2017 08:54 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Automatically Update Beam Joints

Prior to SOLIDWORKS 2017

In previous versions of SOLIDWORKS, changes to models involving beam elements would result in an error when SOLIDWORKS Simulation was re-activated. It would notify the user to edit the beam joints – as seen in the image below. To resolve this error, the user had to open the joints in the simulation and simply recalculate them. This problem resulted in additional mouse clicks for the user while simultaneously slowing down design iterations.

New setting in 2017

SOLIDWORKS 2017 released an improvement to beam elements in FEA. This change causes the beam elements to automatically recalculate any time changes that are made to the model. This removes the repetitive processes of manually recalculating joints each time you run a simulation on changes to the model.

Activating the new setting

This setting is automatically set to active on fresh installations of SOLIDWORKS 2017. Keep in mind that if you import settings from previous years of the software, it may not be. To activate this new setting simply open the simulation settings by going to:

Simulation > Options > System options > General.

You’ll see a window very similar to the one below where you’ll activate “Automatically update beam joints when simulation is activated.” This change will then automatically update beam joints when you activate your simulation.

After the change

After activating this setting, any time you make a change to the model and toggle back to the study, you’ll see this load screen informing you it’s going to quickly recalculate the joints so that they’re all up-to-date for your simulation.


Author: Cody Salyer
Cody is a Support Engineer based out of the beautiful Salt Lake valley. He’s been with GoEngineer a little over a year supporting not only SOLIDWORKS but also Simulation and PDM as well. His background includes mechatronics and automation, where he has worked to develop automated systems to help remove or disconnect people from dangerous tasks.

Author information

GoEngineer
GoEngineer delivers software, technology and expertise that enable companies to unlock design innovation and deliver better products faster. With more than 30 years experience and thousands of customers in high tech, medical, machine design, energy and other industries, GoEngineer provides best-in-class design solutions from SOLIDWORKS, Stratasys, CAMWorks, Altium and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM). For more information, visit goengineer.com.

The post Automatically Update Beam Joints appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GoEngineer at September 18, 2017 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Monday List 38.17 | What We’re Reading This Week

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Can Baseball Turn a 27-Year-Old Into the Perfect Manager?

Take an inside look at the White Sox’s experiment with Justin Jirschele, the youngest coach in professional baseball.

RT, Sputnik and Russia’s New Theory of War

How the Kremlin built one of the most powerful information weapons of the 21st century — and why it may be impossible to stop.

The Strange, Grisly World of Crocodile Hunting in Australia

A Photo Essay.

The Race to Run a Two-Hour Marathon

Nike, Adidas, and Vodafone want a record—and bragging rights—in Berlin.

Whole Foods Shows What Economists Don’t Know

Was Amazon’s price cut a good idea? Econ 101 won’t tell you.

The Road Goes on Forever and the Story Never Ends

Lance Armstrong has a new narrative about his incredible rise and fall. Should we believe him this time?

The post The Monday List 38.17 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 18, 2017 01:09 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2018: How Great Designs Get Built

SOLIDWORKS 2018 is an exciting release that has been designed to address customer needs, including:

  • New innovations to address the flexibility, changing, and evolving nature of product design
  • Additional tools to empower multifaceted engineers
  • Unique features to connect the entire enterprise of small to medium-sized businesses; and
  • Advanced solutions to meet the needs of the entire product lifecycle.

With the many innovations in SOLIDWORKS 2018, companies can accelerate time to market and their innovation processes while reducing product developments costs. As SOLIDWORKS users have come to expect, more than 90 percent of 400+ projects in the release (50 percent in CAD) are customer-driven. I want to thank all of the users who shared their deep insights with our product design team and helped us deliver another fantastic release. I also want to thank the thousands of users who participated in the Beta testing process (online as well as on premise); your feedback is invaluable and has helped make SOLIDWORKS 2018 a best-in-class release.

SOLIDWORKS 2018 lets users automate the creation of tab and slot features used for self-fixturing of parts for welding.

 

At SOLIDWORKS we believe in giving our customers choices – for example, the choice between perpetual or term license – and with SOLIDWORKS 2018, you can choose between a Machine License or an Online License with flexibility to move between the two. Online licensing is the perfect choice for home use and for the multi-faceted engineer who is mobile, perhaps moving between Engineering and the Manufacturing floor.

SOLIDWORKS 2018 empowers engineers and their entire organization to leverage and participate in building intellectual property. In the design-to-manufacturing process it enables Smart Manufacturing – engineering data with or without 3D PMI to flow beautifully to Manufacturing (SOLIDWORKS CAM), Inspection, Data Management, Simulation (Topology Optimization), Marketing (Visualization) and fosters collaboration among stakeholders. With Distributed Data Management, small to medium-sized enterprises can implement Project Management, ECO/ECN, BOM management with dash-boarding and reports. The ease of use and implementation is very similar to SOLIDWORKS PDM.

SOLIDWORKS CAM allows you to integrate design and manufacturing processes under one system to evaluate designs earlier in the process to avoid unexpected costs and delays in finishing products on time.

 

Mechatronics is inevitable in many product designs – with Mechanical, Electrical, and Electronic integration with IoT. SOLIDWORKS is the best design tool to enable the design of connected things. SOLIDWORKS 2018 delivers best-in-class design tools for Connected Objects with several partner solutions that enable IOT with analytics.

SOLIDWORKS 2018 also brings several new, disruptive technologies to market – SOLIDWORKS CAM is now included with SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional, and Premium subscription. Likewise, best-in-class topology optimization is included with Simulation Professional and Premium subscriptions. There are many innovations in core SOLIDWORKS with 3DInterconnect, Combined Mesh and solid modeling, Tab and Slot design, modeling with touch, and more. SOLIDWORKS Manage is a disruptive distributed data management solution for small to medium businesses that have decided not to implement PLM.

Automatically optimize the shape of a design based on weight, function, and manufacturing criteria using the new simulation Topology Study.

 

Please join us in the coming months at local reseller events  for a deep dive into SOLIDWORKS 2018 to see all of the new innovations that I have mentioned above, and more. I am confident that this release will enable you and your organization to scale into next-generation engineering processes, accelerate innovation, and expand your horizons while bringing efficiencies and collaboration features to your product development process while delivering amazing products.

Author information

Kishore Boyalakuntla
Kishore Boyalakuntla
Kishore is the SOLIDWORKS Brand UX leader and and the Product Portfolio Management Senior Director.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2018: How Great Designs Get Built appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Kishore Boyalakuntla at September 18, 2017 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Concentric Mate now includes a Misalignment option

Working with assemblies we sometimes have holes that are slightly misaligned especially when working with imported parts from a supplier, even though they are still within spec and will work for the intended use, we get the Over Defined ketchup and mustard in our feature tree.

But now with SOLIDWORKS 2018 we have this new option under the concentric mate called “Misalignment”.

SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate Misalignment Option

SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate Misalignment Option

The SOLIDWORKS Concentric Mate Misalignment option provides us with the ability to still add the mate, but choose which hole in the part[s] to be misaligned or even have the concentric mates symmetrical (meaning both will be offset the same distance).

This option also gives us the opportunity to define the maximum allowable deviation.

Misalignment Maximum deviation value

Misalignment Maximum deviation value

For those holes which cannot have any deviation, don’t worry this option can be disabled through the System Options hiding the option from the PropertyManager.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2018 Concentric Mate now includes a Misalignment option appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Moe Younis at September 18, 2017 12:00 PM

September 17, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

5 Must-Know Shortcuts for Fast Rendering Setups in SOLIDWORKS Visualize

There are few techniques as divisive as the keyboard short cut. It’s generally a “love it” or “hate it” kind of a tool. When I teach keyboard shortcuts, the average response is something along the lines of, “Bah.. I can never remember those things. Don’t waste your breath.”

I can certainly empathize with that attitude. I use a very wide variety of software packages for different purposes so it’s a full time job keeping track of the keyboard shortcuts for them all. I haven’t always been a keyboard shortcut user and I’m certainly not as serious as some people are. So, while it’s not the first thing I recommend people learn, it sure does boost your productivity once you start to get the hang of things. However, with seemingly a million shortcuts to choose from where do you start?

I use a good number of the keyboard shortcuts available in Visualize. So today, I’m going to share just 5 of them which I’ve found most helpful along the way. Of course, there are the standard Windows shortcuts that carry over (Save, New, Open, Undo, etc.) as well as the SOLIDWORKS mouse and keyboard controls, but in this session I’ll stick to the more obscure Visualize-specific shortcuts. Without further ado, drumroll please…

  1. Focal Length Quick Adjust

Alt + Middle Mouse Button Scroll

This is the first shortcut I fell in love with in Visualize. Having an organic way to change your camera’s focal length makes it incredibly easy to dial in how you want the shot to look. I can set a camera in seconds that used to take minutes. This means I’m efficient, but moreover, I can try more angles and not have to think about buttons and dials while doing it. I can purely work with the framing of the shot with a natural interaction. Simply hold down the Alt key while you’re working the scroll wheel on your mouse and instead of the camera dolly you would normally get, you’ll see a change in the perspective of the image instead. This is the equivalent of changing what lens you’ve got on your digital camera.

  1. Camera Look – At

Shift (or Ctrl) + Alt + Right Click

If there’s one thing that takes a little bit of adjustment when moving from SOLIDWORKS to Visualize, it might be the center of rotation on the cameras. SOLIDWORKS has an active algorithm that is constantly moving the center of rotation for you based your viewport settings and cursor location. This method is perfect when you’re modeling, but Visualize has a different purpose. Visualize is mimicking the way that we use a physical camera. That means we’re setting where the camera looks ourselves based on our needs for the shot. Sometimes I’ll “step away from the camera” by adding a second camera to move around my main camera. But often times that isn’t necessary. If I just want to move what my camera is looking at, a quick swipe of the keyboard and mouse will do the trick. Simply hold Control and Alt together and Right Click on the object you’d like to lock on to. Now your camera will look at and rotate about whatever location you’ve right clicked on.

Both Control and Shift will do this for you. The difference is Shift + Alt will not move your current camera view where Control + Alt will center the camera on your selection. This can be difficult to remember so you can either stick with your preference (I prefer Shift + Alt), or remember it by thinking that Control is the forceful one, it “controls” your camera. Shift is shifty and sneaky and will “shift” the point without you seeing a change.

  1. Smooth Dolly In/Out

Shift + Middle Mouse Button + Mouse Forward / Backwards

Have you ever gone to set up a camera and wanted to get right in between one click of the mouse wheel and the next? When it comes to setting up renderings, we often need to get the view just right to “get the shot”. Holding the Shift key down, press the Middle Mouse Button (instead of scrolling as you normally would), and move the mouse itself forward and backwards. You should now get a buttery-smooth motion of the camera in and out.

  1. Copy and Paste Appearances

Shift + Left / Right Click

It doesn’t get much easier than drag and drop. Visualize is set up let you grab pretty much anything you need, and drag it wherever you want it applied. When it comes to appearances, I often find myself wanting to take the appearance I already have applied on one part, and apply it elsewhere. Visualize does have a handy Appearance selection mode which allows us to quickly locate an appearance and drag that onto our next selection. But when I’m in the groove, I like to stay as focused on the graphics area as possible. By simply holding Shift and Left Clicking on the object that has the desired appearance, you can then Right Click on the object that you wish to have the appearance (still holding the Shift key). If you have a hard time remembering which one is “Copy” and which one is “Paste,” just remember that your Left Click is always the selection tool. Select what you’re after with the Left Click, then transfer it with the Right Click.

  1. Rotate Environment

Ctrl + Alt + Left Mouse Button Drag

This a relatively new addition to my bag of tricks. This might not be the first shortcut you pick up but it is quite slick when you get there. I wouldn’t say that the scene rotation option is buried (it’s right where you’d expect it to be towards the top of the scene settings) but not having to go chasing after it at all is a nice plus. By holding down the Control and Alt keys simultaneously, you can drag your Left Mouse Button horizontally in the graphics area to rotate the environment. This is excellent when you’ve just pulled in an environment out of the library and are checking to see if it meets your needs. It’s also nice if you’re just fine tuning the lighting at the end of the process. Either way, I’ve found I have the patience for more adjustments when I have direct access and don’t have to go hunting for the option!

BONUS:

For those of you who have gotten those down and are looking for more, here are a couple of my honorable mentions.

  1. Environment Brightness

Ctrl + [ or ]

Hold Control and tap the right bracket to increase brightness by .25 or the left bracket to decrease by .25. Great for quick tweaks at the end. Pro tip: Add Shift with the Control key to jump by .5 increments.

  1. Gamma

Ctrl + ; or  ‘

This one looks more obscure on paper than it is on the keyboard. It’s simply the next set of keys down from the brackets. Just like adjusting the Environment Brightness, holding the Control key and tapping the apostrophe will increase gamma by .25 while semi-colon will drop it equally. The Shift key will double the increment here as well.

So there are my top 5 keyboard shortcuts for Visualize (with a couple of freebies). I find that I simply cannot remember keyboard shortcuts unless I use them a few times IMEDIATELY after learning them. So I’ve created a simple example and tutorial that you can watch and download here to give these a try in context.

Open up Visualize, and follow along with the tutorial video here:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/F642hUQx0uE?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

Download the example file here!

P.S. – If you’re looking to get into keyboard shortcuts in Visualize but you can only remember one to begin with, make it F12. F12 is your secret cheat sheet for the rest of the shortcuts! Shortcuts can be easy to forget, so having quick access to a refresher can be the key (pun intended) to remembering them quickly!

Author information

CADimensions
We are an authorized SOLIDWORKS and Stratasys reseller with certified training & support centers located in New York and Pennsylvania, USA. We are 100% focused on living a CADLIFE and have our vendor's unconditional endorsement in the sales and support of their products.

The post 5 Must-Know Shortcuts for Fast Rendering Setups in SOLIDWORKS Visualize appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CADimensions at September 17, 2017 03:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Weldment Structural Member Chain Selection

When creating Weldment Structural Members, sketch entities are selected to create groups.  You may have a simple 2D Sketch, a complicated 3D Sketch or a mixture of both.  Groups can be several parallel (non-connected) lines or a set of connected lines.

Within the Structural Member PropertyManager, you currently CANNOT right-click on a line and use Select Chain to select an open or closed chain of entities.

SOLIDWORKS Weldment Structural Member Right-Click Menu

But you can use Select Chain BEFORE you use the Structural Members tool.  The preselected lines will be used when you start the feature.  But the preselection would need to be done before each Structural Member feature is created.

SOLIDWORKS Weldment Structural Member Chain Selection

SOLIDWORKS Preselect Open or Closed Chain of Entities

Using multiple Groups in the same feature will not have the ability to use Select Chain as they need to be preselected before starting the feature.

SOLIDWORKS Structural Member from Preselected Entities

The post SOLIDWORKS Weldment Structural Member Chain Selection appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at September 17, 2017 12:00 PM

September 16, 2017

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 37.17

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee, and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top ten stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

ShadowDraw Teaches You to Draw Like Professional Artists

Ever since I was a teenager, I always wanted to graduate my art style from stick figures to something a bit more refined. Not everyone has an instinct for drawing, but quite a few would love to draw better and many of us desire to sketch like a pro. ShadowDraw, a creative app for the upcoming Apple iOS 11 update, allows the unskilled Picasso-to-be to learn from the greats.

The LittleBits Droid Inventor Set Lets Kids Build Their Own Programmable R2-D2s

Between instant water balloons, DIY computers, or even just simply finding a reason to get back to nature, kids today have never had it so good when it comes to busy activities

How to 3D Print Your Own Products & Sell Them Online

Despite countless attempts at making the everyday camera wearable, the device still sticks out like a sore thumb. Ultimately, if it’s not hanging at the end of a selfie stick, it’s sitting on the top of your head like a GoPro.

Make This Miniature Meat Cleaver, Stick It Right on Your Fridge

If you’re tired of conventional magnets doing little more than sticking like parasites to your refrigerator, you might want to consider making your own.

Lenovo Slips a ThinkStation P920 and P720 in Your Drink

Yeah, they did it. Lenovo has announced two new upgrades to its line of ThinkStation ‘pewters bound to make your eye muscles tighten and twitch. The ThinkStation P720 and the P920 are two new dual processor systems designed for more taxing operations than opening 50 tabs of Martha Stewart recipes in Google Chrome. (All images save the one below showcase the P920 though, as you can see, the P720 looks like its smaller, slightly more rebellious twin sister).

Ask An Engineer #3: Why Aren’t There More Women in Engineering?

Question: Why aren’t there more women in Engineering and what can be done to change that?

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 37.17 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 16, 2017 09:42 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Vintage Microphone Tutorial

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="355" id="PreviewFrame3D" name="PreviewFrame3D" scrolling="no" src="http://www.3dcontentcentral.com/external-site-embed.aspx?format=3D&amp;catalogid=11199&amp;modelid=806967&amp;width=250&amp;height=250&amp;edraw=true" width="400"></iframe>
Vintage Microphone: We are “on the air” with SOLIDWORKS!

This multi-body part goes over different pattern and mirroring techniques. It does include a few advanced features including sweeps and a loft.

There is an example of a spring created from helix curve and uses a composite curve to add the “pigtail” ends. Other features include linear and circular patterns, revolves and several mirrors.  This part includes multiple split line curves for the text labels. There are a couple of examples of full round fillets and three 3D sketches.

There are two display states: one with red text red, one with clear text to distinguish the on or off status.

Download this file to learn more about pattern and mirroring techniques.

Download: Vintage Microphone
Complexity: Moderate
Features: Mirror, Sweeps, Lofts, Helix Curve, Linear and Circular Patterns.

View all the Part Reviewer Tutorials here.

DraftSight Download: In conjunction with DraftSight, Dassault Systèmes’ 2D CAD product, the 2D drawing(.dwg) file of the Vintage Microphone tutorial is now available for download here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Vintage Microphone Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at September 16, 2017 09:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Why does my SOLIDWORKS Model look so dark?

One of the questions that I often receive is “Why does my SOLIDWORKS Model look so dark?”. It gets even worse if you switch to a ‘Shaded’ display style. Our customers ensure they have a supported graphics card and driver, and in most cases there are no appearances assigned to the model.

SOLIDWORKS Model looks dark?

SOLIDWORKS Model looks dark?

Fortunately, the answer is simple. The lights have literally been turned off!!! All you need to do is:

  1. Switch to the “Display Manager” tab.
  2. Click on “Scene, Lights, and Cameras” and then click on “Lights”.
  3. As you can see in the image below the “Directional1” light is grayed out which means it is turned off.
  4. To turn it on again simply right-click on the Directional light and select “On in SOLIDWORKS” from the shortcut menu.

And your model starts to shine again like a diamond.

Model illuminated

Model illuminated

The post Why does my SOLIDWORKS Model look so dark? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Saeed Mojarad (CSWE) at September 16, 2017 12:00 PM

September 15, 2017

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Bear Fur Battle Drone

nik henderson art

The cones of bear fur lined the cavern ledges. Though they seemed uniform and color sorted, it was quickly apparent why we had heard the noises and rumbles from this place. One by one, we saw, hidden at first but there in the fur, the glowing eyes of these links.

Nik Henderson – Fabulous! Loads of beautiful line work and color in these 2D illustrations of ships, vehicles and more from the Savannah, Georgia based artist.

The Bet Losing Machine – It took him four months of building, and 297 fails but after losing a bet the tabletop machine was finally finished. And he has many more.

Film Color Palettes – A lovely array of films and the colors that, many time, define their characteristic look and appeal.

Craft Beer Branding Guide – The all important process of branding your delicious beverage with everything to consider along the way.

Feedboxes Live – Krzysztof Cybulski demonstrates Feedbox that samples the music as it’s played to provide the musical accompaniment.

2048 – A prequel short, taking place between Bladerunner 2019 and the Bladerunner 2049 sequel, with events leading up to the discovery. Two others too.

Star Trek Discovery – The story from composer Jeff Russo as he leads a 60-piece orchestra in the modern interpretation of the classic.
<script type="text/javascript"> amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "solid0a-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Deals We're Watching"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B01N7GC9Z6,B0194WDVHI,B01N9D7DP2,B01N34PSPL"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "9f105a72bf9c98339f8ff85760e1860b"; </script>
<script src="http://z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>
Powderfinger – New one from his Hitchhiker album with his classic sound and watercolor visuals.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ETOIIWot-3Y?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

The post Friday Smackdown: Bear Fur Battle Drone appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 15, 2017 09:58 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Time-Lapse Tutorial: Desktop Catapult

Medieval times brought us so many great engineering machines which helped brave knights break down the wall of their enemies. Many of these mechanisms are still used today and are being developed for new technologies. So, we took a trip down memory lane and built a small desktop catapult and used some modern technologies to 3D print it. This is also great for annoying your coworkers by shooting little paper balls around the office.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cQ2VUFXmgpg?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

To build the catapult, we use a top-down design technique, this allowed us to change the model as we designed the catapult. This technique is great if you don’t have a full idea of the design direction you are taking.

We built the basic body using basic SOLIDWORKS techniques. Once the main body was complete, we added the axis where the bucket will pivot on; we created the basic shape of the bucket for reference. We built the coil spring, this will be what drives the catapult. To build the coil, we drew a reference circle. Then made it into a spiral using the Helix/Spiral feature. This gave us our reference lines to make the body of the spring.






Once created the spring, we finished the bucket; this is where the projectiles will take place. This shows the best example to where top-down design technique was useful to design the shape and edit it within view of the body. Once the bucket was designed, we used the Move Body feature to move it in the starting position. This lined our catapult model up to create the pins that attach the bucket to the end of the springs.




For printing the design, all the parts were printed at 0.2mm layer height and 15% infill except for the springs, those were printed at 0.2mm layer height and 0% infill. This allowed each layer to be uniform and springing properties.



Building the printed catapult was super easy. We placed the pin for the bucket and alighted it with a screw driver. Then, we put the coil springs in place and aligned the pins for the coils and that’s it! It’s assembled and ready to take siege of your neighbor’s cubicle.




We will continue to develop new technologies using SOLIDWORK to create designs, test them with simulations and then bring them to life with technology.

As always, thanks for reading! If you liked this blog, be sure to check out our YouTube playlist for more SOLIDWORKS Time-Lapse tutorials!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Time-Lapse Tutorial: Desktop Catapult appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at September 15, 2017 09:00 PM

SolidSmack

This Polymer Skateboard Deck Pops Higher and Lasts a Lifetime

Though skateboarders have been blessed with a variety of upgrades to the traditional skateboard (such as a smart electric skateboard with a built-in A.I. and a one-wheeled, all-terrain variant), traditional boards are built of maple plys that’ll snap as soon as you land on it wrong.

They just don’t last long before chipping or breaking down from all the punishment skateboarders put them through. Apart from tricks performed with the board, these slabs of wood on wheels can be subject to some pretty harsh treatment as well.

These are the problems Capsule wants to solve. Unlike your conventional skateboards, Capsule decks are made of 100% recyclable polymer, which is six times more durable than any multi-ply deck you’ll ever buy. According to the team behind it, this makes the Capsule virtually unbreakable and resistant to all types of weather.

For those who want to know how the Capsule performs when it comes to tricks, the deck is coated in a special film which makes it easier to slide down rails, walls, and just about any piece of public property. The composition of the deck reduces the impact riders experience when landing from a fakie front-side down a doubleset, which is a much-needed feature seeing as the materials used also make the skateboard pop higher.

The best feature of the Capsule would have to be the amount of waste and cost it reduces. It replaces the countless wooden decks skaters use over the span of one year with one durable, totally recyclable deck. Even when the Capsule reaches the end of its long life cycle, the board can be ground down to make new decks for future skaters.

It looks just like a regular deck and the Capsule comes in different widths for skateboards and lengths for longboards, with different cat and space-themed designs on all. The skateboard decks cost $75 while longboard decks cost $125, making their price range just about the same as a conventional skateboard deck.

Capsule is well on its way to their $30,000 goal on Indiegogo.com. To learn more about it (and maybe preorder one for yourself), you can check out their page.

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The post This Polymer Skateboard Deck Pops Higher and Lasts a Lifetime appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 15, 2017 07:48 PM

This is How voxeljet’s New HSS 3D Printing Process Works

voxeljet hss 3d printing process

Germany-based voxeljet announced a new 3D printing process they call HSS. voxeljet is known for their line of very large format 3D printers, which are specialized for the production of casting molds. Many companies use voxeljet technology to produce large cast metal parts, and in many circumstances, do so much more effectively than using conventional metal casting techniques.

But the new HSS technology from voxeljet actually doesn’t involve metal – or casting, for that matter. It’s all about plastic.

voxeljet has adapted their existing technology to create HSS. Their “core technology” used to create large casting molds involves jetting binder on a powder surface, which hardens to form the mold. Now that same binder jetting technology can be used to create functional plastic parts.

How voxeljet’s HSS 3D Printing Works

Here’s how it works: a flat layer of plastic powder is applied in the usual manner. A toolhead selectively jets liquid binder on to the powder surface.

Now the interesting part happens: the binder is designed to be highly sensitive to infrared light. When a layer is jetted, an infrared light source blasts the surface, whereupon the binder heats up. The heat is sufficient to melt the powder to which it was applied, fusing the plastic powder into a solid layer and binding it to those underneath. This graphic illustrates the process:

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_89501" style="width: 1100px">voxeljet's new HSS 3D printing process<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">voxeljet’s new HSS 3D printing process</figcaption></figure>

This is a very interesting approach, as it should be able to produce very strong plastic parts more efficiently than laser-based systems that must traverse every voxel of every layer. At top you can see some sample parts produced using HSS.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_89502" style="width: 1100px">Print heads with large printing width vs. laser beam used in selective laser sintering (SLS). <figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Print heads with large printing width vs. laser beam used in selective laser sintering (SLS).</figcaption></figure>

Another interesting aspect is that the powder-based nature of HSS should permit use of any suitable powdered plastic. While I’m pretty sure voxeljet will sell their own line of plastics, it should be possible to use virtually any thermoplastic powder in this system, opening up the possibility that HSS could produce very unusual parts.

voxeljet’s CEO, Dr. Ingo Ederer, explains more:

Our new high speed sintering process will initially be launched on our VX200 platform. With that, we are excited to offer to our customers great flexibility regarding process and machine parameters, as both can be tailored by our customers to their specific needs. We offer the option of open sourcing for materials, as our customers can choose various testing and validation services from voxeljet. ProPrint, our new and modular printing software, is available in a full access development-kit, allowing for even greater customization options. The availability and application of a wide range of 3D printable thermoplastic materials, including elastomers, makes this product line ideally suited for material suppliers, universities, and other institutions.

Thus it seems that HSS will be an option for inclusion on voxeljet’s line of large-format 3D printers. This is quite an interesting development because of the incredible size of the voxeljet 3D printers.

Their vx4000, for example, has a build volume of 4 x 2 x 1m (yes, meters), while the first system to use HSS, the VX200, has a build volume of 300 x 200 x 150 mm.

I’m wondering if this process will be applied to their larger systems, beyond the VX200. If so, it would then be possible to 3D print enormous plastic parts at efficient costs. One possible issue facing voxeljet could be the control of the heating. The amount of heat collected by a build chamber during printing could take some time to cool down, limiting the throughput of HSS.

This is also a challenge for HP, who use a somewhat similar process. However, they overcome the difficulty by creating a removable build chamber, allowing you to continue printing using a second build chamber while the first one cools down. It’s not clear if voxeljet will go this route for their larger units.

However, for now HSS will only be available on the relatively smaller VX200 system.
Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post This is How voxeljet’s New HSS 3D Printing Process Works appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at September 15, 2017 03:30 PM

This Insane Primitive Furnace is Made From Mud and Sticks

For all of the nauseating “Smartphone of the Future” noise we’ve been hearing over the past week, let’s take a minute to go back to basics.

SolidSmack favorite YouTuber Primitive Technology, a mastermind in working with natural materials to create functional shelters and objects, recently created his own furnace using—yep, primitive technology—for manufacturing ceramic goods. The simple design, which is made from mud and sticks, could theoretically also be used to smelt metals.

“The purpose of this project was to test a simplified blower design connected to a furnace,” he explains. “I purposely did this to show that people in most natural environments should be able to replicate this design without difficulty…I made 3 pots and fired them with charcoal.”

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While the purpose of the project was simply experimentation, there’s no denying this is solid badassery at its finest. Head over to YouTube to read the full breakdown.

The post This Insane Primitive Furnace is Made From Mud and Sticks appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at September 15, 2017 01:18 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: Carhartt Long-Sleeve T-Shirt

When it comes to long hours working in the shop, good quality and comfortable workwear couldn’t be more underrated. Heck—why wouldn’t you want to be comfortable?

And while that beloved Pearl Jam 1994 World Tour shirt may do the job a few days out of the week, there’s no denying that there’s always room in the closet. And in our humble opinion, the Workwear Pocket Long Sleeve T-shirt from Carhartt is the perfect addition for all your work wear needs.

Whether worn by itself or as a base layer, the rugged 100% cotton jersey-knit crew neck shirt includes a large left-chest pocket and a side-seamed construction pattern to minimize uncomfortable twisting. And at just $21, you can afford to get multiple colors for each day of the week—if that’s your thing.

Carhartt Men’s Workwear Midweight Jersey Pocket Long-Sleeve T-Shirt — $20.99

Features:

  • 100% Cotton
  • Machine Washable
  • Original fit
  • Rib-knit crewneck and cuffs
  • Side-seamed construction minimizes twisting
  • Left chest pocket with sewn on Carhartt label

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: Carhartt Long-Sleeve T-Shirt appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 15, 2017 12:57 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 Dismiss Message

New in SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 is the ability to dismiss pop-up messages.  For example every time you re-mesh a model after the study had already been solved, you get the pop-up warning that the previous results would be deleted.  You can now select ‘Do not show again’ so it no longer keeps coming up on future re-mesh situations.  Of course you will need to remember that it will delete any previous results when re-meshing.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Dismiss Message Option

Dismiss Message Option

If you have incorrectly set a SOLIDWORKS Simulation Dismiss Message, it can be re-enabled through the Simulation system options (Simulation > Options > System Options tab).

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 Undo Dismissed Messages

Undo Dismissed Messages

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 Dismiss Message appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at September 15, 2017 12:00 PM

September 14, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Free DriveWorks Tech Tips Webinar

DriveWorks Webinar

Javelin’s DriveWorks Expert Lee Herron hosts monthly community meetings where Javelin customers can bring their DriveWorks questions or problems and receive free mentoring and troubleshooting advice. This will be an open meeting format, where all attendees can learn from other companies’ projects, plans and issues.

Please be aware that all attendees will be able to see the questions and concerns that you present, so keep your top-secret company info out of sight! We do encourage you to bring problems or projects you are working on, if the information is not confidential.

Register for the next DriveWorks Free Tech Support Session on Sep 15, 2017 1:00 PM EDT: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5934949746995446275

driveworks webinar

The DriveWorks Free Tech Support Sessions take place on the 3rd Friday of every month.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

The post Free DriveWorks Tech Tips Webinar appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Lee Herron at September 14, 2017 07:53 PM

SolidSmack

App Smack 37.17: Trello, Fenix 2, 3D Parallax Background, and More…

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@www.solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Trello (iOS — Free)

Trello gives you perspective over all your projects, at work and at home.

Logo Foundry (iOS – Free)

Logo Foundry is a professional logo design suite that lets you create powerful branding for your business in a matter of Minutes!

PayPal Business (iOS — Free)

The PayPal Business mobile app helps you stay on top of your PayPal business account while you’re on the go.

Fenix 2 for Twitter (Android — $1.99)

Tired of the same old Twitter apps? Give Fenix a try and you won’t go back!

Photomath (Android — Free)

Simply point your camera toward a math problem and Photomath will magically show the result with a detailed step-by-step instructions.

3D Parallax Background (Android — $1.99)

The original multi-layer holographic illusion live wallpaper!

The post App Smack 37.17: Trello, Fenix 2, 3D Parallax Background, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 14, 2017 01:20 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

How to Configure Your SOLIDWORKS 2018 Workstation

The experts at BOXX share this quick guide to choosing the right processors, SSDs, graphics, memory, and more so you can take full advantage of SOLIDWORKS 2018.

With the arrival of SOLIDWORKS 2018 and all of the application’s new features, it may be time to consider upgrading your SOLIDWORKS hardware as well. Begin by asking yourself three questions:

  • How big are my assemblies?
  • How many geometric surfaces do I have?
  • How complex are my parts files?

Based upon your responses, you can formulate a plan.

START WITH CPU CORES
SOLIDWORKS is a lightly-threaded application, meaning that it predominantly uses fewer cores. Since frequency determines performance more than any other variable, a workstation with fewer cores (but higher frequency) is ideal. You can always buy more cores, but why? Additional cores will cost more money and they’re only beneficial if a sizable portion or your work involves rendering or simulation. Since you have an OS, you’ll need two cores dedicated to the OS and two to SOLIDWORKS.

THE NEED FOR SPEED
Rendering and SOLIDWORKS Simulation commonly utilize multiple cores simultaneously, so if you incorporate these applications into your SOLIDWORKS workflow, a workstation with more cores can provide better performance to complete those tasks faster. In this instance, would adding an additional processor (and therefore more cores) be beneficial? Yes—but only if your workflow revolves around renderings or simulation.

OVERCLOCKING
Professional overclocking definitely matters because it’s the only way to significantly increase core speed and, therefore, performance. With overclocking, all processes run noticeably faster, your workflow becomes more efficient, you become more productive, and that results in a better overall experience.

MEMORY
The “unlimited” RAM available with the 64-bit platform is the single best thing to happen in the world of 3D CAD. Because RAM is how and where the CPU interacts with your parts and assemblies, you need enough to hold all of that data. Significant RAM beyond that will not increase performance—it’s just empty space. Most users begin with at least 16 GB, but 32GB is becoming more commonplace. Consult the Windows Performance Monitor to see how much RAM you have and how much you’re utilizing. If that gauge is full, you need more RAM in order to operate at peak performance.

GETTING GRAPHIC
A frequent misconception is that a bigger GPU is always warranted, but an NVIDIA Quadro K600 card works fine in many workflows. You can opt for higher-performance cards, but the majority of SOLIDWORKS video tasks are done on CPU and RAM. The NVIDIA Quadro P2000 as an ideal graphics card for most SOLIDWORKS workflows, but we also recommend moving to a GPU like the NVIDIA Quadro P4000 or higher if your workflow involves lots of rendering (with SOLIDWORKS Visualize, for example) or if you’re running other applications like 3ds Max or Adobe Creative Cloud.

THE SSD DIFFERENCE
The calculation is simple. Your choice of hard drive makes a significant impact on performance. With SSD, your workstation boots up and loads faster, so that alone makes it worth the expense. Of course, this is all predicated on your company using good data management. Also, you don’t necessarily need a large drive if you rely on a secondary or network drive for additional storage.

If you make sound decisions in these areas and pay attention to ROI and its relationship to performance, your result should be a SOLIDWORKS 2018 system that will save you time, save you money, increase your productivity, and best of all, increase your profits. You can find more information on how to customize your own BOXX workstation for SOLIDWORKS here.

Author information

Joe Pizzini
Joe Pizzini
Since 2013, BOXX Technical Marketing Manager Joe Pizzini has translated complex value propositions into succinct marketing collateral. Joe works closely with BOXX Engineering and key partners like Intel, NVIDIA, and Dassault Systemes to provide accurate, educational, and engaging content. Learn more about BOXX and SOLIDWORKS: http://www.boxxtech.com/solutions/manufacturing/product-design/solidworks

The post How to Configure Your SOLIDWORKS 2018 Workstation appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Joe Pizzini at September 14, 2017 01:12 PM

SolidSmack

The Comprehensive Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle is Now 96% Off

We’ve said it time and time again, but the Raspberry Pi is just so dang cool and we believe all designers and engineers should have one in their toolkit—if not on their desktop. While there is a bit of a slight learning curve, it’s nothing that today’s designers and engineers can’t handle on a leisurely Saturday.

So why not start now?

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle includes 8 courses to get started creating your very own Amazon Echo or even a ‘vintage’ streaming internet radio over a weekend. Throw in your own 3D printed housings, and the opportunities are limitless!

For a limited time, The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle is 96% off of the $865 retail price and can be purchased right here for a mere $34.

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle — $865 $34 (96% Off!)

Courses Included in the Bundle:

  • Automation with Raspberry Pi Zero
  • Introduction to Raspberry Pi
  • Hardware Projects Using Raspberry Pi
  • Bitcoin Mining Using Raspberry Pi
  • Raspberry Pi Robotics
  • Internet of Things Automation Using Raspberry Pi 2
  • Home Automation in 48 Hours Without Coding
  • Build Your Own ArmBot Step By Step Using Raspberry Pi Zero

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
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The post The Comprehensive Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle is Now 96% Off appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 14, 2017 12:42 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018: Factor of Safety Plot for Nonlinear Static Studies

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 includes the ability to define a factor of safety (FoS) plot for Nonlinear Static studies. Herein, the factor of safety plot is extended to nonlinear static studies.

Once a SOLIDWORKS Simulation Nonlinear static analysis completes, you can create a factor of safety plot based on a defined failure criterion.

To enable the plot right-click your Nonlinear results and select Define Factor of Safety Plot from the shortcut menu, as shown below:

SOLIDWORKS Simulation FOS Nonlinear Static Studies

Factor of Safety Plot for Nonlinear Static Studies

You can also create a factor of safety plot from results derived from a selected solution step or from the extreme values across all solutions steps, as depicted below:

Factor of Safety Plot Step

Factor of Safety Plot Step Selection

Factor of Safety Plot Step Selection

Factor of Safety Plot across all steps

 

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018: Factor of Safety Plot for Nonlinear Static Studies appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Siavash Khajehhasani at September 14, 2017 12:00 PM

September 13, 2017

SolidSmack

Ask An Engineer #3: Why Aren’t There More Women in Engineering?

Welcome to our new ‘Ask An Engineer’ series, where Dan Slaski addresses questions that have you losing sleep or staring off into space during important meetings. Have a question for Dan? Send it in.

Question: Why aren’t there more women in Engineering and what can be done to change that?

Dear the Future Is Female,

This is an important question with many complex social factors at play. I am a witness to this phenomenon but not an expert in a way that it would be appropriate to speak authoritatively on the why. The few female engineers I have had the opportunity to work with have been superb and more women designers of that caliber would benefit us all. I can speak on how Engineering is generally an excellent career and provide tips to demonstrate this, which hopefully encourages potential future women engineers. I call this my AAA system.

Aspirational

Careers that attract only on one superficial dimension lack deep fulfillment and sustainability. My work actually fuels me instead of depleting me because it is aligned with my values.”

The first step is to demonstrate that an engineering career path can lead to an aspirational lifestyle. Certain careers lure people in predominantly based on financial incentives or otherwise the perception of a glamourous lifestyle. Careers that attract only on one superficial dimension lack deep fulfillment and sustainability. My work actually fuels me instead of depleting me because it is aligned with my values. On top of that my job does provide me the luxury of affording awesome hi-tech toys, travel opportunities, and time to pursue hobbies like blog writing, improv, and triathlons.

As I get more established, I work fewer additional hours with more flexibility in great environments. An additional bonus is many of the career skills I have developed transfer well to designing a cool living space, creative side projects, and gear heavy hobbies. I know this is starting to sound braggy, but hey, I even drive a blue 2012 Chevrolet Cruze LT! Growing up in a complex, internet fueled world has made today’s youth highly attuned to authenticity. Engineering is an authentically aspirational career. Engineering isn’t ideal for every person, but it is for me and I’m confident it would be for a lot more people if they better understood the realities and the possibilities.

Achievable

It is well known in American culture that to become an engineer you must first go on a spirit quest. First, you must cross the vast ocean, Mathematicus, which is full of dangerous beast like the KraCalculous. Then you must summit the giant mountain, Scientifcus, to defeat the multi-headed dragon Chimestry. To talk about an engineering education is to talk about math and science. To be a writer one needs a solid comprehension of grammar. But being the best at grammar does not make the best writer. Similarly, math and science are fundamental to engineering at a core level, but much more is required.

To make an awesome design engineer requires many skills, both soft and hard. Such as creativity, problem solving, logic and communication skills, persistence, and thoroughness. These are a few of the additional skills that can elevate a person with the prerequisite math, science, and engineering fundamentals to the next level. Once upon a time, to be an engineer you needed to be an egghead that put people in space with slide rules.

We live in a new era with powerful tools to aid design, and, to be honest, they can help do some of the heavy lifting for us. I can tell you from personal experience that if you excel in the majority of the already mentioned skills that make an excellent engineer and have the desire and work ethic, you can push through and compensate for any shortcomings to become an amazing designer.

Awesome

  • Aerial racing drones
  • Weaponized gladiator robots
  • Electric skateboards
  • Self-driving cars
  • Open source fabrication
  • Metal additive manufacturing
  • Evacuated tube maglev train

More than ever there are awesome shows, blogs, and Internet videos shining a spotlight on these awesome creations. What’s behind the awesome?

Behind the Awesome

  • Automobiles
  • Widgets
  • Engines
  • Structures
  • Objects
  • Machinery
  • Equipment
We need to end our tendency to work quietly behind the scenes, perpetuating stereotypes, and instead exemplify the creative and forward-thinking nature of our work through our behaviors, actions, and lifestyle.”

Boy, are awesome creators having an awesome time with awesome tools. We need to move past the stereotype of the pencil pushing, white short sleeved shirt with a black tie, Dilbertesque clone with evidence that there is another breed of engineer. We need to end our tendency to work quietly behind the scenes, perpetuating stereotypes, and instead exemplify the creative and forward-thinking nature of our work through our behaviors, actions, and lifestyle.

Unfortunately, too often I hear, “You are an engineer?” Seemingly indicating a surprise at my ability to make eye contact or crack a joke. I want to hear, “You are an engineer!” Indicating sheer excitement about new technology or projects I am engrossed in.

BatteBots is awesome. What is not to like about fire spewing, weapon wielding robots exploding in twisted metal carnage? In Season 2 of BattleBots we got to know Zoe Stephenson, captain of team Chomp.  I thought Chomp seemed overly complicated and doomed for early annihilation.  As is often the case, I was totally wrong, and Chomp did awesomely well and even made it to the finals. Zoe consistently conducted herself with a cool and composed confidence, backed up by ro-butt kicking performance.

Many of the other teams’ members and captains displayed a false confidence and a know-it-all smarter than thou pretense that is actually transparent and unfortunately all too common amongst engineers. Chomp is awesome, Zoe is awesome. Engineers may never be rock stars or all-stars but we can be north stars in the eyes of bright young people. So, get on board the Awesome train. Next stop, Awesome town.

The post Ask An Engineer #3: Why Aren’t There More Women in Engineering? appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Dan Slaski at September 13, 2017 11:20 PM

Dassault Systemes Points Elbows to Sky, Launches SOLIDWORKS 2018

solidworks 2018

Well, props to the mom’s of 1,000,000+ designers and engineers who, for reasons unbeknownst to them, gave a collective high-five from the sheer excitement of their sons and daughters learning SOLIDWORKS 2018 was indeed released and now available.

SOLIDWORKS 2018

If you had to sum up SOLIDWORKS 2018 in one sentence, you would say, ‘SOLIDWORKS 2018 is a robo-ninja CAD-artillery mech with auto-deploy model-to-manufacturing melee battle action and the flexibility of jointless machine tool operator.” If that didn’t explain things sufficiently, you can say, “Look, SOLIDWORKS captures the whole scope from prototype to manufacturing with new mesh data manipulation, sheet metal features, generative design and topology studies, model-based definition and inspection capabilities, and more ways to capture it all with branching and merging in SOLIDWORKS PDM, process management in SOLIDWORKS Manage, and automated PDF creation.”

Here’s a quick introduction if you only have 2 minutes 35 seconds before the noodles on your stovetop start boiling (keep an eye on the mouse cursor):

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cp0jaOFtqX4?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Now, if that video answered none of your questions about the new features actually in SOLIDWORKS 2018, let take a look at some of the highlights.

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Features

Mesh Bodies

In SOLIDWORKS 2018 you can import mesh data, turn mesh surfaces into SolidWorks surfaces, and convert mesh data and solid bodies into Mesh Bodies. The Mesh bodies show up in a Graphic Bodies folder in the Feature Manager (below the Surface Bodies and Solid Bodies folders). Though you can’t work the mesh like a 3d poly editor, you can use other SolidWorks features on the mesh body.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NcneTj2ck3E?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Tab and Slot Feature for Sheet Metal

Huge. SOLIDWORKS 2018 has a new Tab and Slot (aka Mortise and Tenon) feature that creates both in one go. This is at the part level though, so you’ll still need to position a tab and a slots for separate parts (hint: drive both with a sketch). Still, this feature will save an enormous amount of time for tab and slot creation on single parts.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eBbIE3i7jJw?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Assembly Features

SOLIDWORKS 2018 now allows you to rotate linear pattern instances. You can use the Alt-key to hide surface to select others geometry for mates and override mates that go all wonky. When you create exploded views you now have the option to add Smart Explode Lines with a lil’ click and a chuckle.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kJ3hYLkYEjc?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

3D CAD Interoperability

You now have neutral file format import support, no need to translate STEP, IGES, ACIS, and JT. If you’re migrating to SolidWorks, your legacy data will come in with all that sweet meta data/custom properties and even reference geometry in some cases.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/s-TBRX1hpd4?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Touch Device Sketching

SOLIDWORKS meet hand, hand meet SOLIDWORKS. Wacom users will LOVE this as will those who can draw with a twitching finger reasonably well after five cups of coffee and 12 hours at work. The new Pen commands are available under the new Sketch Ink menu. You can select Pen color, size, trigger Auto Shape, or toggle Auto Sketch Entity, which turns it immediately into a sketch entity.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/aZo8CQvLzHU?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Model Based Definition Updates

More MBD in the Monitor. You can add datum features to patterns and define an overall profile tolerance. There’s also support for the import of annotations from other software like PTC Creo, Siemens NX, CATIA and also for STEP. On top of this, SOLIDWORKS Inspection can grab that data to create inspection documentation for SOLIDWORKS files and the other CAD formats. It also gets integrated with SOLIDWORKS PDM.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YzQ8URIwlxg?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Branch & Merge

Yes, you will use this – if you use SOLIDWORKS PDM, that is. It now allows you to branch (create a new file version) and merge (use a selected file version). From the Vault you simply right-click to Branch a part/assembly or right-click and Merge the preferred part/assembly. Totally removes the need for all that save as, replace reference trickery you’ve gotten so good at over the past 10-20 years.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/oxb0SG449yE?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

SOLIDWORKS CAM

SOLIDWORKS CAM, powered by CAMWorks, is completely integrated inside SOLIDWORKS. It has the feature recognition capabilities with the mill setup laid out automatically. You can go on to generate a plan and toolpath or simulate the toolpath process. Along with this, the CNC operations can be generated directly from GD&T applied to the 3D model based on tolerances you’ve set up.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pPxH-JGTCK4?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

SOLIDWORKS Manage

SOLIDWORKS Manage is a new file-based process management tool to help handle change requests, change orders, notices and provide a better scope of where everything is at. It’s in between PDM + ad-hoc excel, binder system you use now and a full-blown PLM system. Here’s how they explain it:

SOLIDWORKS Manage combines the ease of use and familiar Windows® Explorer interface of SOLIDWORKS PDM with advanced capabilities that allow teams to manage project timelines and resources, complex business processes, and advanced item management.

SOLIDWORKS Manage takes the place of the separate disconnected tools that an organization might use to manage engineering resources and processes. It is compatible with many existing tools, and works to more efficiently and effectively maintain the integrity of enterprise information.

There’s loads in this release of SOLIDWORKS, and plenty we’ve not even touched on. They had over 240 features and improvements added with over 50% of those CAD related. The user interface also has some great new enhancements from a new welcome window to color coded folders, improved selection and up to 12 mouse gestures now. You’ll want to check out the Simulation tools as well if you have that as it now has Topology Study and Generative Design capabilities. Oh, and if you’re wondering about licensing updates, they’ve moved it online to allow faster setup of SOLIDWORKS on any machine.

SOLIDWORKS officially releases September 26th, so be on the lookout for launch events and those upgrade notifications. There’s more on the new features and a hefty amount of eBooks to read at launch.solidworks.com. We would love to know your fav new feature. Let us know in the comments!

 

The post Dassault Systemes Points Elbows to Sky, Launches SOLIDWORKS 2018 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 13, 2017 09:31 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2018

The demand for better ways to bring your ideas to life

SOLIDWORKS 2018 includes new features and enhancements that respond directly to user requests and the needs of 21st century product development. Work more efficiently with an improved user interface that takes advantage of your touch-enabled devices, let SOLIDWORKS automatically generate the optimal shape of your design based on functional and manufacturing criteria, or let SOLIDWORKS automatically generate the NC tool paths needed to machine your parts. These capabilities are just some examples of how SOLIDWORKS is changing the way design and manufacturing is done.

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Enhancements:

User Experience Gets Big Touch Ups  

SOLIDWORKS 2018 supports a dedicated touch screen mode providing a powerful new set of productivity tools for working on touch screen devices. Freehand sketch with a pen and automatically convert pen strokes to shapes to quickly capture design ideas in the office or on the go.

 

Take the Guess Work Out of Optimizing Your Designs

Automatically optimize the shape of a design based on weight, function, and manufacturing criteria using the new simulation Topology Study. You can also improve product performance or reduce product weight based on function and manufacturing constraints.

Finally – Integrated, Intelligent CAM and Inspection Tools

Powered by CAMWorks, SOLIDWORKS CAM provides ‘rules-based’ machining and automatic feature recognition to dramatically streamline NC programming. In addition, both SOLIDWORKS Inspection and SOLIDWORKS CAM support 3D dimensions and tolerances streamlining design, manufacturing and inspection without the need to create 2D drawings.

More Flexibility with Data

Seamlessly work with file formats including STL, OBJ, JT, ACIS, STEP and IGES. 3D Interconnect automatically updates your design whenever new files are received and now supports internal file information like custom properties, materials properties and reference axes. SOLIDWORKS 2018 also allows you to select faces from the imported mesh data, turn them into SOLIDWORKS surfaces and modify with features and geometry.

Drawing Enhancements?  Of Course!

We can’t list them all, but here is a sampling: insert 3D model views, automatic Advanced Hole callouts, layer support for cross hatching, new trailing zero display options, broken out section view support for Section View and Alternate Position View, and an “All Upper Case” switch capability for text in tables.

Tab and Slot Feature – a Perfect Fit to Get Your Designs Built

SOLIDWORKS 2018 lets users automate the creation of tab and slot features used for self-fixturing of parts for welding.  Other sheet metal enhancements include the new Normal Cut feature which ensures proper clearances are maintained for manufacturing, and the new Bend capability allowing users to create and flatten three-corner bends.

Improved Project and Process Management

SOLIDWORKS Manage provides data management, project management, and process management all in one familiar package. It adds powerful project, process, and item management capabilities to SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional.

Convenience Comes to the Fore

Online Licensing makes using your license on multiple machines easier than ever before. SOLIDWORKS Login moves customized content and settings to any machine SOLIDWORKS is installed on, while the Admin Portal allows easier management of SOLIDWORKS products and services.

Get the full scoop on SOLIDWORKS 2018  

There’s still more to see. Check out the full details and learn more about all of the new tools and enhancements in SOLIDWORKS 2018 by visiting www.solidworks.com/sw2018_launch.

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2018 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at September 13, 2017 06:30 PM

SolidSmack

Lenovo Slips a ThinkStation P920 and P720 in Your Drink

Lenovo ThinkStation P920

Yeah, they did it. Lenovo has announced two new upgrades to its line of ThinkStation ‘pewters bound to make your eye muscles tighten and twitch. The ThinkStation P720 and the P920 are two new dual processor systems designed for more taxing operations than opening 50 tabs of Martha Stewart recipes in Google Chrome. (All images save the one below showcase the P920 though, as you can see, the P720 looks like its smaller, slightly more rebellious twin sister).

ThinkStation P920 and P720 side-by-side

Lenovo ThinkStation P920 & P720

Both workstations run Intel’s newest Xeon Bronze, Gold, Silver and Platinum processors, which offer speeds of up to 3.6 GHz and support for up to 28 cores. The P720 can hold up to 384GB RDIMM 2666MHz DDR4, 12 DIMM Slots, while the P920 holds up to 2TB of DDR4, 2666MHz, 16 DIMMs of memory. This makes it possible to run and store a number of high-demand, performance-hungry projects at the same time.

ThinkStation P920 and Lenovo monitor

As for graphics, the workstations utilize Nvidia’s Quadro graphics cards, with the P920 built to support up to three GP100 or P6000 cards. Not only that, but full RAID support for M.2 NVMe SSD drives bringing some mega fast I/O action for working with large CAD files and data sets.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_89423" style="width: 1100px">ThinkStation P920 Internal layout<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The P920 innards are a thing of mech-electrical beauty.</figcaption></figure>

If its internal 6-channel memory isn’t enough for you, the P720 and P920 can be customized to fit your needs, while slapping stickers all over the box is still left up to you. Both ThinkStations have those fabulous Flex Trays we love holding two drives per bay and *cranks reverb* TRI-CHANNEL COOLING-Cooling-cooling system to prevent the whole shebang from overheating during your intense work sesh.

The aim of these workstations is to 1) increase productivity by 2) cutting down the time it takes to 3) do specific tasks while 4) giggling at those with lesser power. According to SPEC wpc 2.1 benchmarking, users of the P720 and P920 see a speed increase of 43% in their workflow over a standard lifecycle. “The lifecycle of a cricket?” No. The lifecycle of a sarcastic reply to a comment like that, give or take a few years.

The ThinkStations will be going on a WORLD TOUR to showcase their features to like-minded consumers before becoming available late October this year. To see each workstation’s features, you can find details on the P720 here and the P920 here.

 

The post Lenovo Slips a ThinkStation P920 and P720 in Your Drink appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 13, 2017 05:01 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Rotate Instances in a SOLIDWORKS 2018 Linear Pattern

Having the ability to rotate your linear pattern as its created is something that would have previously required two or more features. Now with SOLIDWORKS 2018 this can be done with just an extra click of the mouse.

SOLIDWORKS Linear Pattern Rotate Instances

Rotate Instances

In the SOLIDWORKS 2018 Linear Pattern PropertyManager we now have a new check box for “Rotate Instances”. Once selected we can rotate about a face, axis, or circular edge as we normally would for a circular pattern.

Rotate Instances options

Rotate Instances options

The SOLIDWORKS Linear Pattern Rotate Instances option will save a ton of time, making you more productive.

The post Rotate Instances in a SOLIDWORKS 2018 Linear Pattern appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Moe Younis at September 13, 2017 05:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2018: the Tools to Unlock Your Design Potential

Making product development more accessible has been our mission from day one. Access to the right tools at the right time is critical to bringing your ideas to market faster, more efficiently, and at a lower cost. More importantly, it’s paramount that SOLIDWORKS provides these design tools on your terms. You, our customers, are more innovative than ever. SOLIDWORKS is committed to matching your enthusiasm with the most powerful and accessible tools in the industry.

Narrowing the gap between design and manufacturing is the next major step in accessibility. For years, design and manufacturing have used different tools and separate processes, preventing concurrent design and leading to inefficiencies due to poor collaboration. We’re looking to change this by enabling you to take an integrated approach to design and manufacturing with SOLIDWORKS 2018 and the new SOLIDWORKS CAM. The ability to easily move from concept design to manufactured parts quickly enables you to output products faster, with greater, more predictable quality, and at a lower cost. Our hope is that this integrated design-to-manufacturing process will enable you to bring products to market faster and provide more time to create your next great design.

SOLIDWORKS CAM leverages the rich content in your 3D CAD model to speed up product development and reduce error-prone, time-consuming, repetitive manual steps in the current development process, like programming CNC machines.

 

Innovation is not just for the wealthy or connected. It’s for anyone with a passion for ingenuity. We especially want to foster opportunities for entrepreneurs and small- to medium-sized businesses. Lowering the bar for innovation to all types of businesses is important for growing the global economy. This not only includes providing the right tools, but also mentorship and education that users can find in Fab Labs and SOLIDWORKS User Groups around the world. In addition, we’re also working hard to aid startups in the SOLIDWORKS for Entrepreneurs program. The ultimate goal is to provide all engineers with a network of skills, connections, and technological investments to usher in the next generation of innovation. If you teach a person to design, they’ll be an inventor for life.

The key to achieving this level of democratization is not resting on our laurels. SOLIDWORKS has been around for more than 20 years. If we’re going to thrive in the next 20, we need to continue our investment in R&D. SOLIDWORKS 2018 is no exception. Thanks to beta testers and conversations with users, we’ve packed hundreds of new updates in this year’s release. SOLIDWORKS itself cannot and will not remain stagnant. And, new features, like topology optimization (image below), PCB, CAM, and distributed data management are expanding beyond traditional capabilities and bringing you the tools to put innovation at your fingertips.

Based on real-life use, desired goals, constraints, and even manufacturing consideration, Topology Study in SOLIDWORKS Simulation Professional helps guide your decisions on component form, regardless of the manufacturing process you choose.

 

SOLIDWORKS 2018 was created to empower your possibilities. It’s here to streamline your design process through powerful new features, collaborative manufacturing tools, and automation capabilities to let you focus on making great design happen. I encourage you to visit the SOLIDWORKS 2018 website to learn more about what’s to come. However, that is just the tip of the iceberg. Local resellers around the world are hosting SOLIDWORKS 2018 launch events to give you a hands-on experience with new features and deep technical demonstrations highlighting what you can achieve by breaking the barriers to design. You can also learn more by registering for the live stream of the SOLIDWORKS 2018 launch event on Tuesday, September 26. Thank you for being our partner in innovation and I look forward to speaking with you throughout the year.

Author information

Gian Paolo Bassi
Gian Paolo Bassi
Gian Paolo is CEO of Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2018: the Tools to Unlock Your Design Potential appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Gian Paolo Bassi at September 13, 2017 01:47 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: Bondo Lightweight Filler

From quick repairs to form exploration studies, few materials are as useful around the design engineer’s workshop as good old Bondo.

Featuring a resin-based filler and a hardening solution, the hardener is blended together with the filler to create a chemical reaction which cures the creamy and spreadable product into a solid body.

Originally created as a quick-fix putty for auto body repairs, the fast-curing, and easy-to-sand formula carries a tremendous range of semi-permanent applications. No wonder, then, that the two-part putty is used extensively by industrial designers and engineers to easily prototype concepts. Needless to say, a can of Bondo belongs in every workshop.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DXv1EX3YQcg?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Bondo 261 Lightweight Filler Pint Can — $5.49

Features:

  • Original formula for repairing dents, dings, holes, large rusted areas and scratches in vehicles
  • Two-part lightweight compound mixes easily and spreads smoothly
  • Cures in minutes and sands easily
  • Formulated to be non-shrinking
  • Also suitable for wood, steel, aluminum, fiberglass, and concrete
  • Includes Bondo Red Cream Hardener
  • Use during the Fill stage of the 3M Body Repair System

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: Bondo Lightweight Filler appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 13, 2017 01:04 PM

These Damaged Camera Parts Are a Sobering Reminder to Not Shoot Directly Into a Solar Eclipse

We shouldn’t need to tell you the reasons to not stare directly at a Solar Eclipse. If you did, you likely wouldn’t be reading this right now. As you might expect, camera sensors and delicate lenses aren’t safe, either.

In a series of gorgeous—yet slightly sad—shots, Tennessee-based camera lens rental shop LensRentals shares a number of damaged loaner lenses returned after the most recent Solar Eclipse:

“The most common problem we’ve encountered with damage done by the eclipse was sensors being destroyed by the heat,” writes Zach Sutton on the LensRentals blog. “But not everyone follows the rules, and as a result, we have quite a few destroyed sensors. To my personal surprise, this damage was far more visually apparent than I even expected, and the photos really make it visible.”

This being the first Solar Eclipse reaching totality throughout a large swath of the United States since 1979, you could say that this was to be expected. Still, let this be a friendly reminder to always wear Solar Eclipse glasses—and apply a solar filter to your camera lens in 2024.

“Overall, we were really impressed with how few pieces of gear we got back damaged,” adds Sutton. “And of the things returned, we were equally impressed with our customer-base, and their guilt and owning up to the damage.”

Read the full rundown over at LensRentals.

The post These Damaged Camera Parts Are a Sobering Reminder to Not Shoot Directly Into a Solar Eclipse appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at September 13, 2017 12:44 PM

SolidSmack Radio | Radical Radius Renegade

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll get the groove going with “Slowly Disappear” from Hush Moss before diving into sweet melodies from Shoos Off, Evan P Donohue, Diane Coffee, Lina Tullgren, Dent May, and others before wrapping up with “Where’d All the Time Go?” from Dr. Dog. Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/7Grh7DHuFOBg48gYvNbRa1" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | Radical Radius Renegade appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 13, 2017 12:34 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 Email Notifications for Completed Studies

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 now includes the ability to automatically send notification emails to track the status of your studies.  The email setup can be found under Simulation > Options > System Options tab > Email Notification settings.  Here you are required to provide the email server information for SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 Email Notifications.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 Email Notifications

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 Email Notification Settings

The following scenarios will send email notifications:

  • If a study experiences numerical errors during the run and fails to solve, an email is sent
  • If the option ‘Send E-mail for all studies when Simulation is completed‘ is enabled in the Simulation System options, an email will be sent when a study has finished solving

    Send e-mail for all studies when Simulation is completed

    Send e-mail for all studies when Simulation is completed

  • If the option ‘E-mail when Simulation is completed‘ is enabled in a particular study (under its study Properties > Notification tab), an email is only sent when this study finishes solving

    Notification enabled

    Notification enabled

  • If the option ‘Time based notification‘ is enabled in a particular study (under its study Properties > Notification tab), an email is sent periodically at given time intervals of the status.  The units can be set for seconds, minutes or hours.  NOTE: The ‘Email when simulation is completed’ option must also be enabled in the study’s properties.

    Time based notification

    Time based notification

 

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 Email Notifications for Completed Studies appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at September 13, 2017 12:00 PM

September 12, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Using Compound Datums in SOLIDWORKS MBD

Contact between parts greatly influences the way that an assembly is designed. For example, when you design a chair, you probably intend for the legs to come into contact with the ground. When checking the height of the manufactured chair, you would ideally be able to measure the length of a leg, but the actual lengths of the legs will vary. This means that it would be more accurate to measure the height of the chair from the ground. In this case, it isn’t ideal to inspect any tolerances of the seat using a datum defined by the single datum feature of the one leg, but to use all of the legs.

The tape dispenser shown below has a similar case.

In the tape dispenser, the roll of tape is connected to the dispenser by a detachable part, shown below modeled in SOLIDWORKS. The idea behind this model was that the rounded edges that hold the roll of tape are coaxial with the pegs that slot into the tape dispenser. This is so the part which holds the tape will rotate around the axis between both of the pegs when the tape is being pulled.

Using Compound Datums in SOLIDWORKS MBD
If I machined the part, I could inspect it in reference to only one peg, but that would not give me an accurate picture of whether the part will work in this assembly.  When the tape is being pulled and this part is rotating, it will be rotating around the axis created by both of the peg features, not just one. The variation in the axis created by both pegs could be different than the one created by one of the pegs. This is what I am concerned about because it would cause the rotating part to become unstable, and potentially pop out of the tape holder when the tape is being pulled.

One solution is to include both pegs as datum features, and reference a compound datum. SOLIDWORKS MBD allows this tolerances scheme to be done in a CAD model, by adding the datum symbols and tolerances as annotations. To do this:

1. Add datum symbols and then the geometric tolerances to the pegs.

  • Add the datum symbols by clicking on the Datum button on the SOLIDWORKS MBD toolbar.

  • Select the feature you want to add this datum symbol to.

  • Add geometric tolerances by clicking on the Geometric Tolerances button on the SOLIDWORKS MBD toolbar.

  • Then fill out the properties in the dialogue box that opens.

  • Then select the feature, the same as before.
  • Add the dimensions by clicking on the Size Dimension button on the SOLIDWORKS MBD toolbar and selecting the features.

 

2. Using the same method, go to add a geometric tolerance to the outside cylindrical surface.

3. When defining the reference datums, click the drop down arrow. As you can see up to three datum symbols can be added to create a compound datum reference.

Author information

Nicholas Pratt
Nicholas Pratt
Product Portfolio Intern at SOLIDWORKS
Senior at Worcester Polytechnic Institute studying Mechanical Engineering. Currently working with a team of other students on a small scale water energy harvesting project.

The post Using Compound Datums in SOLIDWORKS MBD appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Nicholas Pratt at September 12, 2017 09:00 PM

SolidSmack

Make This Miniature Meat Cleaver, Stick It Right on Your Fridge

If you’re tired of conventional magnets doing little more than sticking like parasites to your refrigerator, you might want to consider making your own.

That’s what YouTube creator BrainfooTV did. After years of decorating his refrigerator with half-broken alphabet letters, he decided to create something a bit more practical for the kitchen.

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This mini meat cleaver may be the size of a thumb, but it is every bit as functional as its culinary big brother. The process in making one is exactly the same as a normal sized cleaver; albeit scaled down to tinier proportions.

Using a small printout of a cleaver as the basis for the build, Brainfoo cuts a Stanley blade and fits it into the shape of the knife. He extends the metal of the blade for it to fit inside the handle.

With the same printout, he traces two outlines for the handle onto a piece of wood. After cutting them out and gluing them together to the Stanley blade with some power Epoxy, the general cleaver is almost done.

Glue won’t be enough to stop the blade from escaping the handle and harming some unfortunate person, however. This is why Brainfoo cuts some nails and fits them in holes drilled into the handle of the cleaver. Some filing down and a mixture of mineral oil and nail varnish give this rather cute culinary tool a professional look.

The last part of this tiny build is a fridge magnet protector for the blade. Brainfoo cuts a sheathe onto a small block of wood and leaves just enough space for a magnet to be inserted. He also makes a small groove which serves as a guide for when he drills a hole for the magnet to fit into.

Gluing this block of wood to another, he drills the aforementioned hole and slides the magnet into place. Using some adhesive, the magnet becomes a permanent part of the sheathe.

All that’s left to do is give it some polish and voila, you now have a magnet which can cut up vegetables, to-do lists, and body hair (though you should probably wash the blade before and afterwards). The best thing about this blade is it can be placed where you need it most: on your fridge.

If you want to create this cutting-edge (literally) magnet, a step-by-step process can be found on Brainfoo’s website. You can find more of his creations here as well as on his YouTube channel.

The post Make This Miniature Meat Cleaver, Stick It Right on Your Fridge appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 12, 2017 06:49 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Smart Explode Lines

Finally! The only boring part of making an exploded view (connecting all of the parts with explode lines) has been automated with SOLIDWORKS 2018! No longer will time be spent connecting each bolt to each nut in your exploded view. The new ‘insert/edit smart explode lines’ tool works great and will save time when making any exploded view.

How does SOLIDWORKS Smart Explode Lines work?

Starting with an exploded view, you can add all of the explode lines with one click (based on the directions you drag the parts in the explode steps).

Flashlight Model from Essentials course

Flashlight Model from Essentials course

With one click, all of the explode lines are added using the bounding box center by default.

All parts have explode lines starting from their bounding box centers in this image

Smart Explode lines inserted

SOLIDWORKS Smart Explode Lines Editing Options

Just as with all SOLIDWORKS commands, the options are numerous on how the explode lines will be created.

Three options that allow granular control

Three options that allow granular control

 

Changing to the component origin may clarify the explode route for a component. The change is applied to the selected exploded component, or there is an option to apply to all instances of the component (i.e. fasteners)!

Selected component in light purple with explode line in dark purple moving to part origin

Easily update the position of explode lines to the component origin

Finally specifying a point allows complete control of the explode lines while not requiring duplication of work.

Using a midpoint to define explosion line

Using a midpoint to define explosion line

To get the increased functionality of Smart Explode Lines upgrade to SOLIDWORKS 2018.

The flexibility of smart explode lines allows for quick and accurate creation of exploded views

Smart Explode lines completed

The post SOLIDWORKS 2018 Smart Explode Lines appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Bryan Sprange, CSWP at September 12, 2017 05:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – September 2017

Hello to all,

Welcome to this new edition of the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News, coauthored by members of the SOLIDWORKS Technical Support teams worldwide.

Don’t stay stuck when you want to delete a file or folder open in another program

By David Heywood

Have you ever been unable to delete a file or folder because it was open in another program? Join the crowd. But you don’t have to be stuck and forced to reboot your computer to that file or folder gets released. The Windows Microsoft® ‘Resource Monitor’ be used to end a process currently holding on to a file (or folder) you are trying to delete.

The steps below describe how to do it. In the example, a folder (containing a temporarily cached SWPDM plugin) needs to be deleted in order to test the reload of the plugin file in SOLIDWORKS PDM.

  1. Make an attempt to delete the folder. You are asked for confirmation.
  2. When clicking ‘Yes’ on the above a dialog is displayed stating the delete action can’t be completed because the folder or file is open in another program.
  3. Open the Task Manager.
  4. Click on the ‘Performance’ tab
  5. Launch the ‘Resource Monitor’ by clicking the button shown above
  6. Once the ‘Resource Monitor’ is opened click on the ‘CPU’ tab.
  7. Expand the ‘Associated Handles’ section
  8. In the ‘Search Handles’ field, paste the path to the folder name and click the refresh button (as shown below). This will carry out the search for ‘Associated Handles’ (processes)
  9. The Associated processes are listed. They are preventing the folder from being deleted. Right click on the ‘Associated Handle’ >> and chose ‘End Process’
  10. Then, refresh the section using the refresh button to confirm there should now be no process holding on to the folder
  11. Once all Associated Handles have been stopped, it should be possible to delete the folder.
  12. The folder is now deleted. Mission accomplished.

Service Pack News

SOLIDWORKS 2017 SP4.1 is available for download

This service pack is now available to Subscription Service customers. To download, click here. Or log into the SolidWorks Customer Portal at https://customerportal.solidworks.com and click Download Software and Updates to access the update.SOLIDWORKS® 2017 SP4.1 replaces SOLIDWORKS® 2017 SP4 which is not available for download anymore. The following problem was identified with SOLIDWORKS® 2017 SP4:SPR 1039919 (Closing files in SOLIDWORKS 2017 SP4 with the SOLIDWORKS PDM Client add-in enabled may cause SOLIDWORKS to become unresponsive.)This problem does not exist in SOLIDWORKS 2017 SP3 or in older service packs of the SOLIDWORKS 2017 software.

General Hotfix for SOLIDWORKS® 2016 SP5 (SPR#988107)

A hotfix is available for SOLIDWORKS® 2016 SP5 that addresses the following issue:
SPR#988107 – 3D Printing Print, Plot: 3D Printing button shows up in the print dialog but does not work when printing drawing on Windows 10 or 8.
The hotfix for this issue is included in attachment of Solution Id: S-073341. This issue is fully addressed in SOLIDWORKS 2017 SP4.

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Online Beta is here!

We are delighted to offer SOLIDWORKS 2018 Online Beta. SOLIDWORKS Online Beta provides access to SOLIDWORKS 2018 Beta3 anywhere, anytime until the end of Beta, without the need to download, install, or activate.

Just log into the Beta website and click on the ‘Try Online’ button. Become a tester and get a head start on all the new features of the entire product line

If you have any questions please email us at beta@solidworks.com.

Simulation Step-Up Series

Last month, Brian discussed the topic of Correlating Simulation to Physical Tests. This month, Brian comes back to talk about Linear Static Productivity.

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Next month, Brian will discuss the topic of Shell strategies.

 

Noteworthy Solutions from the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base

icon - SW Why does the SOLIDWORKS® 2017 SP4 software stop responding when I close files?
An issue with the SOLIDWORKS® 2017 SP4 software may cause SOLIDWORKS to become unresponsive when closing documents with add-ins loaded, such as, the SOLIDWORKS PDM Client or possibly 3rd party add-ins.
For a hotfix and other solutions, see Solution Id: S-073387.

Icon - EPDM Is it possible to use a mobile device to access or manage a SOLIDWORKS® PDM vault?
It is possible to use the browser on a mobile device to access or manage a SOLIDWORKS PDM vault. To do so, you must be able to establish a secure connection to the network that hosts the SOLIDWORK®S PDM Web2 application.
From Solution Id: S-073286.

Icon - EPDM How do I configure the SOLIDWORKS® PDM Web2 application pool to use a local non-administrative Windows® user account for the application pool identity?
The SOLIDWORKS® PDM Web2 application on Internet Information Services (IIS) will use the SOLIDWORKS PDM client Application Program Interface (API) to access file vault information. For the API to be able to access the file vault, the Web2 application pool must run under a Windows® user profile with sufficient access to the local registry and application data folder.
For more, see Solution Id: S-073130.

 In a Motion Analysis study, how do I create a ‘Trace Path’ for the ‘Center of Mass’ of a component or assembly?
It is not possible to create a ‘Trace Path’ for the ‘Center of Mass’ of an assembly or sub assembly.
For information about an existing enhancement request for this functionality, see SPR 1029979.
In SOLIDWORKS 2017, you can only create a ’Trace Path’ for the ‘Center of Mass’ of a component. To do so, see the example and follow the steps in Solution Id: S-072940.

 In a SOLIDWORKS® Flow Simulation animation with the NVIDIA® 375.63 or 376.84 graphics driver, how do I resolve slow performance or a crash that occurs following the NVIDIA OpenGL Driver message ‘A TDR has been detected’?
This problem is due to instability in certain NVIDIA® graphics drivers during graphically intensive functions of SOLIDWORKS® Flow Simulation. This issue is reported as SPR 1031804.
To solve this problem, see Solution Id: S-073462.


That’s it for this month. Thanks for reading this edition of SOLIDWORKS Support News. If you need additional help with these issues or any others, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller.

Also, comments and suggestions are welcome. You can enter them below.

Author information

Julien Boissat
Sr. Technical Customer Support Engineer, SolidWorks, EMEA at DS SolidWorks Corp.
I have been a Tech Support engineer for Simulation products since 2002. I was previously a product manager at SRAC, the original makers of COSMOS for those who remember that time! ;-). I am currently in charge of the content of the certification exams for simulation products. I also initiated and still author the Simulation Knowledge Base and participate as much as possible in the expansion and evolution of the SolidWorks Knowledge Base. Finally, I handle the SolidWorks Support Monthly News blog.

The post SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – September 2017 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Julien Boissat at September 12, 2017 03:43 PM

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Data Reuse Capabilities: Part 1

Data or design reuse is one of the important requirements of an electrical engineer, designers, CAD users. Usually, in electrical designs, we create the circuits, which we can use in multiple projects. Also sometimes we can use the complete design as it is for our new clients just with few changes. Sometimes we need to save a project at some point or level create the design further and then create a different design using the previously saved one. For all these requirements, a copy paste command is used in general design software which is not intelligent copy and paste.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical always helps the designers with the ease of automation and intelligence. There are different design re-use techniques in SOLIDWORKS electrical which cover all the essential needs of a designer, which are mentioned below:

  1. Macros
  2. Project macros
  3. Duplicate project
  4. Snapshot
  5. Paste special

1. Macros:

A very intuitive feature where the designers can simply select a complete circuit or sub-circuit, that they need to use in the other drawing sheets of the same project. With just a drag and drop, these sub-circuits can be saved in the right-side macros pallet (Project level). Different groups can be created in the macro pallet and macros can be saved on application level or project level. These macros can then be used again by simple drag and drop in any of the drawing sheets.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical data reuse capabilities: macros

Figure 1 – Macro creation and insertion

2. Project macros:

If the designers want to save the whole project with all its drawing sheets and configurations as a macro, they can simply “create a project macro” and then “insert project macro” in any new project or in the existing project as well. It makes the data re-use very intuitive. The component marks are updated automatically due to paste special option and all drawing sheets come with new document numbers.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical data reuse capabilities

Figure 2 – Create project macro

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Data Reuse

Figure 3 – Name and save project macro

Figure 4 – Insert project macro

Inserting the project macro not only brings the circuit or sub-circuit, it brings all the drawing sheets of the project. See figure 6.

Figure 5 – Select project macro to insert

Figure 6 – Drawing sheets added to the project

As the drawing sheets are added to the on-going project, the marks and roots are automatically updated. See Figure 7

Figure 7 – Marks updated in project macro sheets


CAD MicroSolutions Inc.
65 International Boulevard, Toronto ON, M9W 6L9 Canada
Office : (416)-213-0533

Author information

CAD MicroSolutions
CAD MicroSolutions is one of the most recognized and reputable SOLIDWORKS resellers in Ontario. Founded in 1984, we have 3 offices in Canada providing SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD software, training, consulting, and software development services.

The post SOLIDWORKS Electrical Data Reuse Capabilities: Part 1 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CAD MicroSolutions at September 12, 2017 03:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 Import Study Features from Parts/Sub-assemblies into Upper Level Assemblies

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 introduces an option to import existing Simulation study properties in a part or sub-assembly to a new Static study in an upper level assembly.  The following Simulation features can be imported:

  • Materials and Element types (solid, shell, beam)
  • Contacts and Connectors (in multibody parts or subassemblies)
  • Fixtures
  • Loads
  • Mesh Controls

You have the ability to import all types or specific types.  All features of the specified type will be imported.

Creating a new Static study in the assembly gives you the option for Import Study Features.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 Import Study Features

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 Import Study Features

In the event you’ve already created a Static study in the assembly and wish to import features at a later time, you can right-click on the top of the Simulation tree to access Import Study Features.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 Import Study Features from Tree

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 Import Study Features from Tree

The Import Study Features dialog will open.  Select which part(s)/subassembly(s) you wish to import from and select the configuration and Simulation study.  If there is more than one instance of a part/subassembly, you can select ‘Propagate imported study features to all instances’ so you no longer need to select each one individually.  The features to import filter on the top right will default to import all, but unwanted types can be selected.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 Import Study Features Options

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 Import Study Features Options

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018 Import Study Features from Parts/Sub-assemblies into Upper Level Assemblies appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at September 12, 2017 12:00 PM

September 11, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Composer Quick Start Guide #6: Technical Illustrations

Hello and welcome to another post in a new SOLIDWORKS Composer tutorial series called the SOLIDWORKS Composer Quick Start Guide! This guide is intended to orient new users in SOLIDWORKS Composer and walk them though the basic features of the software. In this week’s video, we talk about the Technical Illustration Workshop, and how it can be used to quickly and easily create vector drawings of your assemblies.

SOLIDWORKS Composer Quick Start Guide #6: Technical Illustrations

Why would we want a vector drawing? Aside from being a clearer and more simplistic view than what appears in the viewport, vector drawings can be scaled to any size without losing resolution. This makes them an incredibly versatile deliverable to have at your disposal.

The workshop is just a click away in the “Workshops” tab at the top of the SOLIDWORKS Composer window. In the workshop, there are a variety of tools that can be used to modify and supplement your technical drawings. In addition to the vector frame, you can add shadows and color regions, both of which have a variety of properties available to modify.  These technical drawings can be produced as either an image in the viewport or an exportable JPG.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8WbZ7kpf1Do?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

That’s all for another episode of the SOLIDWORKS Composer Quick Start Guide. If you want to stay updated with the newest videos in this series, subscribe to the SOLIDWORKS Composer YouTube playlist, and feel free to check out the SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog and SOLIDWORKS Composer Forums for more great Composer content.

Author information

Mohit Daga
Mohit Daga
Mohit is a Senior Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS Composer. Tables Tennis Champion, Vegetarian foodie and avid kickballer!

The post SOLIDWORKS Composer Quick Start Guide #6: Technical Illustrations appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Mohit Daga at September 11, 2017 09:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Vs. SimulationXpress

Every version of SOLIDWORKS contains SimulationXpress capability to carry out first pass stress analysis on your parts. If you are lucky enough to have SOLIDWORKS Premium, then you also get the linear static analysis simulation add-in. In addition to this, SOLIDWORKS offers a number of simulation add-ins that run within Simulation Standard, Simulation Professional, and Simulation Premium; each provides the user with more simulation capability from basic linear static analysis in Simulation Standard, through to non-linear and dynamic analysis in Premium. Now this raises a question with regards to the role of SimulationXpress especially given that on opening SimulationXpress the blurb contains this paragraph:

Does that mean SOLIDWORKS SimulationXpress is essentially useless? A gimmick included in SOLIDWORKS to allow users to create pretty colours on their models? The answer to that is definitely no, SOLIDWORKS SimulationXpress does have a purpose and actually depending on your model and your analysis setup could present you with the same results as SOLIDWORKS Simulation.

So what is SimulationXpress?

SimulationXpress is a wizard based simulation module within SOLIDWORKS; we assign a material to our model, apply fixtures and loadings, and then run the simulation to solve the problem. It uses a principle called Finite Element Analysis (FEA) to break a big problem down into smaller more manageable pieces, or elements, comprised of multiple nodes (a process usually referred to as meshing). Calculations are then undertaken to determine the displacement and stress at each node, the results of which are then presented as a set of results. These results can be used to check whether the part will withstand the loads applied to it, identify failure points if they exist and allow us to further refine the model if required to improve our products. This whole process is undertaken much quicker than hand calculations could be carried out or even manufacturing a test piece and physically testing the part.

From CAD Geometry to FEA Results

So what can I do in SimulationXpress?

SimulationXpress has some limitations which don’t exist within the other simulation packages; these can be split into four main areas: geometry, loads/fixtures, meshing and finally results.

Geometry

SimulationXpress can only analyse parts, it cannot deal with assemblies or multibody parts. This may potentially not be a show stopper for some users who only wish to test a part in isolation rather than a collection of parts. There’s also little stopping us combining all the parts in our assembly together to bypass this limitation, however this will assume that the parts are rigidly bonded together which may or may not be a real world scenario. This approach may artificially stiffen the model by assuming that parts are bonded together and this will have an effect on the validity of the results (assuming a bolted joint is rigidly glued together is a huge over simplification of a problem for example). In the full simulation package you can specify different contacts between parts and you can also apply connectors to simulate pinned, bolted and welded joints to more accurately represent the real world scenario.

SimulationXpress cannot handle Multibody Parts or Assemblies

Loads/ Fixtures

SimulationXpress allows users to only rigidly fix models by faces; this might not truly represent the real world fixture on the model and again lead to an artificially stiff model. Similarly with regards to loads we are limited to only applying force and pressure loadings to faces, in Simulation there is a wide range of different loadings that can be applied.

Meshing

The FEA process involves splitting a model into many small elements, within SimulationXpress we only have one mesh type available to us (Standard) and that mesh size is Global across the entire model. With the Simulation add-ins we can specify mesh controls to force finer meshes in areas of interest whilst using a more relaxed and coarser global mesh in other areas, this means fewer calculations and quicker results, we would have to have more elements in a SimulationXpress model for this reason alone as we have to choose a mesh size that’s appropriate for the whole model as our global size, leading to longer solution times.

SimulationXpress allows only a global mesh size in Simulation we can put local mesh controls into our FEA model.

Results

Within SimulationXpress we are limited to three output plots: stress, displacement and factor of safety plus a deformed view of the model, we can output a report in both eDrawings and Word formats. The kicker with this is we have very little control over these plots (over and above picking SI or English IPS for our units) we can’t even change the unit display, this might be a limitation if you are interested in further analysis of different plots such as principle stresses, deformation in a known direction etc. The full SolidWorks simulation packages allow you much more control of the study results.

The above may or may not deem SimulationXpress as unsuitable for your requirements but it is important to realise what SimulationXpress is, it’s a first pass stress analysis tool, giving the designer a quick insight into potential issues early in the design process.

Results Comparison

Well this is the surprising bit; the mesher and solver used to solve a SimulationXpress study are the same ones as used for full SOLIDWORKS Linear Static studies so it’s not like you are getting reduced quality in regards to the algorithms used to mesh and solve your study. For simple models (single parts) with simple fixtures the results are identical.

This example is a simply restrained plate in tension. The results are identical for both stress and displacement (417.67MPa and 0.143mm). Therefore its accurate to say that if all you are interested in is running simulations on single body parts, where fixtures are only fixed geometry with simple force or pressure loadings then SimulationXpress is suitable for your needs, it is likely however that these restrictions may cause inaccuracies in your results (over stiffening of a structure due to inaccurate fixtures for example) or due to the lack of mesh controls studies take a long time to mesh and solve.

Obviously if we want to look at assemblies of multiple components with specific contact conditions between each component or you want more control over the entire analysis and post processing then we will need to invest in SOLIDWORKS Simulation.

Conclusion

As with any of the Xpress products in SOLIDWORKS these tools are there to give users an insight into other areas of functionality within SOLIDWORKS. They are designed to be cut down versions of their big brothers and sisters with clear and known limitations. If we work within these limitations and use the products for their intended purpose (to be first pass ‘insight’ tools) and we end up with a better understanding of our design from earlier in the design process this will only leave us with a better end product. Whilst that end product might need to be run through the full SOLIDWORKS simulation suite before sign off the Xpress tool has still been invaluable in the process and it’s absolutely free within our SOLIDWORKS package.

Author information

NT CADCAM
NT CADCAM is the UK's most established SolidWorks reseller in England, Scotland and Wales. Offering a fully supported CAD and CAM product portfolio and high levels of expertise internally, makes NT CADCAM unique within the SolidWorks community, giving customers the confidence and assurance they need that their support issues will be dealt with both promptly and efficiently. As a SolidWorks Certified Training Centre, NT CADCAM provides clients with fully certified and accredited trainers who are experienced engineers.

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation Vs. SimulationXpress appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by NT CADCAM at September 11, 2017 03:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

What are the options for duplicate file names in a SOLIDWORKS PDM vault?

SOLIDWORKS PDM Duplicate file name can be a problem, but there are a few options for handling duplicates, all of which are accessible via:

  • Administration Tool > [Vault Name] > File Types > [Right-Click] > ‘Duplicate file name settings’
SOLIDWORKS PDM Duplicate File Name Settings

SOLIDWORKS PDM Duplicate File Name Settings

Lets take a closer look at each option…

Allow duplicate file names in this file vault

This is a free-for-all…no limitations.  The vault can have duplicate filenames of any file type as long (as they’re not within the same a folder).

Allow duplicate file names

Allow duplicate file names

Do not allow duplicate file names in this file vault

Lock down.  This prevents any duplicate filenames for any file regardless of extension.  For example users will be prevented from creating and checking in both lightbulb.sldprt and lightbulb.slddrw

Do not allow duplicate file names

Do not allow duplicate file names

Do not allow duplicate file names of files with these extensions

This prevents users from creating and checking in duplicate filenames for specific extensions.  Note; The extensions must be defined one per line and without any prefixes.

Do not allow duplicate file names with these extensions

Do not allow duplicate file names with these extensions

For example with the above entries, users will be blocked from having lightbulb.sldasm or lightbulb.slddrw in two places anywhere in the vault (no limitations on .sldprt).

SOLIDWORKS PDM Duplicate file name alternative solution

An alternative solution is to block files from being checked in unless the file name is unique via groups:

  • Administration Tool > Groups > [Group Name] > Warnings
    • Affected Operation = Check In
      • Check ‘File name is not unique’
Block files from being checked in unless the file name is unique via groups

Block files from being checked in unless the file name is unique via groups

Interested in SOLIDWORKS PDM Training?

Contact us about our SOLIDWORKS PDM training courses for users and administrators.

The post What are the options for duplicate file names in a SOLIDWORKS PDM vault? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Williams at September 11, 2017 11:41 AM

September 10, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Customizing SOLIDWORKS Inspection Reports – Part 3

First Article Inspection Report

Limiting the Number of Rows Per Sheet and Grouping Dimensional Characteristics

SOLIDWORKS Inspection Logo

Written by: Gordon Pursel, Application Engineer at DASI Solutions

Missed Part 1 & 2? Check out Part 1 introducing the Inspection Report Editor here or Part 2 on how to add a Report Footer in the Template Editor here.

In Part 3 of this series, I’ll share advanced techniques to customize SOLIDWORKS Inspection reports to limit the inspection characteristics numbers per sheet and group balloons by characteristic values such as manufacturing operations or inspection methods.

In the proceeding steps, you can follow along using the AS9102.xlt template to practice these techniques on the AS9102 Form 3 worksheet.

Start the Template Editor

To begin customizing an excel report template, select the Template Editor from the Inspection Standalone Application or within the SOLIDWORKS Inspection Add-In, then select a template. To review how the template editor maps the inspection project information to a report template refer to Part 1 of this blog series.

Standalone Application: Template Editor Dialogue

SOLIDWORKS Inspection Template Editor

In this example, the “characteristic number” token was inserted into the cell below “5. Char No.”. With the Template Editor’s radial button “Vertical Based Template” selected, this token will extract all the Char # values from the inspection project into this column starting from this cell containing the token.

First Article Inspection Report

When publishing a report from the standalone application the Bill of Characteristics “Char #” column will be mapped to the Excel column using the uniquely identified “@Uid” token.

Standalone Application: Bill of Characteristics

Inspection: Bill of Characteristics

How to Limit the Characteristics Numbers (Char #) Per Sheet

To take control over the number of rows or filter how the data is exported from the Bill of Characteristics Table into a specific Excel sheet, you can manually modify the tokens createdwith the Template Editor.

To control the number of Char #’s in each sheet of the report, open the report template and manually modify the tokens to include a formula for the token’s value. In the below example, the modified token will now only populate the Char #’s less than 11.

First Article Inspection Report Example

When following these steps in the Standalone Application or the SOLIDWORKS Add-In, the tokens will be different as illustrated below. This means you will need to build templates for both applications, if you intend to use both the Standalone and SOLIDWORKS Add-in.

Standalone Application

iex:INSPECTIONXPERT/INSPECTION_SHEET/ATTRIBUTES/ATTRIBUTE[@Uid<'11']/@Uid

SOLIDWORKS Add-In

iex:INSPECTIONXPERT/SAMPLE_SHEET/CAD/ATTRIBUTES/ATTRIBUTE[@prefix<'11']/@prefix

 

It’s very import to note that you must add the stream [@Uid<’11’] or [@[prefix<’11’] respectively for all other tokens in Form 3 page one. To test your modified Form3 sheet, publish a ballooned project to your template to confirm that the token only populates the rows where the Char # is less than eleven. Once the From3 sheet is working as expected, edit the template again and copy the Form3 sheet to a new tab named Form3-Page2.

Author information

DASI Solutions
DASI Solutions
DASI Solutions is dedicated to service and support. As one of a handful of original, charter value-added resellers (VAR) in the SolidWorks Community, DASI Solutions has built partnerships and success stories with many of our customers. We are very pleased to bring you SolidWorks 3D CAD design engineering software and 3D printing services.

The post Customizing SOLIDWORKS Inspection Reports – Part 3 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by DASI Solutions at September 10, 2017 03:00 PM

September 08, 2017

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Fire Kraken Tentacle Pound

cool links of the week

Jets raced through the sky, skimming the embered edge of the fire kraken’s atmosphere. Most wouldn’t make it to the cloud tower port, but if they did, the beast would fall. For there it was discover and known this day what icy hell would be wrought once aligned were these links.

Tomislav Jagnjic – delightful, oddly large and shadowy creatures in other worldly settings and more with a wonderful mastery over light.

eye – “Each eye is unique.” That’s how Akira Miyamoto describes the window to the soul and where he draws the inspiration for his surreal woodcut sculptures.

Antarctica – Pastels? Really? You’ll want to look closer at Zaria Forman’s glacial pastel works. Chucks of glowing ice, whisps of snow, beautiful every one. See at timelapse of one here.

LEGO New York – Love this render creation by J.R. Schmidt of New York in LEGO bricks. Available as different prints as well.

Totality – Remember that solar eclipse a few weeks ago. Figures someone would go and shoot a 4K real-time close-up of it. Shot by Rainbow Astro founder, Jun Ho Oh.

Interactive Foliage Map – Watch the states turn from green to brown with this slider that shows predicted fall colors.

Automatica – What’s better than electronic music? Electronic music made by large industrial robots. Nigel Stanford has an album coming out with just that.
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Hell of a scene – I know it’s heavy. I know it’s fast. But I love me some Comeback Kid. This is there new one from the album Outsider.

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by Josh Mings at September 08, 2017 10:33 PM

AMD Ryzen Threadripper Brings 16 Cores/32 Threads To CAD Render Workstations

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3D CAD

As long as they can jam more power into a PC, we’ll keep opening the checkbooks for something faster, better, MORE POWERFUL. Faster rendering speeds, better processing power – all of these factors help productivity for us who crank the CAD all day. Whether you’re multi-tasking whilst building a massive assembly or want to max the core count for simulation and rendering, the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X is showing more evidence that it’s the 3D CAD Pro’s dream CPU.

The 1950X processor packs 16 cores/32 thread with a max turbo core speed of 4GHz/3.4GHz base clock speed. It uses 2667MHz quad channel DDR4 memory with ECC support and has 40MB of combined cache to access the computer’s large data stores. 64 PCIe Gen 3 lanes also feed the system and cover large GPU and NVMe requirements. This makes it ideal for those who want to run a number of taxing applications at the same time.

A recent study done by guru3d.com compares the Threadripper 1950X as is and when overlocked at 4.0 GHz to its competition. Below is a series of graphs comparing the Threadripper 1950Xs using Cinebench R15 (their figures are marked in dark grey and light blue, respectively). The first graph shows its normal performance on a single thread, while the second shows the results of locking all the processors at 3500 MHz.

As you can see, AMD’s processor stands up to some of Intel’s Core i5, i7, and even the upcoming (much pricier) i9 processors when put through a single thread performance. But where the Threadripper 1950X really shines is in its multi-threaded performance:

It throws the rest of the processors in sack and kicks them to the curb. Even when compared to the lesser Threadripper 1920X, the Threadripper 1950X overtakes it by 541 CB marks. There are other programs (such as Sony Vegas Pro and Ghost Recon:Wildlands) the website puts the processor through to test its performance, but for the most part they all result in the AMD Threadripper 1950x either beating out or standing with its rivals.

Compared to other products with the same specs, this one is a tad more forgiving on the wallet. The Threadripper 1950X costs about $999, making it $700 cheaper than Intel’s i9-7960X (which also has 16 cores and 32 threads). To see an in-depth primer on its specifications, you can check out the Threadripper 1950X on AMD’s webpage.

We’re looking forward to giving this a go ourselves. Have a Threadripper system already? Let us know about it in the comments!
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by Carlos Zotomayor at September 08, 2017 08:52 PM

How to 3D Print Your Own Products & Sell Them Online

3d printing online business

With Mercedes-Benz announcing last year that it is now selling 3D printed spare parts for its cargo trucks, 3D printing is gaining momentum as a commercial strategy for large-scale manufacturers.

But what does 3D printing mean for non-enterprise businesses and entrepreneurs? Can 3D printing really offer ordinary people the chance to change their lives?

As the technology becomes more widely available, 3D printing is set to revolutionize the home business world. 3D printing enables people to embrace the world of product design and run manufacturing, ecommerce, and design businesses from the comfort of their own homes.

Interested? Let’s explore how you can 3D print your own products and sell them online in a world where 3D printing is set to fundamentally change eCommerce. 

Looking to design and sell a 3D product for a community project? Check out our previous post on how you could get yourself some free promotion.

3D Printing and the eCommerce Opportunity

“When I first discovered 3D printing several years ago, I instantly knew it was magical.  My mind was blown by the technology: an almost infinite amount of shapes can be “grown,” layer by layer, just by using a printer. This is going to be disruptive, I knew. It would empower entrepreneurs, freeing them from the constraints of traditional manufacturing.” (Brian Palacios).

3D printing is an amazingly democratic technology: it works for the small time business owner, as well as the enterprise company. It presents a unique opportunity to cut out ‘the middlemen’ like manufacturers, letting business owners go straight to the source and take control of the product design progress. Instead of huge manufacturing machinery, business owners only need 3D printing facilities or 3D printers to run their business.

Using automation and easy personalization, 3D printing is able to offer people cheaper and better products, as well as products that are completely custom and unique. 3D printing allows for easy on-demand commerce: a more streamlined business model that gets rid of the traditional problems of holding inventory and stock.

3D Print and Sell Product Designs

In order to make the most of 3D printing, you need a novel idea or product that leverages 3D printing in a strategic or creative way. Think about how printing your product could potentially disrupt an industry or offer consumers a better way to do something. Product design is an art form, so spend time refining your ideas and designs.

New to design? Start by learning from free Computer Animated Design (CAD) tools such as BlenderSculptrisTinkerCAD, Fusion 360, Onshape or SelfCAD. You’d be surprised by how quickly and easily you can teach yourself and conjure a professional-looking design after just a few tutorials. By making use of free online resources and putting the time in to teach yourself, you can create customizable designs or moving parts to sell online.

Remember: not all products are meant to look ‘good’ — some are practical solutions to common problems.

Here are some high-demand product niches with reasonably healthy profit margins that are easy to fulfill using a 3D printer:

  • Nerf gun accessories
  • Customized shoes and flipflops
  • Architectural models
  • Movie-style props and memorabilia
  • Drone accessories, such as camera holders
  • Decorative ornaments and vases

Give yourself the means to create a multitude of different 3D printed products – that way, you can stock new products as soon as you notice a gap in the market, or when a particularly high-demand product goes out of stock on Amazon or Ebay.

Importance of Market & Value Research

In order to create and sell successful products, you need to understand the mindset of your target audience. Get to the crux of what makes them tick by identifying as much as you can about their aspirations, desires, and challenges. You need to get into the mindset of a particular demographic in order to create something they’ll want to buy. Do market research on platforms like Quora, niche forums, reddit, social media, and blogs to get an unvarnished view into their world.

If you’re looking to get more precise data, use Google Trends and conduct your own keyword research to find out exactly what your customers are searching for online. KeywordTool.io and UberSuggest.io are two fantastic (free) tools. The closer you can get your product offering to what your target audience is actually searching for, the better.

Top tip: Speak to people in the industry to find out what solutions and products they’ve been waiting for, and see whether you can help solve their problems.

Finding your markets

Setting up your own online store is a great way to get your business off the ground and grant you greater autonomy over the look, feel, and functionality of your business. But as well as your own store, you should get your products and designs in front of the 3D printing community. By leveraging the power of an existing audience, you can fast-track product sales and business growth.

Whether you print the products yourself, or leave that to a 3D printing and fulfilment company, make sure that you have healthy margins and remain financially in control. Don’t get so carried away by an idea that you forget to make some money out of it!

Here are some popular ecommerce options to consider:

The Best eCommerce Advice?

Our best advice to get started is simply stated. Embrace the multi-channel approach and sell wherever and whenever you can. Make the most of seasonal trends and spikes in consumer interest, and diversify your sales platforms to stay ahead of the competition.

Leverage the practical and technological advantages of 3D printing, and create a business that’s as future-proof as possible. From conception to production, the key is to be adaptable and consistently research your niche market to stay ahead of the curve, providing products that your target audience wants before other manufacturers do!

Setting up your own store to sell 3D products? Tell us what you’re up to in the comments.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post How to 3D Print Your Own Products & Sell Them Online appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at September 08, 2017 03:10 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How do I download older versions of eDrawings?

Lets say you have SOLIDWORKS 2017 installed on your machine, which also provides you access to eDrawings 2017; but you also need access to an older version of eDrawings such as eDrawings 2015.

To download older eDrawings versions follow the procedure below:

  1. Log in to your SOLIDWORKS Customer portal account.
Customer Portal Log in

Customer Portal Log in

2. On the SUPPORT tab, in the Download section click on Downloads and Updates link.

Download and Updates

Download and Updates

3. Select what version of eDrawings you would like to download. Under Free CAD Tools clicking on the eDrawings (32-bit) will download the file set.

 download older eDrawings versions

Select eDrawings version to download

4. Extract and run the downloaded file. Now launch eDrawings 2015 from the start menu.

The post How do I download older versions of eDrawings? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Vipanjot Kaur at September 08, 2017 12:00 PM

September 07, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Javelin provides “elite” expertise in SOLIDWORKS training and technical support

Elite AE SOLIDWORKS designation awarded to best of the best. Javelin is known across Canada as a leading provider of SOLIDWORKS software and solutions, as well as its dedication to training and supporting customers. This commitment to professional development begins at home – Javelin’s 100 employees have 655 certifications among them.

If we’re talking technical expertise, the best of the best is the SOLIDWORKS Elite Applications Engineer. Elite AEs have top knowledge and skills in the entire portfolio of SOLIDWORKS products and at least seven product certifications.

The Javelin engineers most recently awarded Elite status are: Scott Durksen and Andrew Lidstone, both part of Javelin’s Dartmouth, Nova Scotia team; and Siavash Khajehhasani, based in Oakville, Ontario. They join another member of the Javelin team who have achieved this impressive designation; Alin Vargatu.

SOLIDWORKS Elite Applications Engineer

SOLIDWORKS Elite Applications Engineer (Left to Right) Andrew Lidstone, Scott Durksen, Siavash Khajehhasani

Scott says being recognized with Elite AE status is rewarding, given the time he devoted to studying the different SOLIDWORKS products and writing so many exams.

“It was a personal goal for me to increase my proficiency in the various SOLIDWORKS products,” he says. “SOLIDWORKS has created so many specialized products to help their customers. I’ve gained more insight into the range of industries that use SOLIDWORKS and widened my knowledge of the software.”

He also appreciates Javelin’s support of his efforts.

“It shows that Javelin is willing to invest in their employees to pursue further learning that will in turn be beneficial for our customers.”

Javelin’s technical support manager Adam Harte-Maxwell agrees. He says customers who work with Elite AEs should know they are working with the best people – and resellers – that SOLIDWORKS has to offer.

“It’s called ‘elite’ for good reason,” he says. “Achieving Elite status is no easy task. It has strict qualifiers that require years of work to obtain the required experience, community engagement, and professional certifications.”

Derryl Caillemer leads Javelin’s training team and says she is proud of the talented instructors and consultants Javelin offers its customers.

“We have talent that is recognized in our community as exceptional. It takes dedication and commitment, some of it personal time, to get to Elite status. Javelin has 37 people who have achieved SOLIDWORKS Expert or Elite designations. Those efforts are to be admired.”

If you are interested in advancing your work and career by pursuing certifications of your own, visit javelin-tech.com/main/training/certification.htm. There are eight different qualifications available for SOLIDWORKS certification, including Associate and ProfessionalSheet MetalWeldmentsSurfacingMoldFEA, and SOLIDWORKS Expert.

Elite AE Awards SOLIDWORKS WORLD 2017

Elite AE Awards SOLIDWORKS WORLD 2017

The post Javelin provides “elite” expertise in SOLIDWORKS training and technical support appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Karen Majerly at September 07, 2017 06:59 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

The Elephant in the Room – Large Assemblies

The Elephant in the Room - Large Assemblies

In this blog we will be looking to give you some tips and tricks as well as noting some changes made in SOLIDWORKS 2017 when it comes to ‘the elephant in the room’ that is Large Assemblies.

When working with large assemblies, you could end up with hundreds of parts, mates of various forms and several configurations; performance and stability are always key. To get the most out of SOLIDWORKS when working with assemblies you should always keep note of the following features and tools:

Resolved, Lightweight, Large Assembly Mode and Large Design Review

One of the first and easiest ways to improve a large assembly documents’ performance is to alter the Mode that the part is opened in. This option includes multiple different states with the following benefits;

  • Resolved – The default state. This state will take the longest of the four to load in as it fully loads in all model data to memory. This retains the ability for the user to have full access to make all necessary changes to the parts and assembly.
  • Lightweight – This state improves performance slightly by only loading a subset of the model data into memory, and will load any additional data to memory as required.
  • Large Assembly Mode – This state loads in a collection of system settings, mostly display and view settings, with the aim of turning off any settings which could hinder the systems (SOLIDWORKS Assemblies file’s) performance.
  • Large Design Review – This is the fastest and least resource intense mode. However, does not allow the user to make changes to the assembly or parts. This state is primarily for quick viewing, navigations or measuring, but individual parts can be loaded separately for editing.


Within the SOLIDWORKS application settings you can set the ‘Large Assembly Mode’ and ‘Large Design Review’ to automatically be set based on the number of components the assembly has.

Cleaning Up Your Design Tree

Having a clean and easy to work with design tree is always key to having a good workflow. You should always make sure that you are using an appropriate naming scheme. This isn’t only useful when creating a part but also for when you are creating mates between part as this allows you to more easily go back and make changes.

To make navigation and workflow easier (as well as cleaning up your design tree) you should make use of the “Group Component Instances” feature. What this feature does is group any parts with the same name and configurations into a parts folder. This is especially useful in large assemblies where you could have many instances of the same part such as bolts, washers, screws, rails, which should help reduce the time spent looking for that one part that might need to be altered or removed.

This can be found by right clicking on your top-level assembly and selecting Tree Display > Group Component Instances.

Above is just a simple example of what grouping looks like from an example within the ‘SOLIDWORKS 2017 What’s New document’.

Loading Parts or Documents into Memory Only

A new option available in SOLIDWORKS 2017 can be found under Tools > Options > System Options > External References, title “Load documents in memory only”. By using this option when opening an assembly, the externally referenced parts associated with that assembly will be loaded into memory but not opened in a new window. This keeps the references up to date (Key for when changes were made to a part) but reduces the load on SOLIDWORKS and allows you to get working on your assembly or sub-assembly.

Facility Layout

Another new feature which is available within SOLIDWORKS 2017 is using the special tool and layout option of ‘Facility Layout’ with the ability to publish a part or assembly as an asset. Once a part or assembly has been published as an asset it can be inserted into another assembly (such as a larger assembly) where magnetic mates will snap the asset into place with respect to other assets.

From within the ‘Asset Publisher’ Property Manager, it is possible to directly create a SpeedPak and since using a SpeedPak configuration can drastically enhance performance this can be very useful. Although pre-existing SpeedPaks cannot be used when creating a new asset.

Hopefully, you have learned a few things from this blog which will help you next time you are using a large assembly.


Craig Girvan is an Applications Engineer at TMS CADCentre, a SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller in Scotland.  You can read more from Craig on the TMS CADCentre blog.

Author information

TMS CADCentre
TMS CADCentre - is a SOLIDWORKS Reseller based in Scotland providing 3D CAD Design Software, analysis software & product data management software. The company was formed in 1981 and now pleased to be celebrating 36 years in business. TMS CADCentre is the only UK SOLIDWORKS Reseller based and funded within Scotland and have been providing SOLIDWORKS software, training and support since 1996 when the product was first launched in the UK.

The post The Elephant in the Room – Large Assemblies appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by TMS CADCentre at September 07, 2017 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

Level Up Your Graphic Design Game with This $15 Graphic Design Bootcamp

It’s not always easy to juggle multiple hats in the design and engineering worlds—but if there is a common language that will likely end up saving you a lot of time and frustration down the road, it’s having g basic knowledge of visual communication.

While nobody can become an Aaron Draplin overnight, having a strong grasp on the fundamentals of color theory and layout could easily make or break your projects—particularly when communication specific details to stakeholders. Thankfully, you don’t need to go back to design school to get started with leveling up your visual communication game.

From setting up an Adobe Creative Cloud environment to building a portfolio website, the Graphic Design Bootcamp will accelerate your design sense and assist in further leveling up your existing design or engineering know-how. Best of all, SolidSmack readers can purchase the course for just $15—that’s 88% off the retail price of $125.00.

Graphic Design Bootcamp – $125 $15 (88% Off)

Features:

  • Access 65 lectures & 8 hours of content 24/7
  • Learn how to create pixel-perfect projects for print & web
  • Download all project files to use as references
  • Communicate in a private Facebook group w/ other students to share projects & critique work

GET IT!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
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The post Level Up Your Graphic Design Game with This
$15 Graphic Design Bootcamp
appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 07, 2017 01:01 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: The Wall Control Workbench Metal Pegboard Tool Organizer

If you’re fortunate enough to have a garage or workspace, few things are as satisfying as a functional organizational system for all those tools.

And while keeping the goods stored away in a tool chest is a great start, why not display those organizational skills and add a bit of context to your workshop setting by displaying those tools proudly?

The patented Standard Workbench Metal Pegboard organizer kit from Wall Control offers over 10.5 Square feet of storage space and an all-steel construction that will not warp, fray or crack. Featuring an attractive and sturdy powder-coated finish, the scratch-resistant surface is ideal for haphazardly swapping tools in a pinch while also maintaining the ability to look good. Better still, the pegboard panels are magnetic and accept wall control hooks, brackets, and shelves as well as traditional standard 1/4″ pegboard pegs.

The Wall Control Workbench Metal Pegboard Tool Organizer — $115.35

Kit Includes:

  • (3) combo metal pegboard panels 32″ x 16″ (covers 32″ x 48″)
  • (1) 9″ shelf assembly with shelf dividers
  • (1) 6″ shelf assembly
  • (3) plastic bins with bin hanger
  • (1) screwdriver holder assembly (holds 6)
  • (1) hammer bracket
  • (20) assorted hooks and brackets

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The Wall Control Workbench Metal Pegboard Tool Organizer appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 07, 2017 12:26 PM

The LittleBits Droid Inventor Set Lets Kids Build Their Own Programmable R2-D2s

Between instant water balloons, DIY computers, or even just simply finding a reason to get back to nature, kids today have never had it so good when it comes to busy activities.

And now, they can add Droid Inventor to that list.

Announced last week by LittleBits, the Star Wars Droid Inventor Kit includes everything kids need to start creating their own sidekick droids. With this being a LittleBits set, that also includes a healthy dose of STEM learning along the way, too.

Each Inventor Kit includes 6 Bits (electronic blocks) and 20 Droid parts for configuring custom designs and functionalities. While an accompanying app (iOS/Android) can be used to control their Droid freely, the kit also contains 16+ missions to keep inventors building and training their Droids for weeks to come. Last but not least—the Droids even come with authentic Droid sounds directly out of the Star Wars films.

Says LittleBits:

“The Droid Inventor Kit encourages kids to explore technology and to think of themselves as inventors: to accept challenges, make mistakes, persevere, and feel the triumph and pride of creating something with your own two hands.”

For those who want to take their builds a step further, the company encourages Droid Inventors to further customize their Droids using household items including paper tubes and cereal boxes.

It’s 2017 and now kids and parents can sit around the breakfast table eating waffles and building Droids together. Who said the future hasn’t arrived yet?

Find out more over at littleBits.

The post The LittleBits Droid Inventor Set Lets Kids Build Their Own Programmable R2-D2s appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at September 07, 2017 12:18 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

DriveWorks vs Pack and Go for copying and renaming SOLIDWORKS files

As a longtime user of SOLIDWORKS, I’m a big fan of Pack and Go. It allows me to easily reuse designs, easily rename new files, change folder locations, update references, and even create zip files to quickly collect all the referenced documents of an assembly. But today, I’m not gushing about it. My colleague, Scott, already beat me to it awhile back, and Pack and Go is still as awesome today as it was back then. However, for this example, Pack and Go may not be the best tool for renaming SOLIDWORKS files:

Let’s say I have a BBQ side shelf, and I’m modifying three dimensions with it: Length, Width, and Height:

BBQ Side Shelf, Changing Dimensions Indicated

Now, I could be pretty clever in setting this up such that my assembly uses equations or in-context relations to change the dimensions, but there’s really only a few pieces that change sizes: The L-shaped side pieces (drive the length and height), and the cross beam at the bottom drives the width. I also need to adjust the length of the wooden planks when the width changes. But the plank is metric and the other pieces are in inches, so I’m kind of stuck doing this manually for the moment. Still, it’s 3 pieces, so I can’t complain.

Renaming SOLIDWORKS files with Pack and Go

I also run into a bit of frustration when I go to save the files. You see, we rename the part files so that they include the sizes. Here is what it looks like in the Pack and Go:

Pack and Go renaming SOLIDWORKS files

Pack and Go with Changing Sizes Indicated

I have to manually rename each of these 3 files with the correct dimensions, which invites all sorts of opportunities for error: I make a typo, I forget what numbers I used, my boss interrupts me when I am in the middle of changing the numbers, any one of a dozen or so things could happen resulting in the wrong numbers being entered. If I’m careful, I can get it to work perfectly, but it takes about 5 mins each time I want to create a new BBQ shelf – from opening the original assembly, to changing the dimensions, to going through the Pack and Go, and specifying the folder as well.

Automatically renaming SOLIDWORKS files with DriveWorks

If I were a bit more clever, I could make use of DriveWorks for something like this. I could setup an interface that would let me choose the length, width, and height (and even include a toggle for inch or mm), which would look something like this:

DriveWorks Custom Interface

DriveWorks Custom Interface

I could even set up rules on the back-end to automatically change my filenames and the dimensions at the same time. My new filenames would have the correct dimensions specified on them, and I can even switch units for the metric planks and inch bars. This would take my process time from 5 mins down to about 15 seconds (just long enough to adjust the sliders). Now I can use the other 4:45 for more interesting or value-added activities.

Let others run the process online

I could also consider something like DriveWorks Live to run this on. Because for a repetitive task like this, even spending 15 seconds on it is a waste of my time. I’d rather have the sales person or even the customer spend 15 seconds of their time (in fact, they would spend way more than that anyways sending me an email for a request for the files). With DriveWorks Live, I could put this form online and just have someone out there who does not have access to SOLIDWORKS experience the joy of being able to create a 3D model in a way that we SOLIDWORKS users take for granted.

The post DriveWorks vs Pack and Go for copying and renaming SOLIDWORKS files appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Jim Peltier, CSWE at September 07, 2017 12:00 PM

September 06, 2017

SolidSmack

ShadowDraw Teaches You to Draw Like Professional Artists

shadowdraw

Ever since I was a teenager, I always wanted to graduate my art style from stick figures to something a bit more refined. Not everyone has an instinct for drawing, but quite a few would love to draw better and many of us desire to sketch like a pro. ShadowDraw, a creative app for the upcoming Apple iOS 11 update, allows the unskilled Picasso-to-be to learn from the greats.

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By following the sketch-by-sketch processes of renowned artists, you match a series of lines until the finished piece emerges, but you’re not simply tracing or coloring in the lines. Each drawing progresses with the actual stroke the artists use, allowing you to see the process and match it along the way. Once you get the hang of it, the next stroke presents itself to be mimicked. This continues until your work resembles the professional artist’s work rather than something that resembles a wastebucket set on fire. Your drawing can then be recorded as a video, GIF, or image file which you can use to boast vehemently to your unartistic friends about.

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The artists who are collaborating with the project are no joke, either. The roster consists of artists from Disney, Dreamworks, Marvel, and DC Comics, just to name a few. While the app itself is free, you do need to pay a monthly subscription in order to unlock tutorials from your preferred artist. Exclusive and limited edition tutorials will also be made available as standalone purchases.

shadowdraw

The app is one of many programs envisioned by co-founder Marty McDonough after a childhood accident resulted in the death of his little brother and the paralysis of his mother. He wants to make a wide variety of skills attainable through the easiest and most enjoyable way possible. If ShadowDraw becomes a success, McDonough will be that much closer to accomplishing his goal.

Shadowdraw will be compatible with the iPad Pro, iPad Air, iPad Air 2, iPad 4th Generation, iPad 5th Generation, iPad Mini 2, iPad Mini 3 and iPad Mini 4. Though any stylus will work with the program, it is best used in conjunction with the Apple Pencil.

The project has currently completed 4% of its $29,000 goal on Indiegogo. It’s still to be seen if a user can eventually draw without the aid of the tutorials, but for now, the possibility of creating your own comic book just got a lot more real. To learn more about turning your childhood drawing fantasies into reality, you can head over to the app’s official website.

The post ShadowDraw Teaches You to Draw Like Professional Artists appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 06, 2017 06:53 PM

Model of the Week: Articulating LED Lamp [5 Articulating Points of Awesome!]

It may be a few weeks since you’ve had that dream of attaching articulating arms of grapplers, lights and small laser cannons to your upper torso, but that doesn’t mean you can’t start today. “The hardest part is starting your transformation into a cyborg. Scalpel!” is what my old business partner use to say. That’s why this week’s model caught my attention.

Igor Albuquerque (whose initials are A.I. backwards. Hmmm.) has a wonderful new 3D printed articulating LED lamp project capable of use in a variety of ways and a variety of different places–attached to your desk to light your workspace, attached to your bed to light your bedtime reading, attached to your head to light your path toward world domination–so many uses.

The 3d model was designed using Fusion 360, based on Kenneth’s Articulating, Wall-Mounted, Magnetic Phone Mount design. For this lamp, I redesigned most of the parts using Fusion 360 and made some adaptations and simplifications to reduce the number of different components need to assemble the whole structure.

Igor used a Voolt3D printer to print the ten parts in PLA with a 0.2mm resolution and 10% infill. He wired up an LED spotlight with a separate switch, wire, and connector, but I came across a nice hanging lantern cord cable that provides the length and has a standard E26/E27 socket. Depending on the socket, light and shade you choose, you may have to adjust the diameter of the lamp holder piece slightly.

You can download the files on MyMiniFactory, and view the Instructable here. (Bonus! Check out Igor’s other projects including a great 3D printed tool hanger and a few Arduino projects!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

The post Model of the Week: Articulating LED Lamp [5 Articulating Points of Awesome!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at September 06, 2017 06:33 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: The Max Factory Figma Archetype Action Figure

If you spend a lot of time designing objects for humans, then it would be a grave mistake to arm yourself with knowledge of body proportions and how to convey the use of your objects in context.

Unfortunately, sketching humans accurately can be an incredibly daunting process to learn—particularly if you’re not trying to set out as the next Rembrandt or hit Manga artist.

For simple desktop sketches as the need arises, we’re big fans of the Max Factory Figma Archetype Next Male Action Figure.

Using the smooth posable joints, users can act out a variety of poses for ensuring that they get their proportions right—even if it still takes a few tries. Also, who doesn’t want an awesome action figure on their desk?

The Max Factory Figma Archetype Action Figure — $44.00

Features:

  • A Max Factory import
  • Can be used for illustration modeling
  • Use as a base for your own customized action figures
  • Smooth yet poseable joints
  • Articulated Figma stand included
  • 2 x 0.5 x 6 inches

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The Max Factory Figma Archetype Action Figure appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 06, 2017 12:40 PM

The LEGO Millenium Falcon is the Largest and Most Expensive LEGO Set to Date

If there is one thing the LEGO is good at—besides creating some of the best toys of all time—it’s staying in the news.

Last week, the company announced their new 7,541-piece Lego Millennium Falcon—the biggest and most expensive set ever released by the company.

Created for diehard fans under their Ultimate Collector Series collection, the ultra-detailed plastic brick model includes swappable bricks for modifying the spacecraft design as it is portrayed in different movies from the series. Talk about commitment to accuracy. Additionally, the set also comes with ten Star Wars minifigs—two separate crews—from the original Trilogy and recent Saga films.

“This amazing LEGO interpretation of Han Solo’s unforgettable Corellian freighter has all the details that Star Wars fans of any age could wish for, including intricate exterior detailing, upper and lower quad laser cannons, landing legs, lowering boarding ramp and a 4-minifigure cockpit with detachable canopy,” explains the company. “Remove individual hull plates to reveal the highly detailed main hold, rear compartment and gunnery station.”

If you’re both a Star Wars and a LEGO fan—come on, who isn’t?—then the LEGO Millenium Falcon is the ultimate pinnacle of both worlds.

The set will go on sale on October 1st for $799.99. Find out more over at LEGO.

The post The LEGO Millenium Falcon is the Largest and Most Expensive LEGO Set to Date appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at September 06, 2017 12:33 PM

App Smack 36.17: Quickshot, Invoice 2go, Little Alchemy 2, Crew Messaging, and More…

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@www.solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Enlight Quickshot (iOS — Free)

Enlight Quickshot will make you fall in love with mobile photography.

Weather Atlas (iOS – Free)

Weather Atlas is your window into current weather conditions. See layers of weather info right on the map, with forecast data available at a glance.

Invoice 2go (iOS — Free)

Invoice2go makes it easy for small business owners to create professional invoices on the go.

New Calendar (Android — Free)

This app includes the most common calendar functions and lets users manage their schedules easily.

Little Alchemy 2 (Android — Free)

Little Alchemy, the crafting game enjoyed by millions of players, is back with more items, fresh, new art style and charming music!

Crew Messaging (Android — Free)

Crew is a free messaging tool you use at work. Crew helps managers and employees communicate by replacing text messages and email with one simple-to-use app.

The post App Smack 36.17: Quickshot, Invoice 2go, Little Alchemy 2, Crew Messaging, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 06, 2017 12:32 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

The Ride of Matt Schmotzer’s Life: The Invertigo Roller Coaster

Matt Schmotzer, a Mechanical Engineering graduate student at Purdue University, has always had an affinity towards both roller coasters and 3D printing. While studying for his master’s degree, as well as working at Ford Motors, Matt embarked on a side project that combined both of his passions: creating a 3D-printed replica of the Invertigo Roller Coaster, which he designed in SOLIDWORKS. The Invertigo is one of three inverted boomerang-styled roller coasters in the United States and is located at King’s Island Amusement Park in Mason, Ohio.  After viewing his design at the Detroit Maker Faire, I had to follow up with Matt to ask him some questions about his experiences in creating the roller coaster and plans for the future.

What gave you the idea of designing the Invertigo in SOLIDWORKS, 3D printing the necessary parts, and then constructing it in real life?

“Right now I’m a grad student at Purdue. I graduated from Purdue with my undergraduate in Mechanical Engineering, and a minor in Manufacturing Graphics. I took a bunch of courses with CATIA, and then through the school of Mechanical Engineering, they teach you SOLIDWORKS, so I’ve actually been using CAD software for the past seven years, but the reason I picked to do a roller coaster design is because, I love roller coasters and I like 3D printing, so why don’t I just combine both of those, and do a 3D-printed roller coaster?”

“The next decision was which ride? I wanted it to be a ride I’ve ridden on myself, and I wanted it to be a ride that’s small enough so that when I build it, it can fit in my garage. I actually started the design back in January, when I was fiddling around with SOLIDWORKS for another class project. Once I got it about 80 percent complete, I was like, ‘I should just start 3D printing this!’”

“It wasn’t until about a month ago that I had enough free time to kick off all the printers and actually start printing out all the parts, so the past week I’ve been just trying to get it all assembled, and fully operational. I haven’t gotten there yet, but I’m hoping once it’s all complete I’ll be able to post it by actual CAD files on Thingiverse, so anyone with a 3D printer can go and just print it out without having to do any of the leg work for the design; so that’s kind of a work in progress to come.”

What did you mean when you said the main focus of this project was to create a “working” roller coaster?

“So, I thought about having it work in SOLIDWORKS, but when I say working, I want it to physically work so I’d 3D print out all the parts, and then have the train run on the track and on the rails physically. I never actually thought about doing it virtually through SOLIDWORKS [simulation]. I know it’s possible, but I’ve never actually played with simulations in SOLIDWORKS. I’ve never tried that, but I know it’s possible, and that would be something that I could potentially do in the future.”

 

CAD of the Invertigo, designed by Matt Schmotzer

 

Have you finished your project completely?

“It’s not complete. It’s a fully complete static model, meaning I have the whole structure built, all the supports and the track put together. What’s not complete is I want to have the train physically running on the track, and the train was also designed in SOLIDWORKS and 3D printed.”

“The hiccup there is, when you do a scale model you are scaling everything, but you are not scaling gravity. When you think about momentum and getting the train through the whole circuit, momentum is mass multiplied by velocity; so you need to make sure if you’re scaling this down to 1/25th scale, your mass of the train has to be at least 1/25th the weight of an actual train to keep the momentum to go through the whole circuit. I need to make sure I reduced all the friction on the wheels and the rails, so I’ve got to sand it to make sure it’s all fine-tuned, and then I also have to make sure I get bearings on the wheels that are low friction bearings.”

How do you plan to circuit the train around the whole track?

“Hopefully it’s going to function like a real roller coaster, so it’s going to be all gravity-driven. It uses a chain drive; it’s a shuttle roller coaster. It starts you at the station and the chain takes you to the top, and then releases you. Then you go through the whole circuit up to the second tower, and it takes you back up, and then it drops you and you do the whole circuit backwards. So it’s all going to be gravity propelled, just like the real thing. You just have to make sure the 3D printed part rains are finely sanded.”

How long does it take to 3D print each part of the roller coaster?

“The average track piece is about 10 inches long, and about 2.5 inches wide, so it takes about 12 hours to print one track piece, on average.”

Tell me about the process of printing out each part, then assembling them together. How long did it take to assemble the roller coaster together?

“I have six personal printers, because once you buy one, you kind of have to go buy more because it’s such a fun hobby, and you just want parts faster. The vertical supports that are cylindrical, those are just dowel rods, but everything else is 3D printed. The cool thing about this project is that from the CAD, you can see the footer layout. This is one of my favorite parts that I love in SOLIDWORKS! You can lay down a sheet and extract all the footer locations as a DXF file, and use the laser cutter at the shop to laser cut the plywood sheet so I could get the actual exact location of the footers for all the supports.”

“This was a life saver because when you’re assembling it, it’s kind of like an art in the sense of, ‘Do I put the footer here?’ You’ve got to measure it out, and it was super easy in this case. All I did was export the DXF and then the laser cut all the bolt hole locations on the ground, so I could just easily assemble the footer. It knew exactly where it was going to go. Then I just poked a little hole through the little fake grass, and I just bolted it down. So, it’s actually bolted physically to the table, just kind of like how a real one is, where they would fasten it right to the cement concrete footers.”

“If you asked me before I assembled it, I would’ve told you that it would probably take a day or two. It took about a week and a half, and like two full days over a weekend to get it all assembled because each track piece is bolted together; just like an actual roller coaster. When they manufacture a roller coaster, they manufacture each individual track section, and then they bolt it together on site. I wanted it to be as authentic as possible, so I wanted to do it the same way. I’ll 3D print each individual track piece, and bolt it together with M2 fasteners. It took a long time because each part has about four M2 screws that have a nut on the other end, that can fasten together. It just takes a lot of time, because you have to fit your Allen Wrench in between all these track pieces, and there’s some that have a really tight clearance to get the wrench in there.”

Inside perspective of Matt Schmotzer’s Invertigo replica

 

What other projects have you designed in SOLIDWORKS? Do you plan on doing any for the future?

“I originally was thinking about all other projects that I’ve done in SOLIDWORKS, and the first one that came to mind was an automated pizza slicer for my senior design project. They made us use SOLIDWORKS at school, and that whole pizza slicer was designed in CAD by myself. I really wanted to grab a picture of it in CAD, but I couldn’t find one. It’s probably on my old laptop that I used for school.”

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“Another project I previously worked on was in called ‘Design for Manufactured Ability.’ In the class, we had to come up with a product and design it, or take an existing product and redesign it, so that it’s either more efficient or more functional. We used a fuel sender, which is this component that goes in the fuel tank of your vehicle and pumps the fuel from the tank up to the motor.”

“Our design was just making it more modular so that when you are assembling on the assembly line, it’s just easier to install than the current design that most automotive companies use; and that whole design was made in SOLIDWORKS. While I was working on that, I was tinkering around with [the Invertigo project] on the side, and that’s how it became to be.”

“For future projects, as long as I still have access to SOLIDWORKS, I really want to do another roller coaster that’s bigger; but before I get kicked off on that, I want to finish this one. I want to make it so I can take all the files and just upload them onto Thingiverse, so that anyone can just download it for free.”

Do you plan to use your Invertigo model to help outsource yourself for future career paths?

“As I said, I want to put it on Thingiverse so that anyone can have their hands on it. One of the cool things about just knowing CAD design, engineering, and product development, is it always helps. It just shows that you understand the tool, and one of my professors always said, ‘The best CAD software is the one you know,’ because once you know how one function, you can switch between using software like CATIA and SOLIDWORKS.”

“I really like 3D printing. I guess the image I want to put out there is if you really like roller coasters, you can 3D print your own and kind of just make it a community base where everyone’s feeding off their ideas.”

Have you thought about making tutorial videos on the process of designing this model?

“Definitely, because even on Reddit people have been asking me, ‘How the heck do you model this?’ I know a thousand ways not to build a roller coaster, because I’ve just tinkered around with it so much. I always thought I could put a little tutorial video out there and be tell viewers, ‘If you want to design a roller coaster, here are a couple few steps to get you started, and some of the obstacles you may encounter.’ I would also explain how to properly attack those with SOLIDWORKS.”

Full view of the Invertigo replica

 

Matt plans to graduate with his master’s degree in Mechanical Engineering this December. For more information about his Invertigo model, check out his Reddit and Instagram pages.

 

 

Author information

Connor Burke
Connor Burke
Brand and User Advocacy Intern at Solidworks Corporation
I am a Brand and User Advocacy Intern for SOLIDWORKS Corporation. I currently reside in Westford, Massachusetts and also attend Syracuse University. I aspire to receive my Communication & Rhetorical Studies degree by May of 2019.

The post The Ride of Matt Schmotzer’s Life: The Invertigo Roller Coaster appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Connor Burke at September 06, 2017 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How do I upgrade the SOLIDWORKS SolidNetwork License Manager?

Most of large companies have their SOLIDWORKS licenses on a network. So, when it comes to upgrading SOLIDWORKS it is necessary to first upgrade the SolidNetwork License Manager (SNL) on the server machine before upgrading SOLIDWORKS on client machines.

Here are few things you must check before you upgrade to a newer version of SOLIDWORKS.

You have to make sure that your version of SNL Manager on the server you would like to install should be same as the latest version of SOLIDWORKS you want to run on your client machines.

So if you want to run SOLIDWORKS 2014, 2015, and 2017 on the client machines, then you have to install SNL Manager 2017 on your server.

Follow the steps below to upgrade SOLIDWORKS SNL Manager:

1. Download/Locate installation Media.

Where do I download SolidNetwork (SNL) Manager?

2. Ensure no licenses are borrowed by any user.

Go to Start Menu > Launch SolidNetwork License Manager > License Borrowing Tab > check Borrowed Licenses. If you notice any of the licenses are borrowed request that user to return the license. Aldo make sure SOLIDWORKS is closed on all the client and server machines during this process.

Return any of the license if borrowed

Return any of the license if borrowed

3. Transfer the License.

Usually it is a good idea to transfer the license before you upgrade SNL manager. To do so, Launch SNL manager on server machine > Server Administration > Modify >Transfer license. Make sure you write down your serial number as this will be needed in further steps.

upgrade SOLIDWORKS SNL Manager

Transfer the license

4. Install new version of SNL manager

As you have already downloaded the file set for new version, extract the files. Now right click on setup.exe and click run as administrator. This will launch the SOLIDWORKS installation manager. On the welcome page , Select Server products and then select Upgrade SolidNetwork License Manager on this computer. As you can see in the screenshot I already have 2017 SNL manager installed on my machine , so the upgrade option is faded out and not available.

SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager- Server products

Once you click next, on serial Number page if prompted, enter your SolidNetwork License serial number(s). Use a comma between serial numbers if you are using multiple serial numbers. Click Next and then select Install.

5. Activate/Reactivate the License on new SNL manager

Once the installation is finished we have to reactivate the license. To do so, Start Menu > Launch SolidNetwork License Manager > Server Administration Tab > Modify > Select Activate/Reactivate the license > click Next > Finish the process.

Make sure you click select all option on the page where it shows the list of all serial numbers you have added.

Activate/Reactivate the license

Now, you can upgrade SOLIDWORKS on client machines. Since, the server machine is same , the name of server machine will already be added on Client machines. Check to see if Client machine is communicating to server machine and can obtain the license.

If you receive any errors please look at SolidNetWork License (SNL) Manager Troubleshooting Blog Article.

The post How do I upgrade the SOLIDWORKS SolidNetwork License Manager? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Vipanjot Kaur at September 06, 2017 12:00 PM

September 05, 2017

SolidSmack

This Handmade ‘Jumanji’ Board Build Process Will Suck You In

Jumanji is the movie best known for two things: the “What year is it?” meme, and forever scaring the hell out of 90s kids, making them think twice about ever playing board games again. The film follows the adventures of a boy named Alan (played by none other than Robin Williams) who becomes trapped in a living board game filled with animals, murderous plant life, and a hunter with a mustache so sharp it should be considered a deadly weapon.

This Jumanji board replica created by Steven Ritcher won’t trap you for 26 years, but it will mesmerize you when you watch it take form and see it in action. From the intricate box cover to the four magnetic player pieces, each component of the project is made entirely from scratch.

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Steven starts by shaping multiple pieces of wood and gluing them together to create what will eventually be the box which holds a miniature jungle hell. Once that’s done, he gets to engraving a safari motif consisting of leaves on the tiny cabinets and quadrilateral patterns on the edges of the board itself.

Of course, no board game would be fair without a set of rules. Steven remedies this by screen printing an alternating set of red and black rules and pasting them onto a piece of wood. He then cuts them accordingly and places them beside the game for unknowing players to read.

Jumanji wouldn’t be Jumanji without those big, bold letters on the cover of the box. After sculpting a mold and painting it, Steven splits the iconic board game’s name in two and attaches the pieces to the front and center of the cover.

Now all that’s left to do is to make the actual game. Using a sketch of the movie’s board as a guide, he creates a magnetic grid which pulls on the player pieces and creates the illusion of the board game being alive. Couple this with the translucent center of the board and you have a game which looks ready to suck you into it (literally).

Add a couple of finishing touches and it’s ready to go! Despite the center glass’s lack of foreboading instructions, the completed game looks entirely faithful to its onscreen version. The only thing which would complete the experience is to see Robin Williams (RIP) pop out of it.

You can find more pictures of the completed project on imgur. If you want to see what else Steven is up to (he also makes some sick busts of pop culture characters), take a look at his webpage.

Oh, and if you didn’t know yet, there is a new Jumanji film coming December 2017 although, sadly, it has a more modern twist as a video game.

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The post This Handmade ‘Jumanji’ Board Build Process Will Suck You In appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at September 05, 2017 07:46 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: The ABC of Custom Lettering by Ivan Castro

Long gone are the days when every banner and sign required the specialized touch of a sign writer—yet, even with today’s billboard-sized digital prints created from Photoshop files, the art of good old-fashioned hand lettering is still just as popular as it ever was.

And while it does take some practice to cross your t’s and dot your i’s with a cohesive style, the good news is that you don’t need to go back to design school to get a formal typography education.

Written by graphic design icon Ivan Castro, The ABC of Custom Lettering: A Practical Guide to Drawing Letters is an authoritative resource for designers, typographers, sign writers, illustrators, pinstripers, and other creative professionals looking to add a touch of typographic pizzazz to their work.

The ABC of Custom Lettering: A Practical Guide to Drawing Letters by Ivan Castro — $17.38

Features:

  • Workbook-Focused
  • Easy-to-Follow, Step-by Step Tutorials
  • Gallery Sections for Gathering Inspiration
  • Sample Projects for Practicing Techniques

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The post Cool Tools of Doom: The ABC of Custom Lettering by Ivan Castro appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at September 05, 2017 01:18 PM