Planet SolidWorks

November 24, 2017

SolidSmack

Big Chem Arrives at FormNext, Could Shake Up 3D Printing

Something quite interesting was observed at the recent FormNext exhibition.

This year’s FormNext was indeed the largest dedicated exhibition of 3D printing equipment, materials, and services ever held in human history, with 420 exhibitors and over 20,000 attendees. However, I noticed something very interesting when compared to the same show last year.

This year there were very substantial stands from vendors of plastic materials. No, I don’t mean the usual filament vendors that you have seen before, but instead, I mean the chemical giants behind them.

Very few 3D printer filament vendors design and produce their own plastic. Most simply purchase bulk materials from monster chemical companies, and some will work with them to provide requirements to conjure up new chemistry for plastic. The bulk materials are pellets, which are then extruded into quality filament for use in 3D printers.

So you’d expect to see the filament vendors at a 3D print show, and they were of course present. But in addition to their presence, we saw several giant chemical companies, such as BASF (the single largest chemical company in the world) and Sabic (fourth largest chemical producer in the world), and others.

BASF, in particular, had one of the largest exhibits at the show, where they displayed their materials. They currently provide 3D printing materials in filaments, resins, powders, and pellets. That’s ALL forms of materials. Their products were not just plain plastics, either, as they showed ceramic and metal filled polymers as well.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_91311" style="width: 1100px">Metal 3D prints made with BASF's metal-infused filament<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Metal 3D prints made with BASF’s metal-infused filament</figcaption></figure>

These companies were present, I believe, to show their support and capabilities to the nascent professional desktop 3D printing market, which has been starved for exotic engineering materials. Having suffered for years with the less than optimal PLA and ABS materials, in recent years vendors have provided machines and materials more appropriate to desktop engineering. Materials such as ASA, ULTEM, PEEK, and many others are now becoming commonplace.

These ventures into unusual materials seem to have attracted “the big guys”, who see this market as an opportunity for growth in the future. They are making deals with materials providers and machine producers left and right, especially BASF, who seems to be almost everywhere.

It seemed (although certainly not true) that every other vendor on the show floor was announcing a deal with BASF to supply custom materials of one sort or another.

While the enthusiasm – and enormous financial resources – of these plastics giants are extremely welcome to the world of 3D printing, they still have some learning to do.

One vendor told us the story of when they met with BASF, and was asked by the chemical giant “how many kilotons of plastic they would need?”

Wut. KILOTONS?

A fast extrusion printer with a large nozzle could print at perhaps 6 hours per 1kg spool, so printing A KILOTON OF MATERIAL could take around SEVEN HUNDRED YEARS TO COMPLETE.

And they wanted to know “how MANY kilotons” were needed.

The 3D printing industry is growing, but perhaps it’s not quite there yet.

But it is very encouraging to know these giant companies are now actively engaging in the space to provide their very considerable expertise and materials. Each of them has literally thousands of patented unique plastic materials in their portfolio, many of which can be made into printable filaments.

We’re just at the beginning of a very interesting period in 3D printing.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Big Chem Arrives at FormNext, Could Shake Up 3D Printing appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at November 24, 2017 01:52 AM

November 23, 2017

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: The Best Black Friday Deals for Designers and Engineers

Well, it’s that time of year again folks. Unless you’re busy making and/or eating leftover turkey cranberry sandwiches, Black Friday is the best time to sit down for a few minutes and load up on electronics, workshop supplies, and any other equipment you might need in the coming year. This year, we’ve gone ahead and waded through page after page on Amazon (and a few other places) to bring you only the best and most relevant deals for designers and engineers. But act fast! Many of these deals will sell out quickly!

So what are you waitin’ for? Put that sandwich down and get a head start on your wishlist with these killer deals now.

Workshop Supplies

Mpow Noise Reduction Safety Ear Muffs — $12.69 (49% Off)
Designed with 2 layers of professional noise dampening foam, high sealing solid cup and the unique double-shell, the ear muff offers a SNR 34dB / NRR 28dB (Noise Reduction Rating) for the ear protection. Lab tested and certified to US and European standards.

IRWIN Quick-Grip Mini Bar Clamp 4-Pack — $19.99 (42% Off)
These light-duty Mini Bar Clamps provide up to 140 lbs. of evenly distributed force and feature a unique pistol-grip design and quick-release trigger for one-handed operation.

AstroAI Digital Clamp Meter — $24.99 (38% Off)
Test a wide range of measurements including Voltage, AC Current, Resistance, Continuity, Capacitance, Frequency, and Temperature, Tests Diodes.

Stalwart 30-Piece Hex Key Wrench Set — $9.81 (21% Off)
This Stalwart 30 Pc Hex Key Wrench Set offers Metric SAE Hex tools in a broad assortment of common sizes to fit almost any job you need to tackle!

ATE Pro Dial Caliper — $16.99 (15% Off)
The ATE Pro 98029 dial caliper has a 0 to 6″ measurement range with 0.001″ graduations for obtaining outside, inside, step, and depth dimensions for a variety of precision measurement uses.

PanaVise Vacuum Base Vise — $49.65 (34% Off)
The world’s most PORTABLE work holding tool! Quickly attaches to any smooth, non-porous flat surface with the flip of a lever!

Darice 24-Inch Aluminum T-Square — $10.13 (29% Off)
Aluminum T-Square shows both-inch and centimeter/millimeter measurements. Features plastic head fixed to aluminum shaft, peggable lower end and lays flat.

TEKTON 4-Piece Screwdriver Set — $11.95 (30% Off)
Aluminum T-Square shows both-inch and centimeter/millimeter measurements. Features plastic head fixed to aluminum shaft, peggable lower end and lays flat.

Carhartt Legacy Tool Roll — $18.71 (23% Off)
The Carhartt Legacy Tool Rollis made of rugged synthetic material with Rain Defender durable water repellent for protecting and organizing tools.

Electronics

Ricoh Theta V 360 Spherical Camera — $399.95 (7% Off)
The Theta V is lightweight 360 Degree spherical camera, it’s easy to use and compact enough to carry everywhere.

Anker SoundCore 2 12W Portable Wireless Bluetooth Speaker — $31.99 (20% Off)
SoundCore 2 produces outstanding audio from an astonishingly compact speaker.

Bose Companion 20 Multimedia Speaker System — $199.00 (20% Off)
The Companion 20 delivers natural, room-filling sound from your computer, tablet, or digital player.

Amazon Echo Dot (2nd Generation) — $29.00 (40% Off)
Echo Dot (2nd Generation) is a hands-free, voice-controlled device that uses Alexa to play music, control smart home devices, make calls, send and receive messages, provide information, read the news, set alarms, read audiobooks from Audible, control Amazon Video on Fire TV, and more.

Logitech Wireless Touch Keyboard K400 — $15.19 (24% Off)
The Wireless Touch Keyboard K400 Plus is a full size keyboard layout and touchpad in a compact size.

Gear

BioLite Energy Bundle+ $334.95 (24% Off)
Everything BioLite!

Aicok Ceramic Chef Knife — $5.99 (80% Off)
Delicate but sturdy design for precision slicing and dicing, retaining its sharpness for years, no need of sharpening.

Cable & Case Credit Card Pocket Knife — $9.59 (68% Off)
The Best survival credit card knife on the market.

SGIN Lightning Cable 4-Pack — $11.17 (63% Off)
Never again find yourself without a charging cable!

NewAir 126-Can Beverage Cooler — $198.38 (49% Off)
Cools down to a chilly 34 degrees Fahrenheit, lower than other beverage coolers, ensuring your beverages are perfectly frosty.

Anker 20000mAh Portable Charger — $31.69 (21% Off)
A new frontier in portable charging. PowerCore 20100 offers an unbelievable size to capacity ratio along with best-in-class charging speeds.

Don’t see what you’re looking for here? Any and all purchases made through SolidSmack’s unique affiliate link on Amazon will help support more product design sweetness. Thanks for all your support!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The Best Black Friday Deals for Designers and Engineers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 23, 2017 08:31 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

What is Design Analysis?

In its simplest terms, design analysis is a powerful software technology for simulating physical behavior on the computer. Will it break? Will it deform? Will it get too hot? These are the types of questions for which design analysis provides accurate answers. Instead of building a prototype and developing elaborate testing regimens to analyze the physical behavior of a product, engineers can elicit this information quickly and accurately on the computer. Because design analysis can minimize or even eliminate the need for physical prototyping and testing, the technology has gone mainstream in the manufacturing world over the past decade as a valuable product development tool and has become omnipresent in almost all fields of engineering.

Design Analysis

Design Analysis

Finite Element Analysis (FEA)

Design Analysis employs the finite element analysis (FEA) method to simulate physical behavior of a product design. The FEA process consists of subdividing all systems into individual components or “elements” whose behavior is easily understood and then reconstructing the original system from these components. This is a natural way of performing analysis in engineering and even in other analytical fields, such as economics. For example, a control arm on a car suspension is one continuous shape. An analysis application will test the control arm by dividing the geometry into ‘elements,’ analyzing them, then simulating what happens between the elements. The application displays the results as colour-coded 3D images, red usually denoting an area of failure, and blue denoting areas that maintain their integrity under the load applied.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" gesture="media" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tPLrxytyVx8?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Design Analysis can be applied to just about anything

Engineers analyze just about every type of product development and research effort imaginable. Analyzing machine designsinjection molded plasticscooling systemsproducts that emit electromagnetic fields, and systems that are influenced by fluid dynamics are just some examples of how companies leverage design analysis.

In the field of mechanical engineering, design analysis can solve a wide range of product development problems. Engineers can use design analysis to predict the physical behavior of just about any part or assembly under any loading conditions: from a simple beam under a bending load to car crash simulations and vibration analysis of aircraft. The true power of design analysis is the ability to perform any of these types of studies accurately without building a single thing. All that is needed is a CAD model.

Stress Analysis

The most common design analysis application in the field of mechanical engineering is stress analysis. Engineers study the stresses (both structural and thermal) on a part to determine whether it will fail or not and whether design modifications are necessary to overcome potential problems. Design analysis can be used in a wide variety of fields, here are just a few examples:

  • Determine the potential for deformation of parts
  • Measure resonant frequencies and modes of vibration of parts and assemblies
  • Calculate dynamic and seismic responses
  • Determine Contact stresses
  • Provide temperature distribution.
  • Analyze fluid flow, whether it be a gas or liquid in a pipeline, the mixture of air and fuel in an engine intake manifold, or molten plastic filling up a mold.

Motion Analysis & Electromagnetics

Besides working very closely with CAD packages, commercial design analysis applications also interface with increasingly popular programs for motion analysis to create complete virtual analysis and test systems. In other engineering disciplines, design analysis is used to study electromagnetic fields, soil mechanics, groundwater flow, bone growth, etc.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Software for Design Analysis

With powerful and intuitive SOLIDWORKS® Simulation solutions, product engineers can virtually test new ideas, quickly and efficiently evaluate performanceimprove quality, and get the knowledge for product innovation.

View Simulation solutions

The post What is Design Analysis? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at November 23, 2017 01:44 PM

SOLIDWORKS Feature Freeze Bar Enhanced in SOLIDWORKS 2018

SOLIDWORKS Freeze Bar

SOLIDWORKS Freeze Bar

In previous releases of SOLIDWORKS, the “Feature Freeze” bar would experience issues if it encountered a folder where the features were in chronological order.

This limitation has been addressed with SOLIDWORKS 2018 so that the Feature Freeze bar can force a temporary “unabsorb” of a sketch or feature so that it can freeze the desired folder.

A warning message will prompt you that you are going to perform the temporary separation of the sketch away from it’s feature.

The behavior has been aligned with how the Rollback bar functions within the Feature manager design tree.

Stay Tuned for additional tips demonstrating what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2018!

The post SOLIDWORKS Feature Freeze Bar Enhanced in SOLIDWORKS 2018 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at November 23, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Build Your First Robot with the $21 Ultimate DIY Arduino Robotics Bundle

Robots. They’re freakin’ everywhere these days, man. While we’re not quite yet in an iRobot or T2: Judgement Day scenario, gaining an understanding of how they work from the inside-out is a skill that will increasingly become handier.

And few platforms are better for diving in headfirst than mBot, the world’s friendliest educational robotics platform. The Arduino-based, two-wheel robot comes with built-in sensors and actuators that are programmed via the Scratch graphical programming language.

With the Ultimate DIY Arduino Robotics Bundle, you’ll be up and running in no time with mBot. This three-course, 22-hour bundle includes all the information you need to create your own programmable wheeled Arduino robot. Better yet, you can get it today for just $21 — that’s 70% off the retail price of $300!

The Ultimate DIY Arduino Robotics Bundle – $300 $21 (70% Off)

Features:

  • Create an Arduino wheeled robot that can navigate towards a light source & avoid obstacles along the way
  • Integrate simple mechanical parts w/ motors, batteries, sensors, & other electronics
  • Gain experience in analyzing problems & designing solutions

GET IT!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
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The post Build Your First Robot with the $21 Ultimate DIY Arduino Robotics Bundle appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 23, 2017 08:00 AM

November 22, 2017

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: 3D Printed Triangular Mesh Fabric [100X Better Than Polyester!]

Ugh, not again. You’re digging through the cupboard looking for that triangular mesh fabric to make a mechanoid death eater mask for your chihuahua and you can’t find a sheet of it to save your life. Put that little yappin’ dog in a bag of cheese puffs for a few minutes and check this out.

Devin Montes of Make Anything has created some wonderful triangular mesh fabric you’re just going to love – like wrap yourself in it and roll around in the grass kind of love. He’s experimented with 87 different ways (give or take 20) to create a 3D printed plastic mesh and finally settled on a stellar approach. Have a look.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ge-q6iXDAoc?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

The sheets are very flexible with an outer surface that’s both slick looking and pleasing to the touch. As the video shows, he incorporated a clever way to link multiple sheets together, adding a small tab to the edge pieces that can then be linked to adjacent sections and stitched together using a 3D pen. Devin is using MatterHackers Pro PLA on an Anycubic Prusa i3 and an MK2 with multi-material upgrade for the multi-color prints you see below.

You can download the triangular mesh fabric on MyMiniFacatory.  (BONUS! Check out the cubemail version shown in the video as well. Snag it here!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

This post contains links to affiliate products. Purchases from these links help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no increased cost to you. Thank you!

The post Model of the Week: 3D Printed Triangular Mesh Fabric [100X Better Than Polyester!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at November 22, 2017 11:28 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Cornucopia Tutorial

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="355" id="PreviewFrame3D" name="PreviewFrame3D" scrolling="no" src="http://www.3dcontentcentral.com/external-site-embed.aspx?format=3D&amp;catalogid=11199&amp;modelid=818292&amp;width=250&amp;height=250&amp;edraw=true" width="400"></iframe>

Cornucopia: This festive model is multi-body part. It has two curve driven patterns to make up most of the cornucopia’s shape. The curve driven patterns use 3D sweeps as construction geometry to control the shape of the patterns. To create the cornucopia tapered, horn-like geometry, several scale features are used, some uniform and some non-uniform, to adjust the ring sizes. The scale feature is also used in conjunction with move body features to quickly make two larger size pumpkins from one small one. Multiple “Move/Copy Body” commands are used for translation or rotation of bodies and in some cases for creating extra solid bodies to fill in gaps in the cornucopia’s tail.

Other features include a combine, center line loft, and cut with surface. There are three revolves including a mid-plane revolve. There are multiple swept cuts including one with a twist, simulating a helical curve. “Insert, Part…” with the “Break link to original part” option is used to directly copy the original pumpkin features to save time, not having to recreate geometry from scratch without having any references back to the pumpkin part. Download this file to learn more about curve driven patterns, uniform and non-uniform scaling and how to copy and move solid bodies.

Download: Cornucopia
Complexity: Moderate
Features: Combine, Centerline Loft, Helical Curve, Curve Driven Patterns, and more!

View all the Part Reviewer Tutorials here.

DraftSight Download: In conjunction with DraftSight, Dassault Systèmes’ 2D CAD product, the 2D drawing(.dwg) file of the Cornucopia tutorial is now available for download here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Cornucopia Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at November 22, 2017 10:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cupix Maps 360 Photos To Create Immersive 3D Environments

Don’t let Cupix fool you. On the surface, it may look like any other 3D virtual tour content you’ve seen on real estate sites or hotel kiosks but Cupix is actually a complete web-based platform to map 360 photos to generate full 3D immersive environments.

Their approach is simple. Using an affordable 360 camera (like Ricoh Theta S or Insta360 Nano) you take a series of snapshots in the space you want to map. You load the photos into the Cupix Editor. This is where is gets full-on cray cray – Cupix constructs the camera locations, dense point cloud, optimized 3D mesh, and a textured model automatically, then gives you the capability to add 3D virtual objects, including text, frames, notes, allows you take measurements, then share it with others.

Jaw. Drop.

As if that wasn’t enough, there is no size limitation, you can match camera locations to blueprint for an interactive floorplan, and serve up customized web players. Here’s the overview that explains the process and shows you how Cupix approaches it differently.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/s5Fq6unqefU?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Now, since “3D virtual tour” helps people understand this a little better, you’ll see that mentioned on their website. In fact, you can view sample 3D virtual tours from the homepage of their website. Here’s one of my favorites which includes a floorplan view, hotspots, and 3D text.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="https://players.cupix.com/p/L7U3404Y" style="position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; height: 100%; width: 1px; min-width: 100%; *width: 100%;"></iframe>

 
A 3D virtual tour is good description for what you see above but with the data they’re grabbing, the mesh they’re able to construct and the geometry they’re able to introduce there’s room for immensely more. While that happens they’re introducing new features that take virtual tours to the next level. Last week, at Autodesk University, they previewed ‘4D Tour’ capaility that adds side-by-side, before and after comparison of 3D environments. Inside Cupix, it looks a bit like this:

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="540" id="video-91246-1" preload="metadata" width="960"><source src="https://www.solidsmack.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/cupix-4d-tour.mp4?_=1" type="video/mp4">https://www.solidsmack.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/cupix-4d-tour.mp4</video>

 
And here’s what the ability to add virtual objects currently looks like:
<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="1080" id="video-91246-2" preload="metadata" width="1920"><source src="https://www.solidsmack.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/cupix-add-virtual-objects.mp4?_=2" type="video/mp4">https://www.solidsmack.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/cupix-add-virtual-objects.mp4</video>

 
Now think of interactive overlays in the physical space, geometry recognition, model/product addition or function/fit capabilties. This could easily go well beyond Ben and Nancy looking at neat little virtual tours for their new home in the suburbs.

The team behind Cupix is the same team that created, team management and collaboration platform, TeamPlatform (acquired by 3D Systems) and, prior to that, 3D scanning software, Rapidform (acquired by 3D Systems) – Hmmm, a pattern emerges.

They’re just getting started here and it’s already unlike any 3D virtual tour capability I’ve ever seen. Keep an eye on Cupix and if you’re interested in trying this out to see what it’s capable of and where they’re headed you can get in on the beta here.

The post Cupix Maps 360 Photos To Create Immersive 3D Environments appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at November 22, 2017 09:48 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

The value of SOLIDWORKS Continuous Learning for your team

If you are like most of our customers you are always looking for ways to be more efficient.  You have invested in leading edge technology, modern facilities and manufacturing and fabrications equipment.

What about your People?  Are you tapping into the potential of your employees?  Pretty big asset.

SOLIDWORKS Continuous Learning

Continuous Learning

Javelin is in the engineering software business, providing SOLIDWORKS to thousands of companies across Canada.  There are some standout companies that leverage this investment through enabling their team members to harness the power of the technology.  Every release has hundreds of enhancements, if you upgrade every second release, it is overwhelming to imagine how to leverage the new functionality that you pay for through SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service.

Sir Richard Branson famously said:

“Train people well enough so they can leave, treat them well enough so they do not.”

As technology continues to improve SOLIDWORKS Continuous Learning is key and at Javelin we have developed a unique approach to team training that includes collaboration, best practices development for your company and leaving behind an on-boarding methodology.

There is also Canadian government funding available to help foster the continuous learning environment.

Learn more about our People Services and Contact Us to have a conversation about your training needs.

Contact us

The post The value of SOLIDWORKS Continuous Learning for your team appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Derryl Caillemer at November 22, 2017 09:15 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: ‘This Book Isn’t Safe’ by Garage Inventor Colin Furze

If you’re a SolidSmack regular around here (and let’s be honest—you probably are), then you’re no doubt familiar with one of our all-time favorite ‘garage inventors’, Colin Furze.

The five-time Guinness World Record Holder and YouTube’s undisputed king of crazy inventions have kept millions of viewers entertained with off-the-wall concepts that are both insane and functional—from The World’s Fastest Pram to a working Hoverbike. In total, his video process journals have earned him nearly 5 million YouTube subscribers and a staggering 450 million views.

Now, Furze wants to inspire a younger generation to find their own inner-wackiness through invention with his new (and first) book, This Book Isn’t Safe. With step-by-step instructions to build ten different inventions using a basic at-home toolkit, Furze peels back what it takes to become a successful garage inventor—all in safe fun.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NTYh6sIHKvE?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

This Book Isn’t Safe by Colin Furze — $12.64

Details:

  • Age Range: 8 – 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 – 7
  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Razorbill (September 12, 2017)
  • Language: English

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: ‘This Book Isn’t Safe’ by Garage Inventor Colin Furze appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 22, 2017 02:26 PM

Watch KUKA Industrial Robotic Arms Make Sweet Music in This Stunning Video

In other robotic and A.I. advancement news, robots aren’t just becoming all-terrain, hazard-traversing back-flipping machines; now they can play musical instruments just about as good as mathematically-precise humans, too.

Nigel Stanford, an ambient dance/ electronic musician, has repurposed a number of robotic arms for his newest album, Automatica. Designed and manufactured by KUKA, the robotic arms are traditionally used in automated manufacturing processes for precision-based accuracy.

No doubt, that absurd level of precision comes in handy when it comes to keeping the beat:

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yFUPeXTAY_E?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Nigel, who had relatively little experience with robotics before embarking on the project, preprogrammed the notes before the music video was shot. Each robotic arm has a specific task: from strumming the string of the bass guitar to hitting two keys on the piano. Using three robotic arms may not be the most efficient way to play the drums, but you have to admit—seeing them play in harmony is just about as cool as watching a human drummer bust out a solo.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tNu6PT7KKQg?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Oh and the finished music video?

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bAdqazixuRY?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Nigel plans on collaborating with KUKA for more Automatica’s music videos, so expect the metal musicians to play an encore soon.

Until then, you can check out Automatica and Nigel’s other albums, on his official webpage.

The post Watch KUKA Industrial Robotic Arms Make Sweet Music in This Stunning Video appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 22, 2017 02:07 PM

App Smack 47.17: Flyright, Manifest, Brightmind, and More…

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@www.solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/flyright/id1296706648?mt=8 (iOS — Free)

Flyright uses magic to collect critical information about international travel to over 200 unique countries and regions from trusted sources like the U.S. Dept. of State and presents it all in an easy-to-understand Trip Card.

Manifest – Smart Time Tracker (iOS – Free)

Manifest tracks your time and helps you set and achieve time-tracking goals. Make sure you spend the right amount of time on each of your projects!

Brightmind (iOS — Free)

Brightmind teaches you the meditation system developed by master teacher Shinzen Young. You can progress through a structured curriculum that allows you to tailor each lesson to your goals.

Indeed Job Search (Android — Free)

Find jobs using Indeed, the most comprehensive search engine for jobs.

Quick PDF Scanner (Android — Free)

Whether you’re sending receipts to your employer from the field or saving a magazine article for later, Quick PDF Scanner will help you scan and digitize your paper documents with ease.

Invoice & Estimate on the Go (Android — Free)

Invoice Simple is a fast and easy invoice app for sending invoices and estimates to your customers.

The post App Smack 47.17: Flyright, Manifest, Brightmind, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 22, 2017 01:54 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM Cleanup Tool

As you work with projects in SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM, your PDM working folder may come to have a very large number of files cached locally.  How can you determine which files are safe to remove  and which ones you may still be working on?

The best way to manage this is using the SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM Cleanup Tool.  This can be accessed by right clicking on the “My Workgroup PDM Documents” folder in the File Explorer area of the Workgroup PDM Task Pane and selecting “My SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM Cleanup…

The tool will review all files in the working folder and show if they are:

Older – This indicates that the revision of the file that is locally cached in the working folder is older than the latest one available in the vault.  These files would be safe to delete locally as this revision could always be retrieved again from the vault if needed.

Same – This indicates that the revision of the file that is locally cached in the working folder is identical to the latest one available in the vault.  These files would be safe to delete locally as this revision could always be retrieved again from the vault if needed.

Newer – This indicates that the file in the working folder has been modified is newer than the latest one checked into the vault.  These files should most likely not be deleted (unless you wish to start over) as this would cause a loss of work.

Not in Vault – This indicates that the file has never actually been checked into the vault.  These files should be reviewed and if they should be added to the vault this should be done before deleting the local copy (until the file is checked into the vault the first time, this is the only copy, so don’t delete it unless you are sure).

Conflict – This indicates that the local file has been modified in some way, however the file that was modified is older than the latest revision available in the vault.  This could happen for instance if I checked out a file, made changes and checked the file in to create revision 2 of the file.  However I then open the file and specify that I want to open revision 1 from the vault, then make changes again to revision 1.  This would result in a conflict which would need to be resolved to determine if this file is still valid to check back in or if I need to get revision 2 and make the changes to it.

SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM Cleanup

SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM Cleanup

Are you upgrading to SOLIDWORKS 2018?

NOTE: that SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM is not compatible with SOLIDWORKS 2018.

  • End of life for SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM products is SOLIDWORKS 2017 SP5.
  • SOLIDWORKS 2018 client is NOT compatible with a 2017 vault.
  • When the time comes to upgrade to SOLIDWORKS 2018, a migration from SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM to one of the other SOLIDWORKS PDM solutions will be required.

The post SOLIDWORKS Workgroup PDM Cleanup Tool appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at November 22, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

How a Master Wood Carver Overcame Substance Abuse Through Craft

Plagued by a loss of his Native American identity, booze, and drugs, Master carver Wayne Price was once a drifter who no longer had a connection to his warrior spirit.

Today, the Tlingit wood carver from Haines, Alaska calls upon thousands of years of his ancestry in the form of wood carving to help both himself and his community of fellow Native Americans around him.

From totem poles and dugout canoes to his own woodworking tools (an adze, a traditional Tlingit wood-carving tool used by his ancestors for thousands of years), Price is living proof that staying busy in your craft can truly be life-changing—no matter what situation you came from.

In this portrait of Price from director Jacob Rosenberg, we get a firsthand look at the warrior spirit that drives Price to create his incredible hand-carved pieces:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/238096496?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="800"></iframe>

You can read more about Price and see his pieces over at his website.

The post How a Master Wood Carver Overcame Substance Abuse Through Craft appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at November 22, 2017 11:00 AM

Launch Your First Product Idea with The Entrepreneur Training Bundle (95% Off)

When it comes to side projects, hours become days, days become weeks, and weeks can often become months or years. But what if getting a minimum viable product created could happen on a Saturday…assuming you aren’t building a flying car?

Many successful entrepreneurs have been touting the benefits of the 1-Day MVP—a one-day, all-out sprint to go from fresh idea to app or hardware prototype. Sure, some projects may take a little more energy and time than others, but having the process and infrastructure in place to successfully glide ideas along is what counts the most.

Which is exactly the premise behind the 1-Day MVP 2.0 online training course; one of seven courses bundled in Evan Kimbrell’s Business Launching Bundle.

From validating ideas to outsourcing menial tasks leading up to launch, the bundle covers just about everything you need to get that side project up and out the door. And for just the next 3 days, SolidSmack readers can save 95% off the retail price of $1,213 — that’s just $49 for the entire bundle.

Evan Kimbrell’s Business Launching Bundle

From Concept to Launch: Score an Amazing Mentor in This Silicon Valley Exec & Get 104 Hours of Guidance for Launching Your Business

Included Courses:

  • Intro to Entrepreneurship
  • Outsource Your Idea
  • Idea Validation
  • How to Come Up With Killer Business Ideas
  • 1-Day MVP 2.0: Go From Idea to Minimum Viable Product in One Day
  • Master Outsourcing
  • The Complete Guide to Running a Mobile App Development Biz

PURCHASE HERE

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by SolidSmack at November 22, 2017 06:28 AM

November 21, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Pumpkin Pie Spice Jar Tutorial – Part 4

The leaves are changing colors, football is in full swing (American football that is), and turkeys are finding themselves on edge. It’s fall, SOLIDWORKS users, and, in my opinion, the best part of the fall season is the smell of pumpkin pie in the air. We’re celebrating the season by bringing you a 4 part series where we’ll be modeling this pumpkin pie spice jar, complete with a custom threaded cap, living hinge, and decal.

SOLIDWORKS Pumpkin Pie Spice Jar tutorial

Welcome to the final part of our 4-part series where we are commemorating the Fall season by building the pumpkin pie spice jar. We can practically smell the spice in the air at this point! Let’s wrap up the design of the cap with a simple living hinge. We’ll run through the Thread tool again, add the perforations to the top using a unique patterning tool, and we’ll run through how to apply a custom decal to the outside of the part.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" gesture="media" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/P28Lc-olmHU?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

Miss the first videos in the series? View all of the tutorials in the series here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Pumpkin Pie Spice Jar Tutorial – Part 4 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at November 21, 2017 10:00 PM

SolidSmack

The DipClip Car Vent Sauce Holder is Both Ridiculous and Brilliant Product Design

File this one under strange but true.

The DipClip is—for all you fast food chicken nugget fans out there—a sauce dip holder that clips into just about any type of vehicle AC vent to make your sauce dippin’ culinary delight a hands-free experience.

Yes—just like the GPS or mobile phone mounts, BBQ, Ranch, and Honey Mustard have their own home on the vehicle dashboard now thanks to the group of three friends that make up Milkmen Design.

“At Milkmen Design we believe that dipping sauces were made to go with nuggets and fries,” explain the trio. “For generations, humans had to choose between making a mess in their vehicle or consuming bland, sauce-free food. We were tired of standing by idly as the perfect union of fries and nuggets, and the precious sauces that compliment them grew strained. So we created the DipClip to repair this relationship, reuniting ketchup with the french fry, and nugget with BBQ.”

<iframe frameborder="0" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/19375970/dipclip-a-cup-holder-for-your-sauce/widget/video.html" width="800"> </iframe>

But all joking aside, creating a versatile grip clip that can accommodate hundreds of different vehicle designs and dozens of different dip sauce container styles was not without its design challenges. After months of iterating and countless 3D printed prototypes, the team arrived at a final design with a universal vent mount that utilizes a 25% thicker gauge metal than a traditional vent mount typically uses.

The result is a securely fastened clip that can even withstand the extremes of “rally racing”:

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/avDL9JRcmgs?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

As for the sauce containers themselves, the DipClip can securely fit the four most commonly used sizes and shapes of sauce containers from McDonald’s, Burger King, Chick-fil-A, Wendy’s, KFC, Dairy Queen, Jack in the Box, Arby’s, Popeye’s, Sonic, Carl’s Jr., Hardee’s, and Heinz.

Yes, folks—this is an actual product. The guys currently have 595 backers on Kickstarter who have put forth over $12K to make the DipClip a reality—and there are still 45 days left to go in the $10K campaign.

If you’re serious about your sauce, $15 gets you two DipClips.

The post The DipClip Car Vent Sauce Holder is Both Ridiculous and Brilliant Product Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at November 21, 2017 03:09 PM

Migra Surfboard Bag | Smart Travel Gear for Surfers

The Migra surfboard bag is the brainchild of two friends who for more than fifteen years have travelled to remote islands in search of the perfect wave or “rip” as it’s call by surfers. While each destinations yielded a new thrill, the getting there left something to be desired. The biggest challenge they faced on every outing was safely transporting their toys! They needed adequate protection, as well as places to store peripheral gear. Shortly after a surf trip to the Philippines the two friends felt compelled to pool their talents to develop a surfboard bag. The goal was simple, design a bag that would have extra protection and be fully featured.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="360" id="video-91135-4" preload="metadata" width="640"><source src="https://ksr-video.imgix.net/projects/2540625/video-700955-h264_high.mp4?_=4" type="video/mp4">https://ksr-video.imgix.net/projects/2540625/video-700955-h264_high.mp4</video>

 

Designing and launching a product successfully can be a daunting task. Many ideas and dreams never gain enough footing to rise with the swell and be carried along into production. However, for Marco and Mirco, Migra’s founders, their passion for surfing, coupled with their collective talents of product designer and business manager, uniquely positioned them for success. The duo spent over two years developing the MIGRA bag seeking out the right materials, tuning the functionality, and insuring that the product was durable and of high quality. The project also received a huge boost by way of a successful Kickstarter campaign.  Without further ado let’s have a look at the design features that make the Migra surfboard product the bag to have.

Product Features

Product Details

 

Overall the design of the Migra Surfboard bag seems to be spot on. The solution is a nice blend of product protection, function, and design appeal. Pricing currently is around €189 which seems like a good price to value proposition. So if you are a surfer looking for that special bag to make travel easier and more organized, I’d say it would be worthwhile to give a serious look at getting your hands on a Migra!

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by Vince Haley at November 21, 2017 02:40 PM

Become a Raspberry Pi Jedi with This $34 Mastery Bundle

We’ve said it time and time again, but the Raspberry Pi is just so dang cool and we believe all designers and engineers should have one in their toolkit—if not on their desktop. While there is a bit of a slight learning curve, it’s nothing that today’s designers and engineers can’t handle on a leisurely Saturday.

So why not start now?

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle includes 8 courses to get started creating your very own Amazon Echo or even a ‘vintage’ streaming internet radio over a weekend. Throw in your own 3D printed housings, and the opportunities are limitless!

For a limited time, The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle is 96% off of the $865 retail price and can be purchased right here for a mere $34.

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle — $865 $34

Courses Included in the Bundle:

  • Automation with Raspberry Pi Zero
  • Introduction to Raspberry Pi
  • Hardware Projects Using Raspberry Pi
  • Bitcoin Mining Using Raspberry Pi
  • Raspberry Pi Robotics
  • Internet of Things Automation Using Raspberry Pi 2
  • Home Automation in 48 Hours Without Coding
  • Build Your Own ArmBot Step By Step Using Raspberry Pi Zero

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

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by SolidSmack at November 21, 2017 02:00 PM

Watch a Steel Chain Glow Red Hot and Snap from a Ridiculously High Electrical Current

Electricity does way more than light up your home and toast your Pop Tarts; it’s raw power which, when improperly used, can lead to some extremely dangerous—and highly entertaining—science experiments.

The guys at Photonicinduction know this all too well.

Their YouTube channel is filled with videos of overpowered transformers being used on everyday objects.

In their video ‘Steel Chain VS Electrical Current’, for example, the guys set a high current through through an industrial steel chain—bringing it to a state of glowing red hot:

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0cfu0b1UxlI?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Once the chain is ready for conduction, they start off small by using a 30-volt locomotive charger and setting a current through the steel by using jumper cables. The chain sets a couple of sparks and emits a bit of heat, but otherwise remains intact at 30 volts. It also starts to glow red and stick to other parts of the chain.

Seeing as this wasn’t the exciting effect they were hoping for, they up the voltage with a 50-volt transformer. The results are far more noticeable this time: the chain glows a brighter red, more sparks emit from the metal, and it starts to visibly contort in some parts.

The chain eventually snaps from the heat and starts welding itself together, making it look like the hottest metallic noodle you ever did see.

Photonicinduction’s YouTube channel has a ton more videos which use even higher voltages to achieve more spectacular results (like setting 20,000 watts onto an unsuspecting light bulb). Be sure to check them out for all your abusive electrical needs!

The post Watch a Steel Chain Glow Red Hot and Snap from a Ridiculously High Electrical Current appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 21, 2017 01:26 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Setting a limit for Microsoft SQL Standard Memory Usage

Microsoft SQL Server doesn’t share it’s toys well with others.  By default, SQL Server Standard will dynamically use up memory based on what resources are available.  As a result, it’s fairly common for it to take up ALL available memory on a system and not release it back until the service is restarted.  However there are generally other processes running, not to mention the operating system itself, that will run out of memory due to SQL’s greedy ways.  This will sometimes result in performance issues and instability.

The way to address this is to limit the amount of memory that Microsoft SQL Standard is allowed to use.  By default this limit is set to 2TB of RAM, which is what allows SQL Server Standard to think it can use up all resources.

This limit is set by going to the SQL Server Management Studio and right clicking on the instance name at the top of the Object Explorer and going to “Properties”.

SQL Server Management Studio Properties

SQL Server Management Studio Properties

Go to the “Memory” page and see the “Maximum server memory”.

Microsoft SQL Standard Memory Limit

Maximum Server Memory

PLEASE NOTE:  This only applies to SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional vaults.  SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard uses Microsoft SQL Express, which is limited to only use 1GB of RAM.

So how much RAM should SQL be allowed to use?

Well that depends on a few factors.

  1. Is this server dedicated for hosting just the SQL Database for PDM or is it also hosting the PDM Archive Server service?  If it’s also hosting the  Archive Server service then we will need to hold back about 500MB of RAM for that service.
  2. Is there any other software running on this server?  There shouldn’t be.  SOLIDWORKS highly recommends that the server hosting the PDM Server services be dedicated for that purpose, however if that is not possible for your situation, you will need to determine what other programs are running on this server and what their RAM requirements should be.
  3. Are there any other SQL instances running on this server?  If the SQL server is only hosting SOLIDWORKS PDM then you won’t need to worry about this, but if there are multiple instances for other softwares, then each instance will need to be configured so that they share the available memory.  So for instance if you have 3 SQL instances and determine there is only 10GB of memory that should be made available for SQL, that memory will need to be distributed among each of the instances, setting the maximum value on each so that the total does not exceed the available memory.

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by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at November 21, 2017 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS World 2018 Agenda is Now Live

Are you interested in learning new skills and best practices that might advance your career? Would you like to master new tips and tricks to overcome everyday challenges? Maybe you’d like to become the in-house expert on model-based definition (MBD) or designing products for the IoT? If you answered yes to any of those questions, it’s time to register for SOLIDWORKS World 2018, taking place at the Los Angeles Convention Center in Los Angeles, California, February 4th through the 7th.

SOLIDWORKS World veterans know that the popular, hands-on sessions fill up fast. To make it easier for those who are already registered to attend SOLIDWORKS 2018, online session scheduling is now available for full conference registrants. Don’t delay; register today to get your pick of sessions. You can find the SOLIDWORKS World 2018 agenda here.

Choose your Learning Path

To make SOLIDWORKS World 2018 an even more personalized, hands-on experience that’s completely focused on your industry and interest, we have completely revamped how the breakout sessions are organized.

To start you’ll pick one of eleven Disciplines, which include: Data Management, Manufacturing (featuring SOLIDWORKS CAM), ECAD or MCAD, and many more. Next, you’ll choose a Learning Path, customizing your experience even further with choices like Additive Manufacturing Symposium, Integrated Design and Manufacturing, Rise of Smart Connected Products, and several others.

With a Discipline and Learning Path established, you can choose from a host of breakout sessions that are specifically geared towards you and your interests—ensuring you get the absolute most out of your time at SOILDWORKS World 2018. And, don’t worry, if there’s a session that interests you but isn’t offered through your Learning Path, there are still opportunities to attend.

  • Pick a Discipline –Whether you’re interested in Simulation, Visualization, Partnerships, New Products, Education and Research, or many others, there’s a Discipline available that speaks directly to your needs and interests.
  • Choose a Learning Path—Within your Discipline path there are several learning paths: Model Based Enterprises, Smart Products, Additive Manufacturing, and more. There’s so much to learn and explore, all based around your particular interests.
  • Sign up for sessions—From Topology Studies, to learning how to solve impossible modeling challenges, to exploring Zen and the art of SOLIDWORKS Surfacing, there’s hundreds of amazing sessions waiting to give you the hands-on training you’ve come to expect from SOLIDWORKS World.

What are you waiting for? Register today for the world’s largest gathering of SOLIDWORKS users to learn the skills today that will help you design the great products of tomorrow faster than ever.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS World 2018 Agenda is Now Live appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at November 21, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | Enter 4D

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll get the groove going with “4 U” from Hoops before diving into sweet melodies from Henry Hall, Shamir, Sunflower Bean, Youth Lagoon, and others before wrapping up with “Ultimate Painting” from Ultimate Painting. Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/3y5wKNm8JszTXzjmBiShOA" width="100%"></iframe>

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by SolidSmack at November 21, 2017 11:00 AM

Cool Tools of Doom: ‘The 3D Printing Handbook’ by 3D Hubs

Since screaming on to the rapid prototyping scene in 2013, 3D Hubs has been relentless in making sure their message is heard. Billed as the “AirBnB of 3D Printing”, the company’s business model is based on experienced 3D printer technicians renting out their equipment to other users on a per-project-basis.

Not surprisingly, the 3D Hubs crew has learned a thing or two about what makes for “good design for 3D printing” — and now, they want to share it with all of us.

Released just this week, The 3D Printing Handbook | Technologies, Design, and Applications was written for design and engineering professionals looking to master the key aspects of 3D printing—from connecting parts to internal radius’—and everything in between.

The 3D Printing Handbook by 3D Hubs — $29.00 (Limited Time)

Features:

  • Insights into the mechanism behind all major 3D printing technologies
  • An understanding of the benefits and limitations of each technology
  • Decision-making tools for technology selection
  • Actionable design advice and guidelines
    Industry case studies from world-leading brands

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: ‘The 3D Printing Handbook’ by 3D Hubs appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 21, 2017 09:29 AM

November 20, 2017

SolidSmack

TechShop Closing Makes Dan Weep Sad Tears

tech shop

Washington DC is not known for a being a manufacturing town, which is why I was so surprised when I first heard that TechShop was opening a location here in Spring 2014. When I went on a tour I was smiling ear to ear in wide-eyed disbelief. Had I won a golden ticket? How is this massive warehouse full of hi-tech machines opening in such a high rent area? It seemed too good to be true. It was like a vegan burrito and cold brew coffee cart started following me around for no reason. How and why is this happening? Am I at the center of an elaborate prank? Wait. Am I dead? I decided not to over analyze it.

A little over two years ago I was laid off for the first time in my career. I spent the next few days doing the classic panic induced resume update and application blitzkrieg. After a few days the shock passed, the realization settled in, and I thought, what to do now?

Enter TechShop.

I dove in. At first, I was all business. It was a place for me to update my skills and keep my mind (and body) busy. TechShop provided me a respite. As I went more and started to take it a little easier on myself, I got to know people and began to socialize both inside and outside the shop. It was a place full of super cool, interesting, and like-minded people. Eventually, it became my Cheers, and I its Norm.

Dan Slaski

I got a job within a few months. Coincidentally, it was right across the street from TechShop. At my new workplace, I was able to immediately utilize many of the skills and tools I had just gained access to and made a great first impression. I was also able to continue going to TechShop for learning, working projects, and just hanging out.

While my story is unique, I’m sure there are many similar stories. I read “The Maker Manifesto”, a book which talks about the history and promise of Techshop, the maker movement, and tells many stories of its members. Such as stories of popular products launched from the spaces, tales of people who take “maker vacations”, and others who reinvented their careers and lives through TechShop.

TechShop has an atmosphere.

Alternative music is usually playing, tables are strewn with projects in various states, some people diligently working, and others talking shop or shooting the breeze. All surrounded by unique scent combinations wafting through the air (like popcorn and wood stain). In one sense, it’s like a giant dorm room. Legitimate signs make users aware of machine dangers while others warn of robots and/or raptors. There is a feeling of youthful exuberance, but not in the way that would normally annoy me. I would work at TechShop instead of my office (under the guise of monitoring a 3d print) because I was motivated by the upbeat and lively spirit.

I worked on all sorts of projects there. I did massive remodeling projects for my home, side hustle product designs, gifts, and art for no reason other than I had ideas I had to get out. I even (bless her heart) took a date there to make holiday ornaments on the laser cutter.

Now please allow me to rant.

There were many things that could have been improved and I strongly believe that TechShop should have made it. The problem was this: they did not apply the DIY grassroots methodology they promoted to their own business practices.

It was not open source. Three things seemed obvious to me but were missing. They could have 1) collaborated with the makers and a marketplace to sell their goods 2) a tiered payment system for those who don’t need full access 3) Made it accessible, not just to the handful of designer/engineers like myself but, to a wider audience by finding a way to make it feel less intimidating and prohibitive.

The reservations system was unquestionably abysmal. The only way, to the great frustration of members and employees, to make an equipment reservation was to call in. If they had allowed (or better yet challenged) the community to solve this I guarantee they would have had, for free, an awesome online reservation system and app… that likely would have contained a space unicorn. But the philosophy seemed to be one where the community was welcome to be creative within the static and defined bounds they imposed.

My message to makerspaces of the future is simple: allow the passionate, talented, and creative people who love the place to contribute to improving and evolving it.”

They had a loyal legion of fans at their beck and call. A community of people that inherently questions the status quo and are driven to go to extraordinary lengths when they see needs that aren’t being met. They did not apply a prototyping mentality to iterate on successes and failures. My message to makerspaces of the future is simple: allow the passionate, talented, and creative people who love the place to contribute to improving and evolving it.

Most of the people who worked there were awesome. They seemed perpetually upbeat and helpful despite the inefficiencies. When socializing with their employees (dream consultants), I would hear variations of the sentiment that the only reason they stayed, despite being able to make more money elsewhere, was for the people and the environment.

Yes. I am sad for myself.

I will no longer have this fun and inspirational place. The time and money I spent getting certified on specific machines are largely lost. TechShop was my backup plan, if I was to lose my job again, and provided me a sense of security just to know it was there. For me, like others who utilized the space, the value was unprecedented. I had access to tools for consulting work or design, for selling products or rebuilding a career when a job was lost.

Yes. I am upset for others.

The employees, those who relied on TechShop’s tools to run their businesses, those trying to launch something new, the people for whom it was their second home, and all those future people who won’t get to experience the creative playground that was TechShop. TechShop was an amazing place for entrepreneurs, inventors, and startups. It also welcomed a wide variety of eccentrics with the common thread of passion for making, doing more with their free time than sitting around.

There are other makerspaces, and new ones will rise up to fill the gap. We will continue to create. We will go back to our basements, garage shops and lairs and use our 3D printers and Dremel tools to make. But the failure of the most recognized, publicized and hyped makerspace will give those who are skeptical of the validity and future of the movement something to point at. This is a big setback to the maker movement.

Be a creator, not a spectator.

The post TechShop Closing Makes Dan Weep Sad Tears appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Dan Slaski at November 20, 2017 05:16 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Preparing for a Multi-Release Upgrade Between SOLIDWORKS Versions

Is it the Correct Time for Me to Upgrade? Customers upgrade their SOLIDWORKS licenses for a manner of reasons. Those same reasons may be identical to the reasoning that another company or organization chooses not to upgrade.

As the old adage goes “If it ain’t broke – don’t fix it”, and this approach by and large works for many customers who do not have need of the latest feature-set available within the very latest releases.

Eventually there comes a time when an upgrade does need to occur, in many cases this is due to the end of life support for operating systems or other complementary software that may be on your workstation.

SOLIDWORKS Multiple Version Upgrade

SOLIDWORKS Multiple Version Upgrade

If you DO find yourself in a spot and needing to make a considerable leap between versions of SOLIDWORKS, here are a few questions to consider:

Do I need to have both versions of SOLIDWORKS installed on the same computer?

  • It is not necessary to install the older release on the same computer as the new release in order to convert the files.

Should I backup my OLD SOLIDWORKS files before I begin any upgrade process?

  • You should have a complete backup of your files as they were stored in the “Older” release of SOLIDWORKS. This backup should be current, validated and be stored somewhere safe so that no process can inadvertently upgrade the files without your knowledge or prior consent.  Once you have established a safe fall-back position you can proceed forward into your upgrade with confidence.

Should I install any “Incremental” releases in order to upgrade my files in a few different steps?

  • It is recommended that the jump be a direct jump without any intermediate steps.
  • The only thing intermediate steps would accomplish is to tell us what release of SOLIDWORKS a particular feature was moved by the developers at SOLIDWORKS.
  • This may be Interesting for software development history, however not overly useful for a customer converting files.

Will there be errors in my parts or assemblies once I upgrade them to the new release?

  • THERE WILL BE rebuild errors, this is likely unavoidable as the rebuild tools have incorporated additional advanced error checking in later releases.
  • Some checks that would have only been performed with the “Verification on Rebuild” setting, are now performed in the main rebuild command (CTRL+B)
  • Rebuild errors will need to be addressed in the cases where they happen to cause issues with downstream models or drawings.
  • THERE WILL LIKELY be Equation and custom property errors as both of those areas of SOLIDWORKS have undergone changes over the years of SOLIDWORKS Development.

Can my files be upgraded Automatically?

  • You can use the Task Scheduler or similar functionality within your PDM vault to upgrade your files automatically.
  • One approach is to upgrade the files as needed, and address any errors as the files enter re-use.

The questions noted above are but a small portion of the questions that should be asked and considered before an multi-release upgrade is undertaken.

For a full discussion, please contact our support team so that we can guide you appropriately through the transition!

The post Preparing for a Multi-Release Upgrade Between SOLIDWORKS Versions appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at November 20, 2017 05:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: The FINEX Cast Iron Skillet

When it comes to kitchen tools, some things are worth investing in for the long haul. Sure—a good knife and cutting board set definitely make that list. But so does a great cast iron skillet—arguably one of the most versatile kitchen tools you’ll ever own. But like so many other tools both in the workshop and the kitchen—no two are created equally.

With a patented octagonal “multi-pour” design and an ultra-polished surface, this cast iron skillet from Portland, Oregon-based FINEX is the searing machine of your dreams.

While many other cast iron skillet designs don’t feature a separated handle from the pan, FINEX has implemented an ergonomic “speed cool” spring handle. Best of all, this modern take on the classic kitchen tool comes with a Good Forever guarantee—so you’ll never have to go back to cooking boring steaks and eggs again.

FINEX 8″ Cast Iron Skillet – $130.00

Features:

  • Pre-seasoned with organic flaxseed oil —ready for use
  • Polished, ultra-smooth pan surface for natural non-stick performance
  • Speed Cool stainless steel handle—no need for oven mitts on the stovetop
  • Handcrafted in the USA
  • Good Forever Guarantee

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The FINEX Cast Iron Skillet appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 20, 2017 04:34 PM

Boston Dynamics’ Atlas is the Start of a Jumping Robot Invasion

It was only a matter of time before robots got a 21st century upgrade. No longer do they fumble around on quadrupedal legs or struggle with more dexterous tasks. Now, these robots can grab objects, traverse uneven terrain on two legs, and now, even leap up to dangerously tall heights.

We all knew this was coming; we just didn’t expect it to come so soon.

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Watching Boston Dynamics’ bipedal Atlas in action is downright scary when you realize these hulking pieces of metal and electronics are catching up to the capabilities of the most physically-fit human beings. The robots’ control system coordinates arm, torso, and leg movement to increase the body’s manipulation and coordination (just like a person’s brain). This whole-body manipulation lets the robot do a variety of things at once; it can walk while opening doors, carry objects up to 11kg and transport them, and adjust itself when it is bullied by its human masters.

The hardware used in Atlas is constructed via 3D printing, while the limbs are hydraulically actuated and use sensors located throughout its body to balance itself. LIDAR and stereo sensors lodged in its noggin are used to avoid obstacles while Atlas is in motion. The version in the video above stands at around 5’9” tall and weighs 180 lbs.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fRj34o4hN4I?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

A recent update on Boston Dynamics’ YouTube channel shows the robot can now jump different heights and even SOMERSAULT before landing gracefully – which is something not every person can do.

While Atlas won’t be joining the Olympics or doing parkour in urban areas anytime soon, the coordination shown by the robot outclasses a lot of clumsy people (myself included). Atlas will most likely not be available for commercial release (not everyone is ready to welcome a new species into society just yet), but it sure is a big leap for robotics.

The post Boston Dynamics’ Atlas is the Start of a Jumping Robot Invasion appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 20, 2017 04:07 PM

Master the Bézier Curve in a Weekend with This Graphic Design Bootcamp

It’s not always easy to juggle multiple hats in the design and engineering worlds—but if there is a common language that will likely end up saving you a lot of time and frustration down the road, it’s having g basic knowledge of visual communication.

While nobody can become an Aaron Draplin overnight, having a strong grasp on the fundamentals of color theory and layout could easily make or break your projects—particularly when communication specific details to stakeholders. Thankfully, you don’t need to go back to design school to get started with leveling up your visual communication game.

From setting up an Adobe Creative Cloud environment to building a portfolio website, the Graphic Design Bootcamp will accelerate your design sense and assist in further leveling up your existing design or engineering know-how. Best of all, SolidSmack readers can purchase the course for just $15—that’s 88% off the retail price of $125.00.

Graphic Design Bootcamp – $125 $15 (88% Off)

Features:

  • Access 65 lectures & 8 hours of content 24/7
  • Learn how to create pixel-perfect projects for print & web
  • Download all project files to use as references
  • Communicate in a private Facebook group w/ other students to share projects & critique work

GET IT!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
StackSocial Amazon

The post Master the Bézier Curve in a Weekend with This Graphic Design Bootcamp appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 20, 2017 03:54 PM

The Monday List 47.17 | What We’re Reading This Week

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

China’s Revealing Spin on the ‘Sharing Economy’

China’s cities are suddenly teeming with bicycles, and the humble one-speed, that remnant of China’s collective memory, again serves as more than just a means of conveyance.

How a Millennial Is Keeping a 100-Year-Old Eyewear Brand On-Trend

Zack Moscot doubles down on new designs, brick-and-mortar stores for his family’s century-old glasses company.

Meet One of New York’s Best Professional D&D Dungeon Masters

Timm Woods brings an infectious aura of fun to his sessions as a professional D&D dungeon master.

How to Save a Knocked-Out Tooth

“The idea is to get the tooth back in the mouth as quickly as possible,” says Gene Solmundson, the dentist for the Winnipeg Jets of the National Hockey League.

Hamburger Emoji War: Why Is Apple Right?

Where should the cheese be in a burger?

A Notch Above

The other day, I picked up the iPhone X and felt nothing. Not in the literal sense, more in the philosophical sense. It was the first time I had held the device and not explicitly thought about the fact that I was holding an iPhone X.

The post The Monday List 47.17 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 20, 2017 03:49 PM

This Clever Water Bottle Design Leverages Centuries-Old Japanese Filtering Tech

A long time ago, I learned I could use my campfire charcoal to filter any questionable water sources if no other water was available. Not surprisingly, charcoal can have a profound effect on softening ordinary tap water, too.

London-based design firm Black+Blum recently designed an interesting (BPA free) water bottle to take advantage of a specific type of charcoal called Binchotan, which has been used for cooking and filtering water since the Edo period (1603).

The secret of the charcoal is its ability to soften water, add minerals such as calcium, potassium, and magnesium and absorb certain chemicals such as chlorine. It accomplishes this due to the numerous tiny pores scattered all over its surface area, which attract the positive ions found in some contaminants. Those contaminants stay locked in the carbon, allowing it to filter water for a lifespan of around six months and then can be recharged just by boiling it in water for an hour or more.

While you can use Binchotan in any container, Black+Blum have designed a modern polymer bottle, known as the Eau Good Duo, which allows you to lock the charcoal in place—rather than have it float loosely—and locks by merely squeezing the bottle’s sides. They’ve also included an infuser cap; allowing users to put fruit and herbs in the container that won’t make you feel like you’re eating a salad every time you take a sip. The bottle also features a leak-proof cap that functions much like push/pull spout tops found on many water bottles, although Black+Blum’s design is more robust and made out of sturdy rubber.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1415311456/eau-good-duo-the-ultimate-water-filter-and-infuser/widget/video.html" width="800"> </iframe>

Black+Blum is currently crowd-funding their Eau Good Dou bottle on Kickstarter, and those looking to get their hands on one can pledge $31 or more, which nets you the bottle plus one Binchotan filter (you get more with higher pledges).

The post This Clever Water Bottle Design Leverages Centuries-Old Japanese Filtering Tech appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at November 20, 2017 02:46 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Collecting information for SOLIDWORKS PDM Support

When you are encountering issues using SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional or Standard, the first thing that your Value Added Reseller’s SOLIDWORKS PDM Support technician will want to review in most cases are the log files, from both the local client and the server.

Thankfully, this information and more can be very easily gathered and packaged up using the Collect Support Information Wizard that is available on all client installations of SOLIDWORKS PDM (this is available for PDM Professional and PDM Standard vaults, for CAD Editor, Contributor or Viewer clients).  Here are the steps to use this important support tool:

STEP 1:  On the client system that is encountering the issue, launch the SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration program.  Right click on the vault name in the list and select “Collect Support Information …

Collecting information for SOLIDWORKS PDM Support

Collecting information for SOLIDWORKS PDM Support

STEP 2:  To use the Collect Support Information wizard, you must log into the Administration tool as the admin account.

STEP 3 Collect Logs and Settings On this screen, leave all items checked and click “Next>“.

NOTE:  If you encounter any issues or errors after Step 7 when generating the package, return to this screen and try unchecking any of the items that failed.  If you have to perform this change, make sure to bring it to the attention of your PDM support technician.

STEP 4 Collect Archives The wizard can be used to collect Archives of specific files or folders in the vault.  Unless you have been specifically instructed to include these files by your support technician, you can skip this step for now and click “Next>

STEP 5 Create SQL Backup:  The wizard can be used to trigger the creation of a backup file for the SQL database.  Unless you have been asked for an SQL backup file, there is no need to generate the file now.  Leave the option “Do not create a backup file” selected and click “Next>

STEP 6 Add Additional Information:  On this screen you can enter any additional comments or description of the issue that you wish to communicate to the PDM support technician.  If you have already described the issue to them, then you can simply leave this blank and click “Next>

STEP 7 Create Package Click “Browse” next to the output file path text box and select a Folder and File name for the .zip file that will be created for by the wizard.  Once this is set, click “Finish” and the

STEP 8:  Once the package is complete, send the .zip file to your PDM support technician.

The post Collecting information for SOLIDWORKS PDM Support appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at November 20, 2017 01:00 PM

November 19, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

What’s New 2018 – Smart Extract in SOLIDWORKS Inspection

By Olly Washington, SOLIDWORKS Inspection Specialist

“We don’t create inspection documentation because it takes too long.”

This is an all too common statement that I hear from Engineers, yet many are unaware that create accurate industry standard Inspection Documentation does not have to be a long and laborious process.

“We don’t use SOLIDWORKS so we cannot use SOLIDWORKS Inspection.”

Well, this statement is not true, and this year SOLIDWORKS have made Inspection even more accessible to those using different software. DWGs are now fully supported in the standalone application. Essentially, Inspection documentation is now a 3 step process:

  1. Import a DWG, TIFF, or PDF file
  2. Simply click the characteristics to capture them using the new to 2018 Smart Capture tool
  3. Export to create a ballooned drawing and an Inspection Report.

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Inspection Report

You may be thinking, it’s probably a bit more involved than that, but it actually isn’t. With Smart Capture you can Grab all those pesky but essential tolerance dimensions; Geometric Tolerances; Notes and Document Properties and it automatically builds up your ballooned drawings and an accurate zero error Inspection report.

Zero Error? Absolutely, Yes.

In my days as an Inspector in the F1 industry, I was forever either trying to interpret my Engineer’s dodgy at best, dangerous at worst, inspection documentation. Riddled with errors because the limits were calculated manually, often on the back of an envelope before being carelessly plugged in to Excel. Don’t get me wrong, they were great Engineers, just creating Inspection Documentation was, and still is, a chore, that folk want to get out of as quickly as possible. This is totally understandable as collecting all those tolerances, all those GD&Ts, can literally take hours for one project. Never mind the time added if there was a revision! Surely its far better for Engineer’s to spend their time create those fantastic intricate and novel designs, not spending hours on Inspection reports.

So using the new Smart Capture Capabilities in SOLIDWORKS Inspection 2018, make capturing each characteristic quick, accurate, and easy, just one click for each characteristic. As the Limits and all the dimension type information is grabbed automatically, one click creates a fully propagated characteristic which is ready for your Inspection Report.

SOLIDWORKS 2018 - Inspection Report

 

Well, now you can create zero error documentation in just a few clicks of the mouse, from any DWG Drawing, as well as the PDF and TIFF functionality that SOLIDWORKS Inspection already uses. You can even update revisions quickly and easily! Don’t take my word for it, watch this video where I go from a plain relatively informative single sheet DWG to a fully annotated Ballooned drawing and Inspection Report in Under 5 minutes.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" gesture="media" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/IcLGKTaUUzc?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

Author information

NT CADCAM
NT CADCAM is the UK's most established SolidWorks reseller in England, Scotland and Wales. Offering a fully supported CAD and CAM product portfolio and high levels of expertise internally, makes NT CADCAM unique within the SolidWorks community, giving customers the confidence and assurance they need that their support issues will be dealt with both promptly and efficiently. As a SolidWorks Certified Training Centre, NT CADCAM provides clients with fully certified and accredited trainers who are experienced engineers.

The post What’s New 2018 – Smart Extract in SOLIDWORKS Inspection appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by NT CADCAM at November 19, 2017 10:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Managing large SOLIDWORKS PDM file lists more effectively

When working with large file sets in SOLIDWORKS PDM, the file list generated for actions such as Check Outs, Check Ins and Transitions can get quite long and potentially difficult to manage.

For instance to Check Out an entire file set of several hundred files, it would take quite a bit of time to check the box beside each file, one at a time.

SOLIDWORKS PDM file lists

SOLIDWORKS PDM file lists

Thankfully, there is no need to perform such a tedious process.  Simply Right Click on any file in the list and select “Check Out All Files“.  This will check the Checkout box for each file in the list that can be checked out by you.

Check out all files

Check out all files

 

What is really great about this command is that it’s actually a toggle, so performing it again when all files are checked will uncheck them all.  So as an example, if you are performing a Transition on a file, but don’t want to Transition the entire file set, you can use the “Change State on All Files” command to uncheck all the files, then individually select the file or files that you do want to Transition.

Change state on all files

Change state on all files

The post Managing large SOLIDWORKS PDM file lists more effectively appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at November 19, 2017 05:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Welcome to SOLIDWORKS 2018

The release of SOLIDWORKS 2018 last month unveiled a brand new Welcome window that appears once the program is launched. This new window is packed full of useful links and tips. Starting on the Home tab, you can quickly launch a new file or open a recent document. It also has links to some online resources, including the Customer Portal and SOLIDWORKS Forum, as well as a list of tips at the bottom about ways to improve efficiency in SOLIDWORKS.

The new Welcome dialog also contains an extremely handy learning resources tab. The Learn tab contains links to enhance your SOLIDWORKS knowledge, from built in tutorials, to MySolidWorks Training and even a link to the Certification page. This tab has the tools to make anyone a SOLIDWORKS power user.

The last tab in the Welcome dialog is the Alerts tab. This tab provides valuable information on technical alerts about the SOLIDWORKS product suite. These alerts are links to gather more information on topics such as identified bugs or issues, as well as new software release dates and availability.

To open the welcome window after the initial launch, simply click on the new home shaped icon next to the New document icon on the menu bar shortcuts.

The new home screen is a great addition to SOLIDWORKS 2018, welcoming users to the exciting new features within.

Author information

CADimensions
We are an authorized SOLIDWORKS and Stratasys reseller with certified training & support centers located in New York and Pennsylvania, USA. We are 100% focused on living a CADLIFE and have our vendor's unconditional endorsement in the sales and support of their products.

The post Welcome to SOLIDWORKS 2018 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CADimensions at November 19, 2017 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Copy Link in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018

A great new feature in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 is the ability to generate a hyperlink to any file in the vault through the Right Click Menu.

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 Copy Link

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 Copy Link

Simply right-click on any file, and go to the new Copy Link command.

This will copy a hyperlink to the file’s location to your clipboard.

This link can then be pasted into any document, such as a spreadsheet, or can be sent to another user by email.  For that user to then access the file, they will need to have (1) a vault view created on their computer and (2) “Read File Contents” permissions for both the folder and state that the file is currently in.

Paste in email message

Paste in email message

The post Copy Link in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at November 19, 2017 01:00 PM

November 18, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Working with Assigned Folder Permissions in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 now allows Administrators greater flexibility and control when working with Assigned Folder Permissions.

Previously, each folder had to be assigned permissions one at a time.  Starting with 2018 however, multiple folders can be selected at a time and their permissions set.

To select multiple folders you can either:

  • Hold down Ctrl and click to select multiple individual folders.
  • Hold down Shift and click to select multiple folders in order together.
  • Left Click and Drag to select multiple folders.
Assigned Folder Permissions

Assigned Folder Permissions

 

When multiple folders are selected, the Permissions checkboxes may display one of three different ways:

An empty check box:  This indicates that this permission has not been set on any of the selected folders.

A check box filled with a green square:  This indicates that the permission has been set on at least one of the selected folders.

A checked box:  This indicates that the permission has been set on all of the selected folders.

The post Working with Assigned Folder Permissions in SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at November 18, 2017 05:00 PM

Apply a Bounding Box to any Model using SOLIDWORKS 2018

Let’s take a look at a common scenario that crops up after a design is complete – the design of packaging!

Item to be packaged

Item to be packaged

While some designers may be savvy and experienced enough to embark on their own packaging design, others will need to speak to someone with some expertise in the packaging arena.  One of the first questions that will be asked from the packaging designer will most surely be “How large is the Item”.

While this question could throw us into a wide variety of discussion topics, I am going to focus us on the super-practical aspects of getting an immediate report upon a volume of a box that encloses my part.

In order to perform this operation in prior releases of SOLIDWORKS, one would have had to be working with a weldment or sheet metal component in order to make use of the “Bounding Box” functionality.  This tool has been brought into the mainstream in SOLIDWORKS 2018 as you can make it available from it’s location within the reference geometry toolbar.

Upon entering a few quick values, taking an automated approach or judging the enclosed area against a custom reference surface or plane. We can choose weather or not we would want hidden bodies or surfaces included in the bounding box envelope.

The resulting bounding box will leave a feature within the model’s feature tree, just below the origin of the part.

As you may have expected, our bounding box for this particular component, turned out to be something like this:

SOLIDWORKS Bounding Box

SOLIDWORKS Bounding Box applied

The unexpected bonus to the “Bounding Box” tool is the reported dimensions that are carried into the Configuration Specific Tab of the Custom Property Manager!

Configuration specific properties

Configuration specific properties

With the values reported within the Custom Property Dialog, they should also be available for varied use throughout the rest of the designers work with the component.

Thank you for taking a look at our SOLIDWORKS 2018 content, check back often for additional updates and articles on new and existing SOLIDWORKS functionality.

The post Apply a Bounding Box to any Model using SOLIDWORKS 2018 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at November 18, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 46.17

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee, and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top ten stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

Watch How Artist James Lake Approaches Cardboard as His Medium of Choice

Cardboard generally isn’t the first material that comes to mind when discussing sculptures, models, and prototypes—but legions of designers and artists have shown us otherwise. From quick and dirty product models to functional skateboards, it’s difficult to imagine what can’t be made with a little creativity.

Industrial Designer Eric Strebel Demonstrates His Process for Low Volume Manufacturing

Product design whiz Eric Strebel is at it again – this time with his personal guide on how to create a small batch of 200 vacuum-formed panels for display at a car show.

Watch a Mesmerizing 148,777-Piece Super Mario Domino Mural Collapse

Who could ever dislike Mario? The virtual plumber has been capturing the hearts of gamers worldwide since his first appearance in the 1981 classic, Donkey Kong, and has become synonymous with the video game industry as a whole.

Lenovo Launches New Lineup of Impressive Workstations for 3D Professionals

Just in time for Autodesk University this week in Las Vegas, Lenovo announced some welcome new additions to their ThinkStation and ThinkPad product line. In particular, an exciting new mobile workstation offering for 3D professionals on-the-go.

Toy Maker: A New 3D Printing App for Kids (And Inspiration for Developers)

AstroPrint is on a roll. They’re announcing the release of another app today that does two things for 3D printing. Toy Maker is a free app that 1) introduces kids to the world of 3D printing and 2) introduces developers to the capabilities of AstroPrint’s Cloud platform.

Facing Bankruptcy, TechShop (Sadly) Closes All 14 Locations

When they hit the scene back in 2006, the TechShop business model had everything going for it: a fitness gym-like membership program for the use of manufacturing and other shop equipment.

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 46.17 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 18, 2017 09:00 AM

November 17, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Pumpkin Pie Spice Jar Tutorial – Part 3

The leaves are changing colors, football is in full swing (American football that is), and turkeys are finding themselves on edge. It’s fall, SOLIDWORKS users, and, in my opinion, the best part of the fall season is the smell of pumpkin pie in the air. We’re celebrating the season by bringing you a 4 part series where we’ll be modeling this pumpkin pie spice jar, complete with a custom threaded cap, living hinge, and decal.

SOLIDWORKS Pumpkin Pie Spice Jar Tutorial

Welcome to part three of the SOLIDWORKS Pumpkin Pie Spice Jar tutorial series where we are modeling this pumpkin pie spice jar to celebrate the Fall season. In part two of the series, we wrapped up the design of the main jar body. Now let’s get started modeling the jar’s screw-on cap to help seal in the spice’s freshness. In this part of the series, we’ll run through a few Revolved Bosses, as well as a few Extruded Boss and Cut options. We’ll wrap up this installment with a run through of the Move/Copy Bodies tool.

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Can’t wait for the next video? View all of the tutorials in the series here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Pumpkin Pie Spice Jar Tutorial – Part 3 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at November 17, 2017 10:00 PM

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Felt Bacon Hunters

The piles of wooden legs, metal arms and felt bacon strips was an odd combination to line the corridor. We hadn’t been on board for long, and nearly 45 minutes before they docked, but we knew what they would be seeking. Arm and leg repairs, of course, but they knew the most nutrients would be absorbed from making a smoothie from the felt bacon and these links.

Thomas Chamberlain-Keen – Imaginative and stunning. It’s what pops into the head as the airship, space, and massive worlds pop into your eye.

Transformation – Amazing scan deconstruction of The Bartlett by ScanLAB Projects in collaboration with composer and musician, Eugene Romain.

Tesla Truck – Supercut of Elon Musk announcing the new Tesla Truck and that super cool thing that showed up out the backend afterward.

Cutaways – Great iso cutaways from creative agency DOROTHY. The little worlds in the Apple Mac, Minimoog and Director’s Cut.

Stranger Things 2 Book Covers – Absolutely fabulous. Butcher Billy re-imagined each episode name as a 80s sci-fi book cover and it is just awesome.

Shadows – Instagram follow of the week – Jason M. Peterson takes amazing B&W photos.

Crypto Compare – A handy infographic and other info that compares the main cryptocurrencies, from Bitcoin to Ripple and more.

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Let You Down – A bit sad, but man can this guy rack the rhymes.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fbHbTBP_u7U?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

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by Josh Mings at November 17, 2017 09:39 PM

CUR3D – 3D Model Repair Tool [Review]

We’ve just done a quick test of a new 3D model repair tool, CUR3D Maker Edition.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_91054" style="width: 1100px">The main screen on CUR3D Maker Edition<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The main screen on CUR3D Maker Edition</figcaption></figure>

The need for 3D model repair tools has never been higher, with the number of 3D printers increasing rapidly around the world. 3D printers and their software typically treat poorly formed 3D models in a bad way, often resulting in unpredictable print failures.

The root cause of most of the grief is simply the distressingly poor .STL file format standard, whose syntax permits the proper definition of 3D models that are not 3D printable. You can define non-solid 3D models with .STL, and unfortunately many 3D creation systems do just that when you export .STL files.

Thus the need for repair tools. There have been a few inexpensive and free options available, but more recently some of the action has moved to the cloud, where it isn’t always free. But there are still some reasonably priced standalone packages to be had.

One of them is CUR3D, made by Germany-based RUHRSOURCE, who seem to resell 3D printers as well. The company sells a “Maker Edition” for €50 (USD$58) and a “Full Functionality” version for €9,995 (USD$11,000). There are monthly and annual payment options as well.

CUR3D Maker Edition is designed to be extremely easy to use as it is designed for DIY makers, and it is. It does carry a very provocative billing, however:

CUR3D is the first real 3D printing prepress, making it the first software on the market to prepare a model of any size, no matter what scale, with any resolution for 3D printing.

I cannot believe this is a true statement, as there have been multiple 3D model preparation software options in the past. But let’s press on.

CUR3D Maker Edition has the most bizarre method of distribution I have ever encountered in years of 3D printing: it’s through Steam.

If you’re not familiar with Steam, it is a massive software distribution and management system focused on games. In Steam you can activate any number of games in your account, and have them delivered to whichever computer you’re using. Software updates are handled properly and you never lose your software license.

But it’s for games. Perhaps they were equating Makers with Gamers? That might be the case for some folks, but certainly not for most. I found it quite awkward.

Nevertheless, Steam is still a valid method of acquiring software, so we fired up our Steam account and activated CUR3D, which we were promptly met with this message:

Steam – Error

An error occurred while updating CUR3D Maker Edition (invalid platform)

What? Oh! We were running MacOS. Perhaps this is a Windows-only system? Yes, indeed it was, but this is not stated anywhere. We rebooted into Windows and (after installing Steam again) successfully launched CUR3D.

I have to say that the interface is ludicrously simple. There is simply nothing to do, other than select the file, pick a “Resolution” and hit “Proceed”.

What is this “Resolution”? It’s not really explained, but I suspect that the software uses it as a kind of layer size through which it inspects the 3D model. Your resulting file is then “cropped” to that resolution, so I’d be careful if you have a 3D model with particularly precise structures.

And then you export the result. There’s not much else to it.

We tested a couple of different 3D models in varying states of correctness, and CUR3D seemed to fix them. It seems best at identifying redundant inner structures and eliminating them, which is helpful. One particularly pathological 3D model we tested, which was unresolvable by other tools at our disposal, actually was 3D printable after treatment by CUR3D.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_91053" style="width: 1100px">An ugly 2D face scan was mostly corrected with CUR3D to a printable state<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">An ugly 2D face scan was mostly corrected with CUR3D to a printable state</figcaption></figure>

However, all files we tested seemed to grow very significantly in size once through CUR3D Maker Edition, on average about 10X larger. This could be significant if your slicing program chokes on large sized 3D models. The full version of CUR3D apparently handles gigabyte sized files, so perhaps they aren’t so concerned at that level. But it could be significant at the maker level.

It is very unclear what exactly is being fixed, as you just press a couple of buttons. If you look at their web page, however, you can get a list of what is apparently going on behind the scenes:

  • Automatic scaling
  • Automatic thickening of walls
  • Automatic correction of overlapping areas
  • Automatic correction of wrong normals
  • Automatic filling of gaps
  • Automatic adjustment to the print bed
  • Any 3D printer
  • Any resolution
  • Cut slider
  • Wall thickness analyse
  • Batch processing
  • Explorer 3D model preview extension

Some of these features are clearly only available in the full function version, such as batch processing and “any 3D printer”. There is no way to specify a 3D printer in the Maker Edition.

What is not helpful is the distribution through Steam. The company insists that they are simplifying your workflow. Perhaps that is the case with the full edition, but it is not true with the Maker Edition, as you must fire up Steam before you can even load CUR3D. That’s a big extra step, for which you require security credentials and may suffer delays from updates, etc. It would have been much easier for users if it was distributed in a normal manner.

There may be other options for DIY 3D model repair, but I might suggest you could add CUR3D as another repair tool, since most 3D model repair services can fail on peculiar geometries and it is always a good idea to have more options.

For the full version, which we have not tested, I suggest you do a very thorough examination through a full trial to determine if the product is for you, simply due to the rather high cost of the tool.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post CUR3D – 3D Model Repair Tool [Review] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at November 17, 2017 05:02 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to access libraries in the SOLIDWORKS Electrical Content Portal?

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Content Portal provides access to variety of rich electrical resources that you can use in your Electrical design. During the installation process of SOLIDWORKS Electrical most commonly used symbols, Title blocks, manufacturer parts etc are downloaded to keep the installation process faster. However, sometimes when you require particular symbols and manufacturer parts that aren’t available in your library you can access the electrical portal and add what you need to your existing library.

Electrical Content portal can be accessed from SOLIDWORKS electrical through Help > Online Content > SOLIDWORKS Electrical Portal. Then register for Electrical Portal and  Click on Catalogs and search for relevant symbols/manufacturer parts and Download as required. Once the download process is finished, unarchive the .tewzip file in SOLIDWORKS Electrical through library ribbon.

Gold libraries can only be downloaded from ECP if your license is currently on subscription. However, silver libraries can be downloaded even if your license is not on subscription.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Content Portal

ECP – Gold and Silver libraries

When you will try to download Gold library symbols/parts from Electrical Portal you will get a pop-up message stating: “we are sorry you’re subscription level does not allow you access to this library. Upgrade your subscription level”. SOLIDWORKS 2016 SP0 release on wards access to the Electrical Content Portal has been changed. Any SOLIDWORKS Electrical users will be able to gain access to the ECP gold libraries through the “Update Subscription” feature. The steps are as follows:

1. Start the Manufacturer parts manager.

2. Select Update Subscription. This will give you a pop- up message that you have to log in to ECP before using this command.

Update subscription for Gold level Access

3. Select Yes and log into the ECP using your mail and password.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Login

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Login

4. You now have gold level access.

Subscription Update confirmation

Learn more about accessing the SOLIDWORKS Electrical Library and Online Portal.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Electrical training course either in a Canadian classroom near you or live online. For more information about electrical software and training solutions call 1-877-219-6757.

The post How to access libraries in the SOLIDWORKS Electrical Content Portal? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Vipanjot Kaur at November 17, 2017 05:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: Trusco Toolboxes

Founded in 1959 as a professional tool manufacturer to support Japan’s burgeoning manufacturing industry, Trusco—a combination of the words “Trust” and “Company”—is still manufacturing some of the best toolboxes, today.

While their stripped-down design makes them a must-have for many design aficionados, the pressed steel boxes are ridiculously useful for just about anything—tools or not.

Still manufactured in Fukui, Japan, Trusco toolboxes now come in more sizes than ever—capable of whatever storage challenges you throw at them.

Trusco Toolboxes — $12.27 – $171.12

Features:

  • Steel body, formed for extra strength
  • Versatile sizing for specific storage solutions
  • Double-hinged construction for smooth opening
  • Dividers included
  • Equally useful in the home, office, or the shop

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

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by SolidSmack at November 17, 2017 02:39 PM

Zoetropes Get “4D” with the Incredible 3D Printed 4-Mation Platform

4-Mation Is A Series of 3D Modular Zoetropes With Swappable Animations

Before the introduction of film and movies, pre-animation devices like zoetropes presented a glimpse into the future of moving images. Using a series of paintings or drawings in different phases of animation, a person could paint the illusion of an object (or objects) in movement.

The 4-Mation is a modern take on the pre-film animation device, and uses 3D printing to make its animations come to life. Whereas classic zoetropes are in 2D and often lack brilliant colors, 4-Mation allows fully-colored 3D renders to appear as if a cartoon movie came to life.

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Amazing!

The machine comes in three models: one consisting solely of electronic, another which comes with a laser-cut plywood frame, and the final one which uses a machined walnut frame (as seen in the videos). Each model is powered by 24 3-Watt RGB LED strobes and timed by a microcontroller connected to an encoder motor. The zoetrope’s rotation speed, brightness, and color are controlled via a phone app for Android and iOS.

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Animations, such as the jumping frogs and fish-eating fish, can be downloaded and printed for free. If users get tired of the two animations, they can design their own and play them on the 4-Mation.

The project is set to go live on Kickstarter sometime in December—so we’ll be sure to keep you posted when it’s up!

The post Zoetropes Get “4D” with the Incredible 3D Printed 4-Mation Platform appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 17, 2017 02:38 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to show SOLIDWORKS Sub-weldment Components in a Drawing Cut List

In SOLIDWORKS, a Weldment model usually includes many numbers of components which show in the cut list table. To reduce the rows in the cut list to a manageable number or to create sub-groups for the model, one can group components and save them under a sub-weldment folder. As a result, the cut list table in Drawings will show only one row for each sub-weldment. At the manufacturing stage, you would need to show all of the components in the cut list including the sub-weldment components. We are sometimes asked, in technical support, “how do I show a SOLIDWORKS sub-weldment in my cut list?” The answer is provided in this article.

The image below depicts a weldment part and its drawing which includes balloons to components plus the cut list table. We are going to select the top frame of this model and create a sub-weldment. Note that components could be selected from feature tree or from the graphics area. To select components in graphics area, you need to activate “Filter Solid Bodies”. Otherwise, faces, edges, or vertices of the components would be selected by clicking on each component. The “Selection Filter” toolbar could be shown all time by checking it off under Tools > Customize > Toolbars or it can be toggled on and off with shortcut key. The shortcut key for Filters toolbar is F5.

Note: To select weldment components in graphics area, the “Filter Solid Bodies” must be activated. Otherwise, only faces or edges of the components would be selectable.

A Sample Weldment Model in SOLIDWORKS

Create SOLIDWORKS Sub-weldment

Once the intended components are selected, right-click on the free space on graphics area and select “Create Sub-Weldment”. As a result, a folder will create in feature tree under cut list folder. Also, the cut list in the drawing environment will change. All subweldment components would show in one row and with the same item upon assigning balloons. Exactly the same as bill of material for a subassembly of a top level assembly. However in case of assembly drawings, the bill of material could be adjusted to show all components whether they belong to a subassembly or not. Despite bill of materials, cut list tables do not have an option to show subweldment components along with the rest of components. This will require a workaround to show sub-weldment components as well.

A Group of Weldment Components Could Create a Sub-Weldment

Insert into New Part

In order to show sub-weldment components, the sub-weldment components need to be inserted into a new part. Either right-click on the sub-weldment folder and select “Insert into New Part”, or activate Filter Solid Bodies and select the components in the graphics area and right-click on free space on graphics area. Then, make sure “Cut list properties” is checked off under properties window on the left. Clicking the green check mark on top of the properties window will open a new part file with the sub-weldment components in it. The image below demonstrates the steps of inserting sub-weldment components into a new part file.

Sub-weldment Members Must Be Selected to Insert into a New Part. Then Cut List Will Show its Members

Finally, the new part must be inserted into the same drawing as the main weldment drawing or maybe into a separate drawing page. The cut-list of this new part will have all the sub-weldment components as demonstrated below.

Sub-weldment Cut List vs. Main Weldment Cut List

The post How to show SOLIDWORKS Sub-weldment Components in a Drawing Cut List appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWE at November 17, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Build Your Own Amazon Echo with the $34 Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle

We’ve said it time and time again, but the Raspberry Pi is just so dang cool and we believe all designers and engineers should have one in their toolkit—if not on their desktop. While there is a bit of a slight learning curve, it’s nothing that today’s designers and engineers can’t handle on a leisurely Saturday.

So why not start now?

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle includes 8 courses to get started creating your very own Amazon Echo or even a ‘vintage’ streaming internet radio over a weekend. Throw in your own 3D printed housings, and the opportunities are limitless!

For a limited time, The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle is 96% off of the $865 retail price and can be purchased right here for a mere $34.

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle — $865 $34

Courses Included in the Bundle:

  • Automation with Raspberry Pi Zero
  • Introduction to Raspberry Pi
  • Hardware Projects Using Raspberry Pi
  • Bitcoin Mining Using Raspberry Pi
  • Raspberry Pi Robotics
  • Internet of Things Automation Using Raspberry Pi 2
  • Home Automation in 48 Hours Without Coding
  • Build Your Own ArmBot Step By Step Using Raspberry Pi Zero

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

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by SolidSmack at November 17, 2017 10:27 AM

November 16, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Do PDF files saved out of SOLIDWORKS conform to ISO Standard?

While carrying out technical support customers often ask me: “Do PDF files saved out of SOLIDWORKS conform to ISO Standard?” Answer is, yes they do.

To confirm. Save a PDF file from SOLIDWORKS using the following steps:

  1. Open the SOLIDWORKS model or drawing you would like to print.
  2. Click on File > Save as.
  3. Select the Save as type as .pdf extension and select save.

Now open the PDF file you just saved, and select ‘Properties’ from the ‘File’ menu.  The file will be reported as ‘PDF Version: 1.4’. All files created with Adobe® 5.x as PDF 1.4, like ours, conform to ISO 19005.

Sometimes, you may need to change the version of a PDF you have to ensure compatibility with a client or colleague using an older version of Adobe Acrobat. To do so, you can install a particular acrobat product version to get the required version of PDF (please refer to the chart below).

Acrobat Product version and PDF version Chart

Therefore, to generate a PDF file for a particular Acrobat Product version you have installed on your machine follow these steps:

  1. Open the SOLIDWORKS model or drawing you would like to print.
  2. Click on File > Print > and then save a pdf file by selecting save as type as .pdf.
  3. In this method the version of PDF depends upon what version of Adobe acrobat you have in your system.
  4. Checking File > Properties  showed the pdf version as 1.7 in this case (refer the image below) , as I am using Acrobat product version 8.x on my machine.
Acrobat version and PDF version

Acrobat version and PDF version

The post Do PDF files saved out of SOLIDWORKS conform to ISO Standard? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Vipanjot Kaur at November 16, 2017 05:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Streamline Projects with the Custom Property Tab Builder

Every year SOLIDWORKS adds new features and functionalities to help enhance the user experience and assist you in taking your designs to the next level. Efficiency is the the key to success it seems.

In this video, I’ll be walking you through the Custom Property Tab Builder and show you that with just a few clicks, you can save time and streamline your project designs going forward.
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The Custom Property Tab Builder

Custom properties are a great method to describe information about our designs but to further enhance this function the property tab is a great companion to selecting what properties to add. The first part I’ll be showing is how to set up a property tab builder template. As a side note, we can create a template to work for parts, drawings, or assemblies, but since the majority of our custom properties are stored in the part files we’ll be focusing on creating this template for parts only.

Inside SOLIDWORKS we’ll be heading over to the area known as the task pane and selecting the home tab. Here is where the property tab builder tool is located. With the template editor window open, we will want to do a few things to get set up. 

First, go ahead and save a new .prt property file to the location of your choice. Afterward, we will make sure to head over to the system options, file locations, custom property files, and set up the default locations for our templates.

Back over to our template editor, let’s start by applying a few parameters by simply dragging and dropping these from the left. I’ll start with a group box where it’ll contain a section for the most important part information. Next, we’ll go ahead and drag a text box into the group box and on the right hand side we’ll set up a few know instances such as the header to be displayed on the template and the custom property to be called out on the model.

Streamline Projects with the Custom Property Tab Builder

Text boxes will be useful for typing the information but to make it more selective, we’ll add the other contents such as the radials and lists. Configuring these on the right,  we’ll have your select of options to pick and choose from. A major note will be sure that if our custom properties are not configuration specific, we’ll go back and pick the option for each parameter to have them show up in the custom tab instead.

Once we have completed our template, we’ll make sure to hit that save button. And now to put to good use we’ll borrow a model that is in the finishing design stages. At the bottom of the task pane, we’ll find a special custom properties tab, and go ahead and pick a template from the list.

Now let’s go ahead and fill out those custom properties. As seen, typing in the information is as easy as entering them on the table, but now we can leverage the choices that are pre-configured.

This was at first glance, at how the custom property tab builder lets the user choose what properties to add. But as an added bonus, one advanced setting from the editor is to link a pair parameter to another property.

Based on the previous selection only certain options will be displayed on the next property. Another great way to influence what properties to be selected.

Conclusion

As you can see the Custom Property Tab Builder is a great tool for steamlining your present and future projects. If you are interested in learning more tips and tricks make sure to sign up for one of our training classes or contact our Training Coordinator by email at training@alignex.com

Also, don’t forget to subscribe to the Alignex Blog to always stay up-to-date in the world of SOLIDWORKS.

Author information

Alignex, Inc.
Alignex, Inc. is the premier provider of SOLIDWORKS software and partner products to the mechanical engineering industry in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, Colorado and Wyoming. With more than 25 years of technical experience, Alignex offers consulting services, training and support for SOLIDWORKS as well as support for partner products. For more information, visit alignex.com.

The post Streamline Projects with the Custom Property Tab Builder appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Alignex, Inc. at November 16, 2017 04:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018: Designer to Analyst

When I first started using analysis tools it was the domain of the expert, the engineer with the PhD. Virtual testing was used sparingly and only for high value applications. But today? Today, simulation has become a tool used throughout the product development process. So what changed? Well, simulation became accessible to those without PhDs and computers grew more powerful. The expectations of companies also changed in how the software should enable the user. As I meet new and experienced simulation users, the more I realize that the difference between a designer and an analyst is that the analyst knows the complexity of the analysis problem at hand, and they can describe the physics and analysis procedures required to solve it. The designer knows the real-world behavior they want to study. They both want to solve a problem to make their products better, and it’s our job to help them.

Ever since SOLIDWORKS put simulation tools into SOLIDWORKS Premium, we have worked to make our simulation tools easier to use, more capable and powerful with each release. Our goal is to enable design teams to create and validate great designs. As our portfolio has expanded we have grown from designers validating parts and assemblies for strength, durability and stiffness to fluid flow analysis to plastic part and mold validation simulation tools; adding value to all the products you design.

Using simulation tools in design isn’t just about validating an idea – it’s about powering innovation. With the release of SOLIDWORKS 2018, we’re empowering innovation with the new Topology Study. This new study type enables designers and engineers to develop innovative minimum mass components based on operational loads and conditions. Using a linear static solver, the topology study will ‘remove’ elements from the finite element mesh until the target mass or best stiffness-to-weight ratio shape is reached. This iterative process of element removal is limited by the study constraints such as maximum allowable deflection and any manufacturing controls.

But once you have this shape what do you do with it? This shape doesn’t just live in the simulation tool. It can be saved as a body (smoothed mesh) into your SOLIDWORKS part file. Once it’s in your design tool it is a full citizen of the design process, it can be managed in PDM, be the basis of further design changes with new versioning and be used in further simulation calculations. Additive manufacturing tools can be used to directly print components, incorporating a topology smoothed mesh body.

For applications that require traditional manufacturing, the results from a topology study can be viewed in the design environment like any other simulation result, to be used to guide any parametric changes such as cutouts and pockets.

Structural analysis is not a one shot wonder process; it is iterative, startling with simple models and loads progressing to complex geometry loads and even multi-physics studies. To aid this evolution of simulation needs for the designer and analyst, SOLIDWORKS Simulation studies can now inherit simulation set up from sub parts and assemblies into a full assembly. Loads can also be transferred from a motion, flow or plastics analysis.

Products that move, are shaken when being moved, or experience loads that vary with time can suffer from failures due to vibration and fatigue, when the operational forces are well below the ultimate failure load. Understanding the effect of vibrations, from operation or transportation, on your products is a complex and challenging task that SOLIDWORKS Simulation has streamlined with an intuitive UI coupled with powerful functionality. Engineers can now evaluate the vibration-driven stresses, displacements and component accelerations to assess the impact of any geometry changes to ensure product performance and durability under complex loads.

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation is another example of a type of analysis tool that was once the exclusive domain of the expert but is now used by designer and analyst alike. For the designer the easy-to-use analysis setup wizard has made previously challenging internal, external and thermal flow analysis accessible to all. And for the analyst the breadth and depth of physics and functionality enables complex problems such as non-Newtonian flows, rotating bodies, and electronics cooling. Flow Simulation has added to these advanced features in the 2018 release with the new free surface capability, which enables two immiscible fluids such as a liquid and a gas in the same volume. What does this mean? Well, we can solve three new types of flow phenomenon.

  • Sloshing; a partially filled container experiencing movement
  • Filling / Evacuation; tank emptying or filling times
  • Jet / Open Water; channel flow or flows from a nozzle where the flow is connected and continual (not a spray)

In its simplest application, a user sets the initial water level and then lets the physics take its course, either with a fluid motion, as in this simple boat on the water, below, showing both a bow wave and wake.

Or with the application of gravity, you can carry out tank emptying or filling processes.

The movement of a container (for sloshing) is created by a time varying gravity vector.

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation 2018 enables designers and analysts to tackle a whole new class of problems.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation and Flow Simulation enable designers and engineers to determine the performance of their products under operational loads. SOLIDWORKS Plastics is different; it assesses your designs in terms of their manufacturability by the plastic injection process. With SOLIDWORKS Plastics you can simulate both the part being molded and the mold used to create the parts to determine if you can mold your components as desired and find out if your mold tool will perform as expected. In SOLIDWORKS Plastics you are simulating the manufacturing process, looking for air pockets, weld lines, and time to fill to understand the impact of design on the part quality and mold cycle time.

For Plastics analysis it is important to have accurate mold geometry, including runners, sprues, and cooling lines together with your component geometry in order to understand the complete manufacturing process. Analysis of the component is important to designers as they want to ensure that the gate locations not only ensure the correct fill but also to that all weld lines or sink marks are not visible to the end user. The engineer or analyst will want to take the plastic analysis one step further, to determine the structure and shape of the parts once they exit the mold too. SOLIDWORKS Plastics can determine the variation of plastics density and deformed shape, caused by uneven cooling of the part. This deformed shape can be imported back into SOLIDWORKS to compare the before and after versions of the geometry, which will let the design team know if the warpage is acceptable or if modification of the part, cooling lines or mold is necessary–all before the expense and time of cutting metal.

As I stated at the beginning of this blog, the goal of SOLIDWORKS is to enable all our customers take advantage of simulation from designers refining designs with the new topology or checking plastic part manufacturability to analysis looking for a deep understanding of the product performance with nonlinear analysis, dynamics and free surface flow. The SOLIDWORKS Simulation suite of tools delivers this with the 2018 release. Click here to visit the SOLIDWORKS designer to analyst page and see these tools in action.

Author information

Stephen Endersby
Stephen Endersby
Product Manager at SolidWorks

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2018: Designer to Analyst appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Stephen Endersby at November 16, 2017 03:36 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: ‘The 3D Printing Handbook’ by 3D Hubs

Since screaming on to the rapid prototyping scene in 2013, 3D Hubs has been relentless in making sure their message is heard. Billed as the “AirBnB of 3D Printing”, the company’s business model is based on experienced 3D printer technicians renting out their equipment to other users on a per-project-basis.

Not surprisingly, the 3D Hubs crew has learned a thing or two about what makes for “good design for 3D printing” — and now, they want to share it with all of us.

Released just this week, The 3D Printing Handbook | Technologies, Design, and Applications was written for design and engineering professionals looking to master the key aspects of 3D printing—from connecting parts to internal radius’—and everything in between.

The 3D Printing Handbook by 3D Hubs — $29.00 (Limited Time)

Features:

  • Insights into the mechanism behind all major 3D printing technologies
  • An understanding of the benefits and limitations of each technology
  • Decision-making tools for technology selection
  • Actionable design advice and guidelines
    Industry case studies from world-leading brands

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: ‘The 3D Printing Handbook’ by 3D Hubs appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 16, 2017 02:56 PM

Don’t Like the New ‘Notch’ on the iPhone X? There’s an App for That

It’s not very often—if ever—that a software app is made in response to a mass distaste for a particular hardware feature. And as Apple’s design team has learned time and time again, you can’t please everybody all the time.

The most recent example comes from the “notch” in the physical body of the new iPhone X—a necessary feature that houses the phone’s new face-scanning camera and allows for the rest of the screen to bleed to the outermost edges of the device. Truth be told, having an irregular bump in your line of sight can be a bit distracting. Now, even Apple themselves are acknowledging this.

The company recently approved a new app called Notch Remover—a simple low-tech app that places a black bar across the top of the screen to remove the irregular form and return the screen back to a traditional rectangle.

Created by developer Axiem Systems, the lo-fi utility presents an interesting case study in our increasingly digital world: can software be used to control our perception of industrial design at this scale?

What do you think? Leave the “Notch” as-is, or bring on a future of “modifiable” industrial design via software?

The post Don’t Like the New ‘Notch’ on the iPhone X? There’s an App for That appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at November 16, 2017 02:40 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

New Progress Indicator for Opening Assemblies in SOLIDWORKS 2018

The new SOLIDWORKS Assembly Open progress indicator will resonate with anyone who has sat staring at their monitor wondering at exactly what stage, and exactly how long their assembly will take to open at any point.

SOLIDWORKS Assembly Open progress indicator

Assembly Progress Bar

It is the tip of the iceberg for some additional functionality contained within the Performance Evaluation Dialog.

The aim of this new dialog is to provide us with information that will ultimately keep us from killing the SLDWORKS.exe process from the task manager when we believe things are not taking too long or are “Frozen” while opening assemblies upon the system.

Open process complete

Open process complete

The indicator walks us through the time involved in opening the assembly, as well as which one of the three phases of opening the file we are currently in:

  1. Opening Components into RAM
  2. Updating the Assembly
  3. Updating the Graphics Display

PLEASE NOTE: The progress indicator dialog will only remain open when the assembly takes sixty seconds or longer to open.

Upon completion of the open process for an assembly file we gain an extra note that suggests we take a look at the Performance Evaluation utility to garner additional details regarding the assembly. If you miss clicking the link locate within the dialog, you can always examine the performance Evaluation dialog on your own:

 

 

Opening the Performance Evaluation Utility will allow you to examine a new section to the dialog which will show us summaries of:

  • Files that were suppressed during the opening process
  • Details for each file opened in the process
  • Which files were saved in specific versions.
Open Performance Results

Open Performance Results

Each dialog segment can be expanded into a summary dialog of the files involved by using the “SHOW THESE FILES” options below each of the sections.

Document open file details

Document open file details

Using the “Open Time” column and sorting by the opening times for each component, It should allow us to pinpoint any components taking an abnormally large amount of time to open.

These new options available in SOLIDWORKS 2018 provide us with a high-level and equally useful granular view of potential problems when opening our larger assemblies.

Stay tuned for more SOLIDWORKS 2018 What’s new content from the team here at Javelin Technologies.

The post New Progress Indicator for Opening Assemblies in SOLIDWORKS 2018 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at November 16, 2017 01:00 PM

November 15, 2017

SolidSmack

Facing Bankruptcy, TechShop (Sadly) Closes All 14 Locations

When they hit the scene back in 2006, the TechShop business model had everything going for it: a fitness gym-like membership program for the use of manufacturing and other shop equipment.

For many urban-dwelling designers or engineers, the wide open shop floors provided a haven to work on weekend projects and use industrial machinery. For educators and parents attempting to introduce children to STEM skills, the friendly facility became an indispensable classroom.

Sadly, the business model proved to be unprofitable for those involved, and today, TechShop CEO Jim Newton announced that all TechShop locations are closing immediately. Anybody with existing memberships to the company is instructed to email the trustee handling the bankruptcy process (techshop.trustee@gmail.com).

TechShop—like the many projects that came out of it—was the result of multiple iterations across what would become a total of ten US locations and four international locations. From community engagement to educational programs, the locations also functioned as local community centers for discovering laser cutting, 3D printing, and numerous other digital fabrication technologies that have unfolded over the past decade.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ls9xwt6F3mo?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

“I’m very proud of what my team and I did to build TechShop,” says Newton. “I’m very sad that we were not able to make TechShop into a sustainable business. It is my prayer that each of the people we touched will take those little sparks they received while they worked on their dreams at TechShop, and turn them into their own grand experiment.”

In total, TechShop provided access to over $1.41 million of high-quality tools and machinery
to its users for a membership fee of less than $4 per day. With over 9,000 active members across all of their locations, the company estimates that they engaged over 100,000 individuals since opening.

Find out more over at TechShop.

The post Facing Bankruptcy, TechShop (Sadly) Closes All 14 Locations appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at November 15, 2017 10:16 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Trident Tutorial

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="355" id="PreviewFrame3D" name="PreviewFrame3D" scrolling="no" src="http://www.3dcontentcentral.com/external-site-embed.aspx?format=3D&amp;catalogid=11199&amp;modelid=816672&amp;width=250&amp;height=250&amp;edraw=true" width="400"></iframe>

Trident: This model of a famous spear shows how to make advanced geometry without using surface features. This part was created with only standard solid body features. Even though the final model is a single body, there are some multi-body techniques to allow for isolated cuts and a shell feature not affecting the whole part.

The features used in the trident part include: revolves, lofts, move face, combine, mirror, scale and one delete face.  There are multiple loft features including two “centerline” lofts that act like “swept lofts”.  The scale feature is used twice to save time reducing the size of geometry in a pattern versus creating smaller versions from scratch. There is one example of a face fillet using the hold line option.

Download this file to learn more about lofts and another way to create geometry similar to lofts.

Download: Trident
Complexity: Moderate
Features: Isolated Cuts, Shell, Revolve, Loft, Move Face, and more!

View all the Part Reviewer Tutorials here.

DraftSight Download: In conjunction with DraftSight, Dassault Systèmes’ 2D CAD product, the 2D drawing(.dwg) file of the Trident tutorial is now available for download here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Trident Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at November 15, 2017 10:00 PM

SolidSmack

Lenovo Launches New Lineup of Impressive Workstations for 3D Professionals

Just in time for Autodesk University this week in Las Vegas, Lenovo announced some welcome new additions to their ThinkStation and ThinkPad product line. In particular, an exciting new mobile workstation offering for 3D professionals on-the-go.

The ThinkStation P520 and P250c are desktops for designers, architects, and 3D professionals, while the ThinkPad P52s is the company’s thinnest, lightest and, yes folks, now QUAD-CORE mobile workstation.

ThinkStation P520 and P520C

Starting with the desktop workstation, both the P520 and P520c feature Intel Xeon W processors—each of which holds up to 18 cores with speeds of up to 4.5GHz running Windows 10 Pro OS.

The P520, the more powerful machine, holds up to two NVIDIA Quadro 6000 graphics cards, memory of up to 256GB.up to eight drives and four internal storage bays.

The P520c, on the other hand, is for those who desire a more compact, less expansive option, but a good amount of core count, memory and clock-speed. It can hold the NVIDIA Quadro 5000 graphics card, has a memory of up to 128GB, and holds up to six drives and two internal storage bays. Though pricing isn’t available yet, the 520c is more entry/mid-level for CAD professionals, so those interested might find this smaller-but-still-mighty workstation more appealing.

Finally, the ThinkPad P52s laptop carries an 8th generation Intel core processor and runs on Windows 10 Pro. Again—the thinnest workstation ever created by the reputable hardware company.

“This new, thin and light ThinkPad will benefit any professional that constantly finds themselves on the go – offering raw Intel Core processing and the brand new NVIDIA Quadro P500 graphics, which means fast, on-screen interactivity with dense datasets, simulations, and 2D image manipulation and painting,” says the company. “Whether you’re collaborating in the office, on a job site or with visiting customers, this powerful and lightweight mobile workstation can run CAD applications all day long – offering the fastest, mobile processors and PCIe NVMe up to 1TB.”

All the computers feature the Lenovo Performance Tuner (LPT), which lets users fine-tune application usage to speed up specific programs they need. This includes application priority, power management, graphics, management, resource monitoring, among other options. A major plus in all of the new designs is the ability to access files using the 32GB memory before being saved on its more robust 2TB HDD storage.

If ever the computers conk out, Lenovo has included a workstation diagnostics tool which can be downloaded onto the desktop or phone which helps troubleshoot the problem. In case the computer itself won’t turn on, the phone app allows the workstation to communicate the problems to the mobile device.

Complete specs sheets for the new lineup can be found over on Lenovo’s website: ThinkStation P520, ThinkStation P520c, and ThinkPad P52s

The post Lenovo Launches New Lineup of Impressive Workstations for 3D Professionals appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 15, 2017 09:36 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: The Pointer Brand Indigo Denim Chore Coat

When it comes to work wear, it’s not always easy to find something that’s both functional and could be pulled off in the office. Thankfully, the expert craftsmen over at LC King Manufacturing and Design have got this sorted.

The company’s Indigo Denim Chore Coat—made of lightweight 100% cotton RAW denim—includes four top-loading patch pockets for your pens or smartphone and polished nickel buttons on the cuffs, a snap pocket, and down the front.

Sold in its unwashed, unprocessed RAW form, the coat is built entirely by Cone Denim Mills at their White Oak facility in Greensboro, NC. So whether you’re strapping up for a day in the shop, or need a solid overcoat to wear with a simple t-shirt, you won’t go wrong with this timeless piece.

The Pointer Brand Indigo Denim Chore Coat — $80.00 – $119.00

Features:

  • 100% Made in U.S.A.
  • 11.5 oz denim
  • unwashed
  • nickel buttons

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Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

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by SolidSmack at November 15, 2017 09:23 PM

App Smack 46.17: Adobe Scan, Instaread, Files Go Beta, and More…

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@www.solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Adobe Scan (iOS — Free)

Go from paper to digital fast. The free Adobe Scan app turns your device into a powerful portable scanner that recognizes text automatically (OCR). Turn anything — receipts, notes, pictures, documents, business cards, whiteboards — into an Adobe PDF with content you can reuse.

Instaread (iOS – Free)

With Instaread you can get the key takeaways & insights from bestselling nonfiction books in 15 minutes or less. Experts read and extract key points from books for your convenience. Chapter locations of key insights are referenced.

HotSchedules (iOS — $2.99)

HotSchedules is the industry’s leading employee scheduling app because it’s the fastest and easiest way to manage your schedule and communicate with your team.

Notification History Log (Android — Free)

Cleared any notification accidentally? Want to check any notification that you already deleted? Then Notification History Log will help you.

Monument Valley 2 (Android — $4.99)

Guide a mother and her child as they embark on a journey through magical architecture, discovering illusionary pathways and delightful puzzles as you learn the secrets of the Sacred Geometry.

Files Go Beta (Android — Free)

Files Go Beta helps clean up space on your phone and keeps it organized.

The post App Smack 46.17: Adobe Scan, Instaread, Files Go Beta, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 15, 2017 09:13 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Compatible or Incompatible – Your guide to meshing bonded contacts

Setting up your simulations is a straight forward process made up of just a handful of steps like defining your materials, loads, and fixtures – capturing the real-world environment as closely as possible. And before you can move on to the most important step of meshing, you need to define your contacts. This is where you define how two components or bodies interact with one another. How you define these contacts, or interactions has implications on the way the geometry is meshed. Here’s how.

When setting up a static simulation or a basic strength test, there are three options for defining contacts:

  1. Bonded
  2. No Penetration
  3. Allow Penetration.

But incompatible and incompatible meshing pertains to only one of the contact conditions Bonded. When you have bonded contacts, the geometry is treated as though it were perfectly connected, like one solid piece. This can be done automatically with a global, all-over condition or manually with local contact sets. Unique to bonded contacts is the concept of a compatible or incompatible mesh.

The actual “bonding” or connections will be created by the mesher. At the interface of bonded components is where the concept of compatible or incompatible comes in to play. Compatible or incompatible meshes can be simplified like this – will the components be meshed the same or different?

Example of Compatible Mesh

Example of Incompatible Mesh

When the elements on each component are the same size you’ll have what’s known as a compatible mesh. If they’re different you have an in compatible mesh. As mentioned earlier this is unique to bonded contacts. With bonded contacts there exists the opportunity for element nodes at the interface to be merged forming the bonded contact. This is the cleanest way for a bonded contact to be created but isn’t always possible. Sometimes the geometry just won’t allow for this, for example when the shape and size is dramatically different. In this case the bonded contact is created through additional contact elements instead of the mesh elements.

Dealing with Mesh failures

When dealing with mesh failures of your assemblies it’s a good first step to think about using an incompatible mesh. A vast majority of mesh failures can be addressed using an incompatible mesh because the components are meshed individually with the appropriate elements and then connected using special contact elements. It’s such a common fix for mesh failures that there’s an option to automatically remesh failed components using an incompatible mesh. This option can be set through the simulation system options. But if you prefer to go through the mesh failure diagnostics, the option is there too.

Incompatible Mesh Options

Regardless of whether the elements on both components are the same, the fact remains – the components need to be bonded. If an incompatible mesh is used, then the bonding is done through those special contact elements. SOLIDWORKS Simulation has two different algorithms to handle the bonds between bodies with an incompatible mesh – simplified or more accurate.

Option 1 – Simplified Bonding

The simplified bonding algorithm is node based. When creating bonded contacts with this algorithm, the source body is represented using its nodes, while the target is represented through the element faces. But the only elements that participate in the bonding are the ones upon which a node directly lies. Because of this, the mesh density has big implications on this type of bonded contact. When there are more source nodes and target elements then there will be more contact elements created. In the image below the contact elements are created within the elements in green.

Option 2 – More Accurate Bonding

The more accurate bonding algorithm is also known as the mortar method. With this algorithm the source entities use the full description of the geometry not just the nodes. This means that the edges of the source not just its nodes participate in the bonding leading to complete and accurate description of both the source and target. In the image below the contact elements are created in the elements within green.

 

Automatic Bonding Method

Can’t decide which algorithm to use? Use the automatic setting. When the automatic option is selected, the software will decide which is the most appropriate bonding type with respect to the model and solution times.

It is things like this that really make SOLIDWORKS Simulation such an easy tool to use. The automatic settings for thing like the bonding algorithm, solver, and even the automesher are such powerful tools that they take the tedious guess work out of FEA. Even degreed and experienced engineers (like the one writing this post) find themselves using the automatic settings to make things incredibly easier and much faster. I even was able to leverage these settings to quickly set up and run a simulation in  the middle of the Peruvian dessert. Check out the video below.

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Author information

Stephen Petrock
Since 1998, TriMech has helped our clients design better products by partnering with them and offering, not only CAD, CAE, PDM, FEA, CAM software products, but also by engineering solutions involving full-time and temporary staffing, contract design, analysis and drafting services, rapid prototyping, custom programming and implementation services. TriMech is a value-added reseller of SOLIDWORKS and Stratasys 3D Printers in the Mid-Atlantic and South-East including New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana.

The post Compatible or Incompatible – Your guide to meshing bonded contacts appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Stephen Petrock at November 15, 2017 04:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Model Based Definition is Beyond 3D Drawings

A year ago, I wrote an article about How to Dimension Silhouette Edges Using SOLIDWORKS MBD. This technique is often used to specify revolved bodies such as toruses in relief grooves, cones in chamfers, or shoulder heights on shafts and holes. Figure 1 below shows several examples in a detailed view of a shaft.

Figure 1. Annotations to silhouette edges to define a chamfer and a relief groove.

 

That post led to an interesting discussion about what is a 3D drawing and what is a model-based definition (MBD). So in this post, I thought it would help to clarify. In my opinion, to serve various use cases, MBD implementations entail multiple stages. 3D drawing is a beginning stage to meet 3D visual consumption needs, but far from the full potential of MBD.

A 3D drawing follows the 2D drawing habits. It simply converts 2D annotations onto a 3D model as shown in Figure 1 (above). Because of the inherited 2D conventions, 3D drawings may be easier to adopt initially. They typically define geometries such as edges, curves and vertexes in full details rather than defining features such as faces, holes, slots and pockets. The geometry definitions limit the potential of downstream manufacturing automations due to the lack of features.

Therefore, to serve the manufacturing process better, feature-based definitions are recommended because on the shop floors, what eventually get machined or inspected are faces, holes, slots or pockets. Edges, curves and vertexes are only the results of the features. No machinists would care about the distances between two points or curves. What they care about is the diameter of a cylinder or the distance between two faces.

Furthermore, digital 3D models empower MBD implementations in unique ways beyond the drawing mentalities. For example, annotating features enables the cohesive applications of GD&T and the cross highlighting from annotations to features. Figure 2 shows the tolerance status of several faces in green to indicate they are fully toleranced. Also a width as the datum feature B is highlighted in blue once the annotation is selected. These intelligent 3D annotations can not only be visually read, but also be programmatically analyzed and acted upon by downstream manufacturing software applications, such as computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) and coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Automation is the major benefit of MBD.

Figure 2. A model annotated with intelligent GD&T callouts.

 

To conclude, let’s come back to the various needs in MBD implementations. If your main goal is to convey the visual information in 3D intuitively, then 3D drawings can be a good start. If you want to lay the foundation for downstream manufacturing automations, then feature-based semantic definitions are recommended.

As a software developer, SOLIDWORKS provides both options to serve a wide range of needs. For example, Reference Dimensions work similarly to 2D detailing tools, so may help you with 3D drawing projects. On the other hand, DimXpert closely follows the ASME Y14.5 GD&T standard and ASME Y14.41 digital product definition standard, so can support you better from product specifications to manufacturing automations.

To learn more about SOLIDWORKS MBD, please watch the 22-minute webcast below and visit its product page. Also welcome to discuss with me at Twitter (@OboeWu) or LinkedIn (OboeWu).

Author information

Oboe Wu
Oboe Wu
Product portfolio manager of SOLIDWORKS MBD, passionate about smart manufacturing opportunities, Keen listener to customer challenges, Sharp problem solver with 20 years of experiences in engineering, Sleepless father trying best to take care of a baby daughter.

The post Model Based Definition is Beyond 3D Drawings appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Oboe Wu at November 15, 2017 01:00 PM

November 14, 2017

SolidSmack

Learn How to Create and Sell Your Own Online CAD Courses

It’s no secret that online learning is more popular than ever. From easy screencasting software to dozens of video hosting platforms, learning new skills is easier than ever before. But have you ever considered creating your own online classes—whether to help others with your rockstar workflows or even secure a profitable side gig?

The good news is that anybody can get started—all you need is something to teach and the motivation to do so.

And with the How to Create an Awesome Online Course training, you can get started producing your own content immediately (yes—this an online course about creating online courses).

In this highly self-aware course containing over 8 hours of content, you’ll learn how to source content ideas, produce videos, and promote just about any skill worth sharing. Who knows—maybe becoming an online instructor just might be your new favorite (paying) hobby?

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/A5bc9c3S12g?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>
Lars Christensen has over 30,000 subscribers on his YouTube channel where he “helps people that haaa-ate struggling with their CAD&CAM Software.”

How To Create An Awesome Online Course — $200 $15 (92% Off)

Course includes:

  • Access 93 lectures & 8 hours of content 24/7
  • Understand how to break down your course & how to make it interesting
  • Validate your course idea through a 3-stage process
  • Structure your course into an effective outline
  • Learn how to use ScreenFlow for Mac to record your screen & edit it all together
  • Discover efficient ways to promote your course & find students
  • Create a great sales page for your course & set up PayPal to make money

Purchase Here

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
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The post Learn How to Create and Sell Your Own Online CAD Courses appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 14, 2017 11:25 PM

Watch a Mesmerizing 148,777-Piece Super Mario Domino Mural Collapse

Who could ever dislike Mario? The virtual plumber has been capturing the hearts of gamers worldwide since his first appearance in the 1981 classic, Donkey Kong, and has become synonymous with the video game industry as a whole.

To celebrate the mustachioed mascot’s newest game on the Nintendo Switch, YouTube user TheDominoKing spent the last two months setting up a number of gigantic falling domino murals depicting some of the game’s most iconic elements and characters.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/A9X4V3169Lw?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Made from a staggering 148,777 dominoes, the project was supposed to be done in time for the game’s October 27 release—but TheDominoKing decided to put it off for an extra two weeks in order to put a little more love into it.

The entire video is screen-linked—meaning, he edited the individual murals to seem as though they are all connected. Considering the complexities of the project, it only seems fair that he edit this five-minute video in such a way.

This isn’t even his largest domino mural video (that honor goes to his Undertale Genocide Edition video, which consists of 201,025 dominoes). To see more video game falling domino murals (as well as some pop culture-related ones), TheDominoKing’s YouTube channel is where you will find them.

The post Watch a Mesmerizing 148,777-Piece Super Mario Domino Mural Collapse appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 14, 2017 11:25 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional API: What’s New in 2018?

With each year’s rollout of SOLIDWORKS, what’s new in the API often gets overlooked or relegated to footnotes. It’s about time there are blog posts on what is new in the API for the SOLIDWORKS product line. Here are two of our favorites.

Add custom tabs to a PDM vault view in Windows Explorer

This is an exciting new feature that allows you to customize your vault view to add custom user interface tabs built right into your vault view.  You can now embed any .NET control into the vault view to create a seamless integration to external systems or to allow other .NET functions be called without having to create links to the code through your data cards.  You can use a custom name and icon to identify your new custom tab. These features are implemented using the new IEdmCmdMgr6 interface.

GSC Custom Tab

Code to Add Custom Tabs

Use this code to create the custom tab in a 2018 PDM vault.

    public class CustomTabs : IEdmAddIn5 {
        
        private String tabName = "GSC";
        private String iconName = "GSC.png";
        private String toolTip = "GSC Custom Tab View";
        private String uniqueId = "F4C84E2B-3D7B-4FD2-B65A-3323C82D65BD"; // generated a guid to use, can be any unique string

        public void GetAddInInfo(ref EdmAddInInfo poInfo, IEdmVault5 poVault, IEdmCmdMgr5 poCmdMgr) {
            try {
                poInfo.mbsAddInName = "PDM Custom Tab API Example";
                poInfo.mbsCompany = "GSC";
                poInfo.mbsDescription = "This AddIn will show the basics of what is needed to create your own custom tab in PDM Professional.";
                poInfo.mlAddInVersion = 20170926;
                poInfo.mlRequiredVersionMajor = 17;
                poInfo.mlRequiredVersionMinor = 5;  // Need to use 17.5 until 18 SP0 is released
                
                // need to add both a hook and a command to create the tab.  Since I am not using the command, I am only showing it in admin tool
                poCmdMgr.AddHook(EdmCmdType.EdmCmd_PreExploreInit);
                poCmdMgr.AddCmd(12321415, "CTC", (int)EdmMenuFlags.EdmMenu_NeverInContextMenu + (int)EdmMenuFlags.EdmMenu_Administration);
                // hook to intercept when the tab is activated
                poCmdMgr.AddHook(EdmCmdType.EdmCmd_ActivateAPITab);
            } catch (System.Runtime.InteropServices.COMException ex) {
                MessageBox.Show($"HRESULT = 0x{ex.ErrorCode.ToString("X")} {ex.Message}", "Interop Error", MessageBoxButton.OK, MessageBoxImage.Error);
            } catch (Exception ex) {
                MessageBox.Show(ex.Message, "Error", MessageBoxButton.OK, MessageBoxImage.Error);
            }
        }

        public void OnCmd(ref EdmCmd poCmd, ref EdmCmdData[] ppoData) {
            try {
                switch (poCmd.meCmdType) {
                    case EdmCmdType.EdmCmd_PreExploreInit:
                        createCustomTabView(poCmd.mpoExtra);
                        break;
                    case EdmCmdType.EdmCmd_ActivateAPITab:
                        MessageBox.Show("The custom tab has been activated!", "Activate", MessageBoxButton.OK, MessageBoxImage.Exclamation);
                        break;
                    default:
                        break;
                }
            } catch (System.Runtime.InteropServices.COMException ex) {
                MessageBox.Show($"HRESULT = 0x{ex.ErrorCode.ToString("X")} {ex.Message}", "Interop Error", MessageBoxButton.OK, MessageBoxImage.Error);
            } catch (Exception ex) {
                MessageBox.Show(ex.Message, "Error", MessageBoxButton.OK, MessageBoxImage.Error);
            }
        }

        private void createCustomTabView(Object poCmdMgr) {

            String iconLocation = Path.Combine(getAssemblyDirectory(), iconName);

            // create control
            WinForm wf = new WinForm();

            // get control id
            long windowHandle = wf.Handle.ToInt64();

            // call to add the tab
            ((IEdmCmdMgr6)poCmdMgr).AddVaultViewTab(windowHandle, tabName, iconLocation, toolTip, uniqueId);
        }

        // method to allow the png to be saved in the vault
        private String getAssemblyDirectory() {
            String codeBase = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().CodeBase;
            UriBuilder uri = new UriBuilder(codeBase);
            String path = Uri.UnescapeDataString(uri.Path);
            return Path.GetDirectoryName(path);
        }
    }

Get a list of values associated with a drop-down control on a data card

We no longer have to create a direct SQL connection to the database to get this information, using the IEdmCardControl7 interface, we now can get the card list data from a handy API call.

Card List Values

Card List Program Example Screenshot

Code Sample to Populate a Collection

Here is a small code sample of how you could populate a collection from a selected file’s card variable.

String selectedFile = @"C:\2018-WHATS-NEW-API\New Folder\GSC.png";
String selectedVariable = "Material";
IEdmFile5 file = vault.GetFileFromPath(selectedFile, out IEdmFolder5 folder);
IEdmCard5 card = folder.GetCard(Path.GetExtension(selectedFile).Substring(1));
Object variableName = selectedVariable;
IEdmCardControl7 cardControl = (IEdmCardControl7)card.GetControl(card.GetControlID(ref variableName));
if (cardControl.GetControlVariableList(file.ID, out String[] cardListStrings)) {
    cardListEntries.Clear();
    foreach (String cardListItem in cardListStrings) {
        cardListEntries.Add(cardListItem);
    }
}

You can download and look through the entire code samples on GitHub.

Author information

GSC
GSC fuels customer success with 3D engineering solutions for design, simulation, data management, technical documentation, and 3D printing, as well as the most comprehensive consulting, technical support, and training in the industry. As a leading provider of SOLIDWORKS solutions and Stratasys 3D printing technologies, GSC’s world-class team of dedicated professionals have helped numerous companies innovate and increase productivity by leveraging advanced technologies to drive 3D business success. Founded in 1989, GSC is headquartered in Germantown, WI. For more information about GSC, please visit www.gsc-3d.com.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional API: What’s New in 2018? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GSC at November 14, 2017 04:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: Hudson Durable Goods Waxed Canvas Work Apron

Few shop tools—yes, we’ll call it a “tool”—are as indispensable as a reliable work apron. While not a “tool” in the traditional sense, a good, durable apron can serve many purposes ranging from tool organization to even psychologically making yourself ‘present’ in the workshop.

But no two aprons are alike—and striking the balance between functional and economical isn’t always easy. Which is why we like the Cross Back Adjustable Apron from Hudson Durable Goods.

Made from thick and durable waxed canvas, this stylish work apron features design details that are as carefully considered as the long-lasting materials they’re constructed from. Additionally, the cross-back (X-back) straps ensure that weight from tools is spread evenly across the back to avoid neck strain. Best of all, since the apron is made from waxed canvas, it will only get better with age.

Hudson Durable Goods Waxed Canvas Work Apron — $31.89

Features:

  • Cross-back (x-back) straps spread the weight of tools to prevent neck strain
  • 2 large tool pockets (6.5 inches tall x 8 inches wide)
  • Chest pocket for cellphone/pencil/tools (4.5 inches tall x 4 inches wide)
  • Kangaroo pocket (large hoodie-style hand pocket)
  • Straps sewn on ends to prevent slipping through side grommets
  • Flat black canvas and gun-metal hardware for a low-key, unisex, professional look

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

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by SolidSmack at November 14, 2017 02:32 PM

SolidSmack Radio | Sketch Flow Override (Fall 2017 Edition)

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll get the groove going with “I Don’t Wanna See What’s Happening Outside” from Morgan Delt before diving into sweet melodies from And The Kids, Islands, Arbes, Ducktails, and others before wrapping up with “Garden View” from Hales Corner. Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/3dLN7zFSnj8VNzD86t25HU" width="100%"></iframe>

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by SolidSmack at November 14, 2017 02:30 PM

Industrial Designer Eric Strebel Demonstrates His Process for Low Volume Manufacturing

Product design whiz Eric Strebel is at it again – this time with his personal guide on how to create a small batch of 200 vacuum-formed panels for display at a car show.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/x-uBFJLY8Ow?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

Eric starts the same way he begins all his designs: in the ideation phase. Even though panels aren’t the most complex products, how they look and their ease of presentation to the public are still important factors to take into consideration. He settles on a simple half-pill shaped design similar to nail polish color samples used at nail salons.

The panels come with two hidden hangers at the back which allow a person to hang them for display on either side. There’s even a tiny notch on the hanger where a nail or pin can be used to suspend the panels.

After deciding on the final design, he creates the CAD data for a production tool on the CNC machine. Eric takes this time to add four notches to the corners of the tool which serve as registration marks for each individual panel.

To aid the CNC machine with production, Eric crafts an aluminum tool which the panels will be created on. This can’t be totally done on a machine, so Eric benches the metal and sands it by hand to create a smooth surface for uniform panel production. If you look closely at the edges of the curves, you will notice that he has drilled tiny holes for the air to escape during the vacuum-forming process.

Using a PETG machine, Eric creates the 200 panels using the single tool he crafted with the help of his CAD.

He outsources a local laser cutter to cut out the panels while he cuts the smaller hanger parts himself. Once he has all the pieces, Eric glues the hangers to the panels using a solvent and propping them up using a laser cut piece of cardboard.

They still need their individual coatings of paint, but for the most part, the panels are done. Eric ships them out in specially-designed boxes for painting and shipping to the client.

As always, you can find more or Eric Strebel’s informative production videos on his YouTube channel.

The post Industrial Designer Eric Strebel Demonstrates His Process for Low Volume Manufacturing appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 14, 2017 02:28 PM

The Monday List 46.17 | What We’re Reading This Week

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Can Ford Turn Itself Into a Tech Company?

Its very name was synonymous with the 20th-century economy. Now it’s trying to catch up with Silicon Valley on self-driving cars.

How Many Coders Does It Take to Turn On a Lightbulb?

The Tale of Kubernetes.

The Importance of Doing Absolutely Nothing

In these days of constant work and connection, taking time to do nothing is one of the most difficult agenda items. But it’s more important than ever.

How Sidney Weinberg Went from Making $3 a Week to Becoming the CEO of a Prestigious Firm

There are few institutions in the world that evoke as strong of a reaction as Goldman Sachs.

What My Personal Chat Bot is Teaching Me About AI’s Future

Every once in a while, it says something so weirdly like me that I double-take to see who chatted whom first.

Sound Systems

A History of Musical Notation

The post The Monday List 46.17 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 14, 2017 02:24 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS Helps Product Designers Joseph Joseph Scoop Queen’s Award for Enterprise

Joseph_Joseph_Kitchen

Joseph_Joseph_Kitchen

Say congratulations to Joseph Joseph. The British product design company has landed a prestigious Queen’s Award for Enterprise – with a little help from SOLIDWORKS.

What are the Queen’s Awards for Enterprise?

Good question. Well, it’s as prestigious as it sounds – the highest official accolade for British businesses.

Queen's_Awards_for_Enterprise_2017

Each year the Queen awards companies in one of three categories: international trade, innovation or sustainable development. The winners are selected on the advice of the Prime Minister and an Advisory Committee made up of representatives from government, commerce and trade unions.

Let’s just say that if you win a Queen’s Award for Enterprise, it’s a good sign you’re doing things right.


What did Joseph Joseph win?

Joseph Joseph received a Queen’s Award for Enterprise in International Trade. That means an invitation to a reception held by Her Majesty at Buckingham Palace as well as a crystal chalice and a scroll for the office mantelpiece. Winners are also allowed to use the Queen’s Award emblem in their advertising, marketing and packaging for five years. Not a bad way to get noticed!

Since 2003 Joseph Joseph has grown from a small UK-only business to a successful international brand with offices in France, the U.S. and Japan. Today it is one of the UK’s fastest-growing businesses, releasing around 70 new products per year into 104 markets around the world. Busy, busy.


What does Joseph Joseph make?

Joseph_Joseph_Cutting_Board

Amazing products for the home, that’s what. We’re talking everything from cutlery and colanders to turning tongs and toothbrush holders.

Yet what defines its products is its twist of innovation. Joseph Joseph looks at the humdrum items we use in everyday life and finds ways to make them smarter and easier to use.  The result is a roster of classy, clever bits and bobs that make your home a more enjoyable place to live.

Joseph_Joseph_Cutting_Boards

Joseph Joseph’s progressive approach to product design is outlined in an oddly entrancing article about how they reinvented the toilet brush.


What’s the connection with SOLIDWORKS?

Glad you asked. Joseph Joseph’s design team has been using SOLIDWORKS since 2010. It’s their go-to tool for everything from concept development, through to production-ready data. SOLIDWORKS is the engine that helps design, prototype and produce those 70 new products per year.

Joseph_Joseph_Utensils

Here’s to the future  

By now you may not be surprised to hear that Joseph Joseph is no stranger to awards. In fact, they have scooped no fewer than 11 Red Dot Design Awards. Better start trying to find some room for that chalice from Buckingham Palace. Here’s to the continued success of Joseph Joseph and lots more awards.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Helps Product Designers Joseph Joseph Scoop Queen’s Award for Enterprise appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS UK at November 14, 2017 02:03 PM

November 13, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Document Revisions in SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Designers and engineers sometimes are required to make changes to their drawings. If there is any change in the document, it is required to be given a revision number, the verification and validation date, and person. SOLIDWORKS Electrical can automate the process with just a few clicks. Not only that, when the document is revised you can take a snapshot of the design.

revisions documents SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Figure 1 – Revisions option

The revision attributes can be added to the cover page or your templates which are updated with each revision. See figure 2.

revisions documents SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Figure 2 – Attributes for revisions

revisions documents SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Figure 3 – Revision 0 in cover page

As we enter revision window we can validate and verify the documents the names for validation and verification can also be changed here. See Figure 4 & 5.

Figure 4 – Validate document

Figure 5 – Verify document

Figure 6 – Revision of book and documents

We can print the drawings from here or we can push it to PDF, if not required we can cancel and just update the revision number. See figure 7.

Figure 7 – Print options for revised document

Figure 8 – Snapshot of revised document

The whole process should be repeated when we want to update another revision. See figure 9

Figure 9 – Updated Revisions

Author information

CAD MicroSolutions
CAD MicroSolutions is one of the most recognized and reputable SOLIDWORKS resellers in Ontario. Founded in 1984, we have 3 offices in Canada providing SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD software, training, consulting, and software development services.

The post Document Revisions in SOLIDWORKS Electrical appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CAD MicroSolutions at November 13, 2017 04:00 PM

November 12, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Where Did My Vault Go?!

SOLIDWORKS PDM Tech Tip

Written by: Bryce Hooper, Application Engineer, DASI Solutions

SOLIDWORKS PDM - Select Vault - Missing
Some of us might have seen this screen before and been a little confused. We should be seeing our vault… so why aren’t we? It is a simple reason and a simple fix, but it helps to know what is actually wrong.

What’s Going On:

A lot has changed in recent years regarding how we install the SOLIDWORKS PDM client. Not only have we had the installer moved on us, but we’ve also had the installer radically changed with the introduction of PDM standard. This has left us with additional options that if we don’t set correctly, result in us being unable to see the vault from our client.

We now have both a standard and a professional client version to match each of our license types. This is different from our variations of Editor, Contributor and Viewer. License types in that regard can be changed at will through the Administration tool by going to Help > About SOLIDWORKS PDM.

The only way that we can change our client version from Standard to Professional, is through an uninstall. This guide can be followed the first time through to avoid this as an uninstall/re-install process.

The prime difference between these two PDM client types is not in directly what they can do, but which vaults they can see. If you are a PDM Standard user and install the PDM Standard Client, you will only be able to see PDM Standard Vaults. If you have PDM Professional and have the Professional client installed, you will be able to see both Professional and Standard vaults. This is strictly a visibility issue in regards to the vaults. If we do not have licenses for a PDM Standard or PDM Professional vault, it does not matter what kind of vault we look at. Access is still dictated by license availability.

The Process:

To install the PDM Client (formerly Enterprise PDM client) through the installation manager we need to select the option for “SOLIDWORKS PDM Client”. This is different from the SOLIDWORKS Explorer/Workgroup PDM option. That is for PDM Workgroup and can cause issues if both add-ins are activated. It is also not necessary to select the sub-node for “Item Explorer” unless Items are in use. It is not a necessary component to PDM Professional or Standard.

SOLIDWORKS Installation - Product Selection

When we install the PDM client on a fresh machine, the default is to select PDM Standard as our installation. If the system is upgrading a previous installation of PDM Professional, it will default its selection to this.

Installation Manager Summary

In either case, we can change this on the Summary screen of the installation manager. To do this, we need to click the CHANGE link. We then get the SOLIDWORKS PDM Client Options where we can pick our Client Type as well as Standard or Professional. Click “Back to Summary” and proceed with the rest of the installation as normal. If this was done the first time through the installation should be working and vault view creation will be as expected.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Client Options

It is always better to do it right the first time, but in the end this isn’t such a big deal to correct. It is certainly much better to know that the client is wrong instead of the vault actually missing.

Author information

DASI Solutions
DASI Solutions
DASI Solutions is dedicated to service and support. As one of a handful of original, charter value-added resellers (VAR) in the SolidWorks Community, DASI Solutions has built partnerships and success stories with many of our customers. We are very pleased to bring you SolidWorks 3D CAD design engineering software and 3D printing services.

The post Where Did My Vault Go?! appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by DASI Solutions at November 12, 2017 04:00 PM

November 11, 2017

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 45.17

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee, and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top ten stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

These Insane Chandeliers Are Made From Upcycled PET Bottles

When it comes to upcycling, it’s not always easy to create something new out of discarded waste that doesn’t appear as repurposed…discarded waste. Yet, Czech artist Veronika Richterová seems to have pulled it off.

Build Your Own Amazon Echo with the $34 Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle

We’ve said it time and time again, but the Raspberry Pi is just so dang cool and we believe all designers and engineers should have one in their toolkit—if not on their desktop. While there is a bit of a slight learning curve, it’s nothing that today’s designers and engineers can’t handle on a leisurely Saturday.

Professional Development: Skillz to Pay the Billz

If your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.

Designing and Building Secret Rooms Are This Mechanical Engineer’s Speciality

Thanks to killer set design in movies and television, almost everyone wants their own secret room.

The SmartDesk 3 is A Self-Adjusting Desk With A Built-In Productivity A.I.

As you read this, you’re probably at your desk, killing time while waiting for the workday to end. But do you know just for how long you’ve been sitting down? How about your daily water intake for the day—or meals you’ve eaten?

The Guardian GT is a Gigantic Treaded Robot With Seven-Foot Humanoid Arms

No matter what anyone says, machines will never fully replace humans in the food chain. Having a human supervisor on hand beats out a cold, robotic heart any day.

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 45.17 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 11, 2017 07:40 PM

Watch How Artist James Lake Approaches Cardboard as His Medium of Choice

Cardboard generally isn’t the first material that comes to mind when discussing sculptures, models, and prototypes—but legions of designers and artists have shown us otherwise. From quick and dirty product models to functional skateboards, it’s difficult to imagine what can’t be made with a little creativity.

More recently, artist James Lake has been slicing and dicing the recycled corrugated good stuff for a good cause: to create a sculpture that highlights the need for recycling and finding more sustainable solutions to waste management.

After conducting a study of over 2,000 UK citizens packaging company Rajapack commissioned James to create a sculpture that highlights the importance of recycling:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/237884215?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="800"></iframe>

“What you do when you work with cardboard is you give it value by the time, the effort, and the care you put into it,” explains the artist. “And I think when we come to think about the planet’s resources, actually trying to find a new way to value things and people, it’s very, very important. I’d rather people valued that than value it because it’s made of marble.”

Be sure to check out the artist’s full collection over at his site. In the meantime, you can learn more about cardboard cutting and modeling techniques by heading over to our good pal Jude Pullen’s site, Design Modelling. Rock.

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by Simon Martin at November 11, 2017 07:40 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: Preppin’ Weapon Ergonomic Sanding Blocks

Those wood parts won’t smooth themselves!

But how often do you spend wrestling a piece of sandpaper around weird edges—only to be left with a half-crooked and totally botched result? There’s a remedy for that—and we can’t recommend it enough.

The Preppin’ Weapon sanding block is a workshop necessity that lets users load sandpaper and adjust tension quickly and easily. And while just one Preppin’ Weapon sanding block will go a long way in your process, arming yourself with a four-pack for four different levels of grit will take it to another level—no need to stop and reload!

For power users, the Preppin’ Weapon also lets you stack up to four sheets of sandpaper in each block for quick tearaways when a new sheet is needed without stopping to reset. Fast and consistent sanding has never been this easy.

Preppin’ Weapon Ergonomic Sanding Blocks (4-Pack) — $79.98

Features:

  • Dramatically reduces sanding time
  • Color-coded (yellow, blue, green and red) for different grit
  • Easy to use wet or dry with multiple materials
  • Ergonomic for reducing pain points
  • Preload multiple sandpaper sheets into each block
  • Durable construction with Lifetime Warranty

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

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by SolidSmack at November 11, 2017 07:31 PM

Friday Smackdown: Slender Chin Bender

When the bowls dropped, we jumped out of the barrels. In the rambunction we didn’t notice the machines had moved in. Hundreds of them, thin and towering, light and quiet, only noticed when their combined silhouettes blotted out the sun revealing these links.

Juan Pablo Roldan – Massive scenes, ships, mechs and more. Beautiful lighting and a handle on perspective that adds loads of depths.

What the Fog – Mark Broyer is a freelance Art Director and Designer living in Hamburg, Germany. He likes to take photos. These are photos of Hamburg at night.

Beginners Guide to ZBrush – If you’re interested in learning the popular sculpting program, this will get you started. Coming out soon, but pre-order available.

Thunder Lizard – Like Stranger Things? Well, you know Dustin of course. He sports a cool sweatshirt from the Science Museum of Minnesota. This is where you can get it.

Dali Atomicus – How photographer recreated the famous 1948 portrait of surrealist painter Salvador Dalí by Philippe Halsman. And how it was done.

Banned – The 10 coolest cars banned in the United States. From the Bugatti EB 110 SS to the Nissan Skyline GTR.

Re:scam – Passive aggressive much? When it comes to email scams this is the tool to use. Re:scam will take care of it, trolling the scammers so you can get on with your day-to-day.

Mumbo Jumbo – Her debut video. Starts off weird, but don’t worry, it gets weirder.

 

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OFNCSbOPxqA?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

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by Josh Mings at November 11, 2017 05:12 AM

November 10, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Pumpkin Pie Spice Jar Tutorial – Part 2

The leaves are changing colors, football is in full swing (American football that is), and turkeys are finding themselves on edge. It’s fall, SOLIDWORKS users, and, in my opinion, the best part of the fall season is the smell of pumpkin pie in the air. We’re celebrating the season by bringing you a 4 part series where we’ll be modeling this pumpkin pie spice jar, complete with a custom threaded cap, living hinge, and decal.

SOLIDWORKS Pumpkin Pie Spice Jar Tutorial

Welcome back to our 4-part series where we are celebrating the Fall season by modeling a pumpkin pie spice jar. In part one of the series, we began laying out the pumpkin shaped jar. Now in part two, we will use a unique Extruded Boss option to create the label area, hollow out the jar using the shell tool, and run through an easy way to apply a custom Thread to the design. So, grab a cup of hot apple cider, press mute on the football game and let’s get started with the second installment of our series.

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Can’t wait for the next video? View all of the tutorials in the series here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Pumpkin Pie Spice Jar Tutorial – Part 2 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at November 10, 2017 10:00 PM

SolidSmack

Toy Maker: A New 3D Printing App for Kids (And Inspiration for Developers)

toy maker 3d printing app

AstroPrint is on a roll. They’re announcing the release of another app today that does two things for 3D printing. Toy Maker is a free app that 1) introduces kids to the world of 3D printing and 2) introduces developers to the capabilities of AstroPrint’s Cloud platform.

Toy Maker

On the surface, the Toy Maker app is simple – Pick a toy, print it out. Toys currently range from single piece characters multi-piece puzzles.  After you choose a toy, it will be waiting in your AstroPrint Cloud account. Then you simply print it on your AstroPrint connected 3D printer. Currently, there are over 170 toys available, some free and others available for purchase. The Toy Maker app is available for download on the iOS App Store and Google Play.

There’s no toy modeling or customization here. It’s simply a way to find and print models already created and added to the platform. We’d like to see some toy creation/customization (there’s a severe lack of 3D printed robot creation out there at the moment), along with 3D viewing and a way to submit free/paid 3D prints, privately or publically.

So… you can imagine how it could be extended, or how other apps could be developed using the AstroPrint API to…

Reach 3D Printer Owners

Toy Maker also serves as a proof of concept to developers for AstroPrint’s cloud platform demonstrating how content can be delivered to 3D printer owners. AstroPrint is building out a content distribution platform as much as it has built out software for simplifying 3D printing.

When you think about how the two compliment each other, there’s quite a bit the AstroPrint Cloud platform is bringing to 3D printing – a platform that bridges the 3D printer with cloud-connected software that can be extended through an API to make 3D printing more accessible to everyone.

Download the app and tell us what you think. And definitely, let us know when you develop and release that robot creation app.

 

 

The post Toy Maker: A New 3D Printing App for Kids (And Inspiration for Developers) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at November 10, 2017 06:37 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Electrical: Customizing Simple Reports – Part 1

As you may already know SOLIDWORKS Electrical uses a SQL database to contain and maintain all our Electrical data and information. This has many benefits speed, resilience, multiuser working to name a few but one of the primary features is that the database can be interrogated to present the information it holds and present it how you want to see it.

By now I am sure you have explored the many reports that ship as standard with Electrical, if not these can be found in the report manager project/reports/add.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical reports

When you check out the list you may notice the report title either end in _Imperial or _Metric this is due to the reports being “unit aware”. So you may need to save a report twice to make it available for both unit systems

If you can’t find a report that meets your needs you will need to either customise an existing report or create your own.

Go to Project/Configurations/Reports

Go down the list of reports and choose the report closest to your desired output highlight it and choose to make a copy.

Project/Configuration/Reports

Important: Only edit a report directly if you are sure you do not want to keep it.

You will be asked if you want to edit the new configuration say yes:

Configuration

The first thing you need to do is to rename a save the new report:

Saving a new report

Ok we can now change how the report looks in drawings and what data is used.

First let’s choose the overall look of the report. Select the style tab and you can now choose the fonts for the title, header, content and the totals, remember we are working on an imperial report hence the text height is in inches e.g. 0.1”

Report style

You will, I am sure, notice that as you make changes the preview at the top of the screen updates to reflect the changes.

We can now choose what data is to be displayed and how:

Display

When the SQL query was written by SOLIDWORKS they did not just include the basic information for the report, they thought of what other data a user may want to include and made that available as well. To include it in the report simply tick the selection box.

It’s simple to reorder the data by highlighting what you wish to move and using the arrows at the side to navigate.

SQL query

We can do more formatting of the tables. I will cover this in part two of my blog.

We can now adjust the layout of the report drawing.

Report drawing layout

If you look at the preview my description field is now two wide so I am going to go back to the columns tab and change the description width from 10 to 5, remember don’t forget to choose the apply button.

Adjusting column width

If you have applied the changes we will close the report editor and now open a project a test the report.

In my next blog, I will discuss more about column formatting, how to sort the information and how to apply filters. In my final blog if I am feeling brave I will discuss what happens when you click the expert mode!

By Simon Knibbs, SOLIDWORKS Electrical Specialist

Author information

NT CADCAM
NT CADCAM is the UK's most established SolidWorks reseller in England, Scotland and Wales. Offering a fully supported CAD and CAM product portfolio and high levels of expertise internally, makes NT CADCAM unique within the SolidWorks community, giving customers the confidence and assurance they need that their support issues will be dealt with both promptly and efficiently. As a SolidWorks Certified Training Centre, NT CADCAM provides clients with fully certified and accredited trainers who are experienced engineers.

The post SOLIDWORKS Electrical: Customizing Simple Reports – Part 1 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by NT CADCAM at November 10, 2017 04:00 PM

SolidSmack

Rocking Chairs Get Lightweight and Portable with the Stargaze Camping Recliner

Don’t believe what other people tell you – rocking chairs are NOT just for old people! In fact, they’re one of the comfiest pieces of furniture out there.

Even so, a rocking chair isn’t the most portable seat. Since most of them rely on rockers or springs to operate, they can’t really be disassembled and stored for convenience.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0yxrJGOfsYQ?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

The Stargaze Recliner by NEMO Equipment looks to be a different story. It’s a series of chairs designed specifically for the outdoors which swing users back and forth to remind others of their presence. The seats are composed of water-resistant nylon mesh and can hold up to 300 pounds, while aircraft-grade aluminum legs keep the chairs suspended and can be disassembled to fit into a carrying case.

Fans of stargazing and camping can lean back and the seats will adjust themselves accordingly to meet ethereal needs. The elastic bands anchoring the seats to the aluminum legs play a big part in this, as they stretch whenever the user adjusts their sitting position.

Apart from the normal version (left), a low-profile design (center) which sits closer to the ground and a luxury variant (right) with an extended headrest are also available. All of them feature armrests (for holding arms), cup holders (for holding cups), and a small pocket (for holding things which aren’t arms or cups). The chairs weigh roughly six pounds each (5 lbs. 11 oz. for the normal version, 5 lbs. 2 oz. for the low-profile version, and 6 lbs. 5 oz. for the luxury version), so portability isn’t really an issue.

The chairs cost anywhere from $169.95 for the low-profile variant all the way to $219.95 for the luxury variant. You can find each chair’s specs as well as their pricing here on NEMO Equipment’s webpage.

The post Rocking Chairs Get Lightweight and Portable with the Stargaze Camping Recliner appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 10, 2017 01:50 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: Field Notes Pocket-Sized Sketchbooks

When it comes to being at the right place at the right time, nothing beats that old saying, “the best camera is the camera you have with you.” Perhaps the same can be said for sketchbooks—the best sketchbook is the one you have with you when inspiration strikes.

Which is why the pocket-sized Field Notes have always been a favorite for designers and engineers. At just over $3 a pop, these no-fuss 48-page memo books are perfect for laying down rough ideas without worrying about wasting precious paper in a leather hardcover book. Plus, they’re the perfect size for throwing in a shoebox to keep a record of all those great ideas.

Field Notes Kraft Ruled 3-Pack — $9.95

Features:

  • Ruled Paper 48-page memo book
  • 3 Books per pack – banded and shrink-wrapped
  • Three great memo books worth fillin’ up with good information
  • Made in the USA

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: Field Notes Pocket-Sized Sketchbooks appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 10, 2017 12:56 PM

The PLUTO Desktop 3D Printer

3Devised is about to launch their new “PLUTO” desktop 3D printer on Kickstarter.

The machine is resin-powered and uses the “top-down” approach, unlike almost every other SLA-style 3D printer, which tends to illuminate (usually with lasers) through the bottom of a transparent tank. Instead, the PLUTO fires its light downwards onto the (hopefully) flat and level surface of the liquid resin.

And that light is from a DLP light engine, which is significant. This means that the entire layer is illuminated at once, making the printing much faster than having a laser trace all portions of each layer. Even better, the top down illumination means there is ZERO delay between layers.

In typical bottom-up machines, there must be a pause between layers to separate the newly solidified material from the tank itself (which also causes gradual erosion of the tank). Even in fancy systems such as Carbon, the machine must wait for new liquid resin to flow into the gap between the tank bottom and the growing object. This is NOT the case with PLUTO. It just prints continuously and should be extremely fast. Unfortunately, the company has not published any speed measurements as far as we can tell.

The print volume is quite small, although in line with high-end dental machines at 85.4 x 48 x 130mm. The machine should be able to 3D print layers as small as 0.025mm, which is quite good.

Unfortunately, since the machine isn’t launched yet we don’t have much to go on, other than their teaser video here and a few specifications:

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ybNxTqvEX0w?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="640"></iframe>

However, you can see the machine does apparently produce pretty decent quality output. This is a closeup of a dinosaur print composed of many smaller pieces.

The company has taken steps to simplify the use of the machine. First, they’ve included WiFi onboard the machine to enable you to use it without cabling or pesky SD cards. Secondly, they’ve developed their own management software, aptly named “3Deviser”, to prepare 3D models for printing and control print operations. The software is available on MacOS, Linux, and Windows.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_90877" style="width: 1100px">pluto 3d printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Using “3Deviser” software to prepare 3D models for printing on the PLUTO desktop 3D printer</figcaption></figure>

They’ve also made available a number of different materials, such as castable, reinforced, general use, etc., to enable wider use of the machine. Interestingly, they also have an open materials capability, so you can put any UV-compatible SLA resin into this machine as well. However, you will likely have to do some tuning to get best results.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_90878" style="width: 1100px">PLUTO desktop 3D printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Closeup detail of a print from the PLUTO desktop 3D printer</figcaption></figure>

The machine itself, and I presume the software, is also open sourced, making it possible to hack the machine if you so desired. Or perhaps you’d like to make one yourself.

But that might not be necessary, as the cost of this machine is quite low at only USD$749, at least during the launch phase. That’s a pretty good price for a SLA machine, although its build volume is small.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_90879" style="width: 1100px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Another very high-quality 3D print from the PLUTO desktop 3D printer</figcaption></figure>

One thing we don’t know is the viability of the company itself. It appears to be a startup, like so many others. And with a low-priced machine, they face the same risks that other 3D printing startups have had: over subscription. In far too many cases, startup companies have been thrilled to see their campaign attract countless buyers, only to realize they actually have to make all those machines. And have them all work properly.

We don’t know yet how 3Devised will fare in that regard, so we would advise readers to take a look at our Kickstarter cheat sheet when you’re inspecting their offer.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post The PLUTO Desktop 3D Printer appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at November 10, 2017 02:32 AM

November 09, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

A Rebuild Renaissance in SOLIDWORKS 2018

Author: Chris Briand, CSWE, Javelin Technologies

As you might expect, the rebuild tool in SOLIDWORKS is one of the most frequently used tools in the suite. The frequency of this tool is due to the necessity to regenerate our models into a current state as the physical shape of the model develops along changes in parameters that drive the model or assembly.

SOLIDWORKS Rebuild

Rebuild (CTR+B)

The SOLIDWORKS 2018 Rebuild tool has combined some terminology moving away from the former naming of “Regenerate” operations (CTRL+Q) to align them with the more visible Rebuild tool (CTRL+B) in the SOLIDWORKS interface (most of us called the “Regen” tools “Rebuild” in any case).  They have also given them buttons so that they can appear on any toolbar in the SOLIDWORKS interface.

Force Rebuild (CTRL+Q) – Force Rebuild appears only within the part environment, and Force Rebuild Top Level Assembly (CTRL+Q) – Will Rebuild from the top of the assembly tree.

In addition to the nomenclature change there are also some new additions to the rebuild tools that we have all come to know – Specifically to rebuild configurations within our parts and assemblies. We now have a SOLIDWORKS 2018 rebuild solution that will save us from having to activate any configurations in an effort to update them!

Rebuild All Configurations (CTRL+SHIFT+B), and Force Rebuild All Configurations (CTRL+SHIFT+Q)

The two newest additions to the “SOLIDWORKS 2018 Rebuild Family” tree affect those who use configurations on a regular basis, where a ton of time can be saved, and some added insurance built in, that all of your configurations have been rebuilt successfully before releasing a design to the shop floor.

Author information

Javelin Technologies
Javelin Technologies is a provider of technology solutions since 1997. We are experts in 3D design and have helped thousands of companies with solutions for mechanical design, electrical design and 3D printing. Large or small, we have the skills, experience, and services to propel your organization to new heights so you can aim high.

The post A Rebuild Renaissance in SOLIDWORKS 2018 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Javelin Technologies at November 09, 2017 04:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Don’t Miss the SOLIDWORKS Largest User Group Meeting Ever 2017

Last year Todd Blacksher proposed something unusual for the SOLIDWORKS User Group Network: The SOLIDWORKS Largest User Group Meeting Ever, or SLUGME.

The idea was to bring together hundreds of SOLIDWORKS User Group members to live, local meetings around the world, and at a pre-designated time, each group will tune in to a broadcasted technical presentation. The event was a big hit for the 33 SOLIDWORKS User Groups that participated, and SLUGME is now an annual event.

This year on November 15th, more than 60 SOLIDWORKS User Groups will participate. All around the country (and a few places outside of the US), SOLIDWORKS User Group members will gather together at local meetings for food, networking, and other group business.

Then, at 7:30pm EST, each group will join a webinar featuring a one-hour SOLIDWORKS Tips and Tricks presentation by Todd Blacksher of the SOLIDWORKS User Group of Nebraska.

Based on the number of groups that will tune in, an estimated 1,600 SOLIDWORKS users will be involved in what will truly be the SLUGME.

NOTE: This is a LIVE event, and will NOT be broadcast publicly. You MUST attend your local SOLIDWORKS User Group meeting in order to participate.

Check the list below to find out if your local chapter will be participating and click the links for more information, including the meeting address and start time. Don’t miss your chance to be part of SOLIDWORKS history!

Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=592

Albuquerque, NM
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=378

Atlanta, GA (combined)
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=579

Asheville, NC
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=290

Austin, TX
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=334

Cambridge, ON, Canada
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=470

Chandigarh, India
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=502

Charlottesville, VA
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=228

Chattanooga, TN
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=483

Corona, CA
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=585

Corpus Christi, TX
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=457

Daleville, VA
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=602

Dayton, OH
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=363

Davenport, IA
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=375

Des Plaines, IL (Chicago area)
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=116

Elkhart, IN
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=326

Edmonton, AB, Canada
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=616

Evansville, IN
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=477

Fond du Lac, WI
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=481

Fort Collins, CO
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=598

Fountain Valley, CA
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=422

Fresno, CA
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=451

Graham, NC
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=599

Hauppauge, NY
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=532

Huntsville, AL
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=255

Indianapolis, IN
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=286

Kearney, NE
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=539

Kilgore, TX
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=617

Lafayette, LA
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=438

Lenexa, KS
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=135

Lincoln, NE
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=287

Lorain, OH (Cleveland area)
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=288

Manasquan, NJ
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=552

Melbourne, Australia
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=190

Mountain View, CA
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=600

New Albany, IN
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=411

Omaha, NE
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=514

Panama City Beach, FL
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=507

Pella, IA
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=161

Peterborough, ON, Canada
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=586

Phoenix, AZ
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=193

Plain City, OH (Columbus area)
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=252

Portland, OR
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=339

Rockford, IL
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=224

Seattle, WA (North)
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=127

Seattle, WA (South)
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=530

Sioux Falls, SD
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=476

Skippack, PA (Horsham area)
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=126

Springfield, MA
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=419

St. Joseph, MO
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=571

Sugar Grove, IL (Chicago area)
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=423

Sydney, Australia
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=173

Waltham, MA (combined)
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=235

http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=553

http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=373

Wells, ME
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=413

West Columbia, SC
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=277

Westminster, Co (Denver)
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=180

Williston, VT
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=263

Yakima, WA
http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/ugdetails.htm?id=415

Author information

Richard Doyle
My official title is Senior User Advocacy & SolidWorks User Groups - but most people just call me "The User Group Guy". I've been a SolidWorks user since 1997, and was one of the founding members of the SWUGN Committee. Since starting the Central Texas SolidWorks User Group in 1999, my career path has led me to DS SolidWorks and a dream job supporting the SolidWorks User Group Network worldwide.

The post Don’t Miss the SOLIDWORKS Largest User Group Meeting Ever 2017 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Richard Doyle at November 09, 2017 02:42 PM

SolidSmack

The Guardian GT is a Gigantic Treaded Robot With Seven-Foot Humanoid Arms

No matter what anyone says, machines will never fully replace humans in the food chain. Having a human supervisor on hand beats out a cold, robotic heart any day.

The guys at Sarcos Robotics aren’t trying to make manual labor obsolete. In fact, their newest creation requires a human helping hand.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="720" id="video-90770-1" preload="metadata" width="1280"><source src="https://www.solidsmack.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/guardian-gt-in-motion.mp4?_=1" type="video/mp4">https://www.solidsmack.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/guardian-gt-in-motion.mp4</video>

The Guardian GT is a remote human-controlled, force-multiplying robot with two seven-foot humanoid arms on a treaded base. Remember those hulking robots the humans used to fight the machines in the last Matrix movie? It’s a bit like that, but with a much less violent design.

While the human operator stands comfy in a control harness, the Guardian GT can manipulate heavy objects and go through hazardous terrain. Cameras are propped-up where the robot’s eyes would generally be, giving the operator a clear view through a set of projected glasses.

The huge, three-fingered arms come in handy whenever something four feet in front of the robot needs manipulating. Unlike traditional robot arms, these are custom-made so the distance between the limbs (such as the arm to the elbow and the elbow to the wrist) have the same ratio as a normal human body. This makes it more dexterous and easier for new operators to work with.

Each arm can lift up to 500 pounds and features a force feedback mechanic which adds weight to the operator’s arms. The weight felt isn’t as much as 500 pounds (that would just be nuts), but it helps simulate the stress the robot is going through. From the heaviest debris to the push of a button, each bit of pressure is simulated by the control harness.

As for the base, it is modified to run at four miles per hour on diesel gas. It won’t win any racing competitions, but it’s more than enough to go through rough terrain.

The applications for this robot seem endless. While its general use is for construction, rescue operations requiring higher human judgment and tasks involving hazardous substances (such as those filled with radiation) can also benefit from the Guardian GT.

We’re still a ways from embracing robot overlords, but if the Guardian GT is any indication, the future might see robots and humans codependent on one another. You can find more information on this man-powered beast on the Sarcos Robotics website.

The post The Guardian GT is a Gigantic Treaded Robot With Seven-Foot Humanoid Arms appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 09, 2017 02:18 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: The rOtring 800 Retractable Mechanical Pencil

When it comes to mechanical pencils, not all are created equal. And with rOtring, this couldn’t be truer.

Ideal for sketching, writing, and drawing, the iconic rOtring 800 Mechanical Pencil features an ergonomically enhanced full metal body, with centered weight balance and a comfortable non-slip knurled grip for long work periods without discomfort or fatigue. Featuring a “Twist and Click” retractable mechanism of the entire sleeve and lead, the rOtring 800 Mechanical Pencil can easily go from pocket to sketch without worrying about damage or lead breakage. Quite frankly, you’d be hard-pressed to find a better mechanical pencil for this price.

The rOtring 800 Retractable Mechanical Pencil — $34.25

Features:

  • An iconic tool meant for a lifetime of use.
  • Unique “Twist and Click” mechanism retracts entire lead and sleeve for durability and pocket-safety.
  • Full metal body providing the ideal balance of weight and feeling.
  • Hexagonal barrel ensuring fatigue-free writing and drawing.
  • Fixed lead guidance sleeve prevents breakage and gives a clear page view for ruler-based drawing.

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The rOtring 800 Retractable Mechanical Pencil appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 09, 2017 02:13 PM

The SmartDesk 3 is A Self-Adjusting Desk With A Built-In Productivity A.I.

As you read this, you’re probably at your desk, killing time while waiting for the workday to end. But do you know just for how long you’ve been sitting down? How about your daily water intake for the day—or meals you’ve eaten?

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One of the more obscure applications of A.I., the SmartDesk 3 ISN’T a piece of furniture outfitted with an all-seeing digital assistant with a sexy voice (you must be watching too many sci-fi shows). The desk is the third iteration of a 2015 Kickstarter project by Autonomous Smart Office, a manufacturer of smart office products that help people work smarter.

The company’s proprietary desk app (which runs on Autonomous OS 1.0) gives suggestions on things you can do to stay healthy. It gives tidbits of information about water intake, blood circulation gained by standing up, reminders on when you normally order food and flashes them on a seven-inch screen built into the lower-left side of the desk for interaction.

For food, in particular, the SmartDesk 3 keeps tabs of nearby and frequented restaurants and organizes them into shortcuts for easy deliveries. Say you’ve been eating pizza for four straight days. While it probably isn’t good for your health, the desk will create a shortcut for the pizzeria to cut down on your order time.

As for standing, the SmartDesk 3 props itself up from 24 inches to 51 inches off the ground using two linear actuators to meet the user’s increased height. The desk itself can hold up to 300 lbs of weight and the sound it emits when being adjusted falls to 38db (which is pretty silent, in case you didn’t know).

Adjusting the desk and ordering pizza aren’t the only things the A.I. can do. Since it was built as a work assistant, the SmartDesk 3 app also includes a bunch of reminders for the time, weather, meetings, coffee, and current stock market. It also uses Nest to let users control the room temperature, Spotify to play work music selections, and Uber to get a ride when the work day is done.

The SmartDesk 3 also features gesture movements for some widely-used office programs like Slack and Google Docs. While you could easily access these with a mouse and keyboard, the desk’s touchscreen lets you tap and pinch documents like on a tablet.

The desk was the result of a 12-month development process involving a team of 40+ engineers, product managers, and designers. The project has already exceeded its Kickstarter goal of $25,000 (it currently stands at $64,563) and will be ongoing for at least another month. More details on the desk’s specs can be found on the SmartDesk 3’s Kickstarter page.

The post The SmartDesk 3 is A Self-Adjusting Desk With A Built-In Productivity A.I. appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 09, 2017 02:09 PM

App Smack 45.17: Monument Valley 2, Mosaic, Bear, and More…

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@www.solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Mosaic from Steven Soderbergh (iOS — Free)

In MOSAIC, as in life, the path you pick affects your perception of reality. What one viewer may consider a fundamental fact on one path may be an insignificant piece of trivia on another — or may not even be a ’fact’ at all. As its title suggests, MOSAIC isn’t complete until all the pieces are viewed in their proper perspective.

Prisma (iOS – Free)

Stunning photo effects.

Bear (iOS — Free)

Bear is a beautiful, flexible writing app for crafting notes, prose, code and now sketches!

Microsoft Outlook (Android — Free)

Meet Outlook for Android, the app that helps millions of users connect all their email accounts, calendars and files in one convenient spot. Newly redesigned, Outlook for Android lets you do more from one powerful inbox.

Monument Valley 2 (Android — $4.99)

Guide a mother and her child as they embark on a journey through magical architecture, discovering illusionary pathways and delightful puzzles as you learn the secrets of the Sacred Geometry.

Super Ace Cleaner (Android — Free)

Super Ace Cleaner, Top android phone cleaner app with junk cleaning, phone boost, monitor your system is trusted by users worldwide.

The post App Smack 45.17: Monument Valley 2, Mosaic, Bear, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 09, 2017 02:02 PM

Learn How to Create and Sell Your Own Online CAD Courses in a Weekend

It’s no secret that online learning is more popular than ever. From easy screencasting software to dozens of video hosting platforms, learning new skills is easier than ever before. But have you ever considered creating your own online classes—whether to help others with your rockstar workflows or even secure a profitable side gig?

The good news is that anybody can get started—all you need is something to teach and the motivation to do so.

And with the How to Create an Awesome Online Course training, you can get started producing your own content immediately (yes—this an online course about creating online courses).

In this highly self-aware course containing over 8 hours of content, you’ll learn how to source content ideas, produce videos, and promote just about any skill worth sharing. Who knows—maybe becoming an online instructor just might be your new favorite (paying) hobby?

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Lars Christensen has over 30,000 subscribers on his YouTube channel where he “helps people that haaa-ate struggling with their CAD&CAM Software.”

How To Create An Awesome Online Course — $200 $15 (92% Off)

Course includes:

  • Access 93 lectures & 8 hours of content 24/7
  • Understand how to break down your course & how to make it interesting
  • Validate your course idea through a 3-stage process
  • Structure your course into an effective outline
  • Learn how to use ScreenFlow for Mac to record your screen & edit it all together
  • Discover efficient ways to promote your course & find students
  • Create a great sales page for your course & set up PayPal to make money

Purchase Here

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The post Learn How to Create and Sell Your Own Online CAD Courses in a Weekend appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 09, 2017 12:53 PM

November 08, 2017

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: The ABC of Custom Lettering by Ivan Castro

Long gone are the days when every banner and sign required the specialized touch of a sign writer—yet, even with today’s billboard-sized digital prints created from Photoshop files, the art of good old-fashioned hand lettering is still just as popular as it ever was.

And while it does take some practice to cross your t’s and dot your i’s with a cohesive style, the good news is that you don’t need to go back to design school to get a formal typography education.

Written by graphic design icon Ivan Castro, The ABC of Custom Lettering: A Practical Guide to Drawing Letters is an authoritative resource for designers, typographers, sign writers, illustrators, pinstripers, and other creative professionals looking to add a touch of typographic pizzazz to their work.

The ABC of Custom Lettering: A Practical Guide to Drawing Letters by Ivan Castro — $20.94

Features:

  • Workbook-Focused
  • Easy-to-Follow, Step-by Step Tutorials
  • Gallery Sections for Gathering Inspiration
  • Sample Projects for Practicing Techniques

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The post Cool Tools of Doom: <em>The ABC of Custom Lettering</em> by Ivan Castro appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 08, 2017 02:43 PM

Designing and Building Secret Rooms Are This Mechanical Engineer’s Speciality

Thanks to killer set design in movies and television, almost everyone wants their own secret room.

And who wouldn’t? Having your own private sanctum sounds like a blast: peace and quiet, the freedom to do what you want, plus the rooms are usually sealed off in the coolest way possible — waterfalls, anybody?

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Creative Home Engineering is a company born from this fantasy (its website name, hiddenpassageway.com, is a reference to this).

When company president Steve Humble was renting a large house with his friends back in 2003, he thought it would be cool to secretly wall off sections of the house like in popular movies. But after doing some research and discovering there wasn’t a company who specialized in the field, he aptly quit his job designing medical surgical lasers and decided to put his mechanical engineering expertise to cooler uses.

14 years later, and his dream has become a worldwide manufacturer for motorized, high-security passageways for celebrities, professional athletes, and even the government (for obvious reasons). Creative Home Engineering’s projects range from hidden bookcases, raised staircases, false cabinets, fireplaces – just about any piece of the household can be repurposed by these guys to hide entire sections of an abode.

Each project is analyzed by a team before construction commences. They take in the woodwork of the house, the location of the room to be hidden, and any other concerns the client might have when it comes to secrecy.

The secret doors, in particular, can be customized with security cameras, motorized opening systems, and even bulletproofing material (if you REALLY don’t want someone to get inside). Gaps between the door, floor, and walls are kept to a minimum with integrated warp control, while bookcases, cabinets, and dressers shelve the things they should without looking conspicuous.

Owners have the option to install either a “fail-safe” or “fail-secure” measure in case the power goes out (the former unlocks the door while the later keeps it locked). No matter which countermeasure is chosen, all doors come with a fail-safe exit switch so no one gets trapped in secret. When the power isn’t out, however, the doors can be opened by hitting a hidden switch, pulling out a particular book, or arranging a number of objects a certain way. It all depends on the client’s preference.

The price for having a secret room varies depending on the size, quality, and scope of the project, but rest assured it isn’t cheap. Dreaming about having a secret room is totally free though, and Creative Home Engineering’s gallery has some of the best hidey-holes in the world.

The post Designing and Building Secret Rooms Are This Mechanical Engineer’s Speciality appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 08, 2017 02:32 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Dixon Valve & Coupling Optimizes Manufacturing with SOLIDWORKS and Xometry

Are you constantly looking for ways to improve your productivity and processes?  SOLIDWORKS and its partners strive to provide you with the tools you need to do your job as efficiently as possible.

Let’s take a look at Dixon Valve & Coupling and see how they utilize SOLIDWORKS and the Xometry add-in to help its automation team realize its cost efficiency goals.

For over 100 years, Dixon Valve & Coupling has manufactured and supplied hose couplings, valves, dry-disconnects, swivels, and other fluid-transfer and control products.  The worldwide company, with a broad reach of industries including transportation and construction, created a strategic objective of developing solutions that make its products safer, leak-free, longer lasting, and always available.  In order to continually focus on that objective, Dixon formed an in-house automation team to automate production where justified.

The Dixon automation team relies on the SOLIDWORKS® ecosystem, which the company has used for 20 years. Recently, Dixon added the free Xometry add-in to SOLIDWORKS software to support quoting, feedback, and ordering of manufacturing services from directly within the SOLIDWORKS CAD environment.

With the Xometry add-in, Dixon’s automation team is able to answer those tough questions like “What is the optimal manufacturing solution?” or “What will this change cost?”  With this add-in, it has 24/7 access to production pricing and ordering information inside SOLIDWORKS, and a way to obtain feedback about determining the best way to manufacture a part.

According to Industrial Engineer J.R. Everett, “We were able to get a quote, place the order, and receive the part in a couple days—all without leaving SOLIDWORKS.”

To learn more about how Dixon Valve & Coupling is creating better design and cutting costs with SOLIDWORKS Solutions in conjunction with the Xometry add-in functions, Click Here.

Author information

Josie Morales
Josie Morales
Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post Dixon Valve & Coupling Optimizes Manufacturing with SOLIDWORKS and Xometry appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Josie Morales at November 08, 2017 01:00 PM