Planet SolidWorks

February 19, 2020

SolidSmack

3DAeroventures is the Future of 3D Printed RC Aircraft

Eric Haddad (LinkedIn) is the founder and Pilot in Command of 3DAeroventures, a Texas-based outfit specializing in 3D printed RC aircraft. Some are traditional, some are experimental, all show what the future holds for RC aeronautic design.

3D printing is no stranger to prop-powered aircraft, with many an STL file available for various types and styles of drones, racers, copters, and planes. However, with his background in design, manufacturing, and RC aircraft, Eric is planning to bring a unique angle to the RC aircraft hobby, making it and 3D printing much more accessible, with 3DAeroventures.

He spun up the venture a year ago out of a passion that grew from childhood, making and flying model airplanes with his father. Through the years of school and industry, helping others to realize products in manufacturing, and his experience with 3D modeling and 3D printing, his passion grew even stronger.

I had the honor of speaking with Eric to find out what inspired his interest, how SOLIDWORKS helps with the 3D printed RC aircraft designs, and what he’ll be rolling out to the tarmac with 3DAeroventures.

SolidSmack: What inspired your interest in design and manufacturing?

Eric Haddad: I was always kind of a builder as a kid. I started making planes with my dad when I was 12 so building has always been something I’m into. I made model planes or remote control airplanes, back then, from balsa wood kits. My dad did most of the building, I would help a little, but he’d do a lot of building, then I would fly them. We’d go every Sunday and he was super supportive of the hobbies my two brothers and I had. I did the first 3DAeroventures video with my son. I’m excited to support him and help however I can like my dad was for me.

I’ve kept a balance between the analytical and creative way of thinking, so after going into product development, I got my master’s degree in manufacturing engineering with a minor in art design. I did a lot of artistic design projects in CAD then got a job at James Avery jewelry company in product development. During that time I had side jobs doing product development work with small businesses. Since 2015, I’ve been full time helping startups and small business with product development and started 3DAeroventures last year, diving back into my passion for RC airplanes.

SS: Were you always detail-oriented? Did jewelry design nurture that?

EH: James Avery changed me big time. I never thought I’d go into the jewelry industry, but that company is surprisingly high tech. It was a cool mix of technology and art. They were completely vertically integrated, so they do everything from concept design all the way to owning their own retail stores – they would even build their own furniture for the retail stores. Their goal was to make 10,000 pieces a year all with a handmade look. You always had to have an eye for detail. I was in product development, so we pulled the new designs from concept and transitioned them to manufacturing. Oftentimes, designers would hand us exactly what they want but it might not be manufacturable, so we had to maintain the original intent including as much detail as possible.

SS: So you kept up with your hobby on the side and progressed into 3DAeroventures?

EH: Exactly. I would get busy but always had a plane that was flyable to take out and get in the air. The technology has changed so much since I was a kid. Today, you can buy a ready-to-go foam plane with really light electronics and a really powerful motor. Then I saw 3D printing planes was a possibility, with other companies selling STL files to print your own planes. With my design background and CAD experience, I knew how to create my own designs, so thought I’d dive into designing my own planes. It really kickstarted my passion again for the hobby, so I have a lot of energy to put into this.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption> 3D printed parts for the 3DAeroventures ‘Infinity Wing’ RC aircraft. </figcaption></figure>

SS: Do you do all the design concept in SOLIDWORKS?

EH: Yeah. Everything’s done in  SOLIDWORKS desktop and I’ve dabbled a little on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, using xShape for some of the concept work or, at least, getting an external shell for the more organic features. It’s all been great software for doing this sort of thing, from tip to tail and internal structure.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption> Complete 3DAeroventures ‘Infinity Wing’ 3D printed RC aircraft. </figcaption></figure>

SS: Do you take a top-down assembly approach or bottom-up approach?

EH: It may seem odd, I don’t talk to a lot of people doing it, but I tend to use Multibody part approach instead of assembling single parts bottom-up. I just think it’s faster than trying to do it all in an assembly. Plus, I can 3D print it as one part or split out those parts so they can be printed on just your standard desktop 3D printer.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Drawing view of Eric Haddad’s ‘Infinity Wing’ 3D printed RC aircraft.</figcaption></figure>

SS: What benefit has SOLIDWORKS provided in your build process? Challenges it helped solved?

EH: The planes are assembled on-screen before I even print a part, so it’s all figured out digitally before I spend time building the parts. Everything just fits together perfectly once they come off the printer. I’m not doing a lot of experimenting on the build side since I know it’s going to go together perfectly. It definitely saves time there. I’ve used a ton of CAD software and SOLIDWORKS is just the most user-friendly and has the most intuitive features too. I use a lot of surfacing for the organic forms and it has the perfect blend of complex surfacing capability and parametric mechanical design.

SS: Do you have a favorite style of aircraft or one you would like to design?

EH: I like older propeller-driven airplanes versus jets or super futuristic stuff, but know a lot of people into that, so I might dive into doing some ducted fan military-style jets. But, yeah, I really like the golden age of aircraft — the World War II airplanes – they had a lot of character. I’m really into aerobatics and the aerobatic airplanes, so will start with that.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Eric Haddad’s ‘Super Chipmunk’ aerobatic flyer featured at 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020.</figcaption></figure>

Eric has plans to add a lot more video content to the 3DAeroventures YouTube channel, so be sure to subscribe. Also, sign-up for his newsletter at 3DAeroventures.com to be the first to know when he releases his fully 3D-printable, functional RC aircraft designs.

And if you’re interested in how Eric is helping other companies, check out DiFi3D, a company helping inventors, startups, and small business owners with product development.

The post 3DAeroventures is the Future of 3D Printed RC Aircraft appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 19, 2020 10:28 PM

How to Make a Simple DIY CNC Camera Slider (In A Single Day)

CNC camera slider

Always one to test the limits of what’s possible, designer Daniel de Bruin makes sure to devote a little time each week to a “single day build” which aids his work.

One of his more recent projects captures the process of building a CNC camera slider to help with his client work (which is already pretty awesome if you see his videos). The video a quick 1-minute look at the steps, parts, and process:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CLgJTtxsdzE?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Oh, the things you can do with a laser cutter. It’s a relatively simple build, especially if you’ve used the same parts to build a CNC machine. This build only requires a number of custom laser-cut parts cut from 1/4″ MDF, a 20×20 aluminum extrusion, a few bits of hardware, a ~6cm lazy susan turntable bearing and, at the heart of it all, an Arduino combined with a GRBL, CNC shield, and universal G-code sender.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">CNC camera slider</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">CNC camera slider</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">CNC camera slider</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">CNC camera slider</figure>

After assembling the physical parts of the slider, Daniel attaches the CNC Shield to the Arduino UNO (Kit here), using the open-source GRBL CNC motion control firmware for Arduino to tell the steppers to move along a 20×20 T-Slot aluminum extrusion. (You can see how to set up GRBL for CNC in the Instructable here.)

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">CNC camera slider</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">CNC camera slider</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">CNC camera slider</figure>

Once the program is up and running, he can control the speed and rotation of the camera; allowing for some cool accelerated or slow-motion shots. But since the video above is taken by a different camera, we don’t get a glimpse of what these shots look like (I guess we’ll just have to take his word for it).

There’s not a lot more detail than that but enough to get you on your way or inspire your own single day (week?) build. You can find a few more of Daniel de Bruin’s videos on his YouTube channel. Follow him on Instagram, especially to see his excellent studio tour. And if you really want to know more about the man, check out his personal website.

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post How to Make a Simple DIY CNC Camera Slider (In A Single Day) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 19, 2020 05:18 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020 Server Hardware Recommendations

Article co-authored by Samir Lohmann on February 19, 2020

Here is an overview of our current recommended SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020 Server hardware recommendations.

While the following recommendations are intended as a general overview for most SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional vaults, determining proper server and client hardware is one of the first steps that Javelin will provide during a SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Implementation service.

We strongly recommend that you contact our specialists if you are considering the purchase of any hardware or software for PDM. The optimal hardware and configuration for your vault may vary depending on many aspects, including the number of users, number of files in the vault and other factors.

PLEASE NOTE:  These recommendations do NOT apply to SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard

SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Server:

  • Processor: 4 Cores with 3Ghz or higher clock speed
  • Operating System: Windows Server 2019
  • Database Software: Microsoft SQL Server Standard 2017 (see further information regarding licensing below)
  • Memory: 32GB (see further information regarding memory below)
  • Storage configuration: Windows OS and SQL Server software in RAID 1 SSD ; SQL Database file (.mdf) RAID 1 SSD; SQL Log file (.ldf) RAID 1 SSD

SOLIDWORKS PDM Archive Server:

  • Processor: 3Ghz or higher clock speed
  • Operating System: Windows Server 2019
  • Memory: 16GB
  • Storage configuration: Dedicated high speed storage drive(s) for archives

What is the recommended system architecture for SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020 servers?

For medium and large PDM Vaults, It is recommended that a separate, dedicated server be used for the PDM Database Server.  For performance reasons no other databases should be hosted on the same server that is hosting the PDM database.  It is recommended that the SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Server Service (also called the Database Helper service) be installed on the same system that is hosting the SQL Server software.

PLEASE NOTE: It is very strongly recommended that the Microsoft SQL Server software not be installed on a system that acts as an Active Directory Domain Controller, this can lead to several known issues, including security risks.

A separate server should be used for the SOLIDWORKS PDM Archive Server service.  That same server can also be used for the PDM Web2 Server software.

What are the minimum hardware requirements for SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020?

The minimum SOLIDWORKS PDM hardware requirements can be found on the SOLIDWORKS System Requirements page.

What Processor (CPU) is recommended for SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020?

SOLIDWORKS PDM supports both Intel and AMD processors.

For the Database Server, Microsoft SQL can take advantage of multi core processing.  For optimal performance of PDM functions, it is recommended that the average CPU utilization be kept below 50%.  If average utilization is above 50%, then more cores may be needed.  Please note, If using Microsoft SQL Server Standard Core Licensing, adding additional cores may require also purchasing additional core licenses.  This can be discussed with your Microsoft retailer.

For the Archive Server and Web2 Server components the CPU requirements are much lower.

What Operating System is recommended for SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020 server components?

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 is officially supported on the following operating systems:

  • Windows Server 2016
  • Windows Server 2019 (recommended)

PLEASE NOTE:  Windows Server 2012 & Windows Server 2012R2 are NOT compatible with SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020.

Does SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020 work in virtual environments?

Yes, however SOLIDWORKS only tests and supports PDM in specific virtual environments.

A list of the currently supported virtual environments can be found on the SOLIDWORKS website.

Can SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020 be hosted in the cloud?

Although SOLIDWORKS does not test PDM in any cloud provider (such as Amazon AWS or Microsoft Azure), cloud based servers can be used for SOLIDWORKS PDM.

Javelin offers various PDM cloud based solutions for customers who are interested in moving their data management to this environment.

If you are investigating your own cloud environment, please take note of the following:

  • Amazon Web Service’s Relational Database Services (RDS) is not an appropriate option for hosting PDM databases as it does not allow using a db_owner This leads to several issues when using PDM.
  • The runtime restricted license of Microsoft SQL Standard 2014 that was bundled with SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional licenses purchased before Fall 2019, cannot be used for cloud based environments. For a cloud based SQL installation, you will need to ensure that you have an SQL Server license with Software Assurance, or use a EC2 or Azure instance that includes the appropriate licensing.
  • The latency from the clients to the cloud server should be under 100 milliseconds. Keep this in mind when selecting your Availability Zone.

What version and release of Microsoft SQL Server is recommended for SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020?

The following releases of Microsoft SQL Server can be used to host PDM Professional 2020 file vault databases:

  • Microsoft SQL Server 2014 SP3
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2016
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2017

The database can be hosted on SQL Server Standard or SQL Server Enterprise, however due to performance limitations SQL Express should not be used to host a SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional vault database in a production environment.

For optimal performance, Microsoft SQL Server 2017 is recommended for hosting SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020 databases.

PLEASE NOTE:  Ensure that you have the proper licensing for the version of SQL that you use for PDM Professional (your Microsoft Software Provider can help you determine if you have all the licenses needed for SQL).  Any licenses of SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional sold before the fall of 2019 automatically included runtime restricted licenses of Microsoft SQL Standard 2014.  These licenses can not be upgraded to newer versions and are not eligible for Software Assurance from Microsoft.

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 requires Microsoft ODBC drive 17.3 or later for SQL Server to be installed on the Database Server and the Clients.

How much Memory (RAM) is recommended for SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020?

16GB is recommended for Archive Servers.  For the Database server, a minimum of 32GB is recommended, however this should be increased if necessary.  For optimal performance, there should be at least enough RAM fully cache the database files into the memory, plus an additional 4GB for the Operating System and other services.

What storage options are recommended for SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020?

For PDM Archive storage, a hard drive with fast I/O speeds should be used, ideally a Solid State Drive.  Remote disks, such as a UNC share, NAS or SAN are NOT recommended for storing PDM Archives as there are known performance issues with such environments.  Additionally, SAN and NAS devices are not officially supported by SOLIDWORKS.

For the Microsoft SQL Server, it is recommended that the Windows Server OS (with the SQL software installation), database files (.mdf) and log files (.ldf) should each be separated to individual RAID 1 arrays using high speed Solid State Drives.

What are the network considerations for SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020?

SOLIDWORKS PDM Client and Server components must be able to communicate on the following ports:

Client and Database Server:

  • TCP 1433
  • UDP 1434

Client and Archive Server:

  • TCP 3030
  • UDP 3030

Client and SolidNetwork License Server:

  • TCP 25734
  • UDP 25735

If a firewall is in place between the Client systems and the Servers, exceptions must be added for these ports.

PLEASE NOTE:  These are the default ports used when the server components are installed however these can be changed through adjustments to the settings so always verify which ports your server components are using when creating any firewall exceptions.

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 no longer utilizes Transport Layer Security (TLS) 1.0, allowing it to be disabled if necessary.  However, all previous releases of SOLIDWORKS PDM (2019 and older) require TLS 1.0 to be enabled.

For remote, replicated sites, or cloud based server deployments, network latency between the clients and the Database Server must be less than 100 milliseconds (ms).  Latency above 100ms will lead to severe performance degradation, and above 200ms will result in timeout errors for most PDM functions.

Which releases of SOLIDWORKS are compatible with SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020?

The PDM Professional 2020 Add In for SOLIDWORKS is tested and fully supported for use with SOLIDWORKS 2020, 2019 and 2018.  While combinations of PDM Professional 2020 and older versions of SOLIDWORKS such as 2017 or 2016 may work, please note that they are not officially tested by SOLIDWORKS Development and so they are not fully supported combinations.

A newer release of SOLIDWORKS is never supported with a previous release of PDM (for instance, SOLIDWORKS 2020 is not compatible with SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2019).

Starting with their 2019 releases, SOLIDWORKS Composer and SOLIDWORKS Inspection Standalone both include PDM Integration built into their menus.  New for 2020, SOLIDWORKS Visualize now also includes this integration.

Integrations are available SOLIDWORKS Electrical and SOLIDWORKS PCB through the installation of additional Integration packages.

Which releases of Microsoft Office are compatible with SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020?

Microsoft Office 2013, 2016 and 2019 are all compatible with SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020.  It is recommended to use a 64-bit version of Microsoft Office.

PLEASE NOTE:  SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020 will be the last release to support Microsoft Office

What if I am using an environment that is not supported by SOLIDWORKS?

If you choose to set up SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional in an unsupported or untested environment, keep in mind that while it may initially work, issues can potentially develop at any point in the future and it may be necessary to migrate to a supported environment.

If you are implementing SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional with the assistance of the Javelin PDM Services team,  we will assess your situation and advise you on the possible issues that may arise.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2020 Server Hardware Recommendations appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at February 19, 2020 03:09 PM

SolidWorks Legion

All Uppercase, or how I learned to stop worrying about CAPS LOCK in SOLIDWORKS

SOLIDWORKS 2014 introduced the All Uppercase option for Note Annotations. Forgetting to use CAPS LOCK is no longer something to fear. The post All Uppercase, or how I learned to stop worrying about...

by fcsuper at February 19, 2020 05:53 AM

February 18, 2020

Surfacing Episode Sneak Peek

Today I posted a YouTube video of what it looks like inside the Surfacing Episode site. I know not many of you have seen it, so I thought I’d give…

by matt at February 18, 2020 10:42 PM

SolidSmack

The Birth of SOLIDWORKS on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform (3DX World Highlights)

Well, if you were one of the roughly 5000 SOLIDWORKS users at 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020 in Nashville last week (or one of the many who watched it live), you were part of the first batch to catch a glimpse of the new spot for SOLIDWORKS on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform and one of the first to get a taste of the 3DEXPERIENCE products to come.

If you were one of the other million+ SOLIDWORKS users who didn’t go… well, Dassault Systemes has big plans for the tools and capabilities you have within SOLIDWORKS and beyond. SOLIDWORKS has been ‘on’ the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, but 3DEXPERIENCE World really marks the birth of SOLIDWORKS on the platform. Here’s a quick wrap-up of the highlights, a little context, and things you’ll want to pass along to your partners in product dev.

SOLIDWORKS is Fully Onboard the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform

The 3DEXPERIENCE platform (3DX) is the Dassault Systemes (DS) Cloud solution for all things product dev related. In their own words:

The 3DEXPERIENCE platform is a BUSINESS EXPERIENCE platform [that] provides software solutions for every organization in your company [to] help you, in your value creation process, to create differentiating consumer experiences.

In human words, it’s modeling, collaboration, simulation, and planning apps that connect with each other so you can access them anywhere on any device. (Think of 3DX as an ecosystem, not unlike the Google ecosystem that, with an account, provides you access to all the tools/products from Google.) The backbone of 3DX is ENOVIA product/global lifecycle management software. In the past, SOLIDWORKS has had connections to 3DX.

At the 3DXWorld Day 1 General Session, Gian Paolo Bassi (GP), CEO of DS SOLIDWORKS announced three offers that introduce SOLIDWORKS’ integration on the 3DX platform. From their press release:

The new offers – Standard, Professional and Premium – feature SOLIDWORKS standard, professional and premium applications that are installed from, licensed from, and updated in the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, with data stored in it.

It’s the same desktop app, connected to the 3DX platform, delivering your license, updates, and data with access to support, info, and people, anywhere you’re able to access the software. It also expands the SOLIDWORKS portfolio with more tools coming to and already on the 3DX platform. Does it mean complete interconnectedness between all the apps? Ultimately. Interoperability between SOLIDWORKS and CATIA? Yet to be seen. However, with it, they will begin to introduce more products.

SOLIDWORKS is Getting More Products

SOLIDWORKS is one of Dassault’s biggest brands. How do you grow a brand? Well, outside of adding more customers or selling more products, you can add more products. The three new, previously mentioned, offers match the three traditional SOLIDWORKS packages – Standard, Premium, Professional. Each includes SOLIDWORKS (Standard, Premium, or Professional) bundled with various 3DX apps. It’s best illustrated in this table:

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

“Why did we do that?” GP, asks. “Because we want you to use only what you need. And, you will find it here. And, you will pay for, only what you use.” You can pay for those with a ‘limited time’ 3DX World offer where you can add 3D Creator, 3D Sculptor, or both. Now, before you start asking questions, you need to know…

All About 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS and Roles

Now, on the graphic above, you’ll notice it says ‘3DXPERIENCE WORKS Offers’. As you may have picked up on, 3DX WORKS is the expansion of 3DX apps into the SOLIDWORKS Portfolio. Think of it as a sub-platform of the 3DX platform. They’re bits, bobs, and capabilities that exist in other products on the 3DX platform, made available for the SOLIDWORKS (or mainstream) market. And the 3DX platform has A LOT of products. At last count, the 3DX product portfolio has 328 products. If you clicked through on that link (or caught the Day 1 General Session), you’ll see 3DX products are called Roles. The same goes for 3DX WORKS products. For example, the 3DX WORKS Premium Offer gives you access to the 3D Sculptor, 3D Creator, Simulation Designer, Collaborative Designer, Industry Innovator, and Business Innovator Roles.

GP described Roles at 1:16:18 of the General Session:

Applications are very well organized in Roles. So, it’s easy to find what you need. What is a Role? A Role is a job description, it’s what you do in real life. Why did we call them Roles? It makes a lot of sense. You think what you do and we then find all the tools for you to get your job done.”

One important thing I think GP missed was explaining that each Role can include multiple apps. And, as he said, you pay for the Role only, not each individual app. So, say you have the 3D Sculptor Role that currently contains the xShape app, but could contain multiple other apps from any of the Dassault brands. Here’s an example of the 3DX platform Aesthetic Shape Modeler Role that contains a whopping 18 different apps.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

Structural Mechanics Engineer Role (Abaqus FEA) Added

But let’s bring it back to SOLIDWORKS. If you used SOLIDWORKS, specifically SOLIDWORKS Simulation, over the past few years, you know SIMULIA Abaqus FEA has been available via the Abaqus Associative Interface for SOLIDWORKS, a SOLIDWORKS add-in that connects the two. Well, now you have direct access to Abaqus capabilities (including non-linear static (implicit) and dynamic simulations (explicit), impact/drop/crash testing, compression, etc.) via the Structural Mechanics Engineer Role (SME) within SOLIDWORKS. This comes with all SME apps available in the Role and is a perfect example of how DS can take an existing 3DX Role and make all of its capabilities available for SOLIDWORKS users.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

You Will Have Access to A Lot More Roles

Given that the 3DX platform has 300+ available Roles, and any of those can be spun out for the 3DX WORKS platform in a matter of days/weeks, there’s likely to be many more to come. Plus, with each Role containing any number of apps, the number of tools and capabilities could scale quickly. And, while these apps may not have all the capabilities you have in SOLIDWORKS, they have other features you don’t yet have in SOLIDWORKS. For example, 3D Sculptor provides subdivision (Sub-D) surface modeling technology, which SOLIDWORKS does not have. Another example is the 3D Creator Role, that contains the xDesign app. And, wouldn’t you know it…

xDesign Has Machine Learning

The xDesign app is available in the 3D Creator Role, available with any of the new SOLIDWORKS 3DX WORKS Offers. It has (at least three) features that use machine learning (artificial intelligence) – Selection Helper, Sketch Helper, Mate Predictor. Selection Helper looks at commonality in your selection and provides the option to one-click accept a suggested selection set. In the same way, Sketch Helper will provide suggestions based on the sketch you create. Mate Helper will auto-mate parts based on proximity. Similar to Smart Mates in SOLIDWORKS but, ya know, with the bonus of learning over time. At 1:20:06 GP describes the three features and there’s more on the SOLIDWORKS Blog here.

Xometry On-Demand Integration with SOLIDWORKS

In one of the best announcements of Tuesday’s General Session, Dassault Systemes announced that Xometry is the first ‘Prime Partner’ for MAKE Marketplace for SOLIDWORKS and CATIA which brings tighter integration between the software and Xometry’s on-demand manufacturing quote system. The result is price quotes in context of the design with thousands of manufacturing processes available from Xometry’s service providers.

How It Relates to What You Do Now

If there was one thing 3DEXPERIENCE World was about, it was the 3DEXPERIENCE platform with an all-out effort from DS to show how it works into a SOLIDWORKS user’s workflow and capture their bigger vision that it’s “not about just creating product; customers demand an experience.” In some regard, they struggled to communicate that. Day 2 General Session featured a complete workflow on the 3DX platform within the 3DX apps. It should have hit home. But instead of an, “I can use that with what I do!”, there was this underlying sense of, “Whaaaaat about the software I use now?”

The 3DX apps hold possibilities that should generate huge excitement. Subdivision modeling? I mean, how many decades have we waited for that? Yet, it’s possible… outside of SOLIDWORKS, within another app. Even though the 3DX apps are part of the same family — the same ‘SOLIDWORKS DNA’ — DS is going to have the pushback any outside software would have in the effort to convince them to rework or replace their processes, methodology, testing, and legacy information. We need to clearly see how it complements and utilizes this.

But then you look further out, how you use SOLIDWORKS Simulation, then a connector to Abaqus, now accessing a complete Simulation Suite within SOLIDWORKS, then… one, two, five years from now, realizing all your project information is accessible on the 3DX platform where it’s easier to open in another 3DX app instead of… that… that desktop software. You remember that desktop software? What’s it called? Hmmm, oh well.

The post The Birth of SOLIDWORKS on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform (3DX World Highlights) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 18, 2020 05:35 PM

The Javelin Blog

Unable to access SOLIDWORKS Composer User Guide or Help document?

Every now and then SOLIDWORKS Composer users report that they can’t access the SOLIDWORKS Composer user-guide/help document through SOLIDWORKS Composer window > Help > Help Topics, and by default Composer tries to open the HTML help document through the default browser, in my case I use Google Chrome.

How to access SOLIDWORKS Composer user guide

How to access SOLIDWORKS Composer user guide

Here is the result I get when an HTML document opens on Google Chrome for me. The blocked content can be enabled in Google Chrome using the command prompt, or use a different browser.

HTML document blocked by google chrome

As in above image, the link highlighted shows the path of the user guide location which can be accessed manually through windows file explorer and by clicking on the properties of this document change the default browser for all the html documents.

Default path to access the SOLIDWORKS Composer user-guide  “dsswxcomposerdoc.htm”  is:

"C:\Program Files\SOLIDWORKS Corp\SOLIDWORKS Composer\help\ENU\dsswxcomposerdoc.htm"

In my case, I changed it to Internet Explorer and as soon as I try to open this user guide using Explorer it gives me a pop-up message to enable the blocked content.

Default location of composer user guide

Here is what the SOLIDWORKS Composer user guide looks like:

SOLIDWORKS Composer User Guide Overview

SOLIDWORKS Composer User Guide Overview

Learn more about Composer

To learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer attend our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training course either in a classroom near you or live online.

The post Unable to access SOLIDWORKS Composer User Guide or Help document? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at February 18, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidWorks Legion

3DEXPERIENCE WORLD 2020, a non-comprehensive look

So, technically and actually, everyone that attended 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020 has attended every 3DEXPERIENCE World conference! Isn’t that awesome? A fresh start! Or is it? SOLIDWORKS...

by fcsuper at February 18, 2020 06:05 AM

February 17, 2020

SolidSmack

This Module Adds Realistic, Adjustable Suspension to Your RC Car

SuperScale 2020

If you’ve ever looked at your remote control car and wondered why they seem to lack the “oomph” of other RC cars, odds are it’s the power, the gear, the weight – it could be lots of things, but did you ever consider the suspension?

Obviously, RC cars don’t weigh as much as real cars. They also don’t have the need to protect their passengers from sharp turns or collisions because, well… RC cars are too tiny, and people are too large.

However, if you really want to add that extra level of realism, SuperScale 2020 allows you to simulate a real car’s weight on your RC car by adding an adjustable suspension module:

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CTbNVA4aua4?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The kit itself comes with a number of parts:

The SuperScale module has a single power cable input, four servo signal and power output cables, and a 7-pin JST plug. You’ll also find two universal brackets for mounting the servos to your RC car chassis, a male JST cable and plug, as well as a USB cable to connect it to your computer. Finally, four diodes and resistors are included should you feel like using the module’s LED controls (these activate the brake lights, headlights, and flashes on the car’s exhaust). And the installation is fairly straightforward.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0N0ElcnAqU4?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">SuperScale 2020</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">SuperScale 2020</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">SuperScale 2020</figure>

At the heart of the module is the ability to adjust your RC car’s suspension. Six dials account for different factors: reaction speed, height offset, dampening, balance, servo rotation range, and a suspension stiffness multiplier. Tinkering with these different settings allows you to set a unique suspension for your car, making it run as smooth or as stiff as you want it to.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">SuperScale 2020</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">SuperScale 2020</figure> <figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0vkq_vUlyog?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Apart from the suspension adjustment, you can also activate the brake and backfire LED lights, adjust sounds for a car horn and backfire pop, and print your PC settings for future reference.

New features are also on the way via future updates, such as the ability to adjust your car’s height and other settings via radio. Automatic direction detection will also be coming soon.

Excluding these two planned updates, there are hopes to incorporate gear switching, vehicle roll, gyro functionality, ESC signal pass-through for better acceleration and braking, and to implement even more control of other car parts such as motors and servos.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">SuperScale 2020</figure>

You can find more info on the SuperScale 2020’s various features on the module’s official webpage. There you will find an in-depth description, complete installation instructions, and a link to purchase one yourself. It costs about $80, which is more than a cheap RC car but right in the ballpark for higher-end RC builds, but such is the price of realism and kickass car drifts.

The post This Module Adds Realistic, Adjustable Suspension to Your RC Car appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 17, 2020 08:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to create Angular Center Marks in SOLIDWORKS Drawings?

Center marks are annotations that mark circle or arc centers and describe the geometry size on the drawing.

With the Center Mark tool, we can create a center mark or a center point on circular edges. The center mark lines can also be used as references for dimensions.

Center marks can be shown in three various styles such as:

  1. Single center marks (Regular) – angular center marks
  2. Linear Center marks
  3. Circular Center mark

Angular Center marks:

Angular center marks can be used as long as we are working with the linear center marks. Here is how we can use them:

  • Go to Annotation Tab on Command Manager
  • Click on Center Mark
  • This opens the Center Mark property Manager
  • Make sure the Linear Center mark icon is selected under Manual Insert options section.
  • Now scroll to the bottom of Center mark property manager and type in the value for the angle you want for center mark > hit enter
  • Click on the circular edges to add center marks.
SOLIDWORKS Angular Center Marks

45° Angular and Single Center mark

Note: To show angular and single (regular) center marks on same view , you will have to use center mark tool twice separately for both types. All 4 center- marks can’t be placed right away by using center mark tool once.

Learn more about Drawings

To learn more about SOLIDWORKS Drawings attend our SOLIDWORKS Drawings training course either in a classroom near you or live online.

The post How to create Angular Center Marks in SOLIDWORKS Drawings? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at February 17, 2020 01:00 PM

If You Have Ever Wanted A SolidWorks Surfacing Book…

Really, this is your time. The first Surfacing Bible was written in 2008, and its no longer in print. Plus its 12 versions out of date. I now have a…

by matt at February 17, 2020 09:39 AM

February 14, 2020

SolidSmack

There Will Be No General Purpose 3D Printer In The Future

Recently I’ve seen moves by several 3D printer manufacturers to position their equipment for use in specific industries, and this is a strong trend. 

Let me explain my thinking here: years ago, when the initial 3D printing patents expired, a large number of 3D printing startups appeared. Most tended to offer very basic equipment with limited capabilities. Some were even slightly reliable, but most were not. 

Over time that changed. Equipment functionality improved, as did reliability. But in all this progress the most common scenario was a device that had no specific purpose. When asked, company representatives would provide vague assertions that their 3D printer could be used for aerospace, jigs & fixtures, dental, or perhaps automotive use. Or for prosumer use. 

In other words, companies made a 3D printer but really had no specific target. They were willing to accept any usage, so long as there were buyers. The machines were typically designed for general purpose use. 

This was not exclusively the case, however. In particular, there have long been 3D printers specifically designed for the dental and jewelry markets. But outside of those areas, it was usually unclear for what industry a given machine was designed. 

That’s not to say that 3D printer manufacturers didn’t want to address specific industries. Indeed there were many companies that targeted particular industry segments, like education, aerospace or manufacturing. They would prepare educational programs, case studies, offer consulting and other activities to entice those in a particular industry to partake of their equipment. 

However, in almost every case, the machines themselves were not specifically designed for the target environment. Machine first, with some marketing to push it into an industry. 

It’s no wonder it’s been an uphill struggle to light up the world with 3D printing technology. 

More recently I’ve seen several companies take an extra step. While they still offer the same types of marketing approaches, the machines themselves are different. They and their supporting infrastructure are being specifically designed for specific target industries. 

For example, consider the Structo Velox device we wrote about recently. This is a machine designed from ground up for dental offices. It includes a number of convenience features and automation to make life quite straightforward for dental technicians. This is a machine that could technically be used for other purposes, but would never do so because it is so optimized for dental use. 

In a way, the MakerBot Classroom offering is similar: MakerBot deeply investigated the education segment and came up with a custom solution involving materials, processes, and services — and a 3D printer, although it’s importance in the solution is minimal — that matched the needs of that audience. No other audience would consider purchasing MakerBot Classroom. 

This is the correct approach: engineer a solution that is designed for the end-users. Don’t hope to bend the end-users to fit the machine. They won’t go willingly. 

This approach is likely to be more successful, and it will provoke more 3D printer manufacturers to do the same. Thus, in the future, we’ll see fewer “general purpose” 3D printers and an increasing number of devices and associated services that are specifically designed for particular industry segments.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

Turbine image by CMitchell licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International

The post There Will Be No General Purpose 3D Printer In The Future appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at February 14, 2020 06:20 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Rx now included with SOLIDWORKS Composer

Until SOLIDWORKS 2019 SOLIDWORKS Rx used to get installed automatically by default only with SOLIDWORKS installation.

And now in SOLIDWORKS 2020, SOLIDWORKS Rx now supports SOLIDWORKS Composer and installs by default when SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020 is installed. When we have different sorts of issues with Composer — for example performance issues, the Problem Capture tab in SOLIDWORKS Rx can help us to collect files, videos, log files, and settings that can be shared with a technical support team for troubleshooting.

SOLIDWORKS Composer Rx Tool

SOLIDWORKS Composer Rx Tool

NOTE: SOLIDWORKS Composer will only be shown in the SOLIDWORKS RX 2020 capture drop down list if you have installed the 2020 version of Composer.

Here are the steps of how to use Rx Tool to capture composer issues when reporting problems to Javelin technical support:

  1. Go to the Help icon on the right of Composer user interface >  SOLIDWORKS Rx tool.
  2. This will launch SOLIDWORKS Rx 2020 > Go to Problem Capture Tab.
  3. In the Capture section, choose the application to capture from the drop down list, in our case: SW Composer
  4. Click Record Video > it gives a pop-up message to use current composer session or restart SW Composer.
  5. SOLIDWORKS Rx now records the active SOLIDWORKS Composer session, perform all the steps that you would like to be recorded in the video to report to the Javelin technical support team. Now click finish recording > right away the capture icon will show green check-mark as it’s done.
  6. Add files option allows us to add additional files f needed.
  7. Now once all the required information is added > Click on Package files.
  8. This will let us package the files in the Package section into a .ZIP file and send it, along with a description of the problem.

Information collected using Rx Tool

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer

To learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer attend our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training course either in a classroom near you or live online.

The post SOLIDWORKS Rx now included with SOLIDWORKS Composer appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at February 14, 2020 01:00 PM

February 13, 2020

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2020 Text Leader and Block Leader

Now when using SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2020 we can create text leader lines with blocks and notes in 2D panel layouts and harness drawings.

Text and balloons with leader lines are a common method to convey design notes. Adding these annotations with dedicated commands and a leader style manager it’s easy to finish design work more efficiently and present the design clearly.

How to access text leader/block leader tools?

Text leader and Block leader tools can be access on two separate tabs:

  • Draw Tab > Annotation > Text Leader/Block leader

    Draw Tab - Leader lines

    Draw Tab – Leader lines

  • Cabinet layout Tab > Annotation > Text Leader/Block leader
SOLIDWORKS Electrical Text Leader/Block leader

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Text Leader/Block leader

Once the leaders are used in the electrical drawing, by selecting the leader it shows all the graphical properties in the properties pane on the right.

Using properties pane we can control justification of text, attachment type,arrowhead and specifically for block leader we can select block source as circle, triangle etc.

Graphical properties of SOLIDWORKS Electrical Text Leader

Graphical properties of leaders

Leader style Manager can also be used to set the current leader and manager all leader styles.Learn more about Leader Style manager in electrical here.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Electrical training course either in a Canadian classroom near you or live online. For more information about electrical software and training solutions call 1-877-219-6757.

The post SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2020 Text Leader and Block Leader appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at February 13, 2020 01:00 PM

February 12, 2020

The Javelin Blog

How to attatch to a different SOLIDWORKS PDM Archive Server Location

Whether its because the SOLIDWORKS PDM archives have been migrated to a new server, or you are working in a different office than usual and need to connect through a replicated Archive Server, it may be necessary to modify which Archive Server your PDM Vault View is attached to.

This can be done very easily through the Windows Registry.  The change can be applied without needing to check in any files beforehand and without losing any work.

The first step is to determine how the Vault View on the client computer was originally set up.  There are two possible ways the vault view might have been attached, either using the default “For all users on this computer” or “Only for me

Select Attach Location

Select Attach Location

Depending on which Attach type was used, the server information will be stored in different locations in the Windows Registry.

If you don’t know which Attach type was used originally, first check the location used by the default, “For all users on this computer” option.

If “For all users on this computer” was used:

This option creates registry entries for the SOLIDWORKS PDM Archive Server information in these two locations:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\SolidWorks\Applications\PDMWorks Enterprise\Databases\VAULTNAME

and

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\WOW6432Node\SolidWorks\Applications\PDMWorks Enterprise\Databases\VAULTNAME

The string value “ServerLoc” contains the Archive Server computer name.  To attach to the new server, this value must be changed in BOTH of the locations listed above.  If the value in the WOW6432Node section of the registry is not updated, there will be errors with some applications when trying to browse into the vault view.

ServerLoc Registry String

ServerLoc Registry String

Once the change is made, exit the PDM Client software and log back in again.  The view will immediately begin using the new server name.

If you do not see the vault name listed under “Databases”, then the view was set up using the “Only me” Attach Type.

If “Only me” was used:

This option creates registry entries for the server information in these two locations:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Solidworks\Applications\PDMWorks Enterprise\Vaults\VAULTNAME

and

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\WOW6432Node\SolidWorks\Applications\PDMWorks Enterprise\Vaults\VAULTNAME

Again, the string value “ServerLoc” contains the Archive Server computer name.  Modify the string, in BOTH locations, with the new server name, then exit the PDM Client software and log in again to begin using the new Archive Server.

ServerLoc Archive Server Name

ServerLoc Archive Server Name

The post How to attatch to a different SOLIDWORKS PDM Archive Server Location appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at February 12, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Watch This: Woodturning A Nessie Egg From Cherry Burl and Resin

Woodturning

Despite it not being proven (yet), the Loch Ness Monster has its fair share of cult followers; not all of whom are as crazy as you think. Some just like the idea of a giant sea creature guarding the waters of Scotland, so much so that they want to make a giant wooden egg in place of the real deal.

YouTube channel Etienne Morin Woodturning has taken a Cherrywood burl and turned it into an egg Nessie would be proud to nurture:

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-RzFt_7jN0g?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

After chipping off the bark, he readies the resin and pours it into the burl’s many holes, cracks, and crevices. Most of the resin mixture goes into a giant hole on one side, filling it up to create a more egg-like shape for woodturning.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Woodturning Nessie Egg</figure>

Since he doesn’t have a pressure pot, he has to put borders around the resin and wait for it to harden the old fashioned way. Once the mixture is relatively hard, he can work on fissures located on other sides of the burl.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Woodturning Nessie Egg</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Woodturning Nessie Egg</figure>

With the resin dried, he can finally get to woodturning. Chipping rough wood into a smooth egg takes a lot of time and patience but with enough of it, a mythical being’s egg starts to emerge. And the best part: this one is real.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Woodturning Nessie Egg</figure>

As more of the burl gets chipped away, bad wood is removed and cracks are filled with white epoxy. These are simple matters to attend to, but he has to make sure to take a pause now and then to look out for them.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Woodturning Nessie Egg</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Woodturning Nessie Egg</figure>

Once he gets the burl down to its final egg shape, he cuts off the top portion and starts sanding it down (first with an electric sander and then manually with sandpaper) to make everything smooth.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Woodturning Nessie Egg</figure>

He then applies some Yorkshire grit and high gloss Hampshire sheen to give some shine to the egg’s surface. To cap it all off, he buffers the entire egg until it’s as shiny as the surface of the water Nessie resides in.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Woodturning Nessie Egg</figure>

The bottom portion of the egg is cut off-screen, but you can be sure it went through the same sanding and polishing process as the rest of the faux egg. The end result is a very shiny, very real wooden egg for a yet unproven species.

You can find more woodturning goodness over at the Etienne Morin Woodturning YouTube channel.

The post Watch This: Woodturning A Nessie Egg From Cherry Burl and Resin appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 12, 2020 12:01 PM

This Low-Budget Filmmaker Uses DIY Engineering to Get Hollywood Effects

Movie-Camera

If you ever wanted to recreate some of your favorite movie shots but didn’t have the Hollywood budget for a high-end camera, then be glad you live in the 20th century. Almost all cameras these days, be they on the higher or lower end, have a good photo and video-taking capabilities. Even if you don’t know how to use the various filters and features of your phone or camera, you can still make a bad video look good in post thanks to the power of computer editing.

Just take a look at YouTuber Karen Cheng, who stretches her creativity by using a bunch of Insta360 cameras and clever tricks to create some mesmerizing shots you might see in an Inception-like film:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-4-3 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/y6igxTloESc?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Every scene Cheng captures has a Hollywood-esque vibe to them but in reality, she’s just using the 360 cameras (and her friends) to their fullest extent:

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">360 camera tricks</figure>

The fight scene is done by strapping a camera on a person and wheeling them back on a chair.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">360 camera tricks</figure>

The dolly zoom has the drinkers moving in once the camera pans out, while the zoom effects both to and from the source are added in post-production.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">360 camera tricks</figure>

The rotating stairwell shot uses the Insta360’s gyro and optical stabilization features to stay stable. By attaching the camera to a fishing rod and lowering it down, you get a shot that is hypnotizing as it is practical.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">360 camera tricks</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">360 camera tricks</figure>

This shot with the waves crashing down from above is made by taking a 360 pan of a walk on the beach, zooming it out, and adding effects using an iPhone app. You can even see the person holding the selfie stick in the final video!

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">360 camera tricks</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">360 camera tricks</figure>

Lastly, the “drone’ shot you see isn’t actually from a real, expensive drone. It’s just a 360 camera on a 10-foot pole that gets raised up before diving down through a hole. Once it’s through, it gets passed to another person and re-raised on the other side. As for the pans and other camera effects, these are added in post thanks to the 360 camera feature.

It’s amazing how many shots you can pull with just a few cameras, a little imagination, and good friends who are willing to help you dangle a camera over a hotel stairwell for the perfect shot.

The post This Low-Budget Filmmaker Uses DIY Engineering to Get Hollywood Effects appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 12, 2020 11:56 AM

You Should Follow This Mechanical Engineering Instagram Feed

Gear Design

Have you ever wondered how new machine gears get their intricate, well-defined grooves? The answer is just like anything new made in this world: through the pain and suffering of much older gears and machines.

Medley’s Mechanical Engineering is an Instagram page dedicated to showing the behind-the-scenes work done by machines that make parts for a new tech generation. Most of the videos feature various types of CNC machines which use sharp grooves to sculpt different kinds of metals:

<figure class="wp-block-embed"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-embed"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-embed">
View this post on Instagram

Slowly making a complete bevel gear #gear #metal #lathes #ukengineering #follow #oil

A post shared by @ medleys_mechanical_engineering on <time datetime="2019-08-22T17:14:54+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Aug 22, 2019 at 10:14am PDT</time>

</figure>

Different machines have different methods of cutting specific gears. Some use a single rotating cutting tool while others use two simultaneous parts that cut the gear while oil is poured over the metal. No matter the process, the resulting gears look smooth, precise, and are customized to fit the machines they will soon power.

<figure class="wp-block-embed">
View this post on Instagram

More engineering 👌🏼 @medleys_mechanical_engineering #making #a #bevel #gear #skill #engineering #oldschool #machines #machineshoplife #machineshop

A post shared by @ medleys_mechanical_engineering on <time datetime="2019-09-13T14:38:15+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Sep 13, 2019 at 7:38am PDT</time>

</figure> <figure class="wp-block-embed">
View this post on Instagram

Screw cutting one long bolt!! Follow for more @medleys_mechanical_engineering #share #like #comment #screwcutting #threads #nut

A post shared by @ medleys_mechanical_engineering on <time datetime="2019-09-16T15:44:11+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Sep 16, 2019 at 8:44am PDT</time>

</figure> <figure class="wp-block-embed"></figure>

It also helps that watching different methods of mechanical machining is hugely satisfying. Seeing the clack of two gears and the smoothness of the cutover pouring oil is just as calming as a single tool making the screw cut of a long bolt or file out a giant, cast-iron shaft.

Medley’s Mechanical Engineering Instagram page has more satisfying CNC machining videos. He also has a YouTube channel in the works, so be sure to keep an eye out for it as well.

The post You Should Follow This Mechanical Engineering Instagram Feed appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 12, 2020 11:49 AM

February 11, 2020

The Javelin Blog

3DEXPERIENCE World 2020 Live Online Sessions

If you couldn’t make it to Nashville for 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020 (formerly SOLIDWORKS World) to see the latest from SOLIDWORKS, no problem. You can attend the conference LIVE ONLINE on the SOLIDWORKS website or via the SOLIDWORKS YouTube or Facebook channels each day as they bring you live content from around the entire event.

SOLIDWORKS will be showcasing new technology from a LIVE shop floor in the 3DEXPERIENCE Playground, talking to keynote presenters and passionate customers and so much more. Be sure to visit the 3DEXPERIENCE website and bookmark the page from February 9th-12th!

3DEXPERIENCE World 2020

3DEXPERIENCE World 2020

On-demand and Live Sessions

You can catch the sessions live or watch them on-demand. Sessions include technical breakouts where you can learn tips and tricks

3DEXPERIENCE World 2020: Discover your new potential

Monday, Feb 10th 8:00AM-Noon CT

Starting with the General Session presentations from 8:30-10am CT: when human ingenuity converges with cutting-edge technology, amazing things happen. See how SOLIDWORKS with 3DEXPERIENCE® WORKS is enabling a transformative Industry Renaissance, and is changing the capacity of what’s possible for users, businesses and industries.

3DEXPERIENCE World 2020: Learn from the Experts

Monday, Feb 10th 1:00PM-5:45PM CT

LIVE look into Breakout Sessions, including Toby’s Sheet Metal Tips and Tricks & SOLIDWORKS Assembly Tips and Tricks, Model Mania announcements, Magic Wheelchair Interview, Hack-A-Thon.

3DEXPERIENCE World 2020: Extend your capability

Tuesday, Feb 11th 8:00AM-Noon CT

Starting with the General Session presentations from 8:30-10am CT: For the builders, makers, innovators and leaders who use SOLIDWORKS to bring ideas to life, this is your chance to take a deeper dive. Explore the latest and greatest in the world of SOLIDWORKS, then expand your perception of what’s possible when customers share how and why they are transitioning from product to platform.

3DEXPERIENCE World 2020: Workforce of the Future

Tuesday Afternoon, Feb 11th 1:00-4:00PM CT

Interviews with inspiring Entrepreneurs, Educators from the Education Zone, and Helping Hands Workshop and The Hive. Join a SOLIDWORKS Breakout session, and much more…

3DEXPERIENCE World 2020: Future-proof your creativity

Wednesday, Feb 12th 8:00AM-Noon CT

Starting off with the General Session presentation from 8:00-10am CT: Come together to celebrate one last time, and hear from industry pioneers such as Dean Kamen, and learn about how the skills and strategies shared at 3DEXPERIENCE World can power innovation, growth and prosperity for users, business leaders and entrepreneurs — now and into the future.

3DEXPERIENCE World 2020: Learn from the experts

Wednesday Afternoon, Feb 12th 12:30-4:00PM CT

3DEXPERIENCE World will wrap up with Industry Experts and Thought Leaders, and students making a difference in the design and innovation communities.

Attend the SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE World events online now »

The post 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020 Live Online Sessions appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at February 11, 2020 01:34 PM

SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2020 supports AMD ProRender

Great news for AMD fans!

AMD Radeon™ ProRender, a powerful physics-based rendering engine that enables creative professionals to produce stunningly photorealistic images. Built on highly efficient, high-performance Radeon Rays technology, Radeon ProRender’s complete, scalable ray tracing engine uses open industry standards to harness GPU and CPU performance for swift, impressive results.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Rendering

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Rendering

To use ProRender in SOLIDWORKS Visualize, click Tools > Options > 3D Viewport and, under Render Engine, select AMD Radeon ProRender.

AMD Radeon ProRender Option

AMD Radeon ProRender Option

The post SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2020 supports AMD ProRender appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Shawn McEachern at February 11, 2020 01:00 PM

February 10, 2020

Dezignstuff On Instagram

Instagram has been a pretty passive thing for me until recently. I just kind of watched the pretty pictures go by. But now with the Episodes site, I’ve got more…

by matt at February 10, 2020 06:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to change the SOLIDWORKS Composer Viewport Ground

When working in SOLIDWORKS Composer you will notice that there is a Dassault Systèmes logo on the SOLIDWORKS Composer Viewport Ground by default. If you want to remove this, or change it to something else you can.

Default ground and DS logo removed (before and after)

Default ground and DS logo removed (before and after)

To access the SOLIDWORKS Composer Viewport Ground properties:

Through Collaboration Tab:

  1. On Collaboration Tab > Expand Environment > click on Ground > this shows the properties of the ground on Properties pane.
  2. Ground can be toggled on and off  by checking or un-checking the box.
  3. In properties pane > remove “%DS%” text from the ground texture property to remove Dassault systems logo or click on the ellipsis to browse another texture that can be any supported image type such as bitmap (.bmp), .Jpeg, targa (.tga) or .Rgb.
SOLIDWORKS Composer Ground properties - Collaboration Tab

Ground properties – Collaboration Tab

Through Document properties:

  1. Go to File > Properties >  Document properties (current document)/Default Document Properties (future documents) > Viewport.
  2. In General section toggle the ground on or off by selecting or deselecting the check-box.
  3. Just below the Ground checkbox there is an area where you can remove “%DS%” to remove the Dassault systems from the ground or change the texture path to another image using the ellipsis.
SOLIDWORKS Composer Viewport Ground properties

Ground properties – Document properties (DS logo removed using backspace)

To turn off the ground completely you can also go to Render Tab > Toggle the ground and grid ON/OFF

Toggle ground ON or OFF

Toggle ground ON or OFF

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer

To learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer attend our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training course either in a classroom near you or live online.

The post How to change the SOLIDWORKS Composer Viewport Ground appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at February 10, 2020 01:00 PM

February 07, 2020

The Javelin Blog

How to create a Section View in SOLIDWORKS Composer?

Section views are created to see the internal cross section of the model or peer inside the model — without moving or hiding any geometry.

Normally, we create the section view in a SOLIDWORKS 3D model with the Section Tool from the Heads up view toolbar, and in SOLIDWORKS Drawings using the section line.

In a similar way, we can create section views in SOLIDWORKS Composer by using a cutting plane. Using cutting planes, we can create and manage cross-section (cutaway) views of our models.

Here are the steps to create a section view:

Step 1:

First of all we will add the cutting plane that will appear in the collaboration tab, that we will use to create a section. Go to Author Tab > Cutting Planes > Create.

Right away our cursor changes into big red arrow.

As we had no actors selected, before we clicked create, the cutting plane is applied to the entire model.

Create Cutting Plane

Create Cutting Plane

Step 2:

This Red arrow is the positioning arrow. Now click on any face of the model. The cutting plane is created normal to the positioning arrow.

Now drag the plane manually using mouse to control the depth of section. Or click on the plane to see all the properties of plane in the properties pane on the left of composer window.

Hold the Alt Key to align particular axis when placing a SOLIDWORKS Composer Section View cutting plane.

Cross-section of a watering can

Cross-section of a watering can

Step 3:

Now double click on the cutting plane to re-orient the model, so that the cutting plane is parallel to the screen.

Double click cutting plane to re-orient

Double click cutting plane to re-orient

Step 4:

Now let’s learn how to move and rotate the cutting plane easily. Re-orient the model back to 3D isometric view through Home Tab> Align Camera >select any custom camera position.

Move your cursor to any position on top of the cutting plane, it shows the move handle and allows you to move and control the depth.

However, if you would like to rotate the cutting plane to have a section at an angle, hold the corner of cutting plane, the pointer will change to rotate handle and will allow to rotate the plane.

Move and Rotate the SOLIDWORKS Composer Section cutting plane

Move and Rotate the cutting plane

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer

To learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer attend our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training course either in a classroom near you or live online.

The post How to create a Section View in SOLIDWORKS Composer? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at February 07, 2020 01:00 PM

February 06, 2020

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Application Program Interface (API)

SOLIDWORKS has a lot of tools that allows users to model a simple part design to mount a VFD all the way up to simulating a real life flow simulation task and even extends out to data management capabilities.

Given the above range of events, there also exists a tool in the background that allows users to develop code to integrate within their process for redundant tasks to make their day to day workflow simpler known as Application Program Interface (API).

SOLIDWORKS 2020 API

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Application Program Interface

The SOLIDWORKS API Interface has been around since 2010 and is going strong. The late-breaking updates for the tool can be found on the SOLIDWORKS API Help website, but below is a sneak peek. SOLIDWORKS 2020 API includes that ability to:

Dim instance As ISelectionMgr
Dim Append As System.Boolean

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Macros/API

Javelin provides SOLIDWORKS VB for Applications and SOLIDWORKS API training courses, which you can take live online, or in one of our Canadian classrooms. Check our schedule to learn more.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Application Program Interface (API) appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Samony Riyaz at February 06, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Digital Artist Creates A Virtual Traffic Jam With 99 Smartphones

While most of the topics we share on SolidSmack show the beneficial and awesome aspects of design, there are some which are… less than savory.

Just take a look at how digital artist Simon Weckert takes advantage of Google Maps’ GPS locator technology to create his own personal traffic jam:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/k5eL_al_m7Q?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Now you’re probably thinking where all the cars are at; and that’s just it: there are none. By lugging 99 second-hand smartphones in a red wagon in the middle of the street throughout the city of Berlin, Weckert has effectively created a virtual traffic jam.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">google maps hacks</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">google maps hacks</figure>

Each phone has their GPS turned on, and by walking through the areas where cars usually pass (which is something you should never do), Google Maps takes this information and translates it to a jam-packed street. What would normally be a green, empty road now looks like a red one on the app.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">google maps hacks</figure>

Save for walking in the street, it’s hard to say if what Weckert is doing is illegal. He isn’t hurting anybody, and though drivers using Google Maps might take this misinformation and find another route, all they have to do is visually check the roads to confirm they are empty.

However, it will be hard to find practical applications for this app hack. Lugging a hundred smartphones in your car while driving would only create a virtual traffic jam on the road you are currently on. Unless you have a friend who is willing to drive ahead with said phones to clear a path (if you have such a friend, then good for you), you’ll still have to content with the traffic on your planned route.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">google maps hacks</figure>

Though it’s quite cumbersome to get working (who has time to get 99 smartphones and put them in a wagon?), it’s still a sneaky maphack for an app which has been around since 2005.

Simon Weckert’s webpage goes more into detail of his Google Maps hack, as well as his other, less morally questionable works.

The post Digital Artist Creates A Virtual Traffic Jam With 99 Smartphones appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 06, 2020 12:23 PM

February 05, 2020

SolidSmack

Student or Educator? A RIZE 3D Printer May Be For You.

If you’re a youngin’ whose neurons have just myelinated or an educator who’s responsible for bludgeoning their brain tissue with knowledge, there’s a 3D printer option you’ll want to add to your lab list – A RIZE 3D Printer.

If you’re unfamiliar with RIZE, they came on the scene in 2017, introducing the RIZE ONE 3D printer at SOLIDWORKS World. It turned heads as the first (to our knowledge) to provide 3D printing in the office, with zero VOCs, zero post-processing with solvents, and no need for a technician. Then, in November 2019 at FORMNEXT, they brought the same technology to the XRIZE full-color + composite 3D printer. Both are game-changers for the office space and, apparently, for the education space.

This week, they announced 3x growth of their education customers — whether that’s three new customers or a multiple thereof isn’t clear — and it’s not hard to see why it would be attractive. In their work with New Jersey UCVTS’ FIRST Robotics Team, they brought functional prototyping and part labeling to their designs. Oh, and prevented their exposure to toxic plastic inhalation.

Other colleges and universities working with RIZE, include:

  • Wentworth Institute of Technology
  • Georgia Piedmont Technical College
  • Rochester Institute of Technology
  • Wichita State University’s National Institute for Aviation Research

What are RIZE 3D Printer Prices?

  • XRIZE Full Color 3D Printer – From $55,000
  • RIZE ONE Monochrome 3D Printer – From $26,000

Depending on the funding your design/engineering department receives, that may be affordable or expensive and, while about the cost of a book for English Lit, likely a bit stiff for a debt-saddled student. However, those are the retail starting prices and don’t represent what education or lab pricing RIZE may offer. For the capabilities offered though, it’s certainly one to evaluate for the lab or classroom.

If you’re a student or educator using a RIZE 3D Printer, send us a message and tell us how you’re using it in the classroom!

The post Student or Educator? A RIZE 3D Printer May Be For You. appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 05, 2020 08:46 PM

The Javelin Blog

Changing the SOLIDWORKS PDM License Server

Changing the computer that is used as the SOLIDWORKS PDM License Server is actually very easy and can be accomplished quickly in a single step, even if there are many users or multiple vaults involved.

On any client computer, open the PDM Administration console and log into any vault as the Admin user.

Double click on the “Licensing” node to open the “Set License” dialogue.

Add Server

Add Server

On the Server List tab, click “Add…” then enter the port number (the default licensing port is 25734) and name of the new license server using the format 25734@servername.

Once you have added the new SOLIDWORKS PDM License Server, you can remove the existing server by selecting it in the list and clicking “Remove“.

The License node information is shared among all vaults whose databases reside on the same instance of Microsoft SQL Server, so if you have multiple vaults, you should only have to edit the License node once.

Once this change is made, all users should Exit out of SOLIDWORKS PDM and log back in so they can begin using the new SOLIDWORKS PDM License Server.

License Server has been changed

License Server has been changed

NOTE: If users do not log out, after about a 1 hour grace period, they will no longer be able to access the vault until they right-click on the PDM “blueberry” and Exit the software.

The post Changing the SOLIDWORKS PDM License Server appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at February 05, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Rolls-Royce ACCEL Aims to Be The Fastest All-Electric Airplane

Rolls Royce ACCEL

You may know them for their cars, but Rolls-Royce is currently looking to the sky instead of just the roads. ACCEL – their new electric plane project which stands for “accelerating the electrification of flight” is a single seat, electricity-powered airplane that aims to reach a top speed of 300 mph.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/307303886" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Made in collaboration with a number of partners including aviation company Electroflight and electric motor and motor controller producer YASA Limited, the ACCEL project is given full support by the UK government and is planned to take flight over Great Britain sometime in 2020.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Rolls Royce ACCEL</figure>

Powering this electric plane is an energy-dense battery pack with 6,000 cells. This provides the ACCEL with enough power to fly at high speeds at a maximum distance of 200 miles without having to recharge. To help lessen the plane’s heat and maximum weight, the batteries are given thermal protection, an advanced cooling system, and were made to be as light as can be.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Rolls Royce ACCEL</figure>

Having an advanced battery pack would be useless without advanced motors to power, and the ACCEL has three high power motors designed by YASA Limited to move the plane propellers. Combined, the motors grant a total of 500 horsepower to the plane. Even with this extra power, the propeller blades of the ACCEL are made to rotate at a much slower rate than normal airplanes to keep the plane more quiet and stable.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Rolls Royce ACCEL</figure>

Couple this with an all-electric powertrain, and you have a motor which has 90% energy efficiency with no emissions whatsoever.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Rolls Royce ACCEL</figure>

To make sure the tech powering the ACCEL is always running smoothly, sensors are installed on the powertrain which collect flight information such as the battery’s temperature, wattage, and other performance metrics.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Rolls Royce ACCEL</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Rolls Royce ACCEL</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Rolls Royce ACCEL</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Rolls Royce ACCEL</figure>

The ACCEL project is one of the ways Rolls-Royce seeks to lower vehicle carbon emissions as a whole. Why they wish to work on air vehicles instead of their own cars remains a mystery, but they are also working with Norwegian airline Widerøe to help make the airline’s planes emission-free by the year 2030. Should the ACCEL prove successful, we could be on the verge of a more eco-friendly form of air travel.

You can find the ACCEL project on the Rolls-Royce webpage, as well as find short, ten-second documentation videos on the car company’s Vimeo page.

The post The Rolls-Royce ACCEL Aims to Be The Fastest All-Electric Airplane appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 05, 2020 11:36 AM

February 04, 2020

The Javelin Blog

360 Degree Capture in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020

Now in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020 we have a new option – “360° Capture” which captures a defined number of images of the model along a vertical axis performing a 360° clockwise rotation.

Using this tool will help us efficiently publish/save custom views directly rather than manually creating them in views tab and then publishing.

360° Capture can be toggled on through Workshop Pane > High Resolution Image/ Technical Illustration Tab’s > Multiple Tab > 360° Capture.

The vertical axis determines the orientation of the camera. And can be defined through File > Properties > Document Properties > Viewport > Vertical axis > Select (+,-) X or Y or Z.

360 Degree Capture in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020

360 Degree Capture in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020

  • If Z is defined as the vertical axis, then the rotation plane will be XY.
  • If Y is defined as the vertical axis, then the rotation plane will be XZ.
  • If X is defined as the vertical axis, then the rotation plane will be YZ.

Enter the number of images you want to capture along the 360° path in the Number of Images box.

Whereas, in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2019 this option didn’t exist and we spent so much time defining the angles for custom camera views through File > document properties > viewport properties > custom camera views > created the new views on Views Tab and then saved the multiple views through technical illustration and high resolution.

As you can see in the above image: in my case I selected “+Y” as my vertical axis and number of images to 5. On publishing images through workshop I got total 6 images, one of them was my actual default view in view tab and rest 5 created by 360° Capture.

Result: 5 images created using 360 Degree Capture

Result: 5 images created using 360 Degree Capture

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer

To learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer attend our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training course either in a classroom near you or live online.

The post 360 Degree Capture in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at February 04, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

This Band Makes Wicked Tunes From Barcodes

barcodress

Here’s something you’ve never seen before: a barcode scanner being used as a musical instrument:

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</figure>

Part of the Electronicos Fantasticos project which aims to reuse old consumer electronics by turning them into instruments, this “Barcoderess” may look like normal prison attire but is in fact a piece of clothing covered in a number of different barcodes.

These barcodes do more than make it difficult to check out at the register, however. By scanning the codes using a barcode scanner connected directly to a high-powered speaker, you can create different notes.

In the hands of a maestro (or a very bored cashier), these notes can be strung together to form some really party-worthy beats:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2CvnajExX-A?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Before it is turned into wearable clothing, the cloth is first spread out and filled with different barcodes. The performer gets to practice with the cloth before the actual show so that once he/she wears the “dress”, he knows exactly where each note is located on his/her body.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">barcodress</figure>

To up the difficulty, wearers of the Barcodress actually dance in a frantic but choreographed manner (dubbed the “Barcodance”) during concerts. So instead of waving your hands over your body like someone who can’t seem to find his glasses, you’re actually twisting and contorting yourself to produce your own music.

According to producers Minami Iriyama and the Nicos Orchest-Lab, the Barcodress and Barcodance combo functions like a human turntable, with the clothes being a record, the dancer as a turntable, and the barcode scanners functioning as record needles. This way of thinking, combined with the unique method of sound production, allows for new ways of performing and musical expression.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ANIDBu4B9so?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Electronicos Fantasticos has a number of projects on their webpage similar to the Barcodress, such as a fan bass guitar, an electric fan harp, and a CRT-TV soundboard. If the future of the music industry is this weird, maybe it will keep older people listening to new tunes!

The post This Band Makes Wicked Tunes From Barcodes appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 04, 2020 12:18 PM

February 03, 2020

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Structure System Angle Identifier

The latest feature to be added to the SOLIDWORKS Structure System is Angle Direction and Rotation. It can be quite handy to know what the mitre angle is and if it’s the same on both sides.

Angle Direction and Rotation is displayed in the Cut-List Properties which are also available for Structural Members as well as SOLIDWORKS Weldments.

The Angle Direction property indicates whether the two end faces of the body are along the same direction or not.

SOLIDWORKS Cut-List Properties

SOLIDWORKS Cut-List Properties

You can specify either: Same, Opposite, Out of Plane or None.  The Angle Twist property indicates the angle between the normals of two end cut planes for out of plane trimming. You can set the angle to between 0–180 degrees.

Properties set

Angle Direction and Rotation Properties set

Looking at the screen shots this is how it shows up. This is for primary and secondary members. For a video on how the Structure System works please take a look at my colleague’s SOLIDWORKS Structure System overview article and video.

The post SOLIDWORKS Structure System Angle Identifier appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at February 03, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Michael Papadakis Focuses The Sun’s Power To Make Awesome Scorched Art

heliography

Do you remember being told off for burning ants and leaves with a magnifying glass when you were a kid? If so, congrats; your parents made sure you wouldn’t go blind from staring at focused sunlight for too long.

Taking a page out of this timeless childhood pastime, artist and filmmaker Michael Papadakis of Sunscribes has magnified (see what I did there?) the sun’s rays using a number of lenses and mirrors to create some awe-inspiring etched art:

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</figure>

“Heliography” (a term he coined himself) is more than just the finished product. Papadakis usually gets invited to events for major brands who inquire his unique form of art. It’s there on location where he works his magic and burns a unique piece specifically for the client.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">heliography</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">heliography</figure>

Apart from the usual array of handheld magnifying glasses, Papadakis carries a bunch of different-sized mirrors which he holds up to the wood or stone canvases. He also has a number of lenses on sticks of varying lengths for pieces which are a little taller or out of reach.

What’s amazing is he is totally self-taught and self-produced. Since no one could teach him a unique brand of art, Michael had to go through a lot of trial, error, and eye-blinding to fine-tune his heliography to a point where he could provide consistent results.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kZa_B8JHqKg?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

With every piece, he makes sure to wear UV protective eyewear to protect his eyes and UV protective clothing to save his skin from the sun’s rays and accidents which come from working with focused sunlight (such as chunks of rock unexpectedly chipping off). He always has a fire extinguisher on hand and NEVER works in an area which has flammable materials or is prone to wildfires.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/mq6792iBbCo?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure> <figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wlMbRZU7HsQ?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure> <figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/adnzFq4gPKY?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

His portfolio includes a number of sunburned portraits of everyday objects, calligraphy, and numerous people and animals. You can see the finished products as well as behind-the-scenes footage of them on his Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube channel and of course, the Sunscribes webpage.

The post Michael Papadakis Focuses The Sun’s Power To Make Awesome Scorched Art appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 03, 2020 12:12 PM

Dezignstuff Episodes Open For Business

The first thing I need to say is to those people who paid for introductory memberships, your membership is still good for the remainder of your year. For the rest…

by matt at February 03, 2020 09:46 AM

January 31, 2020

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: The Jellyfiggle (Best Links of the Week!)

A jellyfiggle of small proportions galloped into the stableyard, shifting its gaze toward the pumphouse. We wouldn’t be able to use the blast hoses against its wily thorax flaps, but if we could trigger the flame retardant system, there may be a chance to protect us against its use of these links.

Fernando Correa – There’s something refreshing about Fernando’s sketchy style with muted tones and blocky shading. Cars, weapons, characters and more. Ahhh.

Santi – Lovely bunch of 3D art and visuals with a still life/product shot kind of focus created by Berlin-based artist, SDanti Zoraidez.

Biodiversity Heritage Library – Diagrams, sketches, botanical, animal, and more. Over 150,000 illustrations are available for free download and a treat to view.

Cyberpunk is Closer Than You Think – The entries are in and winners chosen for this amazing photo contest put on by CD Projekt Red.

Petertarka – Instagram follow of the week. From abstract to shape heavy, colorful compositions in this beautiful, whimsical, odd, captivating 3D art.

Decadence and Neglect – The wonderful architectural photography of James Kerwin who has a wonderful eye for symmetry and perspective.

LEGO Dots – What’s this? A new LEGO? The building system plans a spread into the arts and craft industry with its new build system.

Procreate Brushes – if you enjoy drawing with Procreate, this is the best list of brushes I’ve seen. Mix of free and premium.

<script type="text/javascript"> amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "solid0a-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Deals We're Watching"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "b052fb5252aa36dc976daa522a8584b8"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B01NAJGGA2,B01D3BDXQA,B01I956VZU,B07KC2TTGV"; </script> <script src="http://z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>

Don’t Doubt Ur Vibe – First single from… Elon Musk. On ‘Emo G Records’ I was hoping for something more nerdcore, but this’ll do. Great Cybertruck driving music.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-soundcloud wp-block-embed is-type-rich is-provider-soundcloud wp-embed-aspect-18-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe frameborder="no" height="300" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?visual=true&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F752572219&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;maxwidth=770&amp;maxheight=300&amp;dnt=1" title="Don't Doubt ur Vibe by Emo G Records" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The post Friday Smackdown: The Jellyfiggle (Best Links of the Week!) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 31, 2020 11:58 PM

LEGO DOTS is the New 2D Tile System to Blanket the World With LEGO

What do you do after creating the most popular construction system on the planet? You create another system just in case anyone already has all 16414 sets released over the last 70 years.

LEGO announced their new much-anticipated, thought-to-be canceled product, LEGO DOTS, this week. If you thought they exhausted the plastic-snapping possibilities, you’ll be delighted to learn the sets comprise a spectacular array of 2D tiles to blanket a baseplate attached to any wall, box, body, bed, bracelet, frame, art installation, or building exterior.

LEGO DOTS taps into the arts and crafts space by using a 2D tile-based play concept that offers children a creative canvas for self-expression. Based on multiple shapes and colourful tiles, it is supported by an exciting portfolio that ranges from wearables to room décor with surfaces designed for individual customisation and self-expression. To excite young creatives even more, over thirty mood tiles are also being introduced, incl. facial expressions, music note, cosmic planet, star night, paw prints and a rainbow pooh – and many more.”

A. Rainbow. Pooh… ‘to excite young creatives’, ‘even more’. So crafty. The company gained that insight from over 10,000 parents and over 7,000 children, laying the roadmap for the new product line with an expected March 1st, 2020 availability. The first batch will contain various wearables and room decor sets with more to come. Extra DOTS will, of course, be available in case you have your own items you want to Beadazzle DOTify.

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They’ve got a launch event coming up at the House of DOTS (Yes, built from DOTS) at Coal Drops Yard in London, from January 28th to February 2nd. If you’re in the vicinity, you can select dates and register here.

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The post LEGO DOTS is the New 2D Tile System to Blanket the World With LEGO appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 31, 2020 09:57 PM

The Javelin Blog

FDM 3D Printing for Automotive Applications: Are you losing the race with archaic support removal?

As Automotive continues to be one of Additive Manufacturing’s top growth markets in both the number of applications and volume of printed parts, the importance of increased productivity, consistency, and quality through post processing solutions is also ramping.

Automotive applications are heavily weighted towards the use of FDM in rapid prototyping to help cut timelines and allow companies to iterate more effectively. But with this advancement of significantly improved design and build processes, the post-processing step is often overlooked as an opportunity to further optimize overall production times.
automotive applications post processing

To date, many companies printing for Automotive applications have leaned on subtractive equipment from their factory floor and tried to adapt them for Additive, including hand tools, submersible tanks, and traditional tumblers. While this can work in some cases, as volumes ramp issues are arising. Even with assistance from these machines, there is a high component of labor, or what we call attended technician time. It is not uncommon for the attended technician time to last the entire cycle with a tumbler or submersible tank due to the frequent monitoring of the systems that are required.

Even with the best technicians, there can be inconsistent results. Variations in the level of precision and issues of rework are common. With traditional machines not optimized for Additive Manufactured parts, breakage levels can also be especially problematic. As print materials and labor are expensive, re-printing could be significantly affecting the ROI of your Additive operation overall.

Consider how automating the FDM support removal step of post-processing, such as with the PostProcess BASE™, can address these common issues in terms of productivity, consistency, quality, and of course, overall cycle time:

  • Improves overall cycle times to enable rapid prototyping with over twice as many prototypes able to be produced every week
  • Reduces processing time by over 50% and drying time by over 60%when compared to submersible tank systems.
  • Minimizes part warpage and breakage without changes to dimensional accuracy due to lower temperatures and less liquid exposure. These challenges are almost inevitable in a submersible tank.
  • Reduces attended technician time up to 90% from traditional solutions due to the system’s AUTOMAT3D™ software.

Maintaining a competitive edge will continue to propel prototype volumes in Automotive and other markets from thousands per year to hundreds of thousands per year, particularly in companies that rely on fast innovation to drive growth. Here at PostProcess, our mission is to help the industry move beyond brute-forcing post-printing with manual labor and traditional mechanical solutions towards software-based automated solutions to ensure throughput and consistency in line with the market’s expectations.

The post FDM 3D Printing for Automotive Applications: Are you losing the race with archaic support removal? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by PostProcess Technologies at January 31, 2020 09:53 PM

SolidSmack

The Right Way To Market Commercial 3D Printed Designs

3D printing commercial licensed products

I’m looking at how a 3D print company provided colorful 3D prints for sale using commercial designs. 

We’ve all seen this many times, where a popular character from the movies, TV, games or other mass media has been somehow reproduced in 3D form and placed on sale. The question is whether this is done legally. 

Certainly, fans have incredible enthusiasm for characters and objects from their favorite media, but enthusiasm doesn’t mean they have the legal right to reproduce the designs. Nevertheless, there are countless examples of this happening. 

For example, I just did a search on Thingiverse, the most popular online repository for 3D printable models, and found there are 582 results for “Spiderman”, many of which are clearly using the design of the movie character. There are literally tens of thousands of similar examples on that site alone.

I strongly suspect that virtually all of these were produced without permission from the owner of the design. 

Character Licensing

Some companies owning designs of this type are fine with the public reproducing them, as it is a way to grow notoriety of the characters and designs. The Star Trek franchise is notable for this, as they, at least for a while, permitted all manner of use of their characters and designs. However, when someone organized a near-commercial-level movie production, they stepped in and stopped it by enforcing their rights. This resulted in a somewhat draconian set of rules for how their material could be reused by the public.

But at least they do allow some use. Other companies, including one whose name starts with a “D”, vigorously protect their material by shutting down any instance of replication they detect. Their thought is that if they do not protect their material, it will de facto become a public property and they’ll lose the value of the designs. 

This is all problematic in the world of 3D printing because many people truly want to have 3D prints of their favorites. The good news is that some companies have taken the time to properly license the material from the owners to provide a way for fans to legally obtain 3D prints. 

Mixed Dimensions Full Color 3D Models

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Some of the Mixed Dimensions team showing off full color 3D prints of EVE Online models [Source: Mixed Dimensions]<figcaption> Some of the Mixed Dimensions team showing off full-color 3D prints of EVE Online models [Source: Mixed Dimensions] </figcaption></figure>

One great example of this is California-based Mixed Dimensions, who are perhaps best known for their popular “MakePrintable” online 3D model repair service. But as a sideline, they also provide a way to obtain full-color 3D prints of certain characters. 

In this case, they have chosen to work with EVE Online, which is a long-time massively multiplayer online (MMO) game involving spaceships, galactic empires and that sort of thing. It’s been around since 2003, so it is definitely one of the oldest MMO games. The main “character” in the game is not a person, but is in fact the spaceships that people fly through the universe. 

Licensed CCP Games 3D Models 

Mixed Dimensions made arrangements with the game developer, Iceland-based CCP Games, who provided the necessary 3D files directly. This allowed Mixed Dimensions to tweak them for full-color 3D printing, which they apparently accomplish on very high-quality Mimaki full-color 3D printers. 

Currently, Mixed Dimensions offers seven different popular ship designs from EVE Online, with prices ranging from US$40 to US$75, depending on the model. It’s a “collection” within their growing array of commercially licensed designs. They also provide many ship designs from Star Trek through GamePrint, as well as full-color human anatomy 3D prints. 

If you’re interested in Star Trek or especially EVE Online, you might want to check out Mixed Dimension’s products.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post The Right Way To Market Commercial 3D Printed Designs appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at January 31, 2020 07:23 PM

The Javelin Blog

Method for Fixing Corrupted SOLIDWORKS Drawing Views

I ran into a situation where I was working with a SOLIDWORKS drawing that had several sheets in it with every possible kind of view being utilized. One of these views was displaying the back view when it should have been showing the front view?! I was baffled as to why this was happening and what I needed to do to correct it. After much frustration, I was able to fix the issue. This article will provide a couple of methods for fixing corrupted drawing views for this scenario.

Symptoms

  • The SOLIDWORKS drawing view is being displayed as an undesired view.
  • When attempting to change the drawing view orientation from the property manager, a warning appears (see image below).
  • Changing the orientation view does not change the view.

    Drawing View Warning

Two Methods for Fixing Corrupted Drawing Views

There were two methods I used, I need to go back into the model and change the views using the methods discussed in a blog post called changing the SOLIDWORKS Standard View Orientation.

Method 1: Create a Custom View

The most immediate way I fixed the problem was to create a custom view. To create a custom view, press the space bar and select the New View as indicated in the image below. In the drawing, I selected the affected view and changed the orientation to the custom view.

Create Custom View

Method 2: Reset Views (better method)

The second method would be to fully reset the views in the assembly. In the assembly, I pressed the space bar and selected Reset Standard Views in the Orientation dialog box as seen in step one in the image below. The second step required me to find the view that represented the front view, orient the view correctly, then select the Update Standard Views button.

Resetting Drawing Views

Keep in mind that when using this fix, some of the related views will be affected, and you may have to re-orientate some of the items; e.g. detail view boxes or notes, will need to be done.

The post Method for Fixing Corrupted SOLIDWORKS Drawing Views appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at January 31, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 05.20

Huddle around the computer a little bit, your digital detox is a farce! How can you stay away from great stuff that you can read and chew on … mentally that is! We got you covered, while you were away, busy with your digital detox diet. Don’t be shy, take a look at the week that was, right here on SolidSmack.

Cause we are ROCKIN!

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Start Your Monday With a ‘Wallace and Gromit’ 40 LB Stop Motion Cheese Sculpture

You’ve seen dozens of wood buildsmetalworks, and resin casts on SolidSmack, but there’s a real scarcity here on sculptures made of cheese.

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Millo’s Smart Portable Blender Is A Modern, Quiet Take On A Noisy, Classic Design

When you think of a blender, what usually comes to mind is a cylindrical machine capable of grinding, juicing, or mulching down food into elderly-friendly portions. The second thought which comes to mind is the noise; as almost all blenders operate with as much subtlety as an inconsiderate construction worker.

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Star Wars Modelmaking: Can A Tiny Snowspeeder Drone Trip Up A Foam AT-AT?

If you’ve watched Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, you can never forget the iconic scene where the rebels use their ships’ harpoons to trip up a couple of giant AT-AT walkers by flying through and around the machines’ legs.

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Hold Onto Your PCBs – Autodesk Just Added ECAD to Fusion 360

A couple of weeks ago we shared that Fusion 360 users would get access to EAGLE electronic design automation software. At the time, the Fusion 360 January update hadn’t come out, but with the ECAD tease at Autodesk University and the EAGLE announcement, we pretty much knew Fusion 360 was about to get PCB’ed.

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Sleek Chicken Tractor Design Uses Aluminum To Reduce Weight, Bring Style to the Farm

Now those are two words I thought I’d never see together – Sleek + Chicken Tractor. But that’s just one attribute of the Chicken Caravan, a chicken tractor design created by Designers on Holiday’s Tom Gottelier and Bobby Petersen. It’s a simple mobile coop design created for The Ecology Center – a non-profit organization dedicated to creative environmental solutions – based in the heart of California chicken country, San Juan Capistrano.

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Finally, Someone Made A Working Drone Out of LEGOs

It was bound to happen sooner or later, so it comes as no surprise when someone made a working drone using the world’s most buildable children’s toy.

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 05.20 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 31, 2020 12:30 PM

Take A Look At How Faber-Castell Makes Their Timeless Pencils

Designers, artists, and developers are often so focused on working on their next project that they forget the little marvels which help them get to where they are.

Take the simple pencil, for example:

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Sure, we all know it’s made of wood and lead, but a lot of time and effort goes into making these essential drawing materials. In one of their older YouTube videos, pencil manufacturer Faber-Castell goes into detail on their pencil-making process.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">faber-castell pencils</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">faber-castell pencils</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">faber-castell pencils</figure>

Four key chapters make up their pencil production, with the first chapter revolving around the lead making process. From the mixing of graphite and clay all the way to the cooling, pressing, heating, and eventually coloring of the individual leads, these thin strips go through a lot even before they are encased in wood.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">faber-castell pencils</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">faber-castell pencils</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">faber-castell pencils</figure>

Speaking of wood, the second chapter is all about the production of the wood casings and the insertion of the lead to make the final pencil.

It starts with the milling process, where grooves meant to hold the lead are cut into sheets of wood. After applying glue to the grooves, the leads are pressed into the slots via a machine before the whole thing is topped off with another wood casing to complete the pencil “wafer”.

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These pencil wafers are put in a drying wheel where the glue can set in. Once everything is solid, the wafers are milled into a number of individual pencils.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">faber-castell pencils</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">faber-castell pencils</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">faber-castell pencils</figure>

The third chapter focuses on touches such as painting, stamping, and sharpening the pencils. Just like with the leads, there are specific mixtures made for each and every color of pencil. These colors are first applied to the outer wood shell and then to the “butt” of the pencil to seal it off. The pencils are also set with the iconic Faber-Castell stamp before being set to dry once again.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">faber-castell pencils</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">faber-castell pencils</figure>

The fourth and final chapter caps everything off with a string of quality assurance tests. These involve visually checking each and every pencil to ensure all the colors are correct and the leads and labels are in place.

It is also in this chapter where the pencils are sharpened and tested to withstand more than 2.5 kg of hand pressure (for those deadline jitters, no doubt).

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">faber-castell pencils</figure>

Once finished, the pencils are sorted, packaged, and sent off to stores around the world. So the next time you get your hands on a pencil (you might have on in your hand right now), take care to appreciate just how much time and effort it took to make.

The post Take A Look At How Faber-Castell Makes Their Timeless Pencils appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 31, 2020 12:23 PM

Finally, Someone Made A Working Drone Out of LEGOs

It was bound to happen sooner or later, so it comes as no surprise when someone made a working drone using the world’s most buildable children’s toy. The Brick Experiment Channel takes LEGO blocks to the sky and shows us how to make our own toy drones:

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The motors, propellers, and drone body are entirely made from LEGOs. Four LEGO L-motors turn eight LEGO Propeller 1 Blade 14Ls. These are connected via a series of gears and are held up using some sturdy LEGO liftarms and a variety of LEGO pieces.

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While smaller than the LEGO parts, there are a number of essential non-LEGO pieces that make the drone flyable.

You have a LiPo 9s 33.3V 200 mAh battery which powers the motors. The FrSky R-XSR Micro 2.4GHz radio receiver and the FrSky X-Lite 2.4GHz radio transmitter send signals using the onboard Matek F411-mini flight controller. There are also four MOSFET IRLR2905 + Schottky diode 1N5819 + Resistor 12 kOhm motor driver circuits and a number of smaller electronics holding everything together.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lego drone</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">lego drone</figure>

After some set up on a computer and pairing it to a controller, the drone is ready to go. The completed LEGO drone weighs a total of 410 grams and can reach a max thrust of 470 grams. It can perform simple maneuvers like flying under and onto tables and has a sustained flight time of two minutes before it falls out of exhaustion.

All-in-all, the LEGO pieces, and electronics needed to make this drone cost about 502 USD. You could buy a cheap pre-assembled drone with that kind of money, but you would lose all sense of accomplishment in building it yourself.

For more LEGO technic builds, you can check out the Brick Experiment Channel.

The post Finally, Someone Made A Working Drone Out of LEGOs appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 31, 2020 12:16 PM

January 30, 2020

The Javelin Blog

Are you having issues after upgrading SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2?

Following an upgrade of SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional, you may encounter some odd behavior when accessing the vault through Web2.

If you see any of these symptoms, you may have missed one final step in the upgrade process:

  • Login page hanging indefinitely
  • Being able to login successfully but not able to navigate between folders
  • Either hanging indefinitely or being sent back to the Login page when trying to view any details of a file
  • Or, encountering the error “Could not open database“.

These are all symptoms of the same issue, the Web2 application pool using the wrong identity.

This most commonly happens following an upgrade of the software.  That’s because, during the upgrade, the application pool will be reset to the default “Network Service” identity and must be modified back to use the Windows Profile that it was using before the upgrade.

In order for Web2 to work properly, the application pool identity must be set to use a Windows Profile that has:

  1. Has logged into the vault and selected a folder in the vault at least once.
  2. Has been added as a member of the IIS_IUSRS group.
  3. Is a member of the local Administrators group.

Following any upgrade of the SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Web2 Server software, make sure the following steps are performed:

Step 1:  Open Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager, go to the “Application Pools“, select “SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2” and click “Advanced Settings…“.

Application Ppols SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2

Application Ppols SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2

Step 2:  Select the “Identity” field and click on the “” button.

Identify Network Service

Identify Network Service

Step 3:  Select “Custom account” and click “Set…“, then enter the credentials for the Windows User account that should be used for Web2.

Set the credentials for the Windows User account

Set the credentials for the Windows User account

The post Are you having issues after upgrading SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at January 30, 2020 01:00 PM

January 29, 2020

SolidSmack

Sleek Chicken Tractor Design Uses Aluminum To Reduce Weight, Bring Style to the Farm

chicken caravan

Now those are two words I thought I’d never see together – Sleek + Chicken Tractor. But that’s just one attribute of the Chicken Caravan, a chicken tractor design created by Designers on Holiday’s Tom Gottelier and Bobby Petersen. It’s a simple mobile coop design created for The Ecology Center – a non-profit organization dedicated to creative environmental solutions – based in the heart of California chicken country, San Juan Capistrano.

<figure class="wp-block-image">chicken caravan</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">chicken caravan</figure>

That is a pretty sleek-lookin’ chicken coop, in’t it? Especially without the chickens and chicken poo all over it. Though the photos lack the requisite chickens, the gable-style design is fairly clever sporting an aluminum-clad exterior and three hydraulic lift hinges for each side door to allow nesting/roosting chickens out to scratch and ravage the land. Once they’re fed, gotten their exercise, and had a couple clucks, y’all chicken people can fasten’em back up in the coop, attach it to your tractor/atv, and re-locate them wherever they’re needed most. A portable electric fence goes along with the tractor to provide a little protection and keep them from wandering too far.

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If you have chickens or have considered using chickens as part of your permaculture strategy or pest control operation, you know the ability to relocate them is crucial. The chickens will both fertilize the soil, turn it down, gobble up little pests, and allows them to range around more freely. It simply makes for healthier chickens overall.

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The wheels are fixed which limits turning but its small footprint and light weight means easier maneuverability. You’ll notice the roosts are along the inner bottom (and below the enclosed nesting boxes). It makes for more roosting area and, granted the lower boards are removable, would make for easy cleaning. Though the gable ends seem to have vents, I would be concerned with heat on a hot summer day, especially if closed up. Regardless, it’s a well-constructed and interesting design, wouldn’t you say?

To see more on the Chicken Caravan as well as Tom Gottelier and Bobby Petersen’s other works, check out the Designers on Holiday webpage.

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The post Sleek Chicken Tractor Design Uses Aluminum To Reduce Weight, Bring Style to the Farm appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 29, 2020 10:00 PM

Hold Onto Your PCBs – Autodesk Just Added ECAD to Fusion 360

autodesk fusion 360 electronics design

A couple of weeks ago we shared that Fusion 360 users would get access to EAGLE electronic design automation software. At the time, the Fusion 360 January update hadn’t come out, but with the ECAD tease at Autodesk University and the EAGLE announcement, we pretty much knew Fusion 360 was about to get PCB’ed.

Well, their January update was published and, whadda ya know, electronical, baby. And it’s got it all – schematics, PCB layout, component library, simulation, manufacturing, validation… the works.

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How do you access Fusion 360 Electronics Design?

Select File, New Electronics Design. If you don’t see the option, click Job Status (on the right menu) and you’ll see if there’s an Fusion 360 available. If so, restart Fusion 360 and you’ll then see the new electronic design options in the File menu.

Starting a new electronics design opens a completely new document tab with different menu options for creating new schematics, new PCBs, or reference to other schematics and PCB layouts.

There is a lot to this new feature and the update overview does a great job of breaking it all down. There’s also a new Fusion 360 Electronics forum already with a lot of activity. And, the Fusion 360 YouTube page has a new Electronics Design playlist with some fresh, video tut action, so check that out.

Now what’s on your wishlist for Fusion 360?

The post Hold Onto Your PCBs – Autodesk Just Added ECAD to Fusion 360 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 29, 2020 04:59 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Certified Graphics Drivers

 

SOLIDWORKS works closely with graphics card manufacturers to ensure compatibility and certification.  Having a proper graphics card and driver is essential for best performance and stability of the software.

It is crucial to have a professional grade 3D graphics card installed.  SOLIDWORKS only supports NVIDIA Quadro series and AMD Firepro and Radeon Pro series.  Any other brands or series of cards will potentially cause difficulties running SOLIDWORKS applications.

For a more detailed explanation of certified graphics cards, please review our SOLIDWORKS Hardware Recommendations blog article.

Driver Certification

A list of certified graphics card drivers can be found on the SOLIDWORKS Hardware Certification website.  This is a list of the latest cards that SOLIDWORKS recommends.  If you are purchasing a new system, it’s recommended to invest in the latest series to ensure continued support.

SOLIDWORKS Hardware Certification

A full list of supported graphics cards can be viewed from a link on the Hardware Certification page.  Please note that some on this list may be older series of cards and have no certified driver listed.  However general support will still be provided for these older cards.  In the case where you still have an older graphics card that has general support, please refer to the NVIDIA driver or AMD driver website to locate the latest driver available.

SOLIDWORKS Graphics Cards Supported

AMD cards will have quarterly driver certification allowing users to update to the latest security patches and hotfixes.  For example driver 19.Q4 is the latest driver released in Q4 of 2019.

AMD Graphics Driver Quarterly Release

NVIDIA cards are given specific branch support.  Any driver within the same certified branch will be supported.  This provides patch upgrades to the latest drivers but remains a certified version.  For more explanation, visit our NVIDIA Branch Driver blog post on the topic.

NVIDIA Graphics Driver Branch Release

Install Latest Graphics Driver

Determine the computer manufacturer and graphics card for your system. Go to Windows Start and type in System Information and open the App.  The System Information summary will show the manufacturer and model.  Go to Components > Display to locate what graphics card and driver is currently installed.

Windows System Information

System Manufacturer and Model

System Information Display and Driver

Browse to the SOLIDWORKS Hardware Certification page and use the filters or search fields to locate your card.  If listed, download the latest AMD quarterly release or NVIDIA branch release from the link provided for your system.  If you have an older series of support cards not listed, browse to the driver manufacturer’s website for the latest driver.

To ensure a clean install, we recommend first uninstalling all AMD or NVIDIA applications from the Windows Control Panel, then reboot the computer prior to the install.

Uninstall Graphics Drivers from Windows Control Panel

The NVIDIA installer includes a Clean install option to assist.

Additional References

More information can be found on the SOLIDWORKS forum with topics Hardware Certification and Graphics Card Drivers.

The post SOLIDWORKS Certified Graphics Drivers appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at January 29, 2020 01:14 PM

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Structure System Pattern

The SOLIDWORKS Structure System is fairly new and while in its infancy “new” basic improvements are being made with every SOLIDWORKS release. Looking at efficiency best practices, using a pattern comes to mind. The basic answer to why we pattern brings me back to the SOLIDWORKS Essentials class where a “seed” is patterned to increase design speeds, decrease quantity of features, and provides the ability to edit many items faster. Looking at my Dome Monkey Bars model below, this would be quite difficult or time consuming to make without using circular patterns.

SOLIDWORKS Monkey Bars

SOLIDWORKS Dome Monkey Bars

Starting off with my center top circle weldment making sure I have a gap and then creating the first of my arc uprights. I then specify a particular corner treatment.

Seed for pattern

Seed for pattern

When it comes to patterning I chose the circular pattern, Direction 1 – I used the temporary axis of the top circle and most of the time when doing feature patterns we chose features but for Structural Systems you must chose bodies and now there is a new section. Here I selected my upright leg, made sure I had 360° and I wanted 12 in total – including the seed.

Completed SOLIDWORKS Structure System Pattern

SOLIDWORKS Structure System Pattern

This not only copies the part but copies the corner treatment too. I wanted a weld gap in there of 0.01″.

Monkey Bars Seed

Corner Treatment

So other than the corner treatments and the different area to select entities with the patterns it operates in the same manner as every other feature pattern.

Pattern Completed

Pattern Completed

Learn more about the SOLIDWORKS 2020 Structural System »

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Structure System Pattern appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at January 29, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Star Wars Modelmaking: Can A Tiny Snowspeeder Drone Trip Up A Foam AT-AT?

If you’ve watched Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, you can never forget the iconic scene where the rebels use their ships’ harpoons to trip up a couple of giant AT-AT walkers by flying through and around the machines’ legs.

While it would take years to recreate such a large scale battle with real death machines, the guys at FliteTest have instead decided to work something a little smaller. Using a couple of redesigned drones, they plan to fly through a foam board AT-AT’s legs and trip the darn thing:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3_ljaZlYjos?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

To start off, the team cuts up pieces of foam board and glues them together to form the shell of the AT-AT. While the body of the walker is meant to be static, the legs are made up of individual pieces.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">AT-AT tripping drone</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">AT-AT tripping drone</figure>

Two legs are tied to a pushrod mechanism so as they move forward, the tightness of the snowspeeder’s string wrapping around them will cause the walker to topple to the side.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">AT-AT tripping drone</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">AT-AT tripping drone</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">AT-AT tripping drone</figure>

While the AT-ATs are out getting painted, the others work on designing a couple of tiny drones. They cut the base snowspeeder outline on a Styrofoam plate before adding the extra details such as the cockpit and cowlings.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">AT-AT tripping drone</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">AT-AT tripping drone</figure>

To make the snowspeeder actually fly, they have to sacrifice some of the design and cut out holes so more air can flow through the propellers. Add in a few more details and a tiny camera in the front and the rebel ship is ready to go!

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">AT-AT tripping drone</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">AT-AT tripping drone</figure>

Getting back to the AT-AT walkers, the team paints and stencils on the final decals to make them look like menacing machines. Though thee walkers were made, only the biggest one has the built-in leg mechanism which will make it fall.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">AT-AT tripping drone</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">AT-AT tripping drone</figure>

With the snowspeeders and AT-ATs completed, it’s time for some flying! They start with a couple of test runs and as soon as the pilots have gotten a handle of their ships, they start their approach on the large AT-AT.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">AT-AT tripping drone</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">AT-AT tripping drone</figure>

Just like in the movie, the cable (or string, in this instance) starts restricting the AT-ATs movements as it gets tighter and tighter. Eventually, the legs can’t take any more and the walker topples down… along with the snowspeeder drone!

While Luke Skywalker and the rebels were able to release their harpoons in the film, this drone doesn’t have a detaching mechanism. So even if you can technically take out a walker with the drone, it’s going to be a one-way trip for whoever flies it.

FliteTest’s YouTube channel has tons more videos dedicated to flying machines. Fictional ships, drones, planes – if it can get off the ground, chances are you’ll find it here.

The post Star Wars Modelmaking: Can A Tiny Snowspeeder Drone Trip Up A Foam AT-AT? appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 29, 2020 12:20 PM

Learn Raspberry Pi in a Weekend with This $34 Mastery Bundle

We’ve said it time and time again, but the Raspberry Pi is just so dang cool and we believe all designers and engineers should have one in their toolkit—if not on their desktop. While there is a bit of a slight learning curve, it’s nothing that today’s designers and engineers can’t handle on a leisurely Saturday.

So why not start now?

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle includes 8 courses to get started creating your very own Amazon Echo or even a KUKA-like robotic arm for your desktop (how’s that for office bragging rights). Throw in any of your own 3D printed housing designs, and the opportunities are limitless!

For a limited time, The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle is 96% off of the $865 retail price and can be purchased right here for a mere $34.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle — $865 $34

Courses included:

  • Automation with Raspberry Pi Zero
  • Introduction to Raspberry Pi
  • Hardware Projects Using Raspberry Pi
  • Bitcoin Mining Using Raspberry Pi
  • Raspberry Pi Robotics
  • Internet of Things Automation Using Raspberry Pi 2
  • Home Automation in 48 Hours Without Coding
  • Build Your Own ArmBot Step By Step Using Raspberry Pi Zero

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links that help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
StackSocial Amazon

The post Learn Raspberry Pi in a Weekend with This $34 Mastery Bundle appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 29, 2020 12:15 PM

January 28, 2020

The Javelin Blog

How to link Balloons to Custom Properties in a SOLIDWORKS Drawing Template

Recently a customer wanted to know if it was possible, in a SOLIDWORKS Drawing Template, to link Custom Properties to balloons, without the need to edit each balloon? After providing a solution to this customer I thought that other users may find this useful.

Link in the Balloon Property Manager

When a balloon is created or selected, Custom Properties can be specified as Balloon Text values. This is from the Balloon Properties panel.

Balloon Properties

Link in Document Properties

In Document Properties under the Balloons tab, the default text for a balloon can be set to a Custom Property as well. The value for this Custom Property setting, comes from a Property List.

Balloon Document Properties

The Property List is available from File > Properties and then selecting Edit List.

Property List

To get this to work, the Custom Property must be added to the Property List and defined in Document Properties.

Save as a Drawing Template

Once this is done, the drawing can then be saved as a Drawing Template.

Save Drawing Template

Of course the parts themselves must contain the same Custom Property.

The post How to link Balloons to Custom Properties in a SOLIDWORKS Drawing Template appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at January 28, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Pablo Cimadevila Turns Ordinary Airpods Into 18-Karat Airgolds

18k airpods

Though they can be quite useful with their cordless design, Airpods can sometimes look as appealing as a cotton bud sticking out of your ear on a public train.

Eager to give them a bit more class, jeweller and designer Pablo Cimadevila took a normal pair of Airpods and gave them an 18-karat gold treatment:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Kgle4vt3OuI?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure>

After removing the electronics from their plastic casings, Pablo cleans and measures the outer shells to make a special frame for them. He then pops the frame into a small tube wrapped and taped in paper.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure>

The whole thing is put into a machine which pours a mixture of plasticast into it.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure>

After the plasticast has hardened, Pablo takes the encased Airpod casings and removes the outer tape and paper surrounding the small tube. He then places the tube into a heating chamber for 12 hours.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure>

While the tube heats, he simultaneously prepares a number of 18k gold flakes which will encase the Airpod casings in a shell of expensive metal. Once both the tube and flakes are heated, he pops them in the same machine where the melted gold can be poured into the heated tube.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure>

The tube is cooled off in a basin of water where Pablo can safely fish out his 18k Airpod creation.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure>

After some washing and cleaning, Pablo can start cutting and shaping the final casings for the Airpods. He cuts out the casings from the gold frames and files them down to make them much smoother. It’s a long and arduous process but seeing as all he has to do is follow the original Airpod design, Pablo soon finishes cutting out the gold casings.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure>

Once the casings are shaped, he runs them thorough a polisher where they can get nice and shiny before being dipped in a final protective layer of polish.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure>

All Pablo has to do now is reinstall the electronics and seal the whole thing off. After some last minute polishing, the golden Airpods are finally ready to go.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">18k airpods</figure>

Now no one on the subway will dare make fun of you for wearing Airpods. Of course, their golden nature means they’re more prone to being stolen, but that’s a completely different problem Pablo isn’t meant to solve.

You can find more of Pablo Cimadevila’s works on his webpage. If you like the unique cinematography of his videos, you can find more of them on his YouTube channel.

The post Pablo Cimadevila Turns Ordinary Airpods Into 18-Karat Airgolds appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 28, 2020 12:35 PM

Millo’s Smart Portable Blender Is A Modern, Quiet Take On A Noisy, Classic Design

millo

When you think of a blender, what usually comes to mind is a cylindrical machine capable of grinding, juicing, or mulching down food into elderly-friendly portions. The second thought which comes to mind is the noise; as almost all blenders operate with as much subtlety as an inconsiderate construction worker.

Eager to distance kitchen appliances from the noise they are known for, millo’s first foray into a more modern kitchen comes in the form of their smart portable blender:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7Tl96o8EOWg?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Using what they call their patented Magnetic Air Drive technology, the millo uses a brushless magnetic engine which allows torque to transfer from the base to the blender’s blades. This drastically reduces the noise produced by the blades making contact with the contents of the blender (there’s even a Quiet mode in case you want to surprise someone with breakfast in bed).

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">millo</figure>

Unlike other blenders which make you gauge which setting to use for select foods, the millo has a built in Smart Pulse feature which recognizes the density of what you’re trying to blend and adjusts itself accordingly. This prevents any excess power and energy which could otherwise cause a lot of noise pollution.

If you aren’t keen on the Smart Pulse taking over your morning smoothie-making rituals, you could always switch the millo to manual mode and set your own preferences. The millo will save your settings accordingly so you don’t have to keep repeating setting it every morning.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">millo</figure>

As for operating the millo, a buttonless interface found at the base of the blender lets you activate it from any angle. The blender has three settings which you can keep or adjust to fit your blending style.

Powering this sleek blending machine is a wireless battery which takes 120 minutes to fully charge using a USB Type-C port. It can make a total of 10 smoothies before needing a recharge and when it does, a notification on the milli app will remind you to plug it in.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ckzZZEzgOq4?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

As with most technology nowadays, the millo blender can be connected to your phone. Aside from charging notifications, you can track the items you’ve blended in the past, personalize your blends, and even share them with other people who have their own millo smart blender. It feels a bit intrusive (and it totally is), but if you’d like to try the blending techniques of complete strangers, this is one way to do it.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">millo</figure>

Seeing as this is just the first of many products which will use the Magnetic Air Drive tech, we can assume the millo team is out to make food prepping a quieter and more portable experience.

You can find more on the millo on the official millo webpage. If you don’t mind spending €399 (roughly 442 USD) on a smart blender, you can also purchase one there.

The post Millo’s Smart Portable Blender Is A Modern, Quiet Take On A Noisy, Classic Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 28, 2020 12:34 PM

The SolidSmack Monday List 05.20 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

What’s Ahead for IPOs in 2020

This year’s class of Reynolds, Stripe, and Airbnb are hoping to outperform the lagging, newly public fortunes of Uber and Lyft.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

Big Tech Doesn’t Like DIY Repair, But Won’t Say Why In Public

The most interesting thing about Tuesday’s Right to Repair hearing in Washington state was what the tech lobbyists wouldn’t say.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

The Tesla Skeptics Who Bet Against Elon Musk

$TSLAQ is an informal collection of obsessives pushing back against the cult of Elon.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

The US Space Force Has a Rough Launch on the Internet

From controversy over camo print to Star Trek comparisons, the new military branch can’t buy a break online.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

Old Musicians Never Die. They Just Become Holograms.

Companies are making plans to put droves of departed idols on tour — reanimating a live-music industry whose biggest earners will soon be dying off.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

There Are Snipers in These Photos. Can You Find Them?

Simon Menner, the photographer behind the series, is at it again, this time in Lithuania and Latvia.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 05.20 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 28, 2020 12:33 PM

January 27, 2020

The Javelin Blog

PRODUCT RETIREMENT: CATIA® V5-SOLIDWORKS Translator

The CATIA® V5-SOLIDWORKS Translator is no longer supported and can no longer be renewed. This tool is also not available in SOLIDWORKS 2019 or newer.

Replaced by SOLIDWORKS 3D Interconnect

The CATIA V5-SOLIDWORKS Translator was replaced by 3D Interconnect, which provides direct integration of native CATIA files, 3D Interconnect was introduced with SOLIDWORKS Premium 2017 (Premium version only).

See SOLIDWORKS 3D Interconnect in action below:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nUckD-_xq_U?feature=oembed" title="SOLIDWORKS 3D Interconnect" width="500"></iframe>

NOTE: The CATIA® V5 to SOLIDWORKS® Translator will continue to function in SOLIDWORKS 2017 and SOLIDWORKS 2018 software versions as long as you were licensed for it in these versions.

If you do not enable 3D Interconnect functionality, (Tools > Options > System Options > Import > File Format > General), SOLIDWORKS will use CATIA V5 to SOLIDWORKS translator license to import the CATIA V5 files (.CATPart, .CATProduct for V5R8 – 5–6R2016) by using the old SOLIDWORKS translators. Keep in mind that the CATIA V5 translation is greatly enhanced in 3D Interconnect.

SOLIDWORKS 3D Interconnect is designed for a “mixed CAD” environment:

  • Consultants/Manufacturers working with customers that have a different CAD system
  • Companies that have lingering legacy data
  • Companies looking to switch from one 3D CAD software to SOLIDWORKS

What file formats does 3D Interconnect support?

With 3D Interconnect you can:

  • Maintain direct integration of native CAD files from PTC® Creo®, Autodesk® Inventor®, Siemens® NX, Solid Edge®, and CATIA®, and treat them like native components.
  • Avoid fixing errors or problems due to SOLIDWORKS awareness of all components in the native CAD files, like face and edge IDs.
  • Directly open imported files and treat them like Base Parts, so you can freely make design modifications without affecting the native file.
  • Update both part and assembly files as design changes take place with Update Model feature.
SOLIDWORKS 3D Interconnect Inventor Files

SOLIDWORKS 3D Interconnect

Formats supported:

The following formats and their versions are supported in 3D Interconnect:

Formats File Formats Format Versions
ACIS .sat, .sab, .asat, .asab r1-2018 1.0
Autodesk® Inventor .ipt (V6 – V2018)
.iam (V11 – V2018)
V11 – 2018
CATIA® V5 .CATPart, .CATProduct V5R8 – V5-6R2019
DXF™/ DWG™ .dxf, .dwg 2.5 – 2019
IFC .ifc, .ifczip IFC 2×3, IFC 4
IGES .igs, .iges Up to 5.3
JT .jt JT 8.x, 9.x, and 10.x
PTC® .prt, .prt.*, .asm, .asm.* For Pro/ENGINEER® 16 – Creo 6.0
Solid Edge® .par, .asm, .psm V18 – ST10
STEP .stp, .step AP203, AP214, AP242
NX™ software .prt 11 – NX 1847

The post PRODUCT RETIREMENT: CATIA® V5-SOLIDWORKS Translator appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Adam Harte-Maxwell, CSWE at January 27, 2020 05:20 PM

Modify Instances in Assembly Patterns in SOLIDWORKS 2020

The pattern function helps save time when it comes to inserting repeated parts, such as support beams for a temporary tent. But it can be a bit annoying when you need to modify one of those instances to make room for a custom door a client requested to reduce heat loss. In SOLIDWORKS 2020, the ability to modify instances in an assembly pattern is now a reality.  Let’s take a closer look to see how modifying a pattern works in a linear and circular setting.

Linear Pattern Instance Modification

All instances in a linear pattern have the ability to be customized. In the example below, the distance between the legs of the coffee table was made so that the distance between them was spaced out based on a Fibonacci sequence.

Linear Pattern for Coffee Table

When the user is applying a linear pattern to a part, the option to modify instances can be activated by clicking to the Modified instances space that can be found under the Instances to Override section of the Patterns Property Manager as seen below.

Modified instances Property Manager

Similar to selecting the instances to be skipped, a point will appear on each instance preview. Click the point and the drop-down menu in the image below will appear. Select the Modify Instance button.

Modify Instance

From here, the values can be modified. The distance from seed or the offset from nominal can be changed by either inputting the value or using the arrow buttons to increase or decrease them as seen in the image below.

Values to Modify

Instance modification for Circles

Similar to linear patterns, circular pattern instances can be modified as well. In the example below, a few of the leg pattern instances needed to be moved so that they did not intersect with each other.

Circular Pattern for Table

The steps for accessing the options are the same as the linear pattern except for the Values to Modify section. The angle of the instance can be changed based on Angle from seed or Offset from nominal as seen below.

Values to Modify for Circular patterns

The ability to modify instances in assembly patterns provide designers with greater flexibility when using assembly-based patterns. The feature is definitely a welcomed addition to SOLIDWORKS!

The post Modify Instances in Assembly Patterns in SOLIDWORKS 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at January 27, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Start Your Monday With a ‘Wallace and Gromit’ 40 LB Stop Motion Cheese Sculpture

wallace and gromit cheese sculpture

You’ve seen dozens of wood builds, metalworks, and resin casts on SolidSmack, but there’s a real scarcity here on sculptures made of cheese.

You heard me right: cheese. Not many people in their right mind would dare work with such a mushy, pungent, and easy expiring material, but thankfully Lawrence Becker is the exception to the rule.

Becker decided to pay homage to Nick Park’s Wallace and Gromit stop motion animated comedy series in the best way possible: through a cheddar bust of Wallace, the cheese-loving human half of the cartoon duo.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/voomYG7mDuY?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Just like with the cartoon, his sculpture is done beautifully in stop motion. Using a number of well-photographed frames, he gives the illusion that crafting a bust out of a 40-pound block of sharp cheddar is as easy as plucking out chunks of cheese.

Unlike wood or metal, working with cheese poses a number of dairy-related problems. First of all, he has to make sure he isn’t sculpting in too hot an environment so the cheese doesn’t melt. This means being in a low temperature room and keeping the cheese as far away from the lights as possible.

The second problem is time. Seeing as it takes next to no time for most cheeses to spoil, Becker has to finish his sculpture and take still photos of each important part of the video in a set time limit. Finish too late and the whole room will start to smell of cheese.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wallace and gromit cheese sculpture</figure>

As the video shows, he managed to complete Wallace’s smug mug without too much difficulty. What wasn’t shown in the video however, was the demise of this cheese creation. Instead of crying over spoiled cheese, Becker donated chunks of it to his friends to eat. Whatever was left went straight into his stomach.

Lawrence Becker has loads more stop motion animation videos on his YouTube channel and Instagram page (not all of which involve cheese).

The post Start Your Monday With a ‘Wallace and Gromit’ 40 LB Stop Motion Cheese Sculpture appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 27, 2020 12:18 PM

January 24, 2020

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Deploy Vacuum Pods

Encho-Enchev-art

A thickly knitted mist settled around the aft cargo bay. We could override the shield group, leaving our cover exposed, but ensure the vacuum pods would be primed for expelling anything that would try to siphon out these links.

Encho Enchev – Futuristic concept ships? Yes, please. And Sofia-based 3D artist, Encho Enchev, has some of the best. Star Wars concepts and more.

Stud Shooter – That minifig-size LEGO stud shooter won’t do. So Stian Wahlvåg madea human-scale shooter and provided to files to make it too.

LEGO ISS – Speaking of LEGO, there’s a new IDEAS International Space Station build that will be available Feb 1. 864 pieces – $70.

Down – Traditional sculptor Håkon Anton Fagerås turns marble into the softest, plushiest pillows you can imagine.

Hemibrain – The Janelia Research Campus has generated the largest visual of synaptic-level connectome (human brain activity) ever made.

Lightspeed – Great jibbly biscuits…. Red Bull Rider, Brandon Semenuk, shows you what speed is all about. This is insane. Also recommended for a little more chill.

Neodymium Magnet Icosahedron – The Philadelphia Robot Factory is at it again, this time creating small to large icosahedron sculptures with their magnets.

Slipknot Cover – 5-year-old drummer, Caleb, loves him some Slipknot and plays Before I Forget as good as Joey Jordison himself.

<script type="text/javascript"> amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "solid0a-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Deals We're Watching"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "3101cc5765df520b8ea5cefe7814f421"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B0002HLCOY,B07R5QD598,B071NTK5K1,B00BIFNTMC"; </script> <script src="http://z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>

The Long Way – New video from Demun Jones. Sometimes it’s a bit more of a journey.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ql6JzlqUyYo?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The post Friday Smackdown: Deploy Vacuum Pods appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 24, 2020 11:13 PM

Tired of Two-Wheeled Bicycles? Here’s One That Walks.

walking bicycle

If you’ve ever looked at a bike and thought “Man, I wish this thing had a bunch of freakin’ legs instead of wheels”, then you’re probably just as awesome as the people behind YouTube channel The Q.

Taking inspiration from Dutch designer Theo Jansen’s Strandbeests (kinetic sculptures which move with the wind), this bicycle’s rear consists of four metal legs powered by the bike’s pedals:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fXXJ1LOqHEk?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

It took seven months to develop this walking hybrid of a bike and three entire days just to assemble the structure. In total, 400 custom sections were measured, cut, and welded to create the back portion of the walking oddity.

<figure class="wp-block-image">walking bicycle</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">walking bicycle</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">walking bicycle</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">walking bicycle</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">walking bicycle</figure>

After making the initial CAD model in Maya, they started cutting and welding rods together. Once finished, the individual legs were filed, assembled, and tested before being grouped together.

<figure class="wp-block-image">walking bicycle</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">walking bicycle</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">walking bicycle</figure>

Keeping the four legs suspended is a custom-built frame. To power the legs, a unique back pedal has to be attached to the frame to support the new mechanism.

<figure class="wp-block-image">walking bicycle</figure>

After assembling the bike’s new prosthetics, all that’s left to do is remove that horriblly round rear wheel, replace it with the legs, and slap on the pedal chain.

<figure class="wp-block-image">walking bicycle</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">walking bicycle</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">walking bicycle</figure>

It won’t win you any races, but the walking bicycle will definitely get the attention of anyone who passes your way. If you’re wondering why The Q didn’t turn both bike wheels into legs, it’s because pedaling would be too difficult, although, with muscular legs like yours, that’s arguable.

To see more of The Q’s crazy awesome builds, check out their YouTube channel!

The post Tired of Two-Wheeled Bicycles? Here’s One That Walks. appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 24, 2020 10:25 PM

The Dawn of Dual-Screen for 3D CAD Apps… Is Upon Us

You would think this article is from a decade or two ago, but no. It’s really about dual-screen and CAD software using dual-screens… but not like you’re used to.

This week, Microsoft released the preview SDK for their dual-screen Surface Duo, with the Window 10X version coming next month. Along with this, they’re introducing new web standard proposals for web developers to create dual-screen experiences that run on Android and Windows 10X.

Now, dual-screen mode for CAD applications isn’t anything new – we’ve been able to use multiple screens for years. It allows us to use one screen for the application and keep the other apps, toolbars, and distraction to the other. However, while CAD apps are able to make use of two monitors slapped together, they don’t have a dual-screen experience — this is what makes the Windows 10X SDK preview quite something, especially when you consider how it could affect your workflow in and across 3D CAD applications.

Zac Bowden took to Twitter to share three examples of the UI/UX. In the first video, notice the (somewhat) fluid and adaptive nature of the navigation and app switching.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-twitter aligncenter wp-block-embed is-type-rich is-provider-twitter">
<script async="async" charset="utf-8" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js"></script>
</figure>

In the second, he shows a phonecall and messaging, but notice the overlay and how elements move out of the way of others.

<script async="async" charset="utf-8" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js"></script>

It may not seem like much but, according to the the patent published by Microsoft last October, there’s much more planned for dual-screen UI/UX. In one portion describing improved efficiency, it states:

The example techniques may reduce an amount of time and/or resources (e.g., processor, memory, network bandwidth) that are consumed to provide access to information to a user. The example embodiments may increase efficiency of a computing device that is used to provide access to information to a user. The example techniques may increase user efficiency (e.g., by reducing a number of steps that a user takes to obtain access to information and/or to provide input to an application).”

According to Microsoft’s Windows 10X announcement, “Windows 10X will be available on dual-screen and foldable devices starting in the fall of 2020”. That may seem a long time away — then add time for CAD software to catch up. Or, it could be that early access to the SDK gives them enough time to prepare for the future of a more interactive, user-centric dual-screen experience. After all, in that same Twitter thread, Zac reported that Microsoft Edge and Outlook already support Windows 10X dual-screen with adaptive UI.

Now, can you imagine a user-experience like this for SOLIDWORKS, Onshape, Fusion 360 or the like? Or, better yet, within the applications themselves?

The post The Dawn of Dual-Screen for 3D CAD Apps… Is Upon Us appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 24, 2020 09:38 PM

The Cameradactyl Brancopan Is A 3D Printed Camera You Can Make Yourself

cameradactyl brancopan

If you’ve ever wanted to get into photography but were always hindered by how expensive cameras can be, then Ethan Moses has you covered. Provided you have your own 3D printer, you only need $40 worth of filament to make his patented panoramic Cameradactyl Brancopan:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wa4fhQ6KMME?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The Brancopan isn’t your run-of-the-mill, cheapo analog camera. Nope. Though 3D printed, it uses 35mm film and 50-250mm Mamiya press lenses, putting it on par with some very fine low-to-mid end cameras. And, of course, printing it yourself, means any color option you choose. Have a look at some of the variations:

<figure class="aligncenter">cameradactyl brancopan</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter">cameradactyl brancopan</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter">cameradactyl brancopan</figure>

It has a ratchet film advance to help stop the film at each frame as well as a spring-loaded film door latch. Two cold shoes allow for finders and accessories while a tripod mount and strap lugs allow it to be carried much more easily.

The best part about the camera? According to Ethan, the oversized, plastic nature of the camera makes it extremely durable – I’M CHUNKY – something a lot of cameras these days can’t say about themselves.

<figure class="aligncenter">cameradactyl brancopan</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter">cameradactyl brancopan</figure>

As mentioned, you only need a couple of items to make the Cameradactyl Brancopan. Apart from the 3D printer and the filament, you’ll need a hex key (to assemble it), an exacto knife (to cut out/trim the pieces), and some sandpaper (to smooth everything out). What’s awesome about the construction is that, should you ever break one or more pieces, you can simply print out a new part to replace it.

And if you don’t have a 3D printer? Well, the camera is designed to be printed on an FDM printer with a small print-bed, so there are a lot of options. Ethan recommends a few: Creality Ender 3, Prusa i3 MK3, or the Creality CR-10, depending on your needs and how serious about 3D printing you are.

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Ethan wants to make the designs for the Brancopan available so he can focus his efforts on making new camera designs instead of crafting his past works for others to enjoy.

He launched a Kickstarter campaign that reached its goal with 783 backers. Backers got access to the STL files as well as three videos detailing the printing, assembly, and use of the Brancopan. The campaign ended January 10th, but the rest of the world will get their hands on the files and videos, May 1, 2020.

But don’t worry. If your interested in 3D printed cameras and 3D printed accessories for cameras, you can check out the Cameradactyl shop where you’ll find an absolute array of camera goodies, including the Cameradactyl Homonculus 69 that has some of the same features as the Brancopan.

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post The Cameradactyl Brancopan Is A 3D Printed Camera You Can Make Yourself appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 24, 2020 08:43 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020 Inlaid Text for Linear Arrows

Earlier in SOLIDWORKS 2019 we used to place an arrow to show the details on the view, but to show what we were pointing to we used the “Text 2D” tool on Author Tab, to show a description. But now in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020 linear arrow has a new property called “Inlaid text”.

SW 2019 - Arrow properties

SOLIDWORKS Composer 2019 arrow properties has inlaid text missing

Here are the steps of how to use/toggle ON this property:

  1. On Author Tab > Use arrow tool to place linear arrow in the view-port.
  2. Now select the placed arrow and notice in properties tab on the very bottom.
  3. Toggle on Inlaid text property, that allows us to display text inside a linear arrow.
  4. By default it shows the value of length of arrow in the text field,change the type from length to custom.
  5. Doing so, additional text box “TEXT” is shown which allows us to add any information we would like to show inside the arrow.

Note: This property is only available for linear arrows but not the circular arrows.

Inlaid Text Property- SW 2020

Inlaid Text Property in SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020

Learn more about Composer

To learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer attend our SOLIDWORKS Composer Essentials training course either in a classroom near you or live online.

The post SOLIDWORKS Composer 2020 Inlaid Text for Linear Arrows appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at January 24, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

This 12,000-Piece Kapla Set Is Eager To Get Some Sleep

kappla tired coliseum

While most of the world relies on dominoes and LEGOs to make large toppling sculptures, the Dutch have something a little bit different: Kapla blocks. These sets consisting of wood pieces measuring 11.7cm x 2.34cm x 0.78cm are very similar to dominoes, the only difference being Kaplas were made for construction and not for playing a tile-based board game.

YouTube creator Crouzier Benjamin has been making gigantic Kapla sets for years – putting their durability as well as their ability to beautifully collapse to the test. In one of his more recent builds, he creates a giant cylindrical coliseum inside a bedroom before toppling it onto the bed:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7DiScOjdPFI?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

It took him 12,000 blocks and two days to work on this wooden tower of power, and all it takes is a little nudge to set the chain of Kaplas off to sleep.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">kappla tired coliseum</figure>

What’s amazing is how the outer shell topples without causing the inner portion of the tower to crumble along with it. Once the falling blocks reach the top, it sets off three wooden braziers which crumble along with the tower’s legs, promptly making the whole thing fall on the bed.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">kappla tired coliseum</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">kappla tired coliseum</figure>

As with any toppling block build, Crouzier went through a lot of trial and error to get this video just right. Every block had to be placed properly as to not mess up the fall nor jam the whole thing up.

Crouzier Benjamin has a lot more falling Kapla set creations over on his YouTube channel, so give it a look if you’re in the mood for some controlled destruction! Now that his tired coliseum has gone to sleep, maybe it’s creator can get some much needed rest as well…

The post This 12,000-Piece Kapla Set Is Eager To Get Some Sleep appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 24, 2020 12:48 PM

January 23, 2020

SolidSmack

150 3D Printed Robots To Be Assembled And Offered To STEM Students

he “Every Kid Gets A Robot” robot - Danielle Boyer

A young engineering student found a way to deliver 150 3D printed robots to students. Danielle Boyer is a nineteen-year-old engineering student with a passion for 3D printing and STEM. She’s the founder of a non-profit, The STEAM Connection, which develops accessible educational materials designed to increase thinking and diversity in students. 

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">Danielle Boyer with the “Every Kid Gets A Robot” robot [Source: Danielle Boyer]<figcaption> Danielle Boyer with the “Every Kid Gets A Robot” robot [Source: Danielle Boyer] </figcaption></figure>

Boyer is clearly a busy person, as she is currently working on a double major in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering in addition to running The STEAM Connection, delivering public talks and even publishing several books. 

Every Kid Gets A Robot

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">“Every Kid Gets A Robot” robot [Source: Danielle Boyer]<figcaption> “Every Kid Gets A Robot” robot [Source: Danielle Boyer] </figcaption></figure>

One of the key products from The STEAM Connection is an inexpensive 3D printed robot design called “Every Kid Gets A Robot” (EKGAR). Evidently, Boyer was distressed with the high cost of robots then available to educators, and sought to design one of her own that would be far more accessible. 

The result was the EKGAR design, which she developed in SOLIDWORKS. While it’s a fully functional robot, the key feature is the cost: US$18.95 for a build-it-yourself kit. 

The fact that it’s a kit is by no means a problem for students educators, who will learn even more by building the robot themselves. 

The STEAM Connection will sell the kit at that price, and for qualified requestors, they will provide direct access to the CAD files for those who wish to build or obtain the parts themselves. 

The STEAM Connection – 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

That’s all good, but there’s something else happening: Boyer and The STEAM Connection have partnered with Dassault Systèmes to feature the EKGAR design at the upcoming 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020 event in Nashville. (Note: this event was previously known as SOLIDWORKS World, and has been renamed this year by Dassault Systèmes.)

Apparently Boyer and her team of four, along with volunteer event attendees, will attempt to assemble no less than 150 EKGAR kits during the event. These will be dispatched to a variety of educational institutions at no charge, including middle schools, K-12 schools, and STEAM labs. 

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">Assembling the “Every Kid Gets A Robot” robot [Source: Danielle Boyer]<figcaption> Assembling the “Every Kid Gets A Robot” robot [Source: Danielle Boyer] </figcaption></figure>

I happen to be attending the event and will certainly drop by, and possibly even try to assemble some robots, if Boyer allows me to do so. If you are in attendance as well, please lend The STEAM Connection a hand with this work, as there is plenty to do. 

Somewhere I suspect there is a group of 3D printers frantically 3D printing 150+ sets of parts for this project. 

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post 150 3D Printed Robots To Be Assembled And Offered To STEM Students appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at January 23, 2020 10:44 PM

The Javelin Blog

Mate to Reference Geometry in SOLIDWORKS 2020 Large Design Review

New in SOLIDWORKS 2020, you can create mates that use reference geometry as their reference in the Large Design Review mode. By creating your mates in the Large Design Review mode, you can save time and resources without having to open the assembly in the normal mode.

In Large Design Review mode you can create mates using the following reference geometries:

  • Standard planes
  • Origin
  • Reference planes
  • Axes (not temporary axes)
  • Reference points
  • Coordinate Systems

To create these mates, open the assembly in the Large Design Review mode and select “Edit Assembly” to start the edit assembly mode.

Opening the assembly in large design review mode with the edit assembly option

Opening the assembly in large design review mode with the edit assembly option

Click on “Mate”  and select options in the mate property manager to create a mate to reference geometry. These mates will be saved in the top level assembly.

Creating a coincident mate to the top plane

Creating a coincident mate to the top plane

The post Mate to Reference Geometry in SOLIDWORKS 2020 Large Design Review appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at January 23, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Watch a Cherry Burl and Resin Bowl Get Turned on a Lathe

You’ve seen pieces of wood get mixed with resin and turned into kitchen pieces before, but here’s one you can actually use to help with your cooking.

Using a piece of old cherry tree burl and some blue resin, YouTube channel gavel coulee woodworking has crafted a resin bowl as smooth as the concoctions you’ll make in it:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WfbHWE289xM?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

To start things off, he puts the large cherry burl inside a used tub of ice cream and fills it with blue resin. Once the resin settles, he puts on the lid, seals it in a vat, and leaves the resin to harden.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">resin bowl</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">resin bowl</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">resin bowl</figure>

He removes the resin-encased burl from the ice cream container and pops it onto a lathe. This is where the fun begins. Using a special chipper, he starts cutting and smoothening out the burl into the bowl it was meant to be.

After beginning at the bowl’s base, he slowly moves outward and works on smoothening the edges of the bowl to give it a rounded, almost ball-like appearance.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">resin bowl</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">resin bowl</figure>

With the body finally taking shape, he can start cutting the indentation which will eventually become the bottom of the bowl. He does a couple of passes with the lathe before sanding the indentation off-screen up to 400-grit sandpaper.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">resin bowl</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">resin bowl</figure>

After the sanding, he cleans the burl for a bit before applying some sanding paste. He follows this up with a good helping of polish and restoring paste to give it a nice sheen.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">resin bowl</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">resin bowl</figure>

Satisfied with the bottom side, he flips the burl around and starts chipping away at the top portion to make the most important part of the bowl: the part which actually holds stuff. Resin and wood shavings litter his workshop as he carves out the inside. Every now and then, he pauses to examine his handiwork and to make sure none of the resin or wood has chipped off by mistake.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">resin bowl</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">resin bowl</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">resin bowl</figure>

Just like the bottom part, he sands down the inside using up to 400-grit sandpaper before cleaning it, applying some sanding paste, and finally, some polishing/restoring paste.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">resin bowl</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">resin bowl</figure>

The only thing left to do now is clean up the bowl and it’ll be ready to store fruits, vegetables, soups, or whatever else you may need a resin-casted bowl for. As with most pieces of wood cast in resin, the mixture of the resin and the polish bring out a sort of earthy feel to an otherwise boring-looking piece.

More of gravel coulee woodworking‘s woodturning projects can be found on his YouTube channel, so be sure to check them out!

The post Watch a Cherry Burl and Resin Bowl Get Turned on a Lathe appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 23, 2020 12:32 PM

January 22, 2020

SolidSmack

Behind the Design: Core’s Wellness Device

We saw Core, a “meditation trainer”, popping up all over at CES 2020, covered here! Now, they’re sharing the physical product engineering challenges behind creating this wellness device. And there were MANY engineering prob… er, lessons to be learned.

Watch the video below to see our interview with Sara Weber, Director of Marketing & Partnerships, and Bashir Ziady, VP of Engineering.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HvD1S7V7sKw?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Disclaimer for Media Integrity-type Purposes: Core is a client of my optical engineering company, Spire Starter LLC. (It has parts that light up and where there’s light, there are optics.) Therefore, my overall opinion on the product will be totally biased. The engineering lessons below, however, are untainted.

What is This Thing?

Sara Weber, Director of Marketing & Partnerships, sat down with us to explain why they built this gadget.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large is-style-circle-mask">Sara Weber, Director of Marketing & Partnerships at Core.<figcaption> Sara Weber, Director of Marketing & Partnerships at Core.</figcaption></figure>

It turns out learning how to meditate and getting better at it can be hard! With guidance and METRICS, however, it becomes a lot easier to build a meditation practice. After all, “what gets measured gets managed.”

I thought it would be a great product for all the stressed-out engineers I know — which is most of the engineers I know. (Remember, only us engineers suffer from The Engineer’s Curse.) First, it’s a cool tech toy to play with. Second, it’s a tool to give you biometric feedback on how well you’re progressing on your very important learning-to-chill journey.

What Does Core Do?

The physical product pairs to an app that provides audio guidance throughout a meditation. The user holds the device while getting into meditation mode and it provides additional guidance with haptics. It also simultaneously measures heart rate and heart rate variability. Then, it sends that data back to the app to log.

Beyond the real work it’s doing when vibrating, lighting up and collecting data, the device serves a purpose when sitting idly on your end table. Simply by being a physical presence in your 3D field of view, Core becomes a passive reminder. I never thought of this value that a physical product can bring before!

What’s Inside

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large is-style-default">Each group of 15 metal dots on Core is actually one electrode to read your heart rate and HRV.<figcaption>Each group of 15 metal dots on Core is actually one electrode partially sitting beneath the top face. It reads your heart rate and HRV.</figcaption></figure>

This product has a lot of interesting parts. For one thing, Core’s base is real wood to add to that aesthetic appeal. That’s something I rarely see in the world of hardware startups. It also has lighting elements seen through the top face of the device. On the top right and top left of the product are bunches of metal dots and each bunch is a dry electrode — one for each thumb. This part collects data about how your heart is beating. Finally, hidden from view are the motorized electronics to provide haptic feedback by making the entire orb vibrate.

What is HRV? Why Should I Care?

If you’ve never heard of the term “heart rate variability” (HRV), you’re not alone. It’s a metric I’d never encountered in hardware engineering before, either. HRV is a measure of how closely your heart is keeping to the same number of beats per minute. If it beats precisely once per second on the second, that has a lower variability than if it was, say, 60 bpm (beats per minute) for 10 seconds and then 70 bpm for 15 seconds, then 55 bpm for 12 seconds.

Counterintuitively, a higher amount of variability correlates to less stressful states of the body. Yeah, you read that right. The more the beat of your heart skips around, the less stressed you are. When the heart is attentively drumming along with the precision of a Swiss clock, it’s actually on high alert. When it gets lazy and lets its rhythm slide, it’s more chillaxed.

Another surprising thing about HRV is that it’s a more reliable metric for predicting states of high stress than plain old heart rate is. So, now that’s a thing you know.

Engineering Challenges

Bashir “Bash” Ziady, VP of Engineering, walked us through many engineering lessons encountered when designing this product. This segment starts at marker 3:38 in the video.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large is-style-circle-mask"><figcaption>Bash Ziady, VP of Engineering at Core</figcaption></figure>

I was impressed by how much consideration Core made about fine-tuning specs, and soliciting user feedback which they actually used to make design changes. (You can’t see it, but right now, I’m making my genuine amazement face.)

I imagine this is in no small part due to the fact that this was not Ziady’s first time at the races. He’s a seasoned HW guy, and it shows. One of his earlier claims to fame is working on the hardware for, *gasp* Guitar Hero. Legend.

Developing Dry Electrodes

If you’re having your heart rate and its variability measured in a hospital, you’d likely see a large electrocardiogram (ECG) machine wheeled in to do the job. Then, gel-coated electrodes would be stuck directly to your bare skin. While Core didn’t require hospital-level ECG precision, shrinking the capability down to a hand-held device was still a big challenge!

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Here, Bashir Ziady puts a finger on each of Core's dry, metal electrodes.<figcaption>Here, Bashir Ziady puts a finger on each of Core’s dry, metal electrodes.</figcaption></figure>

The metal composition matters a LOT. The team at Core learned this lesson on an earlier prototype run where a Chinese factory just used whatever material they had on hand instead of what was spec’d. It did not work well.

Of course, that’s been cleaned up at this point and with the correct material in place, those electrodes work very well. Takeaway: when problems arise, always check that your vendor really did the thing you asked them to do.

Incorporating Natural Wood into a Mass-Produced Physical Product

Ziady told us that using real wood in a product design at volume is very tricky. But why?

“Tolerances are real.”

Bashir Ziady on why producing several thousands of a product using wood is tough.

Oh, right, OK.

Wood won’t keep tolerances well as the material tends to expand and contract with changes in humidity and temperature. It also doesn’t expand in all directions evenly. Along the grain axis, you’ll get different amounts of expansion than across the grain. So how does one design around all this variability?

Finding High-Quality CNC Vendors

Ziady told us one of the keys to incorporating wood into this device was finding good CNC vendors. It was important that they were highly experienced in working with wood, could do it well, and could do it on a large scale. Just because a vendor can get 100 parts within spec, doesn’t necessarily mean they can do it for several thousand parts.

Type of Wood

The choice of wood ended up being a very important design consideration for this product.

First off, all types of wood have varying expansion properties and ability to keep tolerances when cut. Another thing the team at Core had to look out for was that some wood types looked like a hot mess when it was cut into. They found some woods had high variability in appearance, and ugly grain structures could emerge when they were cut into. A third factor was wood density. Woods that are denser just feel like a nicer, more substantial base for their product. Denser wood also tends to expand less as one might expect with fewer pockets for water to creep into.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">The underside of Core's wellness device. Oohhh check out that grain structure on that real wood base.<figcaption>The underside of Core’s wellness device. Oohhh, check out that grain structure on that real wood base.</figcaption></figure>

Ultimately, Core went with the dense and visually satisfying choice of rosewood.

Mechanical Design

To minimize the negative effects of expansion, a best practice is to remove as much material as possible in your design in areas where you need to account for tolerance stack-up. So, this rule should especially be applied to areas on a part where you’re connecting wood to the rest of the hardware.

Ergonomics – “Hands Are Weird”

“Biomorphology is a strange thing,” Ziady told us when I asked why it was so tough to get the housing shape right.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Device on the left is before modifications to 1.) the top housing shape, 2.) electrode size and 3.) electrode placement. Device on right is next iteration with these features improved.</figcaption></figure>

The curvature of the top rim could be irritating to your thumbs after a while if it was too high in certain spots. At the same, if the top face didn’t have a steep enough angle, your thumbs would need to bend down too much to reach the electrodes. There again, the shape could lead to irritation after prolonged use. In the end, the only way to dial in the final, ergonomic housing shape was to get feedback from hundreds of product testers and iterate.

Getting the Haptics Right

Just like with getting an outer shape that feels pleasing to thousands of different hands, getting the right amount of buzz in the haptics turned out to be a similar challenge. Too much, and you’ll get irritated. You might even experience that lingering vibration sensation like after you use a lawnmower for a long time.

In the opposite direction, the minimum threshold sensation that people can detect varies. So, they had to make sure it was also enough vibration for everyone to know when it was buzzing.

The third thing to make the haptic setting a challenge was – Core is a hefty little doohickey. It contains a lot of mass that needs to be displaced for a user on the outside to feel the sensation. In the end, a lot of user testing from a large group of people helped to dial in this spec, too.

Iterations. Lots and Lots of Iterations.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">A sampling from the product development evolution at Core.<figcaption>A sampling from the product development evolution at Core.</figcaption></figure>

Can we all just take a moment and look at what truly well-done product development looks like?

I talk with many hardware startups that have a working prototype or a 2nd iteration and are confident they are good to go with making 100,000 of the thing with no user testing. *Insert facepalm.* In the image above, we see just a glimpse of the development path of Core’s product. It was based on getting feedback from hundreds of users and then iterating…many times! A startup may not need exactly this many iterations, but can we agree that more than 1 would be a lovely idea to start with?

HW Development Advice from Bash to His Earlier Self

Keep your friends close but your vendors closer.

Ziady’s best tip to his earlier self if time traveling were a thing.

Having vendors who would go the extra mile and do custom work beyond a normal offering was very important in this project. It’s especially valuable when your company is “small and scrappy”. So make sure you have excellent working relationships with those vendors! They might save your hide.

Core JUST Launched!

Core announced during CES 2020 they are ready to be purchased. You can go here to order yours now.

The post Behind the Design: Core’s Wellness Device appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at January 22, 2020 02:24 PM

The Javelin Blog

Using Silhouettes to create sketches in SOLIDWORKS 2020

Using the top-down approach to design parts within an assembly is very common in workflows. Using other parts to create sketches is quite common using the Convert Entities & Intersecting Curves tool. With SOLIDWORKS 2020, the Silhouette tool has been added. This tool allows part bodies to be selected to create a silhouette outline relative to the surface it is projecting on. So this can be great for creating parts that have a female connector that comes in on an angle, or for packaging solutions. Let’s see how using silhouettes to create sketches in SOLIDWORKS 2020 works, and the scenarios where it would be the best option to use.

Using the Silhouette Tool

The example that will be used to demonstrate the silhouette tool will be a sphiricon seen in the image below. The assembly is made up of two parts, and the silhouette will be projected onto the Test Plane.

Project Shericon on to the Test Plane

When in sketch mode, you will be able to access the silhouette tool by going to Tools > Sketch Tools > Silhouette Entities as seen in the image below.

Silhouette Entities command

The Silhouette Entities command manager seen below contains a list of all selected bodies and the option to create an external silhouette of the part, excluding all features such as holes.

Silhouette Entities Command Manager

A comparison between the external Silhouette turned off and on can be seen in the image below. Note the hole feature has not been captured in the right image.

External Silhouette has been checked in the image on the right

It is also worth noting that if you try to create a silhouette of multiple bodies, features such as holes will not be captured even when the External silhouette is not checked on as seen in the preview image below. You will also notice what complex curves will be converted into multiple splines.

Silhouette Projection of multiple bodies

Other considerations when using the tool

  • The Silhouette Entities tool is available only when you clear the Graphics-only
    section option.
  • Silhouette entities do not contain sketch constraints.
  • You can silhouette a component that has only a single instance in an assembly.

Using Silhouettes to create sketches in SOLIDWORKS 2020 is a welcome addition and has many potential applications that will make life a bit easier for designers!

The post Using Silhouettes to create sketches in SOLIDWORKS 2020 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at January 22, 2020 01:00 PM

January 21, 2020

SolidSmack

Must-See TV: David Jason’s Great British Inventions – Airs TONIGHT

Our favorite celebrity maker, design shaker is at it again. Since ‘The Big Life Fix’, Jude Pullen has been up to all sorts of shenanigans on his site and Instructables, including the prep of his super-human, inventive, problem-solving capabilities for a new show on UK’s Channel 4 – David Jason’s Great British Inventions.

Here’s a look at the trailer:

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/KAONr2UWe-k?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

In case you didn’t catch it, David Jason is the older gentleman that is “on a journey of discovery’, out and about experiencing all of the great inventions that shaped products over time, Jude is the one that David apparently has fastened up in the shed creating all sorts incredible gadgets to help explain what’s behind the design.

As Jude explained to me, David goes off and learns about people who invented things and Jude comes in showing how to make it from scratch or illustrate the concept behind the invention, keeping the build to ones and tens of dollars/pounds so others can realistically make it too, completing the picture for the viewer.

What do we have to look forward to? Well, if the trailer is any evidence, there will be bicycles, automobiles, jet packs, hoverboats, airplanes, tanks and, I imagine, much more.

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<script async="async" charset="utf-8" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js"></script>
</figure>

Yes, yes you will, Jude, and we can’t wait to see you.

The show airs TONIGHT, January 21st at 9:00 PM on Channel 4. ” If only it were available in the US!” I know, I know, we need MORE SHOWS LIKE THIS everywhere BUT you should (we hope) be able to catch the episodes online at the show’s homepage. Be sure to follow Jude on Twitter and tell him what you think too!

Oh, and if you were not around seven years ago (!), we interviewed Jude on Engineer vs Designer. He’s done quite a bit since but hearing the chap describe his experience always brings a smile to the face. Listen here.

The post Must-See TV: David Jason’s Great British Inventions – Airs TONIGHT appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 21, 2020 05:47 PM

The Javelin Blog

Methods for screen capturing SOLIDWORKS errors for Support

It’s great that people are taking advantage of Javelin’s support service to make their SOLIDWORKS experience a more pleasant one. Providing a good explanation of the problem with accompanying documentation helps to expedite the process. Once in a while, however well-intentioned, we come across a screen capture that is taken hastily with a camera phone as seen in the image below.

Hurried Problem Capture

Hurried Problem Capture

The photo may have looked fine over a one glance review, but the distortions from the monitor along with a misplaced focus can make the messages difficult to recognize, causing unnecessary emails or calls back and forth trying to figure out what was in the picture. In this article, we will go over methods for screen capturing errors for support effectively every time and in a timely manner, sometimes faster than if you took a picture with your phone.

Creating an Rx Report

Ideally, If a client has an issue that is easily repeatable, the first thought would be to create a SOLIDWORKS Rx report. This feature comes standard with all SOLIDWORKS installations. An Rx report provides background information and the option to capture the error in addition to the steps leading up to it through a video recording. A guide on how to do this can be found here: How to use SOLIDWORKS Rx to diagnose your system and capture problems.

Methods for Screen Capture

If the problem happens intermittently, a good way to capture the error is by capturing an image of the problem. There are several ways to do this and we will go over them in detail. Using the following methods in tandem with publishing software such as Adobe Indesign or Microsoft Word to provide a description can also be helpful.

Using the Snipping Tool

The Windows 10 Snipping Tool is a great way to capture images. It is native to Windows so most users will have access to it. Snipping Tool allows users to select the desired area to be copied. The user can then edit the images using editing tools in the image editor.

Snipping Tool in Windows

Snipping Tool in Windows

Using the PrtScn Button

Pressing the PrtScn button on the keyboard is another great way of capturing the contents of the screen, When opening a program such as Microsoft Paint or Adobe Photoshop, You can simply press Ctrl + V to paste the image into the editing software.

Pressing Windows + PrtScn automatically saves an image file in the folder C:\Users\<your name>\Pictures\Screenshots. If you do not have time to edit the photo or open a program, simply drag and drop the screenshot into an email.

These are only a few of the methods for screen capturing errors for support. We are sure there are many others, and if you have one, please feel free to mention it to the support staff, it would be great to discover more ways to get a good screencap!

The post Methods for screen capturing SOLIDWORKS errors for Support appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at January 21, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Monday List 04.20 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

The Wonderful World of Chinese Hi-Fi

The best pair of $20 earbuds you’ll ever buy.

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How to Scale a Chain-Link Fence

Prepare for ripped clothing. 

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The Unbearable Softness of Engineered Fabrics

The human senses never cease detecting things the brain finds a way to dread.

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Secretive Startup Promises Satellite Internet for the Masses

Skylo’s $100 “hub” antennas can divvy up satellite signals among a bunch of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connections.

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The Secret History of Facial Recognition

Sixty years ago, a sharecropper’s son invented a technology to identify faces. Then the record of his role all but vanished. Who was Woody Bledsoe, and who was he working for?

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7 Things You Didn’t Know About Plastic (and Recycling)

Recycling is a complicated system dictated by market demand, price determinations, local regulations, the success of which is contingent upon everyone, from the product-designer, to the trash-thrower, to the waste collector, to the recycling factory worker.

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The post The SolidSmack Monday List 04.20 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 21, 2020 12:28 PM

January 20, 2020

SolidSmack

Going to 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020? Here’s What You Don’t Want to Miss.

3DEXPERIENCE World Platform SolidWorks World 2020

Well, well, well. What’s this? We’ve left the previous two decades behind and with it the conference that defined the era for a generation of designers and engineers. SOLIDWORKS World is no longer, but that’s OK, because now we have 3DEXPERIENCE World to take us into the next decade with all the experiential experiencing we can experience.

While we may not be entirely sure what the new conference name means for the user experience as a whole, we know the agenda is set, the parties are planned and the show must go on. Here’s what you need to know and where you need to be for 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020.

Changes to Note:

  • Monday and Wednesday have an 8:30 ‘General Session’. Tuesday has changed to an 8:30 ‘Keynote: Innovate with 3DEXPERIENCE® WORKS’ with a simultaneous ‘Innovation Keynote: DELMIAWORKS’.
  • The Partner Pavilion is now 3DEXPERIENCE Playground.

SOLIDWORKS Top Ten

The Top Ten SOLIDWORKS enhancement requests voting has changed a little this year. 1) It’s hosted on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform and 2) ‘Likes’ are counted as votes. Submissions are closed but there’s still time to vote!

Vote Here

(Login with your SOLIDWORKS forum login or create a new 3DPassport login)

Location – Music City Center

The 3DEXPERIENCE World conference is taking place in downtown Nashville at Music City Center. It’s approximately 16 minutes from Nashville International Airport (BNA) to Music City Center.

Music City Center Website
Floorplans
Wayfinding App – iOS | Android

Directions (from airport)

3DEXPERIENCE World Overview & Agenda

Free Certification Exams

On Sunday, from 10-2 and 3-7, you have the opportunity to take a certification exam for free (included with each full conference pass). NEW for 2020 are TWO new 3DEXPERIENCE platform certifications to get your foot in the door on 3DXP.

Party, Party, Party

There’s no lack of off-site parties, after-parties, customer appreciation events, and more. Register at these links to join in.

General Session Live Stream (?)

If you’re not able to attend 3DEXPERIENCE World, the livestream is the next best thing. Catch the keynotes and announcements via these links.

Links coming soon!

SOLIDWORKS typically provides a livestream of the General Sessions. If made available, we’ll post them here.

Special Event – Bash on Broadway

This year’s speical event is a hop, skip, and a jump from Music City Hall. SolidWorks users will take over a city block of Nashville bars and eateries with live music and entertainment scattered throughout. Don’t miss it Tuesday night at 7-10 PM.

3DX Playground

The Partner Pavilion is now 3DEXPERIENCE Playground. It’s split up into four sections (Design, Simulate, Manufacture, Plan) with the Dassault Systemes booth slap dab in the middle.

Overview
Details
Exhibitor Directory

See ‘Location’ above for floorplan and conference center app.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

Get Ribboned

You might have a ribbon or ten on your badge, but make note of these fun subgroups not officially endorsed by SOLIDWORKS, but totally legit. It’s easy to join up too.

SLUGME
CAD Monkey

Previous years – awaiting confirmation
Bacon Brotherhood
Beerme

#Hashtag #atcha

If you want to stay in the loop on the socials, follow the hashtags. The official 3DEXPERIENCE World hashtag is #3DXW20. Use it wisely or don’t.

Things To Do in Nashville?

There are loads of things to do in and around Nashville! Here are a few references and some of my own recommendations. Enjoy.

Things To Do Before/After 3DXW – Matt Lorono shares his yearly things to do before and after the conference.

And my picks…
Smokey Mountain National Park – Just a 3.5-hour jaunt east from Nashville.
Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge – Where is all started for Willie Nelson.
Listening Room Cafe – Great venue to eat and hear up and coming artists.
Johnny Cash Museum – Get to know The Man in Black a little better.
Madam Tussaud’s – Creepy wax people? Yes, please.
RCA Studio B – Into the oldies? Take a tour where it all started.
The Hermitage – Andrew Jackson’s home away from DC.
Grand Ole Opry Calendar – Plenty of shows weekend before and after.
Adventure Science Center – Good day activity for the whole family.
Hattie B’s Hot Chicken – Best Peach Cobbler. Chicken ain’t half-bad either.
Bajo Sexto – Some proper Mexican food in the heart of country.

Breweries? Yes.

Yazoo, Fat Bottom, Little Harpeth, Tailgate, Smith & Lintz, Black Abbey, Blackstone, Jackalope, Tennessee Brew Works, Bearded Iris, Southern Grist, New Heights.

Oh. And, Speakeasies.

Old Glory, Attaboy, Fox Bar, Patterson House, Skull’s, Rudy’s.

Other Links

Here are just a few other links and resources to have on hand at the conference this year.

3DXW Registration (until Feb 12)
SWW Survival Guide (Old but valid!)
Feb Nashville Weather (50s/20s)

Must-Have Things to Bring

  • A mobile charger (Anker PowerCore HIGHLY recommended.)
  • Snacks (granola bars, jerky, trail mix, etc.)
  • Water bottle
  • Notepad/pens
  • Business cards
  • Scan app – Handy (Evernote or Dropbox)
  • Winter clothing (it can get cold/below freezing)

Going to 3DEXPERIENCE World? I would love to meet you. Follow @solidsmack on Twitter for 3DXW coverage and you can get a hold of me @joshmings or over on LinkedIn.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">3DEXPERIENCE World Platform SolidWorks World 2020</figure>

The post Going to 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020? Here’s What You Don’t Want to Miss. appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 20, 2020 08:20 PM

Highlights from the 2nd Annual Hardware Summit

The second installment of Hardware Massive‘s Hardware Summit took place in San Francisco, at Mind the Bridge, on November 6, 2019. In spite of fires raging around the Bay Area complete with power outages, around 200 hardware nerds came out to connect and learn. There were three talks with experts in the physical product space who have seen things. These were interlaced with networking sessions and time to chat with hardware startups and service providers at booths encircling the space.

For highlights from each talk, you can watch the video below:

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RSYao3ED84A?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The Strategy Panel

This talk’s aim was to give guidance on the high-level plans for a HW startup’s development and business model. Its full title was, “The Strategy – Building the Right Team, the Road Map, and Critical Considerations”. Panelists included: Alex Witkowski, founder at Witkowski Law; Alec Rivers, co-founder of ShaperTools; Kelly Coyne, managing partner/co-founder of Grit Ventures; and Anne Cocquyt, founder and CEO of The GUILD. The moderator was HW product entrepreneur, Seth Heltsley.

<figure class="wp-block-image">The Strategy Panel at the 2nd Annual Hardware Summit. From left to right: Alex Witkowski, Alec Rivers, Kelly Coyne, Anne Cocquyt, and Seth Heltsley.<figcaption>The Strategy Panel at the 2nd Annual Hardware Summit. From left to right: Alex Witkowski, Alec Rivers, Kelly Coyne, Anne Cocquyt, and Seth Heltsley.</figcaption></figure>

Kelly Coyne

Coyne shared a story about being an early user of Amazon’s Alexa and needing her husband to turn the lights on and off because Alexa ignored her. Apparently, the male-dominated engineering team behind this product hadn’t done user testing with women. So, it took a while for them to learn that Alexa didn’t respond to the higher pitches of women’s voices. Coyne’s message to startups is that diverse teams aren’t just a feel-good thing that helps with a company’s PR; the range of perspectives within these teams actually help to build a better product.

Alec Rivers

Rivers shared the story behind the birth of Shaper Tools in the midst of him getting a PhD at MIT. He’d developed the idea for the machine vision-based freehand cutting tool outside of MIT. However, he had the option of working with the university to develop the technology into a business. He got some insider advice letting him know that if he joined up with MIT, it could take away the rights to the company at any time if they thought Rivers wasn’t commercializing the tech fast enough. Rivers decided against the partnership, and his advice to startups is to thoroughly research the organizations your business considers getting entangled with. That goes for accelerators/partnerships, lawyers, or any company that would have significant influence over the progress of your baby.

Anne Cocquyt

The advice from Cocquyt echoed the sentiments of Rivers and Coyne. Diverse teams are important, and surrounding yourself with people you can trust is important, too, especially at the beginning of a startup’s journey. However, the people you know and trust going into a startup are more likely to be not diverse. So, when a new business is at the point to bring in new hires, it’s key to build “a team that represents that consumer group that you want to serve.”

Alex Witkowski

Witkowski warned against the desire for startups to get a patent just for the sake of getting a patent. On their own, patents don’t necessarily bring value. “It depends on what’s in the patent application, and what it covers and how enforceable, and how easy it is to design around…”

He also warned, “you can patent something that no one wants to buy.” He’s seen inventors spending years working on a product that doesn’t have a market. Don’t be that guy. Do market testing!

The Operations Panel

I was the moderator of this panel, subtitled, “How to Design for Growth and Avoid the Killer Pitfalls. During our time, I asked the experts if they’ve seen the same weird things in hardware startup land as I have. If you’re thinking I abused my position in order to get public validation of my viewpoints, you’re 100% correct.

<figure class="wp-block-image">The Operations Panel from left to right: Darragh Hudson, Chrissy Meyer, Dana Madlem, and, uh, me - Erin McDermott.<figcaption>The Operations Panel from left to right: Darragh Hudson, Chrissy Meyer, Dana Madlem, and, um, me – Erin McDermott.</figcaption></figure>

Joining uh, me, Erin McDermott, Director of Optical Engineering at Spire Starter, (woah, this is so meta) were these awesome panelists: Darragh Hudson, founder of Kaizen Dynamic; Chrissy Meyer partner at Root Ventures, and Dana Madlem, VP of Services at Rush Order.

What Shouldn’t HW Startups Try to “Wing”?

Dana Madlem sees a lot of people mistake shipping product as a simple task because it seems commoditized and commonplace. He equated this phenomenon to the idea of having kids.

Billions of people before me have had kids and therefore it should be easy, but it’s NOT at all.

– Dana Madlem on how HW startups think about shipping product

Unfortunately, things that seem simple can, for example, result in extra unnecessary dollars in shipping — which can kill your margins entirely. Madlem warned startups not to overlook the parts of your business that seem easy. That would be a sad way to sink!

HW Startup Founders in the Bay Treat HW Development like SW Development

I’ve traveled around the world meeting hardware startups, and more than anywhere else, the ones coming from the San Francisco Bay Area tend to try to build hardware like software. This is in large part because there are a lot of software engineers jumping into hardware development for the first time there. Plus, many of those moving into the wide, grenade-laden world of HW don’t understand how it’s different from building code. But don’t just take it from me! Here’s what the other pros say about this phenomenon and how HW and SW dev differ.

Chrissy Meyer

Yeah, 100%.

– Chrissy Meyer, Partner at Root Ventures

Well, there you have it.

She told us she hears sentiments of this in an innumerable amount of startup pitches. Meyer added: “There are very good reasons why hardware should not move at the speed of software…Once you cut a tool, I’m sorry, there’s no going back.” After a certain point, making changes is extremely expensive, and there’s a limit to how much you can fix with over-the-air software updates after you ship.

Meyer also mentioned most VC’s are afraid of HW startups. Many VC’s don’t understand how to measure the costs and risks associated with HW startups so they play it safe and stay away. Root Ventures is one of only a few firms that focus on hardware because they understand it.

Darragh Hudson

‘Yeah, hardware typically takes a long time, but we’re gonna do things differently.’ FAMOUS LAST WORDS.

– Hudson on seeing startups treat HW like SW development

Hudson pointed out that there are parts of hardware production that can’t be sped up or skipped. And a lot of those steps are very, very costly and time-consuming. Things like opening tooling, kicking off PCBA fabrication or certification each cost thousands of dollars and costs usually cannot be recovered if you need to make changes. So, take the time to plan them well to begin with; it’s worth it!

Where Are Opportunities Missed for Cost or Time Savings in HW Development?

We all had some items that topped our cringe-inducing list of missed opportunities we see with HW startups.

  • Virtual Prototyping – there’s a lot of development that can be done before you hold any physical parts in-hand. This can be CAD to test mechanical fit, optical simulation software to see if your lighting is pretty or if your camera gives a nice image, thermal simulation SW to prevent your widget from melting, etc. This one makes me shudder when I see it skipped because it means unnecessary extra time and cost for development.
  • Reliability Testing – Chrissy Meyer told us a horror story about not doing this enough for a certain project and then discovering a catastrophic failure rate (80%) at the moment they began to ship. Never again. Now she pushes the HW startups she works with to put in the effort for frequent and thorough reliability testing.
  • Using the Tried and True Path – Darragh Hudson explained he sees startups trying to take risks and shortcuts to ship product cheaper and faster, but it never works out well. The experience of those who have done it before is incredibly valuable! And there’s a reason why HW development methodologies exist: they work. Listen to that expert guidance so you don’t get tripped up by details.
  • Building a Flexible Supply Chain – relying on over-the-air updates can only get you so far. Dana Madlem guaranteed us he had more experience flashing firmware than any of us. It’s common for a change at this level to be needed once you’ve already got product waiting to ship! Make sure your supply chain can help out if/when you need this level of tweaking.

Fireside Chat – Trade Policies, IP, and the Future of the Hardware Supply Chain

This talk was a very timely discussion on the state of tariffs and trade with China. Greg Fisher, CEO of Berkeley Sourcing Group, moderated this one. The expert panelists were: Mark Cohen, Director and Distinguished Senior Fellow at UC Berkeley; and Philip Rogers, Ph.D. candidate at UC Berkeley.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">The 2nd Annual Hardware Summit's closing "Fireside Chat" talk from left to right: Philip Rogers, Mark Cohen, and Greg Fisher.<figcaption>The closing “Fireside Chat” talk from left to right: Philip Rogers, Mark Cohen, and Greg Fisher.</figcaption></figure>

Expert Opinion on Trade War with China

Cohen told us that things aren’t actually as bad as the media is portraying. In terms of what the United States asked for from the Chinese government, there’s been compliance on most items. These include China’s laws on technology transfer, foreign investment, and trade secrets. He believes much of the fuss we’re seeing around tariffs is happening more for domestic political maneuvering than in regard to international trade policy.

Key Advice to Hardware Startups

Get Yourself a Chinese Patent

Mark Cohen told us they really like to litigate in China. They do it even more than Americans, and if you’re not protected, your hardware company is at risk.

“If you took all the patent offices in the world, except for China, and put them together, the number of patents would be less than those filed in China.

– Mark Cohen, Director and Distinguished Senior Fellow at UC Berkeley

China has inexpensive rights, too. A simple utility model might only cost you around $500-$1,000, and within a matter of weeks, you have some protection with high litigation value. Without basic protections, it’s highly likely that your Chinese manufacturer will file for rights on your invention in China, as if they were the original creator!

Tips for Mitigating Supply Chain Stress in the Current Trade Climate

Philip Roger’s advice to hardware startups was to always carefully evaluate your own specific situation. Not all industries are being affected equally by the current political disruptions. With some products, it may make sense to move manufacturing to another country, for others, it might not. Also, even if you decide to switch up your supply chain to avoid China, it may not be 100% possible if some key components can only be sourced from there. What’s more, instability can and does happen everywhere! The place you move production to may prove even more disruptive. Lastly, don’t believe everything you see on the news. A lot of what you’re hearing is likely overdramatized, and you should keep yourself educated with your own real research to keep straight what are valid conclusions versus hysteria.

Miss the 1st Annual Hardware Summit (2018)?

If you missed the previous year’s Hardware Summit and want to glean some gems of wisdom from those talks: not to worry. We covered highlights from that event here.

Link to the Full Version Videos

Want the longer version? Hardware Massive’s Matthew Hall put together a more detailed summary of the 2nd summit along with the full-length videos for each talk here.

The post Highlights from the 2nd Annual Hardware Summit appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at January 20, 2020 04:23 PM

This Soapbottle Holds Liquids and Dissolves Over Time

soapbottle

How many soap bottles do you throw out each year? Yeah, enough for the eco-terrorist elite and Leonardo DiCaprio to make you feel guilty for a few seconds while you mock their hypocrisy. All the while, despite our best efforts to rid ourselves of evil plastics, we still produce tons of waste which takes ages to decompose. But what if there were a zero-waste bottle option that dissolved (before?) by the time you were done with the contents?

Jonna Breaitenhuber, a Berlin-based product and process designer, has come up with one such option. Her Soapbottle project (which features bottles which look less like containers and more like bars of soap) holds a variety of liquids and dissolves as the contents are being used:

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Created by pouring soap mixtures into molds, the base Soapbottle features a hole for a hanging string to fit in and is filled with either a shampoo, conditioner, or shower gel. To get to the contents, you have to cut out the small indent on the upper-right edge of the “bottle”. This allows the liquid to be poured out and the bottle to be sealed using a small metal cover.

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You wouldn’t want to fill these bottles with drinks, because Soapbottles are best used in the shower. As their namesake implies, the bottles are made of soap which dissolves as the liquid inside continuously pours out and the Soapbottle is exposed to water in the environment.

Once the soap has outlived its usefulness, you can grate it down and mix it with some natron and baking soda to make your own washing detergent. Or you could just use the whole thing up until there’s nothing left but disgusting leftover soap chips.

<figure class="aligncenter size-full">soapbottle</figure>
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Jonna went through various types of soap fats, bottle types, and molds before ending up with the Soapbottle’s bar-like design. Though it looks to hold little more soap than a week’s worth of suds, the end result is a simple concept (a bottle made of dissolvable soap! ) in a simple design and completely zero waste.

Me? I’m holding out for the 32 oz version but have some ideas to make my own. Let’s hope P&G and other body care product-producing companies pick up on the idea. You can find more on the variations and design process at Jonna Breitenhuber’s webpage. For more photos of the Soapbottle, her Instagram page is the place to be.

The post This Soapbottle Holds Liquids and Dissolves Over Time appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 20, 2020 04:15 PM

The Javelin Blog

Setting the path for eDrawings in SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration

SOLIDWORKS PDM can work with different viewers to preview files within a vault. For SOLIDWORKS files, eDrawings is the default viewer. During the Installation of SOLIDWORKS PDM or SOLIDWORKS, eDrawings can be installed at the same time.

During the installation of SOLIDWORKS PDM, the default location for the eDrawings viewer is noted within the PDM environment. Typically the default edrawings path is:

 C:\Program Files\SOLIDWORKS Corp\eDrawings\EModelViewer.exe

This path can vary between implementations, and in some cases updates can cause the defined path to become invalid.

Assigning the eDrawings PDM Viewer Path

The eDrawings viewer path can easily be fixed though. In the PDM Admin, if you right click on a User, User node or Group, you can access the Settings for that selection.

Accessing PDM User Settings

Accessing PDM User Settings

In the Admin settings under the Viewers options, along the left side of the Settings window, the location of an eDrawings installation can be specified.

Viewers Settings

Viewers Settings

By default, there are two Installed Viewers. One is a SOLIDWORKS File Viewer and the other is the eDrawings EModelViewer. The latter being the default eDrawings viewer.

Adding or removing PDM File Viewers

Additional viewers can be added, and existing ones removed. The first step to add an additional viewer is to first install it. These additional viewers would be for other file types, that are stored in a PDM vault and are not supported by the EModelViewer.

Selecting an Installed Viewer will display the files extensions associated with the viewer. Additional extensions can be added, but the Selected Viewer needs to support those file types.

As noted earlier, a viewer should first be installed before defining it in SOLIDWORKS PDM Settings. The path can be entered manually, or it can be selected by using the Browse button.

Note the syntax “%1%”. It is important to have this syntax at the end of the viewer path, for the default viewers and may also be required for other viewers.

For more information on defining viewers, please refer to “Adding a Viewer for the View File Command”, in the SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration guide, available from the Help pull-down menu in the PDM Admin.

The post Setting the path for eDrawings in SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at January 20, 2020 01:00 PM

January 17, 2020

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Frog Chirples

Frogs chirped amidst the flooded bank of a moon-drenched pond. Little was known about when they arrived or whence they came. One thing was certain though, they seemed to grow louder with closer proximity to these links.

Gernot Buder – Incredible work all around but the clean lines and contrast in his concept work (especially the mechs) is what really stands out.

Paris Musees Collection – Over 150,000 new artworks digitized and online for you browse and enjoy.

Ocean Art – The winners of the 2019 Underwater Photo Comp feature a Crab-eater Seal, Sweetlips, Anemone City, and so much more.

Wave Dabs – Speaking of the ocean, the Instagram follow of the week, Golsa Golchini, puts an ocean scene in a dab of paint, from surfers to swimmers, skiers and more.

The Apple Archive – Unofficial (yet thorough) collection of Apple since the beginning, from ads and keynotes, to design and odd music videos.

Octopussi – Drum ring? How about three drum RINGS. Greenbeats percussion ensemble shows you there’s no limit to the number of drummers you can have.

LIVEN 8bit Warps – If you’re into creating electronic music and looking for the latest all-in-one synth, this new one from Sonicware may interest you.

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Take the ‘A’ Train – The classic, unlike you’ve ever heard it before. Arranged and played by ‘The Mad Arranger’, Jacob Koller.

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The post Friday Smackdown: Frog Chirples appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 17, 2020 06:35 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Assembly Mates Shortcuts

SOLIDWORKS 2020 has many big enhancements that improve performance, stability and usability. Sometimes it’s the small things that matter most. The littlest things that improve our CAD life.

As an instructor who teaches SOLIDWORKS I really try to promote a two hand design theory. What I mean by that is keeping one hand on the mouse and the other on the keyboard, as much as you can. Any time your cursor has to travel to the other side of the screen or you have to look down to find a key on the keyboard you lose time. Now some of that may not sound like a big deal but when you are under crunch time and must make hundreds of parts or a massive assembly – shortcut keys, tips and tricks mean everything.

In the Assembly Tab – third icon in is the Mate command

When in the assembly mode hitting “s” on the keyboard will bring up this menu which can be customized

By holding ctrl key and selecting the entities you want mated this list will appear

There are many ways in an assembly to get to the precious mate command. Mates are the relations of sketches. How I tell most people to add a sketch relations from one line to another is hold the Ctrl key and click both lines. When adding mates in an assembly you can do the same thing. Click on the two entities you want mated and a small list appears in the pop out box. The list of the mates has been expanded.

This new list can contain mates such as: Limit Distance, Limit Angle, Slot, Width, Flip Alignment and Lock Rotation. In my example I am using the assembly found in the SOLIDWORKS Essentials Class. If you are interested in taking the Essentials class with Javelin please check our schedule for upcoming live online classes and in-class sessions.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Assembly Mates Shortcuts appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at January 17, 2020 01:00 PM

January 16, 2020

SolidSmack

A New STEM Site for 3D Print Construction Set Projects

STEM 3D Printed Construction Set Projects

I spoke with Paulo Kiefe, the founder of STEMFIE, a new site dedicated to providing 3D printable construction set components.

The site, as you might gather from its name, is focused on providing an ability for students to learn principles of construction. STEMFIE provides an “open educational construction set” for making new designs. 

Aside: It turns out that Kiefe was one of the designers who produced the original #3DBenchy 3D model back in 2015, which is perhaps now the most-3D printed object in the universe. See a 3D Studio for 3DBenchy here.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption> Paulo Kiefe, founder of STEMFIE [Source: Twitter] </figcaption></figure>

Fabbaloo: What is the STEMFIE project?

Paulo Kiefe: The STEMFIE project attempts to create a new application for 3D printers in schools and homes. The technology and price level of machines and material has become so accessible, that making things on demand, is no longer something that only companies can do.

With that in consideration, STEMFIE was designed as an ecosystem of parts in a coherent construction set toy — which 3D-prints easily on most consumer-level machines.

The system resembles the good old Meccano construction set, which has been around since the late 1800s.

STEMFIE also aims to create a new kind of toy which is downloadable by the end-user. In this way, when kids need more parts for a project, they only need to turn on the 3D printer and make as many as they want.

Fabbaloo: Who started STEMFIE, and when did that happen?

Paulo Kiefe: I am the creator of STEMFIE. Having used 3D printers for 20 years – and now seeing the ease-of-use and affordability of desktop machines – the thought of designing parts that can be useful and have a long-term use at home, was always on my mind. I realised the potential in spreading designs online when I, back in 2015, co-designed 3DBenchy together with my colleague and friend Daniel Norée.

I love construction set toys and especially, building mechanical things with beams, rods, cogwheels, etc. When I was a child, I use to love when my father taught me how to play with these and make my inventions.

I, therefore, decided, roughly two years ago, to start designing and prototyping a set of components that would be small enough to print quickly and easily, but still maintain enough detail and dimensional accuracy.

After many attempts and iterations, I finalised the construction standard for STEMFIE, meaning that all parts attach proportionally and coherently.

Fabbaloo: Who’s funding STEMFIE?

Paulo Kiefe: I developed STEMFIE on my own. I spent time, lots of filament and, sometimes, a bit of sweat and tears. 

Fabbaloo: Are you the only person on the STEMFIE project? Is anyone else involved?

Paulo Kiefe: Apart from myself, I have had excellent help from my friend and inventor Sven Hellestam. He also uses 3D printers and has been very good at helping me see the design from a different perspective.

I have also had great support from my friend Thomas Lindgren, who, apart from also being a maker and 3D print user, printed STEMFIE parts at home and played with his kids, which gave me excellent user feedback.

Fabbaloo: Where is STEMFIE based?

Paulo Kiefe: STEMFIE was born in Sweden.

Fabbaloo: Is there an intention to add additional projects?

Paulo Kiefe: Yes, there is an intention, and ongoing work behind the scenes, to release all the part files for the STEMFIE standard – the fasteners, beams, etc., all in the different sizes.  In that way, anyone will be able to make their STEMFIE projects.

I will also release new projects regularly. There are already a bunch assemblies designed, which I need to do more testing before I release them, and there will be many more in the future built on ideas.

I will also prepare a specific Blender scene file, in which anyone more efficiently will be able to create their projects and modify any part they desire. In other words, I want this to be a community project an let people know that STEMFIE is a toy designed for everyone to use and play with!

Fabbaloo: Do you have any idea what these additional projects might be?

Paulo Kiefe: The list is long! All projects till be released under stemfie.org/projects. I already have plans for making different kinds of projects, suitable for doing experiments in schools and being an educational tool. I also wish to receive community feedback. It is more fun to design a STEMFIE project, knowing that people want to 3D print that and play with it.

I can already mention, as a teaser, that the next project will use a ping-pong ball.

Fabbaloo: Are any formal educators involved in the development of projects?

Paulo Kiefe: I have talked to a few schools in Sweden that have shown interest in using STEMFIE as an educational tool. But as far as the project has progressed now, I am the only person deeply involved developing STEMFIE, and naturally also with the excellent help and feedback from my friends.

Fabbaloo: How are projects produced? Are they made in-house or can anyone submit a design?

Paulo Kiefe: The projects produced now, which I will regularly be releasing in the future, are all created by me.

Nevertheless, I sincerely wish that other users of STEMFIE will make their designs and submit them to the project. I will gladly publish them also on stemfie.org, and naturally, with attributions.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post A New STEM Site for 3D Print Construction Set Projects appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at January 16, 2020 11:27 PM

Japanese Artist Recreates Vintage Machines Using Old Newspapers

newspaper art

While most of us reuse old newspaper to wrap breakables, hold fish and chips, or create paper-mache sculptures of our pets, Atsushi Adachi has a much more creative use for them. A Japanese visual artist, Adachi takes old newspapers and uses them to create replicas of machines FROM THE PAST.

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If you’ve ever been to Japan, you may notice their newspapers are a lot thinner and harder to work with than newspapers from other countries. Apart from locally sourced papers, he also tries to find newspapers from other parts of the globe. No matter what country it comes from, however, Adachi uses newspapers from the same time period as the item he is re-creating, making them even more brittle and prone to flaking than today’s papers.

According to him, working with newspapers dated to the specific build helps him get a better understanding of what the designers had in mind when making the real deal. As an added bonus, many times the newspaper articles reflect the media and public opinion of these creations at the time. You’ll never be able to view them all, but bits and pieces can be seen on certain parts of Adachi’s work (provided you can read Japanese, German, or whatever language the papers are in).

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He’s already re-created an army of battleships, Neil Armstong’s astronaut suit (made from the pages of a novel), a crashed fighter plane, and an old Bugatti T35 among others. To see more of Atsushi Adachi’s work, you can follow him on Instagram. If you aren’t the social media type, then his webpage will keep you occupied.

The post Japanese Artist Recreates Vintage Machines Using Old Newspapers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 16, 2020 11:14 PM

The Javelin Blog

Creating Primary Members based on Points in SOLIDWORKS 2020 Weldments

SOLIDWORKS 2020 provides you with additional tools and control options for creating primary members in weldment structures. In this article, we are going to review these new options in SOLIDWORKS 2020 for primary members based on “point and length”, members “between points”, members using “up to point” end conditions and members based on “direction”.

When specifying Point and Length, you can set a direction for a primary member by selecting a reference which is a sketch entity. The member extrudes in its direction and you can also reverse the direction of extrusion. As an example, consider the part below which is made of a few sketches for the reference geometries.

Starting sketch for primary members

Starting sketch for primary members

To start the primary member command, click on Insert > Structure System > Structure System to get into the structure system mode.

Starting the structure system mode

Starting the structure system mode

Once you are in this mode, you need to click on Insert > Structure System > Primary Member to start adding primary members to your weldment part. It’s a good practice to Pin the property manager of primary member command to be able to add multiple primary members.

Creating the first primary member

Creating the first primary member

Now, you can select the desired profile from the profile tab in the property manager and then switch to the member tab:

Specifying the profile for the primary member

Specifying the profile for the primary member

For our first member type, point-length member is selected:

Creating a point-length member

Creating a point-length member

We select the 4 points from our sketch and specify the length of the members and click OK to confirm.

First set of members using the length end condition

First set of members using the length end condition

For the next members, we change the end condition of the members from length to point and select the start and end points of the new structural members. SOLIDWORKS will create members between the selected points.

Creating members between two points

Creating members between two points

The next end condition to explore is “up to point”. Using this end condition we are creating 3 additional members up to a specific point.

Creating a members using the up to point end condition

Creating a members using the up to point end condition

And the last end condition is to create an structural member based on direction. In the member tab, under end condition we select length and click in the box for member direction. For the direction of the member, a sketch line is selected. The length of the member, also needs to be specified.

Creating a member using the length end condition and choosing a specific direction

Creating a member using the length end condition and choosing a specific direction

Want to learn more about Weldments?

Attend our SOLIDWORKS Weldments training course either live online or in a Canadian city near you.

The post Creating Primary Members based on Points in SOLIDWORKS 2020 Weldments appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at January 16, 2020 01:00 PM

January 15, 2020

SolidSmack

Open: The SolidSmack 2020 Reader Survey (Win a $250 Gift Card)

Greetings, SolidSmack Reader! Welcome to 2020. By now you’ve composed yourself, returned to a normal schedule, and adjusted to all that’s new and amazing about living in a new decade and leaving a previous one behind. Ahhhh.

There’s just one thing you haven’t done yet – take the 2020 SolidSmack Reader Survey! It’s that time of year, and one of our favorites, where we get to know you a letter better and you let us know what interests you, what you’d like to see, and how we’re doing. Be honest!

When you enter the survey, you’ll have the option to enter to win a $250 Gift Card (from Amazon, Home Depot, or iTunes – your choice!), so take a few minutes and let us know what’s on your mind. And, as always, thank you for being a faithful SolidSmack Reader!

The survey will be open until January 31st. The winner of the gift card will be announced here and via email shortly after. Thank you!

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by SolidSmack at January 15, 2020 02:37 PM

CES 2020 Highlights: Trends, Highlights, Hardware, and More

What are the tech trends for 2020 and the decade to come? Read on and watch the video for all the gadget goodness that catches a HW engineers’ eyes at CES 2020! This year’s show in Las Vegas expected over 170,000 attendees and took up literally millions of square feet of exhibit space. That’s a lot of ground for one enginerd to cover. Luckily, I was able to pull in more vantage points from some other hardware pros.

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Trends

The Talk: 2020 Tech Trends to Watch

AR and VR

In this talk before the show, it was mentioned that AR is expected to overtake VR in quantity of useful applications. AR hardware is also trending toward more sleek, streamlined form factors.

Robotics

In terms of viable products, social robots are dying out and robots built to fulfill specific tasks are seeing an uptick. Consumers aren’t buying bots just because they’re novel anymore. Robots are practically commonplace! Today, they need to do a thing today to earn their keep.

Television Screens

Yes, 8K was all the rage this year at CES. However, in this talk, the more notable trend was in screen size, not resolution. In U.S. households, consumer demand is continually driving screen size up larger and larger.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Note the ever-steady rise of television screen size in relation to U.S. consumer demand.<figcaption>Note the ever-steady rise of television screen size in relation to U.S. consumer demand.</figcaption></figure>

For those of us creating games, that could mean that offline multiplayer games can expect a growing platform in American homes. Screens keep getting bigger, and that makes entertaining a group on a home display ever easier.

From an electro-optical standpoint, that also means expensive, high energy-consuming screen formats are not the most sensible platform for display technology. It will be more difficult for a panel of electrified semiconductors to grow with this super-sizing trend, than, say laser projection technology. Plus, projectors like the Hisense L5 Laser TV (shown off at CES 2020) have the added benefit of not frying users with as much radiation, because they use reflective systems. Typically, these types of optics can more easily achieve high viewing angles with less energy.

This is just my view as an optical engineer, but electronic tech is a wild animal, and you never know what “impossible” advances are just around the corner.

Trends on the Show Floor

Endless Rows of Smart Home Devices

If there is a thing in your house that could be made connected, it was probably in one of the many smart home booths at CES. There were so many things that this may actually be a coup instead of a trend.

<figure class="wp-block-image">As far as you can see, the virtual eyes and ears waiting to be implanted in all your home things.<figcaption>As far as you can see, the virtual eyes and ears waiting to be implanted in all your home things.</figcaption></figure>

Holographic Everything

Holographic-type displays for advertising, decoration and game graphics were everywhere. However, most of them appeared to be more like 2D floating graphics, not a fully 3D hologram. Below is another example — the virtual companion (read: imaginary friend) hologram from Gatebox.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Gatebox.ai's holographic imaginary friend was one of the many holograms I ran into at CES 2020.<figcaption>Gatebox.ai’s holographic imaginary friend was one of the many holograms I ran into at CES 2020.</figcaption></figure>

Drink-Making Contraptions

If you’re thinking of getting into a hardware startup that is building a beverage-making machine, you should probably just quit now. I think I’ve seen them all after going to CES 2020.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Is there room for your babybrezza baby formula maker next to your matcha, coffee, and cocktail maker?<figcaption>Is there room for your babybrezza baby formula maker next to your matcha, coffee, and cocktail makers?</figcaption></figure>

On display was the Drinkworks cocktail maker by Keurig, a matcha mixer from Cuzen Matcha and smart baby formula formulators by Baby Brezza.

AMD vs. Intel

During AMD’s keynote, the press was wowed again and again with each new standards-changing product reveal. Their 4000 series mobile processors promised to dramatically boost laptop performance and efficiency. And of course, the thing we all needed but didn’t know yet was unwrapped: the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ 3990X 64 CORE processor. Ok then.

<figure class="wp-block-image">AMD showing off its new 7nm mobile processor with 8 cores and 16 threads for ultrathin laptops.<figcaption>AMD showing off its new 7nm mobile processor with 8 cores and 16 threads for ultrathin laptops.</figcaption></figure>

Intel’s keynote immediately followed AMD’s. It notably lacked major announcements of products with cold, hard specs. There was mention of a focus on AI going forward and a peek at a laptop prototype with a flexible display…

When deciding whether to bother going across the hall to attend Intel’s keynote, I checked out Twitter for spectator feedback. Those had me too busy laugh-crying to make the trek.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Thank you, James Newburrie, @DifficultNerd<figcaption>Thank you, James Newburrie, @DifficultNerd</figcaption></figure>

The winner of this round: AMD. Was there any question?

CES Unveiled

Core – Wellness Device for Meditation Training

I was happily surprised to see the familiar faces of some of Core’s team at the unveiling. Core makes a “meditation trainer” device, and we’ll be publishing a Behind the Design piece on the engineering of this thing later this month. (There were a lot of hardware engineering challenges in designing this wellness product which contains dry electrodes and natural wood.)

<figure class="wp-block-image">CEO, Sarah McDevitt, looks on Core like a proud Momma. As she should!<figcaption>CEO, Sarah McDevitt, looks on Core like a proud Momma. As she should!</figcaption></figure>

Their gizmo also made it to the CES 2020 Innovation Awards Showcase. Congrats, Core!

Hap2U – Haptic Feedback for Touch Displays

This super-thin haptic technology was able to move a demo display screen, just where my fingers were. Unlike other haptics, Hap4U‘s tech doesn’t move the entire phone — just where your fingers are.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Hap4U's haptic feedback makes it possible to feel each scale of this virtual fish as your fingers run over the screen.<figcaption>Hap4U’s haptic feedback makes it possible to feel each scale of this virtual fish as your fingers run over the screen.</figcaption></figure>

“Multi haptics” are also possible where you have one sensation for one finger on one part of the screen, while another part of the screen delivers a different sensation to another finger simultaneously. This is the kind of thing the next generation will one day think we’re silly for thinking is amazing. But it is!

Cosmo Connected – IoT Helmets

This company develops a few different technologies for safer bicycle and motorcycle riding. Their connected helmets and displays have lit emergency, brake, and turn signals; they can detect if you crash and call an emergency contact; and you can also share your ride with another person so they can watch out for you.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Cosmo Connected's helmet gives cyclists hazard lights among many other things.<figcaption>Cosmo Connected’s helmet gives cyclists hazard lights among many other things.</figcaption></figure>

Right now, Cosmo Connected is working on new heads up display/smart glasses, but those aren’t ready for prime time yet.

LiBEST – Flexible Batteries

LiBEST showed off their flexible batteries which promised to be able to power things like iPhones and wireless headphones.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Flexing a LiBEST battery.<figcaption>Flexing a LiBEST battery.</figcaption></figure>

They only flex in one direction, but that still opens up quite a bit of design freedom for hardware engineers – especially in the wearable space.

Automotive Overview

Anthony Swartz, who has an electrical engineering background, was on assignment from Murata to soak up the automotive vibes at the show. He was kind enough to share some of his vehicle takeaways with us, too.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Anthony Swartz, our unofficial CES vehicle tech correspondent.<figcaption>Anthony Swartz, our unofficial CES vehicle tech correspondent…er…interviewee.</figcaption></figure>

Ford

Ford is using the Mustang name to help them jump into the electric vehicle market with the Mach-E. To Swartz, however, the EV version’s look doesn’t meet his Mustang expectations.

<figure class="wp-block-image">The all-electric Ford "Mustang" Mach-E.<figcaption>The all-electric Ford “Mustang” Mach-E.</figcaption></figure>

Jeep

It was interesting to see brands like Jeep, which conjure images of muddy off-roading, also showcase electric versions of their vehicles. If there was any doubt, I’d say this proves electric R&D is becoming mainstream.

<figure class="wp-block-image">We've all been waiting for the electric Jeep and now it's finally here! Wait, were we though?<figcaption>We’ve all been waiting for the electric Jeep and now it’s finally here! Wait, were we though?</figcaption></figure>

Rivian

Rivian has a fully electric truck and SUV and they’re partnering with Amazon to stick Alexa in their vehicles. So now she can both order your toilet paper at home and open the tailgate on your electric vehicle.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Rivian let Amazon's Alexa inside and now there's nowhere we're safe from her.<figcaption>Rivian let Amazon’s Alexa inside and now there’s nowhere we’re safe from her.</figcaption></figure>

Byton

Chinese manufacturers are getting in on the electric vehicle trend and Byton is one of the bigger names in this club. The insides of Byton‘s M-Byte are covered in screens and that’s part of the angle they’re taking to make their EV stand out. Driving is boring, so it’s important to have lots of things to distract you from the road.

Byton expects to start selling in the US next year. Watch out, Elon.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Chinese manufacturer Byton's M-Byte.<figcaption>Chinese manufacturer Byton’s M-Byte.</figcaption></figure>

Sony

And then SONY was like, “well, I guess everyone is doing it now. Let’s make a car.” This vehicle, the “Vision S“, was a surprise appearance at CES.

<figure class="wp-block-image">SONY is now a...car manufacturer?<figcaption>SONY is now a…car manufacturer?</figcaption></figure>

Nissan

Nissan showed off its autonomous driving tech with this golfing demo.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Nissan's self-sinking golf ball as an analogy to autonomous driving tech. I just hope it doesn't get confused and land a car in a hole one day.<figcaption>Nissan’s self-sinking golf ball as an analogy to autonomous driving tech. I just hope it doesn’t get confused and land a car in a hole one day.</figcaption></figure>

Putt it to get it going, and somehow that little ball would make it to its mark, with a bit of flair at the end. According to this article, the functionality requires an overhead camera, so the ball is not a self-contained system, but we get the picture.

John Deere

It was also surprising to see John Deere‘s giant AI-based tractor at CES!

<figure class="wp-block-image">John Deere competing for the Biggest Booth Prop Award for CES 2020.<figcaption>John Deere competing for the Biggest Booth Prop Award for CES 2020.</figcaption></figure>

Swartz said the idea behind this tech was to make farming more efficient. That includes the ability to keep track of which parts of a field were, say, already sprayed with seed, and then turning on and off sprayers accordingly as the tractor travels.

Uber’s Drone “Master Plan”

Swartz explained that eventually, Uber would like users to be able to order their full journeys from their phone – from an Uber car ride to that Bell Nexus drone sky taxi we’re always using. So in the future, Uber may have fleets of these scary things flying around, too.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Uber's Intimidatingly Skynet-feel Sky Taxi.<figcaption>Uber’s/Bell’s Intimidatingly Skynet-feel Sky Taxi.</figcaption></figure>

A Look at Audio

For even more perspectives on CES, I suffered through dinner with Anthony Mattana, CEO of Hooke Audio (previously featured here), and the delightful Philipp Sonnleitner, CEO of MIKME. Here’s what the show looked like through an audiophile lens.

Philipp Sonnleitner:


I have not seen anything interesting for audio.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Philipp Sonnleitner, CEO of MIKEME, audio tech news resource.<figcaption>Philipp Sonnleitner, CEO of MIKEME, audio tech news resource.</figcaption></figure>

Great, Philipp, thanks so much for that.

Audio aside, he did mention that the Neon reveal of their virtual human project was pretty weird.

These video-like avatars generated a lot of buzz before spectators saw them, but then afterward, many visitors were left underwhelmed. It’s still not clear if the demonstrations were simply videos of normal human-type people with canned responses to predetermined questions. They did come with disclaimers, however: “For demonstration purpose only. Not final product.”

<figure class="wp-block-image">Neon's "Virtual Humans" on display at CES but for "demonstration purposes only". HMMMM.<figcaption>Neon’s “Virtual Humans” on display at CES but for “demonstration purposes only”. HMMMM.</figcaption></figure>

Anthony Mattana had some more time to scour the audio tech at CES and so he had real sound bites.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Anthony Mattana, CEO of Hooke Audio, other audio tech news resource.<figcaption>Anthony Mattana, CEO of Hooke Audio, other audio tech news resource.</figcaption></figure>

Things Mattana found of note included a new trend with audio HW factories to advertise themselves as authorities in making true wireless technology. That’s weird because it’s a relatively new thing…but if nothing else, it’s proof true wireless audio is becoming mainstream.

Mattana found Shure’s true wireless earphones to be well-designed. He thought they seemed sturdily built and he liked that they are IPX certified. They weren’t new, astonishing tech; they were simply true wireless made well according to more traditional standards.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Shure's true wireless earphones managed to impress Anthony Mattana of Hooke Audio.<figcaption>Shure’s true wireless earphones managed to impress Anthony Mattana of Hooke Audio.</figcaption></figure>

Over at Logitech’s booth, we could see very clearly what Mattana explained as Logitech’s interesting jump into streaming technologies. He mentioned they recently purchased Streamlabs and it was clear from the booth art they are taking aim at the vlogging generation.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Logitech is going all in on streaming audio and they weren't hiding it at CES.<figcaption>Logitech is going all in on streaming audio and they weren’t hiding it at CES.</figcaption></figure>

Weird And/Or Neat Things to Catch My Eye

Hyperfine – Portable MRI Machine

Hyperfine is bringing MRI technology to places it’s never been before by making it both cheaper and portable. Wow!

<figure class="wp-block-image">Hyperfine's portable, less expensive MRI machine has the potential to bring impactful changes to the medical industry.<figcaption>Hyperfine’s portable, less expensive MRI machine has the potential to bring impactful changes to the medical industry.</figcaption></figure>

A lot of this new tech revolves around a permanent magnet they developed themselves. This machine already being used in studies like with daily monitoring of infants to see if there’s any value to derive. A use case like this would ordinarily be cost-prohibitive, but now that it’s not, MRI can be used in so many more ways!

Toyoda Gosei – E-Rubber

This super-thin, flexible material from Toyoda Gosei can be used to create actuators or sensors in a variety of ways. The primary application right now is in creating virtual beating hearts for aspiring heart surgeons to practice on. Before this booth, I’d never thought about how hard it must be to perform delicate operations on something that’s MOVING. It must be like trying to dress a toddler, except someone might die if you mess up.

<figure class="wp-block-image">This e-Rubber demo blew my mind transferring the sensation of a shaken, water-filled balloon from someone else's fingers to mine.<figcaption>This e-Rubber demo blew my mind transferring the sensation of a shaken, water-filled balloon from someone else’s fingers to mine.</figcaption></figure>

Another freaky demo used both the sensor and actuator capabilities together to transfer the feeling of shaking a water-filled balloon from one person’s fingers to my fingers. It was SO WEIRD. I can only imagine what Solid Smack readers would use this for.

Stoll

On the expo floor was a knitting machine capable of embedding hard components into textiles at the same time as the fabric is being woven.

<figure class="wp-block-image">The part of Stoll's knitting machine being pointed to here is where you'd fit a hard component to be woven into your finished IoT pants, or whatever wearable you're making.<figcaption>The part of Stoll’s knitting machine being pointed to here is where you’d fit a hard component to be woven into your finished IoT pants, or whatever wearable you’re making.</figcaption></figure>

Stoll’s booth also showed applications for this tech – mostly in wearable sensor technologies. I really loved how they took an old-school machine and made it a valuable tool for new tech development with 1 addition. Stoll calls this technology “Technical Textiles“.

BrainCo

BrainCo had a lively demo with attendees driving race cares solely through their power of concentration. They slapped on a headband and then concentrated…on something, on anything. It didn’t matter what they concentrated on, they just needed to concentrate fast. Or deeply. Or…I’m not really sure, but the more they concentrated, the faster their car went.

<figure class="wp-block-image">BrainCo's concentration-powered race car track at CES.<figcaption>BrainCo’s concentration-powered race car track at CES.</figcaption></figure>

Lovot – Realistically Useless, Just Like a Cat

It’s not Lovot’s first time at the CES rodeo, but it is the first time for its latest, most improved version of this companion bot. My first thought was, “hey little guy, aren’t you supposed to be dead?”

<figure class="wp-block-image">Lovot so far survives the dire survival rate of social robots and returned to CES 2020.<figcaption>Lovot so far survives the dire survival rate of social robots and returned to CES 2020.</figcaption></figure>

After the media days talk on trends where the press was told these robots that don’t perform meaningful tasks are going under, it was shocking that this big-eyed thing would still be rolling around. Way to go, you little weirdo.

CocaCola’s New Energy Drink Served By Alexa

To sneak into an expo about tech, CocaCola partnered up with Amazon’s Alexa to show off their new energy drink at CES. Clever. Attendees said some magic words to Alexa and a door opened revealing the drink.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Coke Energy inside an Alexa Trojan Horse.<figcaption>Coke Energy inside an Alexa Trojan Horse.</figcaption></figure>

But what did it taste like? Imagine watered-down Coke and watered down Red Bull. Now mix them together. It’s like that. Actually not as bad as it sounds, though.

Startups Climbing Up From the Basement of CES

Muto Labs – Glass 3D Printer

This Korean startup is creating a soon-to-be Kickstarted glass 3D printer.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Muto Labs showing their glass filament and examples of their 3D printed fake glass teeth (right) compared to traditional implants.<figcaption>Muto Labs showing their glass filament and examples of their 3D printed fake glass teeth (right) compared to traditional implants.</figcaption></figure>

The sensible use case they’re using to promote it first is with making much more realistic-looking and cheaper replacement teeth. (I imagine it would be mostly for crowns?) You can find out more at Muto Labs.

Plasmics – Multiple Material 3D Printer with Machine Learning

This startup is making a 3D printer that builds designs incorporating multiple materials without requiring the user to physically mess with changing print heads.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Plasmics is soon to bring us their multiple material 3D printer without the fuss of having to manually change out print heads.<figcaption>Plasmics is soon to bring us their multiple material 3D printer without the fuss of having to manually change out print heads.</figcaption></figure>

Print heads are automatically changed out to switch to different colors or materials. There’s also some machine learning in there to ensure better quality control as the print is happening.

Iron Bull

This company exists because of the unfulfilled need in all of us to operate a miniature, armed, remote-controlled tank.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Iron Bull's toy tanks can be used to take your aggression out safely instead of going to a real war. Or so I'm told.<figcaption>Iron Bull’s toy tanks can be used to take your aggression out safely instead of going to a real war. Or so I’m told.</figcaption></figure>

The idea is to not sell these tanks individually, but as a game system like laser tag, because battling is only fun when there are other people playing, whose tanks you can pepper with tiny, plastic “bullets”. You can find out more on Iron Bull’s website or their Insta.

Miomove – IoT Pressure Sensors for Shoe Insoles

I’ve seen this Czech startup virtually everywhere I go in the world, starting well over a year ago. Back then, their prototype was at a stage where you still needed to use your powers of imagination to visualize how their IoT pressure sensor show insoles would ultimately look. They’ve come a long way!

<figure class="wp-block-image">Miomove's latest prototype version is looking fully legit.<figcaption>Miomove’s latest prototype version is looking fully legit.</figcaption></figure>

Today, it looks like a real product, and it’s as impressive as my imagination originally hoped. Way to go, Miomove!

Sunflower Labs

These guys are taking pre-orders right now for their wild drone security system. Garden lights create an invisible fence that when tripped tell a flying, camera-laden drone to wake up and patrol your property, sending you video footage.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Release the HOUNDS! I mean, the camera-equipped drone security system from Sunflower Labs.<figcaption>Release the HOUNDS! I mean, the camera-equipped drone security system from Sunflower Labs.</figcaption></figure>

Well.

You don’t need to be Barbara Walters to say to yourself, “THIS is 2020.”

What Piqued Your Interest?

If you attended CES or played along at home, what caught your eye? There was surely more going on that I couldn’t fit here. Please comment below!

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The post CES 2020 Highlights: Trends, Highlights, Hardware, and More appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at January 15, 2020 01:57 PM

The Javelin Blog

Organizing the Annotation Folder in SOLIDWORKS MBD

SOLIDWORKS MBD (model-based design/definition) has some new Annotation organizational features for the 2020 release. When viewing annotations, they can now be displayed per the annotation view. This will help you to identify PMI (Product & Manufacturing Data) for a specific view.

SOLIDWORKS MBD Annotations

SOLIDWORKS MBD Annotation

SOLIDWORKS strives best with bi-lateral communication between the graphics area and the design tree information. For example, when I click on a dimension in the tree, it will highlight where that is in the graphics area.

Annotation Folder

Sort by Annotation Type

The benefits of organizing the SOLIDWORKS MBD Annotation Folder are two-fold. Particular dimensions need to be on specific view captures as you see in the picture. If you like the older view of seeing your dimensions as one block, you can right click on the Annotations folder and select Sort Annotations By Type. For more MBD tips and trick check out our recent SOLIDWORKS MBD Sheet Metal and SOLIDWORKS MBD Security Check articles.

The post Organizing the Annotation Folder in SOLIDWORKS MBD appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at January 15, 2020 01:00 PM

January 14, 2020

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Open & Save As Dialog Improvements for File Types

A simple but very welcome improvement that has been made in SOLIDWORKS 2020 is the file type list in the Open and Save As dialog boxes.

In previous releases, if you needed to open a non-SOLIDWORKS file, when opening the file type drop list, you were presented with a very large list of options, too many to even fit in the window, as shown in the example below:

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Open dialog

Now in SOLIDWORKS 2020, that list has been consolidated and reorganized.  Files are grouped logically by software, and best of all, after the SOLIDWORKS file types, the other file types are listed alphabetically.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Open dialog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Open dialog

The same is true with the Save As dialog. This simple change makes very common actions faster and easier.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Open & Save As Dialog Improvements for File Types appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at January 14, 2020 01:00 PM

January 13, 2020

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Animated Command Tooltips

A great addition to the user interface in SOLIDWORKS 2020 is the new animated tooltips that appear when you hover your cursor over some tools.  This new functionality provides a quick overview of how a command works for new users, or if it’s one that you don’t use very often.

SOLIDWORKS Animated Tooltip

SOLIDWORKS Animated Tooltip

However, for some users, it’s quite possible that they wouldn’t want the very large, animated tooltip popping over their toolbar.  In which case, the tooltip options can be controlled by going to Tools > Customize.  There are 3 tooltip options, Large tooltips with images (new for 2020), Large tooltips without images (the default in previous versions) and Small tooltips.  If you want to completely disable the tooltips, uncheck Show tooltips.

SOLIDWORKS Tooltip display options

SOLIDWORKS Tooltip display options

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Animated Command Tooltips appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at January 13, 2020 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Watch a Fabricator Create a Sideways-Folding Metal Door From Scratch

While there’s nothing particularly wrong with traditional horizontal doors, diagonally-opening “sideways-folding” metal doors look way cooler when you open them.

Case in point, YouTuber Phil Vandelay’s folding metal door for his new workshop:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Tzo7s146RMs?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Despite its daunting appearance, all it takes to make this futuristic door are a few sheets of metal, some metal frames, and a couple of hinges.

Sounds familiar? That’s because these materials are almost exactly the same ones you need to make a normal door; the only difference being this door frame is a little more complicated.

<figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure>

Instead of making a large rectangular door frame around a rectangular door, Phil makes a series of smaller triangular frames that combine to form the door’s shape. Using a design he mocked up in CAD, he then measures and cuts several metal bars before welding them together to form the triangles.

<figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure>

Phil crafts some custom nuts and drills out a couple of the corners of the metal frames to fit them on. He then welds these nuts into the door itself.

<figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure>

To get the door to actually open, he fits custom made bolts into the nuts on the door and hinges on the sides to support the other parts. This allows the metal parts to rotate in place, giving the door its futuristic opening mechanism.

<figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure>

After adding all the nuts, bolts, and hinges in place, the frame can finally be fitted on a wall to see if it actually fits. It takes a bit of effort to install, what with all the folding parts, but Phil manages to get the entrance to his shop up and running without a hitch.

<figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure>

The only thing left to do is add the rest of the metal sheets which make up the body of the door. Compared to making the frame, cutting and bolting the metal onto the existing frame seems a lot easier but is nevertheless an important part to make sure unwanted guests are kept out of Phil’s shop.

<figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">metal folding door</figure>

Finally, the door of the future can be opened! Though relatively simple to build, watching the door magically fold diagonally to switch orientations never gets boring to look at.

If you want to make your own folding door, Phil Vandelay made the plans available for purchase on his Etsy page. To see more of Phil, you can check out his YouTube channel.

The post Watch a Fabricator Create a Sideways-Folding Metal Door From Scratch appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 13, 2020 12:36 PM

The SolidSmack Monday List 03.20 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Is the Viral Non-Ad Ad the Future of Advertising?

A remarkable aspect of so many viral ads today is how brazenly they defer, as long and as fully as possible, the realization that you’re watching an ad at all.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Is It O.K. to Buy a TV From a Pawnshop?

For environmental reasons, the habit of frugality is indeed a virtue worth cultivating. 

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Stock Market Record

Asset bubbles and the desperate search for profits amid negative rates aren’t laughing matters. Be afraid.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The Hidden Dangers of the Great Index Fund Takeover

The Big Three—BlackRock, Vanguard, and State Street—are the most important players in corporate America. Whether they like it or not.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Computers Are Learning to See in Higher Dimensions

New artificial intelligence techniques can spot patterns not only in 2D images but on spheres and other curved surfaces, lifting AI out of “flatland.”

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Awake in Dreams

The science and practice of lucid dreaming

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 03.20 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 13, 2020 12:28 PM

January 11, 2020

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Paper Cunckles

Kez-Laczin-art

The crack and split of the paper cunkles ended as quickly as it started. Stacks upon stacks lined the warehouse with only the edges charred, but their fleshy interiors were still roomy enough to move around in plus forage enough to keep from freezing after the sun set and all was frosted with the icy sweat from the pores of these links.

Kez Laczin – Weird? Odd? Enjoyably so. You will lack no curiosity with the work of this Texas-based artist and you’ll leave wanting to see more.

Nicolacaredda – Instagram follow of the week. This painter from Milan has a way with color. A mix of surreal and dream-infused realities.

Dante’s Inferno Violins – 33 violins and one Cello to be exact. Artist Leanardo Frigo hand-paints each to illustrate the story. Amazing.

Patterns 2019 – More color. But in patterns by Juan Díaz-Faes. I’d not wear any of these, but it’s captivating to think on how these patterns tile.

CY-BO – A packaging concept that combines pieces of something rather than cutting and shaping from a larger piece of something.

Cool Vintage – Love Land Rovers? You will love what Cool Vintage does to give them new life. Loads of inspiration for your own project car in their gallery.

Drone Magic – Marco Tempest has a way with technology. Is it all programmed? Or is it all actually responding to him?

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When I Grow Up – Yup. It’s rap. But not like the rest – It’s NF. Other Rappers: flexing with cars and girls. NF: Garbage truck and shopping carts.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/lxRwEPvL-mQ?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The post Friday Smackdown: Paper Cunckles appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 11, 2020 12:10 AM

January 10, 2020

SolidSmack

Launching New Products Has Never Been Easier, Thanks To 3D Printing

I’m looking at an interesting project undertaken by Protolabs, the well-known manufacturing service. 

The project in question is the curiously-named “Wayzn Slide”, a smart robotic door opening system designed for pet access. It’s a mechanism that attaches to a standard sliding door and can open and close the door automatically. It does this through a set of sensors or via remote command through a smartphone. This gives your pet a “Wayzn”. Protolabs explains how it works: 

Wayzn Slide is a low-profile, powered opener that can be placed just above the track of a sliding door and attaches to both the door and jamb. The high-tech device connects securely to the internet via WiFi. If a dog wants to go in or out, the owner is alerted and can simply push a button on a smartphone, which sends a signal to the device’s motor. The motor pulls the door open just enough to let the pet in or out, then closes it.”

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</figure>

The project was considered sufficiently interesting and valuable to garner not only Protolabs “Cool Idea” award, but also a CES 2020 Innovation Award. It looks to be a system that could easily work in almost every home with a patio door and can be self-installed as well.

For a venture like this to succeed in such a way demands some investigation into how they achieved their goals. 

Like many product ventures these days, the Wayzn folks are not manufacturers; they are product designers and marketers. They had to rely on outside expertise to help with the physical build of the product. In this case, they turned to Protolabs for that help. 

According to Protolabs:

Protolabs made it possible for Wayzn to rapidly prototype enclosures and mechanical components using 3D printing stereolithography technology. 

Protolabs printed the various components under normal resolution in an ABS-like material, Accuar Xtreme White. Additional custom finishing was completed by sanding and painting key components to have the appearance of end-use injection molded components.”

Protolabs apparently managed to 3D print 156 copies of 13 different parts in eight days of iterative work with Wayzn. During this iteration, they helped Wayzn refine the design of the parts to ensure they were mass-manufacturable at reasonable costs.

This work enabled Wayzn to very quickly develop their product and it seems that effort paid off. With the award at CES, they are set to sell a great many units to the public. And that’s within a market of tens of millions of homes that own pets. 

The amazing part to me is that services like Protolabs’ are at the ready to assist startup companies in developing radically new products and ensure they are positioned for the next steps in their corporate journey. 

Years ago this entire sequence of events — and particularly the speed in which it was done — would have been a complete fantasy. Now, it’s a routine event. 

I expect that in years to come those of us from today will be similarly astonished at what manufacturing services will be able to achieve given the likely advances in 3D printing processes and technologies. 

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Launching New Products Has Never Been Easier, Thanks To 3D Printing appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at January 10, 2020 04:49 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Feature Tree Name Translation

More and more commonly, teams spread out across the globe are collaborating together on designs.  SOLIDWORKS Data Management tools make it easy for designers to work together and share files, even if they are located on different continents.

One side effect of this global collaboration though can be multi-lingual Feature Manager Design Trees.

Now in SOLIDWORKS 2020 though, designers can enable a new Tooltip which will translate Feature Names into any language they select when they hover over the Feature.

Translated Tooltip

Translated Tooltip

To enable this new tool, right-click on the top-level file name in the FeatureManager Design Tree and go to Tree Display then Show Translated Feature Name in Tooltip and select the language that you would like the tooltip to be displayed in.

To disable the functionality, just select Hide Tooltip.

Show translated feature name in Tooltip

Show translated feature name in Tooltip

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Feature Tree Name Translation appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at January 10, 2020 01:00 PM

January 09, 2020

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Command Manager and Toolbar controls

A change has been made in SOLIDWORKS 2020 that simplifies the process for controlling both the Command Manager and Toolbars.

In previous releases, to enable additional tabs for the Command Manager, you had to right-click directly on an existing tab to access a specific menu that listed all of the available tabs for that file environment.

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Tab Menu

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Tab Menu

If you right-clicked anywhere else on the Command Manager or any other toolbar area, you got a different right-click menu that just showed the available toolbars that could be enabled.

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Toolbar Menu

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Toolbar Menu

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Enhancement

Now in SOLIDWORKS 2020, those two menus have been consolidated in a single right-click menu with logical flyouts:

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Menu Flyout

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Menu Flyout

This menu can be accessed easily by right-clicking on any toolbar or anywhere on the Command Manager.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Toolbars Menu

SOLIDWORKS 2020 Toolbars Menu

This small change in behavior makes customizing the SOLIDWORKS interface even easier and more intuitive than before.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2020 Command Manager and Toolbar controls appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at January 09, 2020 01:00 PM

January 08, 2020

SolidSmack

Varna Tech Upgrades the Mason Jar – Debuts HALO+ Smart Storage Design

Do you know what a smart lid looks like? Well, you’re about to and it’s likely to blow all your preconceived notions about smart lids out of your pantry drawer.

Varna Tech, a Sprout Labs Company by Boston-based design firm, Sprout Studios, is debuting their answer to your safe storage woes with a simple product that converts the classic and beloved Mason Jar into a VAULT OF GLASS.

The Halo and Halo+ smart lid fit over a standard and wide-mouth Mason Jars to 1) lock 2) protect and 3) provide Bluetooth connectivity for remote locking/unlocking, access permission, content logging, usage history, proximity alerts (and more) for all your valuables/stash/candy/medicine/nuts & bolts.

Halo+ comes with the Halo+ app that allows the Bluetooth connectivity to help you keep track of all your Mason Jar business and the more analog Halo lid has the option to add an accessory loop to add the Halo+ functions if desired.

We created Varna Tech and the Halo line of products to allow users peace of mind when storing their belongings. Whether our users are keeping edible cannabis products out of the hands of their children, monitoring their parents’ and grandparents’ medication intake, or keeping family heirlooms safe our Halo products can help.”

Jordan Nollman, Founder of Sprout Studios

Now, I know what you’re thinking, “Grandpa Joe’s gonna just bust open that glass with his dentures!” Ah, not if his dentures are IN THE MASON JAR. But really, if anyone cracks the glass, you’re gonna know, if not by the sound of breaking glass, by Halo’s mobile app alert system. Yep, you’ll know. Grandpa Joe will have a glass cut and the shame of knowing he’s been found out. Put your teeth in, Grandpa. *Womp womp*

Sprout Studios is debuting the Halo and Halo+ out at CES this week (Booth #51334, Eureka Park, Sands Expo Center) with the official product launch coming in Spring 2020 with a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo.

Oh, and if Sprout Studios sounds familiar, you may remember their successful Pakt One travel bag campaign on Indiegogo. The crowdfunding netted nearly $2.1 Million from nearly 7,000 backers.

But that’s not all Sprout Studios does. They work with some of the coolest companies taking on everything from product and branding to digital and strategy. Check them out at sprout.cc and gather up those loose Mason Jars for their upcoming product launch.

The post Varna Tech Upgrades the Mason Jar – Debuts HALO+ Smart Storage Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 08, 2020 11:08 PM