Planet SolidWorks

January 24, 2017

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Product Showcase Preview: Robotics

The SOLIDWORKS World Product Showcase is always a highlight. It’s the place you can go to see awesome products created in SOLIDWORKS and the people behind the designs. In some cases, you can even get hands on with the products.

Interested in robotics? At #SWW17, we’ve got the droids you’re looking for. In one case, we have the anti-robot you’re looking for. Here’s a preview of some of the cool robotic products you can experience at the Product Showcase.

JPL: RoboSimian

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Team RoboSimian took 5th place in the 2015 DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) Finals by achieving 7 points in 47:59 minutes. RoboSimain’s modularity uses the same actuator design at every joint. There are 28 actuators in the limbs, along with two actuators for the casters, making it systematically easy to build up and maintain.

How They Use SOLIDWORKS:

RoboSimian was completely designed and structurally analyzed using SOLIDWORKS. A small team of mechanical engineers worked collaboratively in SOLIDWORKS to develop the initial unit in less than 12 months. SOLIDWORKS was also used to create models that the software team used for kinematic and spatial analysis as well as simulations of operations.

Motiv Robotics: RoboSimian/Motiv Lightweight Arm (MLA)

The Motiv team has decades of experience delivering mission-critical systems from initial concept through fabrication and operational support. Originally designed at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Motiv assembled the limbs for the DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) competition robot. After competing in the DRC finals, Motiv licensed the technology to make it available to researchers and industry. Motiv is currently working on the next-generation Robosimian, with even more capabilities for assisting in disaster response and mobility research. A direct derivative of Robosimian, the MLA is available for researchers interested in a highly capable, dexterous robotic arm. Designed around an extremely capable actuator, the MLA is cost-effective, easy to maintain, and easy to adapt to different configurations to match a specific task.

How They Use SOLIDWORKS:

Motiv uses SOLIDWORKS for all its mechanical engineering design work and electronics packaging design projects. These tasks include initial concept and feasibility studies using high-quality renders of a proposed finished product to convey the engineering story of how a task could be accomplished. SOLIDWORKS is used throughout the design process to model and analyze mechanical components. SOLIDWORKS Simulation is used alongside SOLIDWORKS for piece-part FEA analysis to rapidly iterate and converge on a working design that meets project and customer requirements.

National Robotics League

The National Robotics League (NRL) is a manufacturing workforce development program of the National Tooling & Machining Association (NTMA) where students design and build remote-controlled robots (Bots) to face-off in a gladiator-style competition. Through this hands-on effort along with industry partnerships, students gain practical knowledge of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) – all essential skills for manufacturing. By formalizing ties between schools or youth organizations and manufacturing partners, students gain a better understanding and become enthusiastic about the career possibilities in manufacturing.

How They Use SOLIDWORKS:

Through the manufacturing process of Bot building, students’ imaginations are captured as they design, build and compete with their own robotic creations using SOLIDWORKS as the foundation of each Bot. Participants are required to prepare a detailed Engineering Document, used to illustrate their deep understanding of SOLIDWORKS and the machines they are creating beyond the physical design.

Jonathan Tippet/Furrion: Prosthesis Anti-Robot

Prosthesis is the world’s first purpose-built, high-performance off-road racing mech. It is 100% electric-powered and 100% human-controlled (hence the anti-robot moniker). This machine combines proven off-road suspension technology with innovative large-scale, exo-bionic controls to usher in a new era of sport: mech racing.

Furrion Robotics is a joint venture between the project’s creator, Jonathan Tippett, and Furrion, a well-established technology leader in electronics, appliances and clean energy systems. It will be the incubator for the technology and will be launching a mech racing league in the near future.

How They Use SOLIDWORKS:

SOLIDWORKS played an integral part in the development of this technology, this dream, from square one. Jonathan and his team made extensive use of motion simulation and FEA to optimize the design of this one-of-a-kind machine before taking it to the proving grounds. Furrion also used SOLIDWORKS, making the integration of the two engineering teams a seamless process.

Now that you know a little bit about who you can meet, here’s where and when you can meet them:

Location:

The SOLIDWORKS World Product Showcase is located inside of the Partner Pavilion, South Hall of the LA Convention Center.

Hours:

Sunday: Welcome Reception/Gameday Party 4:30pm – 7:30pm

Monday: 11:30am – 4:30pm, Evening Reception: 6:00pm – 8:00pm

Tuesday: 11:30am – 4:30pm

Wednesday: 10:00am – 2:00pm

Don’t miss your chance to welcome our robot overlords in-person!

Author information

Mike Fearon
Mike Fearon
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Product Showcase Preview: Robotics appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mike Fearon at January 24, 2017 05:00 PM

SolidSmack

How Hydrous Uses Reality Capture and 3D Printing to Bring The Ocean to All

hydrous-lenovo-3d-reality-capture-coral-reefs-00
hydrous-lenovo-3d-reality-capture-coral-reefs-00

Presented by
lenovo-logo-red-150

The health of the world’s oceans is rapidly degrading, but how can we protect what we can’t see? San Francisco nonprofit, The Hydrous, is tackling this challenge head-on, and in doing so, they’re opening up access to the hidden treasures of the world’s oceans to all.

The team is combining its passion for protecting our world’s oceans with its expertise in marine biology and science education to increase awareness of pressing environmental issues like climate change and plastic pollution. The Hydrous is using innovative technology such as virtual reality, drones, and 3D printing, on board expeditions across the globe to share the ocean with the world – using real and virtual immersive experiences to foster emotional connections with amazing marine environments; learning more about the issues facing them.

<figure class="wp-caption alignright" id="attachment_84569" style="width: 350px;">A diver using scientific protocol to monitor the health of coral reefs<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">A diver using scientific protocol to monitor the health of coral reefs</figcaption></figure>Launched in 2014, The Hydrous has mapped coral reefs in Hawaii, Easter Island, Palau, Guam, Indonesia, Solomon Islands, Belize – and last month the team set sail on the vessel Theia with a group of scientists, divers, filmmakers, and technologists from around the world to explore the islands of the Maldives alongside local marine stewards.

Throughout the expedition, the team conducted scientific monitoring projects that involved sampling for microplastics in the water and sand and measuring coral mortality following a large-scale coral bleaching event. The team also created 3D models using photogrammetry – measuring and examining coral colonies and entire islands using photography and drone footage in conjunction with Autodesk’s ReMake software – as well as collected virtual reality footage (the first to be done in the Maldives).

Capturing the Reef

To capture, process, and then share this VR footage and its 3D models with the world, The Hydrous team requires some of the most powerful technology in the world. For the best possible results, the nonprofit’s designers look to Lenovo’s ThinkStation P510 and ThinkPad P50 to ensure its Autodesk and Adobe suites run without delay.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/100440389" title="Capturing Coral in 3D" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="500"></iframe>

<figcaption class="wp-caption-text" style="margin-bottom:20px; margin-top:-20px;">Video highlighting the 3D modeling process of a coral from water to digital. More videos here</figcaption>

Throughout the Maldives expedition, the team relied specifically on the ThinkPad P50 to manage the Hydrous’ photography and videography, as well as back up these dense files multiple times a day, from various pieces of equipment, without having to worry about compatibility or processing time.

The team also relied on the P50 above the water – using it to enhance the lecture and workshop experience, render 3D models, track GPS coordinates, and review virtual reality footage after dives; all while being portable to travel with and carry in the field. Now that the expedition is complete, the team plans to use this powerful and reliable technology to bring their findings to audiences across the globe.

<figure class="wp-caption alignleft" id="attachment_84575" style="width: 150px;">CEO Dr. Erika Woolsey<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">CEO Dr. Erika Woolsey</figcaption></figure>“Lenovo Workstations are incredible machines that allow us to run high-end virtual reality content, paired with HTC Vive,” said Dr. Erika Woolsey, co-founder and CEO of The Hydrous. “Right now, high-end VR is only accessible to those with high end computing power. Lenovo’s powerful workstations enable us to achieve a whole new level of storytelling and immersion with VR, putting us on the cutting edge of this new medium.”

Beyond the Reef

Though a priority of the trip was to dive in and use this technology to explore the ocean surrounding the islands, the team left their diving gear to spend some time above sea level to learn about local issues – such as sea level rise, waste management, and coral reef protection– from Maldivian community leaders and council members. The team also led several seminars covering topics like underwater photography, photogrammetry, coral reef monitoring, and the effects of pollution on coral reefs.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84574" style="width: 1100px;">Erika using the ThinkPad P50 aboard the Theia during the most recent Hydrous expedition to the Maldives<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Erika using the ThinkPad P50 aboard the Theia during the most recent Hydrous expedition to the Maldives</figcaption></figure>
“The 3D models we created and the footage we collected will find their way to classrooms and help educate young children studying the oceans for the first time through virtual reality.”

Using the footage and data collected during the expedition, The Hydrous plans to provide curated content to supplement science curriculums for schools and educators. Other plans include contributing data to long-term monitoring projects, as well as partnering with museums to host interactive exhibits with VR content accompanied by soundscapes and physical 3D coral models.

“The 3D models we created and the footage we collected will find their way to classrooms and help educate young children studying the oceans for the first time through virtual reality,” Hydrous team member and diver Kiran Punnilathil said in a recent blog post – a must read that covers all the aspects and adventure of what The Hydrous took on in the Maldives.

How The Hydrous Brings An Ocean to More

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84578" style="width: 560px;">1. Section of reef scanned<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">1. Section of reef scanned</figcaption></figure>
<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84579" style="width: 560px;">2. Scan imported to ReMake<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">2. Scan imported to ReMake</figcaption></figure>
<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84580" style="width: 560px;">3. 3D mesh optimized<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">3. 3D mesh optimized</figcaption></figure>
<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84581" style="width: 560px;">4. Reef section 3d printed<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">4. Reef section 3d printed</figcaption></figure>

Lenovo partnered with The Hydrous last year through its ThinkRevolution program, which allowed the nonprofit to not only tell its stories to a broader audience, but also access to the technology they need to create innovations that are revolutionizing its industry.

To learn more about The Hydrous’ upcoming expeditions and projects, visit https://www.thinkworkstations.com/tr-story/thehydrous/.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84582" style="width: 1100px;">Maldives 2016 Expedition participant Kiran Punnilathil<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Maldives 2016 Expedition participant Kiran Punnilathil</figcaption></figure>

The post How Hydrous Uses Reality Capture and 3D Printing to Bring The Ocean to All appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 24, 2017 02:49 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Reconnecting with Olympian Liz Gleadle, one of Javelin’s sponsored athletes

Hello Javelin family! I’m happy to reconnect with you for 2017. I can’t believe it’s been a year since we all first met!

Getting around the Olympic village FAST

Getting around the Olympic village FAST

After competing at the Olympics, I took some real time off: two weeks, no working out allowed! I got to know my teammates better in the Village and at Canada House; Team Canada is such an amazing community. I explored Rio with my family and friends – we saw Christ the Redeemer, danced in the streets of Lapa with the locals, and drank Caipirinhas (Brazil’s national cocktail!) on Copacabana beach.

Liz Gleadle Rio 2016 closing ceremony Liz Gleadle Rio 2016 Closing ceremonies practise Liz and Ray Sightseeing the Lapa Steps

Once back in Vancouver, I had the laziest first week back – all I did was read books, binge watch Suits, catch up with friends, cook with my mom, and drink wine with my dad. “Diet” was not a concern for the first time in a year and I lost my abs – totally worth it, and a great mental break.

The Stawamus Chief Hike in Squamish, BC Off season FUN training climbing the Chief to the peak!

Getting back into training

When I take time off from working out, I enjoy it for the first week…and then I feel lethargic and depressed from the lack of exercise. As soon as I finished my first run through the UBC Endowment Lands, I was out of breath, and euphoric. I spent the next six weeks working my way up to a 10 km run in 58 minutes, stretching it out in yoga a few times per week, and doing short gym sessions to finally instill proper squat technique (something that has always eluded me). I also implemented a sauna protocol after reading about the effects on recovery and maintaining muscle mass.

In mid-November, I went back to training at the Alberta centre with my coach. I’m living with new roommates in Lethbridge, in a bedroom with no closet, but the best lighting in the house. I have only the clothes and kitchen tools that fit in one suitcase…and I’m loving the focus that living a more minimalist lifestyle gives me. My computer crashed, which turned out to be a blessing in disguise; I’ve been tearing through books and articles on fat adaptation (nutrition/health), listening to Malcolm Gladwell’s Revisionist History podcast, and working on getting the “RackFin” fine-tuned and patented (the Javelin Tech assisted project!).

Throwing indoors allows me to do more throws in a controlled environment; however, you can’t see how far your throws go or their flight characteristics. Throwing outside allows for visual feedback, makes you throw harder (because you want it to go farther) and acclimatizes your brain to different visual cues. I always spend the first couple of weeks of spring just adapting to being outside.

My training schedule has been changed up a little bit this year:

  • No more heavy lifts in the morning (just throwing and one or two priming exercises, imitating throws)
  • Eight practices per week instead of nine (two sleep-in days!)
  • Focusing on maximizing technical proficiency by slowing down runway speed

Southern escape over the holidays

For Christmas break I had three days at home, and then to Palm Desert with my family for a training camp! My parents are retired “snowbirds” so I’m testing out a training facility near their house, and my boyfriend Ray joined me for warm weather workouts! My father also tagged along and started making himself a gym routine.

Tracks with javelin runways can be hard to find but I was able to train an hour away, and I even met Tom Petranoff, former javelin world record holder (99.70m)!

Xavier College Prep in Palm Desert – best equipped high school gym I've ever seen Palm tree photo of Ray, and scenic photo FINALLY made it to one my friend's weddings... in Mexico! First flight not related to track since 2012

Back to Canada to kick off 2017

I’m starting off a new training cycle this week, but doing some testing first to see where I’m at! I’ll be doing fewer reps (1-5) in my lifts, focusing on speed and quality. Yesterday’s test results included a personal best in the 4kg back toss – 14.80m!

I’m excited about a few things my upcoming training:

  • Front squatting for the first time since 2011! It’s one of my weaker points, and I find it forces me into better/healthier positions.
  • Shoulder and scapular mobility for better posture and power production.
  • Fine tuning eating habits. I’m back on my low carb (<120g/day) high fat (~120-180g/day) diet, but I’ve compressed my eating window to 11 hours so that I (1) don’t snack mindlessly or aimlessly, (2) extend “fasting” time to take advantage of processes that help with recovery, (3) fall asleep earlier.
  • Re-incorporating mental work into my daily routine. 10 minutes meditation, 10 minutes pre-practice visualization, and five minutes activation breathing. I find visualizing an event before it happens makes it less stressful, because you’ve done it many times before in your mind.

One of my mantras for this season is being EFFECTIVE over efficient. I’m looking for elements that give me the biggest return, and making sure I’m not just running myself into the ground checking off boxes. I can’t wait to see what 2017 holds! No firm competition dates yet but you might see me at some college meets in the U.S. beginning in April.

Looking forward to seeing you all again! Thanks again for your support!

The post Reconnecting with Olympian Liz Gleadle, one of Javelin’s sponsored athletes appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Karen Majerly at January 24, 2017 02:44 PM

SolidSmack

New Study Finds That E-Waste Has Reached All-Time High in Asia

e-waste-feature

e-waste-feature

It’s no secret that e-waste is on the rise. While socially conscious companies are starting to ramp up design for disassembly or otherwise take a closer look at their supply chains, we’re still not exactly in a desirable place when it comes to a worldwide effort – as outlined in a new report from United Nations University.

With an increase in higher incomes and more affordable consumer electric devices, Asia’s e-waste has jumped 63% in the last 5 years alone.

During the period of the study (2010 to 2015), China’s e-waste more than doubled while Hong Kong generated the highest amount of e-waste with nearly 50 pounds of waste for every individual during 2015. Singapore and Taiwan were close behind with just over 40 pounds of waste per person. On the other end of the spectrum, Cambodia, Vietnam, and the Philippines generated an average of just over 2 pounds of e-waste per person.

Says the report:

Across all countries in the region, there is an overall trend in rising e-waste quantities that is outpacing population growth. This indicates an increasing number of products being disposed of, with the fastest growth in newly industrializing countries. The largest contributor is unsurprisingly China, given its large and increasingly affluent population that demands the latest gadgets and appliances.

Further, the report states that one of the biggest problems is a lack of infrastructure for taking back or processing the waste. Instead, the discarded hardware gets dumped, burned, or sent to the black market to be repurposed as a new device. Researchers suggest that a sustainable take-back and recycling system is needed in order to start reversing the damage.

To quote Dieter Rams, “(Good design) makes an important contribution to the preservation of the environment. It conserves resources and minimizes physical and visual pollution throughout the lifecycle of the product.”

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AYshVbcEmUc?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

While not every company has the means and technical know-how to create a line of disassembly robots, today’s designers and engineers have more than enough resources to take the steps necessary for ensuring that their products don’t end up as another statistic.

How are you taking small steps to design smarter products?

The post New Study Finds That E-Waste Has Reached All-Time High in Asia appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at January 24, 2017 02:27 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to kill an SQL connection to force a SOLIDWORKS PDM Client Logout

Currently there is no functionality to force a SOLIDWORKS PDM logout, but the connection between the client and SQL can be temporarily killed. You should only kill SOLIDWORKS PDM if a user cannot be logged out normally.

If you need to prevent access to a vault, you can block a login, refer to my article on how to Block a PDM Login for more information.

To kill SOLIDWORKS PDM / SQL connection, you need to access the SQL Management Studio, then right-click on the SQL server, and select Activity Monitor.

SQL Activity Monitor

SQL Activity Monitor

Click on the Process tab and look for the process EdmServer.exe that is associated with the user you want to disconnect.

PDM Server Processes

PDM Server Processes

Right-click on the process and choose Kill Process from the shortcut menu.

Kill SOLIDWORKS PDM Option

Kill Process Option

If the user now attempts to navigate within the vault they will receive the following message.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Message

SOLIDWORKS PDM Message

Further attempts to access the vault will result in a blank Vault View.

Blank PDM View

Blank PDM View

Before the user can access the vault again, they will need to first log out. If login is currently blocked, they will then receive the message below, when they try to log in.

Blocked login message

Blocked login message

The post How to kill an SQL connection to force a SOLIDWORKS PDM Client Logout appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at January 24, 2017 01:00 PM

How to prevent users from logging into SOLIDWORKS PDM

Whether it is for maintenance, troubleshooting, or preventing unauthorized access, occasionally there is the need to block SOLIDWORKS PDM login.

To block users access the SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration tool and right-click on a Vault and select Properties.

Vault Properties

Vault Properties

Next click on Block Log-ins.

Block SOLIDWORKS PDM login

SOLIDWORKS PDM Block log-ins

Anyone attempting to log into the vault will receive a the message: “system is locked due to maintenance”

System Maintenance Message

System Maintenance Message

To allow access to the vault, select Permit Log-ins and users will once again be able to access the vault.

Permit log-ins

Permit log-ins

NOTE: this will not log out users who are already logged in. People who are already logged in, will continue to be able to access the vault.  There is no built-in functionality to force log-outs, but the connection form a client to SQL can be killed. The process to do this, is outlined in another one of my articles, titled “Killing SQL connection to force a Client logout

The post How to prevent users from logging into SOLIDWORKS PDM appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at January 24, 2017 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Learn from the Startup Trenches at SOLIDWORKS World 2017

If you’re attending SOLIDWORKS World, chances are that you have big ideas. You’ve dreamt about making the next must-have consumer gadget or coming up with a world-changing business idea. With barriers to starting a company lowering each year, the old adage “if you can dream it, you can do it” has never been closer to reality. Interest in startups is booming, and we’re bringing the topic back to SOLIDWORKS World by popular demand.

The sessions, scheduled for the afternoon of Tuesday, February 7, will provide insight from both sides of the startup world: founders and investors. Each perspective includes subject matter experts with a wealth of knowledge on how to start successful businesses and how to obtain funding. Here’s what you can expect to learn at each session:

Hardware Founder Stories
Tuesday 1:30

Maybe you watched the HBO show Silicon Valley and already know everything there is about starting a startup or maybe you haven’t.  Come hear the real stories from our panel of hardware startup founders as they went from ideation to product to business success.

Jon Friedman


President / Co-founder
Freight Farms
http://www.freightfarms.com/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/jon-friedman-95153138

Kayla Matheus


CEO / co-founder
Moti
http://www.moti.io/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/kaylamatheus

Nate Evans


Co-founder
fictiv
https://www.fictiv.com/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/nwevans

 

Startup Funding
Tuesday 2:45

Bootstrapping, credit cards, loans, angel investment, crowdsourcing, venture capital. Cash is king and funding your startup is never easy. Our panel will take a look at multiple methods for funding a hardware startup.

Noramay  Cadena


Co-founder
Make in LA
http://makeinla.com/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/noramay

Clarissa Redwine


Design & Technology Outreach Lead
Kickstarter
https://www.linkedin.com/in/clarissaredwine

Alastair Trueger


Founding Partner
Creative Ventures
http://www.creativeventures.vc/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/alastairtrueger

Attend the sessions, get informed, and then begin your journey toward startup success. You can also explore the SOLIDWORKS for Entrepreneurs program as a partner in innovation. The program offers software, training, and co-marketing resources to help your idea become a product and your product become a business. Visit http://www.solidworks.com/entreprenurs to learn more.

Author information

Greg Smith
Greg Smith
Greg Smith is the Director of Community Applications and Startup Advocate at SOLIDWORKS helping promote entrepreneurship, startups, and accelerators. Prior to SOLIDWORKS, Greg was founder and CEO of Immersive Design, Inc. Plays tennis to stay fit, drinks coffee to stay awake, and experiences wine to chill out.

The post Learn from the Startup Trenches at SOLIDWORKS World 2017 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Greg Smith at January 24, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The Raw Material

feature

feature

This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “Confidence” from Conner Youngblood and work our way through tracks from Wake Owl, Post Animal, Rumspringa, Crumb, John Lennon, and others before wrapping up with “I’ll Believe in Anything” from Wolf Parade.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:0tr7chim9zMZ4jq0fJSYFk" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Raw Material appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 24, 2017 10:55 AM

January 23, 2017

SolidSmack

Something3D Has a Full-Color 3D Printer (and Big Plans For the Tech)

Something3D’s new Chameleon 3D printer features full-color RGB prints by combining several different filaments into many different color combinations.
<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84556" style="width: 1100px;">Something3D’s new Chameleon 3D printer features full-color RGB prints by combining several different filaments into many different color combinations.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Something3D’s new Chameleon 3D printer features full-color RGB prints by combining several different filaments into many different color combinations.</figcaption></figure>

“Witness the world in living color” is more a phrase you’d like to hear a drunk Will Ferrall say, not a phrase usually associated with 3D printing. While some companies (botObjetcs, Spectrom, etc.) tried a slight-of-hand at producing full-color CMYKW prints, most of them fell short of delivering on their claims. Israel-based Something3D wants to throw their hat in the ring. Well, back in the ring, grabbing that phrase and the bona fides of being the first truly capable of full-spectrum, multi-filament color blending with the re-introduction (it was originally introduced in 2015) of their Chameleon 3D printer, unveiled at this year’s CES in Las Vegas.

Not convinced? Well, we’re skeptical too, but tell us what you think of this:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/198168435" title="ST3D Full Color Print" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="500"></iframe>

The cool part? The company can use the 3D printer to apply an image (JPEG at this point) to an object’s outer shell using a texture application while the object is being printed, again in almost any color imaginable. The secret to the Chameleon lies in the color cartridge that houses several colored filaments including Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Black, and White.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84557" style="width: 1000px;">something3d-chameleon-3d-printer-01<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">A concept shot of the Something3D Chameleon, full-color 3D printer.</figcaption></figure>

To make a multi-colored print, all filaments feed into a single extruder, where they are heated, mixed together and pumped out while the gantry rises above the heated print bed. Printing multiple colors is enough of a headache, as it requires timing for filament feeding and there’s no way you’re getting a blend of colors or the gradients show in their examples.

It’s a nightmare for a printer with several extruders, so you can imagine the thought put into a solution using a single extruder. Something3D states the Chameleon combines the color using their “specialized software and ingenious nozzle design” which adjusts the color on the fly without any lag. It also uses what they call “special gCode” to transfer the image and texture information to the printed object. So, in other words, magic.

While Something3D hasn’t set a price for their Chameleon 3D printer, it will come with everything needed to get up and running including an assembled unit, 1Kg of color filament, USB cable, and software.

As far as specs go, the Chameleon V1.0 printer has a heated print bed, a max print size of 300 X 300 X 340mm and a resolution of 50-microns. It also supports Cura and ColorIT, takes advantage of OBJ file types and has a print speed of 50-80mm/s. Although they have a spot for it on their store page, it’s currently unknown when (or if) the printer will be released and at what price-point. Judging from their other offerings (Tyrian, Han and Royal) it could be anywhere from $2,575 or over $5,000.

Though they have the printer listed among their offerings, their goal is to partner with other hardware/software manufacturers to make the technology available to a wider audience. We like the idea of that. Although, if their demonstration printer is as convincing a product as it seems, we smell an interested buyer snatching it up for keepsies.

 

The post Something3D Has a Full-Color 3D Printer (and Big Plans For the Tech) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at January 23, 2017 11:09 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Can’t Make it to L.A.? Register for the Live Stream and Don’t Miss a Minute of the Action

You probably had the best of intentions to register for the greatest CAD event of the year, SOLIDWORKS World 2017, but, sometimes life gets in the way. No worries. You can still catch all the action live as it’s happening by registering for the SOLIDWORKS World Live Stream.

By signing up for the live webcast, you will have remote viewing access to the General Sessions from Monday, February 6th to Wednesday, February 8th, 8:15am to 10:00am PT. The General Session presentations will provide a fresh perspective on the future of design from the leading minds in science, engineering, and technology.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XAl4Zlhj1ms?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

The keynote lineup for SOLIDWORKS World 2017 includes a list of visionaries ready to provide you with new perspectives that will inspire your approach to design as well as customer mashups that pair SOLIDWORKS users with their customer to share their success stories of how SOLIDWORKS is helping them create the great designs of the future. You can read more about this year’s exciting lineup of keynote speakers and customers here.

 

Author information

Barbara Schmitz
Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks
Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post Can’t Make it to L.A.? Register for the Live Stream and Don’t Miss a Minute of the Action appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Barbara Schmitz at January 23, 2017 05:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

‘The Archive Server connection receive operation timed out’ SOLIDWORKS PDM Error

One or both of the following error messages can occur when a replicated SOLIDWORKS PDM archive is taken offline and registry keys are not updated correctly:

Archive Server connection Error Message PDM Error Message

To fix this issue, on the archive server, edit the registry key:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\SolidWorks\Applications\PDMWorks Enterprise\ArchiveServer\Vaults\<vaultname>

Then either delete the ‘Replicate’ string, or set the value to zero.

The post ‘The Archive Server connection receive operation timed out’ SOLIDWORKS PDM Error appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at January 23, 2017 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Additive Manufacturing, 3D Printing and Subtractive Manufacturing: What’s the Difference?

This year at SOLIDWORKS World we don’t just have over 200 break-out sessions for you to gain additional insight into design automation, electrical design, simulation or PDM. This year for the first time, we are offering four specially tailored Learning Paths, each with a mini-general session to kick things off, followed by six certified sessions and finishing with a panel discussion. Attend four out of the six sessions for a given path, and you will qualify for a special MySolidWorks Certificate. There will be specific learning paths for the Internet of Things (IoT), Model Based Definition (MBD) and two for Manufacturing – Subtractive and Additive. Not sure what the difference is? Read on…

One thing I have been asked many times when I tell people what I have been working on at SOLIDWORKS is what the meanings of these relatively new terms are. Let’s start with the easiest to differentiate: Additive versus Subtractive.

The Robot Bike is a high-end custom endurance bike that was designed in SOLIDWORKS and printed on a Selective Laser Melting machine

 

Additive manufacturing (AM) is a relatively new catchall term for the latest techniques for making things, starting with nothing, building up material layer by layer directly from 3D data. It is an industry standard term (ASTM F2792 and ISO TC261) for all techniques that use this process.

There are six or seven types of AM techniques, all of which are quite different but in most cases achieve what was impossible to produce using traditional methods. The reason they can achieve what was previously impossible is they build up parts/component/products/things a layer at a time. Each layer is joined to the last by way of a binder, melting or curing. This offers significant freedoms of the geometry that can be produced as there is no other material in the way. So what are the types of additive manufacturing?

  1. Material Extrusion – commonly known as FDM or Fused Deposition Modelling pioneered by Stratasys. This takes a filament of material and pulls it through a heated nozzle to the point of melting and is deposited where it is needed. Common analogies are a glue gun or icing a cake. Mmmm…cake.
  2. Binder Jetting – this is the technology where the term 3D printing came from since it uses inkjet printer heads that selectively bind powder together. Again, one layer at a time with another layer of powder being spread across the top each time. Any powder not touched by the binder is shook, blown or brushed off the finished part.
  3. Material Jetting – again also uses inkjet technology but this time using material to selectively deposit where needed.
  4. Powder bed fusion – This is exactly the same as binder jetting, except for instead of a binder to fuse the powder granules together, a laser or electron beam melts them together.
  5. Directed Energy Deposition – this is similar to FDM but using a metal wire instead of a polymer filament, but can also use a powder fired into place. The powder or wire is then melted and welded onto the previous layer or surface by an electron beam or laser.
  6. Vat photo-polymerization – as the name suggests starts with a vat or tank or photopolymer (liquid resin that hardens when exposed to a light source). The top layer of liquid is then cured via a light source (DLP) or laser (SLA) and then moves up out of the liquid, or down into the liquid (dependent on the type of machine) for the next layer to be processed.
  7. Sheet Lamination – This process is the reason why I said at the start “six or seven” types of additive manufacturing processes. I will come back to this one since, I think this is technically subtractive.

With subtractive manufacturing, you start with a block or billet of material bigger than the part you want to make and cut away the block (sometimes layer by layer) until you have the desired shape. This is achieved by milling, drilling or turning, for example. So back to sheet lamination…

Sheet Lamination – This one is, strictly speaking, subtractive but since it builds layer by layer it sometimes slips in as an additive process. It works by having a sheet of paper or plastic (or could be any sheet material in theory which is cut by a laser or scalpel into shape and the next sheet layer is cut to size and shape and stuck down on top of it.

We have established subtractive is very easy to define, while additive is slightly more complex due to the number of different processes but a relatively straightforward concept.

What about 3D printing then? Well, the term is often used interchangeably with additive manufacturing and as mentioned earlier, it comes from binder jetting using 2D printing technology. However, unlike Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM), which was trademarked by Stratasys, the term 3D printing was never protected. Many experts in the field have tried to differentiate 3D Printing from Additive Manufacturing by applying their own definitions. For instance, I have heard people say that 3D printing relates to a one-off item manufactured using an additive process whereas Additive Manufacturing leans more towards items produced as a series production method.

For me though, 3D printing is much easier and quicker to say and when you have to say it and write it and type it as often as I do, 3DP or AM will be just fine!

Author information

Mark Rushton
Mark Rushton
Mark is a Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS.

The post Additive Manufacturing, 3D Printing and Subtractive Manufacturing: What’s the Difference? appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mark Rushton at January 23, 2017 01:00 PM

January 22, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Extrude from Context Toolbar within the Sketch Environment

SOLIDWORKS 2017 has added a new Context Toolbar button when you are in the sketching environment.  Adding an Extrude Boss/Base feature from a sketch is probably the most common feature.  So now once you’re done with your sketch, you can simply right-click and start an Extrude.  This is faster than going to the CommandManager to start the SOLIDWORKS Extrude when in the sketch environment.

SOLIDWORKS Extrude

SOLIDWORKS 2017 – New Context Toolbar Button in a Sketch to Extrude

 

If you are still stuck in the past (working with previous versions), you may not have known that you could always add a Feature to the Shortcut Bar in a sketch (the one that pops up when you hit the “S” key).  There are different environments and you may have noticed that the Sketch environment didn’t have an option to start the SOLIDWORKS Extrude.  But that shouldn’t stop you from customizing it!

  1. Tools > Customize
  2. Choose the Shortcut Bars tab
  3. Select the Sketch environment button
  4. Select ‘Features‘ from the drop down and add whatever feature you like
Customize Shortcut Bar in Sketch Environment

Customize Shortcut Bar in Sketch Environment

Now when you’re in the sketch, you can hit the “S” key and start right into a SOLIDWORKS Extrude.

Shortcut Bar in Sketch Environment to launch Extrude Boss/Base

Shortcut Bar in Sketch Environment to launch Extrude Boss/Base

You may also want to add Cut-Extrude to the Sketch Shortcut Bar which is also a common command from a single sketch.

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 Extrude from Context Toolbar within the Sketch Environment appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at January 22, 2017 03:38 PM

January 20, 2017

SolidSmack

Denise Mueller Sets New Speed Record of 147mph… Using a Bicycle

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84538" style="width: 1024px;">Denise Mueller hit the new record using a modified bike from SD Wheel Works, which features two massive 60-tooth chain-rings in a double-reduction system.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Denise Mueller hit the new record using a modified bike from SD Wheel Works, which features two massive 60-tooth chain-rings in a double-reduction system.</figcaption></figure>

Before cyclist Denise Mueller set off to Utah’s Bonneville Salt Flats to break the speed record for fastest person on a bicycle, two others came before. US. Cycling Hall of Fame inductee John Howard who topped-out at 152.2mph in 1985 and Holland’s Fred Rompleburg who managed to cruise at 167mph in 1995.
Like the two men before her, Denise set her record by first being towed behind a modified vehicle outfitted with a fairing that serves two purposes. 1) it allows her to draft the vehicle and avoid wind resistance and 2) the gear system is such that it’s nearly impossible to crank over using your own power.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vlcfanT4eIM?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The bicycle was designed by Chris Garcia from SD Wheel Works, with support from KHS Bicycles and Da Vinci Designs, and features an elongated body, 17-inch shaved dragster wheels and steering stabilizers, making it easier to handle the higher speeds without wobbling. The Body Float isolation seat helps further eliminate vibrations in order to maintain a better peddle cadence while grinding on the double-reduction gear system.

Denise-Mueller-Sets-New-Bicycle-Speed-Record-01

The gear system is the secret to garnering higher speeds, as the two 60-tooth gears create around 488-gear inches, perfect for high-power peddling. To put it into perspective, to reach 147mph, Denise would have to peddle at around 102RPMs. To make it to her record speed of 147mph, Denise was towed behind the modified Land Rover pace car to a speed of 90mph before unclipping herself and switching over to peddle power and increased speed.

Denise-Mueller-Sets-New-Bicycle-Speed-Record-02

Her original plan was to beat John Howards speed record but unfortunately didn’t reach that goal but did set the record for the fastest woman on two wheels. Still, she hasn’t given up on becoming the fastest person on a bicycle and is training to reach that goal sometime in the near future. Keep an eye on Denise at Project Speed.

Denise-Mueller-Sets-New-Bicycle-Speed-Record-03

Images: Project Speed

The post Denise Mueller Sets New Speed Record of 147mph… Using a Bicycle appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at January 20, 2017 06:01 PM

Alan Williams Metal Artist | Creatures of the Deep

AW_MetalArt-59

alan-williams-metal-art-01

The oceans of the world are vast, covering approximately 72% of the planet’s surface. Many people across the ages have travelled the seven seas in search of new worlds! The more bold at heart have sought to explore beneath the surface uncovering the mysteries of the deep. Tales abound of encounters with strange and enormous creatures, the monsters of the deep. This is the stuff that movies are made of. But it’s also the source of inspiration and expression for artists of every ilk. Alan Williams a Brighton England based metal sculptor is one such artist who is enamoured with the sea. Alan is cranking out some amazing work!

Alan teamed up with Ben Cox of Gnarled Apple Productions to produce “Creatures of the Deep” a video that chronicles Alan’s creative process from sketch to finished sculpture. This is a must see for those of us who enjoy the art of making stuff, a.k.a fabrication.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/198559065" title="Alan Williams Metal Artist | Creatures of the Deep" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="500"></iframe>

Here’s what Ben Cox had to say about the project.

“This film is the result of the wanting to create a passion project based around a local Brighton artist. The resulting film has surpassed all my original expectations both in the final product and the experience I had in making it. Working with Alan over the 6 months has been a wonderful experience and I have been exposed to an artist of great talent, imagination and humility. The project has been a wonderful collaboration, with Alan putting a lot of trust and faith in me as a filmmaker and I enjoyed every second of it”.

AW_MetalArt-20

Alan scours local flea markets and recycling centers to find items to repurpose. His aim is to discover items that have history and character and give them a new lease on life.

AW_MetalArt-14In his mind’s eye Alan’s creatures begin to take shape as he sorts through the bits and pieces. Old sprockets, gears among other bits and piece become tentacles and teeth. These repurposed part provide a rich visual texture.

AW_MetalArt-layout-01

Allan begins his process sketching out ideas in visual notebook.  Afterwards he transfers them to a full-size layout working out proportions and overall scale of the sculptural piece.

AW_MetalArt-10

Every piece is hand-worked carefully to match the layout pattern using traditional metal-working tools.

AW_MetalArt-17

AW_MetalArt-44

AW_MetalArt-layout-02

AW_MetalArt-45

As the sculpture takes shape Alan frequently revisits his collections of pieces-parts discovering just the right component that expresses the desired character of his creature.

AW_MetalArt-highlights-02

The sculptures really come to life when Alan carefully accents various areas creating highlights. The overall visual depth is stunning!

Here are few more of Alan’s amazing sculptures!

AW_MetalArt-eagle-01

AW_MetalArt-grasshopper-01

AW_MetalArt-stork-01

The post Alan Williams Metal Artist | Creatures of the Deep appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at January 20, 2017 05:35 PM

Friday Smackdown: Mechs of Millennia’s Past

Col-Price-art

Col-Price-art

Grass grew long between the entrails of the building’s walls torn by the blasts and jumpjets from a millennia past. Many went there for the quiet. Others to salvage any metal remains of the defenders. We hadn’t seen any since, but once in a while the ground would quake and you’d try to convince yourself a machine would reveal itself over the horizon. That never did happen. Well, not until we unburied the box holding these links.

Col Price – Oh, what wonderful mechanical things to see. Ships, mechs and more ships. Huge scenes that delight the imagination and keep you begging for more.

Create a Line Art Coloring Book – Kev Crossley takes you through his highly interesting process for creating beautiful line art, that can be used to create a coloring book.

Bttn.css – A library of buttons and their CSS for when you need a button for your website. Loads way faster than an image of a button and offers more flexibility in the web design.

Toontastic – Google app for kids to help them easily design and create movies.  Who know what would have happened if we all had this when we were kids.

Photo Hotspots – Personally, I like to find spots to photos that are not popular, but this map shows you where people around the world are taking photos.

Asmrion – An ASMR builder that will get you in a total state of relaxation during those grueling days at work.

Inner Trip – How does an artist create a diorama of a broken down, decaying VW bus? Like this. Hernandez Dreamphography shows you how it all comes together.

Radiooooo – Amazing. Pick a country and a decade to listen to different music from around the world over the last century and a half.

Lightning Cable 3 pack – Awesome deal on a 3-pack of extra long iPhone MFi-certified Lightining Cables.

3-in-1 Power Pen – Love this! A pen, a stylus and a power bank for Android or iPhone, all in one

More Colors – New video production from Kidwaste, featuring Chelsea Cutler, of a new song on the “Spleen EP” out on Ultra Music.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/r-RfH8aKbws?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The post Friday Smackdown: Mechs of Millennia’s Past appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 20, 2017 05:17 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Special Event Preview

SOLIDWORKS World is a great place to learn new skills, network with peers and get inspired to create great designs, but we would be remiss not to mention that it’s also a place to cut loose and have some fun. One place where fun is near certainty is at the Special Event, taking place Tuesday night, February 7th, from 7:30- 10:30 pm (PT).

This year’s Special Event will be a block party taking place on the New York City Street backlot of Paramount Pictures StudiosTM in Hollywood. You will most likely recognize the backlot as scenes from many well-known TV shows, such as Seinfeld, This Is Us, Mad Men, Castle, Glee, Marvel’s Agents of Shield, This is Us and NCIS-LA,  as well as movies, such as Austin Powers, Forrest Gump,  Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and Suicide Squad have been filmed in this famous locale. If you’ve ever thought about creating a fan film or episode paying homage to one of your favorite pieces of pop culture, this is your chance to relive the classics! At the very least, you’ll have an excuse to reference Seinfeld for the better part of three hours (not that you needed one).

The block party will feature live music, arcade games, performance artists, and lots of amazing food and liquid libations (which will certainly help reenacting great moments from the big and small screen – especially those involving Mad Men). Don’t miss this event. It will be a memorable one!

Transportation to and from the event will be available. Busses will leave the L.A. Convention Center at 6:45pm for those staying at the JW Marriott, Residence Inn, Courtyard, and Luxe City Center hotels, or attendees not staying at the conference hotels. For those staying at the Hilton Checkers, the LA Hotel, Millennium Biltmore, Omni LA, Sheraton or Westin Bonaventure, transportation will depart directly from these hotels at 7 pm.

Author information

Barbara Schmitz
Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks
Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Special Event Preview appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Barbara Schmitz at January 20, 2017 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to save time with the SOLIDWORKS Magnified Selection Tool

Do you zoom in and zoom out when you need to select a face? Wish there was something that you can use in order to not have to scroll in and scroll out?

SOLIDWORKS has a command to help you save time when selecting entities called “Magnified Selection” which is defaulted to the “G” key on the keyboard.

For example if I wanted to select the thin extruded faces in order to add end caps to the weldment model shown in the figure below:

Weldment Model

Weldment Model

Instead of zooming in I can select the G-key to activate the SOLIDWORKS Magnified Selection window as shown below:

SOLIDWORKS Magnified Selection Window

Magnified Selection Window

With the magnified selection tool activate, it is easier to select entities, and I can zoom in and out within the tool and move it around using the cursor. By using this tool you can maintain the overall view and have a quicker selection method!

Learn about other helpful commands and techniques for selecting entities.

The post How to save time with the SOLIDWORKS Magnified Selection Tool appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Sam Sharkawi at January 20, 2017 01:00 PM

January 19, 2017

SolidSmack

‘The Future is So Metal’ – Markforged Unveils the Metal X (and New Print Tech)

markforged-metal-x-atomic-diffusion-additive-manufacturing-03
<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84514" style="width: 1100px;">markforged-metal-x-atomic-diffusion-additive-manufacturing-03<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Markforged’s Metal X creates full-metal parts using an additive manufacturing process known as ADAM- Atomic Diffusion Additive Manufacturing.</figcaption></figure>

Markforged is known for their outstanding carbon fiber printers ─ the Mark One, Mark X and Onyx series. Now the manufacturing heavyweights are expanding beyond plastic. The’ve gone ‘full metal’ with the introduction of their Metal X 3D printer, which was recently unveiled at this year’s CES in Las Vegas.

Atomic Diffusion Additive Manufacturing

For all intents and purposes, the Metal X is an additive manufacturing machine similar to FDM, but that’s where the similarity ends. It uses a new process derived by Markforged known as Atomic Diffusion Additive Manufacturing (ADAM). The parts are printed layer-by-layer using metal powders encapsulated by plastic binders, which are then removed after printing.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/InYfu5hoV7c?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Once the part is printed, the plastic is dissolved and the metal is sintered thereby creating the entire part all at once. The process allows for the metal crystals to pass through the bonded layers which strengthens the entire part. The Metal X takes advantage of a wide range of metals suitable for use in a myriad of industries, including automotive, industrial, medical and aerospace.

The print materials include:

  • 17-4 Stainless Steel
  • 303 Stainless Steel
  • 6061 Aluminum (Beta)
  • 7075 Aluminum (Beta)
  • A-2 Tool Steel (Beta)
  • D-2 Tool Steel (Beta)
  • IN Alloy (Inconel) 625 (Beta)
  • Titanium Ti-6Al-4V (Beta)
<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84518" style="width: 1100px;">The Metal X is capable of producing parts with complex shapes including those with closed-cell honeycomb infill.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The Metal X is capable of producing parts with complex shapes including those with closed-cell honeycomb infill.</figcaption></figure>

Markforged also claims the Metal X can produce parts with complex shapes and geometries other metal-based 3D printers on the market today are uncapable of printing. The 3D printer also comes with the Markforged in-process, laser inspection feature seen in the company’s other products, which assures part quality and dimensional accuracy.

The Metal X also features a camera, material-handling system and is connected to their Eiger cloud-based platform so you can inspect your product one layer at a time as it’s being produced.

Although other metal 3D printing machines such as Sciaky EBAM 300 series and EOS’s FORMIGA P110 are on the expensive side ($250K and up), the Markforge Metal X comes in at just under $100K ($99,500). A bit of an investment for SMBs or start-ups, but when you compare the price with one-off molds or machining complex geometries, it pays off fast. It’s always exciting to see what Markforged is developing and it’s great to see their running full-tilt on the innovation front.

markforged-metal-x-atomic-diffusion-additive-manufacturing-00

markforged-metal-x-atomic-diffusion-additive-manufacturing-01

markforged-metal-x-atomic-diffusion-additive-manufacturing-02

The post ‘The Future is So Metal’ – Markforged Unveils the Metal X (and New Print Tech) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at January 19, 2017 08:26 PM

3 Adobe Apps to Ponder for the Future of 3D Product Design

adobe-max-stylit-3d-texture-lighting-00

adobe-max-stylit-3d-texture-lighting-00

Well, we’ve seen what Adobe is bringing to 3D and UX design, but Adobe Research has developed some other interesting apps, highlighting them at the 2016 Adobe Max conference. They cover the gamut, from 2D and 3D to voice and VR, leaving us with something to ponder on the future of 3D product design.

Bear in mind, Adobe has yet to announce any release dates for their (still in development) software apps, however they merit a rundown for the technological advancement the graphics software company is pursuing. With each of these, just imagine how it would/could/should apply to 3D modeling/design/rendering software. Let’s begin with a look at StyLit.

StyLit

Simply put, StyLit renders a 3D image based on what the user draws and colors in a real-time setting. Now here is the tricky part, the rendered image doesn’t necessarily need to be exactly what the user is drawing. For example, in the video Adobe’s Paul Asente grabbed an image of a dinosaur and rendered it into an artistic 3D image by drawing and coloring nothing but a ball, essentially porting his style to the digital representation. And it all happens in real-time. Amazing.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/y-vYEVvC9N8?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

A camera situated over the drawing area captures the lines and colors with an algorithm mapping it to the 3D model. Even edits are ported to the image in a real-time setting and can be adjusted on the fly. It was published at SIGGRAPH 2016 by Jakub Fišer and team of Prague-based CTU with Adobe Research. A demo is now available at stylit.org.

VoCo

You’ve heard of putting words into someone’s mouth. This is exactly what that does. VoCo is being touted as ‘Photoshopping for Voiceovers’ and rightly so as the application allows you to edit speech using text by sampling a voice. Yes, you can recreate that sample voice to say anything you want just by typing the text into the VoCo editor, and it sounds identical to the sampled voice. Demoed at Adobe MAX by Adobe engineer Zeyu Jin, you’ll see how easy voice editing will become.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/I3l4XLZ59iw?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

According to Adobe, it takes about 20-minutes for the software to analyze the speech audio and patterns before it can be edited with very few mistakes in the edited audio. Freakin’ scary and freakin’ cool. Could someone use my voice for trickery or something more malicious? In the video Zeyu states that there are safeguards in place and something akin to a watermark that would prevent others from doing just that. Unfortunately, there is no free demo that we can play around with just yet, but chances are we will see (hear) it at some point this year.

CloverVR

Another of Adobe’s previews is CloverVR. This app provides Adobe Premiere-style editing tools directly inside your VR video environment. The current process of editing 360° video requires the users to constantly mount and remove the VR headset–viewing, editing, viewing, editing… it’s highly inefficient. In the video, Adobe’s Stephen DiVerdi demonstrates CloverVR’s capabilities using an Oculus Rift to adjust the look-at direction for the transition between two video clips.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tFkJXwH1VTE?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Using the app’s toolset, Stephen splices together two video scenes to focus on the action so that they appear relative to area you are viewing. You manipulate the editing tools in VR using the headset’s hand controllers rather than a keyboard, which seems to make the editing process easier to some degree. It also seems to provide a better perspective for editing 3D content as opposed to viewing it on a flat display. Again, there’s no word yet on when CloverVR or the other applications will be released so I will update this when it becomes available.

Adobe previewed quite a few different techologies, all approaching creative workflows a little, and often a lot, differently than usual. I recommend viewing them all. We’re hopeful we’ll see some of this sort of tech or, at least, this type of innovative thinking when it comes to our precious product development software and tools.

The post 3 Adobe Apps to Ponder for the Future of 3D Product Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at January 19, 2017 07:18 PM

What’s Behind Sculpteo’s AI-Based 3D Printing Venture?

sculpteo-business-case-3d-printing-ai-00

sculpteo-business-case-3d-printing-ai-00

Last week 3D print service Sculpteo announced a series of AI-based tools to simplify use of their system. But what’s driving them to this?

We spoke with Sculpteo CEO Clément Moreau at CES to find out.

Moreau explained that their firm really wanted to get into 3D metal printing, because that is the best market in 3D printing today. It offers the highest margins and is beginning to attract interest from big industry. This makes much business sense.

However, as I’ve written previously, actually doing metal 3D printing is a difficult matter and requires considerable expertise. There are multiple considerations, such as the size and geometry of parts, development of appropriate support structures, crystalline strength of materials, heat flow through the object, the build plate and support structures and much more.

The problem is that Sculpteo is an online service and using it should be as simple as possible. Difficulties mean lost sales for Sculpteo, so it is in their interest to remove as many barriers as possible.

Sculpteo found that experts in 3D metal printing typically discover solutions, but tend to keep the solution to themselves. They felt that an AI system could capture, grow and distribute that knowledge.

While Sculpteo hasn’t yet deployed this particular part of their AI system, they have launched what they call the “Business Case” AI tool.

It is an “Expert System” that is based on actual experience of experts and is intended as the first point of contact for Sculpteo clients. There the clients can very rapidly discover whether their proposed project is feasible, both technically and financially.

Due to still-widespread misunderstandings of 3D printing technology, Sculpteo clients (and I suspect clients for every 3D print service) often don’t understand the implications of their requests. For example, Moreau suggested someone might ask for an entirely 3D printed bicycle. While this is likely technically possible, it may cost the requestor over USD$1M! That price might change their mind.

It turns out that Sculpteo receives many invalid requests from prospective clients, and each must be discussed and often refined into feasible 3D printing requests with some adjustments. It takes time to say, “No!” The iterations between Sculpteo and client are essentially training the client in how to set up the 3D print properly.

But the work of doing that iteration with the client actually costs Sculpteo money. And that “training” cost is essentially unrecoverable by Sculpteo.

At least, that is, when it’s done by humans. By implementing their Business Case feature, this early consultation can be done automatically by the AI. The results will be received faster by the client and they will be consistent among all requestors. Further, the AI can be improved over time as it learns from experience and share it with new customers. And finally, it’s a lot less expensive for Sculpteo, who then would be able to spend more time on the actual 3D printing operations.

I believe this is an ideal solution, because it can potentially bring a lot of expertise to bear for clients that would typically be from smaller companies that could not afford to have their own 3D metal printing expert on staff.

Moreau explained that the system will also be available for plastic 3D printing clients as well as metal, because the issues and benefits are very similar, albeit with a different set of materials.

Another interesting benefit for Sculpteo is that, with the system, they will accumulate a large amount of aggregated statistical data on the types of parts, materials and approaches used. This can be leveraged to improve their service in the future.

Moreau re-iterated that the Business Case module is only the first of several AI-based tools that will be deployed. He expects the next module to be one that can attempt to modify the designs to make them correct for 3D printing. For example, walls might be too thin to enable proper 3D metal printing, or the support structures are not optimum for conducting heat flow away from the part. This will be done through a complex simulation process that can help understand whether the part will be successfully 3D printed. This is particularly difficult when analyzing an intricate lattice structure, which, by the way, Sculpteo is able to automatically generate.

In all, it seems that Sculpteo is expanding their market by making it easier to successfully 3D print using their service’s powerful tools.

Read more at Fabbaloo

The post What’s Behind Sculpteo’s AI-Based 3D Printing Venture? appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at January 19, 2017 03:47 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Effeffe Berlinetta: A Car Of Yesterday, Conceived Today, Built in 3D CAD

The Effeffe Berlinetta is a throwback Italian sportscar paying homage to the classic years of Ferrari, Osca, Maserati, Stanguellini, Siata, Moretti and others. The vehicle was brought to life by a team of design and engineering enthusiasts using SOLIDWORKS to build their dream car. Read Part I here to learn about the team and their inspiration for building high-performance machines.

From Artist to Industrialization

“We tried to standardize as much as possible the tube section focusing on the simplest possible design,” Sirtori revealed. “The whole frame is braced with “handkerchiefs” joints to ensure rigidity and sheet metal reinforcement. On the plates we arranged suitable reference to facilitate the welding process: the welder puts the platelets in place, wedging them with references on tubes. Mistakes are eliminated and every frame can be identical. SOLIDWORKS proved to be a perfect setting for all operations. Cutting and bending of pipes is executed by CNC machines. SOLIDWORKS allowed us to produce almost automatically the bill of materials and cutting, the drawings to be delivered for laser cutting, and the outline for the bending lines.”

The design proceeded with the study and the adaptation of the car forecarriage via a sheet metal box; the rear axle uses the rigid rear bridge (typical of early ‘60s Alfas). However, it was significantly modified in the joints to the frame. A differential gear was installed, bought in the UK where there’s a thriving market for racing components, built today but based on the originals.

The Effeffe Berlinetta’s engine is an update of the world-renowned Alfa Romeo Giulia’s. After the first engine was acquired on the second-hand market, SolidWorld technicians redesigned it entirely in SOLIDWORKS from scratch, complete with carburetors, camshafts, gears, pulleys, valves and pistons. All SOLIDWORKS kinematics algorithms were used to verify all dimensions and volumes. “Thanks to this “exercise,” we were able to choose the best place for exhausts, where to put the throttle control, modifying and fixing, for example, the clutch housing,” said Sirtori. “The coachwork was entirely built by hand over the completed frame by a panel-beater, an artist who “set” thin aluminum sheets (0.8 mm) on a lightweight tube frame.”

The vehicle’s body was designed directly by the Frigerio brothers and then smoothed, filled and painted. Though it was a beautiful piece of craftsmanship, it would be problematic to replicate. Here Solid Energy, a company that specializes in reverse engineering, came to help. Solid Energy performed a complete 3D scan of the Effeffe Berlinetta to capture its geometry inside the CAD model, correcting the inevitable asymmetry and the imperfections typical of any manual work. Thanks to mathematics imported into SOLIDWORKS, the tubular frame was also digitized, so the workshop could take advantage of CNC-bending machines, obtaining consistent results in each model. A 3D printer from Stratasys was also used to create the double-f logo (made in resin and chrome) mounted on the radiator grill of the car.

A Real Added Value

Digital prototyping played a key role in this recreation of a classic car. “Without the digital prototyping, this project would never have taken off,” says Sirtori. “With the money spent to build physical prototypes consuming the budget, not to mention the enormous increase of time, we’d still be struggling with the first evaluations. The real added value here isn’t just the ability to design tubes to be cut and welded, but rather the fact that we could examine, without wasting time, dozens of alternative solutions, all virtual, without spending resources or money. Not purely aesthetic variants, but functional: overall dimensions, mechanisms movement, collisions, component optimization and assembly techniques. Everyone involved in the Effeffe Berlinetta adventure could see on screen the design development in later revisions, giving opinions and advice through the simulation. Once we validated the final configuration, we could build confidently: the first frame was already perfect. Practically we didn’t build any prototype!”

Even the Frigerio brothers were deeply satisfied. “The frame proved to be great, the rear axle has a very good grip and the structure lightness allows for outstanding performance in relation to the available power. The idea now is to put this simple sport car into production, applying the same concepts from sixty years ago interpreted and corrected for optimum operating efficiency and rationality.” Today the Effeffe Berlinetta is ready to be built by hand in about twenty units a year. The price will be about 350 thousand euros.

The3DGroup: A Wealth of Expertise

While projects like this “Effeffe Berlinetta” are generally undertaken by collaborative efforts of equipment or software manufacturers and large multinational companies with limitless resources, this project was led by distributor the3DGroup. The Italian company proved to have all the knowledge to carry out a project as complex as designing and building a car. Drafting patterns and schemes, designing and modeling geometries (solid and surface), performing structural analysis, fluid dynamics, kinematics simulation, applying digital prototyping and 3D printing. Each step was under the watchful eye of its technicians and experts – especially Carlo Sirtori.

Author information

Giancarlo Giannangeli
Giancarlo Giannangeli
Giancarlo Giannangeli is senior Multimedia Communication & Marketing freelance consultant in IT & Mechanics. He’s been working for decades with many firms in Italy and has written hundreds of articles on Italian press. Currently he’s editor for Tecn’è and Tecnologie Meccaniche magazines.

The post Effeffe Berlinetta: A Car Of Yesterday, Conceived Today, Built in 3D CAD appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Giancarlo Giannangeli at January 19, 2017 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to draw Arrows in a SOLIDWORKS Drawing

On some occasions arrows are needed in a SOLIDWORKS drawing to point to a detail or highlight a feature. In such instances, some users take advantage of the “Note” command with arrows and leave the text box empty. However, there is not much flexibility with that solution.

Draw Arrows in SOLIDWORKS

In SOLIDWORKS the Multi-jog Leader command allows you to draw arrows with various end shapes. This command can be found from Insert > Annotation > Multi-jog Leader. This command works very similar to the Line command. The default for the command is to continue adding lines until it is selected to end. To end the line you either double-click or righ-click and select end leader. When finished the result is a line with two arrow heads, one on either end. In case you need to have only one arrow head, right-click on one end and change its end shape to Plain Line.

To add more arrows one after another you can do one of the following methods:

  • Hit the Enter key to rerun the Multi-jog Leader (last commnad used in SOLIDWORKS);
  • Right-click on an empty space and select Recent Commands > Multi-jog Leader;
  • Copy and paste similar arrows and adjust their location or length/orientation.

The following image shows a number of arrows drawn in a SOLIDWORKS drawing and their end shapes have been adjusted by right clicking on the end point and selecting from the drop down menu.

Arrow in SolidWorks Drawings

Drawing Arrows in SOLIDWORKS

SOLIDWORKS Arrow Applications

The following image shows different shapes that arrows could take in a drawing. The capability of adding these arrows could be used for various applications. A side note or description of a note beside the drawing. Relating a part to its location in an assembly or exploded view. In addition to what was explained about, you can right-click on a leader and select Add New Branch or Add Jog Point to add another branch or readjust the shape of the arrow instead of recreating it.

Different shapes of arrows

Different shapes of arrows

SOLIDWORKS Arrow Size Settings

If the size of the arrow head is not serving your purpose, you can change the size of that individual arrow head by right-clicking on the end point of that arrow and selecting the last item “Size…“. The pop up window is shown in the following figure which has the same setting as dimension line settings in Tools > Options.

Adjust Arrow Size

Adjust Arrow Size

The post How to draw Arrows in a SOLIDWORKS Drawing appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWE at January 19, 2017 01:00 PM

January 18, 2017

SolidSmack

Slice Planner Merges Paper and Digital Through A Unique Visual UI

slice-planner-paper-digital-pie-ui

slice-planner-paper-digital-pie-ui

I admit, I use a planner. There’s simply too much happening during the day, plus I have issues remembering what I need to do and which day is which. Ok, not only do I use a planner, but also a healthy dose of Post-It notes. They’re everywhere, a hodgepodge of mixed notes that make no sense the following day–bread, milk, cereal, check on baby, edit CES article. Hopeless. Clearly, I need a better system to keep tabs on groceries, babies and deadlines. Enter Evopaper’s Slice Planner–paper for those who like analog, and an supplemental app for the digital organizer.

According to the Indigogo campaign, the Slice Planner is designed around their core-concept of easy synchronization between paper notebooks and digital calendars, no matter if you use Google, Outlook or Apple. Along with this, it aimed at adding more flexibility to daily routines by utilizing the Planner’s augmented reality-based application. Have a look:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kiduZScZTYQ?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

One of the main concepts of the Slice Planner is utilizing a clock-face diagram, which Evopaper says “helps visual thinkers (65% of the population) master their time and plan their activities in more intuitive and convenient ways.” The circlular pie-like diagram visually slices the day into segments to help you manage you time and focus on the task for that particular part of the day. Or in my case, the amount of time I’ve wasted doing other things besides the assigned task at any given interval.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84469" style="width: 680px;">The Slice Planner app features several handy tools to add, augment and share note data in a digital format with a clock-based calendar reference. <figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The Slice Planner app features several handy tools to add, augment and share note data in a digital format with a clock-based calendar reference.</figcaption></figure>

The Slice Planner app makes use of your smartphone’s camera along with Google Vision’s OCR (Optical Character Recognition) to take data from your paper-based clock-face diagram and transfers them over to your digital calendar. Notes, timeframes, anything written on that clock-frame reference is digitized and sent to their respective time slots on your preferred calendar. That’s the augmented reality side of the app, which also alerts you with red text if there is something else scheduled for that particular time slot.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CYYcGAhWf_I?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Other features include a smart-crop tool that allows you to draw a circle around any given piece of information (notes, figures, grocery lists, etc.) and transfer them over to a highlighted time segment. A handy tool for when you only need a piece of information from a full page. What’s more, it can take that information from almost any surface.

Apparently, I wasn’t the only one who found the Slice Planner to be a good idea, as Evopaper successfully crowd-funded their intuitive planner on Kickstarter, raising over $117,000 to bring it to reality.

Interestingly enough, the Slice Planner app is free as Evopaper’s campaign focused more on their luxurious leather-covered premium paper notebooks that were designed to complement the app even though almost any parchment will do. Still, they’re beautiful notebooks and come in both hard and soft covers. Those interested in getting one of their own (starting at $29 and up) or want more information on the Slice Planner app should keep an eye on their website, Twitter profile or Instagram account.

slice-planner-paper-digital-pie-ui-01

slice-planner-paper-digital-pie-ui-02

slice-planner-paper-digital-pie-ui-03

slice-planner-paper-digital-pie-ui-04

The post Slice Planner Merges Paper and Digital Through A Unique Visual UI appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at January 18, 2017 07:57 PM

World’s First Electric-Powered Racing Mech to Hit Speeds of 20 MPH

furion-prosthesis-racing-mech-00

furion-prosthesis-racing-mech-00

Human-driven battle robots are already under construction by MegaBots and an array of Japanese-based Kuratas. While those primarily focus on DESTRUCTION! …there are others focused on SPEED. Entering the race this year is Furrion and their human-piloted, all-electric Prosthesis racing mech. Designed by engineer Jonathan Tippett, the 7,700 lb. Prosthesis was recently unveiled at this year’s CES with Furrion stating this as “the first machine of its kind, ushering in a new era of large scale, high-performance mech technology.”

Looking like a cross between Boston Dynamics’ BigDog and Theo Jansen’s Strandbeests, it’s touted as the first ‘off-road racing mech’ and ‘ultimate union of pilot and machine’, which makes use of Furrion’s new, large scale exo-bionic technology platform. Furrion hopes the design will be the first in a series of giant racing machines designed to compete against each other using an amplified, all-electric power system and human pilot.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84461" style="width: 640px;">The Prosthesis is controlled by human movement, which is amplified using an electric motor to actuate hydraulic legs.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The Prosthesis is controlled by human movement, which is amplified using an electric motor to actuate hydraulic legs.</figcaption></figure>

In 2014, prior to being picked up by Furrion, Jonathan and team sought funding on Indiegogo with a campaign that gained lots of interest, but only raised 30% of a $100,000 goal. He now leads the initiative as founder and CEO of Furrion Robotics Inc. where he is continuing the development of, not only, the Prosthesis racing mech, but ‘a new breed’ of all-electric mechs.

The Prosthesis functions by a human pilot using both arms to manipulate the mech’s outer legs and the pilots lower appendages to control the inner legs. The pilot’s movements are amplified using the machines on-board electric-powered motor, which controls a series of hydraulics to actuate the various legs in a odd, otherworldly motion and at speeds of up to 20mph.

furrion-prosthesis-racing-mech-00

Unfortunately, the display model at CES was missing most of the controls needed to actually drive the machine. You’ll need to be in peak condition anyway, as Furrion states it will take an athlete to get it moving at top speeds–which leaves me out. They also state that it’s capable of handling any terrain. Seems suspect with no side-axis or ball-jointed movement, so guess we’ll just have to wait and see on that one. Until then, here’s a complete rundown of the Prosthesis’ currently known specs:

Mass: 7700 lbs (3500kg)
Height: 13.8 ft (4.2m)
Width: 16.4 ft (5m)
Length: 9.8 ft (3m)
Top Speed: 20 mph (30km/h)
Run Time: 30-120 minutes
Power Plant: 96V x 20kWh Lithium-ion battery
Peak Output: 170kW (225HP)
Motion System: 100% human-controlled, electro-hydraulics with direct haptic feedback
Suspension System: 50cm travel, custom engineered air/coil overs shocks

To stay up to date on the construction and development of the Prosthesis and their other mechs, follow the team on Twitter or Instagram.

The post World’s First Electric-Powered Racing Mech to Hit Speeds of 20 MPH appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at January 18, 2017 06:02 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Follow the Learning Path at SOLIDWORKS World 2017

At SOLIDWORKS World there are over 350 learning sessions, and choosing the right ones to attend can be a bit of a headache. Now those nice people on the SOLIDWORKS events team have created an online ‘agenda builder’ where you can find sessions of interest based on a session category, COLLABORATE, CREATE, EXTEND, MANAGE, VALIDATE . But the observable among you will have noticed that there is a new type of session calcification, the Learning Path. This begs the question what is a Learning Path and is it worth attending?

At this years at SOLIDWORKS World there are four learning paths that attendees can follow. The chart below explains each path.

 

This learning path will simplify and demystify the development of connected products.

 

These sessions will span the normal categories but focus on a particular are of technology of the product development process. The goal of these paths is that an attendee can learn about the technology and implementation aspects of these four key areas for manufacturing. The path lectures will be delivered by SOLIDWORKS employees, partners and industry experts, who not only know the technology but have experience in implementing it into a product development process.

Attend these learning path sessions to learn the best practices of implementing model-based definition (MBD).

 

The Additive Manufacturing Learning path will explain the design constraints and best practices for additive manufacturing components and products.

 

Each path will start with a mini-general session and close with a Q&A, industry best practices and networking session. In between there will be at least six lecture sessions covering all aspects of the path topic. Now there is no requirement to follow the complete path, you can jump in and out of a path as you wish BUT if you attend at least four of the lectures on a path, attendees will receive a certificate of ‘path completion’ from MySolidWorks. In addition to the certificate, attendees who complete the MBD path will have access to further lessons and tests on MySolidWorks.

The Subtractive Manufacturing Learning path will focus on traditional manufacturing techniques and how CAD and CAM are being integrated.

 

The learning paths will give attendees a jump start in these important and emerging aspects of manufacturing giving them and their companies both insight and knowledge to accelerate their product development process.

Author information

Stephen Endersby
Stephen Endersby
Product Manager at SolidWorks

The post Follow the Learning Path at SOLIDWORKS World 2017 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Stephen Endersby at January 18, 2017 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Imperial Dimensions Fraction Setup

The drawings in SOLIDWORKS are usually made using drawing templates which are specifically designed for each company. In the drawing templates, the unit system is preset along with many other settings to eliminate the setup steps for engineers and drafters. With respect to dimension units, the companies make multiple templates so that the users select what units they want to create their drawing with. For the metric units, the number of decimal places could be pre-selected and whether leading zeros should be shown. However for SOLIDWORKS Imperial Dimensions, the setting will be different.

Fractions for Imperial dimensions

Although the imperial dimensions could be shown with decimal places same as metric dimensions, some users prefer to show dimensions with fractions or even round off the numbers to the nearest fractions. The following image demonstrate how we can set the dimensions to show with fractions. The decimals must be selected to None. The fractions could be adjusted to any fraction value is preferred, i.e. 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, … . Then, under More the “Round to Nearest Fraction” must be checked. Otherwise it will not show the fractions properly. To find these settings, go to Tools > Options > Document Properties > Units

Set up 1/16th fractions for imperial dimensions.

Set up 1/16th fractions for imperial dimensions.

The following image demonstrates how dimensions would look with the setting for fractions as 1/16th, as specified is the figure above. Also note that when the fractions are selected the quotation sign representing inches is shown after the dimension number.

Showing imperial dimensions of a drawing in the form of fractions.

Showing imperial dimensions of a drawing in the form of fractions.

Dimensions in the form of Feet and Inches

In addition, SOLIDWORKS Imperial Dimensions can be shown in the form of feet and inches. To activate this capability, the same path as before should be taken but units must be set to ‘feet & inches’ and then under more the Convert from 2′ and 4″ must be checked off. The following image demonstrates this.

Set up imperial dimensions in the form of feet and inches.

Set up imperial dimensions in the form of feet and inches.

The following screenshot represents how dimensions would look if the units were set to feet and inches format. Note the feet and inches sign is shown after the dimension number to prevent confusion.

SOLIDWORKS Imperial Dimensions

Showing imperial dimensions of a drawing in the form of feet and inches

The post SOLIDWORKS Imperial Dimensions Fraction Setup appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWE at January 18, 2017 01:00 PM

January 17, 2017

SolidSmack

Foureyes Furniture Shows You the Step-by-Step Process to Build a Modern Bench

foureyes-furniture-modern-bench-00

foureyes-furniture-modern-bench-00

Porches. Porches are ridiculous without a good place to sit. If you don’t want to tear your porch down, you could toss some tree stumps up there, but if you have the slightest bit of woodworking skill, you could build yourself a bench. Chris Salomone of Foureyes Furniture has skill a’plenty, and has been busy publishing a woodworking project series on YouTube, that is absolutely, a must subscribe.

He kicked off the series with a great build for a Modern Wood Bench. Like many woodworkers, Chris’ inspiration began from a chunk of wood found in a dumpster. He brought the wood home, cleaned it up and made the first iteration of his bench. It’s didn’t look sturdy enough to hold much weight beyond that of an imaginary plants. He ended up using it at his office for a place to sit his bags. After someone tried to sit on it, he decided a redesign was in order. He liked the look and simplicity of the original and incorporated it into a new design that holds both the aesthetics and functionality of a modern bench.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/azHzoutf608?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Chris chose cherry for the new bench–don’t you love the way cherry looks and smells, especially when it’s freshly cut, not to mention it holds up really well in weather when sealed properly. He joined and planed the top pieces to fit together tight. The four legs were angled just so at 150 degrees off 90, cut on a miter saw–This angled look is so vintage, I must say. Since he used one piece of wood to fashion two legs, he cut each in half using a band saw–Unconventional sure, but you use the tools that you have. All legs were then sent through the planner in order to match the floor-sides together and prevent wobbling–stable makes it able, as they say.

Dado joints were used so everything fit together tight adding to its beautiful, iconic build with the absence of nails and screws. The end product looks fabulous, better than the first iteration, with its classic, vintage style, made even better by the deep bevel on both ends of the top. For as simple as it looks, there’s certainly some fine craftsmanship and consideration into each piece. To see more of his woodworking builds visit his site and dont forget to subscribe to his YouTube channel.

foureyes-furniture-modern-bench-01

foureyes-furniture-modern-bench-02

foureyes-furniture-modern-bench-03

foureyes-furniture-modern-bench-04

foureyes-furniture-modern-bench-05

foureyes-furniture-modern-bench-06

foureyes-furniture-modern-bench-07

foureyes-furniture-modern-bench-08

foureyes-furniture-modern-bench-09

foureyes-furniture-modern-bench-10

foureyes-furniture-modern-bench-11

The post Foureyes Furniture Shows You the Step-by-Step Process to Build a Modern Bench appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at January 17, 2017 09:37 PM

Adobe Pushes Deeper Into 3D and UX Design

adobe-project-felix-3d-render-graphic-design-00

adobe-project-felix-3d-render-graphic-design-00

Right out of the gate for 2017, Adobe is offering a pair of applications featured at the Adobe MAX 2016 conference–a Windows version of Adobe Experience Design CC (XD) featuring real-time collaboration, and a new 3D product shot composer for graphic designers named Project Felix. They’re focused on accessibility (which we’re strong proponents of here at SolidSmack), making it easier for you to both mock up ideas in 2D and 3D, whether it’s a website or a product design.

Project Felix

Project Felix features some handy tools targeted at graphic designers that have little to no 3D rendering experience, allowing them to create and manipulate images using assets such as object materials, models and lighting. The desktop-based software allows you to drag-and-drop library models, or import an external 3D model, into the scene to instantly view it in a 3D environment. For import, only .3ds, .dae, .kmz, .obj and .ply is supported.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yaMjHn-RJYA?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Felix displays the scene with baked lighting and shadows, with a small real-time preview window available in the lower left of the window or the option to toggle a full screen preview. All controls are quite basic with simple settings for Camera and Image Based Lighting on the right and Scene and Library options on the left. There’s no right-click context menu available in the scene and to access materials, you need to traverse through the Scene tree.

Adobe also listened to Felix beta users and opened-up a stock asset page where you can grab anything from complete models to materials to incorporate into a design, including licensed 2D and 3D objects, which can be saved to your Creative Cloud library. If you have an Adobe Creative Cloud subscription you can already download and try Adobe’s Project Felix or get more info on it here.

Adobe XD

Adobe also updated and previewed a Windows version for their Experience Design (XD) app–an end-to-end platform making it easy to prototype websites and mobile apps, without messing with code or platform quirks. In fact, according to Adobe, you don’t really need to know how to code at all to get things up and running, thanks to a tool set that includes Repeat Grid–a powerful tool for patterning and editing items quickly.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VhYYqzX294s?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

XD features two modes–Design and Prototype. Design provides prebuilt UI kits to get you up and running faster with projects designed for several platforms including iOS, Google Material Design and now, Windows 10. It also includes artboard templates (or you can create your own) and a workspace with drawing, text and image manipulation tools.

Prototype allows you to bring together artboards and content, complete with flow and transition options. A Preview button makes it easy to view your creations in action or how they would appear and function online. What’s more, you can upload everything to the Creative Cloud, share with all interested parties, and garner valuable feedback. Adobe XD was initially only offered for Mac OS with the initial Beta release in March 2016, but is now available in beta for Windows through your Adobe CC account or for more information visit here.

We transitioned to Adobe CC at SolidSmack a few years ago now. Though we stick to a specific set of software most of the time, the subscription model with access to all Adobe products has opened up the use of programs we wouldn’t otherwise have considered. An interesting effect, and something we keep coming back to admire with how Adobe has set up their Creative Cloud subscription platform.

The post Adobe Pushes Deeper Into 3D and UX Design appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at January 17, 2017 08:53 PM

Model of the Week: Baby Groot [I Am Baby GROOT!]

baby-groot-3d-print-Michal-Miszta-00

baby-groot-3d-print-Michal-Miszta-00

Who needs a creepy, baby tree creature sidekick on their desktop? Oh yeah! I see those hands going up. I do too, but not just any creepy, baby tree creature. I needs me a BABY GROOT up in har!

Guardians of the Galaxy 2 is hittin’ theaters May 5th, so that gives you plenty of time to download this super sweet, super detailed model of Rocket the Raccoon’s muscle… or eventual muscle, BABY GROOT. Oh, and you KNEW there was gonna be a baby Groot in the sequel when you saw that adorable little potted stick with hands dancin’ at the end of the first one. GROOT. The best.

This version was designed and modeled by Byambaa Erdene in ZBrush and first printed using a Makerbot Replicator with a 20% infill. There’s a lot of great detail in this model and he’s provided a high-res version with “several million polygons” to bring it all out in your print. This is the first version of the model which has received a lot of praise online so far. Enough that Byambaa plans to bring out additional models, including new heads, a new body and more.

Byambaa has made the high-res version available as a free download here on Inov3D, but you can also grab it (or here on Thingiverse.) He’s also provided the low res version for download on Thingiverse as well.

The painting? I’m sure you can take that on just fine, but if you would like a reference, The Model Maker (maker of the lead image above) has a great write-up on the printing and painting of the model, down to the print specs, primer and paint numbers.

The Inov 3D Facebook Group also has LOADS of examples of people who have already printed this model. Here are some images from the group:

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84421" style="width: 720px;">Print and paint by Brian McMeans<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Print and paint by Brian McMeans</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84422" style="width: 844px;">Print and paint by Jay Yuedol‎<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Print and paint by Jay Yuedol‎</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84423" style="width: 1100px;">Print and paint by Lauren Angers<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Print and paint by Lauren Angers</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84424" style="width: 720px;">Print and paint by Michael Crone<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Print and paint by Michael Crone</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84425" style="width: 1080px;">Print and paint by Michal Miszta<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Print and paint by Michal Miszta</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84426" style="width: 800px;">Print and paint by Mike Bogutsch‎<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Print and paint by Mike Bogutsch‎</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84427" style="width: 960px;">Print and paint by Mike Carr<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Print and paint by Mike Carr</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84428" style="width: 1100px;">Print and paint by Ross Leuck<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Print and paint by Ross Leuck</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84429" style="width: 1100px;">Printed by Jake Jones<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Printed by Jake Jones</figcaption></figure>

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

The post Model of the Week: Baby Groot [I Am Baby GROOT!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 17, 2017 05:28 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS NetWork License Failed to get string for the Localized Property

When installing, or modifying the installation of the SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License Manager, you may encounter the following error: Failed to get the string for the Localized Property : STR_SWINST_ACTIVE_SW.

STR_SWINST_ACTIVE_SW

SOLIDWORKS Error message

This error can occur, if SOLIDWORKS is open on the same system where the installation is taking place. Close SOLIDWORKS and then retry the installation. This should allow you to continue with the install error free.

The post SOLIDWORKS NetWork License Failed to get string for the Localized Property appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at January 17, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Astropad Studio Turns the iPad Pro Into a Full-Fledged Graphics Tablet for Macs

Astropad-Studio-Feature

Astropad-Studio-Feature

For those who depend on a graphics tablet for design tasks ranging from ideation sketching to 3D modeling, Wacom is pretty much the gold standard when it comes to quality and price. Unlike the iPad Pro or Microsoft Surface, however, there’s little else the graphic tablets are capable of doing efficiently and comfortably when not in use – assuming you’re even using a model from the company’s screen-based Cintiq lineup.

Conversely, while the multipurpose iPad Pro has moved up the ranks as the ideal portable digital sketching tablet for many pros, it lacks the ability to operate professional software applications that Wacom tablets play very nicely with – particularly Adobe and robust 3D modeling apps.

Aiming to move into this grey area, Astropad, a company that has previously created wireless second-screen software for iPads to sync with a Mac, recently launched a new product aimed at pros for wirelessly syncing the functionalities of an iPad Pro (and Apple Pencil) with a traditional OS X operating system. The result is the much-desired ability to use the iPad Pro as a dedicated graphics tablet outside of the iOS environment.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="360" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/198755916" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="640"></iframe>

Marketed as going “beyond a graphics tablet,” Astropad Studio was built from the ground up with the creative professional’s workflow in mind. Among other pro-friendly features, Studio includes the ability to sync with a separate keyboard for hotkey commands as well as an option to create custom screen gestures programmed to specific touch patterns.

From a performance perspective, Astropad introduced a new technology called Liquid Extreme to reproduced accurate image quality and reduce latency between the two screens.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="360" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/198852776" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="640"></iframe>

Says Astropad:

“Liquid Extreme features color corrected output and retina resolution. What you see on your iPad is the same as on your Mac. And our built-in Velocity Control analyzes network conditions dozens of times per second to balance image quality and latency. So whether you’re plugged in or wireless, your iPad will stay highly responsive.”

While Wacom tablets have consistently been an indispensable tool for design professionals, tablets have slowly been creeping up behind as a viable option for basic design tasks. Now, with the ability to tap into the more robust OS X via the touch-sensitive iPad Pro, it’ll be interesting to see which way the wind blows.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="360" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/198771233" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="640"></iframe>

But at $7.99 per month or $64.99 for an annual subscription, Astropad Studio might not be for everybody, but for design and engineering professionals who want the portability, power, and convenience of the iPad Pro, it’s safe to say Astropad Studio just might become one of the most useful tools in their toolkit.

Find out more over at Astropad.

The post Astropad Studio Turns the iPad Pro Into a Full-Fledged Graphics Tablet for Macs appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at January 17, 2017 12:45 PM

LEGO and Chevrolet Engineers Build Full-Scale LEGO Batmobile with 350,000 Toy Bricks

Batmobile-LEGO-Feature

Batmobile-LEGO-Feature

When it comes to professionally-engineered LEGO builds, the end-goal is more often than not to recreate a real-world object as accurately as possible using square bricks. For some of the company’s most recent models, this dedication to modeling after true life has gone as far as having a build sequence modeled after the true-to-life factory assembly sequence as well.

Well, not this LEGO model; not by a long shot.

To help ramp up PR for the upcoming film The Lego Batman Movie, LEGO toy engineers teamed up with Chevrolet automotive engineers to build a scaled-up version of the LEGO Batmobile; effectively reversing that traditional process with a life-sized LEGO model to the tune of nearly 350,000 plastic bricks:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AaKa7qxQUII?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

“Totally awesome looking? Yep. Insane crime-fighting arsenal? You know it. Fit for a loner vigilante and average citizen alike, from its stud shooters to its standard roof “ejection” function, the LEGO® Batmobile has something to handle any situation. This Super Hero supercar was precisely engineered to kick butt.”

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ezm-VUI4PpA?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The finished build, which took a grand total of 222 man hours to assemble, weighs in at a hefty 1,700 pounds-400 of those are for the wheels alone and, in total, the finished build stretches 17 feet long. To ensure the entire thing doesn’t collapse on itself like The Penguin over a plate of mackerel, the engineers incorporated an aluminum tube internal frame just like the real thing.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6re2KadYRKU?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Unveiled at the North American International Auto Show this past weekend, Chevy went so far as to created a dedicated website for the new automobile highlighting all the bells and whistles similar to what you might find for—well, a more traditional automobile option. Among other features highlighted include fully-articulating wheels, a rocket booster, Parallel Park Mode, built-in 4G LTE Wi-Fi, and in the case that Robin happens to get behind the wheel, the integrated Teen Driver Technology system helps keep everybody safe.

Why can’t all ad campaigns be this fun?

The post LEGO and Chevrolet Engineers Build Full-Scale LEGO Batmobile with 350,000 Toy Bricks appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at January 17, 2017 12:31 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Vitility Scoops ECRM Award after SOLIDWORKS Debut

What happens when you implement SOLIDWORKS for the first time? Ask Dutch product designers Vitility. After mixing medication with innovation to create the Smart Pill Box, the business has scooped ‘Most Innovative Product’ at the ECRM Awards and been named one of the top 100 most innovative businesses in the Netherlands.


Feeding the cat.

Putting the note out for the milkman.

Locking the garage.

Life is full of little chores – and it’s not always easy to keep up. But, forgetting to take your medication can have consequences beyond a peckish puss and dry cereal. Here to make sure patients remember their pills and avert medical complications is the Smart Pill Box.

Not only does this box make it easy to store different types of medication, it’s linked to an app that alerts patients via their mobile devices when it’s time to take their pills. The Smart Pill Box also monitors pill consumption and prompts patients when they need to renew prescriptions.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XquUrg1uNqg?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>


A debut design in SOLIDWORKS

The Smart Pill Box was produced by Vitility, a Dutch product design business with a growing reputation for innovation. Yet this was its first project completed in SOLIDWORKS. Did the lack of familiarity with SOLIDWORKS muddy the waters? No. Instead, it brought added clarity to the design process and slashed development time.

For example, while the initial idea was for the box to be made out of one complete piece, it soon became clear that this would be difficult in production. Designing in SOLIDWORKS meant Vitility’s designers could quickly model the box’s lid, hinge and main container as separate components to be assembled post-production. Ultimately, this made the Smart Pill Box cheaper, easier and faster to produce.


What next for Vitility?

Switching to SOLIDWORKS has helped spur the collection of ‘Most Innovative Product’ at the ECRM Awards, not to mention a place in the top 100 most innovative businesses in the Netherlands. It’s no surprise Vitility is embracing the software, with another 18 products in the design pipeline.

For Vitility, SOLIDWORKS is the perfect tonic.
READ NEXT:

>> SOLIDWORKS on song for premium hi-fi manufacturer
>> Headkayse improve cyclist safety with folding helmet

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Vitility Scoops ECRM Award after SOLIDWORKS Debut appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS UK at January 17, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | You Know the Drill

SS-Radio-Feature

SS-Radio-Feature

This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “Juniper” from New Madrid and work our way through tracks from Olu Dara, PAPA, The Amazing, Blah Blah Blah, and others before wrapping up with “The Less I Know the Better” from Tame Impala.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:6FxzUYCuurH0vGek7gif0z" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | You Know the Drill appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 17, 2017 10:55 AM

January 16, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SWW17 Time-Lapse Tutorial: Custom Star

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/t7tQUn4iPrk?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

One of the greatest freedoms 3D printings grants us the freedom of choice. You choose the colors, the design, you can customize everything! This opens up a whole new window of possibilities for trying something new. So, with SOLIDWORKS World 2017 in Los Angeles, California, approaching, we thought we would put some names in stars!

The technique used in this tutorial will be printing in multiple colors but with a single extruder. This is great to create contrasting colors and a good way to avoid painting and using glue. The design for this is very simple but does require you to think into the future and know how your machine behaves under certain circumstances. The image below shows a profile of the effect we are after.

So, to start of we made a star using basic SOLIDWORKS features, we then made a neat border and put the name Kirby in the face. We made sure there was a loop on the top to make it a keyring. The name part is the section that we are going to customize. Essentially, all you do is change the name or replace it with a logo.

Now that our model is finished, we are ready to print. To pause a print halfway to change filament can be done in two different ways. You do this in your preferred slicing software or manually. In some Slicers, you can set it up to pause the print at a certain height and once you change the material you can resume. If your slicing software doesn’t have this option you can wait till the right moment and pause the print yourself this does require you maintain and watch your print while it does its magic.

So we knew we would set this up to print in red first and then make the detail in white. We launched the print and waited till it stopped, we then changed to white and launched the print again. The white was layered on and it worked like a charm.

 

If you have two print heads, you can go into a lot more detail with this. The method we have shown you is fairly limited in what you can do. Once you have multiple heads you can create more detailed prints such as white within the red as opposed to on top which we have done here.

These stars are a fun little project which you can make unique to yourself or to anyone you wish to present them to. 3D printing presents this unique way to put anyone’s name amongst the stars and make them feel special.

solidworks custom star

This style of this type of project can inspire a whole new design style and design techniques. Using more than one color or even blending the colors will give birth to really cool ideas. The limit is how far you wish to extend the imagination.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SWW17 Time-Lapse Tutorial: Custom Star appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at January 16, 2017 10:00 PM

SolidSmack

Watch How a Louis XIII Cognac Decanter is Made

LOUIS-XIII-decanter-rare-cask-making-of-00
<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84399" style="width: 1100px;">LOUIS-XIII-decanter-rare-cask-making-of-00<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The end-result of a work of art most of us will never be able to afford- Baccarat’s Louis XIII cognac decanter.</figcaption></figure>

If you’re not up on the latest in regards to expensive booze, Louis XIII Cognac is one of the most coveted and priciest — with a 70 cl (700ml) bottle of Louis XIII costing as much as $3,400. At that price you probably don’t want to chuck it in a $5 novelty flask and stash it in your back pocket. No, you would probably want to store it in a fine crystal decanter made by the world-renowned crystal company Baccarat and, in a minute, you’ll understand why.

The Black Crystal Decanter is truly a work of art. Before it has finished being made, it has passed through the hands of no less than 20 people. The liquid going inside that bottle is a Louis XIII Rare Cask 43,8 (denoting the alcohol content of 43.8%), which has a base price of $22,000, making it one of the finest chugs on the planet (no need for a chaser here!). But enough about the cost, let’s look at the video of how Baccarat forged this crystal masterpiece.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XyOeq98HqQk?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The Louis XIII Rare Cask decanter begins life as black crystal (known to be difficult to work with), heated to thousands of degrees in a massive stone kiln, where it is mixed with white crystal, shaped and molded in a delicate process to get the perfect shape and contour. Once the crystal is shaped using precision measuring and glass-shaping tools, it receives the decorative crystal adornments, pressed, stamped and molded to give the iconic look Louis XIII bottles are known for.

louis-xiii-agegate

Once the top has been molded and shaped to match the body, it then goes on to hand-painted coating of palladium, which is used to dress the neck and adornments, highlighting the Louis XIII label underneath. It’s crazy to see the amount of precision that goes into crafting a bottle without the aid of modern tools (CAD and CNC machinery, is what I was thinking). To get a closer look at the Louis XIII bottle and other spirits most of us will never afford, head here.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_-NaS_a2_4o?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

 

The post Watch How a Louis XIII Cognac Decanter is Made appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at January 16, 2017 06:35 PM

3D Printed Dieselpunk Models Merge Science Fiction and WWII

Noah Li’s Deiselpunk models encompass five different World War 2 factions that feature interchangeable pieces to create any number of designs.
<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84384" style="width: 1100px;">Noah Li’s Deiselpunk models encompass five different World War 2 factions that feature interchangeable pieces to create any number of designs.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Noah Li’s Deiselpunk models encompass five different World War 2 factions that feature interchangeable pieces to create any number of designs.</figcaption></figure>

Sometimes there are Kickstarter campaigns you hope will succeed, but sadly wind up failing. Noah Li is a Game Animator who launched a Kickstarter campaign that didn’t quite reach the funding goal. Maybe I’m biased because I’m a fan of both the MechWarrior universe and World War 2 technology, which is what Noah’s campaign merged together with his Deiselpunk (a close relative to Steampunk) 3D printed models.

Though similar looking to MechWarrior Battlemechs, his creations were made unique by, essentially, strapping a pair of robot legs to a tank body at a 1:100 scale–smaller than most Revell plastic model kits, but awesome nonetheless.

3d-printed-dieselpunk-sci-fi-wwii-01

Noah’s kits, five in total, encompass several different factions including the Soviet Union, Germany, the US, France, Japan and Britain, all of which have interchangeable turrets, legs and chassis that can be mixed and matched to make all kinds of unique designs. Instead of selling the model kits as a complete package, Noah went the made-to-order route that would allow pledges to pick and choose the parts they wanted for their respective builds.

<video class="wp-video-shortcode" controls="controls" height="360" id="video-84383-2" preload="metadata" width="640"><source src="https://ksr-video.imgix.net/projects/2652013/video-718213-h264_high.mp4?_=2" type="video/mp4">https://ksr-video.imgix.net/projects/2652013/video-718213-h264_high.mp4</video>

Like most any model kits, the parts are shipped unassembled and unpainted so you can put your own color scheme on your creations. All of the models have a 5” X 5” build area and a varying height of 3 to 5-inches depending on the combination used, with fully articulated legs and turrets providing any number of poses.

Noah was offering the PLA-printed parts starting at $5 for accessories, ranging upto $250 for a full mech model kit–a tad high, but not unreasonable when you consider the price of resin and other custom toy model/kits. However, he missed his very low target goal of $1,500 to bring the models to reality. It’s unclear whether or not he will offer them later, but you can keep tabs on his Artstation site. I (and others) hope he does relaunch the project, as his designs are awesome to say the least.

Whenever we see an awesome product that launched on Kickstarter and didn’t quite make it, we look at what they could have done differently to succeed. The video was great at illustrating the design and how you could interchange them, but lacked some details, a personal touch without Noah speaking or handling the mechs, and an appeal to fan of this kind of art. With that, here are a few things we hope Noah thinks about when he relaunches the project 😉

  • A visual of the pledge awards (grid with cost and image of what is recieved)
  • Some historical context/story (where did the ideas, shapes, details come from)
  • Behind the design (what printer, design hours on each, research done, etc.)
  • Having all tanks designed (only 3 of 5 were done)
  • Complete test printing (only 2 of 5 were test printed)
  • List of paints/tools (to complete the look as shown)
  • Put this into the video (along with what the funds are needed for)
  • More promotion on social (Artstation, Twitter, Mech fan sites, design sites, etc.)
  • Open-sourcing models (higher pledge level or granted through…)
  • A community site (for access to models, share mods and first access to future models)

Until then, here are some more shots of Noah’s Mechs.

3d-printed-dieselpunk-sci-fi-wwii-02 3d-printed-dieselpunk-sci-fi-wwii-03 3d-printed-dieselpunk-sci-fi-wwii-04 3d-printed-dieselpunk-sci-fi-wwii-05 3d-printed-dieselpunk-sci-fi-wwii-06 3d-printed-dieselpunk-sci-fi-wwii-07 3d-printed-dieselpunk-sci-fi-wwii-08

The post 3D Printed Dieselpunk Models Merge Science Fiction and WWII appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at January 16, 2017 05:42 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Top 3 Useful Enhancements in SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Enhancements

SOLIDWORKS 2017 is here and it’s packed with great enhancements making the use of SOLIDWORKS easier and more enjoyable. Here are my top 3 favorite functionalities in the Analysis tools.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation: Stress Singularities

SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017

Gone are the days when you had to do multiple analyses to confirm diverging results and detect singularities. With 2017’s new Stress Hot Spot Diagnostics, unusually high stresses can immediately be diagnosed as a singularity or a region that needs additional attention.

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation: View Transient Results 

It’s easier than ever to analyze results in a Transient Analysis using SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation 2017 with the new Transient Explorer Option. Being just one click away in the Results option, you can now easily understand the physical mixing of multiple fluids in a tank or the changes in temperature profile of your electronic chip. 

SOLIDWORKS Plastics: Control Valves 

SOLIDWORKS Plastics 2017 has a newly added functionality called Control Valves. For a part with multiple gates, Control Valves helps specify when a particular gate should open. In this clip, the center valve has a small pause before it opens. This helps change the location of weld lines to avoid structurally integral or cosmetically important regions. 

With hundreds of additional enhancements in SOLIDWORKS 2017, I hope you find Simulation enhances your productivity as you design the future.

Author information

GoEngineer
GoEngineer delivers software, technology and expertise that enable companies to unlock design innovation and deliver better products faster. With more than 30 years experience and thousands of customers in high tech, medical, machine design, energy and other industries, GoEngineer provides best-in-class design solutions from SOLIDWORKS, Stratasys, CAMWorks, Altium and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM). For more information, visit goengineer.com.

The post Top 3 Useful Enhancements in SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2017 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GoEngineer at January 16, 2017 04:05 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Experience a Live Startup Competition at SOLIDWORKS World 2017

Shark Tank, Dragons’ Den, and Silicon Valley; startup culture is invading popular culture, and this year you can see a startup competition  taking place live at SOLIDWORKS World 2017. SOLIDWORKS has teamed up with AlphaLab Gear, a top US tech accelerator, to host the National Hardware Cup West Coast Regional at SOLIDWORKS World in LA on Tuesday, February 7 at 4:00pm PST.

During the competition, six hardware startups will pitch to local venture capitalists and investors live in front of attendees. The winner will receive $3,000 in cash, a one-year subscription to SOLIDWORKS, and a spot to compete in the National Finals for a $50,000 grand prize investment. By attending, there’s a chance you’ll get to say you witnessed the next big thing in person before it was cool.

Say you already have a startup, why not apply to pitch an esteemed panel of judges? The panel of venture capitalists includes:

Kate McAndrew, Bolt

Vaughn  Blake, Autochrome Ventures

Aymerik Renard, Western Digital Capital

Austin Clements, TenOneTen Ventures

Fred Vacher, Dassault Systemes

Who can apply to participate in the challenge? Any company with a physical product component is eligible to pitch its business (Internet of Things/Connected Devices, Consumer Products & Consumer Electronics, Fashion, Food, Manufactured Products, Health/Medical, Robotics, etc.). The deadline to apply your business is January 22, 2017 and you can submit your application here. Here’s what to do if you’d just like to attend the event: If you’ve already registered for SOLIDWORKS World 2017, there’s no more action required on your end. If not, you can register for SOLIDWORKS World 2017 today and buy three passes for the price of two!

Author information

Greg Smith
Greg Smith
Greg Smith is the Director of Community Applications and Startup Advocate at SOLIDWORKS helping promote entrepreneurship, startups, and accelerators. Prior to SOLIDWORKS, Greg was founder and CEO of Immersive Design, Inc. Plays tennis to stay fit, drinks coffee to stay awake, and experiences wine to chill out.

The post Experience a Live Startup Competition at SOLIDWORKS World 2017 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Greg Smith at January 16, 2017 01:30 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to obtain the dimension size of an image in centimeters or inches

In some instances, the actual image dimension size is required in centimeters or inches instead of the number of pixels. In this example the image is going to be imported at a 1:1 scale into a SOLIDWORKS sketch so it can be used for tracing and surface modeling.

Image Properties in Windows Explorer

If you right-click an image file in Windows Explorer and select Properties, you obtain the image information with the pixel size. You can see how many pixels the image is made up of, and the image resolution. See the following image.

image-file-properties

Image Properties in Windows Explorer

This does not help if we are looking for dimensions of the image in units of centimeters or inches. There are conversion factors to convert PX to CM or IN units, however, there is another easier way which is described below

Image dimension size with MS Paint

If an image is opened in Microsoft Paint, the image properties tool will reveal more information. As shown in the following screenshot, holding Ctrl key on the keyboard and pressing E (Ctrl+E) in MS Paint opens up the image properties window in which image sizes are provided in three different units: Inches, Centimeters, and Pixels. Alternatively, the image properties window can be accessed from the menu:  File > Properties.

Image dimension size revealed in MS Paint

Image Properties Pop-up window in MS Paint

The size of the imported image is shown in centimeters as 16.25cm x 11.38cm. In the image properties window, the colour of the image could also be set to Black and White or Colour.

image-size-in-centimeter

Show Image Sizes in Centimeters in MS Paint

The post How to obtain the dimension size of an image in centimeters or inches appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWE at January 16, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Monday List 03.17 | What We’re Reading This Week

feature

feature

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Netflix Wants the World to Binge-Watch
The streaming service has a plan to expand everywhere, and it begins in São Paulo.

Stranger Things

You Don’t Need Science to Tell You Why You Like a Song
How scientistic — not scientific — language reinforces existing cultural hierarchies

03

The ingenious story of how Fiestaware invaded the Baby Boomer kitchen
Mix one part nostalgia, one part engineered scarcity.

04

Neanderthals Were People, Too
New research shows they shared many behaviors that we long believed to be uniquely human. Why did science get them so wrong?

05

The Death of the Tunnel Tree
Any tribute I could give the tunnel tree, which collapsed last week in a winter storm, would be fatuous; the tree was older than the language in which I can write.

06

The Preposterous Success Story of America’s Pillow King
Former drug addict Mike Lindell’s multimillion-dollar idea came to him in a dream.

02

The post The Monday List 03.17 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 16, 2017 11:00 AM

January 15, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

My Favorite 2017 Electrical Enhancements

Last year, I wrote about all the new enhancements that came with SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2016, and with the recent release of SW2017, SOLIDWORKS delivered for Electrical again. I wanted to use this blog to bring attention to my favorite updates to Electrical for 2017, but to also note that In 2017, the Electrical Ecosystem saw an addition of a new product in SW PCB, as well as a focus in improving the functionality, interface, and reporting.

Features/Functions

One customer request that made it into Electrical 2017 is the ability to propagate data to objects.  Typically, wire styles have formulas to generate their marks, so this gives us the ability to keep generic marks, while propagating complex marks that don’t fit the formula.  This function can be found in the Process tab, and gives the user the ability copy values from Wire, Equipotential, Terminal and PLC data and paste them into object data fields. In the example below, I’m able to convert my PLC terminal names to my wire equipotential marks.

My other favorite feature is the addition of the Super Part tool (also a customer request!).  We all know a connector is never just a connector; it is a backshell, adapter, strain relief, ground rings, contact pins, and then finally the connector body. In the past, we would place our connector symbol, add the base, accessory, and auxiliary manufacturer parts to the component, and then make a macro of that connector so we could reuse it again in the future.  Super Parts, allow us to skip the macro step and have a library manufacturer part assembly that we can select upon placing our symbol.  With a Super Part created, it’s a simple filtered search that will yield us a group of manufacture parts with a single click.

Interface

We kept the same look and feel from 2016, but we do have access to some new buttons and helpful side panels.  My favorite button isn’t necessarily new, but it went underwent a name change and some added some new functionality.  The “Create SOLIDWORKS Cabinet” function has been changed to “Create SOLIDWORKS Assembly,” which makes me happy, since our electrical designs are not always going to be panel based.  This option also gives us the ability to “Select Existing Files,” meaning we can now reference previously created or working assemblies as part of our Electrical projects.

The addition of the Properties Panel came in the 2016 release.  This gave us some upfront information about what we click in the interface (wire styles, sheet properties, etc.)  New for 2017 is the ability to see Graphical Properties inside of that Properties Panel..  We can now edit layers, line styles, text, alignment, and positions direct from the interface.  Before we’d need to dig into the Modify tab, find the Properties pop out, and navigate between two windows.

Reports

We can now navigate to linked line item entities inside Reports and Design Rule Checks.  Contextual menus create links that will pop up the properties of documents, components, symbols, cables, equipotential, wires, and manufacturer parts.  This helps speed up design verification and validation, to ensure the proper parts are being used or wire styles are following the correct formulas.

In a multi-user environment, we sometimes have many hands in a project, and we want to make sure that all data is accurate and consistent before going out the door.  This responsibility usually falls on the last person in the project. Fortunately, an option in the Project Configurations menu to “Update generated drawings” will prompt that user to automatically update data in reports and terminal strip drawings before printing or archiving.  This will hopefully provide the proper warning to ensure all data is up to date before releasing.

Other Items Worth Mention

A few other enhancements that have me excited for 2017 are listed below. However, the complete list can be found in the 2017 What’s New document at this link.

  • Copy and Pasting with Anchor Points – Ctrl + Shift + ‘C’ adds the point selection option (Customer request!)
  • Associating Data File Shortcuts to a Project – Live links versus embedded documents.
  • Changing Attribute Visibility – Hide, Show Attributes, Show Sample Values, Show Attribute Descriptions
  • Show Connection Dots – Project Level settings for Always, Never, or When Connected.
  • Generating reports specific to each Project book (Customer request!)

As always, feel free to ask questions or share with us your favorite enhancements in the comments section below. You can also reach out if you have any questions or concerns about upgrading to 2017 SOLIDWORKS Electrical. Note: It is highly recommended to archive an environment and test a project before upgrading to 2017.

Author information

CADimensions
We are an authorized SOLIDWORKS and Stratasys reseller with certified training & support centers located in New York and Pennsylvania, USA. We are 100% focused on living a CADLIFE and have our vendor's unconditional endorsement in the sales and support of their products.

The post My Favorite 2017 Electrical Enhancements appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CADimensions at January 15, 2017 04:15 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to repeat your last command in SOLIDWORKS

So you’ve just used a tool in SOLIDWORKS and you want to use it again.  Maybe the tool is not a common one listed in your toolbars so it takes time to find again.

Did you know that you can right-click in the graphics area and get a list of Recent Commands as shown in the screenshot below:

SOLIDWORKS repeat last command

SOLIDWORKS Recent Commands

You can also Search for Commands using the drop down from the Search box, type in the command you require and hit Enter to launch it.

NOTE: The default keyboard shortcut to jump to Search Commands is “W”.

Search Commands

But did you know that if you just used a tool, you can press “Enter” to relaunch the same tool?  The enter key is the default keyboard shortcut to ‘SOLIDWORKS Repeat Last Command’.

Just be aware that SOLIDWORKS keeps a constant track of the very last command you executed.  So if you switched the view to Isometric or started a Sketch or even just hit Save, that becomes the “Last Command”.

Customize Keyboard Shortcuts

Customize Keyboard Shortcuts

The post How to repeat your last command in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at January 15, 2017 02:35 PM

January 14, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Coffee Pod Holder Tutorial

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="355" id="PreviewFrame3D" name="PreviewFrame3D" scrolling="no" src="http://www.3dcontentcentral.com/external-site-embed.aspx?format=3D&amp;catalogid=11199&amp;modelid=703408&amp;width=250&amp;height=250&amp;edraw=true" width="400"></iframe>

Coffee Pod Holder: This assembly has just four unique parts but it does provide a practical example of a chain component pattern. This chain component pattern functionality was introduced in SOLIDWORKS last year. There are few surface features used to create the grip on the tray. Other features included in the parts include: revolve, offset surface, trim surface, extend surface, surface thicken, a thin extruded cut and a mid plane revolved cut. There are some examples of converted and offset sketch entities. Download this file to get a short introduction to surfacing and also how to create a chain component pattern in an assembly.

Download: Coffee Pod Holder
Complexity: Moderate
Features: Extruded Cut, Revolve Cut, Offset Surface, Chain Component Pattern

View all the Part Reviewer Tutorials here.

DraftSight Download: In conjunction with DraftSight, Dassault Systèmes’ 2D CAD product, the 2D drawing(.dwg) file of the Coffee Pod Holder tutorial is now available for download here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Coffee Pod Holder Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at January 14, 2017 10:00 PM

SolidSmack

This Energy Ball (and Your Wrist) Can Charge Your Mobile Devices in Minutes

Michael Vega’s HandEnergy uses an internal spring-loaded rotor and rotating hand motion to charge mobile devices.
<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84364" style="width: 1024px;">Michael Vega’s HandEnergy uses an internal spring-loaded rotor and rotating hand motion to charge mobile devices.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Michael Vega’s HandEnergy uses an internal spring-loaded rotor and rotating hand motion to charge mobile devices.</figcaption></figure>

There are literally a ton of devices on the market aimed at recharging mobile devices with the most common being power banks or battery chargers. Others (and I’ve tried a few) rely on the elements such as solar chargers (Goal Zero), water-based chargers (Estream) and even open-flame cookware chargers (PowerPot). Most of those are great, but are useless if you don’t have access to the elements.

There are also body-motion kinetic energy chargers as well, such as Ampy and Sockett, but none are more unusual and perhaps more practical than HandEnergy–a ball-like device that converts hand motion into an electrical charge producing enough juice to charge a variety of mobile devices. More on this in a bit as the video warrants a viewing to get a better explanation of how it works:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3jB2GmrgRnQ?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

HandEnergy makes use of a spring-coiled rotor that’s engaged by twisting the rotation ring on the devices upper hemisphere. As the rotor spins, a pair of encompassing magnetic rings becomes electrically charged through the mechanical power, which is sent to a stator to produce a current and stores it in an onboard battery. Of course, in order to keep the spring-loaded rotor spinning an external gyration force is needed, hence the hand movement, which produces enough energy to keep the rotor spinning at an average speed of 5000 RPMs. Not too shabby.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84365" style="width: 680px;">An internal cutaway diagram shows HandEnergy’s internals complete with coiled rotor and magnets that it uses to generate power.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">An internal cutaway diagram shows HandEnergy’s internals complete with coiled rotor and magnets that it uses to generate power.</figcaption></figure>

As for the specs, HandEnergy is about as large as a tennis ball at a 2.8″ (72mm) diameter, has a USB output of 5V (1A), a battery capacity of 1000 mAh and an internal Bluetooth module that sends charging information to an included app that can be monitored on mobile devices. The HandEnergy charger was successfully crowd-funded on both Kickstarter and Indiegogo and those interested can pre-order for $69 (and up) to get their hands on one, which has a delivery date of May of this year.

hand-energy-ball-recharge-phone-minutes-02

The post This Energy Ball (and Your Wrist) Can Charge Your Mobile Devices in Minutes appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at January 14, 2017 03:21 PM

January 13, 2017

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Face Kick, Toes Down

Nele-Diel-art

Nele-Diel-art

The box flaps were open, but only slightly. The air was silent, but you could see them vibrate. Normally, you don’t look into something with vibrating box flaps. This was one of those times. We would only find out later after regaining consciousness, that millions of tiny toes exploded from the box. Toes, of these links.

Nele Diel – Huge, ethereal scenes, with a dragon here and there. Masterful lighting that makes her wide range of composition enrapturing the mind.

Boxwood – An intricately carved set of boxwood miniatures of Old and New Testament scenes, each dating back to the 13th and 14th century from the Netherlands, currently on display at the Art Gallery of Ontario.

Dakar Rally 2017 – People from around the world take on the 5,450-mile through Paraguay, Bolivia, and Argentina via motorcycle, quad bike, car, or truck over extreme terrain.

Moxhay – London-based Suzanne Moxhay creates work using a matte-painting technique to combine decaying interiors with beautiful outdoor scenes.

Perplexed Cellarman – Futility Closet, one of my fav sites of late, has a fun puzzle from Henry Dudeney’s Canterbury Puzzles. Also see this post on Futurist painter Luigi Russolo.

Scribbler – Danny Bittman uses Tiltbrush and an VR headset to demonstrate his dancing as performance art. Well, this is one thing you can do with VR.

Local Lingual – An interactive world map where you can explore and listen to different languages around the world.

What is GitHub? – If you’ve ever wondered how it works, or why companies compare what they do as, ‘the GitHub of xyz…’ and so on.

Turo – Find and rent cars wherever you travel, both the typical and inexpensive and the famous and a bit more expensive, like Xander’s ’67 GTO.

Insta360 Nano – Takes real-time UHD 360 videos and photos with or without your iPhone. Capable of live-streaming or being viewed through a VR headset.

Monster – Bleak but interesting visuals in this new video from Starset directed by Punkcity that’s probably an accurate dystopian future-view of our world.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Bq6IuZIJhuI?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The post Friday Smackdown: Face Kick, Toes Down appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 13, 2017 07:25 PM

Microsoft’s $299 MR Headsets Won’t Require a High-end PC

Microsoft has collaborated with several top tech companies to bring about MR headsets to take advantage of the Windows 10 Creator Edition.
<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84322" style="width: 1024px;">Microsoft has collaborated with several top tech companies to bring about MR headsets to take advantage of the Windows 10 Creator Edition.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Microsoft has collaborated with several top tech companies to bring about MR headsets to take advantage of the Windows 10 Creator Edition.</figcaption></figure>

Microsoft has been looking to get a foot in the door of the MR (Mixed Reality) world since early 2015 with their development of HoloLens and the Windows Holographic platform. The company has since announced a collaboration with several leading tech companies, including Dell, ASUS, Acer, HP and Lenovo to produce their own MR headsets in an effort to take advantage of the upcoming Windows 10 Creator’s update (more on this in a bit) that’s scheduled for release early summer. What’s more, the MR headsets are expected to retail for $299, significantly lower than most VR headsets currently on the market. I like what I’m hearing.

While not much is currently known about the respective headsets (other than they are based on the concept and hardware of HoloLens), there is some information Windows has released regarding the hardware specs needed to run them and it’s surprisingly low on the techno-totem pole. Well, perhaps that’s not entirely accurate as the specs increase depending on the type of application running. Before I get into the specs though, take a look Microsoft’s Holographic platform that will be included in the Creator’s Update to get a better idea of the headsets will be able to do:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Gu09UWqS8-Q?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Microsoft recently disclosed the hardware requirements needed to run the Creator’s Update during WinHEC last month in December, which is as follows:

  • Intel Mobile Core i5 (eg, 6200U) Dual-Core with Hyperthreading equivalent or AMD mobile CPU (TBD)
  • Integrated Intel® HD Graphics 620(GT2) equivalent or greater DX12 API Capable GPU
  • 8GB+ Dual Channel RAM required for integrated Graphics
  • HDMI 1.4 with 2880×1440 @ 60Hz / HDMI 2.0 or DP 1.3+ with 2880×1440 @ 90Hz
  • 100GB+ SSD (Preferred) / HDD
  • USB 3.0 Type-A or USB 3.1 Type-C Port with DisplayPort Alternate Mode
  • Bluetooth: Bluetooth 4.0 for accessories

Those specs are, in fact, the bare minimums needed and will most certainly rise depending on the application used. Take those requirements with a grain of salt however–simply look at the requirements on the side of video game boxes and you’ll understand why. You may meet the minimums, but your game will chug with all the spectacular graphic magic that makes the game look incredible. Turn that off and your game will run smoothly, but at the cost of its incredibleness. But what is Microsoft’s Creator’s Update anyway and what will it bring to Windows 10?

Microsoft Windows 10 Creator’s Update

 

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zdJBurRbT4o?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The Windows 10 Creator’s Update will bring 3D to everything–desktop, tablets, mobile devices, your kitchen table, a shelf… you get the idea. It includes new features and tools putting MR and 3D and the center of  creating, connecting, gaming and interacting. The most notable of these upgrades include:

Windows Capture 3D – uses mobile device cameras to capture physical objects and turn them into digital 3D representations. Users simply move their cameras around the object similar to taking a panoramic photo to capture the image.

Paint 3D – allows users to take their 3D images and manipulate them in a Paint setting, even merging them with 2D images for a unique setting. There’s also 3D emojis, the ability to a stickers to create surface textures and even draw and color on the 3D objects themselves.

Microsoft Office in 3D – perfect for PowerPoint. Users can add their 3D images with 2D content and create animated scenes from one slide to the next. It’s unknown what other Office apps will make use of the 3D enhancements. Excel could actually be fun to use.

Remix 3D – A Microsoft website designed for the 3D image community where users can upload and share their designs with others who in turn, can manipulate them to their liking. Will also work with Minecraft and users can even 3D print their creations and bring them into the real world.

There are more upgrades for various Microsoft applications to bring about enhanced social experiences, seamless gaming updates and streaming, as well as simple security features made easier to navigate and implement. It’s unclear when the update will be released or when the new headsets will hit the market, but it should be sometime this year. My money is on a summer or fall release for both but mobile users could get it sooner, considering a lot of the new features were designed around mobile device cameras.

If Microsoft wants to win at everything, they need to do one thing. Remove telemetry and the so called spyware from Windows 10. They’d be slamming dunks all day after that. It does seem to be improving though, with their latest announcement about the Microsoft Privacy Dashboard and the same announcement reveal much improved security and privacy settings coming with the Creator’s Update. While we wait, you can keep an eye on insider previews and other topics on the Windows 10 blog.

The post Microsoft’s $299 MR Headsets Won’t Require a High-end PC appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at January 13, 2017 04:22 PM

Improve Your Design And Quote In Real-Time With This SOLIDWORKS Add-In

xometry-on-demand-manufacturing-05

xometry-on-demand-manufacturing-05

Presented by
xometry-logo-100

Quoting and ordering custom parts from within SOLIDWORKS just became easier and faster than ever. The Xometry Add-In for SOLIDWORKS allows designers and engineers to get seamless instant quotes and a manufacturability feedback within a single integrated CAD workspace.

“The Add-In is all about efficiency,” said Xometry’s Director of Project Engineering, Greg Paulsen. “The quoting process has typically been a very labor intensive and time consuming endeavor, especially for complex orders like end-use CNC machined parts or higher volume orders, but we have removed the inefficiencies and can provide an accurate lead time and price in just seconds – all within SOLIDWORKS!” You can design and quote all at the same time. Once you are ready, ordering can be done with a click of a button.

“We have been able to dramatically decrease engineering time on projects designed using the Add-In,” Paulsen said. “By eliminating the process of tweaking and making compromise changes over the course of several days based on each manufacturer’s ability to make the parts, we are giving engineers and designers extra hours back each day to do the work they actually enjoy instead of worrying about the logistics of ordering parts.”

Xometry Add-In for SOLIDWORKS Features & Benefits

  • Save time by pricing your design without leaving SOLIDWORKS
  • Get manufacturability feedback to adjust parts and avoid potential fabrication issues
  • Get transparent and consistent lead time estimation
  • Select from our wide range of processes including 3D Printing, Sheet Metal, and CNC Milling with over 200 materials and custom finishes
  • Easily re-quote directly in SOLIDWORKS to explore design iterations

So how easy is it to use? Watch this 1-minute Xometry Add-In for SOLIDWORKS tutorial to see it in action.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/IgyDZkECHrA?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

 

Once you’ve seen how it works, here’s how you can get started:

  1. Download and install the Add-In from xometry.com/solidworks-add-in.
  2. Open the Add-In inside the SOLIDWORKS Task Pane, and log in using your Xometry account or quickly create a new account.
  3. Open up a part or create a new one, then click on “Add Part to Quote” to get an instant quote with a price and lead time.
  4. Review the provided manufacturability feedback and modify your design if needed.
  5. Choose from over 200 materials, or narrow down the materials list by selecting from 8 manufacturing processes.
  6. Specify any special features like tolerances, threads, inserts, roughnesses, or weld joints for your part.
  7. Select your surface finish.
  8. Add notes and attach any drawings, sketches, or documents to clarify requirements for your custom part.
  9. Add and quote additional parts as relevant.
  10. Review your quote and order with one click! You will have a chance to review your order again at checkout.

Stop waiting for quotes. Get started today.

The post Improve Your Design And Quote In Real-Time With This SOLIDWORKS Add-In appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 13, 2017 03:18 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

The Company Behind the Best SOLIDWORKS World Booths Actually Uses SOLIDWORKS to Design Them!

Next month at SOLIDWORKS World 2017, take a few moments to check out some of the incredible displays at the booths in the Partner Pavilion. Many of the best booths use Orbus Exhibit & Display Group™ to create those compelling backdrops, but did you realize that Orbus uses SOLIDWORKS themselves? Brands within the group include Orbus365™, SignPro Systems™, Origin™, and Nimlok®, each uniquely positioned to target a specific market sector of the signage, events, tradeshow exhibit and display industry.

In order to maximize their SOLIDWORKS investment, Orbus looks to SolidProfessor. With so many brands to manage, “one of our big initiatives as a company is to improve our company wide training,” said CAD Manager Drew Adams.

The mission of Orbus Exhibit & Display Group is to “become and remain one of the country’s leading trade suppliers of tradeshow exhibits and displays, from portable to custom.” One of Orbus’ core values is to “encourage excellence in every effort,” which is demonstrated by its commitment to providing skills development opportunities to its employees.

Adams worked with its reseller to implement SolidProfessor as its on-demand learning solution. “We have been utilizing SolidProfessor to shorten design time and increase product innovation. By increasing our design team’s proficiency with its software tools, they can create the best deliverable for the customer in the shortest amount of time and most consistent way. SolidProfessor provides the best and most cost efficient option for the company. The quality of the instruction is very high, and the fact that it is self-paced is a nice benefit. SolidProfessor saves our more experienced users from having to take time out of their day to answer training questions.”

“I believe that SolidProfessor is the best self-paced training available on the market. The most impactful result of SolidProfessor is standardized design time; increased product innovation would be number two. As our team learned some of the tools like Weldments, we’ve been taking advantage of those capabilities more and more in our product design, and the way we create quotes and renderings for our potential jobs. That has enabled and improved use of new software technology and features. We’re leveraging features that weren’t being used in the past.”

“The reporting tools give us visibility to track our employees’ progress, which has been very valuable for us, ensuring that our teams are developing at the rate we need them to, in order to be competitive in our industry.”

Orbus is resulting in accolades from its industry, being awarded one of the Seventh Annual Wide Format Imaging Reader’s Choice Top Products Awards for its Hopup™ tension fabric display system. The Hopup features a lightweight anodized silver frame and pre-attached fabric graphics that sets up in less than five minutes.

This year at SOLIDWORKS World, appreciate the design and engineering that has gone into the booths and backdrops at the conference!

 

Author information

Tony Glockler
Tony Glockler is the co-founder of SolidProfessor, an online learning company that specializes in software applications used in engineering and design. Beginning his education at UCLA with a BS in Mechanical Engineering, Tony experienced first-hand the limited resources available to students to become proficient, employable CAD users. His passion is combining the best of instructional design and technology to help engineers and designers become more effective. Through SolidProfessor, Tony has helped design teams keep up with their rapidly evolving software tools with an ongoing guided learning experience. To learn more, visit www.SolidProfessor.com

The post The Company Behind the Best SOLIDWORKS World Booths Actually Uses SOLIDWORKS to Design Them! appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Tony Glockler at January 13, 2017 02:27 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

What’s New in SOLIDWORKS MBD 2017

Does your 2D drawing on the shop floor match your 3D models? Can you easily communicate your designs and products with the manufacturing team, service team, suppliers, dealers, and customers? If you are simply not satisfied with either of your answers to these questions, then maybe it is time to look at going paperless! And this is where SOLIDWORKS MBD 2017 can help!

SOLIDWORKS MBD is a great solution to help manufacturers create and distribute critical design information directly in the model rather than via 2D drawings. SOLIDWORKS MBD is an integrated drawing-less manufacturing solution for SOLIDWORKS 3D design software. SOLIDWORKS MBD guides the manufacturing process directly in your 3D environment. Removing the tedious task of creating 2D drawings.

SOLIDWORKS MBD 2017

SOLIDWORKS MBD 2017

You can define, organize, and publish 3D PMI, including 3D model data, in industry-standard file formats (such as SOLIDWORKS files, eDrawings®, 3D PDF, and STEP 242) right from your SOLIDWORKS Interface.

SOLIDWORKS MDB PDF Output

SOLIDWORKS MDB PDF Output

 

SOLIDWORKS MBD 2017 New Enhancements

SOLIDWORKS MBD 2017 introduces many new enhancements to Model Based Definition that help quickly and accurately communicate critical product information throughout downstream manufacturing operations.

Here are some of the New features:

  • Basic dimensions for features of size and fully automated Polar Dimensioning Schemes.
  • Much more intuitive dimensioning process by allowing direct referencing of edges.
  • Accurately dimension cast or molded parts to easily create intersection geometry between drafted surfaces.
  • Publish 3D PDFs at different accuracy levels, giving you control over file size and quality.
  • Attach any other file to the PDF, including automatic creation of STEP 242 files for direct manufacturing.
  • Interrogate dimension and tolerance changes and produce a concise report to help eliminate interpretation errors.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/840fJ-YxIWY?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

 

The post What’s New in SOLIDWORKS MBD 2017 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Vicky Guignard at January 13, 2017 01:00 PM

January 12, 2017

SolidSmack

Onshape In-Context Assembly Design is Unlike Anything You’ve Ever Seen

onshape-in-context-design-00

onshape-in-context-design-00

Presented by
collaboration in Onshape

Throughout all the years (decades? yeow!) I’ve use 3D modeling software, I can’t think of a time where I didn’t use some type of in-context assembly design. Not building out a design like that gives me the shakes – I honestly can’t grasp how to get accurate fit and function without it. “That there is what them there hammers is fer!” EXACTLY. You just go ahead a beat that fuel line into submission. I’ll stand waaaaaaay over here.

But there are valid reasons why people don’t want to use in-context design in traditional CAD software. Some companies actually ban it or require all reference be destroyed. Why? Simply put, errors, and the potential cost of those errors. The worst case scenario of in-context assembly design is when a part changes and that change trickles down through designs, drawings and manufactured parts. We may not even see an error in the assembly. But then there’s when we do get those errors; when the assembly just blows up with rebuild errors, missing references or corrupt design files. In traditional CAD, you’ll see this effect immediately when you move an in-context part in an assembly. We should flippin’ be able to move parts in an assembly without affecting their features!

Onshape has addressed all of this. ALL. OF. IT. Now, Onshape allows you to create an Assembly Context that gives you the 3D modeling super power of editing parts in context of the assembly WITHOUT all the pain mentioned previously. Pardon me.

With these Assembly Contexts:

  • Models always update in a predictable manner
  • Motion doesn’t affect in-context relationships
  • You can capture multiple Assembly Contexts
  • You can use them to edit single or multiple parts
  • You can update the Assembly Context if needed

The approach they’ve taken to implement in-context assembly design is exact, beautiful in fact, and captures the spirit of design in Onshape that already makes the modeling process such a smooth one. So, how did this feature take shape?

Long ago (last year)…

What’s a Part Studio?
A Part Studio allows you to create one part or multiple parts in a single context. A Part Studio may contain multiple parts, just like assemblies may contain multiple assemblies. It allows you to model an entire assembly that can be used in other assemblies or referenced in other Part Studios. To learn more about how Part Studio work, watch this video.

Onshape came out of beta with a unique way of working with multiple parts – Part Studios. Most people/companies I know don’t model multiple parts in a single part file… unless the part is a purchase part or used for reference. Most model each part and put them in assemblies (bottom-up), or model parts within the assembly to take advantage of referencing other parts (top-down). However, Part Studios are set up to simplify building parts together. If you know they’re related parts, you get some efficiencies by building them together in a Part Studio. For instance, edits are much more controlled and predictable.

However, you may not always be able to anticipate how parts will affect each other until they are assembled. That’s where Onshape’s new in-context design capabilities come in. So, how does that work? Let’s watch the video on the new feature first, then break down what sets it apart.

<script async="async" src="http://fast.wistia.com/embed/medias/oq5lftl0qv.jsonp"></script><script async="async" src="http://fast.wistia.com/assets/external/E-v1.js"></script>

 

How Does In-Context Assembly Design Work in Onshape?

So, you have an assembly in Onshape. You need to add clearance between one assembly part and another. *record screech* Previously, you would sit back, pull on your neck skin and consider how to modify the part. Do you mock it up in the Part Studio? Do you measure it and transfer dimensions in the Part Studio? *grrrr* Either way, it’s not controlled by the part in the assembly. *GRRRR!* No more of that. Now, you can control every aspect of the part in the context of the assembly. Here’s how it works.

Back to our assembly in Onshape. You need to add clearance between one assembly part and another. In the assembly, right-click the part you want to edit and select ‘Edit in context’. The instant you select ‘Edit in context’, Onshape creates a snapshot of the assembly at that moment in time of your design, then opens the Part Studio. You’ll see the part you’re editing, of course, but you’ll also see any assembly part that was visible as a ghosted part. You can then start or edit sketches using those ghosted parts as reference for dimensions or constraints.

Here it is in three steps:

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84285" style="width: 1100px;">onshape-in-context-design-02<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Activate In-Context Editing from right mouse button menu.</figcaption></figure>
<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84286" style="width: 1100px;">onshape-in-context-design-03<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Select the part to edit and start or edit a sketch.</figcaption></figure>
<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84287" style="width: 1100px;">onshape-in-context-design-04<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Add your dimensions with reference to other features.</figcaption></figure>

However, this isn’t meant to replace or fix creating all parts together in a Part Studio or using the Derived feature. In-context features on Multi-part Part Studios or Assembly Contexts are  different, but complementary methods of a production level design environment. You’ve seen how Part Studios can be used. In-context assembly design is for when you don’t quite know design intent up front, when you do know design intent and want to drive assembly parts with other features, when you’re working with lots of imported parts, working on somebody else’s document, or working at the same time in the same document with others.

Here are just a few real-world examples where in-context assembly design gives you an advantage over bottom-up or multi-part design:

  • A bracket can be designed to connect two sub-assemblies
  • A latch keeper can be located and edited to account for interference or function
  • A tie-rod can be adjusted correctly to determine varying lengths
  • An entire assembly can be driven by a base feature

What Sets Onshape’s In-context Assembly Design Apart?

Along with a clean methodology of editing assemblies in-context, there are some very important aspects that set in-context assembly design in Onshape apart from any top-down, in-context design within other traditional CAD software. Because a database captures everything in your Document, that snapshot taken when an assembly context is made, that sucker is kept forever and does not change, which adds benefits you may have only dreamt about:

  • A context will NEVER be broken, or lost, and if it becomes outdated you can update it
  • Geometry of a part doesn’t change when the reference part is moved
  • If a design change is required you control when and how each context is updated
  • You can create a new Part Studio in context of the assembly
  • A part can be edited in-context of itself (multiple instances of the same part in the assembly – they interfere with each other and you want to correct it)
  • It’s feature agnostic. You can edit a feature created BEFORE the context was created and reference downstream features (circular references!)
  • If a part is used in multiple sub-assemblies, you can edit it in context of each sub-assembly, so the same part can be used in several different scenarios (although only works in current Document; support for linked Documents is on the roadmap).
<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84297" style="width: 1100px;">Updating the in-context feature from the assembly.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Updating the in-context feature from the assembly.</figcaption></figure>

During their first year, Onshape added a lot of great features – you can probably name the one that convinced you to give Onshape a serious go of it. If you work in assemblies a lot, the new in-context design feature may be that one for you. It does for me, as one of the must have features. It’s apparent the Onshape team took the time early on to think of these features and how they would work . Which, incidentally, makes me anticipate how they will implement some other features we’ve been waiting for–features I shall leave unnamed *ahem*. I can’t wait for those. But this, this is the feature that tips Onshape over to a production-ready, professional level software platform and I’m convinced any company that uses in-context assembly design will want to take a deeper look at Onshape.

The post Onshape In-Context Assembly Design is Unlike Anything You’ve Ever Seen appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 12, 2017 04:49 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Linking a Note to a Table/BOM Cell in SOLIDWORKS 2017

Author: Saeed Mojarad, CSWE – Javelin Technologies

We all know that notes are an important part of any engineering drawing and help to transfer vital information. One of the problems when dealing with drawings is to keep these notes up to date. The best solution for that problem is to automate the process and ask the software to take care of maintaining them. That is what SOLIDWORKS keeps doing every year. For example, last year SOLIDWORKS added the functionality to link a Note to a Balloon using Flag Notes. Now in SOLIDWORKS 2017, they improved the Note tool again and this time you can link a note to a BOM or hole table cell.

How to Link a Note to a Table Cell

As I mentioned you can link a note to the contents of any BOM or hole table cell. To do so first you need to insert a Note in your drawing with a table. Then double click on the Note and in the Property Manager browse to “Text Format” section and select “Link Table Cell”.

Drawing Note

Drawing Note

Next simply select a cell in the table that you want to link to your Note and press OK. You will see that the value of the cell is added to your text.

Note Linked

Note Linked

Because the note is linked to the table cell, when the cell value changes, the note updates as well.

SOLIDWORKS Note Link BOM

Note and Cell linked

Author information

Javelin Technologies
Javelin Technologies is a provider of technology solutions since 1997. We are experts in 3D design and have helped thousands of companies with solutions for mechanical design, electrical design and 3D printing. Large or small, we have the skills, experience, and services to propel your organization to new heights so you can aim high.

The post Linking a Note to a Table/BOM Cell in SOLIDWORKS 2017 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Javelin Technologies at January 12, 2017 03:45 PM

SolidSmack

Monoprice Launching $149 Delta Mini Desktop 3D Printer, And More

The extrusion system on the new Monoprice Delta Mini desktop 3D printer
<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84310" style="width: 1100px;">The extrusion system on the new Monoprice Delta Mini desktop 3D printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The extrusion system on the new Monoprice Delta Mini desktop 3D printer</figcaption></figure>

Monoprice has become very well known for their low-cost 3D printer options, but things are about to change significantly.

We managed to get a peek at their new set of equipment to be released soon. Currently the company offers a small selection of basic filament-powered desktop 3D printers, one of which, the Select Mini Desktop 3D Printer, is priced at the ridiculously low price of USD$199.

That low price has attracted many buyers, including those wishing to experiment in 3D printing and don’t want to risk a high price. Sure, there are more powerful machines, but a low cost machine like this is often the first machine seen by new 3D printer operators.

But in 2017 Monoprice is set to release not one, but several new machines that could shake the market.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84311" style="width: 1100px;">The all-new Monoprice Delta Mini desktop 3D printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The all-new Monoprice Delta Mini desktop 3D printer</figcaption></figure>

The one that is most earthshaking to me is the all new MP Delta Mini. It’s a delta machine, obviously, and is equipped with several advanced features including auto leveling and WiFi networking. The machine also includes a heated print surface, meaning you can print a wide variety of materials. It’s also somewhat smart in that it can detect an inserted SD card with only a single sliced file and automatically start printing it. The relatively small print surface is metal with an adhesion coating. Cura is suggested as the slicing software. This machine is set to launch in April.

But it’s most incredible feature is its price: only USD$149, the lowest priced filament 3D printer I’ve yet seen.

This price is so incredibly low that it effectively kills the Kickstarter market for low-cost desktop 3D printers. You’d have to give them away for free to beat this option, and that won’t happen.

That said, there will certainly be higher priced Kickstarters for more expensive gear; this item simply invalidates the low end.

There’s more.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84312" style="width: 1100px;">The new Monoprice inexpensive resin-based desktop 3D printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The new Monoprice inexpensive resin-based desktop 3D printer</figcaption></figure>

The company is also set to launch its first resin-based desktop 3D printer. This machine can produce very thin layers, down to only 0.02mm, enabling finely detailed prints.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84313" style="width: 1100px;">Sample 3D print from Monoprice's new low-cost resin 3D printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Sample 3D print from Monoprice’s new low-cost resin 3D printer</figcaption></figure>

The intro-level resin machine can produce wonderful prints, as shown here. However, support structures are made from the same material as the model and will have to be manually snipped off. But that’s the case for most other resin machines, too.

The resin machine will be available in April or May at a price around USD$1,000. That’s incredibly low for such a powerful machine.

Monoprice promises “aggressive” pricing on resin for this machine. While it will be capable of handling “open materials”, Monoprice will recommend their own products and are currently working with resin manufacturers. They expect to initially release several varieties of low-toxicity resins along with the machine, including a food-grade resin.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84314" style="width: 1100px;">The new Monoprice Prism Professional resin-based desktop 3D printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The new Monoprice Prism Professional resin-based desktop 3D printer</figcaption></figure>

Monoprice also is to announce a more powerful resin 3D printer, the Maker Prism Professional, which offers even more powerful specifications. The Prism will offer a 130 x 130 x 180mm print volume, and can print 0.003mm layers, we were told. They list ABS, Ashless Wax, Hard and Rubber resins as “supported materials”. This machine should be available in the first half of 2017 for about USD$3,499 and is intended for jewelry designers and dental applications.

And yes, there’s even more.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84315" style="width: 1100px;">The new Monoprice 3Series Commercial professional desktop 3D printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The new Monoprice 3Series Commercial professional desktop 3D printer</figcaption></figure>

They’ve also shown the MP 3Series Commercial machine, intended for professional office use. This steel-framed, filament-based machine offers a huge 295 x 195 x 575mm build volume and can print 20 micron layers. It’s heated bed and borden-style extrusion system can handle PLA, ABS, TPU, PC, Nylon, Flexible and composite 3mm diameter materials. Of course, it includes WiFi, auto leveling and other goodie features. It’s intended price: only USD$799.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84316" style="width: 1100px;">The new Monoprice Select Mini V2 desktop 3D printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The new Monoprice Select Mini V2 desktop 3D printer</figcaption></figure>

Finally, the company has provided minor updates to their existing Maker Select Plus and Mini Select (now V2) machines, such as new touch screens, UI improvements and better motion system motors. The price for those machines remains the same.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84317" style="width: 1100px;">The upgraded Monoprice 3D printer touch control screen<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The upgraded Monoprice 3D printer touch control screen</figcaption></figure>

Please note that Monoprice doesn’t make these machines themselves; they have been very skilled at selecting well-performing Asian machines and restyling them for Western use. All of the machine above are no doubt versions of existing equipment from other manufacturers, but at the moment I haven’t yet figured out from whom. Nevertheless, I expect these machines to be as successful as their prior equipment.

Read more at Fabbaloo

The post Monoprice Launching $149 Delta Mini Desktop 3D Printer, And More appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at January 12, 2017 02:01 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2017 Revision Clouds

New to SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2017 is the ability to easily draw various revision clouds.  Revision clouds are commonly used in all industries to help call attention to certain areas where a revision was made, or should be made on a specific drawing.

These revision clouds are now easily created in SOLIDWORKS Electrical by simply using the new “Cloud” drawing command from the Draw ribbon.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Revision Clouds

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Revision Clouds

Three different forms can be used to represent the cloud; rectangular, elliptical or freehand. The forms can be directly selected in the ribbon, or in the dockable panel during the insertion.

Once a specific form is selected you can easily size the revision clouds to encompass whatever you would like on your drawings.

This new functionality will help improve readability to electrical drawings as well as improve the design efficiency for the electrical designers.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2017 Revision Clouds appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Justin Flett at January 12, 2017 01:00 PM

January 11, 2017

SolidSmack

Learn How to Make This Awesome Fat Tire Bike

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84269" style="width: 1100px;">Not wanting to pay for car repairs, Mr-Mash chose to learn how to weld, which resulted in his amazing Car Wheel Bicycle.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Not wanting to pay for car repairs, Mash chose to learn how to weld, which resulted in his amazing Car Wheel Bicycle.</figcaption></figure>

Welding is a useful skill to have, especially if you want to repair your vehicle, which was the goal of Instructable user Mr-Mash who figured it was cheaper to repair his own rather than taking it to the shop. For him, the easiest way to learn welding was to build one big, freakin’ bicycle outfitted with… wait for it, CAR TIRES–16″ Radials to be exact–earning himself the ultimate in street-cred among badass bike enthusiasts.

After looking at some creative builds from Atomic Zombie, Mash began his build with a donor BMX bike to get most of the bicycle components he would need for the build, some additional 1-1/4″ and 3/4″ steel tubing and of course, car tires and rims. He cut the middle part of the rims out using an angle grinder, using the additional steel tube to construct the bike rims. Before we go on with the rest of his endeavor though, here’s a short video of him testing the roadworthiness of his initial build:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MrPgGHy95Jg?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Suprisngly smooth riding, isn’t it? (The SolidSmack  crew is already going through dumspters for tires.) Mash then took on the task of widening the hubs from the donor bike in order to fit the larger tires, which he did by cutting in half and welding another axle section to the two halves.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84270" style="width: 1024px;">fat-tire-bike-weld-tutorial-diy-07<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The new hubs, constructed from the donor bike and 1-1/4″ steel tubing, prior to being ground smooth.</figcaption></figure>

With the new, wider hubs finished, he then took to ‘spoking’ the wheels, a tricky procedure that has to be done correctly or, if unaligned, off-center or crooked makes your ride a wobbly mess. He created a slick looking six-spoke design to better handle the weight of the tires and keep from deforming on long fat tire bike rides.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84271" style="width: 1024px;">The totally proper, super slick spoke/rim design for the fat tire bike.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The totally proper, super slick spoke/rim design for the fat tire bike.</figcaption></figure>

His next task centered on the bike’s forks, which needed to be both widened and lengthened to handle the tires. He cut the donor bike’s steel tubing from the upper section, added the necessary pipe and welded it back together. The same was done to the seat-stays on the rear of the bike in order to accommodate the larger girth of car tires. These were then attached to the frame he cut and welded together using the 1 1/4” steel tubing.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84272" style="width: 768px;">Frame complete! With expanded fork and seat stays.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Frame complete! With expanded fork and seat stays.</figcaption></figure>

To complete the build Mash used Sturmey Archer sprockets and added disc brakes, as standard rubber brakes can’t supply the stopping power for a bike massive car wheels (ya think?) and would simply disintegrate after a good, hard ride.

To complement the large bike, Mash gave it a great paint job starting with a zinc primer (to protect against rust), a yellow primer filler (to hide all of the dings) and finished with what looks to be a cobalt blue for the frame and a cherry red for the rims (he doesn’t specify).

Mash states that before he built his bike, he had no knowledge of how to make cuts, weld or had any experience with designing a frame but after a few cuts and burns, he learned what he needed to do to get it done. You are an inspiration, Mr Mash, truly.

For a complete walkthrough of his build and the materials he used, head over to Instructables. There’s a lot of great discussion on the design in the comments as well, so check that out. Oh, and if you have any interesting builds like this, or know someone who does, send ’em in!

fat-tire-bike-weld-tutorial-diy-02

fat-tire-bike-weld-tutorial-diy-03

fat-tire-bike-weld-tutorial-diy-04

fat-tire-bike-weld-tutorial-diy-05

fat-tire-bike-weld-tutorial-diy-06

The post Learn How to Make This Awesome Fat Tire Bike appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at January 11, 2017 11:27 PM

Model of the Week: Modular Castle Playset [Man the Parapet!]

creative-tools-modular-castle-playset-00

creative-tools-modular-castle-playset-00
You know when you’re comfy as a lark in your castle and all of a sudden AN ARMY OF THE UNDEAD ATTACK. I agree, kids in this generation just don’t know how to defend against an occurrence of that sort. Your not gonna text your way out of that one! Oh, yeah, get a selfie of that demusclized skeleton warrior as he cuts your face. Fortunately, there’s a modular castle playset that allows you to set up specific castle attack/defense scenarios AND have fun doing it.

The 3D printable Modular Castle Playset is large set of model files, designed by Tim Wahlström in cooperation with the fine team at CreativeTools.se, created for parents and children who want to become more familiar with 3D printing at home. With a castle model that is modular and many more accessories, there is a huge number of castle constructing possibilities and play.

The set contains walls, towers, houses, characters, animals, and a myriad of different props. All parts are small enough to be 3D-printed in a build volume of 140 x 140 x140 mm (5″ x 5″ x 5″). The walls and towers fit together easily using a simple 3D-printable butterfly joint. You can make as many parts as you want to create your original castle layout!

Oh, I will create an original castle layout. Now, go away or I shall taunt you second time!

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6yjV6TtttiA?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

They have release a LOAD of files, 84 in total (and they’re taking suggestions for others). You have the aforementioned items, along with canons, ladders, barrels and boxes. All the .stl files are provided and available on just about any 3D printing related website imaginable. PLA filament is recommends, along with a printer capable of using PLA – a Lulzbot, Ultimaker, Sigma, Prusa i3 MK2 or Rostock Max Delta printer are all good choices.

The only thing their missing is the Settlers of Catan version. Oooo!

Visit the project site for links to various places where the models or hosted or download from Thingivers where they have a load of other cool projects!

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

creative-tools-modular-castle-playset-01

creative-tools-modular-castle-playset-02

creative-tools-modular-castle-playset-03

creative-tools-modular-castle-playset-04

creative-tools-modular-castle-playset-05

creative-tools-modular-castle-playset-06

The post Model of the Week: Modular Castle Playset [Man the Parapet!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 11, 2017 09:34 PM

InsiteVR Is Direct CAD to VR Awesomeness

insitevr-direct-3d-model-to-vr-00

insitevr-direct-3d-model-to-vr-00

Virtual Reality applications are booming thanks to the onset of VR/AR headsets like Oculus, PlayStation VR, HTC Vive and Samsung Gear VR. Those companies allowed others to develop software that immerses you in a different reality where you can explore and (in some cases) interact with 3D renderings of just about anything.

Outside of gaming, more VR dev companies are turning their attention to other industries, such as architectural and product design, with developers catering to them using new software platforms that allow their clients to view their models in a 3D environment.

One of those emerging companies is New York-based InsiteVR that recently received $1.5 Million in Seed Round of funding from several investors to continue developing their VR application. The company’s software is capable of rendering 3D models direct to VR using modeling software such as Sketchup, Revit, 3DS Max and Navisworks. The models can then be viewed and explored wearing any number of VR headsets with 360 degree video available for mobile devices.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DDf5SxpJcAQ?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Once the 3D model or 360 image is uploaded to the InsiteVR app, it’s instantly viewable in a VR environment with viewer able to explore and presenter able to control the show and navigate using several methods, including mouse/keyboard combo, game controller or touchscreen. The presenter can also invite others to view their designs remotely and even point out different facets of their designs using a virtual laser pointer.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84250" style="width: 797px;">The InsiteVR Desktop Mode interface. Image: InsiteVR<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The InsiteVR Desktop Mode interface. Image: InsiteVR</figcaption></figure>

Views can also be streamed wirelessly using multiple different headsets, which can be synced together via the app. The VR worlds that InsiteVR uses are high-rez photorealistic 360 images, so the uploaded models can be placed in any number settings such as cities, fields, various rooms or just a generic 3-dimensional space, for you to better understand what the model looks like in the real world.

Of course, InsiteVR isn’t the only game in town for rendering models in a VR setting as others such as ARCH Virtual, Blue Marble 3D and IrisVR have similar strengths using slightly different appraoches. In fact, IrisVR is nearly identical to InsiteVR, but develops two distinct VR applications–Scope and Prospect–which allow you to drag and drop a 3D model file onto the app interface, instead of uploading them. What’s more, you can manipulate everything from lighting to backgrounds, insert annotations, and even draw in that virtual space.

Unlike InsiteVR’s all-inclusive platform, IrisVR is split into two apps with Prospect handling everything VR and Scope providing the ability to take 360 panoramic photos and implement them in a VR setting using mobile devices.

If choosing between the two is primarily what you is looking for: for simplicity and ease of use without a lot of bells and whistles, InsiteVR is phenomenal. If increased manipulation of models and settings is your preference then go with IrisVR’s Prospect. Regardless of VR platform you choose, both of them provide free and pay to play versions, which require a simple signup and download to get going.

insitevr-direct-3d-model-to-vr-01

The post InsiteVR Is Direct CAD to VR Awesomeness appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at January 11, 2017 07:16 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Effeffe Berlinetta: A Car Of Yesterday, Conceived Today

Effeffe Berlinetta is inspired by the great Italian sports cars of the past; a two-seat Coupé car born today, but respecting the technical ideas and concepts of more than half a century ago. Besides an intensive manual manufacturing process, all the latest technologies appear in this project, supported by the passion of the multidisciplinary expertise of SolidWorld Srl, SOLIDWORKS Italian distributor.

At the beginning of the ’60s in Italy, over five hundred craftsmen—some well-known, others relatively unknown—were engaged in automobile construction; not only in the traditional region of Emilia-Romagna (later known as ‘motor valley’), but also in Milan, Naples, Turin, Palermo. During this time, many home garages hosted motor sport activities. Before becoming a legend, Ferrari itself was born in an anonymous garage in Modena, as well as Osca, Maserati, Stanguellini, Siata, Moretti and many other brands now gone.

As a result of this passion for automobiles, the philosophy of “gentlemen drivers” grew. The concept was driving a car that would accommodate their significant others or families during the week, but also transform into a slick racing machine on Sundays. Virtually every week there was a race in which to participate; the most famous of which was the Mille Miglia (www.millemiglia.it).

An Adventure Begins

A passion for cars in general and, in particular, for GranTurismo from that era in Italian sports cars has been burning over the decades in Vittorio and Leonardo Frigerio, two contractor brothers from Verano Brianza (Milan). The brothers’ highest aspiration was to build one of these classic vehicles from scratch, perhaps taking advantage of developments in technology.

Word spread of the brothers’ mission and instead of thinking it crazy, people were very enthusiastic and many wanted to help. In addition to young fans, many older, former racing professionals (even some involved with Alfa Romeo) were soon part of the team. A great adventure for a bunch of friends from 30 to 80 years old, working at night, on Saturdays and Sundays soon began and Effeffe Berlinetta was on its way to the open road.

The Frigerio brothers stated, “many people provided us with their time and experience for free. From the beginning, we rode the spirit of master Italian motorists and chassis experts of the fifties and sixties. The only possible approach in manufacturing a car by craftsmen is the iron tube frame; in fact, the load-bearing coachwork assumes too high of investments, typical of the large-scale industry. Sixty years ago the fashionable scheme was that of a small boat (“barchetta”), for example, the Fiat 1100, then the Alfa. They used just the frame, no roof, no windshield, two seats, a hull, that’s all. Besides, Ferrari built its cars with elliptical section tubes for decades.”

The Technological Partners

It wouldn’t be possible to complete the project in a short time frame without the use of information technology. The “missing link” was found by accident, during one of team’s weekend meetings. A skilled CAD designer and one of the first SOLIDWORKS users in Italy, Carlo Sirtori, was a welcome addition to the team. Today he’s working with SolidWorld Srl, the original core of The3DGroup, a group of Italian companies supporting the entire digital “chain” as the most efficient way to bring designers from idea to objects.

Much of the work at the beginning was done during the free time of everyone involved in the Effeffe “adventure,” but soon the group was strongly committed to support the idea of Frigerio brothers, and providing them with resources and manpower. Sirtori completely designed the chassis and mechanics of the car in SOLIDWORKS using various features of the software, starting with the development of the structure in “weldments,” then continuing with 3D solid modeling functions, with brackets and plates processing in the “sheet metal” module.

SOLIDWORKS solutions cover all aspects of Effeffe Berlinetta’s product development process, including verification, sustainable design, communication and data management, through an integrated and continuous workflow so the team can reduce cycle times and increase productivity.

With the team and technology in place, the Effeffe Berlinetta was well on its way to gearing up for the open road. In Part II, the team will discuss in detail how SOLIDWORKS was used to design everything from the vehicle’s frame and engine to its incredible bodywork and look.

Author information

Giancarlo Giannangeli
Giancarlo Giannangeli
Giancarlo Giannangeli is senior Multimedia Communication & Marketing freelance consultant in IT & Mechanics. He’s been working for decades with many firms in Italy and has written hundreds of articles on Italian press. Currently he’s editor for Tecn’è and Tecnologie Meccaniche magazines.

The post Effeffe Berlinetta: A Car Of Yesterday, Conceived Today appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Giancarlo Giannangeli at January 11, 2017 01:30 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 Input Formula For Search Cards

In previous versions of SOLIDWORKS PDM, it was possible to add Input Formulas to Edit boxes in Search Cards … but they didn’t actually do anything.  The input formula box would display for any Edit box in the Card Editor, so the formula could be built, but the search tool was unable to evaluate the formula.

In SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 (Standard and Professional) however, this functionality is now available for Search Cards the same as for File and Folder cards.

Card Editor

Card Editor

Unlike previous releases, when the Search Card is called up in the Search tool, the formula will immediately evaluate the selections from linked fields on the card.

PDM Search Tool

PDM Search Tool

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 Input Formula For Search Cards appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at January 11, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

This Epic Mini-Doc Shows the Process of Manufacturing an Airplane in 1918

feature

feature

From ridiculously complicated product lifecycle management scenarios to some of the most futuristic manufacturing tech ever seen, few industries are quite like the aerospace industry.

While we may be a few years off from some really, really futuristic stuff trickling down to Coach—and even, First—Class, it’s safe to say that we’ve come a long way where aircraft design and manufacturing is concerned.

01

And there’s no better way to further understand this than to take a look back at how airplanes used to be designed—like, nearly 100 years ago.

In this epic recently-unearthed footage, we get a 45-minute play-by-play of aircraft manufacturing from 1918 that documents everything from gathering raw materials to what life was like in a pre–Henry Ford assembly line factory:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="375" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OMygucC9-74?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The post This Epic Mini-Doc Shows the Process of Manufacturing an Airplane in 1918 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at January 11, 2017 12:47 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS support Monthly News – January 2017

Hello to all,

Welcome to this new edition of the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News, coauthored by members of the SOLIDWORKS Technical Support teams worldwide.

Vote to promote the best ideas to the Top Ten List

There isn’t much time left to vote for your favorite ideas to the SOLIDWORKS World Top Ten List. You have until January 20, 2017. With more than 600 ideas posted by the community, you have plenty to choose from. So vote HERE.

The SOLIDWORKS World Top Ten List is YOUR wish list: More than 90% of the enhancements in SOLIDWORKS are directly requested by customers. This is your chance to have your voice heard. You are likely to see your idea or one you voted for in a future release of SOLIDWORKS, as that was the case for the vast majority of ideas on the Top Ten List in past years.

Let the ideas… Begin! Submit them HERE.
Summary:

  • December 15, 2016 is the end for new idea submissions.
  • December 16, 2016 voting on all ideas begins.
  • January 20, 2017 voting ends.
Defining-New-Products

 

Enhancements to the Fixed SPRs list on the Customer Portal

By Julian Galgoczy and Julien Boissat

We recently made some improvements to the way you can list the Software Performance Reports (SPRs) on the SOLIDWORKS Customer Portal.

You now have more controls to search, filter and sort them.

improved-list-of-fixed-sprs

See for yourself here.

Slow network with high latency can affect SOLIDWORKS 2017 and SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017 clients

By Tor Iveroth and Julien Boissat

When you use the SOLIDWORKS® 2017 software on a workstation that has a slow network connection to the SolidNetWork License (SNL) server, the error ‘Could not obtain a license for SOLIDWORKS’ may appear although you have the appropriate license.

This error occurs when the network connection from a workstation to the SolidNetWork License (SNL) server has a response time that is higher than 100 milliseconds (ms). The default timeout for the SOLIDWORKS® 2017 software to communicate with the SNL server is 100ms. If the workstation cannot communicate with the license server within 100ms, the license check out will fail with one of the following errors:

  • Starting the SOLIDWORKS software displays the error ‘Could not obtain a license for SOLIDWORKS. Server node is down or not responding.’
  • Adding the SNL server address to the ‘Add Server’ dialog box in the SolidNetWork License Manager tool displays the error ‘The license server is not reachable. Either the computer name and/or port number are incorrect or the server is not running or is not on the network.’
  • Viewing the server licenses in the ‘License Usage’ tab of the SolidNetWork License Manager tool displays the error ‘Could not get information from this server.’

 

This behavior applies to all SOLIDWORKS 2017 applications, including the SOLIDWORKS PDM products, which use SNL licensing.

To determine the response time (latency) between an SNL server and a client workstation, follow these steps:

  1. At a Windows® command prompt,  type the following command and then press Enter: PING SNL_SERVER_NAME
  2. View the response time in the PING result. If the ‘time’ value exceeds 100ms, you will encounter one of the licensing errors.

 

To avoid these errors on workstations with SOLIDWORKS 2017 installations, follow these steps:

  1.  Open the Registry Editor.
  2. Browse to ‘HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software’.
  3. Right-click on ‘Software,’ then click ‘New’ > ‘Key.’
  4. Name the key ‘FLEXlm License Manager’. If the key already exists, step into the key.
  5. Right-click on ‘FLEXlm License Manager’ > ‘New’ > ‘String Value’.
  6. Name the value ‘FLEXLM_TIMEOUT’.
  7. Double-click the ‘FLEXLM_TIMEOUT’ value and set the value data to ‘1000000’.
  8. You can also extract the attached file ‘FLEXLM_TIMEOUT Registry Workaround.zip’ and double-click the registry file to import the registry value.

For more information, please refer to:

  • Knowledge Base Solution Id: S-072437 for the general SOLIDWORKS issues
  • Knowledge Base Solution Id: S-072431 for the SOLIDWORKS PDM specific issues

 

Simulation Step-Up Series

Last month, Yannick discussed the topic of Material properties. This month, Ramesh comes back to talk about Contact modeling.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Fa1uxmU2OHM?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

Next month, Ramesh will conclude on Contact Modeling with the second part.

Noteworthy Solutions from the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base

icon - SW Where can I find additional information about the SOLIDWORKS® Visualize 2017 SP0.0 and SOLIDWORKS Visualize Boost 2017 SP0.0 software?
The documentation attached to Solution Id: S-071802 contains more information about the SOLIDWORKS® Visualize 2017 SP0.0 software and the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Boost 2017 SP0.0 software.
This article provides information on new features and capabilities of SOLIDWORKS Visualize included with SOLIDWORKS 2017 SP0. It describes changes to licensing, prerequisites and system requirements, and how to install Visualize with the SOLIDWORKS Installation Manager (SLDIM). It also discusses how to install, configure and use Visualize Boost, a service that allows you to distribute rendering across a cluster of computers on your network. It then presents the new features in more detail.
This information became available in the SOLIDWORKS Help effective with the SP1.0 release.

icon - SW What file formats and versions does 3D Interconnect support?
3D Interconnect supports the following file formats and versions:
CATIA® V5*
– .CATPart
– .CATProduct for V5R8 – 5–6R2016
Note: CATIA support is only available with SOLIDWORKS® Premium starting with SOLIDWORKS 2017 SP0.

Autodesk® Inventor®:
– .ipt for V6 – V2016
– .iam for V11 – V2016 (you do not need Autodesk Inventor View to import Inventor files)

PTC®:
– .prt
– .prt.*
– .asm
– .asm.* for Pro/ENGINEER® 16 – Creo® 3.0

Solid Edge®:
– .par
– .asm
– .psm for V18 – ST8

NX™ software:
– .prt for UG 11 – NX 10

NOTES:
– In the SOLIDWORKS 2017 PR1 release, you must already own a legacy CATIA V5-SOLIDWORKS Translator license to import CATIA V5 files.
– In the SOLIDWORKS 2017 release, 3D Interconnect does not support neutral formats such as STEP and IGES files.
From Solution Id: S-071895.

icon - SW Why can I not activate the SOLIDWORKS® Visualize 2016 software with my SOLIDWORKS SolidNetWork License (SNL) serial number?
You can activate the SOLIDWORKS® Visualize 2016 software with a qualifying SolidNetWork License (SNL) serial number. However, in some situations you might see an error advising that you have exceeded the activation count available for your serial number. You may also see the error ‘An error occurred validating the SOLIDWORKS Serial Number. Please contact support’.
To resolve this issue, see Solution Id: S-071848.

Icon - EPDM Does the SOLIDWORKS® PDM Standard software support custom API add-ins, standalone API applications or any of the SOLIDWORKS® PDM migration and upgrade tools?
The SOLIDWORKS® PDM Standard software does not have any API customization support. This includes any form of API code, both when using an add-in and a standalone application. Any API application that tries to access a SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard file vault using API methods will fail to log in. The log in attempt may result in the error ‘E_EDM_STANDARD_APINOTSUPPORTED’. This indicates that there is not support for the API.
For more information, read Solution Id: S-072007.

Icon - EPDM How can I improve the performance of a SOLIDWORKS® PDM Standard computer that hosts multiple vaults?
Performance of the SOLIDWORKS® PDM Standard software depends on the performance of the Microsoft® SQL Server Express database software. If you have multiple vaults and experience sluggish performance, try separating the vaults into multiple SQL Server Express instances.
For more information, read Solution Id: S-072148.

icon - Simulation Is there a sample model that shows “gas assist” injection in a second or different gate location in the SOLIDWORKS® Plastics software??
Yes. You can find an example of a gas assist injection-molded part attached to Solution ID: S-072222. The part has one gate location for the injection of a plastic material and a second gate location for the injection of the gas.

– – – = = = o o O o o = = = – – –

That’s it for this month. Thanks for reading this edition of SOLIDWORKS Support News. If you need additional help with these issues or any others, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller.

Also, comments and suggestions are welcome. You can enter them below.

 

Author information

Julien Boissat
Sr. Technical Customer Support Engineer, SolidWorks, EMEA at DS SolidWorks Corp.
I have been a Tech Support engineer for Simulation products since 2002. I was previously a product manager at SRAC, the original makers of COSMOS for those who remember that time! ;-). I am currently in charge of the content of the certification exams for simulation products. I also initiated and still author the Simulation Knowledge Base and participate as much as possible in the expansion and evolution of the SolidWorks Knowledge Base. Finally, I handle the SolidWorks Support Monthly News blog.

The post SOLIDWORKS support Monthly News – January 2017 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Julien Boissat at January 11, 2017 10:07 AM

January 10, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Fatigue Analysis: The General Process

SOLIDWORKS Fatigue Analysis on Pliers

Running a fatigue analysis is a growing trend in mechanical parts and assemblies. You must already familiar with stress analysis, as it is the basis for fatigue analysis. Stress or strain information from a stress analysis is the basis for predicting how many lifecycles a component will last. While this can be done by hand, using FEA or hybrid methods produce the best results. It will be clear why that is soon enough.

Fatigue Analysis: The General Process

  1. Determine the amount of time you need to a component to last and how many cycles you estimate that represents.
  2. Perform a stress analysis (hand calculation or FEA) for each load that may be present in a loading cycle.
  3. Assess the number of cycles each loading event in the cycle will see.
  4. Find a fatigue curve(s) for you material with the correct loading ratio. This will help you find the damage produced by your stress level for each loading event.
  5. Combine the damages together and multiply by a desired factor of safety.
  6. Put your hands together pray the damages don’t exceed 1! You don’t want to redesign the part!

The Problem With Hand-Calculated Fatigue Analysis

The first problem with a hand-calculated fatigue analysis for stress is that fatigue is highly dependent on accurate stress predictions. With anything but the simplest of geometries, most Engineers make assumptions that make the calculations easier but sacrifice accuracy. In most cases, a larger factor of safety (usually ~3) ensures an uncertainty is accounted for and the design is safe. However, since fatigue life has a logarithmic type relationship with stress, this simplified, factored stress may not even be in the ballpark for a fatigue life estimation.

Secondly, fatigue isn’t something that happens only at the point of highest stress in the material. It happens everywhere. If the load changes as the component moves through the load cycle, there may be multiple peak stress areas. Furthermore, the failure may happen in an area with somewhat high stresses in every load event, but never the peak stress. This means that accounting for work at every point in the model is necessary.

To do this by hand would require either extremely complex math (read: error prone) dealing with partial differential equations, or calculating stresses at many points for each load case. Either case is unproductive and slower than FEA, which quickly (relative to the complexity) gives stress results at all points in the model. From there the software can combine loading events and, in a fast, efficient method, take fatigue into consideration at all points in the model. A manual method will never be efficient by comparison.

Author information

GSC
GSC fuels customer success with 3D engineering solutions for design, simulation, data management, technical documentation, and 3D printing, as well as the most comprehensive consulting, technical support, and training in the industry. As a leading provider of SOLIDWORKS solutions and Stratasys 3D printing technologies, GSC’s world-class team of dedicated professionals have helped numerous companies innovate and increase productivity by leveraging advanced technologies to drive 3D business success. Founded in 1989, GSC is headquartered in Germantown, WI. For more information about GSC, please visit www.gsc-3d.com.

The post Fatigue Analysis: The General Process appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GSC at January 10, 2017 04:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Palatov Motorsports Revs Up High-Performance Auto Design with SOLIDWORKS

Palatov Motorports is a specialty car manufacturer that designs and produces high-performance cars that are primarily used on recreational tracks across the country. The Portland, OR-based manufacturer has built a business around not only designing cars but also designing and supplying components, such as suspension parts, for custom car applications, ranging from individual builds to low- and medium-volume specialty vehicles.


Prior to founding the company, Dennis Palotov evaluated several design solutions before choosing SOLIDWORKS because he found it very intuitive to use and didn’t require an expensive workstation to run it. “The software is very intuitive—it behaves the way my brain works—and allows me to productively transfer the ideas in my head into reality,” says Palotov.  “I design complete cars, featuring tight tolerances, from scratch by myself, and we assemble the cars with a team of four. Most specialty cars are developed by teams of 20 to 30 people or more. We would not be able to do what we do at Palatov Motorsport without SOLIDWORKS.”

SOLIDWORKS helps Palatov cars go with the Flow

Another advantage of SOLIDWORKS was its integrated Flow Simulation software, which enabled the design team to gain important insights into how airflow, drag, and downforce affect car performance. By validating its vehicle designs using SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation, the designers were able to not only improve the aerodynamics of the cars, but also to adjust aerodynamic elements to match specific driver preferences.

For example, the firm used SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation during development of the D1PPS (Pike’s Peak Special), which was specifically designed to compete in the Pike’s Peak International Hill Climb (IHC), a 12.42-mile race up 14,110-foot Pike’s Peak in Colorado that has 156 turns. “We ran flow analysis on the D1PPS using SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation software and then compared the results to real-life data obtained through physical tests,” Palatov explains. “We found a 98 percent correlation between SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation results and what actually happens, which gave us the confidence to rely on the software to improve aerodynamic performance. We still maintain 400 pounds of downforce on that car at 100 mph, but used the results to optimize front/rear distribution of force and allow for aerodynamic adjustments.”
 
Read the entire case study “Palatov Motorsport LLC: Advancing High-Performance Automobile Development with SOLIDWORKS Solutions” to learn how SOLIDWORKS solutions played a key role in the development of an innovative, patent-pending suspension design, which completely eliminates the need for antiroll bars and aero-assist third spring, while also improving handling.

Author information

Barbara Schmitz
Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks
Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post Palatov Motorsports Revs Up High-Performance Auto Design with SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Barbara Schmitz at January 10, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Zero-G Altwork Station is Both Ridiculous and Absolutely Necessary

feature

feature

It’s hard to believe that CES is already behind us in the new year, and with it, a slew of new products and technologies that you likely won’t need for yet another year (Alexa! Drones! OLED TVs!). Okay, so maybe you actually do need an Alexa-enabled device for ordering barrels of cheeseballs and toilet paper automagically.

Yet — for those of us who spend upwards of double-digit hours in front of a screen during the day, the Altwork Station just might be the most useful of the bunch.

Presented at the annual show in Las Vegas last week, the Altwork Station is a $5,900 (hey, it’s a write off) combination La-Z-Boy and a Zero-G desk for reclining comfortably while blazing through those CAD models and simulations.

As for all those fancy peripherals you like to use, magnets embedded in the desk can keep your hardware grounded even when the desk is leaned all the way back to a 72-degree angle.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eHdShyF9x7U?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

While you may have seen renderings of something similar online as early as October of 2015, the company only began shipping the first units in December of last year in the San Francisco area—with plans for wider distribution on the way.

Says the company:

“The Altwork Station supports your body and your work by seamlessly conforming your keyboard, desk, mouse, and monitor to your body. This allows you to create a massive selection of working positions with your computer so you can work the right way for the right task. Our unique focus position allows high-intensity computer users to eliminate the discomfort of standard tables and chairs so they can focus longer on complex tasks. It’s time to move beyond outmoded furniture and create a new way to work for digital professionals.”

If you’ve ever wanted to blaze through an assembly while feeling like a USS Enterprise commander, this just might be your closest bet. Find out more over at Altwork.

The post The Zero-G Altwork Station is Both Ridiculous and Absolutely Necessary appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at January 10, 2017 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Cut List Sorting

In previous versions of SOLIDWORKS users had limited control over the way they could sort the cut list components. One of these limitations was when you slightly change one of the solid bodies in your part, it was shown as a separate component in the cut list. To clarify the enhancement let’s take a look at an example weldment part below. As you can see there are two components in the cut list.

Cut List Components

Cut List Components

I decided to add a small hole to one side of the part by doing a cut extrude. Doing so SOLIDWORKS now shows three components in the cut list. It makes sense as for SOLIDWORKS these are two different geometries. But in many cases you may want to keep those two side bars under one Cut-List-Item folder in your cut list.

Modifying a body will result in new components

Modifying a body will result in new components

Now in SOLIDWORKS 2017 you have the option to tell SOLIDWORKS how you want it to group the bodies. You can collect identical bodies and choose faces and features to exclude in sorting. To test this new option, I opened the same part in SOLIDWORKS 2017. To access the sorting options, right-click on the cut list in the design tree and select “Cut List Sorting Option” from the short cut menu.

pic-3

Next we have to specify how SOLIDWORKS should group the bodies in the cut list. So I checked the “Collect Identical Bodies” checkbox. This option collects all bodies in a Cut-List-Item folder that are geometrically identical. Now if there are bodies that are slightly different, like our example, you can tell SOLIDWORKS to ignore those differences by adding them to “Faces/Features to Exclude” section. I added “Cut-Extrude1” to the list.

Sorting Options

Sorting Options

Using these settings SOLIDWORKS ignores the feature when it wants to group the bodies. As a result, both side bodies now appear in the same Cut-List-Item folder one more time.

Selected Bodies

Selected Bodies

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017, including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 Cut List Sorting appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Saeed Mojarad (CSWE) at January 10, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The New (New) Developers

feature

feature

This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “Fever” from Night Panther and work our way through tracks from Amason, Attaboy, Jon Bap, Tristen, and others before wrapping up with “Clay Pigeons” from the one and only Michael Cera.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:1PZgED6UYigTG4tQAdyXij" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The New (New) Developers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 10, 2017 11:00 AM

January 09, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Time-Lapse Tutorial: Camera Gimbal

With technology advancing rapidly and associated costs becoming cheaper, it is easier than ever get access to it. This allows amateur filmmakers to have access to equipment that used to cost thousands of dollars and is now readily affordable to almost anyone. One piece of equipment is the gimbal stabilizer. This is a kit that has two motors and will keep the camera level while the operator moves. This makes for a better looking video and gets rid of the shakiness.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JEvgJgCfgJA?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

Now, most gimbals for sale online start at around $200. Most of these don’t include the camera. Today we are going to show you how you can use SOLIDWORKS and 3D printing to make you own gimbal stabilizer.

solidworks time-lapse tutorial

This project is easy to do and does require some store bought parts. This includes a Gimbal, this retails at around $40. The gimbal we got is an add on to the first DJI drones and does require a Gopro. This gets strapped to the bottom axis. but these cheap gimbals are made for quadcopters and those who look into building their own.

solidworks time-lapse

With this being an add-on to a quadcopter, there is no power supply as you would plug this into the motherboard of the drone so, we had to get an external power source. This was easy done by purchasing a battery. The last item was a switch. Once again as this is made to connect to a drone and we are just connecting a battery strait into the motherboard there is no way to turn it off without disconnecting the battery.

 

So with all these parts we have a working gimbal but a mess of cables on the top. This is where SOLIDWORKS and 3D printing come into play. We will use SOLIDWORKS to create a neat handle to hold onto the gimbal easily as well as enclose all the wiring. This makes it look more appealing and easier to manage.

 

The design process was simple. We needed a handle that’s comfortable to hold and shell on the inside to hold and protect the cables and battery. The main constraint was the battery would have be removed in order to recharge. This lead to the design being screwed together.

We used a technique which allows us to have metal bolt inserts in the model but we didn’t want hoels on the side or you to be able to see the mess. We what we decided to do was to enclose the bolt in the plastic. This is a trick that can be done with almost any printer. The basis of this is to let it print up to a certain height and pause the print. This will stop the print and move the head away. This gives us the chance to drop the bolts on the insert holes and resume the print. The machine will carry on doing what it does best and will enclose the bolt in the plastic.

Now it is important to not that the cavity must be deep enough that when the bolt is in the head won’t collide with the bolt and the it’s loose enough so that there is no force needed. If you force it it could move the bed and when the machine resumes it won’t line up.

 

With all 3 parts printed, the assembly process was simple. We soldered the switch to the motherboard cables and attached the main body to the gimbal. We then inserted the battery into the handle and screwed it all together. Next, we fired this bad boy up and it was ready to go.

The footage captured for this came out great and it works well, with a total cost of around $50 this gimbal is perfect for those who wish to play around with film making or even those interested in starting a career in the industry, but don’t have a huge budget. As said at the start of this blog, technology is getting cheaper and more accessible. This allows more people to reach for their dreams and makes that high end equipment accessible to more people.

Now it is difficult to show you how well it works when the only way to showcase the gimbal properly is with a video so please check out the video about this gimbal at the top of the page.

 

The idea of this project, taking a bunch of store bought parts and using SOLIDWORKS and 3D printing to assemble them into something with a higher value than the start. This can be applied into almost anything and we look forward to seeing some of your ideas you may have and how you have been inspired to make something great.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Time-Lapse Tutorial: Camera Gimbal appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at January 09, 2017 10:00 PM

SolidSmack

Dyson’s LED Office Light Cools Itself Like a High-end CPU

dyson-cu-beam-led-light-00

dyson-cu-beam-led-light-00

Office lighting just got 10x and a bag o’ corn chips cooler thanks to the son of famed vacuum designer Sir James Dyson. His son, Jake Dyson, set out to redesign a much needed replacement to the inconsistent, or flickering, or glaring, or otherwise headache-inducing lighting found in most office spaces around the world. Enter the CU-Beam–an modern LED suspension lamp capable of directing light up, down or both and running for decades.

dyson-cu-beam-led-light-05

IF you recall the Ariel LED suspension light from 3 years ago, this will look all too familiar. Jake has made some strides since then along with the release of the CSYS task light. The CU-Beam fixture uses the concentrated brightness of a single LED to push out over 8000 Lumens at 90 Watts and can be controlled to shine up, down or both directions at the same time depending on the need. The company claims a single light can burn for up to 180,000 hours or roughly 37 years before the LED luminaire’s needs to be swapped out. The secret to its longevity is the cooling system described in the CU-Beam feature video:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zXkVO_9yFH0?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

So, the secret to cooling the 8000-lumen LED luminaire module lies in Dyson’s heat pipe technology, the same as in their CSYS task lights, which looks and functions very similar to those used to dissipate heat used with some high-end CPU heatsinks. Let’s break it down–the LED luminaire is seated on several enclosed copper pipes that are filled with a small amount of heat-wicking solution. When that solution gets hot it turns into a vapor and travels to the ends of the heat pipes where copper fins help to dissipate the heat, turning the solution back into a cool liquid. Wash, rinse, repeat.

The light’s intensity and distribution is a much-needed change in an office setting and can be tuned depending on the conditions needed–direct, diffused, bright, dark or a combination of any can be had with just a few simple adjustments, thanks to the lamp’s driver. For example, in some meetings you may want to bathe the conference table in direct light for everyone to share notes and ideas easier, while showing a PowerPoint presentation may require diffused ceiling illumination only.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84220" style="width: 1000px;">The CU-Beam broken-down to its base parts including custom lenses, LED luminaire board and heat-pipe technology.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The CU-Beam broken-down to its base parts including custom lenses, LED luminaire board and heat-pipe technology.</figcaption></figure>

The CU-Beam build is rather straightforward with a pair of LED luminaire boards to illuminate both upward and downward, a pair of custom lenses with driver for illumination control and a heat pipe cooling system that extends to each side keeping the LEDs from burning out. While it seems simplistic, it’s no less an effective design set to hit the market this year, but don’t pull out a crisp twenty just yet, the CU-Beam will carry a price tag of $1,999 each. That certainly is on the expensive side, but considering energy cost of an LED is 5x less than an incandescent light, it doesn’t seem like such a bad deal in the long run.

I love LED lighting. CFLs make me so tired after only a few hours. However, I recently read about LED lighting causing retina damage. You’ve heard it all before–that short-wavelength blue light. And the AMA claims that improper LED lighting can cause harm. Keep this in mind, regular old bulbs are cheaper than ever. And who doesn’t like a meeting by candlelight? Just sayin’.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WXxPxvceWaE?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

dyson-cu-beam-led-light-02

dyson-cu-beam-led-light-03

dyson-cu-beam-led-light-04

The post Dyson’s LED Office Light Cools Itself Like a High-end CPU appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at January 09, 2017 08:18 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

How to Tolerance a Part: Simple Steps to Specify Part Tolerances – Part II

This is a sequel to ‘How to Tolerance a Part: Simple Steps to Specify Part Tolerances – Part I‘ provided last month.

Design for Assembly – Criteria for Tolerance Selection contd..

Choice of Assembly process determines the selection of Datums and their precedence in Tolerance specification.

Take the case of Coupler-Shaft Assembly shown as under.

Design for Assembly considerations

Assembly Sequence enumeration

If the bearings and housing are mounted onto the coupler-shaft then it drives the location and orientation of the downstream components.  If the coupler-shaft is inserted into the housing that has bearings located, then it gets located and oriented with respect to the upstream assembly of housing and bearings.  In the former case, the coupler-shaft would be located and oriented with respect to the spigot-recess on the left face and fastened on the PCD flange.  Then, the spigot recess, defined as Datum Feature of Size, would control the location of all features including the shaft Outer Diameter.

However, if the shaft were to assemble itself onto the bearing and housing assembly, then the shaft Outer Diameter would be the Datum Feature of Size, controlling the tolerances of all features and features of sizes, in terms of location and orientation.

Needless to say, DFM plays a critical part in determining features and/or features of sizes that would need to be used as datums.  Datum and Datum sequence (in the Datum Reference Frame) are critical to the success of a product in terms of fit and function.

Functional Datum Selection

Continuing with the same example, if the couple-shaft is located and oriented with respect to the spigot recess on the left and its associated face, on another upstream component/ assembly, then the datum selection shown as under along with the datum precedence would be relevant.

Datum - Basis for Selection

Criteria for Selection of Datum

If the coupler-shaft is assembled onto the housing with bearings, then functional datums would be as shown in the figure below.

Datum Selection based on Functional Assembly

Functional Datum Specification for alternate Assembly method

Tolerance Specification for Features

Selection of Tolerances are based on Fit and Functional requirements.  In the example shown above, for the coupler-shaft, the shaft outer diameter would have a Bearing Fit tolerance.  The spigot diameter would again have tolerances based on fit with the upstream component.  The faces, used as Datum A, would then be ‘oriented’ with respect to the axis taken as Datum B.  If the first assembly sequence is chosen, Datum B would refer to the spigot axis.  If the alternate assembly method is used, Datum B would refer to the shaft Axis.  Datums are derived out of physical features and hence specified as attached to outlines of features/ features of sizes.  Orientation control on Datum B with the axis taken as the reference Datum, would implicitly control form (for example, Flatness) since it is a Level III control and Form is Level II control.  Sometimes it is a good practice to explicitly specify tolerances of form on flat surfaces to prevent ‘rocking’ datums and havoc arising out of the size tolerance specifications.

In the example, since the coupler-shaft would rotate about the assembly axis defined by upstream component/ assembly, the centre of mass of the rotating element, away from the ‘instantaneous axis’ of the assembly influences vibration levels at the bearings.  To keep the eccentricity minimal, it is important that the centre of mass deviation from axis of rotation is kept to a minimum.  This would mean that the ‘tolerance’ should not ‘grow’ as one moves away from Maximum Material Condition (MMC) towards Least Material Condition (LMC).  In other words, tolerance of position as shown in both figures, above, should preferably be Regardless of Feature Size (RFS) and not MMC as shown in the Feature Control frames.  The value of the position tolerance would depend on the permissible eccentricity and process capability.  Needless to say, cost of poor quality due to Bearing failure and replacement should weight on the mind of the designer when arriving at stated tolerances.

More to come in the next part of this series….

 

Author information

Natarajan Ramamoorthy
Design Professional with almost 3 decades of experience working with numerous companies, providing designs for new products, VAVE on existing products, conducting Design Audits and Dimensional Management programs. Teaching Finite Element Analysis, Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing (GD&T), Tolerance Stack Up Analysis for well over 2 decades. Certified ASME GDTP Technologist. Education: MSME from The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA Past: Consultant, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI, USA

The post How to Tolerance a Part: Simple Steps to Specify Part Tolerances – Part II appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Natarajan Ramamoorthy at January 09, 2017 04:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Using Dispatch to Move files in a SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Vault

SOLIDWORKS PDM Dispatch Action is a very powerful, but often overlooked tool in SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional, and with PDM 2017, it’s now even more powerful.

In previous releases it was only possible to use the Dispatch action to Copy, Delete, or Rename files in the vault.

In SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional 2017, the Dispatch action can also be used to move files to a different location in the vault. This Move action will maintain the files history within the vault and will update any files referencing that file with the new folder location.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Dispatch Action for Move/Rename File

Move/Rename File

Using the SOLIDWORKS PDM Dispatch Action

The Dispatch Action can be triggered manually by a Menu command, during a state transition, during checkout or during add.  The file being Moved/Renamed does not necessarily have to be the file that triggered the Action.  For instance, a dispatch action could be set up to move a PDF export of an approved drawing to an “Archive” folder when the SOLIDWORKS .slddrw file is transitioned to an “Under Change” state.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post Using Dispatch to Move files in a SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional Vault appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at January 09, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Monday List 02.17 | What We’re Reading This Week

feature

feature

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Is Emirates Airline Running Out of Sky?
It flies the fanciest product on the biggest planes on the longest routes. There might not be much more room to soar

01

How to Drive Cattle
“It helps to know the cattle.”

02

How to Live the Good Life in a Ski Town
We asked the best pow chasers we know how they make it work in some of the country’s most famous winter resorts.

04

How to See a Star Explode in 2022
For the first time, astronomers are confidently predicting how to see this type of brilliant blast, which will be visible with the naked eye.

03

In Apple-Spotify World, SoundCloud Can’t Find Room
“There are very few music platforms at this tremendous scale.”

05

Psychology textbooks should be busting myths. Instead, they’re misinforming students.
A new study finds that introductory psych textbooks are painting a too-rosy picture of the science.

06

The post The Monday List 02.17 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 09, 2017 11:00 AM

January 08, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Use Magnetic Mates for Quick Layout of Conveyors and Tracks in SOLIDWORKS 2017

Magnetic Mates for Conveyors

 

Written by: Alex Frank, Support Engineer, DASI Solutions

Magnetic Mates are a new feature in SOLIDWORKS 2017 that allow you to quickly and easily arrange and rearrange assembly components until you achieve a desirable configuration. This new feature is intended to make laying out things like conveyors or tracks faster and easier, particularly when it comes time to change the layout.

Let’s look at creating a magnetic mate. In order to use this feature, we have to first create a reference in the component that we wish to insert. The tool used to do that is referred to as the “Asset Publisher” and is found in the tools menu.

Asset Publisher

Activating the asset publisher will allow you to begin creating references for magnetic mates to snap to.

In the asset publisher property manager, you are required to make a few selections. The first selection is referred to as the “Ground Plane”. This selection will represent where our component rests on the ground. In the image below, this is the bottom surface of the model railroad track. Once we have defined a ground plane, we can begin to add a connector. Connectors require two selections. The first selection is a model edge. This defines the point where two components will snap together. This can be a linear or circular edge, for linear it will use the midpoint. For a circular edge, the center point will be used. Our second selection is a face on the model. This face represents the point of contact between two components when they snap. The faces will be coincident to each other. Once you have made the selection, you can click “Update/add Connector” to include it.Asset Publisher Property Manager

Multiple connectors can be added to a model.

Multiple connectors

Connection PointsOnce they are added, it creates a feature in the design tree called “Published references” which can be edited at any time to add, change, or delete connectors. Clicking on the feature will show the connection points.

This feature can be used in either the part or assembly environment. For example, using magnetic mates to create a model railroad I can model a switch yard as a discrete assembly, and have magnetic mates at the points where the switch yard meets the main line tracks.  Below we can see a sub-assembly with magnetic mate references (The sub-assembly was modeled with magnetic mates as well).

Now that I have created components with magnetic mate references I can begin to use them to assembly my layout. In this case, we will look at the model railroad again. While magnetic mates will work with free floating components, it is always good practice to locate the first component with standard mates. Once you have once component located, you will want to turn on magnetic mates in the Tools menu of the assembly environment. This enables the mates to snap together. You can see this toggle in the first image of the tools menu (taken from an assembly environment)

Then, simply drag the two components close together. As you drag, you will see the connection points created in the asset publisher appear as purple dots. A purple line will appear between the different dots as you move the pieces around. This indicates which two mates will snap together. Then, release the mouse button and the components will snap together. You can repeat this as many times as needed to achieve the desired result.

Magnetic Mates

Simple and quick once you set it up! So what’s the catch? There’s always a catch right? Well unfortunately with this great feature there are a few considerations to keep in mind. First thing, is that it’s pretty easy to destroy your hard work with an errant click or drag. There’s nothing worse than spending 20 minutes getting your layout exactly the way you want it, only to add another piece and watch your assembly freak out and turn into a pile of parts.

I’d like to share a couple techniques I found to help mitigate this.

Feature TreeFirst, magnetic mates do create mate features in your feature tree. So you can browse to these either in the main mate folder, or in the component mate folder. Once you find them, a right click gives you the option to “Lock” the mate. This will prevent anything the mates from moving, and prevent other components from attempting to lock onto those connectors.

This technique has advantages; you can lock out troublesome mates from changing as you work or lock groups together. Sometimes however you may want to prevent a large number of parts from moving. In this case, say once I have a large chunk of my model railroad built out the way I want it, I would lock those down a different way. Every assembly component can be set to a “Fixed” state, where it is locked in its current position. Once I know I have a section finalized, I can use the selection box or other multi selection techniques to pick all the components. Right clicking on the mass selection allows me to set those components to a fixed state. That way, there is no chance I can accidentally damage my layout. I can always set them back to floating if I want to make changes later.

The last thing to consider is that multiple magnetic mate references close together may be tricky to get them to snap right. Sometimes the part will rapidly cycle between all reference points (three in this case). To help mitigate this, I found that if you arrange the components so that the desired connection points are close by, you can zoom in so only those two are visible, and SOLIDWORKS will tend to ignore the others. This can make component placement easier. When dealing with multiple mate references in close proximity.

 

Author information

DASI Solutions
DASI Solutions
DASI Solutions is dedicated to service and support. As one of a handful of original, charter value-added resellers (VAR) in the SolidWorks Community, DASI Solutions has built partnerships and success stories with many of our customers. We are very pleased to bring you SolidWorks 3D CAD design engineering software and 3D printing services.

The post Use Magnetic Mates for Quick Layout of Conveyors and Tracks in SOLIDWORKS 2017 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by DASI Solutions at January 08, 2017 04:00 PM

January 07, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Golden Icosahedron Tutorial

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="355" id="PreviewFrame3D" name="PreviewFrame3D" scrolling="no" src="http://www.3dcontentcentral.com/external-site-embed.aspx?format=3D&amp;catalogid=11199&amp;modelid=726824&amp;width=250&amp;height=250&amp;edraw=true" width="400"></iframe>

Golden Icosahedron: This model is a icosahedron which is a polyhedron with twenty faces. The twenty triangular faces have five faces meeting at each vertex. Construction Surfaces(Golden Rectangles) are used to start the model. These rectangles are used to create the individual triangular faces that are mirrored several times and then the model is turned into a solid using the “Knit Surface” command. There is a custom font used to create the number cutouts. There are examples of planar and lofted surfaces and derived sketches.

Download: Golden Icosahedron
Complexity: Moderate
Features: Planar Surface, Lofted Surface, Derived Sketches, Cut Extrude, Knit Surface

View all the Part Reviewer Tutorials here.

DraftSight Download: In conjunction with DraftSight, Dassault Systèmes’ 2D CAD product, the 2D drawing(.dwg) file of the Golden Icosahedron tutorial is now available for download here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: Golden Icosahedron Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at January 07, 2017 10:00 PM

January 06, 2017

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Jello Smacker

Tan-Zhi-Hui-art

Tan-Zhi-Hui-art

Once you’re running full-bore with fists extended, there’s no decision left. You may think of stopping, you may even glance from the corner of your eye–this way, that way. But, no. You ARE going to penetrate that wall of orange Jello. You’ll do it, or face the wrath of these links.

Tan Zhi Hui – Love, love, love the sharp, skewed style and breakdowns of a huge range of characters that remind me of Neon Genesis Evangelion, but cooler.

Bear Mascot Fall – I… I can’t stop laughing. This guy can’t wait until the tapping of this is over, I’m sure of it. That last fall, BAH!

Google Earth Timelapse – Google has updated their Google Earth Timelapse series to show various places around the world spanning the years from 1984 to 2016. All viewable in Google’s Earth Engine.

LEGO Nerf Gun – Love it! A build from Astonishing Studios that is… well, astonishing. The construction is brilliant and makes use of some very simple mechanisms. Now to build an N-Strike MEGA.

2016 Best Movie Posters – Can’t really argue with any of these, although I think the Stranger Things poster should have been included. I guess it’s a TV series, but still.

100 MPH Car Slow-Mo – The Slow-Mo guys are at it again. This time with the fastest RC car available capable of going 100 MPH. The Traxxas XO-1.

Lick – One of my fav skateboarders/photographers/artists, Ed Templeton, has a new magazine out featuring photographs of people licking things. Lots of ice cream.

La La La – Ruslan Khasanov sets up sweet macro visuals of oil and water to Belle Folie’s The Word. Project here.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/198116920" title="La La La" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="500"></iframe>

The post Friday Smackdown: Jello Smacker appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 06, 2017 11:44 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Icon Colours

SOLIDWORKS 2017 gives us a splash of colour!

SOLIDWORKS 2016 introduced a new vector based icon design and colour scheme designed for 4k monitors. Still many users requested the option to return to the more classic colour scheme. DS SOLIDWORKS listened and now provides us with a splash of colour to give that familiar feel to the UI.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Icon Colours

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Icons

To set the icon colours to classic style select Tools > Options > Colors > Classic from the Icon color drop down menu

Enabling Classic Icons

Enabling Classic Icons

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 Icon Colours appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Jamie Hill, CSWP at January 06, 2017 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Place Datum Feature Symbols to Your Preference Using SOLIDWORKS MBD

There are several frequently asked questions about the datum feature symbol placement in SOLIDWORKS Model-Based Definition (MBD), so let’s explore together in this article.

There are four major types of placements. The symbol can be applied to a feature surface, a leader line, a dimension witness line or a geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T) feature control frame. Different companies often have different preferences so SOLIDWORKS MBD supports all of them as shown in Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4.

Figure 1. A datum feature symbol A is placed on a surface.

 

Figure 2. A datum feature symbol A is placed on a directed leader to a surface.

 

Figure 3. A datum feature symbol B is placed on a dimension witness line.

 

Figure 4. A datum feature symbol B is placed on a GD&T feature control frame.

 

You may have noticed that in Figures 1 and 2, the dimension witness line attachment style was disabled. That was because the datum feature A defined a surface, not a feature of size. The symbol didn’t have a dimension to attach to. The dimension attachment option was enabled in Figure 3 because the datum feature B defined a width size feature. This feature has a size dimension and the datum symbol can be attached to the witness line.

A key point to highlight in Figure 3 is that SOLIDWORKS MBD automatically aligned the datum symbol B leader line with the width size dimension line and arrow heads. You can adjust the leader length of B, but cannot move B up or down on the witness line. This is not by accident or for aesthetic purpose. It’s required by the ASME Y14.5 standard. In order to specify a width feature, the datum feature symbol must be aligned with the dimension line arrow heads. Here is an excerpt from the standard, “(The symbol shall be) placed on the dimension line or an extension of the dimension line of a feature of size when the datum is an axis or center plane. If there is insufficient space for the two arrows, one of them may be replaced by the datum feature triangle.”

On the other hand, in the case of Figure 3, if the datum feature symbol B was not aligned with the dimension line, then it would have defined a planar datum feature, rather than a width feature. Figure 5 shows an example.

Figure 5. A symbol T not aligned with the dimension line is to define a planar datum feature, not a width feature.

 

Besides a width, there are other applicable size features, such as spheres or holes. Figure 6 provides an example of attaching a datum feature symbol to a sphere diameter dimension.

 

Figure 6. Attach a datum feature symbol to a sphere diameter dimension.

 

Lastly, you can also adjust the datum symbol styles on the property manager as shown in Figure 7. Their results are instantly visual, so I’ll leave them for you to try out and have fun.

Figure 7. Datum symbol styles on the property manager.

To learn more about how SOLIDWORKS MBD can help you with your MBD implementations, please watch this video below and visit its product page.  Also welcome to discuss with me at Twitter (@OboeWu) or LinkedIn (OboeWu).

Author information

Oboe Wu
Oboe Wu
Product portfolio manager of SOLIDWORKS MBD, passionate about smart manufacturing opportunities, Keen listener to customer challenges, Sharp problem solver with 20 years of experiences in engineering, Sleepless father trying best to take care of a baby daughter.

The post Place Datum Feature Symbols to Your Preference Using SOLIDWORKS MBD appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Oboe Wu at January 06, 2017 01:00 PM

January 05, 2017

SolidSmack

These DIY Magnetic Shoelaces Just Made Life 10X Easier

3d_printing_self-close

magnetic-shoelace-adafruit-01

Yeah, you see kids frolicking about in their Velcro buckle shoes and remember when life use to simple and carefree. No wonder the international sign for frustration is a unlaced shoe. It’s not? Well, IT SHOULD BE.

end-frustration-solidsmack

There, I feel better now.

Fortunately for all of us who can’t bend over to tie a shoe, don’t want to bend over to tie a shoe or are too busy using fingers to screenjab words into a electronic screen, the Ruiz brothers at Adafruit have a magnetic shoelace project that both solves the problem of lacing up and serves as a great project for an intro to design and 3D printing.

Magnetic Shoelace Project

The solution uses two 3D printed lace closures and four neodymium magnets to connect that opening atop your footsies. They go through the design using Fusion 360, providing the measurement and sizing they used for the closure, while showing you what you need to adjust in case you have some weird ass shoes. Here are the magnetic laces in action:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/y-vm-Z-48fY?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Your day is complete isn’t it? AND there’s hope for future. They test printed the closures out on a Sigma BCN3D, Deltaprintr Go and a Printrbot Play 3D printer with no support material used, because they’re gangstas. Since the magnets are press fit, they recommend measuring your own magnets to make sure the fit will be nice and snug – you don’t want to compound the frustration of laces with the frustration of magnetic laces not working… the horror.

3d_printing_self-close

I love the idea of using this project as an introduction to design and 3D printing for younger kids, seeing how they approach solutions to the problem BEFORE showing this one, then reinforcing the principles of parametric design and design for manufacturing. Fun times, right?

magnetic-shoelace-adafruit-03

I don’t know about you, but Ima buy a truck of neodymium magnets and start replacing the buttons, laces and snaps on all my clothes. What? Yeah, I have clothes that snap, and they’re the finest pajama onsies money can buy, in case you’re wondering. Get all the info, instructions and files for the magnetic laces here on Adafruit.

Psssst.

lace-hate

The post These DIY Magnetic Shoelaces Just Made Life 10X Easier appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 05, 2017 10:39 PM

How 3D Printing Revolutionized the World’s Oldest Making Process

from-ceramic-craftsman-3d-printing-maker-00

A wonderful story has been submitted to Fabbaloo describing how a traditional ceramics craftsman was able to vastly simplify his work using 3D print technology.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84173" style="width: 800px;">Alain Canard at work<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Alain Canard at work</figcaption></figure>

Nicolas Tokotuu of 3D Printing Science directed us to France-based craftsman Alain Canard, who has spent 27 years reproducing ceramic objects using very traditional techniques. Over that period of time, Canard has developed tremendous skills in ceramics that few could match.

The business of replicating ceramic objects is an interesting one. While you might find a ceramic object, would you be able to reproduce it? If you had the original mold used to make the item, it would be simple: just cast another one.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84174" style="width: 800px;">An original ceramic tile requiring replication<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">An original ceramic tile requiring replication</figcaption></figure>

However, in many cases the original mold is no longer available or may even be destroyed. Thus enters the craft of reproducing ceramic objects. Essentially, Canard’s role is to reproduce the mold from which more items could be made.

To do so there are a series of steps to take, but recently Canard acquired a 3D printer and hand-operated 3D scanner to smooth out the workflow. Here’s how it works:

An original object is presented. In this case, it’s a small tile. One of the challenges with ceramics is that the curing process shrinks the material by around 15%, thus you must make sure the mold is of the correct size to end up with a properly sized object.

Canard uses the hand scanner to obtain a rough 3D model of the input object. The hand scanner is best for this role as he apparently sometimes is required to reproduce larger objects that might not fit within a tabletop 3D scanner.

In a 3D modeling system, Canard fixes the rough scan and scales it up 17.6% to account for ceramic shrinkage.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84175" style="width: 800px;">Rough plastic positive molds produced on a 3D printer<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Rough plastic positive molds produced on a 3D printer</figcaption></figure>

The 3D model is then printed in plastic to create a “draft positive mold”. This is only a rough reproduction at this stage, as it includes errors obtained during the 3D scan.

A negative mold of the 3D print is created and then plaster is used to produce a new positive mold. Essentially, this is a rough approximation of the original object in plaster.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84176" style="width: 820px;">A ceramic plaster positive mold of the tile<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">A ceramic plaster positive mold of the tile</figcaption></figure>

Then Canard uses his sculpting skills to resculpt the plaster object to be as similar as possible to the original object. It’s important to remember at this point that the original objects were no doubt hand sculpted themselves, and thus they are not necessarily composed of precision shapes as you might find in a machine-generated object. Generally, a hand sculpture process is used to duplicate a hand sculpture.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_84177" style="width: 800px;">The final mold used by an earthenware factory to reproduce the original tile<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The final mold used by an earthenware factory to reproduce the original tile</figcaption></figure>

Finally a proper, industrial negative mold is created from the finely-shaped positive completing the process. The final mold is used to manufacture reliable reproductions of the original piece.

Without 3D printing Canard would have had to create the entire shape in rough form by hand, which could take a considerable amount of time, depending on the size and shape of the object. The injection of 21st century technology into the 10,000 year old ceramics process is a huge contrast, but also showing how life can be easier with 3D technology.

The post How 3D Printing Revolutionized the World’s Oldest Making Process appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at January 05, 2017 08:48 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Wire Style Modification in SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Wire Style Modification in SOLIDWORKS Electrical

<article class="main clearfix article5332">

The process of creating a large quantity of wire styles can be simplified through the use of Microsoft Excel. SOLIDWORKS Electrical can interface directly with Excel to allow for much faster wire style generation.  The following is an outline of this process.

If you want to create new wire styles first then simply click the add button in the wire style manager to generate as many default styles wires as you want, these wires will all then be available to edit through the procedure that follows:

1. Select the configurations drop-down menu from the project tab and then select Excel export/import.

2. From here you will need to create a new export/import template. Click New.

3. Once you have clicked new a menu will appear asking for you to name the template, specify the document type and add a description, click next when complete.

4. After clicking next, scroll to the bottom of the objects to export list and select wire style. Once selected you can add and remove fields from the template by checking them on and off via the fields to export menu.  Since we want all fields checked on in this example, complete this step and click finish.

5. Your blank Excel template will open with all the fields that were selected.  Save the template to a location of your choosing and then close it.  We will then export our existing wire style library to this blank template and I will save it as Custom Wire Library.xlsx.

6. When you have closed and saved, return to SOLIDWORKS Electrical and you will see your new blank template in the list menu we began at, close this menu.

7. Go from the project tab to the import/export tab and click on export to Excel.

8. Clicking this tab will launch the Excel export wizard, click on add.

9. This will open up a list of the templates that are available, among this list you will see the Custom Wire Library.xlsx template that we created earlier, check it on and click ok.

10. You will now see it added to the Excel export wizard, click next.

11. Using the selected template, we should now specify a location that the populated template will be saved to and then click finish.
Note: If this location is the same as the location of the blank template then SOLIDWORKS Electrical will warn you that there is already a template of the same name in this location, either choose a different location or opt to
override/overwrite the existing blank template, click finish,

12. Navigate on your computer to the location that you chose to save to and you will see the Custom Wire Library.xlsx, open it with Excel,

13. Modify any of the cells that have now been populated with your existing wire style library and then save the changes once finished, I have done the first row as an example. You may have to bonce back and forward between Excel and the wire style manager in Electrical to figure out what each of the available column values are by assessing the properties of each wire,

14. Once your Excel document is saved, return to SOLIDWORKS Electrical and from the import/export tab select the import from Excel option,

15. Once this option is selected you will enter the Excel import wizard, click add

16. When add is selected you will be able to browse to the location of your saved Custom Wire Library document, select it and open

17. The excel document will be added to the Excel import wizard, click next,

18. You will be shown all areas of the Excel document that were modified, you can scroll through these to review the changes, click next,

19. A final summary screen is presented of the data that has been imported from Excel, click finish,

20. If this prompt appears then (unless you choose otherwise) select the option that I have highlighted,

21. Head back to the project tab and into the configurations drop down menu then into the wire styles manager,

22. Notice the changes to the library have come through from Excel as expected, to review the changes select a modified wire style and select properties,

23. You can clearly see that the modifications made in Excel have been successfully imported back into the SOLIDWORKS electrical wire style manager,

This method makes the modification of wire styles in SOLIDWORKS electrical much more manageable, increases the speed at which you can modify wire style properties and can be carried out at any stage in the design process to update your wire styles, which in turn will propagate through your project.

***
Lewis Harvey is a Certified SOLIDWORKS Expert  and Applications Engineer at TMS CADCentre, a SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller in Scotland.  You can read more from Andrew on the TMS CADCentre blog
</article>

Author information

TMS CADCentre
TMS CADCentre - is a SOLIDWORKS Reseller based in Scotland providing 3D CAD Design Software, analysis software & product data management software. The company was formed in 1981 and now pleased to be celebrating 35 years in business. TMS CADCentre is the only UK SOLIDWORKS Reseller based and funded within Scotland and have been providing SOLIDWORKS software, training and support since 1996 when the product was first launched in the UK.

The post Wire Style Modification in SOLIDWORKS Electrical appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by TMS CADCentre at January 05, 2017 04:08 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Spell Check can utilize the Microsoft Word dictionary & F7 shortcut

If you have a compatible version of Microsoft Word installed on your machine alongside SOLIDWORKS (see the Microsoft Products table in the SOLIDWORKS System Requirements), you have access to SOLIDWORKS Spell Check to find any spelling mistakes in your notes or dimensions with text.

NOTE: SOLIDWORKS won’t check the spelling in your drawing Title Block, unless you are in Edit Sheet Format mode.

The Spell Check can be found under Tools > Spelling, but just remember to hit the F7 key as a shortcut when you’re reviewing your finished drawing.  This launches the Spell Check similar to Word.  It’s actually using the Microsoft Word standard dictionary as well as the swengineering.dic dictionary (found under C:\Program Files\SOLIDWORKS Corp\SOLIDWORKS\lang\english).

SOLIDWORKS Spelling Check

SOLIDWORKS Spelling Check

Be sure to look through the Suggestions before applying the Change.

SOLIDWORKS Spell Check

SOLIDWORKS Spelling Check – Suggestions

 

Note that Spell Check is only available in English.  Also SOLIDWORKS will not check words found in tables, notes linked to properties, or blocks.

The post SOLIDWORKS Spell Check can utilize the Microsoft Word dictionary & F7 shortcut appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at January 05, 2017 01:00 PM

January 04, 2017

SolidSmack

SlimBox Creates Custom Cardboard Boxes On-Demand

feature

feature

Often overlooked until the very end of a design process, package design can be a critical part of branding that strongly dictates how a consumer feels about a product before they even open it. While nobody is necessarily expected to operate in the upper echelon of Apple iPhone boxes (very expensive), there are better solutions than simply cramming a product into a large box with a bunch of packaging peanuts and bubble wrap.

Such is the premise behind SlimBox, a custom box creation concept that uses a laser cutter and an accompanying smartphone app to create on-demand boxes (and internal supports) for just about any dang ol’ thing.

Slimbox cardboard box example

The setup is simple: measure the dimensions of your product and enter them into the free SlimBox App. Once a custom box size is generated, the user has the option to “Print” the box on the spot.

While this is already possible with a custom-designed box layout and an existing laser cutter, the concept behind SlimBox is to streamline the entire process with their box-creation algorithm. However, no word on how they plan to control that burnt cardboard smell.

Screen Shot 2017-01-04 at 8.03.44 AM

Says the SlimBox founders:

“Before we launched Slimbox, we owned a printing company. Finding right-sized boxes was one of our daily struggles. To remedy this problem, we searched the market for a machine that could customize our boxes in-house without costing too much time or money. We found nothing. We were stunned that such a machine was not yet on the market so we decided to build it ourselves.”

Unfortunately, the only images from the company at this time are CAD renders — but here’s to hoping they can pull through and make this pretty ingenious solution real. In the meantime, find out more over at SlimBox.

The post SlimBox Creates Custom Cardboard Boxes On-Demand appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at January 04, 2017 01:10 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Keynote Speakers at SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Aim to Inspire

At SOLIDWORKS World 2017, the goal is to inspire attendees so they can go back home feeling energized to create truly innovative designs. One way that is accomplished is by providing ample opportunities to network and share tips and tricks with the over five thousand like-minded peers. There is also the Partner Pavilion where you can get your hands on the newest technologies that further leverage the power of SOLIDWORKS. Attending break-out tech sessions will also teach you new skills and best practices to take your careers to the next level.

Each day starts off with general session presentations that will provide a fresh perspective on the future of design from the leading minds in science, engineering, and technology. The keynote lineup for SOLIDWORKS World 2017 includes a list of visionaries ready to provide you with new perspectives that will inspire your approach to design as well as customer mashups that pair SOLIDWORKS users with their customers to share their success stories of how SOLIDWORKS is helping them create the great designs of the future. Check out the #SWW17 keynote speakers and register today for SOLIDWORKS World 2017 in Los Angeles, California, February 3-5.

Here’s a preview of some of the exciting presenters that will change the way you view the future of product design:

Featured Speakers

Anousheh Ansari, an Iranian-American engineer, was the first female private space explorer and spent eight days aboard the International Space Station. She is also the co-founder and chairman of Prodea Systems, a platform for the Internet of Things.

Jason Silva, Media Artist, Futurist, Philosopher. Silva is best known as host of National Geographic’s hit TV series, Brain Games. He is also the creator of Shots of Awe, a short film series that explores innovation, technology creativity, futurism and the metaphysics of the imagination.

Customer Mash Ups

Paul Reed Smith and Jon Wasserman from PRS Guitars join Mark Tremonti, guitarist of Alter Bridge and Creed, to share the story of their collaboration on the design and development of the Mark Tremonti Signature guitar.

Sustainability expert and social visionary, Duane Elgin, talks to Jon Friedman, Co-founder of Freight Farms, about how the company modifies shipping containers to create year-round agriculture in any environment and empower local food production.

At SOLIDWORKS World we will also provide a glimpse of the new technologies that drive development of the next release of SOLIDWORKS software as well as a sneak peek at some of the exciting new features and enhancements in SOLIDWORKS 2018 that will help you get your job done faster and innovate more effectively.

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to share your experiences with your engineering peers at the largest conference of its kind. Register for SOLIDWORKS World 2017 today here!

 

Author information

Barbara Schmitz
Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks
Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post Keynote Speakers at SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Aim to Inspire appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Barbara Schmitz at January 04, 2017 01:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS 2017 has increased Feature Pattern performance

SOLIDWORKS 2017 has increased Feature Pattern performance!

Linear pattern feature performance is improved for SOLIDWORKS 2017, especially when the number of instances is large. In SOLIDWORKS 2016 and prior releases the Pattern Feature takes in some cases over 30% longer to rebuild. This performance boost holds true even for seed features such as extrude boss/cut with simple circular or rectangular profiles.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Feature Pattern Performance

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

Access our resources page to get everything you need to learn what’s new in SOLIDWORKS 2017; including tech tips, demonstrations, and upcoming product webinars.

WHAT’S NEW RESOURCES

SOLIDWORKS 2017 Resources

The post SOLIDWORKS 2017 has increased Feature Pattern performance appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Jamie Hill, CSWP at January 04, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

App Smack 01.17: Exacto, Tasker, Compound, Momento, and More…

Feature

Feature

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device, be it iPhone, Android or Windows!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional and this week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Exacto

Quickly remove unwanted backgrounds or create razor-sharp photo cutouts with the Pen Selection Tool. Previously found only in advanced desktop programs, now available for the very first time on iPhone and iPad with a streamlined and much simplified implementation optimized for touch.

Exacto

Secrets Touch

Secrets is a simple and secure password manager and secure wallet. Store your passwords, credit cards, bank details and more, safely using OpenPGP — a proven industry standard encryption format.

SecretsTouch

Momento GIFs

Using a smart detection algorithm Momento automatically creates beautiful moments using your already on the device photos.

Momentos

Tasker

Total Automation, From Settings to SMS.

Tasker

Compound for Substratum

A pitch black phone theme.

Compound

Top Cleaner & Boost

Top Cleaner is a small but powerful app with many useful features like the memory booster,junk cleaner,CPU cool,power saver and so on.

TopCleaner

The post App Smack 01.17: Exacto, Tasker, Compound, Momento, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 04, 2017 11:00 AM

January 03, 2017

SolidSmack

How To Make a DIY Pressure Pot Exhaust Silencer

eric-strebel-pressure-tank-silencer-00

eric-strebel-pressure-tank-silencer-00

If you work in manufacturing or have your own resin casting operation, you’ll know the all too familiar sound of pressure pots or tanks being bled and the subsequent look of agonizing pain as blood prepares to spray from the earholes… maybe it’s not that bad. Yeah, yeah it is.

Ear plugs always get lost or there’s the embarrassment of having mismatched colors of ear plugs *snicker* and it’s too much work to slap on some Ear Defense 3000 safety muffs, so leave it to Industrial Designer and SolidSmack contributor, Eric Strebel, to address the problem at the source – the pressure pot exhaust port.

Eric has a very simple solution to prevent a lifetime of mind-altering tinnitus with pipe fittings you may very well have laying around the shop. With these, a small exhaust port silencer can be constructed to deaden the sound when you’re ready to purge the pot. Here’s how he made it:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/IrDhcfyM3vE?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Exhaust Port Silencer Part List

  • 3/8″ x 2″ Steel Nipple
  • 3/8″ x 1/2″ Steel Hex Bushing Adapter
  • 1/2″ x 1-1/4″ PVC Busing Adapter
  • 1-1/4″ PVC Male Adapter
  • 1-1/4″ PVC Cap
  • Plumber’s Pipe Dope
  • PVC Primer & Sealant

Eric milled some slots in the PVC Cap, but holes could be drilled just the same. He fastened the steel pipe fitting to the pot’s exhaust port first, applying wee bit o’ the pipe dope to the threads. Then he built up the rest of the fixture using PVC primer and sealant between the adapters.

While you could use a smaller diameter fitting, he chose the 1-1/4″ PVC piping to easily jab in a couple of rolled up washcloths. Once everything is together, you can bleed your tank muff, plug and hands-free. It’s a small cost and quick solution for a big bit of added safety in the shop. Check out Eric’s other videos on his Youtube channel.

eric-strebel-pressure-tank-silencer-03

eric-strebel-pressure-tank-silencer-04

eric-strebel-pressure-tank-silencer-05

The post How To Make a DIY Pressure Pot Exhaust Silencer appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at January 03, 2017 11:01 PM

SOLIDWORKS Blog | SOLIDWORKS Engineering & Design Blog

Super Funny, Super Useless Machine

Just for laughs
<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="480" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Djc8FPHs45o" width="100%"></iframe>

Author

Nick Weirens, Marketing Manager

January 03, 2017 04:21 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Linking a Note to a Table/BOM Cell in SOLIDWORKS 2017

We all know that notes are an important part of any engineering drawing and help to transfer vital information. One of the problems when dealing with drawings is to keep these notes up to date. The best solution for that problem is to automate the process and ask the software to take care of maintaining them. That is what SOLIDWORKS keeps doing every year. For example, last year SOLIDWORKS added the functionality to link a Note to a Balloon using Flag Notes. Now in SOLIDWORKS 2017, they improved the Note tool again and this time you can link a note to a BOM or hole table cell.

How to Link a Note to a Table Cell

As I mentioned you can link a note to the contents of any BOM or hole table cell. To do so first you need to insert a Note in your drawing with a table. Then double click on the Note and in the Property Manager browse to “Text Format” section and select “Link Table Cell”.

Drawing Note

Drawing Note

Next simply select a cell in the table that you want to link to your Note and press OK. You will see that the value of the cell is added to your text.

Note Linked

Note Linked

Because the note is linked to the table cell, when the cell value changes, the note updates as well.

SOLIDWORKS Note Link BOM

Note and Cell linked

Learn more about Drawings

Try our SOLIDWORKS Drawings training course either live online or in a Canadian city near you to learn more about notes and other SOLIDWORKS drawing best practices.

The post Linking a Note to a Table/BOM Cell in SOLIDWORKS 2017 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Saeed Mojarad (CSWE) at January 03, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Behind the Design: The $2,500 Runwell Turntable from Shinola Detroit

feature

feature

Since screaming onto the American manufacturing scene in 2013, lifestyle brand Shinola Detroit has expanded their product line from high-end watches to leather goods to even bicycles — all with a majority of the parts and materials sourced from local or national suppliers and assembled in Detroit, Michigan.

For their latest project, the company pulled out all the stops to create a $2,500 turntable that offers audiophile sound quality and a lifetime warranty —  each assembled by hand in Detroit at the company’s flagship store.

Produced in a limited run of 500 units, the turntables were created in partnership with Harry Weisfield, founder of premier turntable manufacturer VPI.

90

While designed for the ears of the audiophile, the turntable is also designed to be easy to use by any vinyl enthusiast and features a built-in phono preamplifier and a belt-driven pulley with speeds of 33 1/3 rpm and 45rpm.

Perhaps just as interesting as the design of the Detroit-built turntable is the story behind how it came to be:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="450" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/192694526?color=ffffff&amp;title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="800"></iframe>

Find out more over at Shinola Detroit.

The post Behind the Design: The $2,500 Runwell Turntable from Shinola Detroit appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at January 03, 2017 12:53 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS Saves Cambridge Industrial Design from Getting in a Flap

Successful products marry innovative answers to intuitive design. Functionality plus form. Cambridge Industrial Design knows all about that, with a varied range of illustrious clients including Fender, AGA, Philips, and Wharfedale. Enticing product design is the core of its business and SOLIDWORKS helps the company achieve it.


Who is Cambridge Industrial Design?

A joint venture in the UK between Design Director Tim Evans and Managing Director Alex Jones, Cambridge Industrial Design provide product design to the tailored specifics of its clients. Elegant, bespoke product development that’s as useful as it is fancy.  No prizes for where it’s based (clue: it’s UK team could go punting for lunch and it’s not Oxford).

Cambridge Industrial Design Logo

How does SOLIDWORKS help?

To answer that, you might as well ask the cat. Literally.

Tasked with creating an innovative new gadget for pet moggies, Cambridge Industrial Design worked with SureFlap to invent a safer way for feline pets to enter the home. Utilising microchip technology, a chip in the cat’s collar activates the cat flap, allowing only the wearer access to the house, keeping strays safely outside. Simple ingenuity, it’s a great idea in kitty security. Now all that had to be done was to design it!

Cambridge Industrial Design SureFlap

SOLIDWORKS allowed the team the luxury of a virtual design suite without the expense of physical builds and prototypes. The fact that SOLIDWORKS can accurately replicate the real-world behaviour of any given material, allowed real-time stress tests, as the team developed the product. This gave the CID team excellent opportunity to explore variant prototypes as it went along, making adjustments on the fly to generate huge savings on both timescale and material cost. Perhaps ironically for a cat product, complicated changes could be made with just a few clicks of the mouse, all without the need to physically construct a single thing.

The result was a finished product ready for manufacture in a tight schedule, giving SureFlap advantage by getting to market swiftly and surely. There are a lot of happy, safe cats out there thanks to SOLIDWORKS.


Strike the pose

Using SOLIDWORKS has an enormous commercial benefit over traditional methods of practical design and build, such as photorealistic renderings created in the software package. These give a huge advantage in terms of marketing timescales. With the design and ergonomics such an inherent part of Cambridge Industrial Design’s USP, it’s able to take marketing images straight from the software platform ready for use by its clients, before the product is packaged and ready to sell.

Also doing away with the unnecessary expense, time and unpredictability of hiring a photographer, CID can keep going back to the product whenever they need to, grabbing any image from its build as its client demands, with variables such as lighting and exposure never a problem.


Where next for Cambridge Industrial Design?

Cambridge Industrial Design Tablet Accessory

From tabby accessories to tablet accessories, the company doesn’t look set to slow down its design and production any time soon. The appliance of SOLIDWORKS’ intuitive software will carry on making its successful product engineering possible.

Read the original case study by Innova Systems, here.
MORE CASE STUDIES:

>> SOLIDWORKS on song for premium hi-fi manufacturer
>> Headkayse improve cycling safety with folding helmet
>> Adlens zero in on success with SOLIDWORKS

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Saves Cambridge Industrial Design from Getting in a Flap appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS UK at January 03, 2017 12:00 PM