Planet SolidWorks

August 02, 2021

SolidSmack

Magnapot Turns Your Workspace Into a Modular Garden

magnapot

Most desk jobs nowadays involve staying indoors in front of a computer screen. While this is fine for introverts and shut-ins, it doesn’t bode well for those who long for the great outdoors. So why not bring a small and manageable piece to your workspace?

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Magnapot is a series of modular ceramic pots which you can use to spruce up the insides of your home. With the neodymium magnetic tips found on each pot’s side, you can add more pots to your ever-growing garden with zero effort.

Each Magnapot measures 5.25 inches long, 4 inches wide, and has a height of 3 inches. They also weigh 1 pound each; indeed, they are quite heavy for something you’re supposed to snap together like pieces of LEGO.

magnapot

Unlike other small pots, Magnapots are wick-integrated. The Magnapot nourishes your plant without any help from you as long as the wick touches the water;  nonetheless, I’m pretty sure you still need to manually change the water!

Magnapots can hold all sorts of small plants, from the tiny bonsai tree to my personal and low-maintenance favorite: the cactus.

magnapot

Apart from serving as a potted plant holder, the Magnapot can also hold your office supplies and knickknacks. You can dump your pencils, paints, pens, and many other small objects that start with the letter ‘P’.

As for another P, painting, you can actually use the water-containing properties of the Magnapot to mix your watercolor paints. You can easily moisten your brush with a set of Magnapots near your canvas, as long as you’re ready to clean up some mess afterward.

magnapot

With different pots having different magnet configurations, you can be creative with the Magnapots in any way you want. The standard Magnapot box comes with four spherical pots: 2 with four tipped magnets and 2 with two tipped magnets. They aren’t still that distinctive from each other, but the creators are working on making new designs that will liven up your Magnapot collection.

Magnapot is currently live on Kickstarter and is backed by a ton of plant lovers. Currently, it has a funding of US$11,685 – almost double its initial US$5,000 goal. Well, I guess people have been cooped up so long that they want a piece of the outdoors with them in their homes!

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 02, 2021 05:51 PM

The Javelin Blog

Favorite Time Saving Tips for Epic SOLIDWORKS Performance

Are you a SOLIDWORKS user looking to strengthen your epic performance? This webinar is for you! Come learn all the tips and tricks to get faster at modeling, tackle large assemblies and gain back more time in your day.

Join us on Thursday, August 5, 2021 at 10:00am ET for our webinar, as TriMech Elite Application Engineer, Stephen Petrock, will share his favorite tips for epic modeling speed and performance. During this webinar, you will learn how to become more productive and how to save time with your modeling. Stephen will show you a few tricks on how to dominate large assemblies and get the performance for your drawings you have been missing.

In this webinar, you will will learn:

  • How to get more SOLIDWORKS performance with large assemblies
  • Keyboard short cuts to use for modeling speed
  • How to be a performance pro with workflow and steps
  • How to spend less time modeling

Can’t attend? Register anyway and we’ll send you a recording!

About The Presenter

Stephen Petrock, Elite Application Engineer

Stephen has been with TriMech for over eight years. He received his Elite Application Engineer certification in 2012 and has focused on the simulation product suite for TriMech. He lives in Florida but enjoys traveling to meet with clients and help them optimize their designs and engineering processes to help improve their businesses.

The post Favorite Time Saving Tips for Epic SOLIDWORKS Performance appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at August 02, 2021 02:20 PM

August 01, 2021

SolidSmack

Flagship Light Turns Skillets Into Grills

flagship light

There’s just something about the smokey, outdoorsy smell and flavor of well-grilled foods that get me. But as summer ends and the weird weather approaches, chances to cook on an outdoor grill become few and far between. So instead of hoping for good weather, why not bring the grill inside your home?

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Flagship Light isn’t another pan or skillet you need to buy. Instead, it takes your preexisting 10 and 12-inch bottom skillets and effortlessly turns them into cast iron grills.

This 1 cm thick (0.4-inch) piece of cast iron is machined to be as thin and light as possible. Those iconic ridges (which give the telltale signs that the food has been grilled) are actually leveled, allowing the fats and liquids to drain to the outer area of the pan. This also lets the entirety of the piece of food be equally heated and cooked properly, making for some really fine grilled foods.

Even if you don’t own a skillet (or if you just feel like using it), the Flagship Light can also be used as it is. That said, you can directly use this piece of cast iron onto your kitchen stove or simply place it on top of any outdoor fire to grill some fine foods.

Moreover, campers and outdoorsmen can easily carry the Flagship Light in their packs without taking up too much space since it is so thin and lightweight.

Flagship Lights are non-stick and you can easily clean them with some hot water. If you don’t want to burn yourself on a searing hot piece of metal, there are also some stainless steel Easy Grips which you can get. This should allow you to move the Flagship Light around without touching it.

This cast iron attachment is currently live on Kickstarter, where it has already raised more than 20 times its initial US$5,000 goal. Now, it has whopping funding of US$101,872. The reason? Well, I guess people just really love their grilled foods!

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 01, 2021 01:45 PM

Can Car Windows Break Fingers?

car window experiments

When I was four, I had that stupid idea of stopping the blades of an electric fan… using my tiny fingers. Really just a child curious about things. Long story short, I wasn’t able to point at things for a while. But, the good news is I still have that finger (in case you were wondering), satisfied my curiosity, and learned a very important lesson.

That was with a fast-spinning fan. But what would happen if you stuck your finger in something slower? Like say, a car window?

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After finding out a German-made Volkswagen’s windows would automatically pull back once it has detected an obstruction, YouTuber William Osman turned into a curious little child. With the bizarre idea somewhat similar to the one I had as a kid, he wanted to test how far could fingers go in terms of car windows.

Osman would use a Ford Taurus’s more dangerous, non-automated windows for the said experiment. Exciting. However, being an intelligent adult, he had the foresight to not put his own fingers in harm’s way.

car window experiments

The American car easily broke through a couple of food items found in William’s fridge, but those didn’t have bones, ligaments, or skin. So, to test if the car window could actually break a human finger, William’s team had to make something with similar components as a human finger.

Four “fingers” were created for the experiments, each with different makeup.

Ballistic Gelatin

car window experiments

The first finger was made from simple ballistic gelatin – which was basically Jell-O with no “bone” inside whatsoever. The Ford Taurus made short work of this finger; as it had almost no resistance when crushed by the car window.

Synthetic Ballistic Gelatin

car window experiments

The second finger also had no bones inside of it but was made from a more expensive synthetic ballistic gelatin. Unlike the first finger, the synthetic gel was supposed to be reusable and better simulate the ballistic properties of gelatin.

When pitted against the Ford Taurus’s windows, the synthetic gel bent just as easily as the first finger, only it didn’t break. So if you happen to have no bones in your fingers, I guess you wouldn’t have to worry about getting them stuck on a car window!

Oak Dowel and Synthetic Ballistic Gelatin

car window experiments

Eager to see some bones snap, Osman tried a much newer American car.

For the finger though, he used a mix of synthetic ballistic gel with a piece of oak dowel inside to simulate a human bone. He put the finger in place, raised the window, and it just snapped the oak in two!

Since human fingers have thick ligaments and bones inside them, I don’t think this would prove that a car window could actually break a finger. The oak dowel used was actually quite thin, and it isn’t really the best representation of what would happen if you stuck your finger in a car window.

Human Bone and Synthetic Ballistic Gelatin

car window experiments

But you know what is a good representation of human bones for the experiment? Actual human bones!

Osman never really checked if the finger bones he bought online were actual human bones, but I would rather give him the benefit of the doubt than find out the truth. Just like with the oak dowel finger, he coated the bones in synthetic ballistic gelatin and left it to solidify before beginning the experiment.

Crushing this finger in the car window destroyed the gel, but the bone itself was left untouched. They even tried positioning the finger at a specific angle so that the biggest bone would get pinched by the window. Unfortunately (or fortunately), the dried-up human bone didn’t break.

So there you have it. While you might end up with a couple of bruises and even a broken fingernail or skin (should you be unlucky), there just isn’t enough crushing force in a normal car window for it to completely break your finger. Thank goodness for that!

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 01, 2021 01:02 PM

Make a Simple Heron’s Fountain Out of Bottles and Straws

Heron's fountain

Have you ever wondered how one of those perpetual Heron’s fountains works? You know, those ones with a seemingly infinite supply of water?

You could look it up on Google, but where’s the fun in that? Instead, why not have YouTuber DaveHax explain it with a miniature Heron’s fountain built out of bottles and straws?

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The build itself is quite simple. Drill a couple of holes slightly larger in diameter than the straws into three bottle caps. Two of these caps should be glued together, allowing one bottle to stand upside down atop the other.

The upside-down bottle should have two drilled holes on its bottom (which is now its top). This will allow the straws to pass through to the fountain top. The Heron’s fountain top is made by cutting out the plastic top of the third bottle.

Heron's fountain

Getting the lengths of the straws is a bit tricky but with a little bit of color coding, anyone can get it right.

Two connected straws (denoted by their red color) should feed into the three bottles. A shorter combination of straws (yellow) should protrude just a few inches through the top of the bottom bottle. However, it should also cover most of the space inside the upside-down bottle. Finally, a set of blue straws should run down the length of the upside-down bottle and protrude slightly from the bottom of the Heron’s fountain top.

Got all that? No? Well then, here’s an image DaveHax made which better explains the straw placements:

Heron's fountain

As you can see, the Heron’s fountain works using water displacement and air pressure. When you fill up the fountain above, water flows down the red straw to the bottom bottle. The air inside the bottom bottle then gets pushed via the yellow straw into the upside-down bottle, which in turn pushes the water inside that one through the blue straw on top of the Heron’s fountain.

Heron's fountain

The Heron’s fountain will continue working until the water totally fills up the bottom bottle or goes below the blue straw in the upside-down bottle. Once that happens, all you need to do is flip the fountain upside down. This fills up the upside-down bottle, and whatever excess water remains should fall into the bottom bottle. You can then take this excess and use it to fill up the fountain top above; starting the process all over again.

In more sophisticated Heron’s fountains (i.e. the ones you see in malls and parks), an electronic mechanism pours more water into the fountain above. This eliminates the human element; bringing the world one step closer to machine domination.

by Carlos Zotomayor at August 01, 2021 11:08 AM

July 30, 2021

SolidSmack

Here’s Dom the Robot: The Next Great Domino Artist

mark rober dominator

Mark Rober, a former NASA and Apple engineer, always has something up his sleeve. This time, his newest project is a domino-stacking robot he nicknamed “Dom” (short for “Dominator”).

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As said, Dom has one specific function: to stack as many dominoes as fast and as accurately as possible without a single misplaced piece. Why, you ask? Because stacking millions of dominoes in lines would probably cost any person’s sanity. Plus, who doesn’t love toppling them over without the fear of doing it again because you have a reliable domino-stacking robot?

This makes the robot extra special compared to Mark’s previous projects. And though it took him and three undergraduate engineers five years to complete Dom, Mark feels satisfied with his creation.

mark rober dominator

But before we get to Dom, we have to first look at the impressive loading station made primarily out of Hot Wheels tracks and various custom 3D printed parts.

mark rober dominator

Using conveyor belts, dominoes are loaded by color onto the station where a Kuka robot arm at the top awaits them. The arm picks up the dominoes one by one and places them into 1 of the 300 chutes, which are all made of plastic Hot Wheels tracks measuring 2.7 miles or 4.3 km in length.

Once the dominoes are loaded, Dom swoops in under the loading station and waits for them. The lower layer of dominoes is dropped and off he goes to place them!

mark rober dominator

Dom himself is just as impressive as the loading station. Thanks to a pre-programmed route and GPS sensors, the robot knows exactly where to go to place the dominoes. As Dom comes closer to his destination, its positioning gets fine-tuned with the aid of infrared cameras and trackers on the ground.

mark rober dominator

To get around, Dom is fitted with omnidirectional wheels. While your normal wheel can only go forwards or backward, omni-wheels have small discs on them which allow for fine movements in any direction. With these wheels combined with a few brushless servo motors, Dom can make accurate and minimal adjustments to his position very easily.

mark rober dominator

Dom also has some 3D printed parts on his front end which funnel dominoes into the slots. Once the dominoes are loaded, a servo slides out a tray underneath the dominoes; effectively placing them in the desired location. Of course, that’s only scratching the surface of the Dominator. If you want to find out more about Dom’s design, you can check it out here.

Now, for Dom’s actual business:

mark rober dominator

After easily besting mere human domino artist Lily Hevesh in a stacking competition, Dom set his sights on filling an entire warehouse with over 100,000 stacked dominoes.

mark rober dominator

As you would expect from a machine built specifically for this purpose, the Dominator stacked all the dominoes in order without a single accidental topple. The end result was a beautiful 100,000-domino mural of Super Domino Bros.

The build took a little more than 24 hours. Nonetheless, considering it took a group of domino artists a hellish week to do the same thing only to experience sorts of error, Dom’s performance can be considered truly impressive.

mark rober dominator

With the dominoes in place, the only thing left to do for the team was to knock them down! Mark Rober made a special mechanism which pushed a series of pipes down onto the domino art. After 5 years of hard and grueling work, hearing those dominoes fall in sync must be 10 times more satisfying for them than for any of us who can just witness the marvel on YouTube.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 30, 2021 04:45 PM

The Javelin Blog

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 12: Shop Floor Programmer for CAM

In the previous part of our 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial series we reviewed mold design. In this tutorial we are reviewing the features in Shop Floor Programmer that make it very easy to create the program for our carving knife handle as we program half of the mold for the handle that has been created.

When a new product is developed, it is important to gain a clear understanding of how variables will impact production. Shop Floor Programmer helps us do that and is available inside of the 3DEXPERIENCE Works. It includes 2.5 and 3 Axis Milling operations, kinematic machine simulation, 3 + 2 Machining and Probing.

Watch the tutorial video below to learn how we simulated the machining of this part:

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Reviewing the Mold for CAM Programmer

We can access and review the mold prior to programming. Files programmed in Shop Floor Machining can be leveraged from the 3DEXPERIENCE design tools or from an external resource.

3DEXPERIENCE Shop Floor Programmer Mold Review

3DEXPERIENCE Shop Floor Programmer Mold Review

Shop Floor Machining

Shop Floor Machining allows for setups of machining cells that can be reused. In this case, we will use a Tormach Machine already set up. The carving knife mold simply needs to be inserted and positioned. After identifying the work offset and rough stock, it is ready to be programmed.

3DEXPERIENCE Shop Floor Machining Tormach Machine

3DEXPERIENCE Shop Floor Machining Tormach Machine

CAM Tool Selection

We are provided with Axial, Prismatic and Surface Machining Options for programming. Once a machining method is selected, we can leverage tool selection through a created and saved Tool Catalog.

Shop Floor Machining CAM Programmer allows for full customization of the operations, including entry, retract, step overs and feeds.

3DEXPERIENCE Shop Floor Machining Operations Customization

3DEXPERIENCE Shop Floor Machining Operations Customization

Machine Simulation

Once the part is fully programmed, the Machine Simulation is a click away. There are options for Stock removal and Toolpath visualization during the simulation.

Machine Simulation

Machine Simulation

The Shop Floor Programmer CAM role is a complete solution for 3 Axis Milling. Leveraging the tools in Shop Floor Machining, the carving knife mold can be programmed and verified within minutes. This allows for a seamless transition between the other apps in the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

Interested in 3DEXPERIENCE Works?

Visit our website to learn how 3DEXPERIENCE® SOLIDWORKS® connects the industry-leading SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD desktop solution to the 3DEXPERIENCE Works platform, a cloud-based product development environment.

The post 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 12: Shop Floor Programmer for CAM appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by TriMech Solutions, LLC at July 30, 2021 12:00 PM

July 29, 2021

SolidSmack

How Much G-force Can an Average Human Withstand?

human centrifuge

Even with the human body’s natural ability to adapt, we aren’t exactly made to withstand too much g-force. You can chalk this up to humans’ inability to fly or run at supersonic speeds. So, why do some folks even bother going to high-G training? Well, it’s to up their g-tolerance before getting in an aircraft. But how do they do it? And how did it start?

In the 1950s, pilots would willingly strap themselves to rocket-propelled sleds and would get boosted across vast open areas. After attaining the specific amount of g, the sled would slow down with help from water troughs. Needless to say, it wasn’t the safest method in the world for g-force training.

Nowadays, aircraft pilots and astronauts train using a human centrifuge – a machine that spins them around at increasingly fast speeds. By gradually increasing the speed, people inside the centrifuge can practice proper routines without the fear of crashing a million-dollar aircraft.

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Thanks to the Royal Air Force, YouTuber Tom Scott was able to take a ride in their human centrifuge to see how much g-force a normal person can withstand.

human centrifuge

Of course, you need at least some form of basic training before getting in the centrifuge. Spinning in a rapidly accelerating capsule causes the blood in your body to flow towards your feet, so you need to tense your muscles to keep some of that blood in your upper regions. To be more precise, tensing your buttocks and legs forces the blood to go back to your head.

human centrifuge

Another exercise involves a breathing method that increases the strain in your upper chest. This not only increases the blood pressure in the greater blood vessels, but also makes sure your brain stays awake.

If you haven’t figured it out by now, the one big thing astronauts and pilots are trying to avoid is passing out. G-LOC, short for g-induced loss of consciousness, occurs when your brain doesn’t have enough blood. If your body fails to adapt to the g-forces properly, your brain undergoes cerebral hypoxia and you pass out. Apparently, you don’t want that when you’re hundreds of feet above the ground.

Even with the proper exercises, it takes time for the body to get accustomed to the g-forces exerted on it. Pilots normally can withstand up to 5gs. They can also tolerate up to 7gs with a special g-suit that restricts blood from leaving the upper body and brain.

human centrifuge

Unfortunately, Tom, who doesn’t have that much g-force training nor a g-suit, passed out from only 3.7 g-forces. When you compare his limit to that of John Paul Stapp’s record at 25 g-forces, you can see just how useful proper training and preparation can be.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 29, 2021 03:24 PM

The Javelin Blog

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 11: Mold Design

In the previous part of our 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial series we reviewed the plastic injection analysis process. In this tutorial we are going to show how the mold design tools can be easily utilized for functionality on this updated geometry.

Developing a tooling split can be an arduous process using lesser design tools. When using 3DEXPERIENCE Works, the workflow is very direct. With powerful mold tools built in, regardless of what access level you have in 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS, you can efficiently create a tooling split when building molds. With our carving knife handle, this is no exception.

Watch the tutorial video below to learn how we were able to design additional mechanical features and ultimately get to the final design with the powerful, built-in mold tools afforded to all 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS users:

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Organizing Steps

As you can see below, 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS organizes the mold operations very conveniently. Generally, I would recommend working just left to right in this command manager, in completion of the necessary steps to create the tooling split. However, for more complex molds, there are a variety of surfacing commands that will help along the way. If I back up a step further, I would highly recommend for all users looking to generate molds to take our SOLIDWORKS Surface Modeling and SOLIDWORKS Mold Design training classes.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Mold Process Organization

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Mold Process Organization

Accounting for Part Shrinkage

In the screen below, I first scaled the handle at 6% to account for shrinkage after the injection molding process is complete.

Mold Shrinkage

Mold Shrinkage

Generating a Split

Next, we need to generate a split line that will dictate the separation between the core and cavity. The parting line command helps with respect to a draft angle color code whether there is a positive or negative draft, and this allows for quick visualization of these areas in the final part.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Mold Process Generating a Split

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Mold Process Generating a Split

In this case, given the nature of the tight radiuses in the geometry, I chose to use the manual operation with the parting surface. This allowed me to create a very simple radiated surface perpendicular to the pull direction that will helpfully separate the upper and lower halves.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Mold Process Manual Operation

Mold Process Manual Operation

Execute Tooling Split

The last operation to the mold tools operation is to execute the tooling split. This command will conveniently create the upper and lower solid bodies based on the prior commands being run in succession. Because we created a parting line, we can generate a parting surface, and all the necessary steps in terms of the core/cavity functions are created automatically for us, which is super convenient.

Execute Tooling Split

Execute Tooling Split

Below we can see the effect of running the move bodies command. Here, we can see all the pertinent participants in the mold.

Move Bodies

Move Bodies

Interested in 3DEXPERIENCE Works?

Visit our website to learn how 3DEXPERIENCE® SOLIDWORKS® connects the industry-leading SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD desktop solution to the 3DEXPERIENCE Works platform, a cloud-based product development environment.

The post 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 11: Mold Design appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by TriMech Solutions, LLC at July 29, 2021 12:00 PM

July 28, 2021

The Javelin Blog

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 10: Plastic Injection Engineer

In the previous part of our 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial series we learned about drop test simulation. In this tutorial, we will start with a simple part fill analysis to check gate location and determine if the part will fill in a mold. It will show us sink marks and venting locations as well. This will allow us to make any design changes before starting the mold design or cutting any tooling.

In this tutorial we will be using Plastic Injection Engineer, this is a role on the 3DEXPERIENCE Works platform that allows the performing of fill analysis on plastic injection molded components. It will handle a simple part fill analysis to an entire mold study.

Watch the tutorial video below to learn about part-fill analysis with 3DEXPERIENCE Works Simulation:

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Plastic Injection Engineer

Since Plastic Injection Engineer is built on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, we have full revision capabilities, not only for our part designs, but also for any simulation study. For our example here, a branch revision is created on the part. This will allow any design modifications specific to our analysis to stay with the study and not impact the production part. It maintains a link to the original part, so we always have a history of what we have completed.

3DEXPERIENCE Plastic Injection Engineer Branch Revision

Plastic Injection Engineer Branch Revision

Now that a version of the knife handle specific to the analysis exists, it can be opened in 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS and modified to fit the needs of the study. In this case, the study will be run on one half of the part, so we can delete the body to modify the design for our simulation. The design is then simply saved back to the platform.

3DEXPERIENCE Plastic Injection Engineer Saving for Analysis

Saving for Analysis in SOLIDWORKS

Plastic Part Filling

The part is now available for analysis in any 3DEXPERIENCE Works Simulation app. Once opened in our Plastic Part Filling Application, a wizard will guide us through the steps needed to complete the analysis.

3DEXPERIENCE Plastic Injection Engineer Materials

3DEXPERIENCE Plastic Injection Engineer Materials

Process Settings

The next step in the analysis is to define our process settings. Once the step is highlighted in the wizard, the process settings icon appears below and allows us to define the injection conditions. If you’re not sure of the initial conditions, a set of defaults is applied for you.

3DEXPERIENCE Plastic Injection Engineer Process Settings

Plastic Injection Engineer Process Settings

Injection Location

Next, we simply apply an injection location where plastic will enter our mold, and the assistant shows us that the study is ready to solve.

Plastic Injection Location

Plastic Injection Location

Within a few minutes, we can set up a simple fill study and analyze the results to determine if any changes need to be made to the design. Since the study is on the platform, we can also view the results in our web browser, allowing for an easy way to perform a design review with the rest of the team. We can then simply post these results in the community for the rest of the team to review.

3DEXPERIENCE Plastic Injection Engineer Injection Simulation

Plastic Injection Engineer Injection Simulation

Now that we’ve determined that the part will easily fill, and sink marks are acceptable, we can share the design for core and cavity creation.

3DEXPERIENCE Plastic Injection Engineer Fill Study

Plastic Injection Engineer Fill Study

Interested in 3DEXPERIENCE Works?

Visit our website to learn how 3DEXPERIENCE® SOLIDWORKS® connects the industry-leading SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD desktop solution to the 3DEXPERIENCE Works platform, a cloud-based product development environment.

The post 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 10: Plastic Injection Engineer appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by TriMech Solutions, LLC at July 28, 2021 12:00 PM

July 27, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Customer Story: ICAMP’s success in bringing client’s products to market faster with the help of production 3D printers

The Innovation Centre for Advanced Manufacturing and Prototyping (ICAMP) from Canadore College in North Bay Ontario is an innovation center that helps their clients design, develop, prototype, and manufacture products to get them to market.

ICAMP, located in North Bay, has 13,300 square feet of industrial laboratory and design space. Clients can access the space, machinery, and expertise for research and training, demonstrations and testing, and prototype manufacturing.

Watch the short video below to hear more about how ICAMP ‘s team are working on hundreds of projects, helping close to 300 businesses with the help of production 3D printers.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nIvh5dmjIp4?feature=oembed" title="Innovation Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Prototyping" width="500"></iframe>

Production 3D Printers

ICAMP purchased two industrial 3D printers -the Stratasys F900 and the Stratasys 450mc. These two printers are the ultimate manufacturing-grade production 3D printers, providing the widest array of engineering-grade materials, maximum throughput, large build platform, highest accuracy. They are built for reliability, repeatability, and durability for demanding manufacturing production.

“We needed to invest in FDM technology on a larger scale, not only to be able to print more, but also because clients need stronger parts for jigs and fixtures. Clients in mining, aviation, consumer products, and the arts community are all interested in using the F900.”

The F900 3D printer has one of the largest build area (36 x 24 x 36 in.) allowing for one large part of many small parts. It also offers 15 production-grade materials so your parts can meet high heat, caustic chemicals, sterilization, and high impact application requirements.

The F450 printer also has a large build envelope (16 x 14 x 16 in) and 13 production-grade materials including FDM Nylon12CF, Antero 800NA, ULTEM 9085, and PC-ABS. The material capabilities are perfect for real manufacturing applications such as tooling.

Below are some of the sample parts printed on our large FDM production 3D printers:

Ultem parts printed with an FDM Production 3D Printers Blow Mold Automotive Air Duct FDM Nylon12CF fixture printed on a production 3D printers

Learn More
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The post Customer Story: ICAMP’s success in bringing client’s products to market faster with the help of production 3D printers appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Kelly Clancy at July 27, 2021 01:56 PM

July 26, 2021

SolidSmack

Can the Minecraft Wooden Pickaxe Work in Real Life?

minecraft wooden pickaxe irl

Ask anyone who has played Minecraft for 5 minutes and they’ll tell you how things start off. You are dropped into a random world, then punch some trees to get wood, and you make yourself some wooden tools on a workbench. Well, the question is: can a wooden pickaxe break anything in reality?

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To find out, Louis Weisz made a couple of wooden pickaxes in real life and pit them against a number of rocks in his local forest.

Following the Original Minecraft Design

minecraft wooden pickaxe irl

The first pickaxe got its design directly from the crafting recipe found in the game. Using a forest stick and a 4×4 piece of hardwood lumber, Louis made his first pickaxe as crudely as possible.

minecraft wooden pickaxe irl

Just like in the game, he took his pickaxe outdoors and tried it on some shale. While not as solid or strong as the stones found in Minecraft, the shale broke with little effort from the pickaxe.

minecraft wooden pickaxe irl

Unfortunately, you can’t make a stone pickaxe out of shale. So to up the difficulty, Louis used his wooden pickaxe to a harder piece of sedimentary rock. It worked just as you would expect it to – with the wooden pickaxe splintering.

Upping the Materials

minecraft wooden pickaxe irl

Proving that the design can actually work, Louis went back to the drawing board and began improving the materials used.

Instead of hardwood lumber, Louis used lignum vitae to make the new pickaxe head. It is arguably the strongest wood in the world. He attached his new pickaxe head to a long, custom-made hickory handle; making the tool look more like a sledgehammer than an actual pickaxe.

minecraft wooden pickaxe irl

Armed with his lignum vitae pickaxe, Louis returned to the forest and easily broke down a small sedimentary rock in half. Confident that it could break a whole boulder with a little more tweaking, he returned to his workshop to fine-tune the pickaxe’s final form…

The Flint/Wood Pickaxe

minecraft wooden pickaxe irl

Taking a cue from Minecraft once again, Louis figured the best way to focus the wooden pickaxe’s force would be to hammer in some sharp flint at the tip.

Flint is a material that can be easily found in the game. While it isn’t used for making pickaxes, its sharpness is used to start fires.

With the improvements in the lignum vitae axe installed, Louis returned once more to the forest and tried to break a giant boulder.

minecraft wooden pickaxe irl

While the flint did chip a few segments of the boulder, it would take way too much effort and time to break the boulder into workable pieces. So unless you’re content with breaking multiple small rocks, you won’t be making a durable stone pickaxe in minutes just like in the game.

minecraft wooden pickaxe irl

Since he already had a wooden pickaxe, Louis thought it would be cool to pit his tool against other real-life Minecraft blocks.

Granite, while having the same hardness and breaking time as stone in the game, is way denser in real life. There is just no way a wooden pickaxe can break down such a hard material, let alone make something useable out of it.

You probably think that obsidian would also be very hard since it is a material that is needed to fashion some of the late-game weapons and tools. In reality, however, it can be so brittle that even the first pickaxe (the one with a 4×4 head) that Louise made was able to break it easily. It just goes to show that you shouldn’t believe everything you see in video games!

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 26, 2021 04:48 PM

The Javelin Blog

Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing (GD&T) Introduction Tutorial

In this on-demand webinar, certified instructor Shawn Bontaine discusses the importance of Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing (GD&T) and delivers an introduction tutorial on how to apply the standards.

Watch the video to experience one of Javelin’s most popular training courses, and get an introduction to the reasons why GD&T is applied and some of the Characteristic Symbols utilized. Plus, the makeup of feature control frames and datums:

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Meet the GD&T Training expert: Shawn Bontaine

  • Training expert for 20+ years
  • CSWP – Certified Professional, Ontario Teaching Certificate & Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing – ASME
  • Mechanical Engineering Technologist – Conestoga College

Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing (GD&T) Training at Javelin

Our GD&T courses help designers, engineers, managers, and production/manufacturing personnel to understand, create, and interpret GD&T symbols and drawings.

GD&T Training: Fundamentals

Learn best practices for stating and interpreting dimensions/tolerances. GD&T is essential to ensure functional information and design intent from the assembly to its individual parts.  This insures accurate fitting assemblies and spare parts regardless of where they are manufactured.

Designerstoolmakersinspectors and project managers will greatly benefit from GD&T knowledge.

Our Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T) training course covers the fundamentals and principles of the ASME Y14.5-2018 GD&T standard.  The course focuses on the geometric characteristic symbols explaining in detail each symbol, feature control frames, different modifiers and how they affect tolerancing when placed in the feature control frame.

The course also goes into depth on datums and datum reference frames, partial datums and datum target points.  You will be exposed to methods of inspection for the characteristics symbols, composite feature control frames and design exercises.

GD&T Training: Advanced

An in-depth study of the principles of GD&T. The GD&T Advanced training course is designed as a further in-depth course to help understand, interpret and apply the principles of GD&T. It is based on the ASME Y14.5-2018 standard.

Our Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T) advanced training course covers the fundamentals and principles of the ASME Y14.5-2018 GD&T standard.  The course focuses on the geometric characteristic symbols explaining in detail each symbol, feature control frames, different modifiers and how they affect tolerancing when placed in the feature control frame.

PLUS, this course reviews the types of tolerances and the individual geometric characteristic symbols and their tolerance zone. Further explanation on profile tolerances (all round, between points, unequally disposed). Comparison of different characteristics for application purposes.

The post Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing (GD&T) Introduction Tutorial appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at July 26, 2021 12:56 PM

July 23, 2021

SolidSmack

Dig Your Own Underground Bunker Using Spoons

underground bunker with spoons

You can deny it all you want but at some point in your life, you probably thought of digging a hole to (or through) the center of the Earth. There are those western folks who even believe that with enough hard work and dedication at digging a hole, they could pave the way for the first direct tunnel down to China.

While not as elaborate as a tunnel to another country (That’s in another video!), YouTuber Tyler Oliveira’s hole digging plan prompted him to get some friends to join him in digging a secret underground bunker. The most interesting part? They used nothing but S-P-O-O-N-S!

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Another crazy thing about the project (apart from the spoon thing) might be the fact that Tyler and his buddies used nothing to soften the ground they dug up. They instead poured old-fashioned determination and hard-head attitude to the solid, untampered soil.

underground bunker with spoons

Tyler spent the first day digging his underground bunker solo. After 5 hours of digging with a normal-sized spoon, he eventually upped his arsenal with a spoon five times bigger than the previous one. Unfortunately, this bigger spoon broke rather quickly, and Tyler had to find another way to make his underground dream come true.

underground bunker with spoons

It is as they say: “if you can’t beat ‘em, get a bunch of friends to help you out.” With that, the Day 2 of the underground bunker started with the cavalry arriving. With six guys each armed with different spoons, they divided the work amongst themselves.

“Scrapers” were pioneers who broke down the solid ground both below and around the hole. “Scoopers” shoveled the soil the Scrapers broke down into buckets. Finally, “Bucket Emptiers” took the displaced soil and dumped it elsewhere.

underground bunker with spoons

After digging almost 4 feet, Day 3 saw the introduction of an even larger set of spoons to their arsenal. Now armed with spoons the size of shovels, the team managed to turn the hole 6.5 feet deep in no time.

underground bunker with spoons

After days of digging, Tyler and his friends proved that spoons aren’t meant to be used as digging tools. Even their giant spoons were even bent by Mother Nature.

underground bunker with spoons

Now forced to use the smaller spoons, the team’s momentum started to slow down. However, eager to get this bunker done ASAP, Tyler brought on three more of his friends to help out. These fellows, unhampered by days of spoon work, immediately went to help dig it 8 feet deep. Digging into the night, the team finally dug the hole 12 feet deep.

underground bunker with spoons

Satisfied that the hole would suffice as a bunker, the boys covered the hole with a metal trapdoor. To make it even more inconspicuous, they placed a bit of lawn topped with a mailbox. Now whenever someone goes into that desolate wasteland, all they will see is a bright red mailbox on top of some green, green grass.

underground bunker with spoons

Of course, it wouldn’t be a bunker without amenities. That said, Tyler left some items in it. Now, this baby has every appliance known to man. You have a rice cooker, a mini-fridge, a toaster, and air conditioning! Tyler can even dig out more mini-holes to fit whatever he needs to survive an apocalypse, as long as there’s still space available on the walls of his bunker!

Tyler’s project isn’t a hole leading to China, but such beauty is a special joy in and of itself. So, if you find yourself with kids asking you to make them a treehouse, you might want to consider this cool underground bunker instead.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 23, 2021 05:17 PM

MoEa Turns Fruits and Plants Into Fashionable Sneakers

moea

Vegan shoes (those that are made without involving any animal in the process) are rapidly making themselves known in the footwear industry. Instead of harming animals, these supposedly Earth-friendly pieces of footwear rely on faux leathers which are made from PVC or polyurethane. This gives them that leather-like feel. However, what you might not know is that some of these materials (PVC included) use highly toxic plastics which can harm the environment both on a short- and long-term basis. Thankfully, there is a newer and more environment-friendly form of sneakers that will certainly fulfill every vegan’s dream: MoEa.

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MoEa has an interesting concept by using both vegan and recycled plastic materials. Indeed, these shoes are made from a mix of bio-based materials and recycled soles – drastically reducing the carbon footprint made during production.

MoEa shoes come in six different ‘flavors.’ Each flavor is available in two options: one being completely colored and the other one being generally white with a few touches of the flavor’s color.

moea

moea

moea

moea

moea

The materials used have their own pretty interesting stories and origins: unwanted grapes from Italy’s wine industry (violet), hard corn from America (marfil), cacti found in the Mexican desert (dark green), excess apples from Italy’s juice industry (red), and the waste of pineapple leaves from the Philippines (ochre).

moea

You might be wondering what the sixth flavor is. Well, you’ll figure it out easily if you like mixing fruit shakes. Rather than going to another country to source more plant or fruit-based waste materials, the sixth flavor instead combines all the previously mentioned 5 colors into a modest but stylish shoe.

moea

The sneakers are designed to be 100% environment-friendly products. This is why apart from the plant-based leathers, the insoles are produced using recycled wood fiber while the inner lining is made from 75% recycled bamboo.

On the other hand, the soles are made from 40% recycled materials and 60% natural rubber. Water-based glue is used to attach them to the body of the shoes

Lastly, the shoes are laced with organic cotton laces.  And – yes – the shoebox is made from recycled material, as well!

moea

The coolest thing about MoEa shoes is that the recycling process doesn’t stop once they are delivered to your doorstep. Once these sneakers have run their course, you can send them back to the company for free and you’ll get a discount code. Your old pair of shoes then gets shredded and the materials will be used to make new ones.

If you love the environment as much as you love good footwear, you can check out MoEa on Kickstarter. It currently has funding of US$86,893 – way more than its initial US$11,793 goal. MoEa has a brilliant and promising concept so it is really not a surprise that it hit such numbers.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 23, 2021 04:09 PM

The Javelin Blog

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 9: Drop Test Simulation

In the previous part of our 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial series we reviewed 3D printing of our prototype. In this installment, we will walk through the application of drop test simulation with SIMULIA Structural Mechanics Engineer.

Watch the tutorial video below to learn about drop test simulation with 3DEXPERIENCE Works Simulation:

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What is SIMULIA Structural Mechanics Engineer (SME)?

SIMULIA Structural Mechanics Engineer (SME) is a role available with the 3DEXPERIENCE Works Simulation product portfolio. This role allows the use of Explicit Dynamics solver for high-speed nonlinear analysis such as Impact Analysis and Drop Testing. Users can apply complex material models that are readily available in the material database or use the Material Calibration tool to import experimental material test data.

Drop Test Setup

Using the Mechanical Scenario Creation app within SIMULIA Structural Mechanics Engineer (SME) role, we will set up the drop test simulation of our knife handle.

Assembly is simplified to include only key components contributing to the mass. A planar surface represented as a non-deformable rigid body is defined as the target or rigid floor on which the knife handle is dropped. When it comes to meshing, SME provides robust meshing capabilities and various element types.

A surface mesh of quad elements is used for a rigid floor. The carving knife handle and internal components are meshed using tetrahedral elements. An initial velocity and gravity are defined for the drop test.

Drop Test Velocity and Gravity Setup

Drop Test Velocity and Gravity Setup

Running the Analysis

Since SME is a cloud-based solution, users can take advantage of the multi-core scaling with Abaqus solver technology to run the analysis. It offers the option to execute analysis on the cloud using credits or tokens to access more memory or run locally on the user’s machine.

The stress and displacement plots for this analysis is shown below. SME offers powerful visualization and postprocessing capabilities, including automatic report generation and sharing data with the team.

SIMULIA Stress and Displacement Plots

SIMULIA Drop Test Analysis

SIMULIA Drop Test Analysis

Taking users beyond simple stress analysis, Dassault Systèmes SIMULIA Structural Mechanics Engineer (SME) allows design engineering teams and product stakeholders to collaborate more efficiently to build robust products with increased confidence.

Interested in 3DEXPERIENCE Works?

Visit our website to learn how 3DEXPERIENCE® SOLIDWORKS® connects the industry-leading SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD desktop solution to the 3DEXPERIENCE Works platform, a cloud-based product development environment.

The post 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 9: Drop Test Simulation appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by TriMech Solutions, LLC at July 23, 2021 01:54 PM

SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing Discontinuation

SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing was introduced with SOLIDWORKS 2018 as an alternative to Machine Activation licensing.  Online Licensing provided a “named-user” structure where user accounts could be used to log in on launching SOLIDWORKS to obtain the license.

SOLIDWORKS One Account Sign In

SOLIDWORKS One Account Sign In

Unfortunately due to low adoption of Online Licensing over the past 3 years, the complexity of infrastructure to maintain this licensing structure is no longer feasible and will be phased out over the coming months.  The change will have no effect to the large majority of users still using Machine Activation.

The target phase-out date of Online Licensing is February 12th, 2022

SOLIDWORKS 2018 to SOLIDWORKS 2021

Users may continue to use Online Licensing with SOLIDWORKS 2018 SP0 to SOLIDWORKS 2021 SP5 until the phase-out date.  At this date, opening SOLIDWORKS will automatically switch to Machine Activation and prompt to activate.  The license can be moved to another machine through the Activation/Deactivation process.

Licenses can be switched to Machine Activation prior to the phase-out date by use of the Admin Portal.

The Synchronize Settings feature will require updating to SOLIDWORKS 2021 SP5 for continued use and will need a 3DEXPERIENCE ID to log in.  Clients using SOLIDWORKS 2018 to SOLIDWORKS 2021 SP4.1 will no longer have access to this functionality starting March 31st, 2022.

SOLIDWORKS 2022

Online Licensing will not be available starting with SOLIDWORKS 2022 SP0.  Each license will require switching to Machine Activation prior to upgrading.  The Log In functionality on installation will also be unavailable through the 2022 Installation Manager and the serial number will require manual entry.

The post SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing Discontinuation appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at July 23, 2021 12:58 PM

July 21, 2021

The Javelin Blog

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 8: 3D Printing from 3DEXPERIENCE

In the previous part of our 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial series the design was passed between xShape and 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS to quickly make changes and arrive at a product ready for prototyping. In this tutorial we will be demonstrating how to easily 3D print from the 3DEXPERIENCE Works cloud platform using GrabCAD Print.

Watch the video below for our full review of the print process of this project from the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

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3DEXPERIENCE 3D Printing

After signing into the 3DEXPERIENCE platform and clicking on the Communities tab, users can see their feed. Here we see a post from our colleague in Maryland saying, “New handle passes clearance check,” and we can also see tags in the comments.

3DEXPERIENCE Discussion

3DEXPERIENCE Discussion

Preparing to Print with GrabCAD

Responses can be made easily. Here in the comments, we will indicate that we have been made aware that the project is ready for the next steps and then proceed to download and print the file from the platform. Next, we can select the Files tab where we will immediately be able to view the Cordless Handle’s .SLDPRT file.  We will even have access to manipulating and annotating the part directly in the browser. All that’s left to do now is download the file using the third icon from the left, and opening the .SLDPRT file in GrabCAD Print.

GrabCAD Print Icon

GrabCAD Print Icon

GrabCAD Print is free and an extremely powerful and user-friendly 3D print prep tool that is capable of digesting native cad files, .obj, .stl, .step, .iges, and even .3mf files.

GrabCAD Print Settings

For this project, we are going to split the part into two halves and print them separately to avoid having the hollow center cavity of the handle fill entirely with support material. Once we import the .SLDPRT file onto the tray, we can go ahead and manipulate the part material, scale, orientation, infill style and many other characteristics depending on the application and design of the part.

3DEXPERIENCE 3D Printing with GrabCAD Print

3DEXPERIENCE 3D Printing with GrabCAD Print

Next, using the toolbar on the right-hand side of the screen we can quickly change some of the part’s attributes such as infill style and density, material options, layer height and more. Once the part properties are to spec, we can go ahead and orient the part on the tray. In this case, we want to minimize the amount of support material used, so we are going to flip the handle on its back with the open face pointing upward. This is to avoid having it fill completely with support material. Now we can click “Estimate”, and the software will slice the part and generate an estimated time and material usage that can be used to help calculate the cost of the part. After the estimation is complete, simply select the printer from the drop-down menu and click “Print”. This will queue the job on the printer.

GrabCAD Print Settings

GrabCAD Print Settings

Post Printing

Once our 3D printed prototype is complete, we can remove the part from the build tray to clean the part and remove the supports. After the part is clean, we can take a few pictures and upload them to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform to communicate to the team that the job is a success. When we upload the pictures, we can also leave a comment and tag colleagues to notify them to return to the platform for updates.

As you can see, it is quick and easy to access collaborative files from the 3DEXPERIENCE platform and download part and assembly files to prepare for 3D printing. As work from home and remote work become a non-negotiable necessity in the corporate world, the 3DEXPERIENCE platform enables users of all levels and experiences to collaborate with one another and complete projects no matter the time or geographical location.

Interested in 3DEXPERIENCE Works?

Visit our website to learn how 3DEXPERIENCE® SOLIDWORKS® connects the industry-leading SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD desktop solution to the 3DEXPERIENCE Works platform, a cloud-based product development environment.

The post 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 8: 3D Printing from 3DEXPERIENCE appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by TriMech Solutions, LLC at July 21, 2021 03:18 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

2021 Toyota Supra – Turbo Manifold – Part 1

This is the first blog post of a series, so make sure to sign up to the mailing lists if you want to see how our partners at SOLIDWORKS, Creaform and Jabil Inc. are helping us to bring new ideas to life and build more value in the products we create. I’m Mathew Velders.  I run product design engineering at Full-Race Motorsports in Phoenix, AZ. We’ve been in business for 18 years and the only thing we talk about every day is turbocharging. Our customers want to blast down a track at the fastest possible speed…as much as their hardware, and physics, can allow.

Over the years we’ve formed an amazing set of partners. From major automakers and OEM suppliers to professional race teams, we’re helping professionals make the right decisions about turbochargers. We have arrangements with major OEM manufacturers. That lets us keep prices low. And we can source any turbocharger a customer needs (plus, we crunch the numbers for them).

Now, we’re a small company. But every day, we help someone, somewhere, with these calculations. And with customers in 100 countries around the world – we’re super dedicated to making happy customers.

Over these last 2 decades, we’ve seen the thinking change about turbochargers – and the tools used to design them.  For the last 10 years, since the debut of BorgWarner’s twinscroll EFR turbochargers – Full-Race supplied turbo systems to Papadakis Racing, the most winning drift team in history.  While preparing their Toyota Supra for the 2020 Formula D season Papadakis Racing turned to us for the turbo system to achieve 1000hp with their “2 port” B58, 3.0 liter, inline 6-cylinder engine.

The turbocharged B58 engine in the 2020 Supra utilizes a Twin-Scroll manifold/turbine design to produce 335 horsepower and 365 lb∙ft of torque. Twin-Scroll means that the engine’s cylinders are grouped into a pair by their firing order. In the case of the B58, cylinders 1-2-3 are grouped together to flow into the first scroll, or volute, of the turbine; cylinders 4-5-6 are grouped for the second scroll of the Twin-Scroll arrangement. This grouping of cylinders greatly reduces the exhaust pulse interference in the turbine entry. Rather than a single grouping of six cylinders paired in one scroll with an exhaust pulse every 120° of engine rotation, there are two groups of three with a pulse every 240°. This means there is a smoother, consistent delivery of energy to the turbine shaft of the turbocharger, resulting in better turbine response and engine power. While the Twin-Scroll layout is not new, the application of it in this engine uniquely uses an IEM (integrated exhaust manifold) incorporated into the cylinder head of the engine. This means the 6 cylinder engine only has two exhaust outlets, one for cylinders 1-2-3, and one for 4-5-6. These outlets flow almost directly into the two scrolls of the exhaust turbine.

This is done on modern vehicles to simplify component packaging, reduce ‘turbo-lag’ and help meet emissions requirements but it could be a bottleneck when chasing the massive horsepower levels required to win a Formula Drift championship.

Full-Race constructed our ‘top mount’ turbo manifold to suit the 2-Port Supra’s cylinder head and unique chassis. The turbo manifold connects the turbo to the engine, and is the foundation for the entire turbo system.

It had to fit a massive turbocharger like the BorgWarner 9280, rated for 110 lb/min of airflow and featured two ports for twin TiAL Sport MV-R external wastegates. We got on the dyno and managed 1000hp@38psi (with nitrous oxide). The first time out with a brand new car – our Full-Race turbo system allowed driver Fredric Aasbo to win the first round of the season.

These results were promising; however, Fredric and Papadakis Racing are in it to win championships and they need more than just ‘promising’. The engine in the Supra was producing approximately 860hp without nitrous, and while this sounds like a mind altering level of power to the average enthusiast, it wasn’t enough to win a championship in a field of cars regularly producing 1000hp (and some competitors running close to 1200hp).

It was clear to Full-Race and Papadakis racing there was a lot more power left on the table – considering the massive 110lb/min airflow rate of their BorgWarner EFR 9280 turbo. This lack of power was a problem.  And to make matters worse the final two rounds of the 2020 Formula D season were being held at Irwindale Speedway, a track favoring big horsepower.

As mentioned previously, it was suspected that the two exhaust port cylinder head represented a flow restriction that prevented the engine from generating >1000hp off the bottle. Fortunately for Papadakis Racing, Toyota was in the process of releasing their updated Supra for the 2021 model year. The new car featured better engine performance, 382 hp and 368 lb∙ft, thanks to a new cylinder head and exhaust manifold design. This time the cylinder head featured a traditional six port design – one port for each cylinder.

Swapping to the new cylinder head proved to be surprisingly simple. All of the components were compatible with the previous version; we used the same valves, valve springs, sensors and hardware.  The only massive change required was the new turbo manifold. One that would keep the flow from all six cylinders completely separated until right before the turbo charger – where a smooth merge collector could efficiently combine the flow from the two groups of cylinders.

Full-Race was called on to create the new manifold but the situation was complex. There was only 5 weeks before the final two events of the season, COVID-19 was in full swing, the car was in California, Full-Race Motorsports in Arizona, and myself the design engineer in British Columbia Canada. Thankfully this was the exact type of situation that Dassault Systemès had in mind when they were developing their new 3D Experience platform/SolidWorks Connected. They stepped in and set Stephan Papadakis and I up with a cloud connected CAD software package that allowed us to collaborate in real time through a shared project environment. This environment allowed us to collaborate on design ideas, project scheduling, task management and generally streamline project management between teams scattered around North America.

This leads us to the part that my fellow CAD and design enthusiasts will hopefully enjoy; a detailed look at how SOLIDWORKS was used to design the 6-Port turbo manifold for the Supra. First we will look at the design intended for additive manufacturing (AM), printed in Inconel 625. After that, we will run through the process of the CAD designed, hand fabricated manifold that eventually became the production part that can be purchased for your 2021+ Toyota Supra.

START OF AM DESIGN PROCESS

Before the design process could begin we needed to bring the Supra’s engine bay and B58 engine into the SolidWorks digital world. As previously mentioned, the design was being carried out remotely and with covid lockdowns in place we were unable to bring our Creaform HandySCAN SILVER to Papadakis Racing (for more information on our Creaform scanning setup and how we use it stay tuned for future blog posts). So Stephan had the scans done locally and emailed us once complete. The data included scan meshes, as well as iges files with sketch and surface geometry from the CMM probe arm. The meshes were imported into SolidWorks Part files as Graphic Bodies to define the design envelope in a visually clean and light weight (for the computer) setup. Below are screenshots of the engine as well as part of the front subframe, chassis leg/engine bay, and the underside of the carbon fiber hood.

Once a unique part file was created for each portion of the reference geometry, the part files were combined into an assembly.

The CMM probe data was overlaid to create a datum point to base the new manifold design around. It was already decided that the turbo location should remain the same as the Full-Race production manifold linked earlier in the story, so its turbo manifold dimensional data was digitized and included for reference.

With all of the reference material assembled design of the new manifold could begin. In a new part file 3D Sketches and Planes were used to locate the turbine flange coincident with the probe data.

Then a 3D Sketch laid out the centerline for the cylinder 1-3 collector. The collector area where the three runners merge has a circular shape and the T4 flange layout for the turbine has rectangular ports, therefore a series of boundary surfaces were used to create the transitions from round runner to round collector, and round collector to rectangular flange.

Surface Trims, Fillets and Knits were used to create the shape of the first collector. The approach used was to design the internal ‘flow’ surfaces, then external surfaces/solids, finally the internal volume was cut out of the solid.

With the cylinder 1-3 collector complete, the cylinder 1, 2, 3 runners were designed using Surface Lofts, Extrudes and Sweeps. The port transitions used a 3D Sketch with Arcs and Line Segments.

Because of the 3D Metal Printing process we weren’t restricted to any set runner shape so fully defined Style Splines were used to define their centerline path. An attempt was made to make the exhaust path as smooth as possible while avoiding tight bends.

It’s important to note that when using Lofts, Boundary Surfaces, and Splines to take the extra time to ensure surfaces are smooth and free from wrinkles and strange artifacts. This attention to detail will improve the quality of the results.

The same process was repeated for runners two and three, then the surfaces were all Knit together. Many people may be curious about the runner lengths and why they are not all equal. In short it wouldn’t be practical for metal additive manufacturing. Equal length runners would have driven the part count, and thus printing complexity through the roof when we were confident that direct, low pressure drop runners would provide the power needed. However, if you’re interested in monitoring the runner length for your project, the centerline sketches can be measured to give that information.

With the Bank 1 internal surfaces completed they can be viewed, as above, with RealView Graphics where it can be seen to be smooth and free of wrinkles or kinked surfaces.

The above steps are repeated for the Bank 2 (cylinders 4-6) collector and runner layout.

Keep in mind the collector and runner layout wasn’t determined on the first try as the above process may lead you to believe, there were hundreds of adjustments made while finding a runner and collector layout that worked for all six cylinders. Of course the design was also checked for interference with the rest of the scans.

At this point the CAD models for the TiAL Sport MV-R wastegates were added in to help determine a suitable location for them, which would’ve also required a few more refinements to the collector and runner designs. The following shot also shows the BorgWarner EFR turbine housing. Keep in mind that if you don’t have access to supplier CAD and 3D scans, a lot can be done with simple measuring tools and patience.

With the tentative wastegate location selected the wastegate tube design was started. This was done using very similar techniques to the collectors.

Special attention was paid to making a smooth, large radius transition on the inside of the ‘bend.’ This is done to ensure accurate boost control and eliminate boost-creep.

The collector, runner, and wasegate tube design process was repeated, this time for the external solid body. There were many ways to approach this, and sometimes experimentation is needed to figure out what approach works best. In this case the centerline 3D Sketches were reused, with new profile sketches offset by the desired wall thickness.

The external features were capped and Knit with the ‘Create Solid’ option checked. The flanges are modelled using basic solid Extrude and Cut commands and the bodies are combined.

At this point the basic design of the manifold was complete but many many more features were added for a variety of reasons. Anywhere that there was enough space material was removed. Metal printing is largely priced by weight, so anywhere excess material can be removed, money can be saved. Some supports were built in to help support high stress areas of the part, Full-Race and Papadakis Racing logos were also added along with some features for cool looks. At this point the internal surfaces were cut from the main solid body, resulting in the one piece manifold below.

The one piece manifold above was far larger than what could be printed in one piece, also any area on the part with an angle shallower than 45° from the build plate requires support material. Because of this the manifold had to be sectioned into pieces that would fit the printer build volume and prevent supports from being built inside the collectors or runners. The support material is laser welded to the part and can be difficult to remove, if support occurs inside a runner it can’t be removed at all, therefore the sectioning up of the design was a subject of much discussion amongst those collaborating on the project. The more these printing principles can be kept in mind during the design phase, the more likely headaches will be reduced when it comes time to print.

With the part sectioned into ten portions that could be welded together post printing, the solids were exported. A slight variation was also made to the design that allowed it to be easily printed in plastic to verify the fit.

End of AM Design Process

With the final design for additive manufacturing complete and the printer(s) at Mimo Tecknik working furiously, we had come down to the wire and didn’t know if the Inconel manifold would be printed and welded together (let alone tested)  in time to make it to Round 7 of the FD season. The call was made to start on a Plan B turbo manifold – Fully CAD designed in SOLIDWORKS using the same 3D scanning, design, and plastic prototype printing technology used for the printed Inconel manifold. This manifold would be built in the traditional hand fabricated / robotic TIG welded style that Full-Race is known for. The design of the hand fabricated manifold will be covered in Part 2 of this blog post.

Author information

Full-Race Motorsports
I’m Mathew Velders. I run product design engineering at Full-Race Motorsports in Phoenix, AZ. We’ve been in business for 18 years and the only thing we talk about every day is turbocharging. Our customers want to blast down a track at the fastest possible speed…as much as their hardware, and physics, can allow. Over the years we’ve formed an amazing set of partners. From major automakers and OEM suppliers to professional race teams, we’re helping professionals make the right decisions about turbochargers. We have arrangements with major OEM manufacturers. That lets us keep prices low. And we can source any turbocharger a customer needs (plus, we crunch the numbers for them). Now, we're a small company. But every day, we help someone, somewhere, with these calculations. And with customers in 100 countries around the world - we’re super dedicated to making happy customers.

The post 2021 Toyota Supra – Turbo Manifold – Part 1 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Full-Race Motorsports at July 21, 2021 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Let’s Get Down and Nerdy: Surfacing with Parametric Modeling Versus Subdivision Modeling

More and more engineers and designers are being called on to develop the look and feel of new products. The visual appeal of a product often plays a huge role in its popularity. Because of this, especially during the concept phase of design, you typically want to make several models quickly to get a clearer idea of what your customer wants.

Organic shapes are challenging to build with parametric modelers. If it takes you all day to create one concept and another day to modify it, you are two days in and still on that first concept. By leveraging subdivision (Sub-D) modeling, you can streamline the idea or conceptual stage of design because you don’t have to set up all the sub-structure (curves, surfaces, etc.) necessary in parametric modeling.

Both parametric modeling and subdivision modeling techniques are used to create the final models that will go into production. Often people assume that Sub-D modeling is only for the concept phase of the design, but this is not true. Models created using subdivision modeling techniques often go directly to production without re-creating the model using parametric surfacing techniques.

However, most often, models created with subdivision surfacing techniques are augmented with parametric features such as holes, chamfers, ribs, shell features, and more. The resulting model consists of geometry created using both parametric and subdivision technologies. Both technologies—subdivision and parametric modeling—have pros and cons. Taking a closer look at each technology will help to reveal what approach might be best for your projects.

Reverse Engineering in SOLIDWORKS

 

Parametric modeling

SOLIDWORKS® customers know all about the power of parametric modeling where you can drive geometry parametrically with dimensions—change one thing and the entire model updates automatically, no need to redraw models. You can embed intelligence in a design; these “smart” solids make it easy to share with other engineers who can quickly ascertain design intent. Plus, the constraints used in parametric modeling ensure that any modifications made to the design are done so with design intent in mind.

Parametric modeling is based on NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-splines). Surface geometry is solved literally with a network of splines driving the shape of the surface. Due to this method of generating geometry, surfaces can be precise as there is actual math driving the shape of the splines; this is why you can dimension it and constraint it. The curves that drive NURBS surfaces can be any degree: 1st (planar surfaces), 2nd (cylinder or conical), and 3rd (B-rep).

Reverse engineering in 3D Sculptor

 

Subdivision modeling

Many SOLIDWORKS customers are already enjoying the benefits of surfacing with the Sub-D modeling approach of 3D Sculptor on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform®. Surface modeling with Sub-D is superfast when creating contoured, ergonomic, and organic shapes. Making changes is so easy that there is no need to think ahead to make a detailed plan—3D Sculptor is conceptualization on steroids.

Subdivision modeling uses a method of generating a surface from a series of points in space. (Check out the Catmull-Clark algorithm that creates curved surfaces by using subdivision surface modeling.) The points are connected by edges, creating a mesh of rectangles. The surface is created by running a refinement scheme on the rectangular mesh, ending up with a smooth surface beneath it.

In 3D Sculptor, we convert Sub-D into NURBS, so it can be worked with just like any other CAD feature—cut it, shell it, chamfer it, etc. The automatic conversion to NURBS is extremely accurate to the original Sub-D geometry.

Working with 3D Sculptor model inside SOLIDWORKS desktop

 

The Pros and Cons of Parametric Surfacing

Most of you are probably very familiar with parametric surface modeling. Typically, you create a substructure, like a skeleton, of curves, surfaces, planes, points, etc., to use it to loft and blend surfaces together. Combining this with the ability to intersect and trim surfaces allows you to create unique shapes that can be controlled parametrically by modifying the dimensions of the underlying skeleton features.

Many engineers and designers are very comfortable using these surfacing techniques, and they have proven to be a successful technique for decades. However, there are a few drawbacks to this technique. First, you must have a pretty good idea of the shape you are trying to create in advance. This probably means going through several conceptual test models and/or hand sketches to get to the point where you really want to put the extra time into making that final version. Even a small detail change like adding a blister-like crease to an otherwise smooth surface of a model may mean having to go back and recreate the original skeletal substructure, possibly resulting in hours of rework.

In addition, it can be difficult to create the smooth curvature continuous surfaces that so many designers want to create all over their models. Often they resort to filleting, which is an excellent technique for creating smooth surfaces, but won’t give the same results related to reflected light that you would get with a curvature continuous surface.

Race car model in 3D Sculptor

 

The Pros and Cons of Sub-D Surfacing

Less familiar to most engineers and designers is sub-D modeling. SOLIDWORKS 3D Sculptor provides Sub-D modeling capabilities in a browser. In Sub-D modeling, you can push and pull mesh geometry like it’s made out of clay to create your shape. Often you are designing around an assembly of 3D parts or designing with an image as a reference in the background, which gives you an idea of how far to pull and push the geometry. You also have features that let you create hard edges (for creases and flat surfaces). It is easy to augment the initial shape by extruding and bending geometry as well. And model scale can be controlled dimensionally by bounding box dimensions.

A big advantage to using Sub-D modeling is that you can develop radically different models quickly by simply pushing, pulling, extruding, and creasing geometry. The surfaces are naturally curvature continuous, giving an organic look, except in areas where you want creasing and flat surfaces. This makes working with end customers much more manageable—whether in person or a web meeting.

Radical design changes can be made in real-time, allowing you to collaborate with your customer to get the shape desired. Trying to do this when the model is constructed using parametric surfacing techniques typically results in taking notes or marking up a drawing or image for the design, hours of remodeling, and then another meeting. The ability to rapidly create several versions of the model is key to getting design buy-in from your customer earlier in the process and speeding up the final delivery.

But there are some disadvantages to Sub-D modeling as well.

Sub-D modeling is not great for making common features like holes, ribs, chamfers, etc.—features you typically find on plastic and cast parts. To add these features it is necessary to access parametric feature capabilities, as you find in SOLIDWORKS desktop and browser-based tools like SOLIDWORKS 3D Creator. Luckily, it is fast and easy to toggle back and forth between parametric and Sub-D modeling capabilities when using 3D Creator and 3D Sculptor—it is literally a click of a button. One moment you are creating parametric features and surfaces with 3D Creator, and then in the next moment, creating beautifully shaped subdivision surfaces with 3D Sculptor. 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS gives you the best of all worlds in one offering: 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS, 3D Creator, 3D Sculptor, as well as access to the 3DXPERIENCE platform.

Which is Better?

As stated above, both parametric surface modeling and Sub-D surface modeling have their advantages and disadvantages. But it is clear that, at least in the conceptual phase, Sub-D modeling can significantly improve getting to an agreed-upon design faster and easier than parametric surfacing. In addition, if changes to your model during the design/detailing phase require significant remodeling, it could also be advantageous to use Sub-D techniques because changes are faster and easier to incorporate. And finally, if your design is curvature continuous throughout the surface, it may also be advantageous to use Sub-D modeling instead of parametric surface modeling.

If you are a SOLIDWORKS desktop customer who already uses surfacing, then you should simply view Sub-D modeling as a new tool in the toolbox. However, the reality is that a combination of both Sub-D and parametric surface modeling is generally the best solution for most projects. Many users realize optimized workflows—sometimes getting projects done in half the time—by leveraging both SOLIDWORKS parametric modeling and 3D Sculptor’s Sub-D modeling.

More Information

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS connects the industry-leading SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD solution to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, a single cloud-based product development environment, and includes Sub-D and parametric surface modeling.

If you’d like more information on these products, contact your local reseller.

Author information

Craig Therrien
Craig Therrien
Craig Therrien is a Product Manager at SolidWorks

The post Let’s Get Down and Nerdy: Surfacing with Parametric Modeling Versus Subdivision Modeling appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Craig Therrien at July 21, 2021 12:00 PM

July 20, 2021

The Javelin Blog

How to 3D print files from 3D scan data using Artec Leo and Stratasys J55

3D printing realistic prototypes is easier than ever before. Using the right technology can help bring your ideas to life quickly and easily!

In this demonstration video, we use the Artec Leo, Artec Studio software, and the J55 3D printer to make a realistic miniature head model of Cory Green, Javelin’s 3D Scanning Product Manager.

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Step 1: 3D scanning with Artec Leo

First, we use the Artec Leo, the most mobile handheld wireless 3D scanner on the market, to start scanning Cory. The Leo provides an accurate scan while allowing us to move freely around Cory without wires. We can see the scan happening in real-time on the touch panel screen.

3D scanning with Artec Leo

3D scanning with Artec Leo

Step 2: Process scan in Artec Studio

Once we have completed the scan, we use Artec Studio software to clean up the data and prepare it for 3D printing. We’ve applied texture to the 3D model from the scan data. Finally, we’ve scaled the model to 10%, deleted the shoulders, and filled the neck to create a water-tight mesh. A scan of the truck interior was added to check the scale and fitment of the model head.

Process scan data in Artec Studio

Process scan data in Artec Studio

Step 3: 3D print the scan file

The next step is to load the scan file onto the J55 3D printer and press print. The Stratasys J55 is a full colour office friendly 3D printer. It is the ideal printer for both industrial and mechanical design, with a rotating print platform that produces outstanding surface finish and print quality. The J55 can produce more than 500,000 distinguishable colour combinations, print five resins simultaneously and provide multi-material capabilities that help create ultra-realistic models. This model took 2hrs and 38mins to print.

J55 3D Printer

Load the files onto the J55 3D printer

Step 4: Installation

The final step in the process is to remove the support material from the model. In this case, we can easily remove the support by hand to reveal Cory Jr and install it into the truck.

And there we have it! In a few easy steps, we were able to create a miniature model of Cory and 3D print a custom model.

Installation of 3D Printed part

Installation of 3D Printed part

3D scan to print applications

Although this was a fun and simple project, the process can be used for many different applications. For example, Cory has the ability to create upgraded carbon fiber parts for the RC car using Stratasys FDM printers and materials.

If you are looking to bring your ideas to life, fill out the form below to contact our team:

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The post How to 3D print files from 3D scan data using Artec Leo and Stratasys J55 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Kelly Clancy at July 20, 2021 01:55 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Thinking Outside the Box|Camper [Podcast]

Ever since the success of Uber, entrepreneurs are focusing on how to “disrupt” existing large corporate businesses, and some large companies are now even looking to disrupt their own businesses before the competition does.

The way to disrupt a business is to find a better solution to an existing problem.  But, what if you just come up with a different solution for a unique audience? That’s not actually disrupting the industry; that’s just identifying a new market…right?

Jason Bontrager and Rob Miles both come from the camping industry, and together these two innovators created a revolutionary new camping solution from scratch, one that might change the way people commune with nature. It’s not a takeover of the camping industry, just a better solution for getting deeper into the woods than existing camping solutions.  Introducing the “skinny-guy” concept.

Listen to the latest Born to Design podcast and find out what is takes to transition from a corporate environment to that of a start-up with a new design…in an  established industry.

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Be sure to check out all of the Born to Design podcasts, and subscribe below so you will never miss an episode:

Soundcloud  Subscribe to Solidworks Podcast on Spotify iTunes Stitcher Listen on Google Play Music TuneIn - Solidworks Podcast Page Subscribe to Solidworks Podcast on CastBox  Subscribe to Solidworks Podcast on Overcast

To learn more about Skinny Guy Campers, check out the website: skinnyguycampers.com

Learn more about how Skinny Guy Campers used the 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS to design their new campers here…

Author information

Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling is a Senior Marketing Manager at SolidWorks and the host for the Born to Design Podcast.

The post Thinking Outside the Box|Camper [Podcast] appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Cliff Medling at July 20, 2021 12:45 PM

SolidSmack

Can You Chop a Tree Stump Using Its Own Wood?

wooden axe out of tree stump

After carving a wooden spoon using a spoon, you would think craftsman Alex Apollonov wouldn’t have any more inception-like tricks up his apron. Well, you would be sorely mistaken for thinking so.

Upon discovering a stray tree stump in his backyard, Apollonov decided that the best way to get rid of the said tree would be to make a wooden axe out of it. Once completed, he would then use the axe to chop down the rest of the stump. Easy, right?

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Unlike his wooden spoon project, Apollonov didn’t have any restrictions in making the new tool. So to get the wood from the tree, he used a good, old chainsaw.

Shaping the Axe Head

wooden axe out of tree stump

Blessed with a chunk of the stump, Apollonov now had to dry the wood to make it hard and sturdy. His piece of wood was wet from being exposed to the elements, so he had to pop it into the microwave to remove all the moisture. While the microwave gag looks like a joke, woodworkers actually use this method as a way for treating wood.

wooden axe out of tree stump

Sadly, Apollonov realized too late that you’re supposed to treat the wood in a microwave slowly for a couple of days – not at an abrupt high temperature like what he did. This resulted in cracks on the edges of the wood. Thankfully, most of the damage was on the edges; so all he had to do was work around it.

wooden axe out of tree stump

Apollonov drew a guide for the axe head and began cutting away at the wood. Once it started to take form, he used his belt sander to cut the grain upwards. In theory, this would make the axe stronger and allow it to cut better.

wooden axe out of tree stump

He also added another stencil on top to better align the width of the axe. Finally, he drilled a hole right through the top to make room for the handle.

Fitting the Handle

wooden axe out of tree stump

It’s nice to know that Apollonov keeps his errors in his videos. Not only does it make for some fun entertainment, but it also allows viewers to learn from his mistakes.

In this instance, he forgot to cross-check the width of the handle with that of the axe head hole. Since the hole was much too big, he fixed his mistake by stuffing in a bit of wood into the hole and gluing it in place.

Connecting the Axe Head and Handle

wooden axe out of tree stump

Now in a normal axe, you would drive a wedge into the axe head to secure it to the handle. But since this axe’s handle and head are made from the same material, the parts would surely crack and break.

Instead, Apollonov decided to hammer in a couple of dowels into the two holes he drilled on the side of the axe. While not as secure as a wedge, he’s hoping this would be enough to hold the axe while it is cutting the tree stump.

The Moment of Truth

wooden axe out of tree stump

After gluing on a couple of leaves and covering the axe in a mixture of olive oil, vinegar, and lettuce for aesthetic purposes, the axe was finally ready to go.

Apollonov raised the axe high above his head, brought it down with all his might and…

wooden axe out of tree stump

… the axe broke right at the head! It turned out that using less of a material to break the same material would just result in one very disappointing build. There goes a whole month’s worth of work, splintered just like the axe. While the concept was great, the execution and the materials used could not live up to the expectations Appolonov had set for it.

If you want to see projects Alex Apollonov has made which actually worked, do check out his YouTube channel, I Did A Thing. You might be pleasantly surprised when the build in the video you’re watching actually turns out right!

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 20, 2021 10:17 AM

July 19, 2021

The Javelin Blog

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 7: Working with xShape changes in SOLIDWORKS

In the previous videos of our 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial series we updated the handle design using the SOLIDWORKS 3D Sculptor Role (xShape App). The geometry is fairly complex and it’s not a native SOLIDWORKS file. Now we need to make this a usable form from a manufacturability standpoint by making the file visible in 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS so we can make design changes quickly.

With a simple reloading of the handle from the 3DEXERIERENCE platform, our references are maintained and all that’s left for the mechanical engineer to do is to recheck for clearance and fit. Watch the video below to get a complete picture of how to manage xShape changes in SOLIDWORKS:

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Designs adapt and change. Something that was created 20 years ago may have gone through dozens of adaptations to keep up with the market. Identifying design changes and working between CAD applications has always been a laborious task to export in one format and then find the necessary import options to get the CAD file to behave well. The 3DEXPERIENCE platform gives users a homogeneous environment, one that mitigates much of the export/ import issues and limitations of necessary design changes of years past.

Master Modeling Technique

In 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS we can bring those changes back down from the platform by editing the part in context.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Editing xShape Parts

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Editing xShape Parts

As you can see in the next image, this is simply a master modeling technique that all experienced CAD users will identify. It gives the user the opportunity to select what information he or she wants to pass into the master container.

Master Modeling Technique

Master Modeling Technique

Reference Checks

But, because our changes are significant, we see a dangling reference in a sketch for the extrude cut for the knife blades. This isn’t a problem. Because 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS is very similar to desktop SOLIDWORKS, rectifying this issue is very quick. (see below)

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Reference Check

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Reference Check

A quick check of interferences sees that we have the necessary clearance between the handle and our internal components.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Interference Check

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Interference Check

Creating a Shareable Link

It’s that simple. Seeing the latest version of files, even for those coming from the platform’s xApps, is very efficient. For good measure, we will plan to 3D print this part and test it for fit and function prior to manufacturing. We will create a shareable link to those external collaborators that may not necessarily be part of our internal design team. This can be done in the 3D Drive app. (Think OneDrive or Google Drive – the typical cloud apparatus that allows for the ‘old-school’ sharing by way of a hyperlink.)

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Shareable Links

Shareable Links

Identifying and consuming design changes has been and will always be a principal component of data management. As we saw in this article, two very different design members can effectively co-exist. A complex shape was made simply by using xShape. That’s no problem working within SOLIDWORKS to add more well-defined parametric features.

Interested in the 3D Sculptor (xShape)?

Visit our website to get a quote for the SOLIDWORKS 3D Sculptor and learn how 3DEXPERIENCE® SOLIDWORKS® connects the industry-leading SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD Desktop solution on the 3DEXPERIENCE Works platform, a cloud-based product development environment.

The post 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 7: Working with xShape changes in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by TriMech Solutions, LLC at July 19, 2021 05:04 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Six SOLIDWORKS Solutions – PDM Part II

Next chapter in “Six SOLIDWORKS solutions”, this time with the subtitle PDM Part II.

In this blogpost I will cover some more SOLIDWORKS solutions that i have come across in my works as a technical supporter at PLMGroup

Some of them are trouble shooting tips, some of them are tips to make your everyday easier when using SOLIDWORKS PDM

Using Edrawings interface in PDM explorer

When working in PDM explorer you haver several options on how to preview your files.

When viewing a 3Dmodel file, most people are used to this preview

EDrawing no user interface

However you also have the option to use the Edrawings interface.

EDrawing user interface

When in explorer, go to “Display”->”Options”->”Show full UI in SolidWorks preview”7

EDrawing user interface added

On some occasions you might need to restart your explorer for it to take effect.

Please note that this is disabled in order to increase performance, so in you experience a drop in performance, i would recommend that you disable it again.

 

Wrong license installed.

Problem: When starting your PDM you get the following message

And you are quite sure that the number of licenses has not been exceeded

Solution:

This issue is most likely due to a wrong client type installed

During the installation “PDM Cad Editor” was selected, instead of “PDM Contributor”.

You do not have to reinstall or modify the installation.

Simply open your administrator module

go to “Help”-> “About SOLIWORKS PDM Administration…”

License type

Here you have the option to change the client type,

Change PDM license type

After the client type has been selected, restart your computer and you should be good to go

 

See Properties in the PDM add-in

This is not a fix to a problem but a tip that you may find useful

When using the PDM add in, it can sometimes be useful to see specific properties of a CAD model, for instance “Part number”

To achieve this do the following:

Ensure that you are logged on to the vault

Open SOLDIWORKS and make sure that you have the PDM add-in turned on

Go to Tools->SOLIDWORKS PDM->Options”

See Properties in the PDM add-in

And press the “view settings” pane

Under “Display Information” you can select the variable you want to appear and select where you want it to appear

see properties in the PDM add-in

Be aware that the settings is for your SOLIDWORKS machine, meaning that if you have several vaults, this variable will appear on all of your displays regarding what vault you are logged into

When you have set it up, you will be able to see it the properties

see properties in the PDM add-in 3

 

Clean up generation tasks

In PDM you have the option to generate different different files automatically.

However, over time the list of “Completed” and failed tasks can grow quite huge.

This will slow the process down when you want to have a quick view of the tasks.

To reduce the number, simply open your admin module and open the task list

Reduce task list

Press “Options” and change “record all completed tasks” to “record the specified number of completed tasks”

Change the number to a number that you find sufficient

Do the same for the number of failed tasks

Reduce task list

This will speed up the opening of the “Task List”

 

Set values in Copy Tree

“Copy Tree” is a great PDM alternative to Pack and go, as it uses the PDM database to collect the required information when copying an assembly and its components.

However, sometimes it can be required to reset certain values when using this feature, for instance if you have some sort of revision information or if your file cards are set to a certain value.

Clearing the values can be done both on both user and group level. In this example i will do the change on user level (admin)

Open the administration module, right click on the user and press settings.

Set value when using copy tree

Go to the “copy tree” section and press “Add”.

Select the variables to be set (or reset) when performing a copy tree

Set values when using copy tree

 

Read only when checking out files

This troubleshooting tip could also be put under “Six SOLIDWORKS solutions – Opening files”, but for some reason I mostly talk to PDM users about it.

In this scenario, the user has checked out the a part and a drawing.

The drawing has been opened and after reviewing the drawing, it is decided that a change is required.

Read only file

The quick way to open is to right click on the view and open the drawing.

The part is read only despite the fact that it is checked out.

Read only

in most cases this is due to a SOLIDWORKS setting.

Go to Tools->Options->System Options->External references, and make sure that “open referenced documents with read-only access” is not checked off.

Read Only
Restart SOLIDWORKS and open the file again

If this does not solve the issue, contact your VAR as there may be some issues with your PDM connection

Author information

Lennart Tinndahl
I started working with CAD systems in 2003, and have since 2012 worked solely with SOLIDWORKS. I am a certified Technical support specialist as well as a SOLIDWORKS Certified Expert. Since 2016 I have helped PLM Group customers to work smarter, not harder. The inspiration for most of my posts comes from the support cases i work on. When writing blogpost I try to focus on the everyday use of SOLIDWORKS.

The post Six SOLIDWORKS Solutions – PDM Part II appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Lennart Tinndahl at July 19, 2021 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

Stud Hole Puncher: The Center of LEGO – Muji Joint Venture

lego stud puncher

Back in 2009, LEGO partnered with Japanese company Muji and it’s hard to see why. The former is a Danish toy company known for making plastic bricks while the latter is a retail company widely known for its clothing, furniture, and stationery, just to name a few. So, what really spurred LEGO and Muji to come together? Inspiring creativity.

Their joint venture resulted in a number of playsets that used both LEGO and paper to add a whole new dimension to your builds. Inside the sets, you would find pieces of paper to cut along with some LEGO studs. After cutting out the prerequisite shapes, you would assemble them by snapping the LEGO studs together.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MBZO8j5l-SQ?start=195&amp;feature=oembed" title="The GENIUS tool LEGO wants to forget" width="770"></iframe>

And the crux of all this? A simple stud puncher. Dubbed the LEGO Muji One Hole Puncher, this devious little thing would punch a 5.1 mm hole in your paper so that a single LEGO stud would fit perfectly inside it.

The concept worked well for punching a single hole but sadly, the puncher had a couple of design flaws.

lego stud puncher

For one thing, punching more than a single hole for a multi-studded LEGO piece was difficult. You could mark your holes with a provided stencil, but since the stud puncher wasn’t transparent, you would be hard-pressed to find your markers at all.

lego stud puncher

Another issue was the hole diameter. While the 5.1 mm hole was just right for a LEGO stud, it was a little too perfect. There was no room for error when punching these holes. If you got it wrong the first time, chances are you would find a hole too small or too easy to rip apart.

Thankfully, there are a couple of easy fixes to those problems.

lego stud puncher

Instead of the official stud puncher, you could use an ordinary single-hole puncher. They’re easy to find, relatively cheap, and produce more forgiving holes with 6.0 mm diameters. Most single-hole punchers even have an open front so you can easily see your stencil markers before punching.

lego stud puncher

As for the stencil, while it doesn’t really need that much of an overhaul, YouTube channel Playfool decided to make their own improved version. The pink stencil has more holes (20, to be exact), is made from laser-cut acrylic, and is much harder to lose due to its color.

Now that punching holes into paper is easier, you can focus on being creative with your LEGO-paper mashups.

lego stud puncher

Why not try making a giant puppet by connecting multiple paper pieces? How about using different colored papers to create a colorful, moving fish? Daniel of Playfool even switched it up and used the paper as the connecting material to make a LEGO bowtie. Since the LEGO – Muji sets never really caught on, the lack of a manual means you can get as creative as you want!

lego stud puncher

If you want to make your own LEGO hole stencil, Daniel Coppen has made all the resources available here. You can also buy the stencil on the Playfool store for US$10, if you’re not feeling particularly creative.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 19, 2021 12:11 PM

July 17, 2021

SolidSmack

Pluto Square: The Modern, Automated Litter Box

pluto square

Owning pets is like having 5-year-old children around you 24/7. While their Instagram photos and videos paint a picture of a perfect world, life behind the scenes is anything but. You have to train them, feed them, and worst of all… clean up their mess, specifically their dung!

No one likes to clean someone (or something) else’s waste, so it comes as no surprise that cat owners have already fully funded Pluto Square – a modern litter box that eliminates the need to scoop or touch your cat’s droppings ever again.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ku81pjGCKgc?feature=oembed" title="The Life of Cat Daddy - Pluto SQUARE" width="770"></iframe>

Once your cat has done its business, a weight sensor activates and the Pluto Square quietly hums to life. The top container shifts at a 90° angle, dropping the waste into a container below. To ensure the litter box doesn’t accidentally flip when your cat is using it, a safety sensor works in tandem with the weight sensor and stops when something is obstructing its path.

pluto square

A stepper and canopy attachment ensures your cat approaches the Pluto Square at a single angle – leaving the surrounding area free of residue kitty litter. The canopy also has the added benefit of giving your cat some privacy and gives them a small outhouse to poop in instead of an exposed box.

pluto square

The Pluto Square can keep up to a week’s worth of litter in its odor-trapping hidden compartment before reaching its capacity. Once full, all you have to do is remove the old bag and replace it with a new one. And that’s as close as any pet owner should ever be to their cat’s crap.

pluto square

The coolest thing about Pluto Square has to be the companion app for Android and iOS devices. With it, you can see the weight of your cat’s poop, as well as factors that determine your pet’s overall health. Best of all, the app allows you to activate the Pluto Square remotely.

pluto square

Cleaning out kitty litter is one thing, but what about the container itself?

As it turns out, all you have to do is lift the tray and rinse it with warm water. I’m not sure if the cleaning method is the same for the canopy, but if simplicity and efficiency are Pluto Square’s mantra, then it’s bound to be just as easy to clean.

Pluto Square currently has a Kickstarter funding of US$220,415 – way more than its initial US$25,000 goal. You can find more on this automated kitty waste cleaner on its Kickstarter page.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 17, 2021 01:58 PM

July 16, 2021

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Join Us for Manufacturing Live with TITANS of CNC on August 3rd

We have talked about manufacturing and why it is important. With the growing gap in employees, how does anyone start?  Who is out there leading the charge in education and showing people how manufacturing has changed?   While many people are dabbling in these discussions, there is only one person and company moving the needle for the future of manufacturing.  That person is Titan Gilroy of TITANS of CNC.

Consider looking around at every physical object that is manufactured by someone somewhere.  Do you wonder how it is made or who are the people that designed and built these components?  The internet wouldn’t exist without physical computers and servers.  Smartphones wouldn’t have a need without the internet, and so on.  From the bed, you sleep on to the tools you use to cook, shop, and travel, everything was once a design that went through manufacturing to enhance life.

But what is manufacturing?  Is it the dirty places often portrayed in movies and TV where the person is almost always filthy?   I can tell you the answer is no; even though some manufacturing is dirty, most manufacturing today is very clean and often one of the most high-tech positions available today.  But what about the people who do these jobs?  Who are they, and where does a person go to learn these skills?   Well, to start, let us look at the current state of manufacturing.

Over the next decade, 4 million manufacturing jobs will likely be needed, and 2.1 million are expected to go unfilled if we do not inspire more people to pursue modern manufacturing careers. Moreover, according to a recent report, the cost of those missing jobs could potentially total $1 trillion in 2030 alone. (Source: Deloitte and The Manufacturing Institute)

Manufacturing is facing a widening gap of talent and people entering the workforce today. It is growing, thanks to the often flawed perceptions mentioned previously and the stigma that it doesn’t pay well or provide a solid future.  These misconceptions lead me to my second statistic.

Manufacturers in the U.S. perform 61.8% of all private-sector R&D in the nation, driving more innovation than any other sector. R&D in the manufacturing sector has risen from $184.2 billion in 2000 to $293.6 billion in 2019. In the most recent data, pharmaceuticals accounted for 30.6% of all manufacturing R&D, spending $89.8 billion in 2019. Computer and electronic products (17.9%), semiconductor and other electronic components (12.6%), and motor vehicles and parts (9.2%) also contributed significantly to R&D spending in 2019. (Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis)

Due to the high-tech nature of manufacturing today and more people choosing office jobs, manufacturing has become a place for designers to test out their ideas and prototypes. Associated with the employee’s knack for technology and the physical part creation, these innovative problem-solvers are often the unsung heroes in getting your favorite items to the market.  Along with this, manufacturing also has a big impact on local communities and their economies as well.

For every $1.00 spent in manufacturing, another $2.79 is added to the economy. That is the highest multiplier effect of any economic sector. In addition, for every one worker in manufacturing, there are another five employees hired elsewhere. For every $1 earned in direct labor income in the manufacturing sector, there will be another $3.14 in labor income earned elsewhere, including indirect and induced impacts. (Source: NAM calculations using 2019 IMPLAN data.)

With that said, recent research suggests that manufacturing’s impacts on the economy are even larger than that if we consider the entire manufacturing value chain plus manufacturing for other industries’ supply chains. That approach estimates that manufacturing could account for one-third of GDP and employment. Along those lines, it also estimated the total multiplier effect for manufacturing to be $3.60 for every $1.00 of value-added output, with one manufacturing employee generating another 3.4 workers elsewhere. (Source: Manufacturers Alliance for Productivity and Innovation)

Titan Gilroy saw a need for someone to dedicate their life and company to evangelize the value of manufacturing and provide free content that anyone can access to get into the manufacturing field.  By demystifying design, programming, CNC machining, and industrial manufacturing, people from all backgrounds can find a place to make the world a better place.

To find out more about Titan’s mission and insights into manufacturing, please join us on August 3rd at 11AM ET as we talk with the man behind the revolution in manufacturing today.   Manufacturing Live is the one place where you can interact in real-time with SOLIDWORKS and Titan.  To find the livestream, please go to the SOLIDWORKS LinkedIn page.

We look forward to seeing you on August 3rd!

 

Author information

Michael Buchli
Michael Buchli has 20 years of design and manufacturing experience throughout the Midwest ranging from Aerospace to recycling systems. A number of those years were spent learning and understanding workflows and processes to improve efficiency and productivity. From running CNC equipment to welding and painting Michael has been hands-on in all aspects of bringing products to market. Michael is also certified in many areas of mfg and a CSWP. He has also written the CAMWorks Handbook.

The post Join Us for Manufacturing Live with TITANS of CNC on August 3rd appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Michael Buchli at July 16, 2021 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 6: Design Changes in xShape

In this edition of our ongoing 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial series, we will be making design changes to the handle for our electric carving knife project using the SOLIDWORKS 3D Sculptor Role (xShape App).

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS brings you a better design experience and improves cross-functional communication with your different teams. Often we must revise our designs. The ability to collaborate in real-time with issues and solutions is an incredible benefit to using a cloud-enabled platform.

In the previous part of this tutorial series, we discussed managing our data within the platform. However, during the design process, we noticed some interference between the handle and the internal components which needed to be resolved. Watch the video below to learn how to edit the original handle component to accommodate the motor and make some additional design changes.

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Moving Task to ‘In Work”

We are going to create an updated handle design using subdivision modeling. Once the project has been reviewed for the state of each task, we will choose the one we are working on and place it in the ‘In Work’ column so our teammates know we are in the process of our task. Then we can get started!

SOLIDWORKS Collaborative Space in Work Task

Collaborative Space in Work Task

Subdivision Modeling Environment

Once the new handle shape component is opened, we will get back into the subdivision modeling environment and making changes is easy. We will edit the subdivision surface feature in the Design Manager tree.

In the xShape Sub-D environment, there are no parametric features or dimensions to edit. The only way to modify the shape of the solid is by selecting faces, edges, or vertices, and dragging them to change their size and position. In the image below we have selected an edge ring towards the back of the handle and dragged it to scale it outwards along the X-axis.

SOLIDWORKS xShape Sub Division Modeling Environment

SOLIDWORKS xShape Sub Division Modeling Environment

Rotating Vertices

In addition to making the handle wider in the back, we want to modify the design so that the front face of the handle is angled forward towards the knife. To accomplish this, we will use a simple box-select to grab all of the vertices connected to the front face, then used the arc on the manipulation triad to rotate these vertices about the X-axis.

Rotating Vertices

Rotating Vertices

SOLIDWORKS xShape Design Changes Arc Manipulation

Arc Manipulation

Arc Bend Tool

Lastly, the Arc Bend tool is used, which dynamically bends selected entities by dragging an arc that appears on the screen. The amount of bend applied is determined by dragging the end handle of the arc relative to the horizontal guideline in xShape.

Arc Bend Tool

SOLIDWORKS xShape Arc Bend Tool

Saving the New xShape Design

After some final touches on the shape, we are ready to save this component. When the file is saved to the team’s collaborative space on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, everyone will have access to the new design instantly. The SOLIDWORKS assembly which references this xShape design file will also be updated and should not have any interference with the internal components.

SOLIDWORKS xShape Saving Design

SOLIDWORKS xShape Saving Design

We are done! Next up, we will see this new design imported and integrated into the SOLIDWORKS Assembly, so we can add some mechanical features to fit the handle with the rest of the assembly.

Interested in the 3D Sculptor (xShape)?

Visit our website to get a quote for the SOLIDWORKS 3D Sculptor and learn how 3DEXPERIENCE® SOLIDWORKS® connects the industry-leading SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD Desktop solution on the 3DEXPERIENCE Works platform, a cloud-based product development environment.

The post 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 6: Design Changes in xShape appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by TriMech Solutions, LLC at July 16, 2021 12:00 PM

July 15, 2021

SolidSmack

Doorwing Keeps Your Fingers and Toes Safe From Slamming Doors

doorwing

If you ever accidentally smashed your fingers or toes in a door, you’ll know it’s one of the most painful experiences imaginable. (Perhaps, second to the agonizing pain of LEGOs under your foot) The pain would usually start a little while after the impact but trust me, you’d say the nastiest words possible once it kicks in.

While doorstops prevent these types of accidents, they can easily be broken or moved by children and pets. So how do you keep the door safe for everyone?

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Becky and Billy Pesacov think they have the answer with the Doorwing – an attachable door and finger guard which keeps doors open safely. Instead of hammering in a new device onto each of your doors, the Doorwing can be adjusted to fit the entrances of your rooms.

The Knob

doorwing

The guard is mostly comprised of white ABS plastic which is molded using steel molds. To attach it, all you need is to turn its knob to lock the device on the edge of a door. Since you can adjust the height of the Doorwing, you can ensure only those who are tall (or clever) enough can reach the guard.

The knob can be fitted to doors measuring 1.2-1.8 inches thick. As an added safety bonus, a finger pinch guard is located near the knob. This acts much like your standard doorstop and prevents accidents that could result in blackened fingers or broken nails. (Ouch!)

The Hook

doorwing

The other half of the Doowing prevents people from going in. While the knob latches onto the door itself, the hook attaches to the door frame. Frames measuring 5.4-8.5 inches thick can be covered by the hook’s length while still allowing you room to adjust the door opening.

Say you want only a small gap to ventilate the room. Just add a few inches of extra space to the adjustable hook. Want room for your cat to enter but not the dog? Add a few inches more.

It’s Adaptable and Easy to Use

doorwing

The cool thing about the Doorwing is how adaptable it can be. If you just want to use it as a doorstop, you can fold the hook to disable the locking mechanism. If you don’t want to use the Doorwing at the moment, you can fold the entire thing away whilst still keeping it attached to your door. It even works on those fancy double doors!

doorwing

The Doorwing is also idiot-proof. Should you accidentally lock yourself out of or inside a room with a Doorwing attached to the entrance, you can unlock the device from either side by sliding the hook.

The Doorwing is currently live on Kickstarter and currently has a funding of US$6,037. Its original goal was just to reach US$4,015 but to our surprise, it seems like lots of folks out there are in desperate need of a tool like this. Well, we can’t blame them. Seeing that a lot of us still work from home, it’s no surprise that people would want to keep their workspaces safe from naughty kids. Most of all, it keeps your fingers in a good condition at all times!

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 15, 2021 04:46 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Adding a New PDM Standard License

Have you just purchased a new license with a PDM Standard CAD Editor, or a Contributor/Viewer license and need to get up and running with it ASAP?  Providing you already have a PDM Standard installation, these quick and easy to follow steps will help you to get on your way in no time at all….

 

Step 1

Open the SolidNetwork License Manager Server, easily found by using the search bar on the server.

 

Step 2

Before moving on any further, you’ll want to make sure that none of the licenses are in use at the moment. This may require an email round to all SOLIDWORKS users, or simply a shout around the office, but you can always double check the status before proceeding.

To check all licenses are free, we can click on the “License Usage” tab in the SolidNetwork License Manager. If the number of total licenses is equal to the number of free licenses, we know that no licenses are currently in use.

 

Step 3

Now we want to stop the server and block access for anyone who is eager to get back to work before you have finished.  This can be achieved by navigating back to the “Server Administration” tab.

 

Step 4

Adding the New License.

To add the new license to your SNL, you will need to go to “Add or Remove Programs” and select to ‘Modify’ the SolidNetwork License Manger.

Here you will need to click ‘Next’ through the wizard until you are asked to add your new serial number.  You will need to separate your serial numbers with a comma (, ) when adding them all to the correct field.

You can now continue through the Installation Wizard and select ‘Finish’ at the end.

 

Step 5

Activating your new serial number within the SNL.

This can be done easily by selecting ‘Modify’ on the SolidNetwork License Manager in the “Server Administration” tab.

You will first need to select ‘Activate/Deactivate Your SOLIDWORKS Product’ and click through until you are given the option of which serial numbers you want to activate, where you can click “Select All”.

You can then click ‘Next’ and ‘Finish’ after the serial numbers have been activated.

 

Step 6

Checking the new license has been activated.

To check the license has been activated you can go back to the “License Usage” tab and you will now see that the total number of licenses has increase by the number of new licenses. This shows the activation has been successful and you are now ready to start using it.

Step 7

The last step is to restart the SNL (if it hasn’t already done so). You’ll find this option back on the “Server Administration” tab.  Once this has been completed, all other users can log back in and continue as before.

Hopefully these quick and easy steps help you with adding any new serial numbers to your SNL, and get you working with them as soon as possible.

 

****

Kieran Mooney is an Applications Engineer at TMS CADCentre, a SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller in Scotland.

You can read more from Craig on the TMS CADCentre blog

 

Author information

TMS CADCentre
TMS CADCentre is a SOLIDWORKS Reseller based in Scotland providing CAD Design Software, analysis software & product data management software. Founded in 1981, TMS CADCentre is the only UK SOLIDWORKS Reseller based and funded within Scotland and have been providing SOLIDWORKS software, training and support since 1996 when the product was first launched in the UK.

The post Adding a New PDM Standard License appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by TMS CADCentre at July 15, 2021 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 5: Working with xShape Models in SOLIDWORKS

In the previous 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS tutorial of our carving knife design project, we created an ergonomic handle using the 3D Sculptor Role (xShape App). In this step of the project, we will show you have to work with xShape sub-d models in 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS, the cloud-connected version of SOLIDWORKS desktop.

One of the great things about 3DEXPERIENCE Works is that you can access it from anywhere as long as you are connected to the internet from a computer. Once the files are saved, they can easily be utilized by any team member without the complication of controlling and managing servers. Watch the video below to learn how to use xShape models in 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS.

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Bookmarks

When using the Bookmarks Editor, a nice feature is the option “Allow products expand”. This is important when opening the last task file, which is an item coming from xShape. It lives underneath the top-level assembly, so this will let me see the xShape part in the Bookmark.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Bookmarks

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Bookmarks

Working in a Collaborative Environment

Next, after the file is opened, we want to edit the cordless handle part. 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS warns us that the file is read-only. This is a great first step in understanding work in a collaborative environment.

SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE Editing Parts

SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE Editing Parts

In this case, the file has been reserved and we inserted a part inside the New Handle Shape part. This is important because it receives the data from xShape. If there are changes to the handle from xShape, we can see those changes in this part in SOLIDWORKS.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Changes from xShape

SOLIDWORKS xShape Model

Shelling the Plastic Designed Part

Now that the part from xShape is open, we will quickly apply a constant wall thickness to this part- it will ultimately be 3D printed for both prototyping and injection molding, so a constant wall thickness will ensure its ability for manufacture toward the end of the design stage. In SOLIDWORKS, you can shell the part to the tune of 2 millimeters here.

Applying a Constant to the SOLIDWORKS xShape Model

Applying a Constant to the SOLIDWORKS xShape Model

Splitting the Plastic Part Into Halves

Next, we want to separate this body into two pieces, a left, and right-hand version. Boolean operators have been included in desktop SOLIDWORKS for nearly 30 years. In 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS, it’s quite similar. Users can add, subtract, combine and split the bodies with a convenient selection of the datum planes here.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Modifying xShape Model Sections

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Modifying Sections

Fitting the Parts

In the assembly, the handle half matching up to the internal guts of the electro-mechanics can now be seen more clearly. It is starting to look good here. We will account for clearance to the cutting knife and also plastic standoffs for a nice fit between the two halves.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Internal Components

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Internal Components

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Internal Components Detail

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Internal Components Detail

What to Do When You Get Interference

Oh-no, there is interference! We want to run a quick check and analyze for potential problems in our design. Clearly, in this case, the issue needs to be communicated back to the teammate who created the handle shape that it needs to be a bit more ballooned to account for the motor coil area.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Interference Detection

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Interference Detection

That completes this installment. We took the complex handle design from xShape, inserted it into SOLIDWORKS Connected and created more parametric and mathematical design features in 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS including shell, standoffs and clearances to the mechanical components. Because we are using 3DEXPERIENCE Works, our team members are quickly made aware of the interference issue and can start working on design changes.

Interested in the 3D Sculptor (xShape)?

Visit our website to get a quote for the SOLIDWORKS 3D Sculptor and learn how 3DEXPERIENCE® SOLIDWORKS® connects the industry-leading SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD Desktop solution on the 3DEXPERIENCE Works platform, a cloud-based product development environment.

The post 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 5: Working with xShape Models in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by TriMech Solutions, LLC at July 15, 2021 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – July 2021

Hello to all,

Welcome to the new edition of the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News!  This monthly news blog is co-authored by members of the SOLIDWORKS Technical Support teams worldwide.

Troubleshooting Tip: Why particular annotation view is not available in the list of possible annotations views?

By Mario Iocco

Frequently, a user wants to move a dimension to a different annotation view. However, sometimes that particular annotation view is not available in the list of possible annotations views. In the below video we explain the reasons why those specific annotation views are not displayed in the list.

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Optimizing Visualize Project file size

By Richie More

SOLIDWORKS Visualize allows you to create stunning photo-realistic images and videos with the existing design CAD data.

Creating Visualize Project involves importing of 3DCAD data, applying appearances, scenes, adding cameras, etc.

While the user does a combination of addition of assets to the project, the Visualize Project File size may increase beyond expected. This is because even when the assets are not used for the Project, the ones added will be retained in the project.

We can easily optimize the Project file size with the following Process.

Procedure to optimize project file size

Step 1– Open the large file size Visualize Project. (file size for the test project is 91,948KB )

Step 2– Navigate to Project > Delete All unused Objects

Step 3– You may select individual entity and analyze, or select all and analyze the unused Objects to be deleted.

Step 4– You may select individual entity and analyze, or select all and analyze the unused Objects to be deleted. Also the option “Save after Cleaning” saves the project after hitting clean button.

Step 5– You may select individual entity and analyze, or select all and analyze the unused Objects to be deleted. Also the option “Save after Cleaning” saves the project after hitting clean button.

Once the Clean is complete, notice that the Visualize Project file size is optimized. (File size for the test project reduced to 34,333KB)

Note- Objects once deleted, cannot be restored. Thus kindly verify the objects selected after analyzing which are set for deletion.

Publishing multi-sheet PDF’s from DraftSight

By Gayatri Keskar

Batch print command in DraftSight allows users to send a set of drawings and Sheets to printers in few mouse clicks. It is very helpful when we are working on a big project and want to print multiple .dwg files to PDF format.

Using default settings we get multiple PDF files, with one sheet on each PDF. What if we want to create single PDF file from all the drawing sheets?

We can change it in Batch Print dialog by clicking on PDF Options:

  • Type BatchPrint in DraftSight command line to launch below window.
  • Click in Add files\Add folder to includes files to print

  • Click on PDF Options and select ‘Publish as multi-sheet PDF’ as below:

We can also enter the name of printed PDF file by unchecking option ‘Specify PDF file name on file dialog’ so that printing operation will be performed without user intervention.

In order to use Batch Print command model and all the sheets must have Print Configuration assigned. In this case we want to print sheets to PDF format hence default printer in print configuration should be PDF as below:

Note: ‘PDF Options’ button will be available only for sheets which are using PDF build in printer in print configuration. Hence while creating print configuration make sure to use correct printer.

DraftSight Professional, Premium, Enterprise and Plus packages have ability to Batch Print.

Noteworthy Solutions from the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base

icon - SW While opening SOLIDWORKS® using SolidNetWork License (SNL) Manager licenses, why I see the error ‘Could not obtain a license for SOLIDWORKS Standard. License does not support this version. (-21,126,0)’?

his error message may indicate the presence of a license file on the client computer. To get more information, see Solution Id: S-079217

icon - SW In the SOLIDWORKS® software, how can I customize sheet metal tables to avoid translation issues with the flatten feature for multinational companies with offices that speak different languages?
The attached PDF document in Solution ID: S-079218 shows the basic details for a recommended approach in SOLIDWORKS®.

Icon - EPDM How do I filter the resource object within a SOLIDWORKS® Manage process?

To filter the resource object inside a process, create a field inside the resource object and the condition inside the process object. For a demonstration of how to achieve this result, see the attached video in Solution Id: S-079228

In drop test studies in SOLIDWORKS® Simulation 2021 and newer, why is the Blended Curvature Based mesher (BCB) not available for studies with more than one solid body?

For drop test studies with multiple solid bodies, the only available meshers are Standard and Curvature-Based (CB). For more information, see Solution Id: S-079234

That’s it for this month. Thanks for reading this edition of SOLIDWORKS Support News. If you need additional help with these issues or any others, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller.

 

Comments and suggestions are always welcome. You can enter them below.

Author information

Bishwaraj Roy
Bishwaraj Roy
Mechanical Engineer with overall 8 years of experience in consultation and Technical Support of Computer Aided Design and PLM Products, 5+ Years experience in Supporting SOLIDWORKS suite of products. Certifications: 3DEXPERIENCE® Collaborative Industry Innovator, 3DEXPERIENCE® Industry Innovator, 3DEXPERIENCE® 3D Creator

The post SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – July 2021 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Bishwaraj Roy at July 15, 2021 05:57 AM

July 14, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Introducing three new PolyJet 3D Printers from Stratasys

Stratasys recently released three new PolyJet 3D printers to add to the portfolio. These additions expand capabilities for designers and allow for better quality, full colour, functional prototypes.

New PolyJet 3D Printers

New PolyJet Stratasys 3D Printers (J55 Prime, J35 Pro, J5 MediJet)

Stratasys J35 Pro

Let’s start with the Stratasys J35 Pro, a low-cost all-in-one 3D printer. This office friendly 3D printer offers full colour, multi-material printing for designers and engineers in a much smaller compact package. Use up to three different materials separately or simultaneously to produce concept models, functional prototypes, jigs, fixtures, and more.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/K7qnLGt5hIk?feature=oembed" title="Stratasys J35 low cost prototyping 3D printer" width="500"></iframe>

The J35 Pro allows prototypes to look, feel, and function like the final product. Designs that were once outsourced can now be created in-house in a fraction of the time, which saves both time and budget. Start iterating earlier, correct errors easily and verify designs more efficiently, so you can get your design to market faster.

 

Learn More

Stratasys J55 Prime

The new Stratasys J55 Prime extends the J55 outstanding modeling offering from the visual full colour to tactile, textual, and feeling sense. Includes the ability to combine rubber-like shore (elastico), high-impact (D-ABS), VeroContact (Biocompatibility) materials together with the full-colour Pantone validate capabilities.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_3_dp3hR8m8?feature=oembed" title="Introducing the J55 Prime: possibilities at every turn." width="500"></iframe>

If you are familiar with the Stratasys J55 3D printer, the key differences in the J55 vs J55 Prime are:

  • Addition of more than 140K colour space
  • Opaque colours
  • High tough – D-ABS (Ivory)
  • Flexible/Shore – Elastico (Clear and Black)
  • Biocompatibility (VeroContact Clear)

The addition of VeroUltra opaque colours is perfect for the following applications:

  • Toys & Figurines: High fidelity modeling with fine detail simulation for the toy industry
  • Consumer Electronics: ideal solution for fine thin plastic models with textures simulating fabrics or wood for consumer electronics.
  • Consumer Goods: saturated colours, smooth tones, and fine textures allows consumer goods to be modeled to the highest realism for appearance.
  • Automotive: perfect for expo models with the capabilities for transparent parts, back-lit panels, and buttons.
  • Packaging: ideal for simulating simple and complex packaging including all textures, text, and logos.

Learn More

Stratasys J5 MediJet

The last addition is the Stratasys J5 MediJet. This economical, compact 3D printer is ideal for the medical industry.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HBEBcKXUDl0?feature=oembed" title="Stratasys J5 MediJet Medical 3D Printer" width="500"></iframe>

The new J5 MediJet PolyJet 3D printer has multi-materials and multi-colour capabilities allowing academic medical centres, hospitals, and medical device companies to create vivid anatomical models and drilling and cutting guides that are sterilizable and biocompatible.

J5 MediJet applications include:

  • Hospitals & Academic Medical Centers: Patient: specific 3D printed medical models can help improve patient outcomes by allowing medical professionals to train and better plan for surgical procedures.
  • For Medical Device Companies: Enhance training and education programs and improve product quality. Create consistency in new medical device development and testing to enhance product quality, reduce costs and accelerate time to market.
  • For Doctors & Surgeons: Improve clinical outcomes, increase efficiency, and reduce waste using models based on real patient anatomy.

Learn More

The post Introducing three new PolyJet 3D Printers from Stratasys appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Kelly Clancy at July 14, 2021 02:51 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Electromagnetics Engineer: Successfully Testing and Managing Electromagnetic Fields

Long-established industries, such as automotive, medical, communications, home, and lifestyle, are being disrupted by an explosion of smart and connected devices. All electric/electronic devices create local electromagnetic (EM) fields, and the way these fields perform and interact with nearby devices, people, and the environment is an important aspect regarding their performance and safety.

Every new electrical and electronic device (electric vehicle, mobile phone, antenna, etc.) must comply with electromagnetic regulations that require the passing of expensive and time-consuming physical tests. An example of regulation impacting a new and emerging market is wearable devices used by operators at logistics plants. These devises must comply with BioEM standards, as well as the related IoT systems that they must connect to.

Virtual Testing

Avoiding the expense, in both time and money, of failing these regulatory tests requires that product design teams adopt a virtual testing approach for EM evaluation during the design process to better understand the implications of both design decisions and component selection on a product’s electromagnetic and signal performance.

Electronics designs have to take into account and manage near and far electromagnetic fields.

Development of smart and connected devices is a multi-disciplinary task. Mechanical, electrical, and PCB engineers all need to work together on a single data set to ensure that all teams are aware of the design approaches the other teams are taking. Each team’s decisions impact the other teams and can affect the EM performance of a product. By using the new SIMULIA Electromagnetics Engineer role, teams can quickly and easily assess electromagnetic fields on their design and see the impact of any design changes on the EM performance of a product.

No matter the industry, as soon as you add electronic systems to a product you must consider the possibility that interference between systems can result in poor product performance or failure.

Managing the Unseen

SIMULIA Electromagnetics Engineer was developed by our sister brand SIMULIA and is powered by the industry-proven CST Studio Suite technology. It delivers high performance 3D High Frequency electromagnetic simulation for analyzing and optimizing electromagnetic components and systems via a seamless, intuitive, and modern user interface on the 3DEXPERIENCE® platform.

SIMULIA Electromagnetics Engineer enables designers and engineers to perform low to high frequency (static to optical) electromagnetic simulations, including the optimization of antennas, microwave components, and electro-mechanical devices as well as some optical applications and charged particles dynamics scenarios. Electromagnetics Engineer assists design teams in improving product performance, reducing time-to-market, and minimizing device malfunctions, warranty claims, and recalls.

The design of motors and generators requires electromagnetic simulation for best product performance.

Safety Matters

With the explosion of mobile and wearable technology, the impact of electromagnetic waves on the human body is causing increasing concern. The simulation of human body exposure to electromagnetic fields via the technology of Electromagnetics Engineer is key to producing safe products.

With its broad range of capabilities and unique capacity to identify and mitigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and electromagnetic interference (EMI) risks in electronic devices, Electromagnetics Engineer ensures that a device will pass any certification tests required by regulatory and industry standards the first time.

Controlling the performance of electromagnetic fields is key for mobile device certification.

Learn More

Calculating the impact of electromagnetic fields on product performance is only half the challenge, an often overlooked but vital step is to make these results available to everyone on the design team. This is where being connected to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform comes into play. With all the product teams using the platform everyone will have easy access to the latest designs, simulation results, as well as advanced design, data management, and manufacturing tools that will allow you to implement new strategies and workflows.  And of course, being connected means you can collaborate with more people more easily—colleagues, customers, partners, and more—through the cloud-based platform.

To learn more about what SIMULIA Electromagnetics Engineer can do for your company, contact your local reseller.

 

 

Author information

Stephen Endersby
Stephen Endersby is a Director of Product Management at DS SolidWorks Corp, leading a team developing solutions for Simulation, ECAD and PCB. A passionate believer in the benefits of design analysis, Stephen is confident that every designer can make use of simulation to validate and improve their products during the design phase. Prior to joining the product management team Stephen was a Territory Technical Manager for 5 years covering the UK and Northern Europe region. With his wide exposure to many industry problems and extensive education including a PhD in Analysis and an MSc in Aerodynamics Stephen is well versed in the application of simulation to solve real-life problems.

The post Electromagnetics Engineer: Successfully Testing and Managing Electromagnetic Fields appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Stephen Endersby at July 14, 2021 12:00 PM

July 13, 2021

The Javelin Blog

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 4: Subdivision Modeling with 3D Sculptor (xShape)

In this edition of our ongoing 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial series, we will be creating an ergonomic handle design for our electric carving knife project using the SOLIDWORKS 3D Sculptor Role (xShape App).

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS can empower you and your team to create impressive designs using a real-time ecosystem that connects people, ideas and data. In the previous tutorial we discussed the connection of those design elements and how this collaborative ecosystem makes project elements available to your whole team. As a designer, you will see there are some great tools that are hard to do without, one of which is the 3D Sculptor. Watch the video below to get the full walk-through of creating the ergonomic handle:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fUbK2U5M3AU?feature=oembed" title="3DEXPERIENCE TECH TIP: Edge of Design: Pt 4: Creating a New Design with xShape Subdivision Modeling" width="500"></iframe>

Rough Draft

Before jumping into the CAD modeling environment, we took a pencil and paper and sketched out a rough idea for the handle design. Scanning this image and inserting it into our 3D modeling space in SOLIDWORKS 3D Sculptor (xShape) gives us a digital version of this draft. This will serve as a guide while working on the CAD model. The black lines sweeping across the handle represent sharp edges, and the faces between them will be smooth and continuous.

Sketch of the proposed handle design

Sketch of the proposed handle design

Transforming the Shape with SOLIDWORKS xShape

After inserting the guide picture, we inserted a primitive shape into the subdivision modeling environment. The primitive determines the number of subdivided faces in the X, Y, and Z directions, as well as the overall size.

Sketch imported into 3D Creator / xShape

Sketch imported into SOLIDWORKS 3D Creator / xShape

This shape is only a starting point and will be transformed quickly. In this case, a Quadball is inserted. In the next step, we will drag to elongate it in the Y direction.

xShape Quadball

SOLIDWORKS xShape Quadball

xShape Elongating in Y Direction

SOLIDWORKS xShape Elongating in Y Direction

Manipulating Faces and Edges

After this, the workflow for modeling in xShape is much like modeling clay. Unlike in parametric modelers, there are no sketches or dimensions driving the geometry. The solid body is manipulated by selecting specific faces, edges, and vertices and dragging them with your mouse to influence the overall shape. In the subdivision modeling environment, all of the faces on the model are curvature continuous, which allows the user to produce high-quality freeform shapes with ease. However, certain tools can be used to crease model edges or create flat faces when needed.

Manipulating Faces and Edges

Manipulating Faces and Edges

Using Symmetry and Transparency

Turning on Symmetry ensures that all the changes made will result in a model that is perfectly symmetrical across the YZ plane. Turning on model transparency allows the user to work with the hand-drawn sketch as a guide while pushing and pulling the model into position.

Model Symmetry and Transparency

Model Symmetry and Transparency

Quick Align

Most of the magic of xShape lies in the ability to artistically click and drag directly on edges, faces and vertices on the model. But there are other advanced tools like Quick Align, which quickly snaps selected points to a sketched curve as seen below..

xShape Quick Align

xShape Quick Align

xShape Quick Align Results

xShape Quick Align Results

Adding Elements

The last thing needed for this design is the finger grip. We will extrude some extra material on the underside of the model, then adjust its size and the surrounding curvature.

xShape Adding Elements

xShape Adding Elements

xShape Adding Elements Detail

xShape Adding Elements Detail

Then, after some final tweaks and touches, the design is complete!

Final Handle Design

Final Handle Design

That’s it for this segment. In the next part of this series, we will discuss how to work with this data in the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

Interested in the 3D Sculptor (xShape)?

Visit our website to get a quote for the SOLIDWORKS 3D Sculptor and learn how 3DEXPERIENCE® SOLIDWORKS® connects the industry-leading SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD Desktop solution on the 3DEXPERIENCE Works platform, a cloud-based product development environment.

The post 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 4: Subdivision Modeling with 3D Sculptor (xShape) appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by TriMech Solutions, LLC at July 13, 2021 02:26 PM

SolidSmack

Are Chainless Drive Shaft Bicycles Any Good?

chainless drive shaft

While most people are familiar with the classic chain gears in bicycles, there are a number of other, less greasy alternatives now which are seeing more widespread use.

One of these alternatives – the chainless shaft drive – hasn’t quite found a foothold in the bicycle world. But why is that?

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In a video by cycling enthusiast Alee Denham, he tries to uncover whether or not chainless drive shafts are a boon or a burden for cyclists worldwide.

What is Chainless Drive Shaft?

chainless drive shaft

Instead of using a gear-and-sprocket mechanism, a chainless drive shaft consists of two sets of gears. These gears (which are usually housed in a casing) transfer the kinetic energy from your pedals to the rear wheel using a drive shaft.

With this in mind, Denham tries to analyze how the chainless drive shaft compares to the classic chain and gear mechanism in 5 categories:

  1. Cost and Availabilitychainless drive shaft

Compared to derailleur drive trains (AKA classic chain mechanism), the chainless drive shafts are more expensive, harder to manufacture, and can only be placed on compatible bikes.

Derailleur drive trains, which have been around longer, are much more cost-friendly. You can easily clean the various parts, plus it isn’t that hard to find replacement components at your local bike shop.

That said, well-made chainless drive shafts require less maintenance than derailleurs since their high-quality components are encased and protected from the elements.

  1. Efficiencychainless drive shaft

The reason derailleurs are used so much by cyclists is that they can easily adapt to the terrain. Say you’re going down a hill or want to go faster – use the high gear. Going up the hill? Switch to the low gear.

Chainless drive shafts don’t have that kind of versatility. They move at a steady pace – which is good sometimes – but don’t excel on any surface.

On the other side of the coin, biking over mud or in the rain isn’t a problem for chainless drive shafts. The reason? Its only saving grace: the protective casing. With this, it can chug along in a storm with no problem. However, the opposite happens to the derailleur. Without a protective chain case, dirt can gunk up its gears and chain.

  1. Weightchainless drive shaft

Since the gears and other components in a chainless drive shaft are much smaller than a derailleur’s, the material used to make them has to be of a higher, sturdier quality.

To this end, most chainless drive shafts are made using heavy metals like aluminum. Compared to the derailleur’s gears and chain made of stainless steel, this results in heavier components that weigh your bicycle (and you) down.

  1. Gear Alignmentchainless drive shaft

In order for a chainless drive shaft to reduce wear and increase its effectiveness, the gears have to be spaced just right so that they mesh properly. Since all parts of a bike bend when sat on, the bike frame has to be sturdy enough to withstand very high loads. On top of the load capacity, the chainless drive shaft has to be able to mesh its gears effectively.

The rear bevel gears also have to be easy to align, so as not to cause problems when installing the rear bike wheel.

  1. Proprietary Partschainless drive shaft

Tying in with cost and availability, having a bicycle with a chainless drive shaft means you’ll be stuck with the mechanism for as long as you own the said bike. A bike with a chainless drive shaft cannot be converted into a derailleur or vice versa since the bike’s frame does not support it.

So you better make sure you can find replacement parts at your nearby shop before choosing a bicycle beforehand!

Despite the hurdles the mechanism has to overcome, chainless drive shafts have a promising start in the bicycle world. They’re sturdy, easy to clean, and provide a good, all-around bike ride no matter where you are.

If you want to learn more about different bicycles, their parts, and the lifestyle of a cyclist, you can check out Alee Denham’s webpage, Cycling About.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 13, 2021 12:36 PM

You Can Now Automate Your Lens Cleanup With LensHD

lenshd

Though I don’t wear a pair of glasses regularly, I know how annoying it can be to have dirty sunglasses at the beach. It’s hard to enjoy the scenery when someone’s fingerprints (most likely yours) are smudging up the view.

You could wipe your glasses yourself, but that might just make things worse. So, why not automate the process?

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/KH03IAQRGsw?feature=oembed" title="LensHD - World's First All In One Glasses Cleaner" width="770"></iframe>

The LensHD is designed to make cleaning glasses easier. (Bet you already knew that.) Knowing that the process would be simpler if it would be automated, multiple tests were conducted and boatloads of questions were asked. How would a machine hold a pair of glasses? What would be the ideal method for cleaning? Can it support all types of frames? With all those questions as guiding principles of the project, the creation of the perfect lens cleaner started.

LensHD is a fully automated, portable lens cleaner that cleans all types of glasses. You just pop your frames into place, close the lid, and let the machine do its thing.

lenshd

Once the LensHD has gotten ahold of your glasses, two pairs of micro-fiber-lined sponges get to cleaning. The sponges rotate in an off-centered rotation pattern, so they cover every inch of your glasses. If you want your glasses to be even more spotless, you can spray on some lens cleaner (any brand will do), and the sponges will ensure it gets spread evenly across your lenses. According to the designers, it takes about a minute for the LendHD to fully clean a pair of glasses.

lenshd

The sponges clean all types of gunk: from fingerprints to wasabi stains. (I have no idea how wasabi can get on your glasses.) Once enough dirt has accumulated, you can pop off both the sponges and cleaning wheels to easily clean them yourself.

lenshd

Even the case is built with convenience in mind. Measuring 3 inches thick, 6.5 inches wide, and 3.5 inches high, the LensHD case easily fits inside your backpack, purse, or whatever bag you carry around with you. It also requires a USB Type-C cable to operate, so you won’t have to worry about battery life either.

lenshd

The LensHD already surpassed its US$1,000 on Kickstarter (it currently has funding of US$239,304), and still has a full month to go before its campaign ends.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 13, 2021 11:40 AM

July 12, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Controlling the License Timeout in DraftSight Enterprise

When managing network licenses of SOLIDWORKS software, you may want to ensure that a license is returned to the pool after a user has been idle for a certain amount of time.

By default, for most SOLIDWORKS software the license will be returned once a user has been idle for 2 hours, and this time can be adjusted using the SolidNetWork License Manager Options File.

For DraftSight Enterprise, the license is not set to timeout by default AND it cannot be controlled by the TIMEOUT command in the Options File like other SOLIDWORKS software can!

This is because DraftSight Enterprise can work with two different licensing set ups, the SolidNetWork License Manager (SNL) or the Dassault Systems Licensing Server (DSLS).  For this reason, the controls for the license timeout are actually located in the Options of the DraftSight Enterprise , instead of being controlled through the licensing server.

To enable and set the timeout for DraftSight Enterprise go to Options and select the System Options screen.  Expand the General group, then expand Licensing.  Check the box “Return license if idle for more than xx minutes” and set the desired number of minutes.

DraftSight Enterprise License Timeout Option

DraftSight Enterprise License Timeout Option

Interested in DraftSight Enterprise?

DraftSight Enterprise is for organizations with many users or multiple sites that need an advanced 2D CAD drafting solution with powerful, productivity boosting features and API to help bring their designs to life quickly and easily. Learn more about DraftSight Enterprise »

The post Controlling the License Timeout in DraftSight Enterprise appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at July 12, 2021 12:00 PM

July 11, 2021

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Geometric Shark – SOLIDWORKS

This tutorial for a geometric shark demonstrates how you can use images on sketch planes to guide a 3D model. A png image file of the shark was added to the top, right and a plane off the front plane. The images can be brought into a sketch from, tools, sketch tools and then sketch picture to use as reference points for sketches and creating the 3D model. it helps to have multiple views of the 3D object you’re trying to recreate. For the shark I used png files, which meant I could remove the white background using the image masking tools, this makes it easier to work with. The png files are available to download here.

Planes were placed along the body of the shark, rough sketches are then drawn over the top of the shark images and are lofted along in segments to create the sharks body. Cut extrude and chamfer was used to create more geometric details.

The side fin of the shark was mirrored over to save time modelling, and chamfer was used again to add more detail. Fillet was also used to soften the sharp corners of the fins and round off the shark nose.

Finally and decal was applied top the shark body using projection mapping, the decal is available to download here.. You can see the finished design below which was rendered in SOLIDWORKS Visualize.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2cGXrHoNs7Y" title="YouTube video player" width="560"></iframe>

 

Author information

Jade Crompton
I am a 3D Designer and Solidworks Blog Contributor from the UK. I am a self taught Solidworks user, and have been using it to inform and create my designs since 2012. I specialise in the design of Ceramics, Home Accessories and Wooden Toy Design.

The post Geometric Shark – SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Jade Crompton at July 11, 2021 03:00 PM

July 10, 2021

The Javelin Blog

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 3: Making Changes in a Connected Environment

In our previous video tutorial, we established what needed to be done to the carving knife assembly using the 3D Product Architect role in 3DEXPERIENCE Works. This time, we will be covering the design and reference of parts and making them available to team members, including industrial designers, machinists and management. We will be using 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS (a cloud-connected version of desktop SOLIDWORKS) and various other apps in 3DEXPERIENCE Works to complete these tasks.

Concept, design, simulation and production can all be tasks that involve many professionals of varying areas of expertise to create a successful end result. Watch the tutorial video below to learn how the design and reference of parts in SOLIDWORKS can be easily made available to all your team members with a cloud-connected environment:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MQB5PZPcnE4?feature=oembed" title="3DEXPERIENCE TECH TIP: Cutting Edge of Design: Part 3 - Making Changes in a Connected Environment" width="500"></iframe>

Task State

Up first, is a task waiting inside 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS. We will begin by browsing our team’s collaborative tasks. As we review tasks, we see that our responsibilities are to locate the battery. Now that the task has been identified, it can be moved to an “In Work” state so that other team members can see this work has begun.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS cloud-connected Task State

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Task State

The battery needs to be located so that the next team member can design a new cordless handle shape with respect to this new geometry in our changed product. In 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS, we have designed the guts to the carving knife, defined various parametric designs based on product requirements, and this will be made available for downstream operations, including SOLIDWORKS 3D Sculptor (xShape) and various simulation tasks in the platform.

Accessing Files

Accessing the necessary files for this task is very efficient. With the Bookmark Editor in 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS, you can directly access the product. You can also access the files directly through deliverables and/or attachments in the assigned collaborative task as well, for an even more streamlined workflow.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Accessing Files

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Accessing Files

The correct battery pack has already been placed into the product design, so we can make very quick work of location by using standard mates in 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS. Ultimately, the battery just needs positioning, but if you are looking for more capabilities within SOLIDWORKS (creation of design features, creation of core/cavity), you can find much of this in the TriMech Video Tech Tip library.

Saving Changes

Now that the battery is located, we need to make sure the changes propagate to the platform. Seen below, the green key to the top-level assembly indicates you have ownership and can make changes. Once saved, we can put in a comment to help with finding this file in the future with the power of 3DEXPERIENCE 6W Tags.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Saving Changes

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Saving Changes

That’s it for this tutorial. The design of the handle shape can now be tackled in the next tutorial. We’ll circle back later with how we can read 3D Sculptor (SOLIDWORKS xShape App included with 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS) components in SOLIDWORKS.

Connect your 3D CAD, Data, and Processes all in one place

Learn how 3DEXPERIENCE® SOLIDWORKS® connects the industry-leading SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD Desktop solution to the 3DEXPERIENCE Works platform, a cloud-based product development environment.

The post 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 3: Making Changes in a Connected Environment appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by TriMech Solutions, LLC at July 10, 2021 12:00 PM

July 09, 2021

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Ride-on Electric Unicorn Car- Part 2

In the first part of this series we recreated our broken car in SOLIDWORKS and gave it a new paint job. It turned out awesome, but our car still isn’t running, so in this blog we set out to draw a schematic for the electronics and add the components to 3D. Then we wire things up and I’ll do a quick repair on the actual car to make sure everything is working IRL. Let’s jump into SOLIDWORKS Electrical and get started with our Line Diagram.

Line Diagrams are great because they help us plan out our project and visualize it from a high level. They are also efficient because almost all the work we do now can be reused when we draw our schematic. Since this is a brand new project and I’m working off of a fresh installation of SOLIDWORKS Electrical, we can start by making some symbols.

Of course, we want to minimize the amount of work and time we put into this, so let’s create our battery symbol simply by copying and modifying an existing one.

The main modification we will want to make to any Line Diagram symbol is updating the graphic, so I went ahead and got some realistic photographs of our components and saved them in .bmp format in preparation. Since most pictures don’t come in bitmap format to begin with, all we need to do is find a picture in any format, open it up in MS Paint, and go to File > Save As > BMP. This preps it for use in SOLIDWORKS Electrical.

Now that we have our pictures saved, we can go to Library > Symbols Manager, find an existing symbol we like, Copy/Paste, update properties (Right-click > Properties), and double-click to modify. Literally the only thing we need to replace is the picture, so let’s delete it and then go to Draw > Insert Image to add our custom image in. Here’s what our Motor Gearbox Assembly looks like after we modify it:

I went ahead and repeated this for 3 additional Line Diagram symbols and created some parts to go along with them, and we’re good to go! Here’s what our project looks like so far:

Note: Creating new parts is also easy! The way I decided to do it was from the symbol > double-click >  Manufacturer part and circuits > Create manufacturer part.

The most important thing to remember here is that our part has circuits and terminals that need to be added in addition to Reference and Manufacturer. Technically we don’t have to add them now, but remember – we get to re-use this work, so I opted to do it upfront.

Now that we’ve added all of our parts and we have a high-level overview of our project, we can do one of two things: we could continue on to draw the schematic *or* we could switch gears and create our assembly in SOLIDWORKS 3D. If there were two of me, I would do both of these things at the same time, but there’s just one of me so I decided to move to 3D for a bit and have some fun.

I started by creating parts for each of our electrical components that we’re going to be wiring up. This was actually quite relaxing. I just busted out my trusty digital caliper, dissected the car, and went about approximating the parts. Approximating at this stage is an art – too simple and we won’t know where the wires attach or how our parts fit in space, but too complex and we waste time. I like to err on the side of wasting time because I just enjoy the process so much, but you do you. Here’s what the finished Electric Motor looks like:

I repeated this process for the remainder of the parts and then decided to go ahead and add some electrical intelligence to my models using the Electrical Component Wizard (Tools > SOLIDWORKS Electrical > Electrical Component Wizard).

When we launch this tool, we get some pretty nifty options that simplify things significantly. For example, my favorite way of adding connection points to a model is directly from the manufacturer part (that we created earlier).

To do this, we can simply select CPoint from manufacturer part and then click Add. Next we can select our part from our library and Right-click > Create Connection Point before clicking on a sketch point (or a face in an approximate position) to create our routing point and associate it with the terminal in our actual part.

The last thing we want to make sure of is that our newly created routing points are pointing the correct direction. In this case, they are correct because they point out towards where the wires should come out of our part. If they were reversed, we could correct them quickly by finding and editing the routing point features in our FeatureManager Design Tree.

Fantastic! There are other steps we could take to simplify insertion of our models, but I decided to skip this step and save my models after just adding routing points. The next step is creating an assembly with all of our parts.

Let’s start by creating our assembly. From SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2D, we can quickly do this by going to Process > SOLIDWORKS assembly and selecting just our top Project-level assembly for creation. If this project were much bigger, I might consider splitting things up into subassemblies based on location, but this one is relatively simple, so we can do everything in one assembly without getting confused.

After creating our assembly, we can double-click it in our Document Tree to open it directly in SOLIDWORKS 3D. From here, I decided to insert all of my parts first and then Associate them to my parts in SOLIDWORKS Electrical later. This technique is also incredibly useful if you already have previously-made assemblies that you want to re-use. The only thing we want to remember here is that if we insert a fully completed assembly into our SOLIDWORKS Electrical assembly, we should dissolve it so that the subassemblies and parts are visible in our new tree. In our case, we can just start inserting components from Assembly > Insert Components. Once we have all of our components in place, the next step is super incredibly simple thanks to the power of our purpose-build tool (SOLIDWORKS Electrical 3D). All we need to do is jump over to our SOLIDWORKS Electrical tab and Right-Click on each component > Associate.

Now all we need to do is click on the 3D model that matches the part. The program helps us avoid accidentally double-associating to the same model by turning already associated 3D models transparent during this command. So simple, easy, and fast! We’re done with our work in 3D for now, so let’s jump back into SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2D and create our schematic with detailed wiring.

To start off our design, we need a symbol that represents a battery. Since SOLIDWORKS Electrical comes with a ton of pre-loaded standard symbols, we don’t need to create or even modify a symbol here. We can simply go to Schematic  > Insert Symbol and select one of our Battery symbols to use out-of-the-box. Once we place our symbol, our properties box automatically pops open. From here, we can quickly Associate our symbol to the component we already created when we made our Line Diagram. Simply click on the correct component in the tree on the right and then click OK.

Don’t you love design re-use? The best part is that once we do this, our circuits come over as well. But wait! Since we used a symbol we didn’t create, let’s double-check them.

Taking a closer look, we can see that our circuit types don’t match so the circuits aren’t associating. Eek! We could solve this by modifying the circuit type in our part or by modifying the circuit type in our symbol, but I decided I was in a hurry this time, so I took a shortcut. Another way to solve this issue is simply by dragging and dropping the red onto the blue (red = circuit on the page, but not available in parts, blue = circuit available in part but not represented on the page). This forces an association and we’re good to go! Just remember to click Yes when the program points out that the circuit types are different.

Laziness success! Of course, if we were going to do projects like this repeatedly with this part and symbol, we would want to opt for changing the circuit types, but this is a perfect solution in our situation.

Moving on, I went ahead and used some standard connector symbols and a DC Motor symbol to complete the design. The only custom symbol I created was a simple Connection Label for the 6 pin connectors in the Shifter Assembly to clarify the layout. I did this by opening my Symbols Library and selecting to import a dxf file. From there, I made sure to specify that it was a Connection Label type of symbol and I added numbers to specify the location of terminations. Here’s the final product:

To insert, I simply right-clicked the part in the tree and selected Insert Connection Label for Components.

We’re almost done! Our last step is to create some custom wires and hook everything up.

One way to access the Wire syles Manager is by going to Project > Configurations > Wire styles….

Now we can create some custom wires. Note that these wires are stored on a project level, so if we want to use them again, we will need to either create a Macro out of them or save them in our Project Template. I started by creating a new custom group and a single 14 AWG wire. Then I copy/pasted the wire four times and modified the clones so that they were all unique colors. I also modified the Equipotential Formula so that it would include the wire color since white and black wires are difficult to differentiate between in schematics. Here’s what our finished custom wire styles look like:

Now we get to wire everything up! This is incredibly simple as long as you know where everything should go AND as long as you have SNAP turned on. If you don’t have SNAP on, you can turn it on by Right-clicking in the bottom right corner or by simply hitting F9.

The very last step is to number our wires, so let’s go ahead and finish this step and take a look at our beautiful schematic. Simply go to Process > Number New Wires and select OK. We’re done!

Now that all of our wires are in place, we get to jump back into 3D and actually run our wires. This is probably my favorite part because it feels like magic.

Since all of our components are already placed and associated, we could technically simply click Route Wires and it should work, but it would look a bit like spaghetti, so I went ahead and gave it one more piece of information – a Routing Path to guide the wires in the correct general direction. To add one yourself, simply go to SOLIDWORKS Electrical in the Command Manager and select Create Routing Path. This opens a new 3D sketch where you can be as detailed (or not) as you like. A couple of tips for creating 3D sketches: (1) start at a point in space that is already defined such as a point on an actual face – even if you need to delete this line later, you’re better off than randomly clicking in space and (2) TAB and rotating your model are your friends – this will help you understand where your next line is in 3D space and gives you a chance to adjust by hitting tab again etc. Also, keep in mind that your routing path does NOT need to touch any of your components. It just needs to be close enough to where you want your wires to be that it ends up helping to guide them.

Here’s what our routing path looks like:

Now for the fun part! All we need to do is go to SOLIDWORKS Electrical > Route Wires and let the program do its magic. At this point, SOLIDWORKS 3D is looking at our schematic for connection information, wire color, wire diameter, and then looking back at our model for connection points and trying to route along the path we just drew all within a matter of seconds. I always like to choose the 3D Sketch option initially because it is faster and allows us to troubleshoot any potential bamboozles that pop up while routing. I also like to check the box next to Show Errors so that it’s easier to find and fix potential problems. Below, we can see that an error was detected:

Since the error specifies that No valid path [was] found, I decided to further investigate by going to SOLIDWORKS Electrical > Route Wires and selecting the Draw Graph option at the bottom of the properties dialogue box to get an idea of all possible routes. When we do this, we can see the problem clearly:

The program isn’t detecting any connection to the indicated terminal on our connector part! After zooming in, however, I also realized an even bigger mistake – my wiring was all upside down! I fixed this, rerouted, adjusted my routing path, and we’re back in business! No errors at all and everything is wired up nicely except…

Yuck! My wires aren’t following the path in this section and it’s causing an intersection. Luckily, I have an incredibly simple trick we can use that doesn’t involve re-drawing our routing path. In fact, all we need to do is edit our path sketch and insert a few Points.

When we do this, it forces our wires to try and hit these specific points. Now all we need to do is click Route Wires one more time and…

So. Much. Better! As a side note, we can also adjust our Routing Parameters or modify our Routing Path to tweak things further, but I’m happy with this result and it took two seconds, so let’s move on! At this point, we can go ahead and click Route Wires a final time but select the SOLIDWORKS Route option to get actual solid wires. I went ahead and did this and the results are beautiful.

That being said, if all we’re interested in is wire length, we don’t need to take this step at all. The SOLIDWORKS Route option is great if we want to understand Duct Filing Ratio or if we are planning on rendering our work in SOLIDWORKS Visualize as I did above. Now that we have our wires routed, let’s finish everything up with a quick report so that we can fix the car!

Jumping back into SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2D, all we need to do is go to Project > Reports and add the List of Wires by Line Style report from the standard reports list if it doesn’t already exist in our project. From here we can modify the report to suit our needs. I ended up modifying the formula for the From/To information so that it wouldn’t include the path of each component (F1 L1 …). To do this, all we need to do is modify the formula and add “parent” to one of the variables as can be seen below:

Now all we need to do is click Generate Drawings and select to create this report. When we do, we get the following fantastic reference:

How cool is that? Now we know how much of each wire type we need and we can even pre-cut our wires if we want to. Another trick I like to use in the report is to modify the Length formula to include 10% more wire than what was routed. This gives manufacturing a built-in safety net.

The final thing I did was export my project to PDF by going to Import/Export > Export PDF Files. I absolutely LOVE the PDFs we can get from this program. I’ve noticed more and more companies are switching to having tablets or computers with large screens on the manufacturing floor as an eco-friendly solution, but also these PDFs are so easy to navigate because of all the hyperlinks that are automatically inserted for us. For example, if we click on MOT1 in our Line Diagram, the PDF will jump to the representation of this motor in the Schematic. There are also hyperlinks in our reports that can help us navigate and understand our project quickly and simply. Here’s what our PDF looks like once exported:

We’re done! Thanks so much for following along. In our next blog we will revise our work and create a SUPERCAR version of this ride-on electric car, so be sure to check back in soon! As always, feel free to share and comment below if you have any questions or if you have an idea for something you would like to see in the future. Bye for now!

 

Author information

Loretta Stiurca
Loretta Stiurca
Loretta is a mom, a wife, and an engineer. She is a CSWE and has been using SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS Electrical for more than 6 years. In her free time, she enjoys hiking with the puppy, playing Dungeons and Dragons, thinking up crazy inventions, learning magic tricks, juggling, making her baby girl laugh, and going on adventures.

The post Ride-on Electric Unicorn Car- Part 2 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Loretta Stiurca at July 09, 2021 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

The LockPickingLawyer Puts Every Security Device to a Test

lockpickinglawyer

When you buy a safe, padlock, or any kind of security device, you want that device to keep your stuff safe. Sadly, a lot of these devices aren’t up to snuff and do a poor job of keeping your valuables away from prying hands.

So how do you tell the good security devices from the bad? Well, let the YouTuber known as the LockPickingLawyer handle it.

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Armed with a vast array of lock picking and power tools, LockPickingLawyer does everything in his power to break into (or break apart) every security device imaginable. If a device doesn’t give, it’s foolproof; but if it does, you might want to consider buying a different brand.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2guvwQvElA8?feature=oembed" title="[756] Sentry Safe Cut in Half FAST!" width="770"></iframe>

The LockPickingLawyer has broken into a lot of security devices over the course of his 5-year YouTube career. He’s slashed supposedly slash-resistant bags, cut entire safes with a hacksaw, and picked hundreds, if not thousands of locks, just to name a few.

What would drive a man to such lengths, you ask?

As his YouTube moniker implies, LockPickingLawyer is a lawyer: a real lawyer. Apart from his day job, he works with lock manufacturers to improve the security of their products. His YouTube channel also helps those who are looking to purchase a security device to make better decisions. Of course, you don’t want to buy a thousand-dollar safe that can just be easily broken into, do you?

With just a quick glance at his channel, you’ll see a lot of security devices that have had their quality put into question. But is there any lock this man hasn’t been able to break into?

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qV8QKZNFxLw?feature=oembed" title="[636] Bowley Lock Analysis and Update" width="770"></iframe>

And the answer is yes. There are quite a few locks the LockPickingLawyer has had trouble with, but the most notable one has to be the single and double variants of the Bowley lock. Due to the strong materials and build of the locks, it took hours for the LockPickingLawyer to break into them before throwing in the towel.

If you’re in the market for a new security device, or if you just want to see some very detailed videos on lock picking, check out the LockPickingLawyer. You might just learn a thing or two about breaking into places you shouldn’t.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 09, 2021 02:07 PM

Star Wars: Visions Is an Anime Anthology Set in a Galaxy Far, Far Away

star wars visions

The Star Wars franchise is no stranger to Japanese culture. The Jedi and lightsaber battles were obviously inspired by samurai. Wipe transitions have their roots in old Akira Kurosawa films. Even the symbols representing the Rebels and the Empire were inspired by the emblems used by powerful Japanese families.

Japanese culture runs deep in the said space opera saga, so it’s only fitting that one of the franchise’s newest ventures delves into yet another of Japan’s contributions to the world: anime.

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Star Wars: Visions is an upcoming anime anthology that sees seven Japanese animation studios’ unique takes on the franchise, both in terms of storytelling and animation.

The animation studios, followed by the episode titles they are working on, are as follows:

Kamikaze Douga – The Duel

Geno Studio (Twin Engine) – Lop and Ochō

Studio Colorido (Twin Engine) – Tatooine Rhapsody

Trigger – The Twins

Trigger – The Elder

Kinema Citrus – The Village Bride

Science Saru – Akakiri

Science Saru – T0-B1

Production IG – The Ninth Jedi

That’s quite a number of well-renowned anime studios there. Kamikaze Douga, for instance, is famous for the anime adaptation of Part 3 of Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure, while Studio Trigger is known for animating high-octane action anime like Kill la Kill and Darling in The Franxx.

But going back to Visions

star wars visions

According to Executive Producer James Waugh, the genesis for the project stemmed from people at Lucas Arts wanting Star Wars to be expressed in Japanese animation. Apparently, there are just as many people in the company who are inspired by the art form now as there were back then. They reached out to a number of Japanese studios and here’s the news: They too are big Star Wars fans! Well, who isn’t?

star wars visions

Having the chance to put your spin on one of the world’s biggest and most influential franchises is just something you don’t pass up. You can definitely catch glimpses of the different studios’ unique takes in the trailer, from iconic Jedi duels to more somber, heartfelt moments involving the galaxy’s less violent citizens. (There’s even an Astro Boy-like droid in one of the episodes!)

All nine episodes of Star Wars: Visions are set to come out sometime in September of 2021 on streaming service Disney+. So I guess we have no other choice but to love the platform even more, especially now that it is promising more exclusive Star Wars shows this year.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 09, 2021 01:01 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

It’s Time for Hassle-Free Data Management

If you’re like most SOLIDWORKS users, you can’t help but think about data management. You care about things like:

  • Securely centralizing your data
  • Ensuring proper access rights
  • Avoiding version mismatches and accidental overwrites

Every solution out there seems to have trade-offs in terms of learning curve, software/hardware overhead, and complex implementation requirements. Perhaps it’s left you wondering…

Why does data management for SOLIDWORKS have to be so hard?

It doesn’t. The answer is Collaborative Designer for SOLIDWORKS. It happens when you connect your existing SOLIDWORKS desktop license to the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform. It’s a fast, flexible, and hassle-free way to start managing your SOLIDWORKS data on the cloud.

 

What can it do?

It all starts when you save your SOLIDWORKS parts, assemblies and drawings to your private space on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform. Everything you need is integrated in the SOLIDWORKS Task Pane, so you don’t have to leave your familiar SOLIDWORKS environment.

A bulk upload tool is even included to help you automate migrating your data to the cloud.

Pushing new revisions and managing lifecycle operations is a breeze.

 

All users have visibility into what other team members are working on and can communicate through apps built into the platform. It’s such a more seamless way to work and collaborate.

Non-SOLIDWORKS users can view, markup, explore product structure and collaborate with team members—all from a browser on any device.

How does it work?

SOLIDWORKS users simply purchase and install the 3DEXPERIENCE Connector add-in. Non-SOLIDWORKS users purchase a collaborator license that they access through any browser. There’s nothing to install. You can choose either quarterly or annual subscription terms. Support is included and updates are automatic.

Nothing about your current SOLIDWORKS licensing has to change. In fact, you don’t even have to be running the current version. Cloud data management is supported on the current plus two prior SOLIDWORKS versions.

Unlike traditional data management software, there’s minimal admin or IT overhead. Any settings you want to adjust are accessible from any browser, but most users can be successful right away with the out-of-the-box setup.

What next?

For whatever reason, you haven’t yet found your ideal data management solution for SOLIDWORKS. Are you ready to learn more about Hassle-Free Data Management? Watch the video below to see what can happen when you connect your SOLIDWORKS desktop to the cloud.

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For more information on how you can connect your SOLIDWORKS to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, by contacting your local reseller.

 

 

Author information

Brad Williamson
Brad Williamson is a Senior Industry Process Consultant with Dassault Systemes who has been helping customers learn, use and succeed with SOLIDWORKS since 1996. Based in the Music City, when he’s not designing in SOLIDWORKS, you’ll find him out playing drums in the Nashville music and theatre scene.

The post It’s Time for Hassle-Free Data Management appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Brad Williamson at July 09, 2021 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 2: Organizing a Product Structure

As we move forward in our multi-part video tutorial series creating an electric carving knife handle using 3DEXPERIENCE Works, we will capitalize on the firm foundation built in our previous 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS video tutorial using the Project Planner app, we now need to create a Product Structure.

In this video tutorial, we will be defining what needs to be done to the assembly, using the 3D Product Architect role on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform. This provides tools to define a product structure outside of a CAD System. It is a perfect solution for project managers who need access to CAD data, but don’t need a full seat of SOLIDWORKS.

Watch the video below to learn how the 3D Product Architect can define a product structure outside of a CAD System:

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Using the 3DEXPERIENCE Product Structure Editor

First, we launch the 3DEXPERIENCE Product Structure Editor. This is a browser-based application that allows the opening of CAD data and interrogating the corresponding structure. We get access to all the components that compose an assembly, and the associated meta-data like description, part number, material, etc. We can also select which revision needs to be placed and create new revisions on the fly.

SOLIDWORKS 3DEXPERIENCE Product Structure Editor

3DEXPERIENCE Product Structure Editor

Product Structure Design Revision

In the 3DEXPERIENCE Product Structure Editor, a user has the ability to remove components that aren’t needed for the new design revision and add existing components. In this case, the old handle is removed and the required battery pack is added. Not only can a user add the new component, but the viewing window allows the component to be moved into place, showing a designer exactly where the component belongs.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Design Revision

Design Revision

Adding a New Component

Once this is done, it is simple to add a new component into the assembly as well. For our carving knife, a new handle component is added to the structure. This creates an empty part in which the designer can place the handle geometry. This part has the part number already assigned.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Adding a New Component

Adding a New Component

Post to the Community

Now that the structure is set for the new knife design, a simple post to the community allows other users to know that the design is ready to move to the next step.

3DEXPERIENCE Posting to the Community

Posting to the Community

Learn more about the 3D Product Architect

Built on the cloud-based 3DEXPERIENCE® platform, 3D Product Architect is a browser-based solution that enables you to create, modify and explore multi-CAD product structures in a single context, enhancing understanding of designs and design changes. It helps you reduce design iterations by making review and digital mock-up of designs, design variants and proposed changes universally accessible to stakeholders. Learn More »

The post 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 2: Organizing a Product Structure appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by TriMech Solutions, LLC at July 09, 2021 12:00 PM

July 08, 2021

SolidSmack

This Elliptical Pool Table Ensures You Hit All Your Shots

eliptical pool table

At its core, billiards (or pool – as the cool kids like to call it) is just a game about simple geometry. Once you understand how the balls move and react on a flat rectangular plane, you can pull off some sick moves by bouncing them off of walls and into each other.

While the premise is simple, the execution is rather challenging. It takes a lot of practice to master billiards on a standard table. With this, why not put all that hard work into something which flips the odds in your favor?

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This elliptical table created by The Q doesn’t exactly fit standard pool dimensions, but it will make sure every strike you make results in a dropped ball. The design is quite simple, but the methods The Q used to create it are quite thrifty and ingenious.

eliptical pool table

For instance, did you know you could trace a perfect circle with just two nails and a piece of string? By using the nails as anchors, you can draw a circle without using a stencil or compass.

eliptical pool table

Once the pool table is cut, he used the hole left behind as a guide for the border. He measured the dimensions with a compass and cut a slightly larger circle than the first.

eliptical pool table

Even the excess felt left from covering the pool table didn’t go to waste. Since the amount of leftover cloth more or less managed to fit the measurements of the border, The Q just made a few adjustments so that he could staple it properly.

eliptical pool table

Apart from the wood and the felt, the only other materials The Q used for this project were some rubber strips glued to the table border and a plastic circular outline for the hole.

After all the process, you can see the table itself is propped up using two wood planks and a wooden recess below feeds the dropped ball back to the player.

eliptical pool table

As long as you aren’t inebriated or have the arm strength of a newborn baby, every shot you make results in a ball falling into the hole. The table might not conform to the standard pool table standards, but when you’re hitting shots left and right, does it really matter?

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 08, 2021 01:01 PM

The Javelin Blog

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 1: Project Planner

In this multi-part video tutorial series, our goal will be to create and design the ergonomic handle of an electronic reciprocating carving knife. We will be walking you through the concept, design, simulation and production of real product prototypes using 3DEXPERIENCE Works to manage all the project personnel and data. Establishing a centralized plan can significantly increase the success of a project, so we are kicking off the series with how to use the 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Project Planner Role/App.

After all, you can’t start successful product development without tasks, people to do those tasks, and milestones for those people to achieve. Watch the video below that details how establishing a centralized plan using the Project Planner app can significantly increase the success of your project:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Jd6Z3PyA_xM?feature=oembed" title="3DEXPERIENCE TECH TIP: Cutting Edge of Design: Part 1 - Project Planner" width="500"></iframe>

Using the 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Project Planner

Using the Project Planning app from the Project Planner role on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform, you can design the order and flow of a plan, assign users to tasks, get real-time updates as the project progresses, monitor metrics and leverage a secure and centralized source of deliverables.

Even better, this master plan can be accessed anywhere you can log onto the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform, including through the 3DEXPERIENCE tab in your SOLIDWORKS Task Pane.

Project Plan

Project Plan

Create a New Project

The Project Planning App can be found in your Compass. Leverage the search at the top of your app list.

Create a New Project

Access Project Planning

Drag and drop this app onto a new tab in your dashboard and maximize the widget.

Creating a Project

Create a Project

Upon creating a new project, you can customize the title, project icon, description, and even reuse some elements of a preexisting project structure.

New Project Dialog Box

New Project Dialog Box

Adding Tasks

A task captures the duration, owner, priority, referenced files and progress of duties or phases of a project. Add all necessary tasks by populating the Create a Task text field. Each task will automatically populate the To Do column in the Tasks view.

Tasks List

Tasks List

The 3DEXPERIENCE Project Planner Schedule view sets us up to design a Gannt chart using these new tasks.

Schedule View of Tasks

Schedule View of Tasks

Editing Tasks: Scheduling and Settings

Editing the task via a right-click will reveal configurable properties. These properties capture metadata centralized on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform such as Priority, Maturity State, Percent Completion, links to appropriate files in the Collaborative Space and the user(s) assigned to the tasks.

Project Planner Task Properties

Task Properties

 

Project Duration

Project Duration

For example, from within a task, you can link referenced attachments from a collaborative space and even upload your tasks’ deliverables from within the task to streamline communication.

The Planned Start, Planned End and Estimated Duration will update the Schedule view of your tasks to a useful Gannt Chart. Link dependencies between tasks by connecting the end of one task to the beginning of another.

Project Planner Task Association

Project Planner Task Association

When a task duration is updated, the expected start and respective end dates will adjust accordingly for any downstream linked tasks. With the tasks appropriately linked, the project impact of any scheduling delays or early completions is instantaneously visible.

Project Planner Linked Tasks

Project Planner Linked Tasks

Add Milestones

Adding Milestones to this Project Planning Schedule view helps you design and adjust the schedule around any significant dates of your project. These milestones are collected in the top row of your project.

Adding Milestones

Adding Milestones

Project Planner Milestone Properties

Project Planner Milestone Properties

There are options to link tasks to milestones as well as fix the target dates. When a schedule shift interferes with a fixed date, the Project Planning app will bring visible attention to tasks being crunched to adhere to fixed dates within your project.

Project Planner Showing Milestones

Showing Milestones

Assign Users

A benefit of having all participants in a project on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform is being able to assign one or more colleagues to any task. Doing so will create notifications at appropriate times to the appropriate audience. The avatars of the assigned users will appear at the end of the task name.

Task Assignees

Task Assignees

The Tasks tab lays out the Maturity State of each task: To Do, In Work, or Completed. Once a user has completed their task, they can easily drag and drop the tile representing their task from one Maturity State to the next. This interface allows the users to quickly visualize and interact with the progress of the project.

Maturity State Summary

Maturity State Summary

You’re All Set Up!

Leveraging the 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Project Planning app for this carving knife project, we can quickly define the project scope, members and key delivery milestones, in one environment. Being able to visualize the project before execution can help identify risks early and adjust as needed. Since this information is captured on the cloud in the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform, users can monitor, receive updates and interact with the project progress in real-time.

Learn more about the 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Project Planner

Project Planner provides simple and assisted iterative planning, execution and monitoring of projects. It helps collaborators to accelerate the time from idea to delivery through lean collaborative planning and execution. Project Planner captures innovation tasks and deliverables into projects where team leaders invite team members to collaborate with ad-hoc access rights. Learn More »

The post 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Part 1: Project Planner appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by TriMech Solutions, LLC at July 08, 2021 12:00 PM

July 07, 2021

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Introducing High-Performance Computing on the Cloud for Simulation

If you are a SOLIDWORKS Simulation user pushing the computational limits with large and complex simulation models, you might be interested in 3DEXPERIENCE® Works Simulation solutions. Why? Well, not only does 3DEXPERIENCE Works Simulation deliver world-class SIMULIA technology (with proven Abaqus® and CTS solvers), it also enables access to cloud-based, high-performance computers for extra computational power when it is needed. Users can decide which computing approach—cloud or local—best suits their needs.

If any of the following questions apply to you, then cloud computing could be the answer:

  •         Are solve times limiting the number and frequency of the simulations you want to run?
  •         Would off-loading computational jobs to the cloud free up your computer for other tasks?
  •         Are running simulation jobs locally delaying product development?

Results of an impact simulation solved on the cloud with Abaqus in 3DEXPERIENCE Works Simulation.

Cloud Computing Can Save You Time

When running simulations on the cloud, your local computer is freed up, so you can work on other tasks, such as working on your next cool SOLIDWORKS® design—no need to wait for the simulation to complete.

Running multiple simulations concurrently is something that many users have been asking for. The value is obvious: You can set up multiple simulation scenarios on multiple design alternatives and send them for computation on the cloud. Now, you can do other tasks or even shut down your computer for the day. All your simulation results will be ready for your review in the morning.

For structural finite element analysis (FEA), running a non-linear analysis with Abaqus will reduce the solve time when compared to SOLIDWORKS Simulation, even on eight CPU cores, and especially on challenging non-linear contact problems. The Abaqus solvers in 3DEXPERIENCE Works structural simulation applications are highly scalable when leveraging additional CPU cores for solving large and complex problems.

Real-World Simulation Tests

Below are three examples: a rubber bushing stiffness test, a camera drop test, and the bolting of a cylinder head onto an engine block test. These examples illustrate the time saved when running a structural simulation on the cloud versus locally. You will notice the scalability of the computation time when leveraging more CPU cores. As a user, you will see two benefits in one: reduced computation time and time saved by running the simulation remotely since your local computer system will be available for other work.

Rubber bushing stiffness test solved with Abaqus implicit using general contact, hyper-elastic rubber material, and sequential multi-step loading (331,853 degrees of freedom*). In this example, the local hardware used has a limit of 4 cores, so 4 cores maximum will be used for the local run.

Camera drop test scenario solved with Abaqus explicit using general contact (340,827 degrees of freedom*). In this example, the local hardware used has a limit of 4 cores, so 4 cores maximum will be used for the local run.

 

Bolting a cylinder head onto an engine block test solved with Abaqus implicit using general contact and bolt pre-tension with multi-step loading (17,101,105 degrees of freedom*). In this example, the local hardware used has a limit of 8 cores, so 8 cores maximum will be used for the local run.

*Degrees of freedom (DOF) are the fundamental variables calculated during the analysis. For a stress/displacement simulation, the degrees of freedom are the translations as well as, for shell and beam elements, the rotations at each node (Source: Abaqus documentation).

Cloud Computing Offers Flexible and Scalable Compute Resources

SIMULIA recently introduced the unified license model for compute licensing, called SimUnits. It means that you can now have one pool of licenses to run any type of physics: structures, fluids, plastics, and electromagnetics.

Depending on your project needs, you can choose between SimUnits credits or SimUnits tokens.

  •         SimUnits credits have a lower entry point and are a good fit for short-term, high-demand workloads. Credits are consumable items (one-time use). SimUnits are also shareable for a group of engineers using simulation on their projects.
  •         SimUnit tokens have a higher entry point and are a good fit for medium- to high-frequency workloads. SimUnit tokens have unlimited reuse and are “locked” when used during a computation.

Cloud Computing is Easier Than You Think

Cloud computing does not require complex and expensive hardware setup or maintenance of a high-performance computing (HPC) cluster. With the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, HPC clusters are already set up on the cloud, ready to go for all users who have been provided access.

Today, every 3DEXPERIENCE Works Simulation Role (set of applications) includes compute capacity locally or on the cloud. The workflow to run locally or on the cloud is very similar and accessed from an easy-to-use “Simulate panel” in the user interface. Below is a workflow illustration that starts in SOLIDWORKS.

Local or cloud computing workflow starting in SOLIDWORKS

Consider the Advantages

In summary, cloud computing for the SOLIDWORKS community confers an excellent and unique advantage for running large and multiple simulations. The gains are time and money with increased simulation capabilities. The advent of SimUnit compute licensing expands your compute capacity and flexibility with easy access for multiple users to more powerful HPCs on the cloud and access to any type of SIMULIA physics—not only structures but also fluids, plastics, and electromagnetics. Computing on the cloud eliminates the need to install, maintain, or update your own HPC infrastructure and frees up local machines for other work.

All the platform applications needed for product development and collaboration are directly available within your own CAD environment, enabling multiple teams to work on a singular product definition in a concurrent, safe, and real-time computing ecosystem. The platform not only accommodates your internal team’s project work but also allows key customers, suppliers, and managers secure access to the data they need when they need it. Plus, the 3DEXPERIENCE platform simplifies communication workflows, thereby improving productivity.

For more information, visit our website or contact your local SOLIDWORKS reseller.

Author information

Nicolas Tillet
Nicolas Tillet
Product Portfolio Manager at DS SOLIDWORKS Corp.
Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS Simulation

The post Introducing High-Performance Computing on the Cloud for Simulation appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Nicolas Tillet at July 07, 2021 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

The Cutting Edge of Design 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Video Series

In this multi-part tutorial video series, we will be walking you through the concept, design, simulation and production of real product prototypes using SOLIDWORKS and the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. This will give you a great idea of how this tool can empower you and your team to create using a real-time ecosystem that connects people, ideas and data.

Upcoming 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Videos

The idea of using cloud computing for product development is not a new idea. In fact, there are almost as many purported cloud solutions as there are product development processes. With all the opportunities that this technology offers it is easy to see why there’s so much excitement around it, but it can be hard to understand how this abstract idea can be applied to a real-world process.

The sample project goal will be to create and design an ergonomic handle for an electronic reciprocating carving knife. There are several different skill sets, people and departments that need to be involved in this process and we’re going to use the cloud power of 3DEXPERIENCE Works to string all the different employees, vendors and teams together.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Videos

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Video Carving Knife Project

SOLIDWORKS and 3DEXPERIENCE Together

Many of you are probably very familiar with SOLIDWORKS (or at the very least with traditional desktop 3D CAD design) but maybe not so much with the newer 3DEXPERIENCE Works cloud-powered platform. Both are provided by Dassault Systèmes and were specifically designed to work together, but what does that really mean and what do you need to know to follow along in this series?

The good news is that this series is specifically designed for people new to the idea of cloud-powered project design. Where we won’t be diving into all of what 3DEXPERIENCE Works can do, we will be breaking it up, so that it will be easy to follow along, even for those that have never seen it before.

To get a little bit more of a general understanding, you can read up on some of the other introductory articles we have written and watch the video below for a general overview and introduction from our team of engineers.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/32Uy-5avT_U?feature=oembed" title="3DEXPERIENCE® Platform Overview" width="500"></iframe>

Discover related articles and case studies on the TriMech website:

Cutting Edge of Design Series

With this 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS tutorial series, we’ve tried to organize it by skillset or the role that a team member would play in the product design cycle. In some cases, the project will be passed back and forth between team members and we’ve tried to simulate that in this project. We’ve tried to represent these different roles with different TriMech engineers, so it’s easier to see where the project is, by who is walking you through it.

  1. Project Planner – Establishing a centralized plan can significantly increase the success of a project, so we are kicking off the series with how to use the Project Planner app.
  2. Organizing a Product Structure – Defining what needs to be done to the assembly using the 3D Product Architect role: a perfect solution for project managers who need access to CAD data, but don’t need a full seat of SOLIDWORKS.
  3. Making Changes in a Connected Space – Designing, referencing and making parts available to different collaborative team members including industrial designers, machinists and management.
  4. Subdivision Modeling with 3D Sculptor (xShape) – Getting into the creation of an ergonomic design from preliminary sketch (literally) to full 3D CAD model.
  5. Working with xShape Data in SOLIDWORKS – We see how the recently created xShape data, stored on the cloud, can be accessed from anywhere and works within the 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS interface.
  6. Design Changes in 3D Sculptor (xShape) – We noticed some interference between the design and the internal components which need to be resolved. We will edit the original design component to accommodate and make some additional design changes.
  7. Handling 3D Sculptor (xShape) Changes – We updated the handle design using xShape, but the geometry is fairly complex and it’s not a native SOLIDWORKS file. We show how to make this a usable form from a manufacturability standpoint.
  8. 3D Printing from 3DEXPERIENCE – It’s time to bring this virtual design into reality with a prototype. In this step, we show how easy it is to 3D print your designs from the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.
  9. Drop Test SimulationSIMULIA Structural Mechanics Engineer (SME) is one of the roles in the 3DEXPERIENCE portfolio and allows for high-speed nonlinear analysis such as Impact Analysis and Drop Testing.
  10. Plastic Injection Engineer – We look at a part fill analysis to check gate location and determine if the part will fill in a mold. This will allow us to make any design changes before starting the mold design or cutting any tooling.
  11. Mold Design – We walk through how the 3D Mold Creator can be utilized for functionality on our complex design geometry.
  12. Shop Floor Programmer for CAM – We review the features in Shop Floor Programmer as we program the CAM data for the mold for the handle that has been designed.
  13. Project Wrap-Up – With the mold successfully created for the production of our design, we have come to the end of our project. We take a step back and take a top-level view of all the different parts of the process in this recap.

Subscribe for the 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Videos

Each new tutorial video will be released daily on the Javelin and TriMech blogs. Subscribe to the Javelin blog to get the tutorial videos emailed to you when they are posted.

The post The Cutting Edge of Design 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Tutorial Video Series appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by TriMech Solutions, LLC at July 07, 2021 12:00 PM

July 06, 2021

SolidSmack

Experience the Medieval Times by 3D Printing a Life-size LEGO Helm

3d printed lego helmet

Making things with LEGO is cool and pretty easy. The same thing goes for creating the bricks themselves.

Due to the toy’s simple design and the amount of stuff you can build with it, there’s a lot of unofficial products which try to emulate the Danish company’s iconic bricks. Even though they might have been made by fans for personal use, LEGO doesn’t really like it when others butt in on their brick monopoly.

Stian Ervik Wahlvåg is one of these fans. A 3D generalist and multimedia developer, Wahlvåg loves 3D printing toys for both him and others to enjoy. He usually shares his STL files online for free, but he doesn’t post his LEGO blueprints due to LEGO’s unwillingness.

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That doesn’t mean he can’t share his love for the brand, though. Using a standard-sized LEGO minifig helm as a basis, Wahlvåg supersized the design and made a life-size LEGO helm for himself to wear to medieval festivals.

3d printed lego helmet

As with all 3D prints, Wahlvåg had to first start with a 3D model. He took a couple of pictures of the original minifig helm and placed them inside 3Ds Max. Inside the 3D modeling software, he used the pictures as a guide in building his model.

3d printed lego helmet

Before going all-out with a life-size helm, Wahlvåg figured it would be a good idea to start with a smaller 3D print. The first helm was printed on a Creality Ender 3 and it ended up being roughly 200-300% bigger than the original helm.

3d printed lego helmet

Satisfied with the final print and how his creation’s visor flips up and down, Wahlvåg then moved on to creating the life-size helm – which should be 2020% bigger than the original LEGO piece.

While Wahlvåg would be using Creality Ender 5 Plus this time,  the settings and filament remained the same. Using grey and white 3DNet PLA filament, the printer ran at 0.2 mm layer height with 8% infill and a 50 mm/s print speed. All of the parts were sliced using Simplify3D.

3d printed lego helmet

The most satisfying part of 3D printing anything must be the moment of removing the extra filament and supports. Hearing the crunching sound of excess PLA is like a grown-up’s version of opening Christmas presents.

3d printed lego helmet

After Wahlvåg cleaned everything up, the only thing left to do was to assemble the helm parts together.

It doesn’t cover the entire length of his beard, but the helm fits Wahlvåg’s head just fine. Now, his noggin will be safe should he suddenly be challenged to a joust. It took 255 hours to 3D print the helmet parts, and a couple of hours to make the 3D model. Count in the time spent making the miniature 3D print and you’re looking at about a week-long project.

You can find more of Wahlvåg’s projects on his YouTube channel, agepbiz.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 06, 2021 01:42 PM

The Javelin Blog

Why you need to use Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing (GD&T)

Join certified instructor Shawn Bontaine, on Thursday July 15 at 2:00pm EST, to learn the importance of using Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T).

This webinar will briefly introduce you to the reasons why GD&T is applied and some of the characteristic symbols utilized. It will introduce the makeup of feature control frames and discuss datums. Experience one of Javelin’s most popular training courses live online.

Meet the GD&T Training expert Shawn Bontaine

Shawn Bontaine

  • Training expert for 20+ years
  • Certified SOLIDWORKS Professional (CSWP), Ontario Teaching Certificate & Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing – ASME
  • Mechanical Engineering Technologist – Conestoga College

Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing (GD&T) Training at Javelin

Our live online GD&T training courses help designers, engineers, managers, and production/manufacturing personnel to understand, create, and interpret GD&T symbols and drawings.

GD&T Training: Fundamentals

Learn best practices for stating and interpreting dimensions/tolerances. GD&T is essential to ensure functional information and design intent from the assembly to its individual parts.  This insures accurate fitting assemblies and spare parts regardless of where they are manufactured.

Designerstoolmakersinspectors and project managers will greatly benefit from GD&T knowledge.

Our Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T) training course covers the fundamentals and principles of the ASME Y14.5-2018 GD&T standard.  The course focuses on the geometric characteristic symbols explaining in detail each symbol, feature control frames, different modifiers and how they affect tolerancing when placed in the feature control frame.

The course also goes into depth on datums and datum reference frames, partial datums and datum target points.  You will be exposed to methods of inspection for the characteristics symbols, composite feature control frames and design exercises.

GD&T Training: Advanced

An in-depth study of the principles of GD&T. The GD&T Advanced training course is designed as a further in-depth course to help understand, interpret and apply the principles of GD&T. It is based on the ASME Y14.5-2018 standard.

Our Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T) advanced course covers the fundamentals and principles of the ASME Y14.5-2018 GD&T standard.  The course focuses on the geometric characteristic symbols explaining in detail each symbol, feature control frames, different modifiers and how they affect tolerancing when placed in the feature control frame.

PLUS, this course reviews the types of tolerances and the individual geometric characteristic symbols and their tolerance zone. Further explanation on profile tolerances (all round, between points, unequally disposed). Comparison of different characteristics for application purposes.

Not sure if GD&T is for you? Attend this complimentary 45 minute webinar to learn more!

The post Why you need to use Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing (GD&T) appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at July 06, 2021 12:58 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Meet the Brains behind the Bots at SOLIDWORKS LIVE with BattleBots

I’m going to assume that many of you reading this, at some point in your career or education, have designed or been on some sort of robotics team.  Robotics teams for students served as a great introduction to engineering and STEM principles for engineers today, and robotics teams are growing around the globe.

Many of those who were fascinated with robotics went on to design robots professionally.  Some design for professional purposes—Marc DeVidts, of the BattleBots Team Ice Wave, for example, started his own company designing robots (learn more about Marc’s story here…).  While others just enjoy competing with other robotics teams in BattleBots.

So, what does it take to build a 250-pound fighting robot to compete with other skilled engineers?  I’m not sure, but you can ask the experts next week at the next SOLIDWORKS LIVE event, July 8th @ 11am EST [Set your reminder here…] We will have three Battlebots teams on discussing how they design these massive fighting machines, how they got started, and what it’s like to compete at a BattleBots events.  Be sure and watch LIVE, so you can get answers to your burning BattleBots questions. Hear from these team leaders:

  •         Jamison Go, Team SawBlaze
  •         Jonathan Schultz, Team HUGE
  •         Brandon Zalinsky, Team P1

You can watch on several platforms:

…so, get your BattleBots questions ready before July 8th, 11am EST

 

Want to learn more about the BattleBots teams? Listen to these BattleBots podcast interviews:

…or BattleBots Customer Stories here:

Author information

Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling is a Senior Marketing Manager at SolidWorks and the host for the Born to Design Podcast.

The post Meet the Brains behind the Bots at SOLIDWORKS LIVE with BattleBots appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Cliff Medling at July 06, 2021 12:00 PM

July 05, 2021

SolidSmack

Can Old Chainsaw Chains Be Forged Into a Cleaver?

chainsaw damascus experiment

Metalworks require a lot of time, patience, and hard work. Moreover, the materials for metalworking aren’t cheap or easy to come by, so it’s always nice to see some old chunks of metal get recycled into something new.

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Italian metalworker Black Beard Projects thought it would be a good idea to break down a couple of old chainsaw chain links and forge them into a simple cleaver. It was more of an experiment than an actual project, as he wanted to see whether or not the scrap metal could be forged into Damascus steel.

Prepping the Chainsaw Chain

chainsaw damascus experiment

After cleaning the chains, he cut the metal into smaller links. These links were welded together so that there would be as few gaps as possible between the metal pieces. Finally, the compact links were welded onto a piece of rebar and popped into a forge for the first heating.

Forging the Chain Into Shape

chainsaw damascus experiment

As the metal was being heated, Black Beard made sure to add some borax to prevent oxidation. Once it was hot enough, it was hammered both manually and with a power hammer into a nice flat shape.

You’ll notice that the metal was consistently being heated between hammering sessions. This is the method for forging Damascus steel, which gives the metal its iconic wavy pattern.

Making the Final Metal Piece

chainsaw damascus experiment

The flattened chainsaw metal was then grinded flat and dunked in oil. This plate would be weak on its own, so it was welded to a sturdier, more solid piece of metal. This stronger metal was then heated and hammered together.

chainsaw damascus experiment

This final piece will be the metal used to make the knife, so Black Beard cut it into shape using a grinder. He then applied some heat treatment to the metal before popping it into the forge.

Inspecting the Finished Blade

chainsaw damascus experiment

Black Beard let it cool down before grinding it again and giving it some final touches. You can still see remnants of the metal’s previous life on the surface – small circles representing the interlinked chainsaw chain.

This is why Black Beard advises against making a blade out of chainsaw Damascus steel – as he surmises the metal isn’t as strong as it appears. There is a high chance the steel has weak points; largely due to the construction of the original metal.

chainsaw damascus experiment

As for cutting papers though, the chainsaw Damascus cleaver works pretty well; as is anything that is given a proper sharpening. It may not be the strongest metal out there, but you could definitely turn your old chainsaw chains into a knife if you really wanted to!

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 05, 2021 03:03 PM

The Javelin Blog

Improve your 3D scans with AESUB scanning spray

Artec 3D scanners are used in a wide variety of industrial applications, scanning objects small and large, to easily capture data while reducing time and costs.

Even with the best professional scanners, a 3D scanning spray is sometimes necessary to help capture all the intricate details of reflective and transparent parts. Javelin Technologies now offers AESUB scanning sprays. Watch the short video demonstration below to see them in action:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bok5NnbBq3w?feature=oembed" title="AESUB Sublimating Scanning Spray" width="500"></iframe>

AESUB scanning spray is ideal for transparent parts, reflective parts, deep pockets, or when high quality and accuracy are important. It creates a matte white coat reducing reflection which allows for a better scan.

AESUB sublimating sprays

AESUB scanning sprays are a quick and easy way to scan difficult objects with no mess or cleanup. The sprays dry instantly, and vanish without needing cleanup. Developed by scanning expert, AESUB is free of TiO2 and does not contain any pigments, which avoids contamination of sensitive areas.

Blue

  •  AESUB’s original sublimating spray is available in a convenient rattle can and vanishes in approximately 4hrs. Perfect for fast turnaround work.

Orange

  • AESUB’s new long-lasting sublimating spray, available in a rattle can and lasting approximately 24hrs. Perfect for long scanning sessions and outdoor use.

Green

  • AESUB’s new long-lasting bulk spray, available in tins for application with a wide-nozzle spray gun. Great for large jobs and large area scanners like Artec Ray

How to use scanning sprays

AESUB scanning spray is simple to use with only three easy steps:

  1. Spray: Apply scanning spray 15-20 cm away from object. Push down the spray button and move the can across the area using even strokes. Spray the entire surface that you will be scanning. It is applied “wet”. The solvent vanishes within a few seconds, leaving an even, matte-white coating on the surface.
  2. Scan: Start scanning a soon as you have a stable and white coating.
  3. Done: AESUB Blue sublimates, eliminating the need for time-consuming cleaning.
Spraying object with 3D scan spray Scanning object to capture intricate details AESUB vanishing and permanent spray

If you are interested to learn more about adding AESUB sprays to your scanning workflow, our 3D Scanning Product Manager will be happy to help answer any questions.

Ready to start scanning?

We have scanners, accessories and permanent and sublimating sprays available for purchase on our webstore.

Buy Now

 

The post Improve your 3D scans with AESUB scanning spray appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Kelly Clancy at July 05, 2021 02:17 PM

July 04, 2021

SolidSmack

How Do Potholes Form?

potholes

You hate them. We hate them. They’re the bane of every vehicle owner – potholes! These nasty depressions in the roads may seem harmless to pedestrians, but they can cause millions, if not billions, of dollars in vehicular damage if left unchecked.

But how do these sneaky buggers even come to be?

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gRuarpWsKHY?start=478&amp;feature=oembed" title="How Do Potholes Work?" width="770"></iframe>

Civil engineer Grady Hillhouse explains that potholes are inevitable due to the design of roads. Underneath most roads is a subgrade layer of native soil; whereupon a base course of flat rock lies. This base course provides the bedrock for the black asphalt you see every day.

potholes

This is the design being used by almost every country to create roads due to how cost-effective and efficient it is. But no matter how sturdy a material is, continuous exposure to elements is bound to take its toll.

potholes

It starts with cracks in the asphalt. As cracks begin to appear, holes leading from the surface to the base course and subgrade make it easy for water to accumulate underneath.

potholes

But that’s just one-half of the pothole-making process. Once the water goes in, vehicles pressing on the cracked asphalt push the water back out – carrying soil particles from the subgrade.Tthis also explains why you’re likely to find potholes in high-traffic areas.

As time goes on, the soil underneath the road begins to weaken and collapse. This pushes the asphalt down, creating the potholes you all know and loathe.

Grady goes on to say that roads in areas with icy weather are even more prone to potholes. Ice lenses are pockets of ice which form due to the expansion and freezing of the water underneath a road. Once the ice thaws out, an even bigger gap is left. This will then start a huge pothole.

potholes

To fix a pothole, roadway owners typically replace the missing soil and cover it up with new asphalt. This isn’t a full-proof solution, as they’re just using the temporary material to bandage what is broken.

potholes

There are a couple of better ways to fix these roads, such as thickening the asphalt or using sturdier materials like concrete. Nonetheless, doing so can significantly increase the cost.

There’s also the concept of maintenance. Since roads are constantly being bombarded by traffic and the weather, they have to be regularly maintained. This is one reason you pay your taxes. So, next time you’re driving and feel a bump because of a pothole, better call the attention of those in power by sending them this informative read!

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 04, 2021 03:06 PM

July 02, 2021

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Ride-on Electric Unicorn Car – Part 1

When I was a kid I dreamed of someday having my very own electric car, so as a grown adult with a toddler, I decided that my daughter NEEDS one. Recently, I was browsing our local Buy Nothing group and I found an absolute jackpot – a FREE electric car. Two seats, four wheels, and… oh yeah, it doesn’t run. Details, details, right? We can fix broken things! We are engineers! We picked the potentially functional car up and, after taking a couple of measurements with my multimeter, I determined that the issue was the electric motor – NBD, as they say. The only other issue was the paint job – it could use an upgrade.

So… in this blog and in the following two blogs, we set out to (1) recreate the car in SOLIDWORKS and give it a new paint job, (2) draw a schematic for the electronics and add the components to 3D, and (3) give the car an upgrade (MAKE IT GO FASTER) but modifying the electrical components and giving it a pair of new wheels. Let’s get started with the mechanical bits.

Step 1: Get orthogonal pictures of the model vehicle.

This is really important because these pictures are going to be our reference. If they aren’t orthogonal, the points on the side view won’t match up with the points on the top view, no matter how much image manipulation we do.

That being said, with all of the cameras and technology that we have at our fingertips today, this should be easy, right? Errrrr… turns out not-so-much. Well, I suppose it depends on your circumstances. I’ll show you a picture to explain mine:

Without distraction or interruption, however, the technique is quite simple. All you need to do is take a zoomed-in picture from as far away as possible. This imitates an orthogonal lens and, at least in my case, is the closest I can get. I also recommend taking these pictures during daylight hours unless you have a well-lit house and a long corridor. I learned this the hard way so that you don’t have to! I made sure to get TOP, BOTTOM, FRONT, BACK, LEFT, and RIGHT images, but technically that’s a bit overkill for this project since there is a lot of symmetry in this model.

Step 2: Rotate, Crop, and edit.

The first two steps are necessary in order to make sure the pictures will line up, and the “edit” step is a trick I use – I like to remove the background to make it even easier to line my pictures up. This also helps me because I really zoom in and I can find the imperfections/non-orthogonal bits of my pictures as I go. Like I said earlier, the pictures are close, but not perfect. You can use any photo editing app to do this as long as you have the ability to Rotate, Crop, and Remove Background. I like to use GIMP because it is free and it even allows you to crop directly to content after you remove the background, but my husband swears by photopea.com which is also free and doesn’t require an installation. Here are some of the photos I collected and edited:

We’re off to a good start! Now the fun part – we get to open SOLIDWORKS!

Step 3: Add your pictures to a new SOLIDWORKS part.

Take a few measurements and add your pictures to your SOLIDWORKS model, being sure to scale as you go. A trick I used here was to create a 3D sketch first with a “cage” around the exterior measurements that I took. This made it easy to visualize where each picture should be. I also created planes for each sketch picture to match and inserted my pictures directly onto these planes (Tools > Sketch Tools > Sketch Picture). The simplest way to scale these pictures is to set the Width or Height in the properties box and move them using the X and Y positioning boxes.

Here’s what it looks like so far:

Off to a good start! Now let’s get to modeling.

Step 4: Choose a place to start and dig in.

This is the second-to-last step, but it is a big one. My goal in this next section is to step through most of the techniques used to finish the mechanical design using the reference pictures. If I attempted to step through every single thing, you would be reading a chapter book, so I won’t do that. You’re welcome. However, if you do want more details about any of it, feel free to comment below or send me a message on LinkedIn.

Because we have so many perfectly imperfect photos, it is important to pick one or two as your “default” – as in, if things aren’t matching up, you know where to go. I chose the LEFT side view as my default and FRONT as my backup for most things. Another tip before we dig in to the nitty-gritty is to organize features into folders in your FeatureManager Design Tree. This is a good idea for any model that is going to have a large number of features because it allows you to quickly edit specific sections as needed without looking through a thousand features first. Also, for the reference pictures specifically, it allows you to very quickly turn them on/off by suppressing the Folder itself rather than having to find and Shift + Select the group of sketches. For reference, here’s what our FeatureManager Design Tree looks like so far:

The first part of the car we are going to work on is the hood and the technique I used here involves surfacing. Many moons ago I recreated a Delorean using 99% surfacing, so I figured this would be a fun way to start things off.

We’re going to create a Surface Loft, so we need two sketches. Looking at our LEFT side view, we can see that these sketches will need to be on non-default planes, so let’s create those first. Sketching on the Right plane, I created two lines representing the start and end of our loft.

From here, I selected the lines individually and used the shortcut key (S) to select the Plane feature. The first reference is the line and the second reference is a plane – in this case we can select the RIGHT plane and make sure to select the Perpendicular relation.

I repeated this for the second plane before switching to a FRONT view and opening a sketch on the plane we just created that is closer to the front (I renamed this to “Grill Plane” in my tree for the sake of organization and sanity). Now we get to trace the front of the hood! Note: it is important here to trace our reference picture in a FRONT view rather than in a view normal to the angled sketch plane that we just created. I tend to personally gravitate towards using lines and arcs here instead of splines, but you could use splines just as easily. Here’s what my trace looks like:

Another trick to use here is to take advantage of symmetry. I only traced half of the vehicle, making sure to add a tangent relationship to a horizontal construction line at the middle so that, once mirrored, the surface would look smooth. From here, we can use the Surface Loft command, selecting the two sketches we made to loft between and then Thicken them, using the FRONT view as a reference for how much to thicken them. At this point, I realized the fatal flaw in this technique: our front and back edges end up being curved.

I could have gone back and finished tracing/creating sketches that would have allowed me to do a normal loft, but at this point, I was committed to the technique, so I went back and added a few steps to correct this. First, I rolled back in my tree to right after the surface was created and used Surface Extend to create a larger surface than needed.

Then I rolled back to the end (after thickening) and used the Cut with Surface command, along with the two planes we originally created, to cut away the extra. This leaves us with two beautiful planar faces at the start and end of our hood. Here’s what the hood looks like after applying Mirror to the half we created:

Way better! Now all that’s left to complete this feature is to add a couple of fillets, although we can easily leave this as the last step in modeling (this is often advantageous, but in this case, it is fine to add them now). Either way, it’s all good in the hood.

The next portion of the car I modeled was the grill, but I used simple extrudes and cuts here, so let’s move on to the front bumper.

The technique I used here involves the massively useful Intersect command. We begin this technique by sketching the basic shapes we see in the bumper from the TOP and FRONT views. I sketched these on the default TOP and FRONT planes.

Now we extrude each shape out past the point where the material actually exists, making sure to un-check the Merge box in each feature. We get this crazy thing. Don’t panic – it will get better, I promise!

Now it is time to activate the magical Intersect command. After activating the command, we want to select all of the bodies we just created and click the Intersect button after selecting Create both in the properties box. Then we can start clicking in the graphics area to remove excess material. I find this to be the simplest way of getting exactly what I want, especially with a large number of bodies, but we could have also checked and unchecked boxes in the Regions to Exclude area of the properties box. Once we have exactly what we want, we can select Merge result and hit ok.

Now all that’s left is to Mirror our body on the RIGHT plane, add a quick Extrude for the connector (traced from the BOTTOM reference picture), and add some fillets to get rid of sharp edges.

Beautiful and fairly simple really, considering all of the shapes we created with a single command!

The next part of the car I decided to tackle was the front fender. I could have used the Intersect technique again, but because it was so simple I decided to just use the Extrude and then Cut-Extrude technique here. From the LEFT side, I traced the profile and used the Extrude command to draw out a solid close to the correct size.

From here, I traced the profile from the TOP, and cut away the excess material using a Cut-Extrude by selecting Flip side to cut in the command and selecting the body we just created under Feature Scope.

Next, I added a couple of fillets to match the original side profile before running into an issue! Due to the imperfectness of our pictures, the profiles didn’t line up correctly, resulting in an unwanted flat face at the front.

Yikes! Luckily, this is a super easy fix. All we have to do is right-click on the face and go to Delete Face, being sure to select Delete and Patch in the properties box.

Instant fix! Now, all we need to do is add a couple of fillets, Mirror our body, and move on to the next feature.

At this point, I basically used the techniques we discussed above to create a bunch more geometry – wheels, the windshield, the side panel, the dash, steering wheel, side step, floor, front axle, back axle, back bumper, and the back panel/bumper were all fairly straightforward with few new techniques of note, so let’s fast forward a bit to the floodlights because these are a bit more interesting. Just to catch you up, here’s our model so far:

For the support portion of the floodlights, I started by tracing the profile for the first segment from the LEFT side view and then from the TOP view (modified slightly so that things line up later) like so:

Then I selected the sketches and used the Project Curve command to project the first sketch onto the second sketch, essentially defining their intersection. Here’s what the resulting curve looks like:

This is perfect, *except* it is obviously missing a portion. I got around this by creating a 3D Sketch, selecting the curve and using Convert Entities to bring it over, and then drawing in the portion that was missing manually, being sure to double-check my sketch against my reference pictures. I also took advantage of the fact that we can Mirror within a 3D Sketch now to complete the curve on the other side.

Beautiful! Now it is time to Sweep some actual material into existence. Many moons ago we would have had to first create a profile consisting of a circle at the end of our path, but today SOLIDWORKS makes it incredibly easy with the Circular Profile option inside of the Sweep command. I opted for this, obviously, setting it to a diameter of 1.25in based on the reference pictures. Then I repeated the process for the second support beam and reused the same paths (using Convert Entities in two additional 3D sketches) to create the T-joint.

Gorgeous! Creating the Flood Lights themselves was actually pretty basic, so I won’t go into a ton of detail here except to say that I used a Revolve to create the connector and I used a Circular Pattern to create the detailed cuts around the edges of each light. I also went ahead and added fillets.

Now that we have most of the external car parts  (besides seats, which were also created using the techniques previously discussed), it’s time to move on to the internals. This part was actually a bit trickier since our reference pictures don’t show everything inside the vehicle, but also critical since we are planning on adding in our electrical components and then modifying them in subsequent blogs. The trick I used here was to actually go back to the physical car and look at it… with my eyes. This required getting up, which was a good idea at this point anyway, so it was a win-win. I then approximated some of the sketches and measured some parts using digital calipers.

For the battery compartment in the front of the car, I started by hovering over the hood and hitting TAB to hide it. Then I sketched out the approximate shape that I saw after looking under the actual hood and extruded it to a depth based on the LEFT side reference picture. Next, I used the Shell command, selecting to remove the top face and extruded a top to the compartment using existing geometry and using Convert Entities.

Fairly straightforward so far, right? Next, I added what I’m called the “underbelly” – again using the partial information we get from the side view – before moving on to the pedal and the area that houses the electronics from this and connects to the battery area in the front. The rest of the conduit was fairly simple after going back and forth, but I do want to mention one place that I made a mistake the first time using the Shell command. Essentially my technique was to Extrude the conduit and then Shell it out to create a path for our wires, but the timing of the Shell matters. Make sure you can visualize the end product before hollowing it out because you might want to combine multiple bodies before activating this command. Here’s what most of our conduit looks like in isolation and then in the context of our whole vehicle.

Now that our car is pretty much done, it’s time to add some details to the back and front bumpers. Jumping into a BACK view (Ctrl 2) we can trace the geometry from our reference picture.

From here we can use the Split Line command, being sure to select the appropriate faces along the back bumper, to split our faces and prepare them for painting. I repeated this on the front and added some fun text at my daughter’s request.

The final piece I added in was a custom unicorn horn “windshield wiper,” again at my daughter’s request, using a simple Extrude and some Fillets.

We’re done! We made it! Now it’s time to make it shiny and give it a paint job.

Step 5: Give your vehicle a dream paint job.

There are so many different ways to add appearances, but the way I like to do it is mostly from the graphics area. All we need to do is click on a part of the car we want to “paint” and then select the largest relevant area to paint. What I mean by this is that we want to first apply to the part, then to bodies, then features, and finally faces if we are getting really specific. I’ll give you an example.

The majority of the car is going to be one color – blue, as selected by (you guessed it) my toddler. Let’s start with that by clicking anywhere and selecting the part before grabbing our blue appearance from the task pane.

This turns our entire car blue!

Now we can start getting a bit more specific. The seats and the window’s glass are separate bodies, so we can apply an appearance at this level. The same thing goes for most of the grill, so we can apply an appearance and get more specific with the lights and turn signals later.

Next, we can apply to specific features (the wheels and the headlights require this), and finally any faces that need to be unique. This technique ensures that we are being as efficient as possible. I also want to mention that we can copy/paste appearances between sections as needed as well using the same menu.

Fantastic! Our new coat of paint looks awesome.

The last thing we want to do is add some decals (NEEDS MORE UNICORNS), but let’s wait until we are in SOLIDWORKS Visualize to do this since we need to reapply there anyway. Note: I added a unique appearance to the unicorn horn in preparation for exporting so that applying a decal would be easier in Visualize.

With our SOLIDWORKS Visualize tab activated, we can go ahead and click Export Advanced to jump into Visualize. Applying decals in Visualize is easy – all we need to do is activate the Appearances tab and right-click in the background > New Decal > Image… before selecting the picture we want to use.

From here we can simply drag, drop, and reposition/resize as needed before rendering. I also changed the scene to brighten things up a bit and exported a video of the turntable. Here are the resulting images in all their glory:


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ISN’T IT MAGICAL? My daughter is so pleased. Thank you for following along on this electric vehicle journey. I hope you will join me next time as I wire everything up using SOLIDWORKS Electrical. As always, feel free to ask questions, share, and add suggestions in the comments.

Author information

Loretta Stiurca
Loretta Stiurca
Loretta is a mom, a wife, and an engineer. She is a CSWE and has been using SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS Electrical for more than 6 years. In her free time, she enjoys hiking with the puppy, playing Dungeons and Dragons, thinking up crazy inventions, learning magic tricks, juggling, making her baby girl laugh, and going on adventures.

The post Ride-on Electric Unicorn Car – Part 1 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Loretta Stiurca at July 02, 2021 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Design to Manufacturing Bill of Materials (BOM) Production

Watch the on-demand webinar below for an introduction to DELMIA® solutions, and producing Bill of Materials (BOM) from Design through Manufacturing:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/r5p2UcpjuMo?feature=oembed" title="Design to Manufacturing Bill of Material Production using Manufacturing Items Engineer" width="500"></iframe>

In this DELMIA on-demand webinar you will learn

Leveraging the power of the 3DEXPERIENCE Works platform, and the Manufacturing Items Role allows a production engineer to build a manufacturing bill of materials from the engineering bill of materials. In doing so, the engineer can define manufacture intent such that as the engineering bill of materials changes, so does the manufacturing bill of materials.

  • An understanding of how the Manufacture Items Management role helps to build the Manufacturing Bill of Material.
  • How ENOVIA® change actions ensures that the correct products are manufactured.
  • How the Manufacturing Bill of Material moves into production through the use of DELMIA | Works.
Manufacturing Items Engineer

Manufacturing BOM Items Engineer

About the Manufacturing Items Engineer Role

Define, compare, manage and update the Manufacturing Bill of Material (MBOM) from the Engineering Bill of Material (EBOM)

  • Easily creates the Manufactured Items Structure directly from the 3D Design data
  • Allows users to update the whole manufacturing BOM for all impacted Manufacturing Items
  • Reduces deployment time via an easy-to-use web client with 3D visualization, which provides users with a more accurate representation of the MBOM
  • User defined templates save time by reducing re-works
<script src="https://www.javelin-tech.com/3d/wp-content/themes/bb-theme-child/scripts/parentcode.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" id="pardotform" scrolling="no" src="https://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2020-11-10/d4ntgv" style="border: 0" type="text/html" width="100%"></iframe> <script type="text/javascript"> var form = 'https://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2020-11-10/d4ntgv'; var params = window.location.search; document.getElementById("pardotform").setAttribute("src", form + params); </script>

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by Rod Mackay at July 02, 2021 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

in-tech GmbH Eliminates Prototypes and Cuts Delivery Times by 66 Percent with SOLIDWORKS

in-tech GmbH develops innovative electronic systems that support automation and connectivity for the automotive, industrial, and transportation sectors. The company employs around 1,500 engineers, software developers, and technicians in eight countries.

The company’s products include electronic systems that make testing of automotive systems more efficient, accurate, and reliable. Its orangeSwitch, for example, enables automated switching between tests of electronic control units (ECUs).

“We’ve been able provide our customers with a higher-quality product while simultaneously growing sales and profit margins—a win for us and a win for our customers.”

-Julian Renz, Lead Engineer

This functionality facilitates switching between tests from one real-time virtual simulation of an ECU-controlled system to another without manual intervention, which allows for testing during off-hours while supporting all common testing-automation frameworks.

Because the original orangeSwitch was developed as a custom product for each customer’s particular need, its production became inefficient. The original version included a plastic enclosure and a breadboard that had to be prototyped. Also, each unit had to be soldered and wired by hand. This tedious manual assembly process was prone to error, and difficult to troubleshoot and repair.

To save time and money, enhance quality and appearance, and increase customer satisfaction, Lead Engineer Julian Renz explains, “we decided to completely redesign the orangeSwitch as a standard product with a modular design requiring little customization, for which we needed better-integrated, automated design tools.”

After in-tech obtained SOLIDWORKS® 3D mechanical design software, the orangeSwitch redesign team added SOLIDWORKS Electrical design software, and later SOLIDWORKS PCB electronic design software to create the electrical systems, schematics, and printed circuit board (PCB) required for the redesign. “They [the software] are easy to use, integrated with SOLIDWORKS mechanical design, and provide the capabilities that we needed,” says Renz.

Integrating Electromechanical modular design

Because SOLIDWORKS mechanical, electrical, and electronic design tools are integrated, in-tech completed the design without a prototype, and with only one revision. The product circuit board was created with SOLIDWORKS PCB, the electrical schematics and cable harnessing with SOLIDWORKS Electrical, and the mechanical housing with SOLIDWORKS CAD.

“In particular, we valued the comprehensive design rules and online design routing check (DRC)in SOLIDWORKS PCB and the simplified yet informative schematics diagrams created in SOLIDWORKS Electrical software,” Renz recounts. Now only configuration of the cable harness is necessary for customer-specific customization.

Reduce delivery lead times and increase profit margins

Minimal customization on each orangeSwitch enabled in-tech to achieve its primary goal of reducing delivery time. Before the redesign, it took six to eight weeks to deliver each customized switch. Now in-tech can deliver a switch in two weeks.

The orangeSwitch redesign and subsequent market launch created a better product, increased sales, and improved profit margins. “Using SOLIDWORKS electromechanical solutions to redesign the orangeSwitch improved the overall look and performance of the product, which helps us make a more professional impression,” explains Renz.

Renz concludes, “We’ve been able provide our customers with a higher-quality product while simultaneously growing sales and profit margins—a win for us and a win for our customers.”

Learn how you can reduce delivery times and increase your profit margins by implementing SOLIDWORKS electromechanical solutions by reading the full case study here.

 

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post in-tech GmbH Eliminates Prototypes and Cuts Delivery Times by 66 Percent with SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at July 02, 2021 12:00 PM

July 01, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Discover the benefits of Cloud Based PDM for SOLIDWORKS

In this on-demand webinar learn how Calgary based Bowhead Corp tapped the power of 3DEXPERIENCE Works to expedite new product development with SOLIDWORKS cloud based PDM for their latest mobility chairs and bikes:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/702LtfzRP5E?feature=oembed" title="ENOVIAworks Bowhead Reach Workflow Demo" width="500"></iframe>

Keep All People, Projects and Processes on Track with Cloud-based Tools

Product development today has become a much more complicated endeavor due to the growing complexity of products and the reality of dispersed product development teams. Imagine a way to bring everyone together so that all key stakeholders can collaborate in real-time on product designs, each one providing the insight necessary to create truly innovative products.

In this recorded webinar, you will see firsthand the benefits of using cloud based PDM tools to enable better-connected design teams and processes that are more agile. You will also learn how the collaboration and data management tools in the 3DEXPERIENCE Works portfolio allow you to take advantage of change processes, project planning, and sophisticated design data tracking.

In just 30 minutes, learn how you can use an integrated, design-centric platform to:

  • Integrate design, data, and project management into one seamless workflow
  • Collaborate in real time with internal and external stakeholders
  • Get instant access to all vital information from anywhere on any device with no software to install
  • A single source of truth for all product data
<script src="https://www.javelin-tech.com/3d/wp-content/themes/bb-theme-child/scripts/parentcode.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" id="pardotform" scrolling="no" src="https://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2019-10-25/d38r4b" style="border: 0" type="text/html" width="100%"></iframe> <script type="text/javascript"> var form = 'https://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2019-10-25/d38r4b'; var params = window.location.search; document.getElementById("pardotform").setAttribute("src", form + params); </script>

The post Discover the benefits of Cloud Based PDM for SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at July 01, 2021 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

This Is How Road Barriers Have Become Safer Over the Years

road barrier safety design

Unless you’ve been in a vehicular accident (which I hope you haven’t), you won’t notice how much road barriers have evolved over the years.

Despite what you see on television, these accident prevention materials have actually gotten better at saving lives rather than ending them. It just so happens that the small percentage of deaths related to them are the ones that always make the news.

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In this informative video by Andrew Lam, he mentioned how Americans have the Manual for Assessing Safety Hardware (MASH) to thank for that.

To put it simply, MASH is a strict set of guidelines that manufacturing companies have to adhere to when making roadside safety equipment. The guidelines are constantly being updated to cover more equipment and the ever-increasing types of vehicles on the road.

There is a LOT of road safety equipment out there but Andrew focuses on road barriers and how they have become safer, thanks to MASH.

road barrier safety design

Road barriers have three general rules to follow:

  1. They have to keep vehicles upright and not cause them to roll over.
  2. They should not cause vehicles to tip more than 75° or go over the barrier.
  3. They should not be able to penetrate or crush the passenger compartment.

There’s a lot more information regarding each rule, but that’s the gist of it. To prevent vehicles from crashing into obstacles or going off the road, the road barriers themselves have to be safe to crash into.

There are three types of road barriers: concrete, guardrail, and cable. Different road barriers are used on different roads depending on factors such as traffic, type of vehicle frequency, and your local government’s funding.

road barrier safety design

Concrete barriers are the most solid and expensive. They have a sloped surface that, if properly designed like the F-shape and single slope barriers, can bounce a vehicle off its surface without launching it skyward. This slows down the vehicle and prevents it from hitting anything else at a high speed.

You’ll commonly find concrete barriers in enclosed areas that have hazards – like on the edges of flyovers or near construction sites.

road barrier safety design

Where there is more space, guardrails can be implemented. In contrast to concrete, guardrails have a rather ingenious design. The rails are held via posts that are placed into the ground. When hit, the rails push the posts outward and into the ground, using the soil as a cushion. The soil then absorbs the kinetic energy, slowing down the vehicle.

road barrier safety design

When guardrails are connected to something more solid (like a concrete wall), more posts are placed near the material to prevent the guardrail from tearing. Without these extra posts, the broken guardrail will allow vehicles to smash directly into the solid material – and nobody wants that.

road barrier safety design

Lastly, you have cable barriers. These are the cheapest barriers available and use three to four cables to mitigate the damage from a vehicle crash. A lot of controversy surrounds these cable barriers since their high penetration rate and low cost makes them less preferable to concrete or guardrails.

road barrier safety design

Provided the barrier is of the guardrail or cable variety, you’re bound to find a terminal grounding it. This has also seen design changes over the years and are now way safer to hit, should you find yourself accidentally barrelling towards one. One type of terminal collapses into the barrier if you hit it head-on, while another pushes itself under the vehicle which mitigates frontal damage.

road barrier safety design

You also have crash cushions, which serve a similar purpose to terminals but are placed in front of more solid structures like concrete barriers or toll booths. These include sacrificial systems like sand barriers and cushions which use polyurethane cylinders or gas.

The whole video is definitely worth a watch, as Andrew explains more about these systems and how your government determines just how much your life is worth when investing in these road barriers.

by Carlos Zotomayor at July 01, 2021 11:26 AM

June 30, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Use SOLIDWORKS Component Reference to label Assembly Components

The SOLIDWORKS Component Reference provides you with the ability to assign a label to each instance of a component in an assembly. For example, you could use Component Reference to identify each instance of the same Gear component used in an assembly.

You can show the component instances as separate line items in a BOM. In a SOLIDWORKS Drawing you can link the value of a component reference to the text of a balloon.

In the example assembly shown below I have very similar gear components, some of which are instances of the same part. Ideally what I’d like to do is add a reference to the parts so I know what the function of each gear component is without having to change component names in the tree:

Multiple Gear Components

Multiple Gear Components

How to apply a Component Reference

In a SOLIDWORKS assembly document:

  1. Right-click a component that you want to assign a reference to, then select Component Properties from the shortcut menu
Component Properties

Component Properties

  1. Enter a value in the Component Reference field in the Component Properties dialog box, in this example ‘Motor Gear’ has been entered:
Example Component Reference

Example Component Reference

  1. Pick OK on the dialog and the value appears in braces { } at the end of the component name string in the FeatureManager Design Tree, as shown in the figure below.
  2. Repeat the steps to reference other components.
SOLIDWORKS Component References Added

SOLIDWORKS Component References Added

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Assemblies

Attend our live online SOLIDWORKS Assembly Modeling training course to learn more about external references and working more productively.

The post Use SOLIDWORKS Component Reference to label Assembly Components appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at June 30, 2021 06:23 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

What is MES and Why Do I Need it?

The manufacturing industry is full of incredible technology. Digital transformation, Industry 4.0, and Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) principles and methodologies are key initiatives worldwide. In fact, there is a worldwide competition to win the 4th Industrial Revolution. So what are manufacturing execution system (MES) solutions and where do they fit in this discussion?

According to Wikipedia: Manufacturing execution systems are computerized systems used in manufacturing to track and document the transformation of raw materials to finished goods.

 

In the manufacturing industry, any discussion about digital transformation, digital manufacturing, and Industry 4.0 must include MES solutions. MES is central to these discussions and winning the 4th Industrial Revolution is impossible without it.

And the reason is clear: MES provides visibility, information, and metrics of manufacturing operations in real-time. This visibility provides invaluable performance, efficiency, capacity, and quality data that business leaders can act on as it happens—instead of when it is reported to management (if ever) or some other point after the fact. This information includes:

  •         Machine/Work Cell/Production Line Performance Metrics
  •         OEE – Overall Equipment Effectiveness
  •         Quality/Defects/Rework
  •         Scrap/Waste
  •         Yields
  •         Inventory/Raw Material Levels
  •         On-Time Delivery
  •         Supplier Quality
  •         And much more…

To exploit this information to its fullest the MES must be connected, in real-time, to the enterprise resource planning (ERP) software. Without this connection, the real-time information remains on the manufacturing floor eliminating opportunities for key stakeholders in the organization to respond.

DELMIAWorks provides this capability by combining MES and ERP in a single, unified database gathering information from the manufacturing floor in real-time to feed the ERP system.

A simple example to illustrate the value of real-time information: When a customer calls for a quote on “X” amount of product by a specific date, how do you know if you can manufacture and deliver on time? What do you have to know to provide an accurate, competitive quote to the customer?

Let’s take a look at four areas: accurate costs of product, inventory levels, current schedule, and manufacturing capacity.

Accurate Costs of Product

Most manufacturers operate their businesses on a standard cost model. Understating a standard cost by only 5% will typically cost a $20 million business up to $700,000 per year. Without MES it is difficult at best to have an accurate assessment of actual costs to produce product.

MES provides critical, up-to-date information for determining actual costs by tracking:

  •         Raw material consumption
  •         Scrap
  •         Actual setup and machine time
  •         Production rate
  •         Labor

Inventory Levels

Accurate accounting of raw materials and finished goods is one of the most difficult and impactful areas of manufacturing. The MES/ERP approach of DELMIAWorks provides end-to-end visibility of raw materials, demand, consumption and WIP. Whether the materials are in the warehouse, at a work cell or the shipping dock, inventory is tracked and traced during the conversion from raw materials to finished goods.

Current Schedule & Manufacturing Capacity

Can the job fit into the current schedule and be produced by a specific date? Manufacturing capacity determines how much a plant can produce and is determined by three critical factors with respect to machines/equipment:

  •         Availability
  •         Quality
  •         Performance

Overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) is a key metric in determining manufacturing capacity and is calculated using this formula: Availability X Quality X Performance = OEE.

Availability

The percent of time equipment is available to produce during manufacturing hours. It is a measure of equipment availability, planned and unplanned downtime.

Quality

The percent of good parts produced when the equipment is running.

Performance

The percent of performance compared to expected or ideal performance. If equipment is rated to produce 100 parts per hour, is it producing 100, 80, or 65 percent? The average OEE for companies that do not measure it is 40 percent. “World Class” OEE is 85 percent!

By implementing MES and gaining visibility to OEE, a manufacturing company can literally double their manufacturing capacity utilizing their existing machines, floor space, and people.

Conclusion

MES is a critical component of digital transformation, digital manufacturing, and Industry 4.0. A manufacturer using real-time data from MES to drive business decisions is at a distinct advantage over the competition. Knowing your company’s OEE can revolutionize how you meet and exceed customer-driven goals so rather than asking: What is MES and why do I need it? A better question might be: MES: How will I compete without it?

For more information about how DELMIA’s MES and ERP solutions can optimize your business and outpace the competition, contact your local reseller.

Download this white paper Benefits of Investing in an MES Solution to learn how this important technology can use your own real-time data to drive better decision-making to help you transform your manufacturing.

 

Author information

Dick Longoria
Dick Longoria
Dick Longoria is a Sr. Partner Manager with DASSAULT SYSTEMES DELMIAWorks. He has assisted engineering and manufacturing companies evaluate, acquire and deploy new technologies to increase efficiencies and reduce costs for years. Today, his focus is on manufacturing and platforms that allow companies to better compete in the future.

The post What is MES and Why Do I Need it? appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Dick Longoria at June 30, 2021 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

How People on the Frontier Procure Ammunition

18th century ammunition

Back in the 18th century, travelers on the American frontier had to constantly move to get stuff done. Whether it’s to trade, settle, or explore, chances are you’d need a gun to feed and protect yourself. Be it a musket or a pistol, guns back in the day used circular bullets mixed with gunpowder to get the job done.

You could easily carry gunpowder, but what about ammunition?

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zQIZSIoiKSI?feature=oembed" title="Early American Ammunition" width="770"></iframe>

According to Townsends – a channel dedicated to preserving the 18th-century lifestyle – ammo was sold by traders on the frontier. You would find lead bullets of varying sizes at different trading posts, but these would often not fit the gun you were carrying.

Instead of buying bullets, most travelers would opt to purchase a couple of pieces of lead and make the ammo themselves.

18th century ammunition

Using the lead they bought from a trader, they would melt it down in a bowl or ladle by a campfire to 620°F (327 °C).

This wasn’t the most efficient way of making molten metal, but it was by far the most convenient. Once liquefied, impurities on the surface were removed and the pure lead was poured into a bullet mold.

18th century ammunition

A lot of gun-wielding folks back then carried portable bullet molds so they could craft ammunition of their own. Since lead is a heavy metal, you could only carry so many bullets before the load started to weigh you down. In order to lighten their loads, frontiersmen would carry a small amount of ammo and make the rest as the need arose.

18th century ammunition

Like with all molds, casting the perfect bullet is nigh impossible. It’s best to remove the excess lead so the bullet can fit into the barrel of your gun. Once you’ve trimmed it down to size, you can then take the surplus and put it back into the lead-filled bowl for later use.

As explained in the video, sometimes you would get a bullet mold when purchasing certain guns. This made it easier for gun owners to create ammunition for their own since they wouldn’t have to go through the trouble of finding or making the specific bullet mold they needed.

18th century ammunition

These finished lead balls weren’t the most accurate projectiles, but neither were the round, store-bought ammunition you could buy at the time. It was a time of learning; and until bullets were shaped to be slightly pointed at the end, there would be a lot of missed shots on the frontier.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 30, 2021 11:25 AM

The Design Behind This John Wick-Inspired Nerf Video

nerf gun cinematography

This is one of those instances where art begets art. Inspired by the high-octane movie John Wick: Chapter 2, the guys at Corridor decided to put their own spin on the mass-murdering hitman… only with a more kid-friendly arsenal.

Meet Nerf John Wick:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9MrnAJsxL8c?feature=oembed" title="Nerf John Wick" width="770"></iframe>

The 3-minute video showcases moves lifted directly from the film, such as using an enemy’s chest to conveniently reload a shotgun as well as a couple of moves that could only be done with Nerf guns.

nerf gun cinematography

For instance, there is no way you could catch an opponent’s bullet and use it to kill someone else if they were using a real gun. But thanks to the foamy ammunition which feeds into the toy guns, you can totally swipe someone’s ammo mid-flight and jam it into another person’s head.

The action is constant throughout the final product but you’ve got to remember – these are grown men playing with children’s toys. If you see this being filmed in real life, you would be less excited and more concerned for their mental health.

So why does the final video seem more exciting?

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UGwphKjAhew?feature=oembed" title="Nerf John Wick &amp; Stunts!" width="770"></iframe>

The first and more obvious contributor to the action is the stunts. This is where you see everyone behind the video channel their inner child and use the John Wick movie as inspiration. Punches, kicks, tactical reloads – moves that made Keanu Reeves the badass into the bogeyman – were condensed into this short video.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UcwlRIKSPVg?feature=oembed" title="Secret Sounds of Nerf John Wick" width="770"></iframe>

The second and more subtle factor is the audio. Nerf guns don’t make the most satisfying noises when fired, so it was up to the team to tweak and add extra sound effects to make them sound cooler.

nerf gun cinematography

By laying multiple Nerf gun sounds on top of one another, Carmichael was able to increase the sounds of the Nerf darts while staying true to their foamy origins. To add more power behind the shots, he layered on some punches and slaps, as well as a couple of whooshing sounds to give the darts more speed. Finally, he added in a bunch of thud sounds to underscore the fall of the thugs to the ground.

There are a lot more sounds used in the video, all of which expand on the original audio which was taken during filming. As Carmichael says, the purpose of good audio design isn’t to exactly mimic what is going on in real life, but to communicate an idea in the clearest, most concise way possible.

nerf gun cinematography

Unlike some other Nerf videos made by Corridor in the past, Nerf John Wick uses no CGI and relies solely on stunt work and good shots – much like the John Wick films it is based on. This idea to preserve the older methods of filming action movies is why so many fans love the franchise. Plus, it gives you a greater appreciation for the medium.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 30, 2021 11:08 AM

June 29, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Lock SOLIDWORKS External References to prevent design change

When working with an assembly that utilizes the SOLIDWORKS top down assembly design approach it is good practice to lock the external references for a design that is ready for release.

This will help to ensure the design does not change unless the external references are unlocked first. Locking external references will also increase rebuild performance of an assembly. This is because SOLIDWORKS needs to keep track of any references applied in the assembly and if a rebuild is applied to a part that is referenced by other parts this will in turn cause the referenced parts to rebuild.

In this tech tip I will show you how to lock an external reference in this simple garden light design:

Garden Light Design

Garden Light Design

What is an External Reference?

External references are created when a part is built while in the assembly environment. Using existing geometry of another part to help create a new part will generate an external reference, for instance a sketch entity could be created by offsetting an edge of an existing part, or a feature is extruded up to an existing part’s face as shown in the image below:

Reference in Assembly

External Reference in Assembly

Parts that have external references are denoted within the FeatureManager Design Tree with the ‘->’ symbol as shown in the figure below. The feature that was created with the reference and the overall part icon will both display the symbol. A part may also have multiple features with external references.

External Reference Symbol

External Reference Symbol

How to Lock an External Reference

  1. Open your top down assembly document that contains parts with external references.
  2. To lock an external reference Right-click on the Part (or Feature in a Part document) with the external reference (denoted by the ‘->’ suffix in the FeatureManager Design Tree).
  3. Select External References from the shortcut menu.
List External References

List External References

  1. In the related dialog box the external references will be listed for each feature of the component, in this example an Extrude feature is present as shown in the figure below.
  2. To lock the external references pick the Lock All button in the dialog.
Listed references

Lock external references

  1. SOLIDWORKS will warn you that you will not be able to modify the reference in the part while it is locked, pick OK on the dialog.
Lock external reference warning

Lock external reference warning

  1. The part (or feature) will now be listed as locked in the dialog. Select OK to close the dialog.
  2. In the Assembly FeatureManager Design Tree a locked symbol ‘->*’ will now be displayed as a suffix of the part name to denote that the reference is locked. If you need to add more references to the part you can unlock it using the same procedure.
Locked external reference

Locked external reference

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Assemblies

Attend our live online SOLIDWORKS Assembly Modeling training course to learn more about external references and working more productively.

The post Lock SOLIDWORKS External References to prevent design change appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at June 29, 2021 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Don’t Miss SOLIDWORKS Live: Manufacturing

What defines manufacturing?  Is a building one single product?  Is it that “aha” moment we always see in the movies with an 80’s style montage to magically build it? Or could it be that manufacturing is the pursuit of customer satisfaction and the drive to improve not only ourselves but for other businesses as well?

If you believe the latter (which I do), then you will love participating in our next Manufacturing Live event on LinkedIn starting at 11AM ET on July 6th.  We will be talking with Manufacturing expert Jason Jacobson from Brehmer Manufacturing, locate in Lyons, Nebraska.

Who is Brehmer?  That is a good question; they have been designing and manufacturing components from Agriculture to tire recycling since 1974.  Throughout that time, they have refined design and manufacturing processes to help others be successful.  From farmers and ranchers to companies trying to deal with that massive issue of old tires and the environment, the company has refined the craft of design and manufacturing.

A few of the areas the company has focused on over the years are:

Fertilizer Tenders to ensure farmers are efficient and responsible as possible when applying fertilizer on their fields to feed the world.

Hog Equipment ensures the animals get the water and feed they need to stay healthy and sterile; and last, but not least,

Tire recycling equipment ranging from breaking the beads from the rims to cutting tires and baling them to be recycled efficiently.

As you can see, manufacturing is more than building widgets. When done correctly, it truly can be the pursuit of customer satisfaction and the drive to improve ourselves and other businesses, which also happens to be the motto of Brehmer for more than 45 years.

If you want to know more about what makes Brehmer Manufacturing successful, please tune into the SOLIDWORKS LinkedIn page at 11AM ET July 6th to ask questions and hear from Jason Jacobson, one of the Brehmer manufacturing experts!

Author information

Mike Buchli
Mike Buchli
Michael Buchli has 20 years of design and manufacturing experience throughout the Midwest ranging from Aerospace to recycling systems. A number of those years were spent learning and understanding workflows and processes to improve efficiency and productivity. From running CNC equipment to welding and painting Michael has been hands-on in all aspects of bringing products to market. Michael is also certified in many areas of mfg and a CSWP. He has also written the CAMWorks Handbook.

The post Don’t Miss SOLIDWORKS Live: Manufacturing appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mike Buchli at June 29, 2021 12:00 PM

June 28, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Electro-Mechanical Design and Collaboration with SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Without modern electro-mechanical design tools that support a collaborative workflow, engineers will spend the equivalent of four months each year fighting their software instead of improving their designs. That’s the real price of designing in silos and using ill-suited tools.

Fortunately, it doesn’t have to be like this. SOLIDWORKS Electrical provides excellent collaborative solutions that automate many of those tasks and empower engineers to be engineers. Watch the on-demand webinar, in which we will focus on collaboration from the perspective of the electro-mechanical user:

  • The power of real-time collaboration to streamline communication and design efforts
  • How an integrated electro-mechanical design environment eliminates redundant data entry and facilitates the creation of unified BOMs and other documents
  • How using 3D for complete product definition opens the door to other benefits – simulation, visualization and technical documentation

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" loading="lazy" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YUAF-_9g_Rs?feature=oembed" title="Get It Together! Electro-mechanical Collaboration with SOLIDWORKS Electrical" width="500"></iframe>

SOLIDWORKS Electro-mechanical design tools

SOLIDWORKS Electrical solutions simplify electrical schematic design with specific tools for engineers and intuitive interfaces for faster embedded electrical system design and control panels.

SOLIDWORKS® Electrical helps companies simplify the electrical design process and enables concurrent development of electrical and mechanical aspects of a design. SOLIDWORKS Electrical is unique in its ability to provide a real-time, bidirectional link between
SOLIDWORKS Electrical schematics and 3D mechanical models. This offers a clear advantage to any company where two or more users must collaborate on a project, and having up-to-date and synchronized information is a must.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Overview

SOLIDWORKS Electrical is a set of computer-aided engineering (CAE) design tools that are integral parts of the SOLIDWORKS design and simulation portfolio. SOLIDWORKS Electrical helps design engineers reduce the risk inherent in innovation, enabling companies to get products to market faster and with less cost, due to a decreased need for physical prototyping. With a powerful and intuitive set of electrical design capabilities, designers can establish an integrated design early in the design process. This helps minimize or even eliminate potential defects and avoids costly design rework, saving time and money.

Electro-mechanical design

Electro-mechanical design

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Benefits

  • Streamline the development process.
  • Avoid hidden costs.
  • Reduce manufacturing defects.
  • Avoid time-to-market delays.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Capabilities

  • SOLIDWORKS Electrical schematics are bidirectionally linked to allow multiuser interaction in real time. They’re also linked to your 3D SOLIDWORKS assembly, facilitating verification of proper fit; planning of all wire, cable, and harness routes; and calculation of wire lengths prior to assembly.
  • ECAD and MCAD share a common database, ensuring consistency and facilitating creation of a single, unified bill of materials (BOM), including both electrical and mechanical elements.
  • Component database is easily linked to MRP/ERP to ensure that proper part numbers, pricing, supplier info, lead-time, and other relevant data is captured at the time of design.
  • SOLIDWORKS Electrical, with its real-time, multiuser design, enables complex schematic designs to be easily shared across multiple disciplines.
  • SOLIDWORKS Electrical translates single-line schematics into detailed multiline power and control and PLC schematics.
  • SOLIDWORKS Electrical offers detailed terminal strip management tools.
  • SOLIDWORKS Electrical allows for the reuse of existing designs.
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The post Electro-Mechanical Design and Collaboration with SOLIDWORKS Electrical appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at June 28, 2021 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Manufacturing the DTV Shredder

While the final touches to the design of the DTV Shredder was wrapping up; many of the components had already been released for manufacturing. Two of these components are the complex track arms on either side of the vehicle that the track system mounts to.

To get ahead of schedule, we can start working on the manufacturing and NC programming for these components well in advance of the project being complete. For this task, we’ll leverage NC Shop Floor Programmer on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform; best in class NC software developed by DELMIA. NC Shop Floor Programmer gives us access to several new apps, including Shop Floor Machining, which delivers powerful 2.5- and 3-axis, full 3D NC machine programming.

We can start this task with confidence when all of our design data is on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform, because even if these parts change while we’re working, the updates are automatic within Shop Floor Programmer. So let’s dive in and start making chips.

We’ll start, like in most apps on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform, by simply searching for the part we want to fabricate. From there, we can dive right into the Shop Floor Machining Wizard to help guide us through the initial setup.

The first thing we’re asked to do is define the machine that will process the part. You can do this one of two ways. You can choose to use a full 3D model of the virtual twin of the CNC machine you will be using. This will provide advanced features like Machine Kinematics, which allows you to understand how your part, fixtures, tools and the machine all interact with one another.

The other method is to define the machine virtually. When doing this, you have all the same control of the final NC programming. You can even specify a standard catalog of machine tools you work with regularly adding consistency to all of your NC tool paths, and also lighting fast to find. The one other thing you will want to do is define the Post Processor you will be using based on the machine you will be machining this with.

With the machine set up, you will want to define your stock material. You can use any 3D geometry for this. So, for example, if you had a 3D model of a casting for this part, you could use that as a starting point. Alternatively, Shop Floor Machining allows you to generate a rough stock, based on the overall geometry of the part, in which you can customize any of the values to account for standard materials sizes, or material you have on hand. You can either enter these values in the dialog box, or use the on-screen rulers, whichever you find to be easiest.

With the stock and material set up, the last thing we want to do is automatically recognize any holes on our part. This will save us a lot of them when it comes to doing drilling and boring operations, by automatically capturing the size, depths, and any common holes to be used in patterns. This is a big timesaver, allowing you to focus on the more complex aspects of your NC program.

With all of the setup out of the way, it’s time to start roughing this part in with the Roughing Tool. The fist thing you’ll want to define is the tool you want to cut the material with. Here is where the catalog that we defined earlier makes it simple to search through your common tools and assemblies.

Within every machining operation, there are parameters that are specific to the process you’re performing. In this case, you can customize the step over, cutting depth and more. The Surface Machining tools in Shop Floor Machining are very powerful in that they reference the 3D model in its entirety. So there’s no need to select all of the surfaces you want to machine and convert them to a program specific entity. The application looks at the entire part, and the stock material we specified and calculates the entire roughing operation for this part leaving 1mm of material for a finishing pass later. Once calculated, you can always review the NC toolpaths that are created instantly, and play the simulation of the machining process to ensure that everything is processed as intended.

This style of showing NC tool paths is fairly typical with CNC software, and is what many machinist have come to expect from the NC tool. However, the DELMIA machining tools, including Shop Floor Machining, provide a much easier way to understand these complex step-by-step interactions. Intermediate Stock is a powerful and simpler way to visually understand see where there’s material left, and how the current machining operation will impact the overall manufacturing process. This graphical representations make it very simple for both new and experienced machinists to have a better understanding of each machine process performed.

Automation is great for getting large mundane tasks taken care of quickly. However, there may be times where you want very specific control of the machining of a specific feature or area of your design. The Prismatic Machining tools provide that level of control for process-specific features, like Pockets. You can simply specify the face of a pocket, and the perimeter will be selected for you. You can control every aspect of the features, including how the side walls will be finished.

For that extra level of control, macros are available within every machining feature that enable you to customize and self-define how the tool will interact with the process. For example, on this part, avoiding the boss in the center may be critical, so extra approach and retract values can be added.

You may have also noticed that when a different tool was selected for this process, Shop Floor Machining automatically added a tool change operation to the Activities Process View. This will be added to the NC code, so that your machine can handle these tool changes as needed.

As for drilled holes on the part, these are fairly straightforward because of the automatic hole-recognition performed on the part in the beginning. This is as simple as making any minor adjustments you want to the automatically generated drilling operation.

The last step for this manufacturing setup of this part is to finish all of the rough surfaces created earlier. The Advanced Finishing Tool provides precise machining on all of the remaining material on the part, removing the extra 1mm left behind. Like the roughing operation, this looks at the entire part, and the remaining material from the intermediate stock and quickly comes up with a solution for this step.

It is time for a new manufacturing setup. On the underside of this part are several complex rib features. Using Advanced Surface Finishing again, you can quickly generate the complex 3D toolpath needed to create these unique features.

There are times, when you may not want to perform a surface machining operation on the entire part. In these cases, you can use the Limiting Contour controls and selection tools to define specific regions where you want to perform these tasks. This may be useful, in cases like this where the overall machining time is intensive.

You can also finetune Advanced Surface Finishing as much as you would like, and perform multiple passes with different tools to get the perfect finish on this part; in this case, this looks good for an initial run of these parts.

As you develop your manufacturing processes, every setup, tooling change and machining operation is added to the Activities Process View. This visually lets you understand the step-by-step way in which you programmed the manufacturing of your parts. More importantly however, it lets you parametrically return to any process and make adjustments as needed. Similarly, you can reorder any of the steps in the manufacturing of the part, giving you the freedom to define each step, then decide in which order they should be performed.

At any time, you can review each machining operations on a feature by feature bases, or review the entire program of the part. This provides multiple graphical ways to understand how the part will be machined, and will always let you review the NC program before sending it off to be machined.

To learn more about the DTV Shredder, and the entire design through manufacturing process, visit shredder.solidworks.com.

Author information

Jeremy Regnerus
Jeremy Regnerus
Senior User Advocacy and Community Manager at SOLIDWORKS
CSWE, SOLIDWORKS Geek and connoisseur of all things geeky and nerdy.

The post Manufacturing the DTV Shredder appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Jeremy Regnerus at June 28, 2021 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

This is How These Black Shade Balls Help the L.A. Reservoir

shade ball design

Near the shores of Los Angeles stands the Ivanhoe reservoir. And covering the entire surface of this 39-hectare (96-acre) wide reservoir are over 96 million shade balls.

You must probably be betting that this is the world’s biggest ball pit and you might be right! But those balls serve a greater purpose than providing the local population a place to host kids’ parties.

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A few years ago, Derek Muller of Veritasium took a boat trip to the middle of the Ivanhoe reservoir. Here, he picked the brains of its custodians and found out just why this reservoir which provides so many people with clean drinking water has so many black balls floating on top of it.

shade ball design

First things first: shade balls AREN’T made out of toxic plastic. They measure 10 cm in diameter and made from a non-toxic, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) which is totally safe to ingest. The balls are partially filled with water (210 ml to be exact) to weigh them down and prevent them from flying out of the reservoir.

But their most distinguishable feature is that they are black – unlike the colorful plastic balls you normally find in ball pits. This black color is made possible via a material called “carbon black,” which blocks out sunlight and prevents the water in the reservoir from excessively heating up.

So why go through such lengths to cover the reservoir with shade balls?

shade ball design

As it turns out, it’s to prevent the formation of carcinogenic bromate in the water. Bromide, on its own, is a harmless compound which naturally finds itself in all bodies of water. But when that water is mixed with chlorine in sunlight, it produces toxic, carcinogenic bromate. Since chlorine is needed to keep the water disinfected, the only way to keep the reservoir pure is to handle the sunlight problem.

shade ball design

Prior to this, the folks living near the reservoir tried to look for a couple of different solutions. One idea was to cover the reservoir with a wide tarp or trampoline. They also thought of covering the reservoir with long HDPE pipes. However, the latter idea could be too costly due to the amount of material, not to mention the possibility of the pipes being easily displaced.

Eventually, Dr. Brian White found out about bird balls – these non-toxic, HDPE balls which can be used to deter birds from settling on bodies of water. After testing them against the other proposed solutions, the bird balls won by a landslide and were repurposed into shade balls.

shade ball design

While the shade balls definitely do their job of keeping sunlight away from the water in the reservoir, they have a couple of other handy uses as well.

Just like the bird balls which came before it, the shade balls excel at keeping flying wildlife at bay. This prevents other toxic elements besides bromate from developing in the water. The shade balls also prevent algae from forming, resulting in the use of less chlorine to disinfect the reservoir.

And just before you go thinking that the black balls increase the evaporation rate in the reservoir, Derek Muller made sure to clarify and explain this particular issue to the staff at the L.A. reservoir.

shade ball design

Apparently, having the balls be half-filled with air actually decreases evaporation. While the top of the balls does get hotter, the area below them remains cool. Since air is a good thermal insulator, the heat on top doesn’t reach the water below. This reduces the evaporation rate of the reservoir by 80-90%.

Considering they spent 33 cents per shade ball, that’s a total of $31,680,000 used to cover the entire L.A. reservoir with black balls. But according to Chief Operating Officer Marty Adams, this cost serves as offset given the amount they save on water maintenance.

So there you have it – what looks like the world’s biggest ball pit is actually home to one of the cleanest sources of water out there. So if you happen to come across the L.A. reservoir and have an inkling to jump in, please don’t. Not only will you be contaminating millions of gallons of water, but you’ll also be escorted out by security!

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 28, 2021 10:25 AM

June 25, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Communication Tools included with SOLIDWORKS Professional & Premium

SOLIDWORKS Professional and Premium packages include communication tools for advanced visualization, viewing and publishing to create powerful connections between designers, clients and consumers. Learn about the communication tools: SOLIDWORKS Visualize and SOLIDWORKS eDrawings below:

SOLIDWORKS Communication Tools

SOLIDWORKS Communication Tools

Photo-realistic Images and Animations using Visualize

An image, or an animation, can communicate a complex idea immediately, effectively and impactfully, in ways that mere words can’t manage. An image can take an idea out of the solitary realm of imagination and into a shared experience and common understanding. An image can transform abstract concepts into concrete realities—and shared visions.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard, included with SOLIDWORKS Professional and Premium when on subscription, lets you quickly and easily create photo-quality images:

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Ensuring that other people “get it” is one of a designer’s most difficult tasks. A revolutionary idea can gain traction with a client—or a consumer—only if it is understood and appreciated. SOLIDWORKS communication tools allows users to “show” ideas rather than having to explain when working to align team members’ efforts and share knowledge. Crystallizing concepts as comprehensive, detailed imagery makes it possible to minimize miscommunication, accelerate processes and achieve greater efficiency than ever before.

Do more with SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional takes it to the next level and lets you create animations, interactive content and web experiences. It goes beyond functional designs to generate immersive, engaging visual experiences that bring designs to life and let viewers not just see your designs, but experience them. Advanced photorealistic rendering capability and fi le sharing functionality also give your clients direct visibility into the design process, improving collaboration and generating confidence.

Here’s just some of what you can do in SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional:

  • Share lifelike product images—even before you prototype—to support Kickstarter campaigns, secure preorders or gain client approvals.
  • Fully animate parts, models, appearances, cameras and environments for ultrarealistic demonstrations.
  • Generate interactive web content, including Interactive Images and Panorama presentations.
  • Create immersive virtual reality experiences to dive directly into your CAD data, changing how you design, develop and deliver your products.
  • Tell a deeper story with your final design using one-click 360-degree spins.
  • Demonstrate inner design complexity with animated cut planes (section views).
  • Present and compare varying design solutions side by side .
  • Apply advanced lighting and environmental features for added realism.
  • Present designs in real time and never wait for a render to finish again.

Communicate your designs with eDrawings

A designer’s most important collaborator? The client. Shared understanding, open communication and clearly identified objectives are critical in order to ensure that client needs and objectives are met. The other SOLIDWORKS Communication tool included with Professional and Premium is SOLIDWORKS eDrawings® file viewer and publisher. eDrawings capabilities makes the essential collaboration and knowledge sharing effective and effortless. eDrawings makes it possible to share 3D models and information with other stakeholders anywhere and anytime — even if they’re not using SOLIDWORKS. This sharing works both ways: Recipients can also mark up and measure the models in eDrawings to quickly and accurately communicate changes. With eDrawings, your team can do the following:

  • Accelerate the design process and get past the “fuzzy front end” by sharing 3D designs in a lightweight fi le that can be attached to an e-mail;
  • Easily share a wide variety of file formats, including SOLIDWORKS, DWG/DXF™, 3DXML, Creo Pro/ENGINEER®, STL, or eDrawings files;
  • Share animations of SOLIDWORKS models;
  • View and share simulation results;
  • Zoom, pan, rotate, section and virtually disassemble designs;
  • Collaborate with mobile and non-CAD users through the eDrawings for iOS mobile app;
  • Safeguard intellectual property with password protection.

Whether you’re reviewing a new concept, discussing a design change, evaluating alternate designs, or getting an approval, you’ll find eDrawings makes the process faster, easier and more efficient. It also virtually eliminates miscommunication and misunderstanding because what you design is what they see—clearly and unmistakably. That reduces mistakes, increases efficiency and ultimately improves your products.

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Communicate more effectively with SOLIDWORKS

SOLIDWORKS Professional and Premium communication tools include cutting-edge visualization capabilities take designs far beyond the 2D plane— and unlock the full potential of the design imagination. Whether the goal is to sell a concept, contrast competing designs, assess functionality and interoperability, or sell a finished product to a discriminating consumer market, SOLIDWORKS Professional has all the tools you need to let designs shine more brightly than ever before.

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The post Communication Tools included with SOLIDWORKS Professional & Premium appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at June 25, 2021 02:36 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Skinny Guy Campers Designs Products that Enable Exploration Anywhere with 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS

The recreational vehicle (RV) industry is in Jason Bontrager’s blood. In 1968 his grandparents founded Jayco, Inc., manufacturer of the top travel trailer in the world, the Jay Flight®. Bontrager was head of Jayco product development for many years.

When Bontrager got the itch to extend the reach and freedom of camping experiences beyond the RV, he became founder, owner, and CEO of Skinny Guy Campers. In addition to enabling fuel-efficient off-roading and garage-able storage, Skinny Guy Campers include heat, hot and cold running water, power, a cooktop, and a toilet all dropped into a standard pickup truck.

Bontrager recruited Robert Miles III, with whom he worked closely at Jayco, to become his engineering design and technical documentation lead. Bontrager had led Jayco’s transition to the Autodesk® Inventor® 3D design package, so both men were trained in Inventor. Still, Miles had previously used SOLIDWORKS® 3D design software, and he and suppliers advised Bontrager to use SOLIDWORKS to develop the unique pickup truck camper.

Leveraging Cloud-based Connection

The team accelerated development, productivity, and collaboration by connecting SOLIDWORKS design data to the 3DEXPERIENCE® platform.

“As a startup, we needed to be both agile and lean, so we could quickly and cost-effectively develop and commercialize the Skinny Guy camper concept,” Bontrager explains. “We’re looking to maximize brand value and awareness, and establish our products more as pickup truck accessories and less as RVs. Using SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD connected to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform gives us the capabilities we need to achieve our product development goals without having to make a large investment in server hardware.”

Product development began at the beginning of 2020. With the flexibility of working from anywhere, the company met its final milestone of final prototyping its standard truck bed model in Spring 2021, despite the pandemic.

Automated Design Tools

The 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS advanced automated sheet metal design tools were crucial for the innovative camper-in-a-truck-bed because its simplicity facilitates creating complex flat and bent sheet metal shapes.

Miles notes, “Instead of thinking in sheet metal, I can leverage the platform’s sheet metal tools, and let the computer do the heavy lifting. Similarly, when aligning holes for the 850 to 1,000 rivets in our design, I can use the automated features in SOLIDWORKS to create, space, and align all of the holes instead of facing the tedious task of making, spacing, and aligning the holes manually.”

Enabling Future Growth

While cloud-based 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS solutions gave Skinny Guy Campers the flexibility, agility, and cost controls necessary for its initial R&D, the platform also provides the product-development foundation to support future growth and expansion. “Being on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, we can purchase additional apps as we need them without having to maintain hardware and software in multiple locations. It’s sort of like our product: A Skinny Guy Camper lets you explore and camp wherever a pickup truck can go; 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS lets us design and manufacture products wherever we have web access.”

Download the full Skinny Guy Campers Case Study here…

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Skinny Guy Campers Designs Products that Enable Exploration Anywhere with 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at June 25, 2021 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Learning How to Make 3D Pen Models is an Art in and of Itself

learning 3d pen

Unlike the expensive 3D printers, a 3D pen isn’t the most precise instrument for making printed models. That’s not entirely the pen’s fault, however.

By adding in a human element, you’re effectively reducing the speed and accuracy for a more personalized 3D print. Still, some people like that human touch – even if it doesn’t necessarily look as good as the things printed out of a 3D printer.

Over the course of 51 hours, the creator of the Build-a-Skill YouTube channel documented his journey from 3D pen printing novice to… a somewhat adept 3D pen printing artist:

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From drawing spindly 2D lines on paper to making a fully-formed robot, it’s interesting to see how far dedication can bring you in such a short time.

Testing Out the Medium

learning 3d pen

The first models are robots that started on a 2D plane. This is where novices feel out the basic dos and don’ts of 3D printing – like making sure all the parts are connected so they don’t get left behind!

Combining 2D Models Into 3D Frames

learning 3d pen

After learning how to make a few basic shapes, the creator wanted to see if he could make a car. He made the sides of the car in 2D before connecting them together to make a 3D frame. Once the frame was connected, it was simply a matter of filling in the empty space with filament.

This is where he made one very important discovery about 3D pens. While they can be great at making lines and frames, they aren’t as great at filling out solid objects. What this means is that 3D pens are really good ideation tools for making wireframe models; not finished products.

Wireframes and Spider Webs

learning 3d pen

With this in mind, the creator made a couple of models which play to the 3D pen’s strengths. He made a few wireframe vases (none of which made him particularly proud), a t-rex, and a very intricate unicorn.

learning 3d pen

The unicorn deserves special mention because it incorporates a wireframe along with wrapped filament to give the model its shape. It doesn’t fill every single crevice, but this spider web technique does the job of projecting the model without wasting too much filament. Add that to the unicorn’s hair, which uses different layers of filament, and you start to see more depth and texture in the model.

Revisiting the Robot

learning 3d pen

After making models of a robot and a very cool Day of The Dead mask, his final 3D model harkened back to his first one: which is to say, another robot.

Using everything he learned, he made a red wireframe skeleton for the robot before adding in a ton of elements to give it depth and texture. Hydraulics, wiring, a sword – the amount of detail on this robot is insane. It may have taken 15 hours to build, but the payoff is definitely worth it.

learning 3d pen

The video makes it look easy to learn how to use a 3D pen, but we’re sure it is still challenging. Even with years of 2D drawing experience, the creator mentioned it took him a long time to get anywhere close to making something worthwhile. If you want to try your hand at it, be sure to bring a lot of filament and even more patience.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 25, 2021 08:01 AM

These Guys Mixed Gallons of Soda With Mentos to Make a Giant Foam Monster

soda mentos explosion

We’ve all been told never to consume soda and Mentos at the same time. It is pretty obvious why: you don’t want to see yourself vomiting some foam. How would that happen? Well, it’s pretty simple. This scotch mint can nucleate the carbon dioxide in the soda, resulting in a rapid increase in the latter’s precipitation rate.

If you want to know what that looks like without subjecting yourself to a really bad stomach ache, look no further:

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YouTube channel Toys King took a ton of carbonated drinks and poured them all into a water drum. Then, armed with some Mentos and baking soda, they shot the contents sky high.

soda mentos explosion

In order to get the best possible angle of the eruption, the team dug a hole in the sand and placed the drum within. Since the distracting blue figure of the drum was already concealed, witnessing the outcome of the awesome experiment would be more amusing. Moreover, it made the pouring of the carbonated drinks easier for the team.

soda mentos explosion

Dumping gallons of sodas needs no explanation since it was the amount needed to get the best result out of the experiment. To make things more interesting, let’s try estimating how much soda was poured into the drum. Let’s say the first 3 containers had 5 gallons of soda, 2  jugs had 2 gallons, and the 4 had 7 liters (1.85 gallons). Add that to the 16 .355 L soda cans and the 12 .5 L soda bottles. All in all, these folks poured roughly 27.65 gallons (104.67 liters) of soda in a single water drum!

soda mentos explosion

As amazing as that sounds, the combined slosh of sodas doesn’t look refreshing at all. The black liquid that slowly rose inside the drum look a little like Coca-Cola but imagining the mixture of flavors, the blend would probably taste like toilet cleaner.

soda mentos explosion

To get the soda to explode, they prepared nine rolls of Mentos (around 126 Mentos discs) mixed with baking soda in a plastic cup. They also prepared a cup of green food coloring to make the eruption more visually appealing.

With all the pieces in place, the only thing to do now for the team was to mix them all together. They dumped the Mentos and food coloring inside the drum and…

soda mentos explosion

BOOM! An eruption of green foam rocketed skyward from the water drum’s hole. Thanks to baking soda, the mixture of carbonated drinks turned to foam. From a distance, it was like a snake violently poking its head out before slowing down to a crawl.

soda mentos explosion

See? This could happen inside your stomach if you tried ingesting soda and Mentos at the same time. So do yourself a favor: stick with water instead.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 25, 2021 07:17 AM

June 24, 2021

SolidSmack

How to Create a COVID-19 Paper Mache Model

paper mache covid-19 virus

As we near the end of this pandemic and things start going back to normal, there are few things I’m definitely going to miss. I’ll miss staying indoors for weeks and weeks. I’ll miss not caring about how I look as no one but my immediate family gets to see me. But most of all, I’ll miss wasting mindless hours buying stuff online I don’t even need.

Caught smack dab in the middle of COVID-19 last year, Bobby Duke fell into the same trap I did: Amazon online shopping. With so many cardboard boxes around and the number of activities he could do at home dwindling each day, he came up with one interesting idea: make the COVID-19 virus himself.

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Well, the video title is certainly misleading. He didn’t go to a lab to replicate this human-killing virus. Instead, he took all the cardboard boxes lying around his house and made a paper/cardboard mache model of the virus.

Now to be clear: anyone can easily make a paper mache sculpture. Just dunk a bunch of paper strips into a glue mix, slap it over a mold to dry, and you have an instant art.

Creating the Virus Body

paper mache covid-19 virus

Bobby used a ball to mold the main body of the virus. Nonetheless, it might have been better if he used a balloon for better convenience and effortless removal. Thankfully, the mold still turned up pretty perfect.

Once the ball was removed, he figured it would be accurate to drop in a mosquito repellant bracelet to represent the virus’s RNA. So into the ball it went, followed swiftly by Bobby Duke sealing the giant hole with some more newspaper and water/glue mixture.

paper mache covid-19 virus

To finish the body, he slathered on a little more glue and dunked the whole thing in a bowl full of tiny foam balls. This gave it some more texture and made the previously brown body look closer to the virus you know and loathe.

Paper-Mush-Clay

paper mache covid-19 virus

While he was making the paper mache body, Bobby Duke was stewing his cut-up Amazon cardboard boxes on a stove nearby. After popping it in a blender and wringing out most of its moisture, Bobby explained that this pulpy mush can be a good substitute for clay and aptly dubbed it “paper-mush-clay”.

He poured a good helping of glue into this cardboard mush before mixing it all up. This resulted in the material he would later use to make the multiple spike glycoproteins and surrounding the COVID-19 virus.

paper mache covid-19 virus

He popped the molded pieces into the oven to let them harden and dry. Once finished, he drilled a bunch of holes into the bottom of the spike glycoproteins. These allowed Bobby Duke to push toothpicks into them and pop them right onto the body of the virus.

Color Coding Time!

paper mache covid-19 virus

Of course, he had to spray paint all the parts first. The main body ended up being a light gray/silver, while the spike glycoproteins were painted red. The proteins on the surface of the viral envelope, on the other hand, were painted yellow and orange.

paper mache covid-19 virus

After painting all the parts, the only thing left to do now for Bobby was to put it all together.

paper mache covid-19 virus

The biggest enemy of the real COVID-19 might be a soap, but this paper mache model faced an even bigger threat: Bobby Duke wearing a soap T-shirt. Armed with a baseball bat, he smashed his model to pieces without a single bit of hesitation.

Bobby’s way might be a little dramatic to express our hate towards this horrible virus, but considering how a lot of us now have cabin fever… I’d say a little excessive violence is justified.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 24, 2021 02:00 PM

This Pizza-Making Machine Could Give Pizza Chains a Run for Their Money

pizza making machine

The thing I love most about pizza is how you can literally put anything on it and it will still be a pizza.

The worst thing about pizza? Making it. With no culinary expertise whatsoever, your entire pizza crust could end up as undesirable as the cornicione; not to mention the mess and the effort of assembling the pizza itself! So, it’s really a relief we have pizza delivery.

Despite living in Brooklyn, New York where pizza parlors are everywhere, inventor Joseph Herscher of Joseph’s Machines decided his newest machine would be used to make everyone’s favorite Italian dish:

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With a mechanical toy train as the crux, Joseph created a Rube Goldberg machine that can prepare you a pizza. Provided you get the ingredients and place them on the machine beforehand, it will move like clockwork. With all of the details, the machine looks like a very complicated replacement for a pizza chain’s pizzaiolo.

pizza making machine

In his video, Joseph’s machine started the process by applying the sauce. As the train passed by its first station, it released a bottle filled with red tomato paste over the dough. With a little push from the train and a (hopefully clean) comb, the sauce was evenly distributed on all sides.

pizza making machine

Next was the cheese. After lightly drizzling some shredded cheese over the pizza, a padlock struck a domino chain which pushed a ball into the way of the train. This ball activated a whole new contraption on the other side of the pizza.

pizza making machine

The scene featuring a ballerina figurine was the most tedious part that Joseph had to carefully prepare. Not only did Joseph have to slice the meat beforehand, but he also had to find the right speed at which to drop each slice of pepperoni. Too fast and the slices could spread willy-nilly over the pizza. Too slow and there would be areas with an uneven amount of toppings.

pizza making machine

As the pizza finished its pepperoni rotation, the train had one more stop to make: the olive Ferris wheel.

Unlike the ballerina, getting the Ferris wheel to drop tiny fruits onto the pizza seemed much easier. Thanks to the even spacing of the carts and a small wooden slope, the olives easily rolled to their destination and embedded themselves onto the pizza’s sticky sauce.

pizza making machine

Unfortunately, Joseph’s machine can’t heat the pizza. He instead employed the use of a highly sophisticated oven to get the job done.

pizza making machine

After baking the pizza, Joseph cut off a slice and brought it back to his machine. Prior to that, he changed some parts of the pizza maker to instantly turn it into a pizza feeder.

It isn’t perfect by any means of the imagination, but the machine practically gets the job done. Most of all, this seems like a good alternative to get more slices of hot pizza if you are too shy to order another box.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 24, 2021 01:13 PM

The Miniature Hydroelectric Dam That Waters Plants

miniature hydroelectric dam

Normally when you water your plants, you sprinkle them using a garden hose or some kind of water container. That’s for sure… unless you have the time and the vigor to create a hydroelectric dam to make this task more automatic. That’s exactly what the YouTuber known as Construction General did.

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By scaling down his construction skills and implementing a simple electronic setup, he was able to create a system capable of powering the lights of a (very small) bridge as well as the irrigation system for his plants.

Making the Dam              

miniature hydroelectric dam

As mentioned, this tiny dam was made almost exactly like its bigger counterparts. Using wooden sticks as rebars, Construction General was able to create the outline of the dam. He placed a piece of a banana trunk in the middle, covered the outline with some boards, and filled the whole thing with cement.

Once the cement hardened, he removed the boards and pushed the banana trunk out; creating a spillway for the water to flow through. Construction General covered the hole with a metal plate – effectively creating a watergate.

The Miniature Bridge

miniature hydroelectric dam

To help the surrounding wildlife circumvent his man-made structure, Construction General placed some tiny fences and streetlights on top of his dam. What’s cool about them is that just like real streetlights, the tiny versions were assembled using wires which were placed carefully under the bridge. The wires feed into a generator installed in the dam’s penstock, powering the streetlights and the irrigation system.

The Penstock

miniature hydroelectric dam

The penstock is where the redirected water flow is converted to electricity. Just like the dam, it is also made from cement. It features a small tunnel that feeds into a recess where a turbine is located. As water passes through, the kinetic energy is converted into electricity by a generator. With the help of some tiny utility poles and wires, the generator transfers the electricity to the bridge’s streetlights and into the irrigation system on the other side of the dam.

The Irrigation System

miniature hydroelectric dam

Compared to the penstock, the irrigation system is pretty simple in terms of its construction. It uses a number of pipes that take stored water from the dam and expel it through a rotating sprinkler system. As long as the circuit is turned on and there is electricity provided by the generator, this sprinkler system will continue watering the plants.

To conserve electricity, Construction General made two switches: one to power the streetlights and one to activate the irrigation system.

miniature hydroelectric dam

Considering he carved a stream on the side of a hill to make this project, I’d say those vegetables better taste pretty good!

The whole video is definitely worth a watch, as it delves deeper into the creation process of this miniaturized man-made structure.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 24, 2021 12:19 PM

The Javelin Blog

7 Time-saving Paths to Simplified Prototyping with the Stratasys J35

Product designers and engineers are often faced with same challenge — how to make a prototype faster and easier. Learn how a cost effective office-friendly Stratasys 3D printer can help.

Creating parts and prototypes that test form, fit and function can be difficult, time-consuming and expensive to make using traditional methods. But, prototyping allows for product verification and validation prior to final production — which leads to a better part or product.

Prototyping with Stratasys

Prototyping with Stratasys

Ideally, designers and engineers should have access to an in-house 3D printing tool that can help them test and iterate designs quickly to meet demands while keeping costs to a minimum. That’s where the Stratasys® J35™ Pro 3D printer comes in. In this article, we’ll review how the Stratasys J35 Pro provides fast and easy prototyping, while reducing production costs and simplifying your design workflows.

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An all-in-one prototyping solution

Supporting different engineering and design needs during various stages of the product development cycle can be challenging. However, when you have engineering-grade, multi-material 3D printing at your fingertips, a lot more is possible. Built for a wide range of industries, including consumer electronics, education, automotive, aerospace and medical, the J35 Pro 3D printer can produce models, parts and prototypes that meet your needs — all in-house.

3D Printed Prototype

3D Printed Prototype

Office- and workflow-friendly design.

With the J35 Pro, you get all the benefits of an in-house, engineering-grade printer without the hassle thanks to a small footprint, low-maintenance design and silent, odor-free operation. Additionally, you get access to a full ecosystem of workflow tools designed to streamline your process, including cloud-based service, print-to-click software, on-demand training and an online support community.

High-fidelity prototypes, faster decisions

Preliminary prototypes can now look, feel and function like the final product. This is because the J35™ Pro features PolyJet™ technology, which allows you to combine grayscale color, transparency, texture and moving parts to create realistic models that key decision-makers can hold in hand. As a result, quicker design decisions can be made.

Time- and cost-saving production

Design steps that were once outsourced can now be created in-house in a fraction of the time, which saves both time and design budget. The J35™ Pro also enables you to iterate, correct errors and verify designs more efficiently, so you can get the final design to market faster. Additionally, the J35™ Pro offers multi-material printing capabilities at a lower investment compared to other PolyJet multi-material solutions.

Simplified Workflow

With the Stratasys J35 your CAD files can be easily printed with GrabCAD Print:

Stratasys J35 GrabCAD Print

Stratasys J35 GrabCAD Print

All CAD formats accepted

With other 3D printing solutions, you may be required to convert file formats or use a third-party file format — which can be a time consuming task that takes away from your design time. However, using SOLIDWORKS software with the J35™ Pro, you can make file changes and optimizations on the spot before printing without changing file formats. Colour changes are simple. File sizes stay compact, easing the process of staying organized while saving larger files. Additionally, file management and version management become easy and struggle free, which is important in an iterative design process.

Automatic file fixing

Instead of exporting your file to an expensive, third-party software, you can use the automatic file-fixing feature to save time. Automatic file fixing enables you to go from CAD to printer in less than five minutes. It also allows you to achieve an accurate, high-quality print without spending more time and money on additional file-prepping software.

Print management and delayed prints

With the J35 Pro, you can change items in the queue. This means if a more urgent project arises, you can send it to print and move it ahead in the line of prints already in queue. The delayed print feature also allows you to take material quantity into consideration and schedule a print job for a specific day and time to coordinate with your design timeline.

Regular monthly system updates

While some competitors might not have updates for over a year, Stratasys proactively provides bug fixes and new features through over-the-air (OTA) programming. This allows you to update regularly and as soon as new updates are made available.

Vast multi-material print capabilities

The J35™ Pro 3D printer offers multi-material capabilities ideal for functional design and concept modeling. In one print, you can design parts with various combinations of flexibility, sure hardness, impact resistance, translucence and biocompatibility. With this capability, you can achieve digital material compound parts, assembly parts or three separate, single-material parts that meet your specifications.

Prototype Models

Prototype Models

Meeting your exact needs

Streamlining your product development cycle can be an easy task with the right tool. Offering engineering-grade, multi-material 3D printing in an office-friendly system, the J35 Pro is equipped to help you produce functional designs for a wide range of industry applications in-house. Combined with its simplified workflow software, this solution can take your 3D printed designs to places they have never been before.

To learn more about Stratasys 3D printers, visit our website.

The post 7 Time-saving Paths to Simplified Prototyping with the Stratasys J35 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Stratasys Ltd. at June 24, 2021 12:00 PM

June 23, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Get Flexible with the 3DEXPERIENCE 3D Sculptor

Can computer aided designs have the beauty and flexibility of gymnastics? With 3DEXPERIENCE 3D Sculptor they can!

Industry Process Consultant and 3D Sculptor expert Jordan Tadić joins Gian and John to show some of the more advanced tools in Sub-D modeling, from bending, to twisting, to flexing, and more. Jordan shows his favorite features as he walks through his process for designing a prosthetic hand with 3D Sculptor:

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What is 3DEXPERIENCE 3D Sculptor?

3D Sculptor (xShape) is a browser-based 3D subdivision modeling solution that enables industrial designers, engineers and artists to create stylized ergonomically or organically shaped models faster and more easily than traditional parametric tools.

Built on the cloud-based Dassault Systèmes 3DEXPERIENCE® platform, 3D Sculptor complements the parametric workflows of SOLIDWORKS Desktop 3D CAD with intuitive subdivision modeling and a seamless interchange of design data.

What can you do with 3D Sculptor?

You can quickly create 3D models that are organically and ergonomically-shaped with 3D Sculptor, a browser-based 3D subdivision (sub-D) modeling solution built on the 3DEXPERIENCE Works platform.

3D Sculptor is a lot like clay modeling but on a computer. Most designers typically start with either a sketch, imported image, or actual 3D models as a reference in the background and then design around those shapes.  Of course, with 3D Sculptor, you can also create shapes using no reference on the screen – just freehand design.

3D Sculptor is easy to use and fast to learn.  You start with a 3D shape or a 2D surface and simply push, pull, scale, crease, and bend your sub-D model to get the shape you desire.

3DEXPERIENCE 3D Sculptor Role

3DEXPERIENCE 3D Sculptor Role

Designs that take hours to create with traditional parametric surface modeling may take only a few minutes to create with 3D Sculptor. And changes that often require a designer to start the whole design over with a parametric surface modeler may take seconds in 3D Sculptor.

3D Sculptor complements the SOLIDWORKS® suite of design-through-manufacturing tools by providing subdivision conceptual modeling capabilities that are easy to learn and use. And if you make a change in 3D Sculptor that change is propagated to SOLIDWORKS automatically.

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by Rod Mackay at June 23, 2021 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Robust 3D Mold Design on the Cloud

Mold and tooling engineers face unique challenges that ultimately affect manufactured product quality and cost. Issues can include material variations, weld lines, sink marks, warpage, long cycle times, and incomplete cavity filling. Once the mold design has been completed and manufacturing begins, making design part changes can become very expensive. Therefore, good upfront communication between plastic part designers and mold and tooling engineers can help eliminate potential problems earlier, saving time and costs downstream.

Mold and tooling designers and plastic and metal cast part designers benefit the most from 3D Mold Creator. It is an excellent tool for companies that design plastics injection molds, die cast molds, and other types of tooling used in forming parts, like thermoforming and forging.

3D Mold Creator is not just for mold makers. It is also an excellent tool for any engineer or designer who designs plastic, cast, thermoformed, and forged parts. It allows quick creation of cores, cavities, and inserts, ensuring parts can be manufactured properly. For plastic, cast, and forged part designers, 3D Mold Creator lets the part designer take control of the design of the core, cavity, and inserts, ensuring that the part manufactured will look exactly like the part designed.

Improve Mold Design and Communication

3D Mold Creator helps anyone design mold tooling faster and also helps improve the communication between plastic part designers and mold makers. With 3D Mold Creator, mold core, cavity, and inserts can be created quickly with CAD tools specialized for mold design. The user interface helps guide users step by step through the mold design process.

By referencing the design model directly, the mold updates with any changes to the design model. 3D Mold Creator provides specialized functionality, including mold shrinkage compensation, automated parting line creation, automated parting surface and shut off surface creation, automated mold splitting, and creation of inserts that can be output for manufacturing. In addition, 3D Mold Creator also includes features for creating draft on your part as well as checks for draft and undercuts.

Built-in mold design workflow intelligence automatically directs you to the next feature in the process. If you miss a step in the workflow, the software will display a design tip with a shortcut to the recommended next step. This is great for new users and can even help speed the design process for experienced users.

Create Designs in Minutes

Often, mold makers receive designs from their customers with problems such as improper draft and unintended undercuts, making the mold more expensive to produce. Weeks can be lost going back and forth trying to resolve these issues. With 3D Mold Creator, part designers and mold makers can create mold core, cavity, and inserts in just a few minutes. Instead of sending 3D CAD models without proper draft and undercuts, part designers can check their designs and even create the mold inserts themselves and send the part and mold inserts to the mold maker, thereby giving the mold maker a head start delivering the mold and first manufactured parts.

In addition to specialized, automated CAD functionality for mold design, 3D Mold Creator also improves collaboration between mold makers and plastic parts designers. 3D Mold Creator is part of the 3DEXPERIENCE® Works portfolio of products, which run on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform on the cloud in a browser. No need to download software, all you need is an internet connection and a connected device. There is also no need to worry about which revision of the software you are running. Since 3D Mold Creator is on the cloud, your software is always up-to-date.

Communications Tracked Automatically

Plus, plastic part designers and mold makers can more easily share data and resolve issues faster. Product data is managed automatically by the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, so there is no extra effort needed to ensure the data you are working on is the most current. Project access with all design and manufacturing stakeholders is one click away from any device with an internet connection and a browser. Communication occurs by posting and sharing data in private chats that you, your team, and your customers can share instantly, allowing you to keep a history of communications to keep track of changes and decisions made during the project.

More Efficient Mold Design

In 3D Mold Creator on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, the mold designer can design quickly and communicate efficiently with the part designer to make the updates needed. In addition, the mold designer can work on a model that is derived from the design model, which means it references the design model directly. Changes to the design model are thus reflected in the mold.

3D Mold Creator provides an integrated, easy-to-use process from part design to tooling design. Specialized and automated functionality for the design of mold core, cavity, and inserts combine with improved collaboration and automatic data management to equal more efficient mold design.

If you are ready to speed and simplify mold design, contact your local reseller to learn more about 3D Mold Creator.

Author information

Craig Therrien
Craig Therrien
Craig Therrien is a Product Manager at SolidWorks

The post Robust 3D Mold Design on the Cloud appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Craig Therrien at June 23, 2021 12:00 PM

June 22, 2021

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Hands-on Teaching for the Next Generation of Engineers [Podcast]

At what age can students really grasp the concepts of science and engineering?  And, what is the best way to teach STEM to the engineers and innovators of the future?

I don’t know these answers, but in this Born to Design podcast, I interview two dedicated people who do have the answers: Melissa (Mel) Ahmed and Greg Beddoe of TechWuman. These two very bright design engineers share a passion for STEM, and are so dedicated to the effort of exposing school children to science and engineering that they spend HALF of their time promoting STEM to schools in the UK by teaching it though hands-on learning opportunities with STEM Activity Days.

Mel and Greg spend the other half of their time designing physical security systems for businesses, and have somehow managed to balance both their work and their passion for STEM.

There is much more to this story, which I know you will enjoy hearing in this Born to Design Podcast.

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Be sure to check out all of the Born to Design podcasts, and subscribe below so you will never miss an episode:

Soundcloud  Subscribe to Solidworks Podcast on Spotify iTunes Stitcher Listen on Google Play Music TuneIn - Solidworks Podcast Page Subscribe to Solidworks Podcast on CastBox  Subscribe to Solidworks Podcast on Overcast

 

To learn more about TechWuman, check out its website: https://techwuman.co.uk/

Also, if you are interested in supporting Mel and Greg’s efforts, they are looking for STEM Ambassadors and sponsors.  You can reach them directly at: hello@techwuman.co.uk

Author information

Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling is a Senior Marketing Manager at SolidWorks and the host for the Born to Design Podcast.

The post Hands-on Teaching for the Next Generation of Engineers [Podcast] appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Cliff Medling at June 22, 2021 12:30 PM

The Javelin Blog

Streamline Your Design Process with SOLIDWORKS Associative Analysis from Abaqus & SIMULIA

Are you ready for simulation that matches your desire for innovation? The 3DEXPERIENCE® Works Simulation portfolio provides comprehensive all-physics all-scale simulation solutions for SOLIDWORKS® users to evaluate how your products will behave in real life. Learn more about 3DEXPERIENCE Works Simulation with Abaqus and SIMULIA in the demonstration video below:

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About 3DEXPERIENCE Works Simulation

With structural, fluid flow, plastic injection, fatigue, and electromagnetic simulation all in one place, you are empowered in getting the right technical insights you need for a new product development process backed with industry-leading solvers from Abaqus, fe-safe, CST, and SIMULIA.

Beyond the leading analysis capabilities, access to cloud-enabled collaboration features means version control is no longer out of control and high-performance computing power is at your fingertips. What’s better: SOLIDWORKS-associativity puts painful import/export procedures in your rear view.

SOLIDWORKS Abaqus Analysis

SOLIDWORKS Abaqus Analysis

Why 3DEXPERIENCE and Abaqus

The 3DEXPERIENCE Works Structural Simulation portfolio helps businesses of all sizes (small, medium or large) solve all types of structural problems enabling companies to bring new and innovative products to market faster.

Benefits of this portfolio:

  • Accessible
    • The SaaS model provides the right set of apps for the length of a project (three-month or one-year subscription) for flexibility.
    • It is accessible directly from SOLIDWORKS® and 3DEXPERIENCE® SOLIDWORKS roles for unique and smooth design workflow.
    • Company experts can easily customize the application UI based on internal workflows for everyone in the company to access simulation.
  • Scalable and Powerful
    • All structural roles use the same Abaqus FEA technology, recognized as the industry leader, from the Designer to the Analyst role.
    • This cutting-edge, proven Abaqus technology solves with speed and accuracy from the simple linear static, small-deformation scenarios to the most complex nonlinear dynamic, large-deformation, high-speed events.
  • Connected
    • All structural roles use the same cloud-based 3DEXPERIENCE platform where data is securely stored and easily accessible from anywhere at any time.
    • Making design decisions is faster with simulation results that are easy to review, compare and share from the web dashboard.
    • The cloud computing option lets the user choose when to run simulations in the cloud to free up local computer resources and access unique computing power.
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by Rod Mackay at June 22, 2021 12:00 PM

June 21, 2021

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation Remote Solver (Network Solving)

Author: Scott Durksen, CSWE @ Javelin Technologies

 

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation software provides the ability to share the calculations of a project over a network connection to a SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation Remote Solver.

Resources are then freed up on the local computer to continue other work without reduced performance as the solver is running.  You can open a new SOLIDWORKS window to continue working on other files.  This can be useful where multiple users have computers with limited hardware, but can share a powerful desktop computer to run calculations with increased speed.

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation

The processing is shared between the local and remote machine:

  • Local Machine — Meshing, creation of the flow results file and pre-processing prior to first iteration calculation
  • Remote Machine — All solution iterations

NOTE: The calculations can only be performed on one remote machine

Setup:

SOLIDWORKS and Flow Simulation need to be installed on both the local and remote machines, and both must be on the same version and service pack.

Licensing:

While SOLIDWORKS and Flow Simulation must be installed on the remote machine, it does not require authorization.  Only the local machine will need access to the SOLIDWORKS and Flow Simulation license.  While solving, the local machine will still utilize both the SOLIDWORKS and Flow Simulation license.

  • If using a single node-locked license of SOLIDWORKS and/or Flow Simulation, activation is not needed on the remote machine
  • If using shared network licenses of SOLIDWORKS and/or Flow Simulation, the remote machine will not utilize any additional licenses

Options:

Remote Solver options can be found on the local machine under Tools > Flow Simulation > Tools > Options.

Communication between local and remote machines is done through a TCP port over the shared network.  By default the TCP port 30950 is used.  This can be modified within the options or before solving if another application requires the use of the default port.  Have your IT ensure that both inbound and outbound communication is allowed through the defined port in network firewalls.  Run a Telnet test to verify connectivity to the remote machine.

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation Remote Solver Options

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation Remote Solver Options

While the solution is run, results are being saved to a temporary directory on the remote machine.  By default this is saved under C:\Windows\Temp but can be modified in the Remote Solver options as shown above.  New subfolders are created to store the results while solving.  When the solution is complete, the results are copied to the local machine and the temporary subfolders are deleted from the remote machine.

Solving:

To solve a project, the Run dialog gives the ability to selectively choose the remote computer.  By default this is set to ‘This computer’ which indicates that all iterations are solved on the local machine.  Changing to ‘Add computer’ allows you to browse to a network computer or manually add the remote machine name.

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation Run Remote Solver

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation Run Remote Solver

The local machine does have access to regular previous, goal plots and plot previews while calculations are being performed.  The remote machine will have nothing displayed on screen, only a process ‘efdsolver.exe’ will be running in the background.

Author information

Javelin Technologies
Javelin Technologies is a provider of technology solutions since 1997. We are experts in 3D design and have helped thousands of companies with solutions for mechanical design, electrical design and 3D printing. Large or small, we have the skills, experience, and services to propel your organization to new heights so you can aim high.

The post SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation Remote Solver (Network Solving) appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Javelin Technologies at June 21, 2021 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

DTV Shredder Part Five: Issue and Change Management

Up to this point in the design, the team has done an excellent job collaborating and staying connected with the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform and 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORSK Connected.  In our previous blog posts, we saw the design of the riders platform come to life using SOLIDWORKS Surfacing tools and 3D Textures to give it the much needed surface finish.  We also took a look at how simple and advanced mates proved to be critical in understanding and assembling the pivot and steering mechanism used to control the Shredder.  The team even tackled a virtual validation of the complex bushing design to improve the riding experience by leveraging the simulation capabilities on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform.  Up to this point, this project has run without any issues…but in the real world,  this is never the case.

While the team’s manufacturing engineer, Sam, is working on lining up some vendors, he runs into an issue with the board design and the stowage position of the Shredder.  The intention is for the handlebar console to lay flat to be easily transported, but the design of the board looks to be causing some interference and keeping the bars to fold to the required position.

 

 

These types of issues can easily be reported by any team member and managed directly on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform.  Sam provides his secure credentials and gets started logging a new Issue regarding the interference concern.  He is even able to provide a possible resolution to help accelerate the completion of any possible design changes.

The next step is to attach the issue to the affected part, which can be done directly on the 3D model itself!  After the rider platform is selected, any reference components which might need to be reviewed are included.  These references are critical to understand in case any re-tooling needs to be considered when reviewing the issue and ordering any required changes.  Sam makes sure to include all of the appropriate team members as well to make sure everyone is aware of the interference concern.

Now that the issue has been logged, Sam takes one more additional step to make sure everyone is clear on the problem and potential solution by attaching a 3D Markup.  Adding a simple sketch and some text to a 3D representation clearly defines his suggested next steps to help minimize lost time during this design change.

Turning over to Pete, the team’s project manager, we see his dashboard showing all issues, their status and where they reside within  the current assembly.  The newly submitted ‘handlebar and board interference’ flag shows that it’s in a new ‘To Do’ issue.  Pete get started to further investigate the problems’ severity and any downstream implications to the project’s completion.

After reviewing the issues submitted by Dan and checking all referencing components, Pete recognizes that this is an opportune time to issue a change order for the modification of the rider platform design.  The engineering change order is attached to the issue and the affected component, and then once the change action is created, the designer is notified of this urgent task so he can get started right away.

The last order of business is for Dan to log into 3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Connected and make the required changes before the board moves to manufacturing.  A simple cross section shows the necessary clearance needed, which he uses to define a new sketch and exudes some geometry.  From here,  the indent feature is used to build a channel for the handlebar console to lay flat.  The Change action and issue are put through their respective lifecycles, along with a new revision made of the board design and the team can continue to move forward.

 

To see this process unfold and more on the collaboration and design of the DTV Shredder, check out shredder.solidworks.com.

 

 

Author information

Mike Sande
Mike Sande
Territory Technical Manager at SOLIDWORKS
Michael is a graduate of Montana State University where he focused in finite element analysis and simulation MEMS manufacturing in his quest for his BSME. When not enjoying engineering documentaries, you will find Michael exercising his creative side through his love of photography, art, family, animals and of course SOLIDWORKS CAD.

The post DTV Shredder Part Five: Issue and Change Management appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mike Sande at June 21, 2021 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Multi-Surface Features and 3 Axis Contouring with SOLIDWORKS CAM

For milling complex multi-surface features, SOLIDWORKS CAM is equipped with three tool paths to quickly and easily program most challenges. Machine time can be a different story in these cases:

  • Area Clearance: Area Clearance is the 3-axis roughing operation. This cycle removes the material between the stock or contain area and the selected feature at decreasing Z depth levels by making a series of parallel cuts across the stock, or by pocketing out toward the stock. Depths of cut can be constant or variable.
  • Z-Level: The Z-Level cycle is a finish contouring cycle that removes material by making a series of horizontal, planar cuts. The cuts follow the contour of the feature at decreasing Z levels based on the Surface Finish specified. Cutting starts from the highest location of the model and works downward.
  • Flat Area: The Flat Area cycle uses a pocket out pattern to remove material from feature faces that are flat and parallel to the XY machining plane. Toolpaths are only generated on completely flat areas. If a face/surface has even a small gradient, toolpath will not be generated. This cycle can be used for finishing where excess material has already been cleared and supports single or multiple depths of cut. Learn more about 3D contouring toolpaths available in CAMWorks.

Multi-Surface Feature Example

In this exercise, we will machine the top of the part below. We will use a profile sketch of the part for the stock as it is provided as a blank. The top centre of the stock will be our work offset.

Example Model

Example Model

New Mill Part Setup

Next, we need to create a new Mill Part Setup. In the SOLIDWORKS CAM Command Manger Tab select Set-up > Mill Set-up. Define the cutting direction for our machine. Since we are using a 3 Axis Vertical Mill the top plane is used as it is normal to our Z axis. With that selected we see cut direction shown on out part. If not correctly defined adjust accordingly for your machine.

New Mill Part Setup

New Mill Part Setup

Once complete, RMB in the Mill Part Set-up and select Multi-Surface Feature.

Multi-surface Feature

Multi-surface Feature

SOLIDWORKS CAM Area Clearance

Select Area Clearance, Z Level as the strategy. We are selecting Faces or Surfaces under Feature Type. Select All Faces under Selection Options. We may also select specific faces, and/or their adjacent faces or window select faces. We may also isolate specific faces using All Faces, STL or faces by colour or surface finish with the addition options under Feature Type.  Multi-Surface Feature can also be used as Avoid Areas.

Multi-Surface Feature

Multi-Surface Feature

Generate Option Plan

We have a Multi Surface Feature1 (Area Clearance, Z Level) under our Mill Part Set-up. RMB on Mill Part Setup1 and select Generate Option Plan. Our Area Clearance and Z Level have become separate operations populate by the TechDB. RMB on an Operation and select Edit Definition to adjust the Operation Parameters and Tools.

SOLIDWORKS CAM Flat Area

The third tool path Flat Area is not present by default, to add it to our program RMB on the Mill Part Set-up > 3 Axis Milling Operation > Flat Area.

Generate Option Plan

Generate Option Plan

Select a tool for the operation and then click on the Feature Tab.

Select a tool for the operation

Select a tool for the operation

Check the Mill Part Setup1 under Features for Flat Area. Hit the Green Check.

Check the Mill Part Setup

Check the Mill Part Setup

Operations Generated

Now we have our three operations. Generate Toolpaths and preview by clicking and hovering over the Operations.

Area Clearance Preview

Area Clearance Preview

Z-level Preview

Z-level Preview

Flat Area

Flat Area

Simulate and refine the SOLIDWORKS CAM Multi-surface Features as you desire. Right-mouse button on an Operation and select Edit Definition to adjust the Operation Parameters and Tools.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS CAM

Learn more tips and tricks with our SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard and SOLIDWORKS CAM Professional online live training classes.

The post Multi-Surface Features and 3 Axis Contouring with SOLIDWORKS CAM appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Shawn McEachern at June 21, 2021 11:11 AM

June 18, 2021

SolidSmack

Can You Use a Hot Glue Gun to 3D Print Filament?

3d print with glue gun

If you break it down to the basics, 3D printing simply involves heating filament and using a bunch of preprogrammed electronics to place it where you want. So, in theory, you can cut out all the complexities by heating the filament and manually spreading it yourself… right?

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While 3D printing pens definitely exist, the guys and girls at The King of Random wanted to see if you could repurpose a glue gun to heat up some PLA+ filament and 3D print with it.

Right off the bat, you can see the biggest problem of printing with a glue gun: the filament is way too small in diameter to be pushed by the gun’s mechanism. Normally, you would use special glue sticks which are made to fit inside the chamber of the glue gun, allowing the walls to press the glue through the heater and out the nozzle.

So how do you turn the PLA+ filament into a glue stick?

3d print with glue gun

Why, 3D print it, of course!

With the help of a real 3D printer, the guys were able to create a bunch of PLA+ sticks which would feed perfectly inside the glue gun chamber. Considering PLA+ melts at around 130-160°C (266-356°F), your average glue gun will be able to easily melt the filament and use it for non-glue-related purposes.

3d print with glue gun

After printing the PLA+ glue sticks, they decided to test them. It took some time for the glue gun to heat up but after a while, the PLA+ filament really did go through the nozzle; all heated up and ready to go!

3d print with glue gun

Now comes the hard part: actually making something with the glue gun. Since the human hand is nowhere near as accurate as the technology of a 3D printer, drawing with a gun will take some getting used to.

The good thing about the PLA+ filament is that it cools pretty fast. This allows you to add more on top of your existing creation much faster and it doesn’t disturb your creative flow. I can see dedicated artists mastering this technique, provided they spend enough time with this 3D printing glue gun.

3d print with glue gun

Suffice to say, the guys and girls at The King of Random didn’t have as much time with their repurposed glue guns as they would have liked. They were able to make a couple of 3D-printed roses, neither of which looked like something you would want to buy on Etsy.

Still, the concept was a success! If you don’t have a 3D printer of your own or don’t have the money to buy one, you could, in theory, just buy a glue gun and ask a friend to print you some filament sticks. You can repay them later by making them something with your 3D printing glue gun!

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 18, 2021 12:14 PM

The Javelin Blog

Clearance, Rapid and Feed Planes for Speed and Safety with SOLIDWORKS CAM

Finding the right balance of speed and safety is critical for SOLIDWORKS CAM programmers. Clearance, Rapid and Feed Planes allow us to control how far away the tool will engage or clear the work. Keeping the tool down while cutting saves time.

Retracting to a safe level may help with chip removal and minimize potential crashes and gouges, more time. I will leave it for you to decide. These options are found in the NC tab when you Edit Definition on any operation.

SOLIDWORKS CAM Clearance Plane

SOLIDWORKS CAM Clearance Plane is the absolute Z location the tool rapids to before feeding down in the Z axis. It is also the height the Z axis positions to during rapid moves to get from one cut to another with the same tool.

The Clearance Plane location can be set relative to different depths:

Top of Feature

Specifies that the clearance Z plane, that the tool retract to, will be at an incremental Distance above the top of the feature.

Operation Parameters

Top of Feature

Setup Origin

Specifies that the tool retracts to a clearance Z plane that is an incremental Distance above the Setup origin.

Setup Origin

Setup Origin

Previous Machined Depth

Specifies that the tool retracts to a clearance plane that is always an incremental height above the previous cut depth. The initial clearance plane will be an incremental amount above the top (face) of the feature.

Previous Machined Depth

Previous Machined Depth

Top of Stock

Specifies that the tool retracts to a clearance Z plane that is an incremental Distance above the Stock. This option will be valid only for Mill Part Setups that are normal to the default SOLIDWORKS planes: Plane1, Plane2 or Plane3.

Top of Stock

Top of Stock

Skim

Specifies that for Rough Mill and Contour Mill operations, SOLIDWORKS CAM automatically computes a minimum safe Z retract position between each cut level within a feature. Only the feature geometry and avoid area geometry is considered in the computation.

Skim

Skim

For 2.5 Axis VoluMill toolpaths, SOLIDWORKS CAM will limit the Clearance level above the feature top (in Z axis direction) by the Floor Clearance value defined in the VoluMill Settings dialog box.

Distance

This value is the incremental distance above the specified location that defines the Z value of the Clearance plane.

For the Skim option, this value defines an amount to clear above the highest Z of the feature or avoid area between the retract of one level and the plunge of the next.

SOLIDWORKS CAM Rapid Plane

The Rapid Plane is the absolute Z location at which all XY rapid moves are executed from. The Rapid Plane is also the height the Z axis returns to when the operation is complete. The amount that you specify here should take into consideration any clamps on the part.

The Rapid Plane location can be set relative to four different depths. Following are the options available:

Top of Feature

Specifies that the rapid Z plane will be at an incremental Distance above the top of the feature.

Top of Feature

Top of Feature

Setup Origin

Specifies that the rapid Z plane will be at an incremental Distance above the Setup origin.

Setup Origin

Setup Origin

Clearance Plane

Specifies that the rapid Z plane will be at an incremental Distance above the Clearance Plane for 2 Axis operations. Specifies that the rapid Z plane will be at an incremental Distance above the value of the Skim clearance parameter on the Entry Retract tab for 3 Axis operations.

Clearance Plane

Clearance Plane

Top of Stock

Specifies that the rapid Z plane will be at an incremental Distance above the top of the stock. This option will be valid only for Mill Part Setups that are normal to the default SOLIDWORKS planes: Plane1, Plane2 or Plane3.

Top of Stock

Top of Stock

Distance

This value is the distance above the specified location that defines the Z value of the Rapid plane.

SOLIDWORKS CAM Feed Plane

Feed plane is (group box and associated parameters not available for Rough Mill operations with VoluMill Pattern). This option allows the Z Feed plane to be set relative to the Previous Machined Depth or the Current Machined Depth.

Previous Machined Depth

If set to Previous Machined Depth, the tool rapids down in Z to the Clearance plane and then feeds down in Z to the cutting depth.

Previous Machined Depth

Previous Machined Depth

Current Machined Depth

If set to Current Machined Depth, the tool rapids down in Z to a position above the cutting depth equal to the Distance amount, then feeds down in Z to the cutting depth.

Current Machined Depth

Current Machined Depth

Distance

When the Feed plane is set to Current Machined Depth, this parameter defines a distance above the current cut depth that the tool should begin feeding in Z. If the value is 0.00, the tool will rapid to the Z cutting depth.

The Feed Plane is option is not supported for point to point operations viz. drilling, reaming, boring, tapping, etc. 

Retract between features

Group box and associated parameters not available for Rough Mill operations with VoluMill Pattern.

Retract between features

Retract between features

Use skim plane

When machining multiple features with a Rough Mill or Contour Mill operation, this option allows you to specify a retract location between features. The Z retract position is based on the perimeter and island geometry for the features being machined by the current operation as well as any avoid areas.

When the ‘Use skim plane’ option is not checked:

When the ‘Use skim plane’ option is not checked, the tool retracts to the Rapid plane between features.

When the ‘Use skim plane’ option is checked:

When ‘Use skim plane’ option is checked, the tool rapids vertically to the minimum Z height needed to clear the feature perimeter, islands and avoid areas, moves in XY to the start of the toolpath for the next feature, then feeds down vertically to the first cut depth.

Distance

When Use skim plane is selected, this parameter defines the minimum distance above the feature perimeter, islands or avoid areas to rapid from the end of one feature to the start of the next.

Rapid plane (G98) / Clearance plane (G99)

For single point operations, these options allow you to specify whether the tool retracts to the rapid plane or the clearance plane.

Use Setup Definition

The definition of Planes can be done locally for each operation in the NC tab or globally from the Mill Part Setup level. The Use Setup Definition checkbox option allows you to choose whether to use the global Mill Part Setup definition or to use the local definition for this operation.

To define any of the above planes locally for an operation, ensure that the Use Setup definition checkbox option within the Plane is group box is unchecked. Use the parameters within this group box to define the Rapid Plane Z depth.

If you want to use a global setting, define the Rapid plane on the NC Planes tab in the Part Setup Parameters dialog box (Part mode) or the Setup Parameters dialog box (Assembly mode) and then place a check in the Use Setup definition option within the Plane group box under the NC tab for each operation.

When the Use Setup Definition check box option is checked, all the parameters within the plane group box will be disabled.

Learn More

Learn more tips and tricks in our SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard or SOLIDWORKS CAM Professional Training Classes

The post Clearance, Rapid and Feed Planes for Speed and Safety with SOLIDWORKS CAM appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Shawn McEachern at June 18, 2021 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

The Very First SOLIDWORKS User Group

One of the traits I have admired most about SOLIDWORKS, even when I was an Autodesk employee, was their very passionate customers.  Nothing illustrates this more than SWUGN, the enthusiastic SOLIDWORKS User Group Network.  Recently SWUGN celebrated an impressive milestone.

The very first user group, SASPUG (Seattle Area SOLIDWORKS Power Users Group), started by the amazing Eric Beatty, celebrated its 25th anniversary!  This remarkable accomplishment was celebrated virtually by droves of fellow User Group comrades as well as SOLIDWORKS employees and executives.  Even SOLIDWORKS CEO, Gian Paolo Bassi, attended and shared his thoughts (and gratitude) in a presentation.

The SASPUG journey began in April of 1996 (apparently the famous User Group pizza tradition can also be traced back to SASPUG).  The user group was nameless during that first meeting and comprised of 12 customers, 12 students and one 7-year-old girl in a tutu. First judgements led most to believe this young girl was probably tagging along with her dad. Imagine everyone’s surprise when it was revealed that she had been taught SOLIDWORKS by her dad and she was the true instigator behind their attendance! Clearly the need for a SOLIDWORKS user group resonated with a very wide audience.

Eric ran the group solely until 2001 when one of his early SOLIDWORKS trainees, Michelle Pillers, jumped in to shoulder some of the responsibility.  Michelle’s contribution to the User Group community as well as SOLIDWORKS was monumental – and today there is a SWUGN Community award named in her honor.

Eric eventually stepped down and several other User Group leaders came and went along the way  – Bruce Nutter, Tony Valenzuela, Tim Ganstrom, Jeff Mirisola and Phill Melo ensured that SASPUG continued to thrive.  Seven years ago the group even split into a North and South SASPUG with Francisco Martinez leading the Southern Seattle group.

One of Eric’s most poignant memories go back to that fateful day –  Sept 11, 2001. SASPUG had a meeting scheduled that evening, but due to the monumental events of the day there was understandable hesitation in holding the meeting.  After wavering back and forth, and at the urging of many members, Eric and Michelle chose to move forward and about 75 people showed up looking for comradeship and support.

An unexpected bonus also occurred that night as DriveWORKS CEO Glen Smith, unable to return to the UK, gave the group an unforgettable impromptu demo.  The takeaway – user groups are more than just a place to get technical information, they are a place to connect, energize, and sometimes even gain solace.

SASPUG has come a long way and overcome a few obstacles in the past 25 years.  They even adapted to COVID by continuing to meet virtually with amazing results.  In fact, Eric was so impressed with the results he has vowed to always invite a virtual audience to their live SASPUG meetings moving forward.

I have worked with many user groups throughout my CAD career and I can testify that keeping a user group actively running for a couple of years is no easy task, let alone for a quarter of a century! We at SOLIDWORKS commend Eric and all the SASPUG leaders over the years for their efforts – and we look forward to another 25!

Author information

Lynn Allen
Lynn Allen
In her 20+ year career as a Technology Evangelist, first for Autodesk and now at Dassault Systèmes, Lynn Allen has spoken to more than a half million professionals at events in over 50 countries. Her online presentations and videos have easily reached over five million individuals. Her passion and strength is connecting with users, helping them embrace change and shining a light on new technology. For over 20 years she wrote a column for Cadalyst magazine, and was the voice behind their popular videos –“Tips with Lynn Allen”. The author of three technology books - Lynn has over 21,000 followers on Twitter (Lynn_Allen) with over a quarter million impressions every month.

The post The Very First SOLIDWORKS User Group appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Lynn Allen at June 18, 2021 12:00 PM

June 17, 2021

The Javelin Blog

Lifting Up Designs in the Cloud with 3DEXPERIENCE® Works

DS Industry Process Consultants Gian and John dive into the SOLIDWORKS® cloud-based design tools as they design and assemble an electric winch.

In this on-demand webinar you’ll see part design, sheet metal design, subdivision modeling, top-down and bottom-up assembly techniques, and built-in collaborative features at every corner.

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Featured in the on-demand webinar

With 3DEXPERIENCE Works, your teams have access to powerful capabilities for design (SOLIDWORKS Cloud Apps), Simulation, manufacturing (DELMIA | Works) and product data and lifecycle management. The portfolio enables you to extend your product development capabilities and solve new problems faster.

SOLIDWORKS Cloud Apps accelerate your design process with rapid iteration on design solutions and real-time collaboration helping your organization deliver innovative products to market faster:

  • SOLIDWORKS 3D Creator (xDesign App) is a browser-based 3D modeling solution that enables designers and engineers to create, review and evaluate 3D models through easy-to-use parametric modeling capabilities. Essentially 3D Creator is an online version of SOLIDWORKS desktop.
  • SOLIDWORKS 3D Sculptor (xShape App) is a browser-based 3D subdivision modeling solution that enables industrial designers, engineers and artists to create stylized ergonomically or organically shaped models faster and more easily than traditional parametric tools.
  • SOLIDWORKS 3D SheetMetal Creator is an intuitive, browser-based solution that offers associative parametric sheet metal design capabilities to build components, assemblies and enclosures. Its specialized, all-in-one 3D sheet metal design environment helps you streamline how you create, store, share, validate and manage designs, and bring sheet metal products to market faster.

The post Lifting Up Designs in the Cloud with 3DEXPERIENCE® Works appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at June 17, 2021 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

A Solid Aluminum Baseball Bat Is Strong Enough to Break Wood

solid aluminum baseball bat

Ah, baseball: one of America’s favorite pastimes. While it is fun tossing the ball of the same namesake around, what really gets the crowd cheering is when someone hits the said ball with a good, solid bat.

Though Major League Baseball requires the use of wood bats, lower levels have allowed the aluminum bats to rise in popularity. They’re cheaper, lighter, and have a wider barrel – resulting in faster hits with more frequency.

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But those aluminum bats are hollow. The bat made by Black Beard Projects is solid and is more suited for bludgeoning fruit than hitting a baseball.

Start With a Wooden Bat

solid aluminum baseball bat

Believe it or not, casting a solid aluminum baseball bat requires you to make a wooden bat first! Black Beard Projects glued two similar planks together and placed a thin sheet of newspaper in between. The newspaper would make it easier to split the bat once it’s carved. Before he can do that, however, he used some clamps to hold the wood together in place.

solid aluminum baseball bat

In his project, making the wooden bat was just a matter of taking the glued wood to the lathe and shaping it. As the wood started to get more cylindrical, clamps had to be added to either end to prevent the planks from splitting.

solid aluminum baseball bat

It’s mesmerizing to watch the wood ends with different diameters merge in the middle. Once the final shape of the bat had been carved out, the clamps were removed and the two wood pieces were split apart with a chisel.

Prepping the Mold

solid aluminum baseball bat

Black Beard Projects lightly dusted the bat halves with talc powder before placing them inside his wooden molds. He then poured Petrobond sand (special oil-bonded sand used for metal casting) over the bat and hammered it in to make the pattern for the cast.

Casting and Shaping the Aluminum Bat

solid aluminum baseball bat

Once the mold had set in, he removed the wooden bat inside and poured in the molten aluminum.

solid aluminum baseball bat

Just like with any cast, the hardened metal still had to be shaped down into the finished product. It was taken to a metal cutting band saw, where the infeed, outfeed, and excess metal jutting out of the bat were cut.

solid aluminum baseball bat

To make the grip more secure, the handle was smoothened out on a metal lathe. Finally, the whole thing was sanded down with some 400-grit sandpaper.

Polishing and Painting

solid aluminum baseball bat

With the bat nearing completion, the only thing left to do was to polish it.

To give the bat some character, Black Beard Projects thought it would be a good idea to apply some black spray paint on the barrel.

solid aluminum baseball bat

The solid aluminum bat weighed in at a total of 159 ounces (4507.57 grams). Considering your average aluminum bat weighs 20-26 ounces, this bat is meant to be more of a weapon than a sporting club.

solid aluminum baseball bat

Black Beard Projects effortlessly crushed various blocks of wood with his new toy, so it wouldn’t be out of the question for him to smash an ordinary baseball into pieces.

by Carlos Zotomayor at June 17, 2021 10:59 AM