Planet SolidWorks

April 21, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis Tutorial – Part 1

On May 20th and 21st, 1927 Charles Lindbergh, aka “Lucky Lindy”, made history by completing the first solo, nonstop, transatlantic flight; piloting his monoplane, the Spirit of St. Louis, from Long Island, New York to Paris, France. To celebrate the anniversary of Lindy’s achievement we’re showing SOLIDWORKS users how to model a 30” wingspan version of his iconic aircraft. Throughout this series, we’ll fly through lessons on how to work off imported images, and we’ll use a series of extrusions, lofts, and sweeps to model the Spirit of St. Louis.

In part 1 of this series we’ll start importing and laying out several downloaded images to model around.  Keep this technique in mind when modeling any vehicle, be it an aircraft, boat, or car.

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Whether you’re an aviation enthusiast or are just looking for a new SOLIDWORKS challenge, the Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis tutorial series is for you!

Can’t wait to watch the next video? View all of the tutorials on the playlist here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis Tutorial – Part 1 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at April 21, 2017 09:00 PM

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Ridiculactocumulus

Julien-Gauthier-art

When the hood was pulled back, the amount of tentacles spilling forth was overwhelming to the eyes–And with each holding a maraca, the sound matched the sight. You ask yourself what to do in a situation like this. That is until you realize you’re the one with the maraca tentacle face, trying to use the sounds waves to find the latch to release these links.

Julien Gauthier – A huge range of talent in scenes with ships, characters and creatures. Love the wide field of view and scale he brings to his concept work.

Super Friends League – You know the new Justice League movie? Well, this the trailer using footage from the 1980’s Super Friends Saturday morning cartoon. Preferring the cartoon version actually.

Typerwriter Synth – Bestill my beating heart. What if a 1920’s Remington typwriter was a video mixer? Ithaca Experiments created exactly that. All kinds of fabulous.

How to Draw Type – And Influence People. Our book pick of the week. If you’ve ever been interested in typefaces or creating your own. Releases May 2nd.

Collatz Conjecture in Color – Alex Bellos explains the one of the greatest unsolved problems in math, the Collatz Conjecture, then how mathematician Edmund Harriss creates images based on it.

ReCore – A look behind Tom Whalen’s graphic design process of the poster for the new ReCore game on Xbox. Video timelapse as well.

Lincoln Skull – Shaun Hughes shows the intrciate process of hand engraving a Lincoln penny, turning the face into a skull.

StarCraft: Free – In anticipation of StarCraft: Remastered, you can download and play the original absolutely free, along with the Brood War expansion. There goes the weekend.

Say What You Want – Face to Face, with a new previously unreleased, out as a single on Fat. That bass line. (Oh, and there’s a new Me First Greatest Hits.)
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by Josh Mings at April 21, 2017 08:03 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

3D Interconnect – Say Adiós, Au Revoir and Goodbye to inter-CAD language barriers!

In this blog we are going to explore the bi-lingual capabilities of SOLIDWORKS 2017 through the powerful 3D Interconnect functionality. But first, let’s be clear about what we are talking about here, a quick google definition will help. “A device used to connect two things together” that’s exactly what SOLIDWORKS 3D interconnect makes possible! The connecting of two completely different CAD packages!

Since the launch of SOLIDWORKS 2017 I can only imagine that international use of the word interconnect will have increased exponentially, considering the impact that 3D Interconnect has had on the world of inter-CAD collaboration. You’ll notice my predictive modification of the ‘Use over time chart’ to reflect my expectations.

The cool thing is that 3D Interconnect does not translate the proprietary data of other CAD systems into a language that SOLIDWORKS can understand, No! SOLIDWORKS 2017 is a computer aided polyglot! and already understands the languages of PTC® Creo®, Autodesk® Inventor®, Siemens® NX, SolidEdge®, and CATIA®
With SOLIDWORKS 2017 we can open proprietary CAD files right into SOLIDWORKS and treat them like native components without conversion or translation. What’s more! 3D interconnect can maintain or break the link to the original proprietary CAD file.

This means that changes made to the proprietary file when linked will associatively update directly within SOLIDWORKS and all downstream features will be maintained. If associativity is to be avoided then the link is easily broken.

You can turn on and turn off the 3D Interconnect functionality in the SOLIDWORKS software. It is turned on by default.
To turn 3D Interconnect on or off:

Click Tools > Options > System Options > Import.
In the dialog box, set File Format to Inventor/Catia V5/Creo/NX/Solid Edge.
Select or clear Enable 3D Interconnect.
Click OK.

3d interconnect

To quickly give an example of 3D interconnect in action, we have taken an Autodesk® Inventor® file and placed it into an existing SOLIDWORKS assembly. With 3D interconnect this operation is as simple as using the insert component tool within the open SOLIDWORKS assembly and browsing for the Inventor Assembly file extension. Once the file has been selected we can place it just like a regular SOLIDWORKS assembly file and mate it into position. The entire assembly structure from Inventor® will also come through and is visible in the feature tree.

If a design change is made to the Inventor® file and sent to us then it is a straightforward process to update that file within SOLIDWORKS. The newly updated design can be updated by overwriting the existing file location of the old design with the new files we received and the 3D interconnect ‘update’ function can be used within SOLIDWORKS. SOLIDWORKS will detect the new file we have pasted into our original file location and the update option will become available.

The update function is as simple as a right clicking the Inventor® assembly in the feature tree and selecting the update model option. The assembly file will then update and an in-context relationships and mates defined with the previous assembly file will all update seamlessly.

And that’s it! The process is so simple but extremely powerful. 3D interconnect is just one of the ways that SOLIDWORKS are providing solutions which make the day to day realities of inter-CAD collaboration that little bit more enjoyable.


Lewis Harvey is a Certified SOLIDWORKS Expert  and Applications Engineer at TMS CADCentre, a SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller in Scotland.  You can read more from Andrew on the TMS CADCentre blog

Author information

TMS CADCentre
TMS CADCentre - is a SOLIDWORKS Reseller based in Scotland providing 3D CAD Design Software, analysis software & product data management software. The company was formed in 1981 and now pleased to be celebrating 35 years in business. TMS CADCentre is the only UK SOLIDWORKS Reseller based and funded within Scotland and have been providing SOLIDWORKS software, training and support since 1996 when the product was first launched in the UK.

The post 3D Interconnect – Say Adiós, Au Revoir and Goodbye to inter-CAD language barriers! appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by TMS CADCentre at April 21, 2017 03:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Results Save Location

The SOLIDWORKS Simulation Results Save Location can be specified in the simulation options. In this post I’ll explain how to save the results, the options available to you, and the best practice when you use SOLIDWORKS PDM.

Simulation Options

After enabling the SOLIDWORKS Simulation add-in and opening a file, you can open Simulation > Options > Default Options tab > Results.  Under the ‘Result folder’ section, I would recommend avoiding the ‘User defined’ option.  This would default to save results of ALL new studies in a single folder.  If you have many studies saving results to the same location, this folder would become very large in size.  Microsoft Windows can potentially have issues with a single folder that is extremely large in size.

SOLIDWORKS Document Folder option

The SOLIDWORKS Document Folder option includes another checkbox for ‘Under sub folder’.  This means the Simulation results will save to the same location as the SOLIDWORKS model file, but generate a new sub folder of your choice.  I prefer to call it something like ‘FEA Results.’  This helps to keep the results separate.  Otherwise the Simulation result files will be mixed in with your model files and gets a bit messy.

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Results Options

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Results Options

Issues with Saving over a Network

Choosing where to save your Simulation results is very important.  Saving directly over a network can significantly slow down the solve times and also potentially cause corruption if there is any slight hiccup in the network connection while running (even if it doesn’t show a connection loss).  I’ve seen scenarios where saving results over a network is was not just a little slower, but more like 10x slower.  This can really add up if your studies take a couple hours to solve.  Saving results locally is always preferred.

Also the SOLIDWORKS model is closely linked to the Simulation results.  So even if the Simulation results are saved locally but the SOLIDWORKS model files are saved on the network, you will still see delays when opening the models and switching between Simulation plots.  For best performance, BOTH the SOLIDWORKS files and Simulation results should be saved locally.

Be aware that intermediate temporary result files (while the Simulation studies are solving) can be many times larger in size than the final results (.CWR file).  So ensure that plenty of space is available on the hard drive, otherwise you may get errors while running indicating it was unable to save results.

Simulation Results in SOLIDWORKS PDM

In a multi-user environment, saving locally can make it difficult for collaboration which is why PDM is great solution.  This allows you to save SOLIDWORKS models and Simulation results locally as you work, then check the files into the vault once the study is complete.

There are a few things to be aware of to avoid issues with the check-in/check-out of Simulation files:

  • By default PDM should automatically check-in Simulation results when checking in the SOLIDWORKS model files that contain studies.  If it doesn’t, ensure that the PDM Display Menu option under Display > Options > ‘Include SOLIDWORKS Simulation results in check-in‘ is selected.
  • The .CWR file contains all of the Simulation results.  This is the file that should be checked in automatically
  • When checking out the SOLIDWORKS model files with the Simulation study, in order to view the results the .CWR file must be checked out. While this can be done manually, you can also enable the option ‘Try to check out all referenced files when the referencing file is checked out‘ in the PDM Settings Dialog
  • The error ‘Failed to create temporary file‘ may occur while trying to review results if the .CWR file is not checked out.
  • SOLIDWORKS PDM may attempt to create a Preview of the .CWR file.  As some .CWR files are very large in size, this can take some time to process.  You can exclude file types in PDM to prevent the preview from being generated.  The .CWR file type can be added to Exclude File Types under the PDM Display Menu options.

The post SOLIDWORKS Simulation Results Save Location appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at April 21, 2017 12:00 PM

The Top 5 Ways a SOLIDWORKS & MakerBot 3D Bundle will speed your design cycle

This month we are running a great promotion for SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD software. When you buy a SOLIDWORKS Bundle which includes technical support, you will receive a discount on a MakerBot desktop 3D printer to create your prototypes. Here are the top 5 ways a SOLIDWORKS MakerBot 3D bundle will speed up your engineering design cycle, resulting in a rapid return on investment:

  1. Reduce prototyping time and expenses. Instead of outsourcing every prototype, a desktop 3D printer can democratize design by allowing more engineers to test proof of concept, especially in the early stages of development.
  2. Create better designs. The ability for design engineers to 3D print at their desks allows them to try new ideas and make mistakes. Without real-time prototyping, the most innovative design may never be discovered.
  3. Speed approvals. Hand a client or upper-level management a physical model to transform the design cycle. 3D printing speeds the design process by ending arguments and avoiding long meetings, leaving more time to focus on the best ideas.
  4. Ease of use increases productivity. Using the latest generation of MakerBot® Replicator® Desktop 3D Printer allows design engineers to:
    • Choose settings that range from fast drafts to finer resolutions that don’t need post production.
    • Accelerate prototyping with the printer’s large build volume, on-board camera and diagnostics, and assisted build plate leveling .
    • Use Wi-Fi, USB and Ethernet connectivity to ensure a seamless production workflow that can be remotely monitored.
  5. Competitive advantage. Be faster out of the gate with a design that has been prototyped and improved multiple times by incorporating desktop 3D printing into your design engineering workflow.

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SOLIDWORKS MakerBot 3D Bundle

A SOLIDWORKS MakerBot 3D bundle provides the tools you need to design your products and build a plastic prototype. We will provide you with the essential knowledge you need to get started with 3D CAD and 3D printing. Plus the technical support to solve your tough design problems.

SOLIDWORKS MakerBot Bundle

SOLIDWORKS MakerBot Bundle

Our bundles include:

  1. SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD Software
    • Choose from SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional or Premium software.
    • Includes 3D design tools and application specific add-ins.
  2. SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service
    • Technical support from Javelin’s SOLIDWORKS experts.
    • Software updates and new releases.
    • Access to MySolidWorks online training and resources.
  3. A MakerBot 3D Printer and Training
    • Receive a MakerBot Replicator+ desktop 3D printer at a discounted price.
    • Includes Basic Starter Kit:
      • 1 spool of material
      • 6 month standard manufacturer’s warranty

Act Now. This special offer ends May 31, 2017.

CHOOSE A BUNDLE

The post The Top 5 Ways a SOLIDWORKS & MakerBot 3D Bundle will speed your design cycle appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at April 21, 2017 02:00 AM

April 20, 2017

SolidSmack

How Big is the Carbon-Adidas 3D Printed Shoe Deal?

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Last week Carbon and Adidas announced a deal to produce 3D printed midsoles. But how big is this deal, exactly?

It’s hard to gauge the magnitude of a business deal from popular reports, but I believe it can be estimated based on the statistics shown to the public.

Carbon has developed a custom resin specifically for this application, which will obviously require a flexible material that is resilient, able to withstand considerable forces as it is to be located on the business end of shoes, and must exist in harsh outdoor conditions for long periods of time. With this material, Carbon will produce production-ready midsoles for Adidas.

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What do we know? Well, according to the Carbon press release and materials, they are to produce “more than 100,000 pairs by end of 2018”, and that:

Three hundred pairs of Futurecraft 4D will be released in April 2017 for friends and family, followed by more than 5000 pairs for retail in Fall/Winter 2017, and further scaling in the coming seasons.
So according to this, it appears they must produce something close to 95,000 pairs, or 180,000 prints, during 2018.

Let’s do some arithmetic to guess at how many Carbon M1’s this might correspond to.

180,000 prints over a year, if one is printing 5 days a week, means about 700 prints per day, or perhaps 60 per hour assuming a 12 hour print day.

I’m assuming a 12 hour print day because the machine will print these midsoles fairly quickly – it’s not like you can leave the machine overnight for a 29-hour print, these prints will be much shorter than that. So unless you have 24-hour staff supervising print activities, you probably will have a constrained production day.

How long might this part take to print on a Carbon M1? That’s hard to say, but we know from a number of videos that the Carbon M1 can print very quickly, especially on a sparse structure such as the design of the Adidas sole. Carbon’s most notable video has a ball-sized object being printed in about seven minutes, but this is a larger object so it will take longer. Let’s make a guess that each print takes about 20 minutes to complete. And if you can fit more than one midsole into a single print job, it will take about twice as long, so the math will work out either way.

For a 20 minute print, you can produce three midsoles per hour per machine, assuming operators can swap out the completed prints and fuel the machine at warp speed.

To produce 60 midsoles per hour in this configuration, you would need something around twenty Carbon M1’s operating simultaneously. If there are machines out of service from time to time, you’d need a few more to compensate.

Our previous analysis of Carbon’s total cost of ownership revealed that a single Carbon M1, operating at normal business velocity would cost around USD$290K for a fully-outfitted three year subscription.

We can then estimate that a single year of operation of a Carbon M1 might cost close to USD$100,000. And in the twenty machine Adidas scenario, that would be USD$2,000,000 (plus more for facilities, labor, other equipment and redundant equipment). But let’s say it’s USD$2M.

For the 180,000 pairs, this suggests that each might costs Adidas at least USD$11 or USD$22 per pair for the Carbon printing costs alone. That’s probably quite a bit higher than what they would pay for producing “normal” midsoles using mass manufacturing but probably is well within the cost envelope for sales of this premium shoe. It seems like a feasible project.

For Carbon, the may gain a few million in revenue from this deal, but that’s not the whole story.

What this project really means is that it proves that 3D printing can actually produce consumer-level products at moderate scale effectively, at least for premium-cost products.

And that proof could easily entice other manufacturers into exploring the same technology for their operations. That’s where the real benefit to Carbon – and indeed the rest of the 3D printing industry – will be seen in the future.

Read more at Fabbaloo!

The post How Big is the Carbon-Adidas 3D Printed Shoe Deal? appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at April 20, 2017 03:29 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

15 Quick Steps to Setup a Design Library Feature

Are you finding yourself generating the same feature every time you create a new part? Would you like an easy way to stamp your company logo into your products? Then the SOLIDWORKS Library Feature is meant for you!

Library features allow you easy access to commonly used features with all of the parameters and dimensions pre-defined to your specifications. Simply drag and drop onto your model and SOLIDWORKS takes care of the rest.

_Intro.gif

Let’s take a look at how this is done.

Before we get started, you’ll first want to create a custom Design Library directory to save everything into, whether on your personal hard drive or on a server to share with colleagues. You will reference this location in your settings [Tools > Options > File Locations > Design Library].

add-design-library.jpg

Now when you go to the Design Library tab in the Task Pane you will find a folder to the directory you linked. Right click on this and create a new folder.

2-Add-Folder-web.jpg

With the folder structure in place you are now ready to create your library feature.

Step 1: Create a Place Holder Extrusion

Begin by creating a place holder extrusion, similar to the geometry you plan on inserting this library feature onto. In this particular example I commonly create a vent sketch on rectangular faces so I will use this type of shape as my place holder.

3-Beginning-Shape-web.jpg

Step 2: Sketch the Geometry

Sketch the geometry you will be using with the library feature. As you create the sketch you should avoid creating relations tied to the origin of this place holder model, otherwise SOLIDWORKS will attempt to use this as a Reference when re-using the feature. You can either sketch off to the side or as you sketch hold the CTRL key on your keyboard to avoid creating a coincident relation to the origin.

4-Origin-No-Yes-zoomed.jpg

Step 3: Define Sizes of Sketch Entities

Next, fully define the sizes of your sketch entities if necessary. You want to make special considerations for the dimensions or relations controlling the geometry’s position in space. These References will be used when we turn this into a library feature in a few steps.

Because I typically dimension my vent off of edges of rectangular faces I will dimension the center position of my vent with this in mind. Note that even though the center is on top of the origin there is no coincident relation to it. As an alternative option if you would prefer to drop the feature onto any geometry regardless of its edge conditions you should not use these locating dimensions/relations and should instead leave the sketch under-defined. I often leave my sketch under-defined when creating a logo as shown in the final step of this article.

4-5-sketch-offset-locating-dimensions.jpg

Step 4: Create Features for Library Feature

From here you can create your cut or boss/base feature and any additional features you would like to incorporate into the library feature. You do not need to limit yourself to one sketch or one feature. How far you go is up to you. In my example the sketch is all I need.

Step 5: Drag Feature(s) into Folder within Design Library

When ready you will left click on the feature(s) to be used and drag them into the folder within your Design Library. In this step you do not want to include your place holder feature(s).

7-drag-and-drop-to-add.jpg

Step 6: Define Design Library Saving Preferences

The “Add to Library” PropertyManager should appear on the left allowing you to define what, where, and how you want to save into your Design Library. If you missed any features you can still add them to the list. For the File Type dropdown you will choose “Lib Feat Part (.sldlfp)”.

8-Add-To-Library-Property-Manager.jpg

Step 7: Open Library Feature Part

Once complete you will see the Library Feature Part in your Design Library. Save your original model if you wish, but you will want to close the original file and then open the Library Feature Part by double clicking it. You will notice there are some unique folders in the feature tree and all of the library features will have an “L” over their icons.

8-9-Open-Library-Part-Feature.jpg

Step 8: Add Additional Features to Library Feature Part (Optional)

If you wish to add additional features to the Library Feature Part you can always right click on them in the tree and choose “Add to Library”. An “L” should appear over the feature’s icon.

Step 9: Move Dimensions into Locating Dimensions Folder

If you want an easy way to modify the Locating Dimensions when you use this library feature in a new part you will want to move the appropriate dimensions into the Locating Dimensions folder. These will be used later in step #13. The Internal Dimensions folder is further explained in step #14.

10-Move-Locating-Dimensions-web.jpg

Step 10: Drag and Drop from Design Library to Model

Save the changes and close the Library Feature Part. You are now ready to use your library feature in a new model. Simply drag and drop from the Design Library onto your model.

11-Inserting-Feature-Into-New-Part-web.jpg

Step 11: Define Face/Plane to Place Feature Onto

The Property Manager that appears will allow you to further define which face/plane you wish to place the feature onto. If the library feature has configurations you can choose it from the list. There is also a Link to library part option which will cause the feature to update in the future if the Library Feature Part is ever changed.

11-Configurations-and-Link-To-Part-web.jpg

Step 12: Select the New Edge to be Referenced in New Model

The References will list the geometries you used for positioning purposes (from step #3). Select each item and a small window will appear showing the original model. Within this model it will highlight the original edge referenced by the first dimension/relation. Within your new model you will need to select the new edge to be referenced. In my example I dimensioned to the edges of the rectangular face to control the vent position so I need to select the appropriate edges in my new model. If there were no references used in the original part there will be nothing listed here.

selecting-references-in-new-part.jpg

Step 13: Adjust Dimensions Further in ‘Locating Dimensions’ Folder

Because I placed dimensions into the ‘Locating Dimensions’ folder within the Library Feature Part (step #9) I can easily adjust them to further control the position of my feature.

13-Using-Licating-Dimensions-web.jpg

Step 14: Add Dimensions NOT to be Changed to ‘Internal Dimensions’ Folder

Under ‘Size Dimensions’ you can check the box to override the original dimension values. If there are any dimensions you do not want the ability to change you will want to add them to the “Internal Dimensions” folder referenced in step #9.

14-Overriding-Dimensions-web.jpg

Step 15: Confirm to Add Library Folder into FeatureTree

After you confirm the options you will see a Library Folder added into your FeatureTree. Within this folder will be the library features.

15-feature-tree-web.jpg

In my example only the sketch carried over but you can see in the example below we can incorporate as many features as we want when creating these Library Feature Parts. For additional examples to spark ideas on how you could apply this tool I would encourage you to look at the samples in the default Design Library which comes pre-installed with SOLIDWORKS. They are found within the ‘Features’ folder.

16-use-cases-web.jpg

You will notice above I created a Library Feature for the Alignex logo. If you wish to create your company logo in SOLIDWORKS you can find out how in our Smooth Sketching Using Splines in the SOLIDWORKS Sketcher article. Thanks for reading!


Written By: Jesse Butwinick, Application Engineer at Alignex, Inc. Jesse is a regular contributor to the Alignex Blog. Find more tech tips on the Alignex Blog and subscribe to get content like this delivered straight to your inbox.

Author information

Alignex, Inc.
Alignex, Inc. is the premier provider of SOLIDWORKS software and partner products to the mechanical engineering industry in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, Colorado and Wyoming. With more than 25 years of technical experience, Alignex offers consulting services, training and support for SOLIDWORKS as well as support for partner products. For more information, visit alignex.com.

The post 15 Quick Steps to Setup a Design Library Feature appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Alignex, Inc. at April 20, 2017 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

Learn to Code This Year with This 10-Course Pay-What-You-Want Bundle

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Code. You don’t have to be a computer science hotshot to take the deep dive—heck, some people are up and running with their first project in a matter of weeks. But knowing where and how to enter can be half of the battle.

The recently-launched Learn How to Code 2017 Bundle is the perfect entry point and includes over 156 Hours of premium coding instruction, from Python to Ruby & everything in between.

Consisting of ten courses in total, the ‘Pay What You Want’ bundle covers not just specific code languages, but also how and why you may decide to choose one over another depending on the project at hand.

Included Courses:

  • Learn How To Code: Google’s Go Programming Language ($249 Value)
  • The Complete Python Course: Beginner to Advanced! ($195 Value)
  • Learn By Example: Scala ($50 Value)
  • Projects in Programming Languages: Ruby, Python, Java ($150 Value)
  • Learn Angular 2 from Beginner to Advanced ($195 Value)
  • How to Make a Freaking iPhone App: iOS 10 and Swift 3 ($200 Value)
  • The Complete Web Developer Masterclass: Beginner To Advanced ($195 Value)
  • Git Complete Mastery With GitHub: 100% Hands-on Git Guide ($200 Value)
  • Professional Rails Code Along ($40 Value)
  • JavaScript Programming Complete ($99 Value)

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

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by SolidSmack at April 20, 2017 01:02 PM

How Onshape Changes Traditional CAD – Real-Time Deployment

Agile design banner-01

Presented by
collaboration in Onshape

Anyone involved in product development knows there’s constant pressure to get to market faster. However, success often comes to, not necessarily those who get to market faster but, those who are able to iterate and innovate faster. For that to happen, companies across every industry need tools that promote rapid discovery, decisions and delivery. That’s obvious to us in product development, but what we’ve found interesting of late though, is how Onshape is taking the concept of Agile Design and applying to Product Design.

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In fact, Onshape wrote the book on Agile Product Design which happens to be a GREAT primer on the approach of using Agile Product Design to iterate and innovate faster. The whole of the process boils down to three key principles:

  • Real-time Deployment and Access
  • Real-time Data Management
  • Real-time Analytics & Control

Real-time Deployment and Access

Onshape is the first full, cloud-based CAD platform. Sure, it makes it independent of hardware or operating system, but more important is 1) deployment – get someone started in seconds – and 2)  access – anywhere, anytime, on any device. Less time wasted. No downloading service packs and configuring laptops. Those days… gone.

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Many CAD systems would buckle under the weight of such a concept, no? Here’s the question though. What do Onshape’s Real-Time Deployment capabilities mean for an individual or company frustrated with the old way of doing things? Let’s look at four applications:

1. Instant Software Deployment
All members of a design team have an instant connection to their CAD system and CAD data the moment they are added. How long did it take you to get set up when you started your last job? The focus in Onshape is immediately shifted to the product design.

2. Instant Software Access
Onshape runs on a variety of software operating systems and devices, so whether you’re on a PC, Mac, or mobile device, you can access your data. Where do you have to be to access your data now? That accessibility with Onshape is simply a matter of launching your web browser or the Onshape app and getting to work.

3. Instant Upgrades & Updates
Everyone is always on the latest software version with no need to download or install updates. Are you on the latest version of your CAD software? The software is always up to date, but more than that, changes made by anyone on any device are instantly updated for everyone.

4. Instant CAD De-provisioning
When an employee, contractor or outside partner leaves the team, you can instantly remove their access to your CAD data. I don’t think I need to ask you what a pain this can be. With Onshape, there are no licensing transfers or deactivations, and absolutely no lingering “offline” copies of your IP.

More Than Theory

So, how does this work out in reality though? Well, this is why our interest is piqued. Agile Product Design is more than just theory. Onshape is seeing the reality of real-time deployment work out in their customer base. Neil Deshpande, Technical Lead for Coca-Cola Company’s McDonald’s Division, switched his engineering design team to Onshape. They went from a traditional CAD approach that took team-members weeks to get laptop and CAD access to a deployment of minutes with Onshape by just adding their email. Oh, and as quickly as access can be granted, access can be revoked.

That’s just one example of agile product design in action. It’s an approach that gets designers started faster and CAD admins on more important tasks. A new install is accomplished by adding the employee’s email. No need to request license codes or update service packs. When employees leave, they don’t have to uninstall, deauthorize computers, or call a VAR to assign a license to someone new.

The net result of Onshape real-time deployment is that everyone on the development team is more agile, free to chase down innovative ideas and rapidly iterate until they arrive at the right product solution. Take a deeper look at Onshape here.

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The post How Onshape Changes Traditional CAD – Real-Time Deployment appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at April 20, 2017 01:00 PM

Watch the Mesmerizing Process of Crafting a Hand-Carved Canoe

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When it comes to summertime activities, few things beat a lazy ride around a lake or down a creek in a canoe. And while today you can fetch a decent newer model for anywhere from $500-$2000, nothing beats the beauty and craftsmanship of a traditional dugout canoe.

And if you’ve ever wanted to make your own, look no further than this 18-minute documentary on Latvian woodworker Rihards Vidzickis.

Created from a single tree trunk using traditional hand tools, Vidzickis’ canoe is the perfect example of how—especially in the age of advanced digital manufacturing techniques—older really can be better:

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Rihards started as an apprentice before receiving his Master degree in Latvian Craft. In addition to understanding wood at a craftsman level, he also holds a Doctorate degree in engineering materials science. Currently, he is a member of the Northmen Guild of Northern Master Craftsmen. Find out more over at the Northmen Guild.

The post Watch the Mesmerizing Process of Crafting a Hand-Carved Canoe appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at April 20, 2017 12:53 PM

Behind the Design: The Tenderwood Cushioned Wood Bench

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When it comes to some of the more exciting developments in product design, oftentimes it comes down to simply looking at new ways of manipulating old materials rather than seeking out new ones.

Such is the case with ‘Tenderwood‘, an experimental new bench design from Taiwanese industrial designer YenHao Chu.

Using a combination of Japanese ash wood, sponge, and veneer, Chu has effectively created a bench that looks like it was made entirely from carved wood, but includes a discreetly built-in sponge cushion in the seat hidden by a matching layer of veneer.

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“Wooden chairs are usually elegant and neat; however, it is difficult to sit on them for too long,” explains the designer. “Therefore, a cushion is always placed on the chair. What if a wooden chair became soft but still kept the aesthetic of wood? After several experiments, I found a way to achieve this. With the combination of 3D pressed flexible wood veneer and soft foam, the sitting surface provides subtle softness.”

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Be sure to check out the rest of Chu’s fascinating experiments with wood over at yhcpresent.

The post Behind the Design: The Tenderwood Cushioned Wood Bench appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at April 20, 2017 12:30 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Localized Tutorials for SOLIDWORKS Visualize

Put down your coffee and hold onto something…because all 16 SOLIDWORKS Visualize tutorials have been localized into all 14 languages! By now, you should be familiar with the Visualize tutorials that have existed on MySolidWorks since February 2016, in English only. Our global team has been hard at work to translate and localize this important training content into the other 13 languages Visualize supports. Now there’s no excuse to use your complimentary seat of Visualize Standard (wink wink).

Click the link below to sign in and discover learning Visualize in your own language:

WATCH THE LOCALIZED VISUALIZE TUTORIALS NOW!

The following languages have fully localized Visualize tutorials. This includes the introduction screens, Visualize interface, quiz questions at the end, and also the speech is in the native language:
· French
· German
· Spanish
· Japanese

These languages have subtitles in the native language, with English speech and Visualize interface:
· Czech
· Italian
· Korean
· Polish
· Portuguese
· Russian
· Turkish
· Chinese-China
· Chinese-Taiwan

For even more text in your desired language, new to the MySolidWorks website, you can also now choose your desired language for the entire site from the main dropdown in the upper right corner! This new feature allows you to select the language for all text throughout MySolidWorks, letting you read all the Visualize lesson descriptions in your native language.

To follow along in SOLIDWORKS Visualize with your native language, go to the Tools > Options window > User Interface tab and select your desired language. Close Visualize and re-launch it to change the entire Visualize interface to your selected language.

Don’t forget to follow SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager @bhillner on twitter for product news and updates, and share your SOLIDWORKS Visualize creations on social media with #swvisualize and #gettinvizzy!

More Resources to get started with SOLIDWORKS Visualize:

DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE SEAT OF SOLIDWORKS VISUALIZE right now to bring your products to market faster than ever before.

WATCH TWO WEBINARS on SOLIDWORKS Visualize and its benefits by SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager Brian Hillner.

CHECK OUT OTHER BLOG POSTS to learn more about the latest news on SOLIDWORKS Visualize.

UPGRADE TO SOLIDWORKS VISUALIZE PROFESSIONAL for an enhanced 3D visualization experience. Contact your Reseller now!

Author information

Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner is the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager.

The post Localized Tutorials for SOLIDWORKS Visualize appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Brian Hillner at April 20, 2017 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Selecting Transparent Components with the Shift key

Changing the transparency or adding transparent appearances to components helps to see inside your assemblies. However you’ll notice that if you try to select transparent components you will likely select the opaque component behind it.

SOLIDWORKS Component Transparency

In this example it passes through the blade cover and selects the blade behind it.

SOLIDWORKS Selection Through Transparent Component

If you select a transparent component in a location that doesn’t have any opaque component behind, then it will select the transparent component.  If there are multiple transparent components in a row and no opaque components behind, then it also will select the first transparent component.

Select transparent components without any opaque components behind

Select transparent components without any opaque components behind

But you still have the ability to select the transparent component in front of any opaque components.  Simply hold down Shift and then select on the transparent component.  You’ll see the selection no longer passes through.

SOLIDWORKS Shift Select Transparent Components

The post SOLIDWORKS Selecting Transparent Components with the Shift key appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at April 20, 2017 12:00 PM

April 19, 2017

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: Armored Piggy Bank [Hello, Sir Pigglesby!]

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What do you do with your pennies? Do I even need to ask? Look, I know everyone loves blasting a few penny out their nose, but like your grade school financial planner told you, “Your nose is gushing blood! You should be saving those pennies!”

Maybe saving pennies would be easier if we could do it using an, oh, I dunno, ARMOURED PIGGY BANK that looks like an ARMOURED PIG and goes by the name of MR. PIGGLESBY. And yes, it does exist.

Time to gather those snot-soaked pennies, because Louise Driggers has done what no one else has done – created an amazing, multi-part 3D printed armored piggy bank that looks every bit amazing as it sounds.

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See? Here’s the story behind Sir Pigglesby:

“Sir Pigglesby is a brave knight who serves in the army of the Sun. He wears a magic belt given to him by a Moon princess in thanks for joining her on a quest to rescue her parents from an army of Trolls. The belt (which bears the crescent insignia of the Moon Kingdom) enables Sir Pigglesby to carry an infinite number of objects without being hampered by bulk or weight. Only the chosen wearer can release the objects and as he is a noble, honest and loyal pig, he is in great demand to transport valuable items on the most dangerous missions.”

Louise has been working hard with professional commitments and helping her family in Lousiana recover for the devasting flood last year, so created him to “make anyone smile even on the worst days” and “protect those close to him, no matter the danger.” You have succeeded Louise, you have succeeded.

She uses a range of 3D modeling software including Blender, OpenSCAD, SolidWorks, Fusion 360, MeshMixer and Maya. For this design, she used Blender for everything but the threads which were modeled using Fusion 360. She printed all the parts using a Prusa i3 and Proto-pasta filiment.

You can download the model on Thingiverse and see the step-by-step assembly of Sire Pigglesby on Instructables! (Bonus! Check out here ball-jointed frog dolls!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!
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The post Model of the Week: Armored Piggy Bank [Hello, Sir Pigglesby!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at April 19, 2017 09:39 PM

This Dude Made His Own iPhone From Scratch…and it Works!

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“You know the thrill of walking down a back alley in hopes you might find something amazing? I fucking live for that.”

This is how US traveler Scott Allen opens up the About page on his website devoted entirely to hardware hacking and documenting his strange-but-true stories straight out of the world of technology and manufacturing.

“Shenzhen, China is my new obsession,” he explains. “I’ve been spending a ton of time here in the past year and a half. I feel like I’m just starting to scratch the surface. It’s been called the workshop and factory of the world. There is so much to discover tucked away in corners of industrial markets and down back alleys.”

More recently, Allen built a like-new (and working!) iPhone 6S entirely from parts he bought in the public cell phone parts markets of Huaqiangbei. While assembling an iPhone from scratch with instructions and all parts included is enough to give even an advanced engineer the willies, Allen impressively undertook the task of discovering all these components in an open Chinese marketplace and built his own working iPhone for just $300.

“I’ve been fascinated by the cell phone parts markets in Shenzhen, China for a while,” he explains. “I’d walked through them a bunch of times, but I still didn’t understand basic things, like how they were organized or who was buying all these parts and what they were doing with them.”

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Read Allens full breakdown of the build over at his website, Strange Parts.

The post This Dude Made His Own iPhone From Scratch…and it Works! appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at April 19, 2017 12:15 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to combine multiple Custom Properties in a SOLIDWORKS Bill of Materials

When going through the process of creating an assembly drawing, it is beneficial in most cases to make use of Custom Properties listed in individual Bill of Materials (BOM) columns. These could be a Part Description, Part Number, Manufacturer, etc. Sometimes, it may be beneficial to combine multiple part Custom Properties into one column in a BOM.

For the purposes of this example, an assembly was created using two screws. Individual Custom Properties were made that detailed the thread diameter, length, and type of each screw. When we make a BOM with these column headings, it appears as shown below:

SOLIDWORKS BOM

SOLIDWORKS BOM

Each of the custom properties is contained in its own column. In this case, we may want to summarize the information in these custom properties in a single column. The three pieces of information would work very well as a description for this particular part. To do this, we will reference each Custom Property. To reference another custom property, the format below should be used:

$PRP:”custom property name”

In this case, our custom properties are THREAD DIAMETER, LENGTH, and SCREW TYPE. Therefore we can enter the data into each of our part’s “Description” Custom Property as follows:

$PRP:"THREAD DIAMETER" x $PRP:"LENGTH" $PRP:"SCREW TYPE"

Resulting in a BOM appearing as below:

Modified BOM with combined custom property values

Modified BOM with combined custom property values

The post How to combine multiple Custom Properties in a SOLIDWORKS Bill of Materials appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Colin Murphy, CSWE at April 19, 2017 12:00 PM

April 18, 2017

SolidSmack

Product Design in Practice: Mobile Solar Charger Prototype

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We’re back! If you’re familiar with some of my other projects or subscribe to my YouTube channel, you’ll notice two new videos. Those are the the first of an eight part video series on building product prototypes.

The series captures the process of creating a working prototype for a solar charger power bank – The Solar Vox Ultra. (Nice name, huh?) We’ll go over the design process I follow to design and refine the concept into the final product and build a working prototype of the device. I hope you’ll join me! Here are the first two videos of the series.

Part 1: Inspiration & Ideation

This episode is about concept ideation and the various ideas used for designing a product.
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Part 2: Final Sketch Rendering

This episode cover hand rendered pen sketching with Prismacolor marker and making digital adjustment to the image.

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In the next episodes, I’ll cover how to vacuum form some simple, styrene dome shapes I’ll use for the petals. Then I’ll move on to show how to sand and finish the styrene as well as create a solvent well for the parts.

I’ll show the process of using RenShape (low density foam boards) to cut out the main body and turn it on a lathe, then assembly and paint the parts. Last but not least, I have two episodes to cover some very important aspects on how the electronics are installed and the camera gear I use to take photographs of the prototype.

I look forward to sharing this process with you! Contact me at botzen.com, search for me on Google+ or follow me on twitter at @botzendesign – I always post cool design stuff there.

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The post Product Design in Practice: Mobile Solar Charger Prototype appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Eric Strebel at April 18, 2017 07:27 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Upgrading to the New Version of DriveWorks – Everything You Need To Know

The new version of DriveWorks has just arrived, and I know that all of our lovely customers can’t wait to upgrade and start using the awesome new features. Let’s take a moment to review some best practices when it comes to upgrading DriveWorks.

New version of DriveWorks

DO NOT UPGRADE YOUR CURRENT PRODUCTION SYSTEM!

This point cannot be stressed enough. While in most cases upgrades go smoothly, in the unlikely event that a bug is found and ends up disrupting your main DriveWorks system, it could end up disrupting the day to day operation of your company. If your company is heavily dependent on DriveWorks, this could cause significant delays and lost data if IT must go to system backups to restore your setup.

Create a COMPLETELY separate testing environment, with a copy of your current DriveWorks group and all project files.

It is best practice, in general, to not actively edit a project that your company is using for day-to-day operations. When it comes to a new version, this is even more important. There are several different methods to achieve this depending on your setup.

Case A – Individual group with project files in DriveWorks 14

  • Simply copy the group file and all project files to a new location and then use data management to remap everything.
  • Another option is to use the copy group function in data management. This is a new function added to DriveWorks in version 14.2 and will be in all new versions going forward.
New version of DriveWorks

DriveWorks Tasks

Case B – Shared group with project files in DriveWorks 14

  • A shared group within DriveWorks will be running a SQL server within your company. It is best to use the copy group tool to copy the group over, as well as all the project files.
  • Manual backing up and restoring of the SQL databases is not recommended unless you are familiar with SQL Server.

Case C – Individual group with project files in DriveWorks version prior to 14

  • Simply copy the group file and all project files to a new location and then use data management to remap everything if it is present in your current version.

Case D – Individual group with project files in DriveWorks version prior to 14

  • As mentioned above, manual backing up and restoring of the shared groups is not recommended.
  • An alternative method would be to create a new shared group in the admin tool, then use the data management to import your projects from the main production group the testing group. You may have to copy some of the related project files over manually.

Additional Considerations

If your project uses external resources such as ERP, MRP, CRM, External Databases, Web Services or has any custom add-ins running, you maybe want to create testing versions of those as well. This usually involves creating a testing version of the databases in question, or changing the connection in DriveWorks to use the sandboxes for these systems for the duration of the testing.

Consult this help file if you are unsure of how to use any of the tools mentioned above: http://docs.DriveWorkspro.com/Topic/Welcome

Ask for help if you need it!

Reach out to your IT staff if you need their assistance with databases, virtual machines or servers. They will most likely be your best resource to find out exactly how things are backed up now, and the easiest way for you to achieve your testing environment safely.

Upgrades are not typically covered under technical support unless error from within DriveWorks has caused an issue. This is due to the fact that DriveWorks’ projects can be interconnected with many company systems and often require considerations outside the scope of just DriveWorks technical support.

Javelin does however offer DriveWorks mentoring and upgrade services, if you require assistance or would simply like us to perform the upgrade for you.

If you encounter any strange unexpected behavior, contact dasupport@javelin-tech.com and report it to us. This way we can ensure DriveWorks is aware of any issues and ensure that the issues are addressed by either Javelin or DriveWorks.

The post Upgrading to the New Version of DriveWorks – Everything You Need To Know appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Lee Herron at April 18, 2017 07:25 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS: Bring Your Drawings to Life!

It’s easy to understand the range of motion of an assembly when you’re working with a 3D model. But how can one communicate this effectively in a 2D drawing environment? Well, the Alternate Position View makes quick work of this by allowing you to indicate the range of motion of assembly components by showing them in different positions.

It utilizes configurations of your model to overlay one or more views on top of the original using phantom lines. You can either have these configurations created before inserting the view, or you have the option to create a new configuration when the view is created.

In this example, we’ll start with a drawing view of the assembly that shows the gripper in a closed configuration. Our goal is to superimpose a view of the assembly with the gripper in an open position.

SOLIDWORKS: Bring Your Drawings to Lifeimage001

 

To create this Alternate Position, we’ll select the view and click on Alternate Position View from the View Layout tab in the CommandManager. This will open the Alternate Position View PropertyManager where you’ll find two options: create a ‘New configuration’ or select an ‘Existing configuration.’ If we had a configuration of the gripper in the open position, we could select Existing configuration and choose it from the dropdown menu. Since we do not, we will select New configuration, and type in the new configuration name.

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When you click OK, SOLIDWORKS will switch to the assembly model (or open it automatically) with the Move Component tool active. You can use the options in the PropertyManager to move/rotate components into the desired position. You can even use collision detection to achieve realistic motion/positions.

SOLIDWORKS: Bring Your Drawings to Lifeimage003

 

Once the assembly is oriented the way you want, click OK. SOLIDWORKS will switch back to the drawing and you’ll see that the outline of the new configuration (shown with phantom lines) has been added to the drawing view, which you can dimension as needed.

SOLIDWORKS: Bring Your Drawings to Lifeimage004

 

I hope you found this information useful. Be sure to check back often and also check out our YouTube channel for more great tips and tricks! Don’t forget to sign up for one of our Night Schools about drawings and detailing!

For a quote on SOLIDWORKS, check out our website or contact us at hawk@hawkridgesys.com today.

Author information

Hawk Ridge Systems
From design to production, Hawk Ridge Systems delivers best-in-class solutions in 3D design, CAM software, and 3D printing.

The post SOLIDWORKS: Bring Your Drawings to Life! appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Hawk Ridge Systems at April 18, 2017 03:05 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Javelin and SOLIDWORKS at ISA Calgary 2017

On Wednesday April 19th and Thursday April 20th Javelin is exhibiting at  ISA Calgary 2017 – BMO Centre, Stampede Park. Visit booth #714 to see the latest features in SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD for mechanical and electrical design automation.

Javelin’s SOLIDWORKS electrical and mechanical design experts will be onsite to perform live demonstrations and answer any questions you have regarding SOLIDWORKS capabilities as it relates to your specific business needs.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2017

SOLIDWORKS Electrical and Mechanical 3D Design Automation

What is ISA Calgary?

“From the International Society of Automation, ISA Calgary show boasts a reinvented experience – new features, technology, education programs, networking events and much more! Join us in 2017 to get in touch with products and innovations at the forefront of today’s energy landscape. Access the latest trends and knowledge, and source expertise and services to help your company reduce costs, streamline operations and create efficiencies in today’s competitive climate.” (https://isacalgary.com/)

Why you should attend ISA Calgary 2017

ISA Calgary Show 2017 is the event to expand your business by seeing what’s new and networking with professionals. As North America’s leading show for automation, instrumentation and control professionals, this two-day event is the place to be to ensure you are up to date on the latest innovations.

Explore:

  • Analytical Instrumentation
  • Control Systems
  • Flow & Pressure
  • Instruments
  • Maintenance & Operation
  • Process Automation
  • Robotics
  • Valves & Regulation
  • And more!
SOLIDWORKS Solutions ISA Calgary 2017

SOLIDWORKS Solutions

Featured SOLIDWORKS Demonstrations at Booth # 714

 

SOLIDWORKS PCB 2017 
  • The new SOLIDWORKS PCB 2017 design tool combines the power and usability of Altium with the 3D expertise of SOLIDWORKS to unite the “electronic” and mechanical worlds, one design at a time.
  • By integrating Electronic designs seamlessly with SOLIDWORKS utilizing your trusted mechanical workflow, designs come to life with integrated design data, managed ECO processes, and greater analysis capabilities.
SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2017
  • Designers and engineers can quickly define the electrical interconnect of complex electrical systems with SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2017 software.
  • Utilizing intelligent single line or traditional multiline schematics, and a library of thousands of electrical schematic symbols and parts, you can develop embedded electrical system designs in a real-time, collaborative, multi user environment that connects mechanical and electrical engineering.
Technical Communications
  • SOLIDWORKS 2017 Communications tools enable you to create product communications early in the design process, simplify its creation, keep it updated, and deliver it on time. This easy-to-use software leverages your existing design data so you can work faster and more efficiently.
  • SOLIDWORKS Technical Communications software can help you clearly present even the most complex data for technical and user documentation, sales materials and presentations, and inspection and manufacturing.

Register for ISA Calgary 2017

 

Date Time Location
Wednesday April 19, 2017 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM Calgary Stampede – Halls DE

1410 Olympic Way SE, Calgary AB

REGISTER
Thursday April 20, 2017 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM Calgary Stampede – Halls DE

1410 Olympic Way SE, Calgary AB

REGISTER

 

Redeem your Complimentary expo entry online using code: ISA101

We hope to see you there!

The post Javelin and SOLIDWORKS at ISA Calgary 2017 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Erin Elliott at April 18, 2017 01:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Good Things Come in Threes: SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional and Premium

Many good things come in threes–like fast food: would you like small, medium or large?

Other times, we choose between three different flavors, colors, or levels of amenity. That “good, better, best” concept applies to SOLIDWORKS CAD, which is offered in Standard, Professional, and Premium configurations. But this can be confusing. What’s in each package? Which one do I have? Are there tools I could be using to do my job better?

An easy way to think of it is SOLIDWORKS Standard is built on core capabilities for the casual user. SOLIDWORKS Professional builds upon that with productivity boosters for the everyday user, while SOLIDWORKS Premium adds specialty tools for the power user.

Watch this short video showing the highlights of each package. Chances are you’ll learn something you didn’t know was in the software and perhaps find one or more new tools to help you do your job better.

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Good things come in 3’s: SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional, and Premium. If you already own SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium, why not try one new add-in on your next project? If you are a SOLIDWORKS Standard user but would like to experiment with Premium or Professional add-ins, you can try them out by requesting a SOLIDWORKS online trial. Just click here  to get started running SOLIDWORKS Premium right in your browser with no software to install!

Author information

Brad Williamson
Brad Williamson is a Senior Technical Manager, and has been helping customers learn and use SOLIDWORKS since 1996. He played drums and toured with original rock band, Abby SomeOne, for several years, and even had a few songs on the radio that you probably never heard. He continues to play actively in the Nashville music scene when not working on the latest SOLIDWORKS demo.

The post Good Things Come in Threes: SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional and Premium appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Brad Williamson at April 18, 2017 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Is repetitive Custom Property insertion taking too long? Try the Property Tab Builder

I am always surprised when I discover that a long time SOLIDWORKS user does not know about the SOLIDWORKS Property Tab Builder.

During training courses at Javelin, we always emphasize the importance of building strong standards across your teams. It helps to organize information input and facilitates tasks across the user base. One thing I see often in many industries are designers being too busy to create standards and share them with their teams. An example of that is custom property insertion, such as Description, Weight, Materials etc.

There is an easy way to create a list of user defined standard properties as a template that a SOLIDWORKS user will be presented with right in the SOLIDWORKS interface, the user can then input the values when a model is created, which eliminates the extra steps of select File > Properties, and then manually typing in property names and values.

Javelin has developed a specialized training course geared specifically towards the FASTEST WAY to input Custom Properties to all components of an assembly and how to utilize the Custom Properties tab to speed up your data insertion by at least 60%. Below are the steps to take to start your very first properties tab if you haven’t used it before.

To create the property tab, you will need to first create a new file inside of SOLIDWORKS. Then, go to the task pane on the right hand side.  The second to last tab is the location to create the property tab.

Create New Custom Properties

Create New Custom Properties

A new application window called the Property Tab Builder will pop up. The Builder is a stand-alone utility used for creating a customized interface for entering custom properties into SOLIDWORKS files.

  • The left column is a list of types of properties can be used.
  • The middle column is what will be shown in SOLIDWORKS when the property tab is ready.
  • The right column is the options/settings for each parameter.

When the entire middle column is highlighted (red outlined box), users can choose what type of template it is on the right hand side.  There are different template for different file types, (part, assembly, drawing, and weldment.)

SOLIDWORKS Property Tab Builder

SOLIDWORKS Property Tab Builder

By default, when you open the Property Tab Builder, a groupbox is automatically included in the middle column.  All the property types under groupbox have to go inside a groupbox.  Additional groupbox can be created by double-clicking or drag-drop onto the mat (middle column).  When a groupbox is highlighted, it can be either expanded or collapsed. When any of the boxes are selected, in this example, the textbox.

The caption on the right hand side is just the name which appears above the text input field. You can change this name for the actual property name which is stored in the model.  This is similar to manual input in the properties page in SOLIDWORKS.  A pre-defined value can be used. This will automatically setup the property with the value when a model is created.

Property Tab Builder overview

Property Tab Builder overview

When you are finished and all the properties are setup, the location where the file is saved needs to be known by SOLIDWORKS in order to use it. This is done the same way you would for your custom templates. But instead you’ll select the “custom property files” in System Options > File locations. Read our Property Tab Builder Templates article to learn more.

System Options

System Options

Learn More

If you would like to learn more about the advantages of this tool, attend our SOLIDWORKS Custom Properties Management training course either live online or in a Canadian classroom near you and become a Pro!

The post Is repetitive Custom Property insertion taking too long? Try the Property Tab Builder appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Vicky Guignard at April 18, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | Sunshine Rays and Marker Bleed

SSFeature

This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw, or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these fresh tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “Melted Rainbow” from Mr. Gnome and work our way through tracks from Whitney, Foxygen, Black Books, Youth Lagoon, Jim James, and others before wrapping up with “White Gloves” from Khruangbin.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:7uUMgGCaTeTwJETQhdvPDc" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | Sunshine Rays and Marker Bleed appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 18, 2017 11:47 AM

Top 3 Onshape Updates: Projected Curve, Bridging Curve, Merge Surfaces

onshape-whats-new-features-1704-00

Late last week Onshape rolled out another major release. If I was to read into this at all, I would say preparations are being made for surfacing. Reason, to work with surfaces efficiently, you need to be able to work with curves and existing surfaces efficiently – this update adds a bit for all of that.

You can see the history and catch the latest updates on the Onshape What’s New page, but we’ve had some interest from readers and discussion around keeping closer track of the Onshape features, breaking down the latest, pointing out our favorites and highlighting the ones we think push ahead product dev for CAD in the cloud.

As usual, we’ll attempt to pick our ‘Top 3 Onshape Updates’ and provide a quick overview of the others. Tell us which one you like the best, which need work, or if we picked the completely wrong features!

The Stats:
Total Updates: 12
Total Updates YTD: 53

Top 3 Onshape Updates (04.13.17)

Projected Curve – Curvacious! Use two sketch profiles to create a curve at the intersection of two sketches.

Bridging Curve – Curvacitastical! Use vertex/point and/or an edge to create a curve between two selections.

Merge Surfaces – Curvacisuperlicious! Use ‘Add’ to merge a surface to an existing surface using the Extrude, Revolve, Sweep or Loft command.

Other updates

 

Conics – You can now create a conic sketch curve using the new Conic feature in the Sketch toolbar.

View-only User Collaboration – Users with view-only permissions for a shared Document can now use Follow Mode and see the Document edited live.

Delete Face – There is a new option to ‘Leave open’ that will delete the face/faces selected and leave you with an open surface.

Break View – You can now break drawing views, which is useful for long parts that extend beyond the border of the drawing.

Importing Curves – Onshape now supports importing curves. If you are importing CAD data with curves, you should now be able to see the curves in Onshape.

Curve Improvements – View curves as a separate item in the Parts List, and make them easier to hide/show/rename/delete.

Flip Dimension Text – Left-click a new elbow point in the leader to flip the dimension text to the other side of the arrow.

User Property Type – New option for property type called ‘User’ that allows you to search by name when entering a property value.

Offset Surface – Offset surface is moved out of the ‘Move Face’ command for faster/clearer access.

You can see videos that breakdown each new features here. We’ll be keeping an closer eye on what Onshape is releasing with each update, so let us know what features you’re watching for or want to see the most!

Ask questions and talk about Onshape on SmackTalk!  Our new community site!

The post Top 3 Onshape Updates: Projected Curve, Bridging Curve, Merge Surfaces appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at April 18, 2017 10:23 AM

April 17, 2017

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery

A few weeks ago I wrote a blog post letting you all in on my fascination with brewing beer – in particular, with the entire brewing process. So in an attempt to publicize my passion for brewing, there were a lot of folks who took advantage of watching one of my two webinars I presented using the digital version of an electric home brewing system. If you missed it, you can watch it right here.

I’ll admit it, creating this assembly was actually a lot of fun – the electrical cabinet with all its components, the insane amount of detail in the kettles, and even building the wort chiller with SOLIDWORKS features such as the helix command (which I never thought – as an electrical guy – I would have needed THAT awesome feature.)

But even after creating the home brewing project, and conducting a couple webinars, I felt like there was still SO much more I could do with the assembly. Maybe I’m being selfish, but I’ve put a lot of work into this project and I didn’t want to see the assembly simply get put on the shelf once our webinars were complete.

It just so happens, that one of my teammates here at SOLIDWORKS actually has very similar brewing equipment to what I built in my digital assembly. So after months of prep work, planning, and coordination, a small team of beer enthusiasts here at SOLIDWORKS, helped me with what has been dubbed as the first ever “SOLIDWORKS Brew Day.”  Over the course of the brew day, we filmed the entire process – trying to capture every single step that was needed in order to create our beer. But of course, simply spending the entire day brewing beer would raise some questions (and some eyebrows). For example, “How does brewing beer, relate to SOLIDWORKS?”

So for each major step in the brewing process, we’ve created detailed videos that encompass how SOLIDWORKS Electrical can relate to our brewing system, but ultimately help when designing components and equipment. Additionally, these videos are not only related to brewing equipment, but ANY equipment that has circuitry incorporated within it. With that, I am thrilled to share with you our introductory video on “Brewing with Electricity.”

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rQVdhMVGDks?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

 

To take our designs a step further, we’re also producing even more detailed videos that relate to specific features and functions within SOLIDWORKS Electrical and we will be posting those videos on MySolidWorks.com.

I am extremely excited about this interactive project we’re creating and we hope you will be too. So keep an eye out and your taste buds ready for more information about this awesome brewing adventure with The SOLIDWORKS Brewery.

If you’re a fan of Twitter, you can follow me @SWECAD

Author information

JP Emanuele
JP Emanuele
JP is a Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, North America.

The post Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by JP Emanuele at April 17, 2017 05:44 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Technical Support FAQ: Share a Sketch, Stored Files and Saving Native Files

Can SOLIDWORKS share sketches between different part and assembly files?

The easiest way to share a sketch is to create a Sketch Block.  A Sketch Block turns individual sketch entities into a group or block. Sketch Blocks can be saved and placed into the Design Library to be shared with multiple users or parts. Multiple sketch blocks can be used in a single part to layout a 2D part or assembly design.

To create a sketch block, simply create a sketch and right click and select block.  From the Design Tree, a Sketch Block can be edited, saved, exploded or added to the Design Library.

 

 

Why is performance so bad for files stored on Network Drives?

Optimal SOLIDWORKS Performance is dependent on many factors. Where the files are stored and how quickly those files travel through the network can greatly affect performance.  Slow performance may be due to indexing services, applications, anti-virus software and network bandwidth.

To test if the Network is causing poor performance, store files locally and then open the files.  If the files open quickly from the local hard drive, but not the network, then there is a problem with the network that needs to be addressed.

Can I save SOLIDWORKS files into native past version files?  Why not?

No, SOLIDWORKS files cannot be saved as a native past version file. Each version of SOLIDWORKS is packed full of new features, to make each of these features backward compatible is near impossible. As a workaround, SOLIDWORKS does allow users to save files as a native Parasolid, step, or IGES format.

To save a file as a Parasolid, step, or IGES format. Select File -> Save As. Any file format can then be chosen.


We hope you enjoyed this installation of the GoEngineer Technical Support FAQ. Let us know if you have a question we can address.


Author: Krystine Thoroughman
Krystine has been working with CAD for the past 10 years as a Designer and Technical Support Engineer. She became interested in the industry through working with her Dad, a machinist from Arizona. Krystine’s current focus is SOLIDWORKS PDM support and helping customers understand how different pieces of software can work together, to create a more efficient work environment!

Author information

GoEngineer
GoEngineer delivers software, technology and expertise that enable companies to unlock design innovation and deliver better products faster. With more than 30 years experience and thousands of customers in high tech, medical, machine design, energy and other industries, GoEngineer provides best-in-class design solutions from SOLIDWORKS, Stratasys, CAMWorks, Altium and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM). For more information, visit goengineer.com.

The post Technical Support FAQ: Share a Sketch, Stored Files and Saving Native Files appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GoEngineer at April 17, 2017 03:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Javelin is Exhibiting at Design Engineering Expo [DEX] 2017

It’s officially tradeshow season! Javelin is exhibiting at the Design Engineering Expo [DEX] in three locations across Canada this year. The DEX season kicks off on April 18th at the Victoria Inn & Convention Centre in Winnipeg, MB. Followed by Coquitlam, BC on May 2nd and Kitchener, ON on October 11th.

Design Solutions for OEMs

“DEX is a series of one day regional table-top tradeshows where engineers, product developers, machine builders and systems integrators can discuss, network, and solicit advice on the latest technologies and applications that drive their businesses.” (www.dexexpo.com)

Javelin Technologies - Design Engineering Expo

Javelin Technologies – Design Engineering Expo

SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD & Stratasys 3D Printing

Javelin is Canada’s leading provider of 3D technology solutions. Since 1997, our 3D design experts have helped thousands of companies with solutions for mechanical design, electrical design, data management and 3D printing.

Visit Javelin at the Design Engineering Expo this year to discover the features and enhancements included in the latest release of SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD and learn what is new in 3D Printing technology. Today’s digital design process is changing the way we create, test and manufacture products. Javelin is more than just a reseller of 3D design technology. We have the solutions and services to help your business and your people succeed through every step of the product lifecycle

Stop by our booth at a show near you and say hi! We would love to discuss your design ideas in person and introduce a variety of ways that SOLIDWORKS and 3D Printing technology can help all aspects of your business.

SOLIDWORKS 2017 3D Printing

SOLIDWORKS 2017 3D Printing

Javelin Dates and Locations at DEX

To register for DEX please click on the “REGISTER” button below and complete the form with your contact information.

Location Date Venue
Winnipeg, MB April 18, 2017 Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre REGISTER Onsite
Coquitlam, BC May 2, 2017  Molson Canadian Theatre REGISTER
Kitchener, ON Oct 11, 2017  Bingemans Centre REGISTER

 

Online Registration for Winnipeg is now closed. Bring your business card to register for FREE onsite. 

Why you should attend DEX 

  • MEET face-to face with suppliers & develop new business opportunities
  • CONNECT with suppliers and develop new leads for your business
  • ENGAGE in an approachable, friendly atmosphere
  • EXPERIENCE easy and no maze-like halls
  • SEE new products and services
  • ENJOY FREE PARKING on-site
  • FREE REGISTRATION

Register to attend a Design Engineering Expo

 

The post Javelin is Exhibiting at Design Engineering Expo [DEX] 2017 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Erin Elliott at April 17, 2017 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Monday List 16.17 | What We’re Reading This Week

feature

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Homo Faber
Discovering the Infinite Universe

01

New Technology Is Built on a ‘Stack.’ Is That the Best Way to Understand Everything Else, Too?
We describe everything as if it were technology.

03

Mike Judge, the Bard of Suck
From “Idiocracy” to “Silicon Valley,” the writer and director has established himself as America’s foremost chronicler of its own self-destructive tendencies.

02

Cyclists Hunt for an Edge. This Time, It’s Data, Not Drugs
Spain’s Telefónica is trying analytics to steer its team to victory in upcoming races.

04

Don’t Despair: Big Ideas Can Still Change the World
An excerpt from the book ‘Utopia for Realists’

05

How a Totally Average Runner Broke the Sub-Five-Minute Mile
Sometimes setting an unreasonable goal is the only way to jump-start your fitness

06

The post The Monday List 16.17 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 17, 2017 12:04 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to use a Solid Body as a Profile for a Cut Sweep in SOLIDWORKS

Did you know that you can use a Solid Body to perform a Swept Cut? If you usually work with multi-body parts, you will find this tool very handy to complete your designs. Under the SOLIDWORKS Cut Sweep command, there is an option which allows you to select a solid body instead of a sketch as a profile to produce the cut.

The following image shows two bodies and a helix which works as the path for the sweep command. Solid Body #2 represents the cutting tool. Instead of drawing a separate closed profile to use as the sweep profile, this solid body will be used for the cut sweep command.

Running Cut Sweep Using the Solid Body as the Cutting Profile

 

The following image shows how the Solid Profile can be used instead of Sketch Profile under the Cut Sweep command. Notice a Solid Body called ‘Revolve1’ is selected in the profile selection box, and the helix is used as the path.

Solid Body called Revolve1 is Selected as the Profile for the Sweep Command.

Solid Body called Revolve1 is Selected as the Profile for the Sweep Command.

The following image is the final result of this operation:

SOLIDWORKS Cut Sweep with a solid body

Resulted Model from another Angle.

The post How to use a Solid Body as a Profile for a Cut Sweep in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWE at April 17, 2017 12:00 PM

April 16, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

How Your Competition is Beating You Using SOLIDWORKS Smart Components

For those of you who haven’t noticed, SOLIDWORKS is really big on “data reuse.” That’s because recreating information is likely one of the largest contributors to lost time and designer frustration.

I was recently on a call with a customer who was using the “Smart Components” feature in SOLIDWORKS in a really cool way. It is a neat example of file reuse. Here’s how it works:

Kevin Wilson at MAXPRO Technologies designs high pressure gas booster, liquid pump, and air amplifier systems, among other high pressure systems and components. Like any system, they use standard hardware and fittings to connect all their components.

Take this pressure regulator, downloaded from the manufacturer, for example:

For ease of use, Kevin was making sub-assemblies of this component, and its typical fittings. Easy, right?

Easy, until you have multiple instances of this regulator and a different fitting for each one. He was creating a different configuration of the assembly suppressing/unsuppressing each fitting.

Still not too bad, right?

That is, until you also have to change the angle at which that elbow is installed. When you change one instance, since it has been created using multiple instances of the same subassembly… they all change. This wreaks havoc on your mates and you end up spending time reattaching references. That has never happened to anyone, right?

Enter Smart Components. With a few simple clicks from a “dummy” subassembly, you can create this part with linked fittings and SOLIDWORKS will do the rest. If you want to learn how to create Smart Components, check out my tech tip on the topic here.

Once you set up your Smart Component, and add it to your assembly, the icon in the tree looks like this: , and when you highlight the component, it gets an icon like this:

When you click this icon in the graphics area, SOLIDWORKS opens a couple of windows, similar to when you insert a library feature (shameless plug for my library features webinar here).

Notice the graphics preview showing overlaid connectors. From the list on the left, just check the components you want. When you accept it, it automatically adds the components (AND THE MATES) to the assembly!

For those of you with keen eyes, notice that he even set up one of the connectors as a smart component. Now, with just a few clicks, he can repeat the process on the connector, and have everything update as needed while not affecting other instances of this “subassembly.”

This is a great method for reusing data and managing common components. In this particular instance, since all the components are purchased, revision control and part modification is not an issue. If you want to use Smart Components for your production parts, I would highly recommend some sort of data management solution.

There are many tools out there to help with this. An Enterprise solution like Dassault Systeme’s Exalead OnePart is the premiere option for tracking data. It parses everything in every file including CAD geometry and metadata (background file information) and provides incredible searching capabilities. Data management solutions like SOLIDWORKS Product Data Management (PDM) will help keep track of revisions and permissions, as well as walk your designs through workflows. Both options are great at what they do and I’m certain would come recommended by any professional in the field (myself included). However, they do require setup and administration to be effective.

I’d like to thank Kevin Wilson for allowing me to use his name and parts (and smarts) for this blog and tech tip! Kevin is a long-time SOLIDWORKS user and, from what I understand, quite the musician. If you were at SOLIDWORKS World 2015, I heard he stole the karaoke stage! Check out his Facebook Page.

As always, thanks for reading and Happy Modeling!

Author information

CADimensions
We are an authorized SOLIDWORKS and Stratasys reseller with certified training & support centers located in New York and Pennsylvania, USA. We are 100% focused on living a CADLIFE and have our vendor's unconditional endorsement in the sales and support of their products.

The post How Your Competition is Beating You Using SOLIDWORKS Smart Components appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CADimensions at April 16, 2017 03:00 PM

April 15, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Arc Dimension

Sometimes you need to add a SOLIDWORKS Arc Length Dimension.  This can be done in both Sketch and Drawing environments.  The Smart Dimension tool, with the correct selections, is used to create a SOLIDWORKS Arc Dimension.

Arc Dimension in a Sketch

Within the Sketch environment, the order of selections doesn’t actually matter.  As long as you select the arc and the two end points, the smart dimension tool will create the Arc Length Dimension.  It doesn’t matter if you select the two points first and then the arc, or the arc first and then the two points, or even one end point and the arc and the last end point.

SOLIDWORKS Arc Dimension - Sketch Environment

SOLIDWORKS Arc Dimension – Sketch Environment

Arc Dimension in a Drawing

However in the Drawing environment you’ll notice the order of selections is actually important.  You’ll need to select the two endpoints first and then select the arc.

SOLIDWORKS Arc Dimension - Drawing Environment

SOLIDWORKS Arc Dimension – Drawing Environment

Adjusting the Leaders

The Leader Style can also be adjusted.  Typically the leaders will be parallel to each other (due to “Automatically choose arc length leaders”).  This can be changed to radial leaders within the PropertyManager Leaders tab.

SOLIDWORKS Arc Dimension Leader Style

SOLIDWORKS Arc Length Dimension Leader Style

SOLIDWORKS Arc Length Dimension Leader Style Options

SOLIDWORKS Arc Length Dimension Leader Style Options

The post SOLIDWORKS Arc Dimension appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at April 15, 2017 12:00 PM

Economics 101: SOLIDWORKS & MakerBot Desktop 3D Printing [WHITE PAPER]

This month we are running a promotion on SOLIDWORKS and a MakerBot 3D printer. To help you research the benefits of a MakerBot 3D Printer you can download the following white paper…Economics 101: Desktop 3D Printing. The paper includes:

  • The advantages of MakerBot desktop 3D Printing
  • Typical return on investment (ROI)
  • Why you should choose a MakerBot
  • Example case studies

Download White Paper

MakerBot Desktop 3D Printing 101 White Paper

MakerBot 101 White Paper

SOLIDWORKS MakerBot 3D Bundle

A SOLIDWORKS MakerBot 3D bundle provides the tools you need to design your products and build a plastic prototype. We will provide you with the essential tools to create your prototypes. Plus the technical support to solve your tough design problems.

 

Our SOLIDWORKS MakerBot bundles include:

  1. SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD Software
    • Choose from SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional or Premium software.
    • Includes 3D design tools and application specific add-ins.
  2. SOLIDWORKS Subscription Service
    • Technical support from Javelin’s SOLIDWORKS experts.
    • Software updates and new releases.
    • Access to MySolidWorks online training and resources.
  3. A MakerBot Replicator+ 3D Printer
    • Receive a MakerBot Replicator+ desktop 3D Printer at a discounted price
    • Includes the 3D Printer + Basic Starter Kit includes 1 spool of material + 6 month standard manufacturer’s warranty

Act Now. This special offer ends May 31, 2017.

CHOOSE A BUNDLE

The post Economics 101: SOLIDWORKS & MakerBot Desktop 3D Printing [WHITE PAPER] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Rod Mackay at April 15, 2017 12:00 PM

April 14, 2017

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Wing Suit Spine Graft

Alena-Aenami-art

Five times they turned, each time winding up. The top of the peak was in sight, but to go the rest of the way, they would have to use the wing suits. Now, the idea of a wing suit sounds nice, but once helmet fuses itself with the brainstem, the wingframe is grafted to the spine – the wing suit is now active, powered by these links.

Alena Aenami – Oh, the clouds… And everything else. Loads of incredible, colorful scenes with video process on her gumroad and prints available.

Self-reflected – Over two years, Greg Dunn and Brian Edwards took a thin slice of a brain scan to painstakingly apply 1,750 sheets of gold leaf as a microetching.

Resin Burl Blocks – Crazy pieces of dyed and resin-impregnated wood burl by Derranged Donkey. Some look like lava, others like blocks of water.

The Last Jedi – Trailer for the next Star Wars film, out December 15th. Mixed feelings.

Paste – A new Slack app from FiftyThree that provides a better way to add images and review things.

Dexter – Ever thought of making a bot? Well, even if you haven’t, this makes it super simple.

Lit – What Generation Z (today’s teens) thinks is cool. Compared with Mellinials as well. Interesting info in this pdf report from Google.

Constructive Interference – A set of ‘static-kinitic’ sculptures on display at Oregon State University by Hypersonic and Plebian Design developed in Processing, Rhino-Grasshopper, and Python.

Food carving – Gaku is still at the mukimono. I guess we all would be if we could carve insanely intricate patterns on various fruit and vegetables like he can.

Zipperless – A zipperless sleeping bag? They do exist.

Party On Apocalypse – New video from pop punk icons New Found Glory.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FG5au6-jTCQ?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The post Friday Smackdown: Wing Suit Spine Graft appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at April 14, 2017 08:04 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

How to Hide/Show Dimensions in a SOLIDWORKS Drawing

In some cases instead of deleting a dimension, you might decide to hide SOLIDWORKS Drawing Dimensions. Now the question is how to make a hidden dimension visible again? This article demonstrates how to hide and then show dimensions in the drawing environment.

Step 1: Right-click on a dimension in a drawing view and select Hide from the shortcut menu:

Hide SOLIDWORKS Drawing Dimensions

Right-click on a dimension and select Hide.

The image below shows that two dimensions are hidden: “3” and “150”.

SOLIDWORKS Drawing Dimensions are hidden

Dimensions “3” and “150” are hidden.

Step 2: Activate Hide/Show Annotations. This is done through View > Hide/Show > Annotations (see below)

Activate the Hide/Show Annotation

Step 3: When the Hide/Show Annotations is active, the hidden dimensions appear in a gray colour. At this stage, the mouse cursor shape will change to an eye with a cross line on it. Now, clicking on any gray hidden dimension will display them in the drawing.  Also, clicking on a visible dimension will change it’s colour to gray meaning that when the Hide/Show Annotation selection is complete, the gray dimensions will be hidden from view.

By activating Hide/Show Annotation, the hidden dimensions would show in gray color.

Step 4: Deactivate the Hide/Show Annotations – If only dimension “3” is selected, it will show up after deactivating the Hide/Show Annotations and others would still be hidden. In the following image, dimension “3” is selected to show up, while dimension “150” is still hidden.

show dimensions

Dimension “3” has reappeared and dimension “150” is still hidden.

Hide or show Multiple Dimensions at Once

When Hide/Show Annotations is activated, all hidden and shown dimensions would be shown either in gray or black color. Selecting shown dimension would change their color to gray and vice versa. Therefore, if Hide/Show Annotations is activated as shown on Step 2, any numbers of dimensions could be set hidden or show hidden dimensions. The following image demonstrates how more dimensions are set to hidden.

Multiple dimensions could be set hide or show while Hide/Show Annotations is active.

Author: Mehdi Rezaei, CSWE, Javelin Technologies

Author information

Javelin Technologies
Javelin Technologies is a provider of technology solutions since 1997. We are experts in 3D design and have helped thousands of companies with solutions for mechanical design, electrical design and 3D printing. Large or small, we have the skills, experience, and services to propel your organization to new heights so you can aim high.

The post How to Hide/Show Dimensions in a SOLIDWORKS Drawing appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Javelin Technologies at April 14, 2017 03:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Where are the hidden settings for the display of SOLIDWORKS Cosmetic Threads?

If you had interest in my previous article: The “Easy Bake” recipe for Displaying Cosmetic Threads, you may be wondering where to find the four settings that were mentioned. This article will help you to locate each of the four SOLIDWORKS Cosmetic Thread Display settings.

The four settings that affect the visibility of cosmetic threads within the SOLIDWORKS part, drawing and assembly environments are:

  • “View All Annotations” Setting
  • “Cosmetic Threads” Setting
  • “Display Annotations” Setting
  • “Use Assembly Settings for all components” Option

As I mentioned in my previous article, it is a combination of these settings that can often prevent the display of cosmetic threads entirely.

Some of these options can be mildly difficult to find, thus I will do my best to illustrate them below:

“View All Annotations” Setting”

The “View All Annotations” setting is located within the View menu:

View menu > All Annotations

SOLIDWORKS Cosmetic Thread Display in the View Menu

SOLIDWORKS View Menu

The remaining three options are all found via the right-click shortcut menu of the Annotations Folder on the Feature Manager Design Tree.

“Cosmetic Threads” Setting

The “Cosmetic Threads” may be found via Right click on Annotations folder > Details > “Cosmetic threads” checkbox

Annotation Properties

Annotation Properties

“Display Annotations” Setting

 

Right click on Annotations folder > check the “Display Annotations” option

Display Annotations Option

Display Annotations Option

“Use Assembly Settings for all components” Option

Right click on Annotations folder > Choose Details > “Use assembly settings for all components” checkbox

Annotation Properties

Annotation Properties

Now that you are armed with the “Where” and the “How” of the SOLIDWORKS Cosmetic Thread display settings, you can feel confident in moving forward to troubleshoot any display issues you encounter involving cosmetic threads!

The post Where are the hidden settings for the display of SOLIDWORKS Cosmetic Threads? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at April 14, 2017 12:01 PM

The “Easy Bake” recipe for Displaying Cosmetic Threads

Are SOLIDWORKS Cosmetic Threads a ‘Nice to have’, or a ‘Nuisance’? Depending on your organizations standards, SOLIDWORKS Cosmetic Threads can be a life-saver or a nuisance.

The nuisance factor may be enhanced multi-fold, when you are unable to display cosmetic threads as intended in your drawings or assemblies.

SOLIDWORKS Cosmetic Threads displayed

SOLIDWORKS Cosmetic Thread displayed

Given the difficulty that can ensue with the display of this annotation feature, many give up and elect to avoid using SOLIDWORKS cosmetic threads altogether. Our hope with this article is to guide you through the pinch points and have you confidently apply cosmetic threads as desired.

Display settings for SOLIDWORKS Cosmetic Threads

There are five main settings that will effect the display of SOLIDWORKS cosmetic threads within your parts, drawings or assemblies.

The very first point to make regarding the visibility of cosmetic threads is:

IF the cosmetic thread annotation in the component’s feature tree is set to HIDDEN, the cosmetic thread WILL NOT display – regardless of any other setting you attempt to apply.

To repair this, one simply has to find the Cosmetic thread feature within the feature tree and show or hide the feature, depending upon your preference.

SOLIDWORKS Cosmetic Thread Feature

SOLIDWORKS Cosmetic Thread Feature

No Magic Here, Simply Settings to Choose

Contrary to some popular beliefs, the remaining display options for cosmetic threads do not require you to hold your tongue a certain way, cross your fingers or perform a complicated dance routine in front of your colleagues…

The remaining four settings that will affect the visibility of cosmetic threads within the part, drawing, and assembly environments within SOLIDWORKS are:

  • “View All Annotations” Setting
  • “Cosmetic Threads” Setting
  • “Display Annotations” Setting
  • “Use Assembly Settings for all components” Option

Combinations of these four options will yield one of two different results, either the Cosmetic Thread notation will be visible in the graphics area, or it will not.

The combinations are weighted against the display of cosmetic threads, as two-thirds of the combinations will result in the cosmetic threads not being displayed at all.(No wonder you were unable to get them to show up…)

The table below illustrates the possible cosmetic thread display combinations, and the visible or not visible result of those selections.

“View All Annotations” Setting “Cosmetic Threads” Setting “Display Annotations” Setting “Use Assembly Settings for all components” Option Display of Cosmetic Threads
View Menu > All Annotations Right click on Annotations folder > Details > “Cosmetic threads” checkbox Right click on Annotations folder > “Display Annotations”option Right click on Annotations folder > Details > “Use assembly settings for all components” checkbox Cosmetic Threads are Not Visible or Visible
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
Not Visible
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
Not Visible
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
Not Visible
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
Not Visible
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
Not Visible
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
Not Visible
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
Not Visible
ON
ON
OFF
ON
Not Visible
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
Not Visible
OFF
ON
ON
ON
Not Visible
ON
OFF
ON
ON
Not Visible
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
Visible
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
Visible
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
Visible
ON
ON
ON
OFF
Visible
ON
ON
ON
ON
Visible

 

If you are wondering where to find the display options noted above we have some help available for that too…

Take a look at the following article: Where are the hidden settings for the Display of Cosmetic Threads?

The post The “Easy Bake” recipe for Displaying Cosmetic Threads appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at April 14, 2017 12:00 PM

April 13, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How Accurate is SOLIDWORKS Plastics? [VIDEO]

I am often asked questions regarding the accuracy of SOLIDWORKS Plastics and if it lines up with real injection molding.  The simple answer is YES, it lines up very well.  Plastics is great at predicting and avoiding manufacturing defects in your injection molded parts. Don’t just take my word for it. I encourage you to watch the video below for a better understanding of what SOLIDWORKS Plastics can do and how it measures up against traditional design validation methods.

SOLIDWORKS Plastics for Designers – Real World Correlation

In this 15 minute video, Brian Zias (Senior Technical Manager, DS SOLIDWORKS) introduces the insights you can gain as a designer of plastic parts using SOLIDWORKS Plastics.

Watch this video to learn:

  • What this Injection Molding Simulation Software can do
  • How you can use it as part of your design process
  • How it compares with physical results

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LJfoqfz82CU?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

In this video; with the use of an injection molded part, we can see how this software predicts:

  • Flow front visualization
  • Fill time
  • Sink Marks
  • Weld Lines
  • Warpage
With SOLIDWORKS Plastics you can evaluate the manufacturability of your parts and molds at the same time you design for form, fit, and function.
SOLIDWORKS Plastics

SOLIDWORKS Plastics

Intuitive Workflow and Design Advice

SOLIDWORKS Plastics works directly on your 3D model, so there are no translation issues. You can make changes to your model and see the impact right away. The state-of the-art meshing system is powerful and fast, and covers a range of geometries, from thin-walled parts to very thick and solid parts.

If you are interested in seeing how this software can help you design plastic parts with more accuracy and confidence, please contact us today.

Try SOLIDWORKS Plastics

 

The post How Accurate is SOLIDWORKS Plastics? [VIDEO] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Peter Kjellbotn at April 13, 2017 10:11 PM

SolidSmack

The ‘Eye’ iPhone Case Adds Android OS + 5″ Display

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How many times have you looked at your iPhone and wished it was an Android? The opposite? No? Well, what if you had an iPhone and Android together? What lunacy is this, you ask? And what if it included twice the battery life, removable storage, a second 5″ display AND a headphone jack? Well now, hello. ESTI has the first of its kind. The ‘Eye’ Smart Android Case for iPhone.

Eye Android iPhone Case

Strapping Android to an iPhone?! Isn’t that brand loyalty blasphemy? Yes, there will be plenty an Apple/Android fanboy likening this case to a parasitic virus, but if you care more about practical functionality and less about logos, you’ll love the features this case mixes in.

eye-android-os-iphone-case-02

Case features include:

  • Up to 256GB of extra physical storage
  • IR & RF blaster and receiver
  • 3.5 mm headphone jack
  • 5″ FHD AMOLED screen
  • 3GB LPDDR3 Memory
  • Touch and physical button in one
  • 2800 mAh extra juice for your phone
  • Lightning port for iPhones
  • USB C for android devices
  • NFC, open for all uses

Android features include:

  • Native call recording.
  • Real file explorer.
  • Recognition of unknown numbers (with apps like Truecaller).
  • Moving files freely between your computer and handset (just drag and drop).
  • Full customization of OS colors, icons, home and lock screen and much more.
  • Enjoy real multitasking—back up all kind of files to the cloud on the background with 3rd party apps (e.g., Google Photos). Send large files to friends trough IM apps without the need to stay in the application for the transfer.
  • Android exclusive apps including:
    • Casper (save snaps on Snapchat, among other Snapchat hacks).
    • OGInsta+ (Instagram hacks/tweaks, download/save a photo/video to photo library).
    • Popcorn Time, Kodi, Showbox, SopCast and TV Portal.
    • Tasker.
    • Screen recording.
    • TubeMate, FireTube and Floating Tube.
    • Amazon Underground.
    • NFC Tools.
    • You can even install and play the original Flappy Bird!
  • Root the Eye for even more possibilities.

eye-android-os-iphone-case-01

The more I think about this, the more I’m surprised it hasn’t been done sooner. It’s so odd, and so practical all at once.

With a screen gap on the Android side, scratching the screen is eliminated when laying flat and you have just enough space for a screen protector. If you’re into taking selfie’s, the screen mirrors the iPhone screen in camera mode so you can see exactly what’s in the frame. The always-on display also allows for time/photo display and, of course, notifications.

How much thickness does it add to the iPhone? I have a mophie case which contains a battery to extend the battery life of the phone. That’s all it does. It’s thick but isn’t uncomfortable. So that’s why I find the image below quite interesting – the mophie Juice Pack at 0.57″ thick and the ESTI Eye at 0.52″ thick. A small difference, but huge given there’s a second phone strapped to the back of your iPhone.

mophie-juice-pack-vs-esti-eye-thickness-iphone-case

Why would you need a second phone on the back of your iPhone? The extra juice, storage and headphone jack may be reason enough for some, but those who want their Android apps or already carry two mobile devices, this is a bit of a no-brainer.

The Kickstarter campaign crossed the $95,000 goal early on. With less that two days to go, you can still get one at the campaign price for $119 or a 4G version for $149 with other options for 4X and 10X bulk packs. (They’re pushing for a $1,000,000 goal to add waterproofing for the case.) If you don’t make it though, don’t worry, these are sure to be available for pre-sale on there website and later on when it will retail for $189 and $229 (4G).

The case will be available for iPhone 6, 6s, 6 Plus, 6s Plus 7, 7s, 7 Plus, 7s Plus and the next iPhone model (one month after its launch). It’s still in the prototyping stage, but set for delivery worldwide in September 2017.

VERY interested to know what you think about this and, to any future users who have one, let us know how it has worked out for you!

The post The ‘Eye’ iPhone Case Adds Android OS + 5″ Display appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at April 13, 2017 05:44 PM

Easy 3D Printable Landscapes: TouchTerrain

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Looking for an easy way to find/create 3D printable terrain models? Go no further than TouchTerrain. TouchTerrain is a project of the University of Iowa that allows you to select a rectangular surface area of anywhere on the Earth and then download a 3D model of the surface terrain.

3D Print a Terrain Models

The interface is quite straightforward, although you must expand the map and drag the prominent rectangle over the area you wish to download. Here is the control screen for a download of the San Francisco area:

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86145" style="width: 1100px;">The control screen of TouchTerrain about to generate a 3D model of the Bay Area<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The control screen of TouchTerrain about to generate a 3D model of the Bay Area</figcaption></figure>

And this is the corresponding 3D model. Note that it doesn’t look like much and that’s because the world is actually quite flat, in spite of your very localized personal view of the terrain.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86146" style="width: 1100px;">The not so dramatic 3D model of the Bay Area<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The not so dramatic 3D model of the Bay Area</figcaption></figure>

The service is best used to portray areas with dramatic elevation changes, such as the view of Death Valley at top.

It’s also possible to download the surface imagery for the same rectangular section and then apply the texture to the surface of the 3D model. Then if you have access to a full-color 3D printer, you may be able to 3D print a color textured terrain model of anywhere you wish.

There is one caveat: the system uses higher resolution data for US locations and less for other places. This is likely not much of an issue unless you zoom in too closely.

This is a research project and doesn’t seem to have any cost to operate, so feel free to use at your discretion.

Read more at Fabbaloo!

The post Easy 3D Printable Landscapes: TouchTerrain appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at April 13, 2017 03:34 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Bring simplicity to your SOLIDWORKS Sketch through advanced use of basic features

When we start out with a model we usually have every intention of keeping the SOLIDWORKS Sketch clean, simple and easily understood. With continually compressed timelines, even the most basic sketches can turn into a mess…very, very quickly.

Consider the case of a simple sketch involving a rectangular profile used to cut a groove into a shaft, as shown in the figure below.

SOLIDWORKS Sketch for a Groove Cut

Groove Cut

Reduce SOLIDWORKS Sketch Entities

One method that can assist us in steering clear of messy sketches, is to keep the number of sketch entities as small as possible — by using advanced functionality within our most basic features. While advanced methods can not address a lack of time in the day,  it may at the very least shorten diagnosis if you run into any issues involving the sketched feature and bring some elegance to your feature tree.

Typically, the need for this type of shape can lead one to think about a revolved-cut feature, and indeed that would be one method to go about creating the cut.

Alternative Sketch

Alternative Sketch

If it aligns with our design intent, we can simplify the number of sketch entities required by choosing another feature entirely; a cut extrude feature with a very simple sketch.

Offset Cut

Offset Cut

Using advanced feature options

Through the use of the “From option” set to “Offset” along with the “Flip side to cut option” within the cut-extrude feature, we can accomplish all that is required to define an identical shape to the original groove using the simplified sketch geometry.

Slot created

Slot created

Building upon this very basic technique within one feature, take a look at how much of the advanced functionality you employing when generating your own components and designs. We are confident that you can find some sketch related efficiency in some of your most basic features.

The post Bring simplicity to your SOLIDWORKS Sketch through advanced use of basic features appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at April 13, 2017 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

How to Choose the Best Additive Manufacturing Technology for Your Application

Many analysts predict that 2017 will be the year where the hype around 3D printing fades away and becomes a realistic and commercially viable way of manufacturing more than just prototypes.

The biggest challenge for this is understanding how the many different additive processes work and how to design specifically for it. Simply 3D printing an existing design that has been optimized for a traditional manufacturing method will almost certainly be more expensive. But how do you go about choosing from the many different technologies available?

To help you answer that question and learn more about the current options, we have launched a new mini site focused on additive manufacturing. Check out http://www.solidworks.com/am today. This area will evolve with more webinars, videos, design guides, customer stories and blogs to keep you fully up to date with this very fast-moving technology. There will also be tips and tricks you can use in SOLIDWORKS to allow you to change your manufacturing process without changing CAD systems.

You can expect some very exciting things to help progress designs in this area as well. At SOLIDWORKS World 2017 we announced a partnership with nTopology for lightweight microstructures and generative design capabilities from our sister brand Simulia’s Tosca, which will be integrated into SOLIDWORKS.

SOLIDWORKS will be presenting at the Science in the Age of Experience event taking place May 15-18 in Chicago. There will be a Design Hackathon specifically for Additive Manufacturing where attendees can use SOLIDWORKS to design a product specifically for 3D printing.

Author information

Mark Rushton
Mark Rushton
Mark is a Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS.

The post How to Choose the Best Additive Manufacturing Technology for Your Application appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mark Rushton at April 13, 2017 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Discover the True Value of SOLIDWORKS Simulation [Webinar]

Let’s start by thinking about how much it costs if you don’t use design validation tools as part of your design process. There are many factors to consider; the time it takes to fix the design in CAD, the money that is spent during re-work, and the worst case scenario – product design failure in the market. SOLIDWORKS Simulation software can help your business avoid these common design challenges by improving efficiency and ensuring that your design will be correct the first time.

Join us on Wednesday April 26th to learn why 53% of best-in-class companies are using virtual design tools that reduce their development time by 16% and reduce their product cost by an average of 13%. You will also discover how these companies are integrating design validation tools early in the design process to maximize efficiency with their resources.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ouz969H_Hss?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Simulation Accuracy Benefits Product Development

With integrated SOLIDWORKS Simulation solutions, you can run accurate FEA simulations right inside SOLIDWORKS CAD software, giving you fast access to structural analysis results early in the development process, such as stress level, deformed shape, product lifespan, etc. With this vital information, you can make critical design decisions that help you:

  • Create product innovations
  • Accelerate time-to-market
  • Optimize material usage
  • Eliminate design uncertainty
  • Minimize field performance issue
  • Decrease warranty claims and returns
  • Boost profitability.
Best-in-Class Companies use SOLIDWORKS Simulation

Best-in-Class Companies use SOLIDWORKS Simulation

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Simulation Webinar

Learn The True Value of SOLIDWORKS Simulation on Wednesday April 26th from 2:00 PM – 2:30 PM (EDT) and see real world examples of how various businesses are using SOLIDWORKS Simulation as a critical part of their design process.
<iframe frameborder="0" height="900" scrolling="no" src="http://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2017-04-10/81mvkx" style="border: 0;" width="100%"></iframe>

 

The post Discover the True Value of SOLIDWORKS Simulation [Webinar] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Erin Elliott at April 13, 2017 12:00 PM

April 12, 2017

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: Moon City [It’s a City… INSIDE A MOON!]

3d-printed-moon-city-thingiverse-00

There are cities inside the massive head of a rotted out celestial being (name it!) but cities inside the partial shell of a small planet? …I dunno, I can’t think of one of those. Maybe that’s why our model of the week is so cool.

Jukka Seppänen recalls a concept drawing of a city inside a moon that has been destroyed. When he saw the drawing, he immediately wanted to create it in 3D. WHO WOULDN’T!? Jukka uses Blender, Sculptris, SolidWorks, and 3D-Coat for modeling and has a knack for modeling intricate structures. The Moon City model he created is just incredible, with loads of buildings and loads of details, along with a few massive craters on the outside (because meteorites don’t hit the inside of a hollowed out moon floating in space).

He printed this on his FlashForge Creator Pro 3D Printer. At the default size, running at 60mm/s with a 0.2mm layer height, he says the print took around 12 hours. Yes, you can have your own moon city 12 hours from now. Scale it up life-size and it’ll only take a few hours/decades more to create!

You can download the model and see the step-by-step on Thingiverse.

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

3d-printed-moon-city-thingiverse-01

3d-printed-moon-city-thingiverse-02

3d-printed-moon-city-thingiverse-03

3d-printed-moon-city-thingiverse-04

3d-printed-moon-city-thingiverse-05

3d-printed-moon-city-thingiverse-06

3d-printed-moon-city-thingiverse-07

3d-printed-moon-city-thingiverse-08

3d-printed-moon-city-thingiverse-09

The post Model of the Week: Moon City [It’s a City… INSIDE A MOON!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at April 12, 2017 09:59 PM

Kasita Brings the Smart World to Tiny, Prefab Stackable Houses

kasita-tiny-house-prefab-stackable-home-00

Professor Dumpster, Jeff Wilson (professor of environmental sciences at Huston-Tillotson University), is in the production phase for his Kasita prefabricated, connected tiny house, which will most likely be available in December of this year.

This isn’t your typical tiny house but rather a modern take on a popular movement centered on sustainable living. In this case, ‘sustainability’ means including smart capability and packing it into an efficient 352 square-foot design, which is ready to go with everything you need to start living, inside a 325 square-foot home.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86091" style="width: 1100px;">Kasita comes equipped with a Nest thermostat, Sage Glass, Hue lighting, and Amazon Echo. <figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Kasita comes equipped with a Nest thermostat, Sage Glass, Hue lighting, and Amazon Echo.</figcaption></figure>

The house is equipped with the latest technology including a Nest thermostat, Sage Glass, Hue lighting and an Amazon Echo–all set to your personal preferences. Of course, there are standard amenities as well, including a queen-size bed, washer/dryer, fridge, and induction oven and over-range microwave. You’ll hardly want to leave your little home.

Oh, and if you do think of leaving, just remember, there’s also a water-conserving shower, sink, and toilet system–adding to the sustainable, lock-me-in-and-throw-away-the-key aspect of the home. The tiny house can be set up within a day and was designed to be portable, letting you easily move your tiny home when need. What’s more, they can be connected or stacked (up to ten stories high) with other Kasitas utilizing an external slot design anchored to the unit’s steel framing with one caveat–to stack them on top of each other, there needs to be a special docking platform (foundation) to lock the bottom units in place and keep them from moving or drifting.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86092" style="width: 870px;">Kasita homes can be connected to each other utilizing a slot system connected to the home’s steel framing.<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Kasita homes can be connected to each other utilizing a slot system connected to the home’s steel framing.</figcaption></figure>

The Kasita home is a beautiful take on a tiny home with a modern design and amenities. To date, Austin is the only city to utilize the docking platforms, so living in a Kasita complex is limited, however, the company is working on deals with other cities to build more docking platforms.

These are on the premium side too, with each unit will set you back $139K ($394 per square foot!). If interested, you can reserve a unit for $1,000. And while the cost sounds high, it does come partially furnished with all the amenities listed earlier. Still, and for many of you, it may serve as an inspiration to build your own, outfit it with whatever you want or maybe add an extra 100 square feet for a billiard room and fireman pole–you know, the essentials.

kasita-tiny-house-prefab-stackable-home-00 kasita-tiny-house-prefab-stackable-home-03 kasita-tiny-house-prefab-stackable-home-04 kasita-tiny-house-prefab-stackable-home-05

The post Kasita Brings the Smart World to Tiny, Prefab Stackable Houses appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at April 12, 2017 09:05 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

3 Ways to Make the Most of the Command Search in SOLIDWORKS

The Command Search function in SOLIDWORKS has to be my favorite feature. I find myself using it nearly every single day. What I love most about it is that any, and every, command is at my finger tips. Whether it’s a command I use once a quarter or once a decade, I can find it using this feature. But it doesn’t stop there, not only can you launch any command through this feature but you can also customize your interface and learn where a command is located through this tool. Here’s how:

3 Ways to make the most of the Command Search

 

  • Customize on the Fly: Drag a command from the search results to the command manager.

Search and Customize

  • Find a Command: Click on the “eye glasses” to have SOLIDWORKS automatically navigate through the menus. A big red arrow will show you where the command is located.

  • Launch a Command: Type in the search box and launch a command by clicking on it or scroll through with the arrow keys and press enter.command search tool

Author information

Stephen Petrock
Since 1998, TriMech has helped our clients design better products by partnering with them and offering, not only CAD, CAE, PDM, FEA, CAM software products, but also by engineering solutions involving full-time and temporary staffing, contract design, analysis and drafting services, rapid prototyping, custom programming and implementation services. TriMech is a value-added reseller of SOLIDWORKS and Stratasys 3D Printers in the Mid-Atlantic and South-East including New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana.

The post 3 Ways to Make the Most of the Command Search in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Stephen Petrock at April 12, 2017 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Releasing My Inner Child – SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids

I’m a child of the Space Age. I was fortunate to grow during a time that marked the birth of what was perhaps the greatest era of exploration, scientific and technological achievements. My childhood coincided with the Apollo missions, with its crowning achievement of seeing men walk on the moon and their safe return to earth.

It was a much different era for a child to grew up in than today. Like many of my generation, I somehow managed to survive my childhood with all limbs still attached. Despite my best effort discovering electricity, being able to own fireworks and having access to a multitude of sharp implements.

Throughout it all I discovered a passion for building things and most likely for their destruction as well, which has lead me into a lifetime of working in design and manufacturing.

Technology has evolved over my lifetime. How we design and manufacture has changed dramatically. Technology influences every aspect of my life. As does its effect on how kids of today will interact and learn. We all know that devices that kids hold in their hands today have infinite more computing power than was accessible to NASA when it was planning to send men to the moon.

SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids fits into today’s era and allows kids to explore the depths of their imagination and create designs and products in the digital age. What is wonderful about kids’ creative minds are they are not yet cluttered by rules and regulations, laws of physics, concepts of colour or any other restrictions that creep into our mindset, as we are forced into adulthood.

SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids is a browser-based program. When complete it will be a full range of apps that will allow the design, creation, display, gaming and manufacture of your mind’s creations! Currently still in Beta, the current apps concentrate on the design and creation of your ideas.

With that in mind I’ve tried to reach back in time, release my inner child and go explore in SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids.

At the heart of SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids is its 3D modeller – Shape It.

Shape It is digital modelling clay! You start with a predefined shape: a box, a cone, a cylinder, a torus, a globe or a ball. These shapes form the bases of your design and start out segmented. The rest is all up to you. By selecting a segment, or group of segments, you can add or subtract material. The segments can be pushed or pulled, stretch and rotated, skewed or deformed. Segments can be further segmented, new shapes added. The only limits are imagination and ability.

I took the child-like approach, diving straight in! Discovery is the best form of learning, right? Those who like to take a more common sense approach might head to the Help section. No boring instructions that require reading!  Instead short concise instructional videos are provided. Nice!

Zooming and rotating around the model will be familiar to anyone with CAD experience. Too many years in SOLIDWORKS, a reflex muscle reaction and I discovered both Apps for Kids and SOLIDWORKS share the spacebar short cut and a common View Selector. With that commonality you might yet be able to pass on some tips to your children!

My childhood was so influenced by the space adventure of the time that most of my school books were covered in doodles of rocket ships. These sketchings were also inspired by the cartoon creations of the day, which meant that all rockets of the time required tail landing fins and a needle nose spire.

With those thoughts planted in my mind I jumped into Shape It to try and recreate my childhood memories.

Pushing and pulling the starting cylinder to create the nosecone was a simple process. As was lengthening the cylinder for the rocket body. Adding material to the nose, then required a little inward pushing from all directions, before a final pull to form the spire.

The tail landing fins proved to be another matter. Not because of Shape It ability. More so my child mind abandoned me and the adult in me came out! I wasn’t overly satisfied with the shape I was creating for the fins. Adults are judgmental and I’m a harsh critic of my own work.

I settled on the design, but in hindsight and a little more experience with Shape It, I would take another approach to how they were created.

Shape It handles multi-bodies. Adding a torus as a new body, I sized to suit and manipulated it into position for the window.  Duplicating the created body provided the additional windows. With that my first model created in Shape It was complete!

Whilst the design may have been complete, it was not ready for presentation. This is where Style It comes in. Style It is the artistic program of SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids. I settled on a classical red, white and blue colour scheme before adding an astronomical themed background. There is a wide range of colours that can be applied along with multitude of stickers to assist with artistic impression. Backgrounds choice, at this stage, is a little limited. I’m sure the range of backgrounds will increase as the product is further developed.

With my Rocket painted and ready for display it was right to share with the SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids online community – Rocket by Michael aged 57

If Shape It is digital modelling clay, then Mech It reminds me of my favourite childhood toy, Meccano®. Or as its one-time competitor product was known in the U.S., Erector Set. I personally consider the Frank Hornsby designed Meccano sets to be the greatest engineering toy ever produced. The sets I had as a child were all purchased secondhand, but I treasured them more than any other toy I was ever given.

Mech It is used to create two-dimensional layout that can have mechanical actions. Mech It can create radius end bars and wheels. Along with slotted straight and circular tracks. Multi -shaped polygons can be created and used as joining plates. Pins can be inserted to create rotation points and parts can have fixed locations. Pistons can be added to create control and motors added to provide drive.

These assemblies can have their driving actions shown in animation.

 

Creating components was a simple matter of point selection and dragging to a required length. As components are created, selection points are added automatically. Components could be resized or moved by grabbing the predefined points. Joining parts together is either a matter of starting a new part on a selected point, or a matter of hovering another component over the selection point of a different part until that attach. Flyout menus allow motors and pins to be added

The ability to build in Mech It is only limited to the creative imaginations and the laws of mechanical actions.

I found it easy to while away the hours creating in either Shape It or Mech It. Whether it be on my computer or sitting at the kitchen table using a touch device. At times I struggled a little without having the availability of precise control and as  well as the inability to tweak things without the use of dimensions. But that is saying more about me with too many years of routine and structure than it does about SOLIDWORKS App for Kids.

I have fond memories of my own childhood activities and creations. Even fonder memories of the hours spent drawing and colouring with my own children. In years to come, I would like to think, that these next generations will look back with similar feelings for the enjoyment and learning that they have gained from using SOLIDWORKS App for Kids.

Author information

Michael Lord
Michael Lord – I work as a Design/ Engineer – Manager at Trakka Pty Limited, an Australian manufacturer of Motorhomes and Special Purpose Vehicle. Sydney SOLIDWORKS User Group Leader. I cover how I use SOLIDWORKS products at http://michaellord.me/ Lover of the great outdoors, hiker, retired caver & climber.

The post Releasing My Inner Child – SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Michael Lord at April 12, 2017 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Are you at Risk for SOLIDWORKS Disc’s Disease During Upgrade Season?

Are you, or your Team at High Risk During SOLIDWORKS Upgrade Season? Now that I have your attention, let us stop here and define what affliction we are speaking of: To answer your very first question, no this article is not about a degenerative spinal disorder or anything of the sort.

The primary symptom of SOLIDWORKS Disc’s Disease is the act of uncontrollably placing newly received SOLIDWORKS installation media into a drive and running the Installation Manager without a SOLIDWORKS upgrade plan in place.

Disc’s Disease most often occurs when a user receives installation media for a new SOLIDWORKS release, and is unable to resist that urge to stick the DVD in the drive and begin an unplanned upgrade of their SOLIDWORKS workstation!

SOLIDWORKS Upgrade Plan

This is when Disc’s Disease becomes the most infectious, and contagious as other users who are unaware of the unplanned upgrade are unable to access files, or an entire shared toolbox library as they have been upgraded by a single user – bringing an entire design team to a halt.  If you are lucky your design team may have performed a self inoculation by having a well managed PDM system, for which your users can roll-back and perhaps only loose the last 8 hours of work or so.

We see an upswing of cases every year, coinciding with the first service pack release of each major release of SOLIDWORKS.

How do we Combat the Epidemic ?

The most common and effective treatment for this SOLIDWORKS Upgrade disease is education and communication!

  • Have a Plan in place for SOLIDWORKS upgrades! The plan does not need to be elaborate, but a well thought through plan that takes into account file backup, User downtime and installation best practices will often protect an organization from this affliction, far more effective than anything from your local pharmacy.
  • Communicate the plan to your SOLIDWORKS users! Without communicating your plan to all of your users, you leave the door open for the primary symptoms to occur (it’s kinda like washing your hands…frequently).
  • Appoint a leader! Just like first aid and CPR training, it helps to have someone on your team well versed in the special needs and best practices that SOLIDWORKS requires in order to conduct a robust, proper upgrade.

A SOLIDWORKS Upgrade does not have to be administered by seasoned IT veterans to succeed!   Here at Javelin, we have assisted many SOLIDWORKS users to become installation leaders for their teams; all it takes is a few minutes of conversation to get you started with the best practices that will allow you to succeed.

Get a SOLIDWORKS Upgrade Plan

Check out our new SOLIDWORKS CAD Upgrade Checklist and our SOLIDWORKS PDM Upgrade Checklist

The post Are you at Risk for SOLIDWORKS Disc’s Disease During Upgrade Season? appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at April 12, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Ford’s New Baby Crib Uses Lights, Sounds, and Movements to Emulate Riding in a Car

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Who doesn’t love falling asleep to the muffled growl of a V8 engine?

If you’re the type of car-loving family that has motor oil running through your blood, you may be the ideal candidate for a new crib for your youngest, thanks to Ford Spain (assuming it’s not an April Fools’ joke a few days too late).

Called the Max Motor Dreams, the ‘smart’ crib aims to mimic riding in the backseat of a car – complete with LED lights that mimic passing streetlights, speakers that reproduce engine sounds, and rocking movements that emulate car turns.

MotorDreams11

MotorDreams12

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From an industrial design standpoint, it’s not a bad-looking crib. And for those that want to fine tune the sleeping experience, an accompanying app can even track familiar routes and recreate them using the onboard lights, sounds, and movements:

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Currently, it appears that the crib is in a conceptual stage right now (surprise), but Ford Spain has supposedly produced one unit—which they are giving away to one lucky winner after they take a test drive in the Ford Max.

The post Ford’s New Baby Crib Uses Lights, Sounds, and Movements to Emulate Riding in a Car appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at April 12, 2017 11:52 AM

Boeing to Begin Using FAA-Certified 3D Printed Parts for New 787 Dreamliner

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While 3D printing may still be in the midst of having an identity crisis in the world of mass production (although the recent Adidas and Carbon partnership looks promising), there is no shortage of applications for custom parts in the aviation industry.

Although airline manufacturers have been using a variety of additive manufacturing methods for a range of purposes for decades, Boeing is set to begin using FAA-certified additively manufactured titanium parts in their finished aircraft, according to a Reuters report. The savings in production costs are estimated to save the Seattle-based company at least $3 million per manufactured jet – starting with its 787 Dreamliner jet airliner.

RPD-In-Process-787-Component_LR-800x599

Titanium alloy, which is both strong and lightweight, can cost seven times more than aluminum and the material cost of titanium alloy alone accounts for roughly $17 million of the $265 million it costs to produce the Dreamliner. The company depends on titanium alloy on the Dreamliner in particular because of its carbon-fiber fuselage and wings.

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The company plans to begin producing the 3D printed parts—which will supply 144 Dreamliners set to be produced next year—on nine Norsk Titanium industrial 3D printers by the end of 2017.

The post Boeing to Begin Using FAA-Certified 3D Printed Parts for New 787 Dreamliner appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at April 12, 2017 11:34 AM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – April 2017

Hello to all,

Welcome to this new edition of the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News, coauthored by members of the SOLIDWORKS Technical Support teams worldwide.

Introducing NEW SOLIDWORKS Self-Paced eCourses on MySolidWorks.com

By Joe Rousseau

We all know that learning in a classroom is one of the best ways to learn SOLIDWORKS, but sometimes it’s not possible to attend a live class. You need the convenience to learn what you want, where you want. SOLIDWORKS is pleased to announce a library of self-paced, high quality, interactive eCourses that offer learning on your schedule.

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The initial launch of this program includes eight eCourses:

  • Creating Animations Using SOLIDWORKS
  • Flow Simulation
  • Mold Design Using SOLIDWORKS
  • Routing: Piping & Tubing
  • Sheet Metal
  • SOLIDWORKS API Fundamentals
  • Surface Modeling
  • Weldments

You might be wondering what separates a SOLIDWORKS eCourse from other eLearning options. SOLIDWORKS eCourses include:

  • Everything from the SOLIDWORKS instructor-led training manual in a self-paced eLearning format
  • Background information and key concepts
  • Subject-matter expert videos and demonstrations
  • Interactive simulations that allow you to make the picks and clicks yourself
  • Offline exercises that allow independent study and further practice

SOLIDWORKS eCourses are hosted on My.SolidWorks.com and are available for purchase from your SOLIDWORKS reseller as a three month subscription.

For more information about the SOLIDWORKS eCourses and other training options, visit http://my.solidworks.com/training. To sign up for a SOLIDWORKS eCourse, please contact your reseller.

Proceedings of SOLIDWORKS World 2017 are available online

The SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Session Materials are available for viewing.

 

Spotlight of features: Noise Prediction in SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation

by Lotfi Derbal

The Noise Prediction is available with SOLIDWORKS 2017 SP3. The acoustic Power Level is calculated with Proudman formulae, one of the known steady-state approach in CFD. The Proudman’s formula gives an approximate measure of the local contribution to total acoustic power per unit volume in a given turbulence field.

This can be used to estimate broadband noise generated by turbulence.

Available results include the Acoustic Power, in W/m^3 and the Acoustic Power Level, in decibel (dB).

Simulation Step-Up Series

Last month, Reza discussed the topic of Mixed Meshing. This month, he gives us an engineering view of FEA.

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Next month, Omar will discuss the topic of basic failure analysis.

Noteworthy Solutions from the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base

icon - SW When using NVIDIA® GeForce® graphics cards with the SOLIDWORKS® software, what can cause extremely slow performance?
NVIDIA® GeForce® graphics cards have not been tested for use with the SOLIDWORKS software. For this reason, SOLIDWORKS does not officially support the use of these cards.
SOLIDWORKS Technical Support strongly recommends that you use a graphics card that the SOLIDWORKS software supports. For a list of supported graphics cards, follow the link.
It is possible that a recent Windows® or NVIDIA update installed graphics drivers that are causing this issue. If you continue to use a GeForce graphics card, you might be able to resolve the problem by installing a newer driver or by rolling back to an earlier driver version.
From Solution Id: S-072800.

Icon - EPDM In the SOLIDWORKS® PDM vault view, how do I refresh the thumbnail preview?
If SOLIDWORKS® files display the wrong thumbnails in the SOLIDWORKS PDM vault view, follow the steps in Solution Id: S-072536 to refresh the thumbnail preview so that the SOLIDWORKS PDM vault view works the same as the local Windows® Explorer view:.

Which level of the SOLIDWORKS® Plastics Add-In is active in my current session of SOLIDWORKS (Standard, Professional, or Premium)?
To determine which level of the SOLIDWORKS® Plastics Add-In is active in your current session of SOLIDWORKS, download and extract the  part file attached to Solution Id: S-072594. Then, compare the list of available analysis types to the images in attachment of the Solution.


That’s it for this month. Thanks for reading this edition of SOLIDWORKS Support News. If you need additional help with these issues or any others, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller.

Also, comments and suggestions are welcome. You can enter them below.

 

Author information

Julien Boissat
Sr. Technical Customer Support Engineer, SolidWorks, EMEA at DS SolidWorks Corp.
I have been a Tech Support engineer for Simulation products since 2002. I was previously a product manager at SRAC, the original makers of COSMOS for those who remember that time! ;-). I am currently in charge of the content of the certification exams for simulation products. I also initiated and still author the Simulation Knowledge Base and participate as much as possible in the expansion and evolution of the SolidWorks Knowledge Base. Finally, I handle the SolidWorks Support Monthly News blog.

The post SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – April 2017 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Julien Boissat at April 12, 2017 07:49 AM

SolidSmack

This Little Device Makes Any Headphone Wireless

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Not everyone was happy about Apple removing the 3.5mm jack from the latest iPhone. Understandable if you sunk good money into a pair of expensive, wired cans because, of course, we can never settle for anything less than perfect sound playback. There are workarounds for the lack of a jack by using a Bluetooth connector or simply buying wireless headphones.

Well, good news. If you like your headphones, you can keep your headphones. “THEY WILL HAVE TO PRY THEM FROM MY COLD, DEAD HANDS.” I’m with you, friend, I’m with you. Podo Labs has you covered with their Jack Bluetooth connector, which offers a simpler design and a little benny over most others currently on the market.

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Podo’s Jack is claimed to deliver the “best sound quality” porting hi-fi audio over from any Bluetooth-enabled source, including smartphones, tablets, PCs, and watches. What’s more, you can also transmit te audio to nearly any sound-capable devices by connecting Jack to the device’s aux ports. And the bonus? You can even sync and share that audio with anyone (provided they also have a Jack).

So what’s under the hood regarding technology? The device sports CSR’s 8670 audio SoC, which packs Bluetooth 4.1, 16MB of eFlash and 80MHz DSP in a 1″ x 2″ x.25″ package. It also uses the same aptX protocol found in higher-end audio devices and is powered by a 300mAh Li-Ion battery said to provide playback for as long as 12 hours.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86085" style="width: 1024px;">Podo Jack specs - 1" x 2" x AWESOME<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Podo Jack specs – 1″ x 2″ x AWESOME</figcaption></figure>

Podo Labs crowd-funded Jack sucessfully on both Kickstarter and Indiegogo. It’s now available on Indiegogo for $29 or $49 for a pair, $95 for a 4-pack and other combos with headphone and case or in bulk. By no means is the Jack the ultimate solution for those who prefer the sound of hi-fi wired headphones but the ease of use and price make it a very attractive option for porting your tunes quickly. Tried it? Know another? Tell us in the comments!

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The post This Little Device Makes Any Headphone Wireless appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at April 12, 2017 12:53 AM

April 11, 2017

SolidSmack

Teacher 3D Prints Massive StarCraft Hyperion Battlecruiser

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Gambody is a 3D model repository for all that’s awesome in gaming and pop culture. The detail on many of their models is impressive, which is one reason why 3D design teacher Sam Fenimore chose Gambody to snag the STL files for his StarCraft Hyperion Battlecruiser.

The ship is predominantly featured in StarCraft II: Wings of Liberty—a popular RTS (Real Time Strategy) game developed by Blizzard in 2010. The level of detail on the Hyperion is astounding, considering there was a time when 3D printing resolutions couldn’t match the technical features of injection molded models from companies such as Revell, Bandai or MPC.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86077" style="width: 1100px;">It took Sam Fenimore 325 hours and nearly 9lbs of PLA to 3D print the Hyperion. (Image credit Sam Fenimore)<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">It took Sam Fenimore 325 hours and nearly 9lbs of PLA to 3D print the Hyperion. (Image credit Sam Fenimore)</figcaption></figure>

To build the Hyperion, Sam downloaded all 100 STL files needed to 3D print the battlecruiser, which was done using a D-Force 400 Delta along with nearly 9 pounds of PLA material. Altogether it took Sam over 325 hours to print the pieces with zero failures in the process.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86078" style="width: 1100px;">Sam employed his D-Force 400 Delta printer to produce the 100 pieces needed to create the Hyperion. (Image credit Sam Fenimore)<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Sam employed his D-Force 400 Delta printer to produce the 100 pieces needed to create the Hyperion. (Image credit Sam Fenimore)</figcaption></figure>

Sam’s Hyperion is still a work in progress with LED lighting being added for the windows and engines, and plans to paint the ship at some point. And this is just one of his projects. “I just finished another Harley Quinn. I am printing the Mammoth Tank and the Millennium Falcon base at the moment,” says Sam. “I expect to finish the Mammoth Tank next month. Who knows when the Falcon will be finished–I am sure I will purchase all the add-ons for that also.”

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86079" style="width: 1100px;">Pieces of the Hyperion’s body are coming together to form the battlecruiser. (Image credit Sam Fenimore) <figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Pieces of the Hyperion’s body are coming together to form the battlecruiser. (Image credit Sam Fenimore)</figcaption></figure>

3d-printed-hyperion-battlecruiser-gambody-00

The post Teacher 3D Prints Massive StarCraft Hyperion Battlecruiser appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at April 11, 2017 11:12 PM

Sub-$1000 Moai SLA 3D Printer Hits Pro Level Sweet Spots

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Peopoly’s Moai 3D printer began as a personal project between a pair of friends (Shu Peng & Richard Li) who wanted a better 3d printing option that could go beyond what RepRap, Ultimaker and other kit-based printers had to offer. They wanted professional quality with an affordable price. After building several of those machines, they set out to design their own and gave birth to the SLA-based Moai, which boasts professional features, easy assembly, and affordable price.

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What are the specs on the Moai SLA 3D Printer? Let’s have a look. The machine is outfitted with a fully adjustable 150mW UV laser with a 70-micron spot size, which is galvo-controlled for precision movement. What’s more, it has a large build volume of 13 X 13 X18cm and can work with nearly any G-code and slicer platform on the planet, uploaded via SD card only.

To take advantage of their high-resolution laser, Peopoly designed their own high-polymer resin, although you can use other types as well, including wax and even dental-grade resins. The laser head can be adjusted to handle most anything and at your desired resolution, well down to 70um at any rate.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86062" style="width: 1100px;">Resolution comparison between Moai (left) and FDM (right) 3D printers. (Image credit Peopoly)<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Resolution comparison between Moai (left) and FDM (right) 3D printers. (Image credit Peopoly)</figcaption></figure>

Peopoly has successfully crowd-funded the Moai on Kickstarter, grossing over 130K over their target goal of $30K with the project in the prototype phase and delivery of the first machines set for July 2017. Furthermore, they believe their 3D printer will appeal to others than just makers, with the quality and capabilities able to serve jewelers and dentists alike.

As far as other SLA-based machines go, the Moai is one of the more affordable about to hit the market with a beginning pledge of $900 and up, which gets you the kit and a liter of Moai resin. It will be interesting to see if they can deliver an SLA printer with these capabilities, a sub-$1000 price and on time. In the meantime, GreatScott! has an excellent review on the SLA 3D Printer I recommend checking out.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_86060" style="width: 1100px;">Peopoly’s Moai is outfitted with a fully adjustable 150mW laser with a 70-micron spot size. (Image credit Peopoly)<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Peopoly’s Moai is outfitted with a fully adjustable 150mW laser with a 70-micron spot size. (Image credit Peopoly)</figcaption></figure>

The post Sub-$1000 Moai SLA 3D Printer Hits Pro Level Sweet Spots appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at April 11, 2017 11:06 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Create Custom Cutting Threads in SOLIDWORKS

SOLIDWORKS 2016 introduced the Thread feature, which allows you to easily create standard threads as actual, fully-modeled geometry. What if you have non-standard threads you want to use? The answer is to create your own thread profiles. The process is pretty straightforward and explained in the SOLIDWORKS Help.

One of the rules for custom thread profile creation clearly states that the pitch must be larger than the thread root, and this is understandable because we’re creating sweeps. If the pitch is smaller than the thread root, the sweep will intersect itself; of course, there is no such thread specification anyway, as it wouldn’t make sense.

But…What if you need to have the thread profile and pitch be the same?

This is something that, in the real world, you can achieve — but in SOLIDWORKS, such a sweep setup would result in zero-thickness geometry, which is an error condition.
Sharp vs. Standard threads in SOLIDWORKS

This quandary was presented to me by a prospective customer. I have to admit it took some experimentation to first discover a method that would give him what he was looking for, and then work through the available options to develop the easiest repeatable workflow.

Here’s the Secret…

In a nutshell, the secret is to realize that SOLIDWORKS is accurate to far more decimal places than typical manufacturing processes can discern. You can use this fact to get around the zero-thickness problem.

Say, for example, you wanted a thread profile that was 0.125″ high, but you also wanted a pitch of 8 threads per inch. You can define such a profile, but when using it with the Thread command, you’ll get an error. However, if you modify the pitch to be 0.125001, the feature works. For all intents and purposes, the pitch is 8 threads per inch, but geometrically, it’s just a tiny amount larger — enough for SOLIDWORKS make the sweep.
Sharp thread settings in SOLIDWORKS

While it would be nice to be able to put this pitch directly in the custom profile definition, my experience has shown it isn’t always reliable. However, when I make the modification in the Thread feature definition (overriding the built-in pitch), it has worked every time. Note also that, depending on the size of the sketch, adding 1 millionth of an inch may not be sufficient. But, I’ve never had to add more than 1/100,000 of an inch to get it to go.

That’s it! You now know the “secret” to create cutting threads in SOLIDWORKS 2016 and later.

Author information

GSC
GSC fuels customer success with 3D engineering solutions for design, simulation, data management, technical documentation, and 3D printing, as well as the most comprehensive consulting, technical support, and training in the industry. As a leading provider of SOLIDWORKS solutions and Stratasys 3D printing technologies, GSC’s world-class team of dedicated professionals have helped numerous companies innovate and increase productivity by leveraging advanced technologies to drive 3D business success. Founded in 1989, GSC is headquartered in Germantown, WI. For more information about GSC, please visit www.gsc-3d.com.

The post Create Custom Cutting Threads in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GSC at April 11, 2017 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Schooled in SOLIDWORKS: Mattias Robertsson Reveals Tips to Slash Manufacturing Costs

schooled-solidworks-simulation-2

Level-up your SOLIDWORKS skills as our inside experts reveal features you never knew existed. In this month’s webinar, find out how you can use SOLIDWORKS Simulation to slash manufacturing costs by testing your product without creating expensive prototypes.   

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The best way to learn is to do. The second best? Pluck advice from people who are aces in their field. To help you do just that, SOLIDWORKS is holding a series of webinars hosted by the crème de la crème in our company. It’s your chance to hear from the people who know SOLIDWORKS products like the back of their hand…the next best thing to being in a room with them.

Each month an expert member of our team will share tips on how to get the most from SOLIDWORKS. You will learn to use our product not just as a design tool, but as a means to ease business challenges and ignite rapid progress towards your strategic goals. Sit back and power-up your knowledge of the world’s most advanced 3D design software. Submit your questions at the end.

But hurry, you need to register your interest to benefit from the inside knowledge.

This month we talk to Mattias Robertsson, SOLIDWORKS Technical Manager for Northern Europe.

Here’s a Q&A to introduce his webinar…

Or register your interest now

1. Please introduce yourself…

Hello, my name is Mattias Robertsson. I started my career as a mechanical engineer and joined SOLIDWORKS in 1996 as a reseller. Today I am a Technical Manager in Northern Europe – based in Sweden – and support resellers on all of our products in the Nordic area.

2. What is your webinar about, who is it for and why should I attend?

This webinar is for anybody that has an interest or is curious about SOLIDWORKS’ powerful Simulation tool. The seminar will focus on design optimisation and I’ll be introducing some of the lesser known Simulation tools and how to use them. If you are interested in reducing design time and manufacturing cost, be sure to register.

3. What quick advice would you give to anyone uncertain about using SOLIDWORKS Simulation?

Despite being an incredibly powerful tool, it’s phenomenally easy to use. In fact, it’s like switching from doing sums by hand to using a calculator. Why would anyone go back?

4. What’s your favourite feature of SOLIDWORKS Simulation?

ISO section view – no doubt about it.

5. What makes ISO section view so good?

SOLIDWORKS Simulation is all about reducing manufacturing costs by allowing users to test how a product will behave in the real world. You can test strength, heat resistance, load-bearing potential and much more. ISO section view provides a clear understanding of where energy is absorbed in the material, meaning there’s no need to add to production costs by building prototypes.

6. How do you think customers have benefitted from using SOLIDWORKS Simulation?

Customers can make design decisions based on the results they find in SOLIDWORKS Simulation. Customers don’t need to build expensive prototypes thanks to the testing they can do directly in their 3D model, and then they can simply make the design tweaks needed. Ultimately, it saves them time and money.

7. When does your webinar take place?

8:30 AM-9:00 AM GMT on Wednesday, April 26th. Can’t make it? No biggie! Register your interest anyway and you’ll be notified when the video of the webinar is available to stream.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Schooled in SOLIDWORKS: Mattias Robertsson Reveals Tips to Slash Manufacturing Costs appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS UK at April 11, 2017 01:31 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

SOLIDWORKS Electrical and SOLIDWORKS Mechanical Working in Collaboration

Often we find users surprised with how the complete solution works and delivers next level of technology. Integrating the mechanical and electrical design space requires change from existing design practices. SOLIDWORKS Electrical collaboration with SOLIDWORKS Mechanical CAD requires a few key criteria to be satisfied. Listed are the 4 important areas than need to be setup:

The Symbol:

The symbol must be defined with the right circuits as you would envision this to operate. For example if you were working with a coil symbol, you would select the option of a Relay coil for required circuit.

The Component:

One component can consist of multiple symbols thus defining a unique device mark/designation for the grouped symbols. The component must have manufacturer part to ensure that ever symbol circuit is linked to manufacturer part circuit. Designer can add as many parts or symbols to a component as long as the physical component actually has those circuits.

The Manufacturer:

The manufacturer part must have circuit and terminal information defined properly. Such that when it is added to a component, it is easy to identify circuit mapping within the schematic symbol and 3D model.

The 3D Model:

The model must run through the Electrical component wizard in SOLIDWORKS and the electrical add-in. The faces must be defined correctly and the mate surfaces should be setup along with routing points. This will ensure that the model functions efficiently in terms of identifying mating surfaces, component placement and planning the route.

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Collaboration

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Collaboration Map

Following these guidelines will help create a seamless smooth collaboration experience:

  1. One Component mark can have multiple manufacturing parts and multiple symbols
  2. Each manufacturing part can have multiple circuits
  3. Each component or one component mark will only be linked to one physical 3D model
  4. Multiple symbols can make up one component
  5. Multiple components or component marks cannot be linked together

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Electrical training course either in a Canadian classroom near you or live online. For more information about electrical software and training solution call 1-877-219-6757.

The post SOLIDWORKS Electrical and SOLIDWORKS Mechanical Working in Collaboration appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Delvin Masilamani at April 11, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

A Hardware Hacker Just Built a Portable Gaming Console Into an Altoids Tin

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Few examples of product packaging have had an upcycling history quite like the iconic Altoids Tin. From wallets and first aid kits to even a mini bbq stove, the applications people have come up with for repurposing the cheap tin containers are as wide-ranging as they are ingenious.

And in the age of DIY electronic hacking, it’s only natural that the latest comes in the form of a portable video game system.

Created by hardware hacker sudomod, mintyPi 2.0 is the second iteration of a Raspberry Pi-powered Altoids tin featuring updated design features and the Raspberry Pi Zero W—a critical update that adds Wi-Fi functionality to the Curiously Strong mints case:

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“I’ve been working on a much-improved version of the mintyPi project I showed off a while back,” explains sudomod. “It uses 3D-printed parts to drastically improve the look and comfort of it, so it’s actually something you wouldn’t mind sticking in your pocket and playing games on.”

Screen Shot 2017-04-11 at 7.52.39 AM

Specific updates from the first version to the second version include an integrated hinge to hold the screen up while playing, a larger and crisper display, and USB sound rather than PWM audio.

Utilizing a gaming emulator for the Raspberry Pi that lets users play retro video games, sudomod has essentially bundled a popular Raspberry Pi project into a tiny little box that was previously housed by mints.

Screen Shot 2017-04-11 at 7.51.31 AM

For those interested in building their own mintyPi 2.0, sudomod will be releasing build plans on his website in the coming weeks.

The post A Hardware Hacker Just Built a Portable Gaming Console Into an Altoids Tin appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at April 11, 2017 11:54 AM

SolidSmack Radio | Those Harsh Rays (Bring It On)

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This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw, or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these fresh tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with the classic “Odessa” from Caribou and work our way through tracks from Baseball Gregg, River Gazer, Vacations, Monster Rally, and others before wrapping up with “Pumpkin” from Islands.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:5kuxwDuzWPklGStnp1iYga" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | Those Harsh Rays (Bring It On) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 11, 2017 11:31 AM

April 10, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip: Creating Left and Right Hand Version of Components

Assemblies often have duplicate components used throughout the design. However some of these duplicates need to be oriented as a left or right hand version of the original. SOLIDWORKS enables you to mirror components and simultaneously create left and right hand versions of individual components, which remain linked in the design and update together. Check out the video below to learn more!

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Want to see more SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips? Check out our playlist on YouTube to catch up on past videos or you can even jump ahead to the next video!

Do you have a suggestion for the next Tech Tip? Tell us in the comments; we’d love to hear your ideas!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Tech Tip: Creating Left and Right Hand Version of Components appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at April 10, 2017 09:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

PicoBrew’s Latest Kickstarter Project Brings Homebrewing to Everyone

PicoBrew was founded in Seattle in 2010 by brothers Bill and Jim Mitchell, a former Microsoft executive and food scientist, along with engineer Avi Geiger. Combining their food science and technology expertise with their passion for homebrewing, they set out to improve the craft beer brewing process for small producers and homebrewers.

The goal was to create a small-scale brewing machine that would improve on the precision, repeatability and overall quality of the home-brewing experience. The first result was the PicoBrew Zymatic, which has since been awarded three patents, with more than a dozen others pending. The team didn’t stop there, however. They are focused on democratizing the home-brewing process and making it as simple as possible for anyone, even those with zero experience, to brew high-quality beer.

PicoBrew’s latest project, the Pico Model C, makes craft brewing easier, more affordable and more fun than ever. The model C is a smart craft beer brewing appliance that allows you to brew 5L kegs. You can check out the Kickstarter by clicking here. The Pico C reached its funding goal in a mere seven hours. This is thanks to PicoBrew’s reputation for innovation and high-quality, reliable machines.

When PicoBrew was looking to transform the home-brewing process, it turned to SOLIDWORKS to design its revolutionary countertop device. “We’re always innovating at Picobrew and trying to deliver that in the shortest time possible,” Avi said. “SOLIDWORKS helps us build complex machines where every part needs to fit and function, and that’s something worth raising a glass of fresh craft beer to.”

As for the beer itself, it is brewed using PicoPaks. Each PicoPak contains all the grains and hops needed to brew a delicious batch of fresh craft beer. The beers are created from award-winning recipes from their brewery partners all over the globe allowing you to brew their beer in your home! When I’m on vacation, I love to try new beers but sadly not all of them are available in my area. PicoBrew makes this problem a thing of the past and its brewing partners include famous names such as Abita Brewing, 21st Amendment, and Rogue, just to name a few. They also offer a selection of PicoPaks from their own line of killer recipes, created by Master Brewer Annie Johnson. Annie was the first woman to be honored as the American Homebrewer Association’s prestigious Homebrewer of the Year award.

If you love the idea of home brewing, but feel intimidated by the home-brewing process, the Pico Model C is the choice for you. They make brewing beer at home practically foolproof. Better yet, the company makes brewing your own fresh craft beer even more affordable, simple and fun. SOLIDWORKS users create truly amazing products. We’ve seen everything from space travel to ocean cleanup technology. I must say, giving me the tools to successfully brew delicious craft beer has to be up there with landing a man on the moon.

Support the Kickstarter today! Reserve your machine and when your Pico C is ready, you’ll be turning around 5L kegs in a matter of weeks and the results will be delicious. Click here to check out the Pico C!

Author information

Mike Fearon
Mike Fearon
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post PicoBrew’s Latest Kickstarter Project Brings Homebrewing to Everyone appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mike Fearon at April 10, 2017 12:26 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Adjusting Virtual Memory (Windows Pagefile) for increased SOLIDWORKS Performance

A kin to the article that our teammate Josh Carrier wrote, back in 2010, I thought it high time we review the process of how to increase virtual memory on your workstation.

We use this procedure a great deal when attempting to enhance the performance of systems where SOLIDWORKS is having difficulty with importing or exporting geometry, or handling larger assemblies.

What we are essentially doing is raising the ceiling and giving the operating system the extra room in needs to maneuver if it runs out of physical memory.

One of the tidbits we have discovered over the years is that SOLIDWORKS typically throws the demand for more page file at the Operating System so quickly that it takes time for the operating system to allocate the needed amount of virtual memory, further slowing operations.

SSD or NOT?

One item to highlight, having grown in prominence these last few years is the effect of a page file being located on an SSD drive which may be acting as the host drive for your Operating system and installation of SOLIDWORKS.

Before SSD technology was readily available you would have placed the page file on the Root of the main drive (C:\), without jeopardizing the long term safety of your HDD drive. The trade off here is that writing operations to a page file located on the HDD would have slowed performance slightly as the HDD was much slower than RAM. This is still true today with SSD drives however there is an added danger, as SSD’s have a limited lifespan and can only handle so many writing cycles – it may be a better choice to locate a larger page file on a secondary spinning disk.

How much RAM?

To properly adjust your virtual memory values, you will need to know how much physical memory, or RAM, is on the system.  You can find this by navigating to the System Information Dialog

The System Info Dialog can be found by typing “System Info” in windows 10 and opening the System Info dialog (or Start > All Apps > Windows Administrative Tools > System Information)

IMPORTANT: One question to research before attempting the following procedure is: Do I have sufficient Disk Space to make a change to the page file size?

With Physical Memory (RAM) amounts of 4GB to 24 GB we suggest having a page file minimum size set to 2 times the amount of Physical Memory (RAM) in the system.

If you are lucky enough that you have more than 16 GB of RAM in the system, we suggest that the page file minimum be set between 1 and 1.5 times the amount of RAM.

Changing the Virtual Memory Values

  1. Within the Windows 10 Search type “Performance”
  2. This should bring up an entry that states: “Adjust the appearance and performance of Windows” (This is the same dialog that you would have accessed if you had navigated via the control panel: Control Panel > System > Advanced System Settings > Advanced Tab > Settings)
Adjusting Virtual Memory for SOLIDWORKS Performance

Accessing Virtual Memory

  1. Once you have arrived within the performance options dialog choose the Advanced Tab > and select the “Change” button located within the in the Virtual Memory section of the dialog.
  2. Uncheck the “Automatically manage paging file size for all drives” Option
  3. Select the drive where you have room or deem it appropriate to place the page file.
  4. Choose the “Custom Size” Radio Button.
  5. Enter a MINIMUM value of 1 to 2 times the amount of physical RAM you have in the system. (16GB would appear as 16000MB)
  6. Enter a MAXIMUM value of 2GB more than the MINIMUM value specified in the step above. (This will ensure that windows reporting and other diagnostic reports are correct)
  7. Choose the “Set” button
  8. Restart the Workstation to realize the changes to Virtual Memory.

Stay tuned to the Javelin Blog for many more tips regarding SOLIDWORKS and system performance!

The post Adjusting Virtual Memory (Windows Pagefile) for increased SOLIDWORKS Performance appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Chris Briand, CSWE at April 10, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Ti Pocket Pro is a Pen That Telescopes to Accommodate Over 80 Ink Refills

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For the hardcore pen fanatics out there, the ability to accommodate a particular type of ink refill can make or break the purchase of an otherwise perfect pen. Further, few people enjoy being locked into a propitiatory refill—forced to buy only one particular kind of ink.

Enter the Ti Pocket Pro—a titanium pen that adjusts to over 80 different kinds of refills from a wide range of manufacturers.

“Refill tip diameters vary from one manufacture to the next,” explains the pen’s co-creator, Chadwick Parker. “So, if you want a versatile machined pen that can accept multiple refill brands, you’re typically stuck with an oversized pen tip opening and a refill that wiggles/jiggles/rattles around while writing. It can be pretty annoying and noisy in quiet environments.”

The EDC-inspired, pocket-friendly pen is already a Kickstarter hit—with nearly a month left to go in their campaign, Parker and his business partner Joe Huang have already raised $150,000 with an original crowdfunding goal of just $5,000. Not too shabby for a pen.

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Manufactured in both stonewashed raw titanium and DLC black, the Ti Pocket Pro’s ultimate selling point is that it not only accommodates over 80 different ink refills with a unique telescoping design, but it does so without the need for any spacers or ‘hacks’ that would otherwise compromise the experience of using the product. In other words…it “just works”.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/klinkokids/ti-pocket-pro-the-auto-adjusting-edc-pen/widget/video.html" width="800"> </iframe>

“We find that the majority of people typically like (or dislike) a pen based on a refill related preference,” explains Parker. “After all, the refill ink and tip design is what largely contributes to the dry time, line consistency, and how/if the ink will even stick to certain paper types. So, being able to swap out 80+ popular refills without any headache, spacers, or hacks allows you to keep a grade 5 titanium pen body for a lifetime. You can literately pass down a functional piece of family history to future generations that helped record yours.”

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And at just $65, the pen is priced competitively for what is sure to be a mainstay in your pocket, sketchbook, and workshop. Find out more over at Kickstarter.

The post The Ti Pocket Pro is a Pen That Telescopes to Accommodate Over 80 Ink Refills appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at April 10, 2017 11:52 AM

Adidas Partners with Carbon to Launch First Mass Production 3D Printed Shoe

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For an industry responsible for wrapping material around a human foot for athletic performance purposes, it’s been a long hard road for shoe manufacturers to take 3D printing seriously as a viable form of bespoke manufacturing on a grand scale.

And while companies ranging from Under Armour to New Balance have been keeping pace, it is Adidas who has reached the finish line in what is sure to be an interesting test run of running shoes made through additive manufacturing methods.

Utilizing Carbon’s Digital Light Synthesis technology (CLIP)—a process that allows for the mass production of previously impossible midsole geometries for the unique needs of every athlete and customer—the Futurecraft 4D marks a new and exciting chapter in footwear design and manufacturing.

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While previously 3D printing has been used extensively as a way of prototyping footwear midsoles, this marks the first time that a major footwear manufacturer has made a serious stride towards bringing the technology mainstream to tens of thousands of users across a chain of retail outlets.

“With Digital Light Synthesis, we venture beyond limitations of the past, unlocking a new era in design and manufacturing,” explains Eric Liedtke, Adidas Group Executive Board Member Responsible For Global Brands. “One driven by athlete data and agile manufacturing processes. By charting a new course for our industry, we can unleash our creativity- transforming not just what we make, but how we make it.”

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Of course, creating a one-off prototype from a 3D printer is one thing; creating a wearable 3D printed midsole that can withstand the average abuse that typical rubber midsole goes through is an entirely different challenge. Working closely with the Adidas design team to understand the use cases, the Carbon team developed over 150 different material formulations to achieve the desired mechanical properties of the 3D printed midsole.

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“Despite the influence of technology to improve almost every other aspect of our lives, for eons the manufacturing process has followed the same four steps that make up the product development cycle – design, prototype, tool, produce. Carbon has changed that; we’ve broken the cycle and are making it possible to go directly from design to production,” added Dr. Joseph DeSimone, Carbon founder and CEO. “We’re enabling engineers and designers to create previously impossible designs, and businesses to evolve their offerings, and FutureCraft 4D is evidence of that. Our partnership with Adidas will serve as an ongoing testament to how the digital revolution has reached the global manufacturing sector, changing the way physical goods are designed, engineered, made, and delivered.”

Lattice-1

Shoe-1

Find out more about the Futurecraft 4D shoe and its future availability over at Adidas.

The post Adidas Partners with Carbon to Launch First Mass Production 3D Printed Shoe appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at April 10, 2017 11:30 AM

The Monday List 15.17 | What We’re Reading This Week

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Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Each Monday, we’ll link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you. Be sure to check in each Monday morning for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Sleep Is the New Status Symbol
At M.I.T.’s Media Lab, the digital futurist playground, David Rose is investigating swaddling, bedtime stories and hammocks, as well as lavender oil and cocoons.

01

A Town Forgotten
Cairo has no hotels. The only fast food franchise is a Subway — closed the days I was there. The last grocery store left in 2015. For shopping it has a Dollar General and two corner stores.

03

How to start a panic over coffee cups
Can the “the most famous hot cup in the world” compete with imitators?

04

Special Experience
Whether at the bottom of the ocean, in the Arctic Circle, or on Mars, a sense of wonder can help an explorer of terra incognita stay sane.

05

The Gig Economy’s False Promise
In reality, there is no utopia at companies like Uber, Lyft, Instacart and Handy, whose workers are often manipulated into working long hours for low wages while continually chasing the next ride or task.

02

Instagram Killed the Retail Store
The members of Gen Z are rewriting the rules of selling fashion.

06

The post The Monday List 15.17 | What We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 10, 2017 11:02 AM

April 09, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Excel Documents as SOLIDWORKS PDM Forms

SOLIDWORKS PDM Tech Tip

Written by: Bryce Hooper, Application Engineer at DASI Solutions

Filling out forms is always a drag. Automating those forms with data cards and transition updates is a great way to alleviate that burden. There are many forms we see around the industry, so we’ll start with an example in Microsoft Excel.

Here we have an example of an Engineering Change Notice form.

Engineering Change Notice

Now, to map these properties to our file and our data card, we will need to start with the variable setup. For Microsoft Office documents, the setup is pretty simple and should be familiar. For each variable we are mapping, we will want to use the attribute block CustomProperty. This should be familiar as it is the same that we would use for SOLIDWORKS documents.

Edit Variable - Custom Property

Set this to use the proper extensions that we are intending to use and the rest of the options can be set at your discretion.

We then turn to our spreadsheet to set up the variables inside for display. The first step to this is to create a named range. It’s generally a good recommendation to name this range something close to your variable/attribute name for ease of setup later.

Note: No spaces can be used in the name for a range. See that in the image below I have simply pushed all of the text together without spaces.

Create a Named Range

After these ranges have been named, it is time to map the custom properties to those ranges. This is done by going to the file info inside of Excel, then properties and Advanced properties.

Excel Advanced Properties

In the dialog that shows we go to the Custom tab. Here we find a list of properties that are already defined. If your variables haven’t mapped to the file yet, that is fine as we will create the link here. If they are mapped that is fine as well, we will link their pre-existing values to ranges. To do this, we can select the name in the list or type a new name.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Forms - Mapping Properties

Check the box for “Link to content” and select the named range from the Source drop-down. Click add to add it to the list. From here on out, those cells will be filled in with our values from the data card.

From here, we can make things even easier by creating a template to help us fill in values or serialize a naming convention. We can also create actions in our workflow transitions to automatically fill in names and dates for approvals.

 

There are of course some pros and cons to this technique. I’ll break them down a bit here. By no means is this an all-encompassing list.

Pros:

  • Your company’s forms are probably already in Excel (or some other Office format), so the translation isn’t difficult.
  • If they aren’t already in Excel, this is an easy program for anyone else to learn and create forms.
  • Setup for this is fairly simple and intuitive. The process works similarly for other office formats.

Cons:

  • The PDM Preview window does not update until the file has been checked out, opened, saved, and checked back in.
  • Requires Microsoft Office on any machine that would need to view/print it.
  • Does not handle changes down the line to the form/format with ease. EX: As your company uses the process and changes the formatting or logo, old forms will not update to the new format without manual updates.
  • As of this article, some variable types either don’t work (Yes/No) or don’t display correctly (Date)

 

If you’re looking for other ways to create forms inside of PDM, you may also want to check out our upcoming blogs in the coming months on Microsoft Word and XML documents as forms in PDM.

Author information

DASI Solutions
DASI Solutions
DASI Solutions is dedicated to service and support. As one of a handful of original, charter value-added resellers (VAR) in the SolidWorks Community, DASI Solutions has built partnerships and success stories with many of our customers. We are very pleased to bring you SolidWorks 3D CAD design engineering software and 3D printing services.

The post Excel Documents as SOLIDWORKS PDM Forms appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by DASI Solutions at April 09, 2017 03:00 PM

April 08, 2017

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Large Assembly Tips & Tricks

Working with a large assembly in SOLIDWORKS can be a little challenging for slower computers. Fortunately, there are a number of techniques that you can employ in order to improve performance whilst maintaining functionality. Let’s take a look…

Consider the Mode

There are 4 different ‘modes’ that an assembly can be opened in, as seen in the image below; Resolved, Lightweight, Large Assembly Mode and Large Design Review, each opening the file in a different state.

Large assembly SOLIDWORKS

Resolved

The default option when working within assemblies. Opens the assembly and all of the associated file information. For example, when opening an assembly, all of the associated parts feature history is loaded into memory.

Lightweight

Opens the assembly, but none of the associated file information apart from the primary planes and the origin. Restricts the files from being edited. An image of a feather appears next to the associated file in the FeatureManager Design Tree.

Large Assembly Mode

Performs the same process as the Lightweight mode option above, however,  it involves a few more options that can be altered as seen in Image 2. Each option restricts particular processes and features to aid performance. These options can be accessed via: Tools > Options > Assemblies.

Large Design Review

This is very different to the other three modes of opening an assembly. This option presents the user with a very restricted command manager. It allows you to very quickly open your model for viewing purposes. You can navigate, take snapshots and take measurements. This mode does not open the file into memory, so it’s a great way of quickly opening and navigating very large assemblies.

Note: All modes allow the file to be set to ‘Resolved’ at any point and the files to be loaded into memory as seen in Image 3. Assembly files of a certain size can be set to open automatically as a particular mode defined by the user as seen in Images 3 and 4 below.

Large assembly SOLIDWORKS

Large assembly SOLIDWORKS

Large assembly SOLIDWORKS


Use Simplified Configurations

Another technique you can use to improve navigational performance is to create a configuration within the assembly, suppressing some unnecessary associated parts and subassemblies. For example, many configurations may be needed for a different combination of the components within the main assembly. These can then be loaded upon the file opening if chosen on the open dialog box as seen below.

Note: This effect can also be applied at part level which would have a positive knock on effect if also applied at assembly level.

Large assembly SOLIDWORKS

SpeedPak

A SpeedPak configuration reduces the file size by limiting the file to specific faces or bodies. These faces are required for mate referencing only. You can either create a SpeedPak at top level or within the subassembly, each providing you with different options as follows:

Subassembly

The SpeedPak configuration at subassembly level can be created in the ConfigurationManager via the right mouse button (RMB) as seen in Image 6. The aim is to remove all but the information required (faces, associated mates, etc) to maintain the references at the top level. This then becomes a derived configuration which has to be activated at top level.


Image 6: RMB on existing configuration
SpeedPak PropertyManager

Top Level

Once the subassembly is mated into position at the top level, RMB on the sub assembly and you are presented with two options as seen here:

Large assembly SOLIDWORKS
Mated SpeedPak

This option automatically keeps the faces that have been mated together.

Graphics SpeedPak

This is a purely graphical representation with no resolved geometry or mate references.


Defeature

Another technique similar to creating a simplified configuration is the Defeature tool. This tool removes the selected faces, features, etc. The file can then be saved as a “Dumb Solid”, which is a file without any feature definition or history. This is also a great for protecting intellectual property whilst maintaining a good understanding of the geometry.

Defeature can be found via: Tools > Defeature.


Large assembly SOLIDWORKS


Assembly Structure

It is not always possible to have the foresight in terms of how your assembly will finally be constructed. Sometimes it may be necessary to build up your assembly using all of the relevant parts, this however can make it top heavy and result in poor performance. It is always best to construct your assemblies with as many subassemblies as possible, which can either be done by inserting them individually (as normal), or at assembly level.

In order to begin this process, you need to RMB on the relevant part you want to be included within the subassembly and select ‘Form New Subassembly’ as seen below.

Form new subassembly (step 1)
Form new subassembly (step 2)
This then creates a new virtual Subassembly within the main assembly. Additional parts from either the main assembly or another subassembly can just be dragged and dropped into this new subassembly. Be careful when moving components as referenced components via mates, patterns or external references will be broken – unless all associated parts are brought with it!

Final Tips!

  • Work locally, never over a network! (Even PDM creates a local copy for this reason).
  • Ensure all files are up to date. Files saved in older versions will rebuild and open slower.
  • Don’t include unnecessary details (e.g. threads).

We hope you found that useful!

Have you seen our blog archive where we have posted plenty of helpful articles? We also have a fantastic video library filled with easy-to-follow videos on a number of topics inspired by other SOLIDWORKS users – take a look. Also, don’t forget to follow Innova Systems on twitter for daily bite size SOLIDWORKS tips, tricks and videos.

Author information

Innova Systems Experts in SOLIDWORKS Training & Support
We specialise in the supply, consultancy and training of SOLIDWORKS software. Based in Cambridge we have a central location to service a UK wide customer base. We offer the skills and experience to help you develop new products using SOLIDWORKS - empowering smarter, faster and more cost effective design. We've been recognised by SOLIDWORKS Corporation for providing the highest rated customer support in Northern Europe in 2014, 2015 and 2016. Email: info@innova-systems.co.uk / Telephone: 01223 200690.

The post Large Assembly Tips & Tricks appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Innova Systems Experts in SOLIDWORKS Training &#38; Support at April 08, 2017 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 14.17

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Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee, and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top ten stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

ABC and Mattel Partner to Create a ‘Shark Tank’ for Toy Inventors

In a new spin on the Shark Tank show format, where inventors and budding entrepreneurs pitch their ideas to investors including Mark Cuban and Barbara Corcoran for advice and hopefully, an investment, ABC has teamed up with toy manufacturer Mattel to give toy inventors a stage for pitching their concepts.

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The Lo1 is a Simple Desk Lamp That Requires No Hardware

There is something zen-like about products that require no hardware to assemble (we’re looking at you, IKEA). It’s as if those materials and parts were created for the sole purpose of existing as the components of a seamless assembly.

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PERK Wants to Revolutionize Coffee with an Automated Pour-Over System

Originally designed for brewing the perfect cup of joe in low-gravity environments, the PERK fully-automated pour-over coffee system gently pumps water through the coffee grains to ensure that the water reaches each grain evenly. Unlike a manual pour-over system, the PERK is also capable of lifting, tumbling and separating the coffee grains while it’s brewing.

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Garage Inventor Colin Furze Squeezes a Motorcycle Engine into a Bumper Car

When it comes to ‘garage inventors’, few people carry the title as well as Colin Furze. The plumber-turned-viral YouTube video star out of Stamford, Lincolnshire has created everything from the world’s fasted pram to a hoverbike in his humble UK-based garage workshop.

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VETR Speaker Design Goes Flat, Ditches the Box

Traditional speakers, the kind that sits on your bookshelf, produce sound by applying an electrical audio signal to a voice-coil, which vibrates rapidly back and forth, thus moving a diaphragm, which pushes air resulting in an audible tone.

vetr-flat-speaker-design-boxless-kickstarter-00

A UK Engineer Just Built His Own Iron Man-Like Flying Suit

Whether it’s the 1991 film The Rocketeer or any of the more recent Iron Man movies, Hollywood has been teasing us with the jet pack for years. After all—who wouldn’t want the chance to fly?

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The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 14.17 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 08, 2017 10:30 AM

April 07, 2017

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Fling Those Otter Tails

jan-sarbort-art

Long ago, the wrinkled hands of the oarsmen would take the otter tails by the tips and fling them repeatedly towards the front of the boat. A lone traveler watching the rising mound of otters amidst their tails, playing quite gleefully, asked why they were thrown to the front. They replied as if asked before, “To keep them away from these links.”

Jan Sarbort – Oh, the wonderful concept ships, robots, space scenes and more, drawn with a captivating perspective and atmosphere.

Free Oil Painting Lessons – A great series from Web Art Academy on painting in oil. Includes nine lessons and only requires an email.

Deeply Artifical Trees – So, if you always though Bob Ross was a little creepy, this will seal the deal. Alexander Reben experiments with an AI’s interpretation when trying to decern words and find images.

Jumbo Playing Card – My boys have been learning card tricks. Slight of hand may be a little tougher with these hugely massive playing cards.

Figuarts Man – Get rid of those boring old artist dummies and snag some of these Bandai action figure poseable figures. Male and female versions, plus exchangeable hands.

Hill Bombs – Sean Greene is droppin’ bombs down the hills of San Francisco. Thar be some speed. Sk8 or die.

KA-Bar Folding – Just picked one of these up. One of the best quality, lowest cost knives around. Lots of colors to choose from as well. Don’t need a knife? Then check out this Shotgun Shell Thermos!

Spring Blossoms – The Big Picture grabs the joys of spring in these shots of flowers, flowers being flowers, and people taking pictures of flowers.

Guardabosqu – Crazy, detailed paper sculptures of animals, objects and environments created by Carolina Silvero and Juan Elizalde of Guardabosques design studio in Buenos Aires.

Good Trip – New video from Missine+Tripstoic. Listen to and download the new album here.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="375" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/211394697" title="Missine+Tripstoic - Good Trip (Album Version) ► Official Video" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="500"></iframe>

The post Friday Smackdown: Fling Those Otter Tails appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at April 07, 2017 11:05 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Rose Tutorial – Part 4

Are you tired of getting the same old bouquet of roses for that special someone in your life? We suggest our fellow SOLIDWORKS users try something a little different by modeling this rose for that special someone. It will be a gift that shouts, “Hey, I care about you so much that I learned SOLIDWORKS Surface modeling just for you. And like my love for you, this version of the rose will last forever.”

Welcome to the final part of our series where we are spreading some surfacing love by showing you how to model this rose in SOLIDWORKS. We are going to wrap up our series by modeling a thorn using the Boundary Surface, Extend Surface, and Filled Surface tools. We’ll also run through creating a random patter in the Curve Driven Pattern Tool. Lastly, we will drop in a few custom appearances to give this rose some color.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/D1ke7OM7bz4?feature=oembed" width="1140"></iframe>

While real roses are beautiful, they don’t last forever. Fortunately for us, roses made in SOLIDWORKS will! Whether you’re looking for a gift that will stand the test of time or just want to improve your surface modeling skills, the SOLIDWORKS Rose Tutorial Series is for you!

Can’t wait for the next video? View all of the tutorials on the playlist here.

Do you have a green thumb for growing SOLIDWORKS Roses? Share your creations with us in the comments below! As always, thanks for watching!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Rose Tutorial – Part 4 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at April 07, 2017 09:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Why your Sales and Marketing Teams need SOLIDWORKS Composer [Webinar]

How much time are you spending on Technical Documentation? Getting the necessary images for technical documentation and or marketing can take several weeks, or even months! Delays in the process will often occur as the product needs to be completely designed and or manufactured before any content can be created including images, screen shots and pictures. This means that if a design change ever happens (and we know they always do) that process need to be repeated. What would you say if I told you that we can use your existing CAD files as they are being designed and start the image creation much earlier on in the process? It is possible with SOLIDWORKS Composer.

SOLIDWORKS Composer

SOLIDWORKS Composer

Better communication across multiple channels

SOLIDWORKS Composer is a critical step in ensuring your product design is communicated correctly to the manufacturer. Good communication can be challenging in any business, let SOLIDWORKS Composer do the work for you! By streamlining the technical documentation process you will get your product to market faster, reduce costly errors, and the sales and marketing teams will have better images and materials to showcase the product. Essentially, the organization will win more deals by standing out of the crowd with better technical documentation.

Assembly Instructions in SOLIDWORKS Composer

Assembly Instructions in SOLIDWORKS Composer

Top 3 Benefits

  1. Eliminate error-prone and costly documentation processes involving human intervention and rework to incorporate product design changes.
  2. Gain significant cost savings and competitive advantage by taking products faster to market.
  3. Leverage existing 3D design data (independent of CAD systems) to produce accurate and up-to-date product documentation.

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Composer Webinar

Learn why your sales and marketing teams need SOLIDWORKS Composer on Monday May 8th from 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM (EDT) and see how SOLIDWORKS Composer uses your CAD files (as they are being created) to generate beautiful images that can be used for:

  • Assembly instructions
  • Service manuals
  • Training manuals
  • Parts catalogs
  • Marketing & Sales materials

<iframe frameborder="0" height="1000" src="http://solution.javelin-tech.com/l/2012/2017-04-06/81l2rn" style="border: 0;" width="100%"></iframe>

The post Why your Sales and Marketing Teams need SOLIDWORKS Composer [Webinar] appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Vicky Guignard at April 07, 2017 02:46 PM

SolidSmack

Reebok Announces New Plant-Based Sustainable Footwear Line

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Corn. It’s not just for soaking in butter or rotating on a drill at 2500 RPM.

While Nike has made huge strides to minimize their environmental footprint, and Adidas has been introducing shoes made from plastic sourced from ocean waste, Reebok is the latest footwear company to get in on the sustainability action with the announcement of a new eco-friendly line of footwear.

Simply called “Cotton + Corn”, the line of shoes will use DuPont’s Susterra Propanediol to craft a 100% sustainably and renewably sourced outsole that will be paired with an upper created from organically-sourced cotton. The shoes are so eco-friendly, they can even be used as compost at the end of their life.

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“This is really just the first step for us,” explains Bill McInnis, Head of Reebok Future. “With Cotton + Corn”, we’re focused on all three phases of the product lifecycle. First, with product development, we’re using materials that grow and can be replenished, rather than the petroleum-based materials commonly used today. Second, when the product hits the market we know our consumers don’t want to sacrifice on how sneakers look and perform. Finally, we care about what happens to the shoes when people are done with them. So we’ve focused on plant-based materials such as corn and cotton at the beginning, and compostability in the end.”

The first line of “Cotton + Corn” shoes is expected to make its way to retail later this year.

The post Reebok Announces New Plant-Based Sustainable Footwear Line appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at April 07, 2017 12:17 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

Relocating SOLIDWORKS PDM Archive Folders

As your SOLIDWORKS PDM vault is used, and more files are added, and new versions of those files are created, the archives where all of those files are kept will grow significantly.  You may need to move these SOLIDWORKS PDM archive folders around as the vault gets larger; for instance relocating the entire archive to a different drive with more space, or splitting it up across multiple drives.  This can be done very easily directly through the interface of the “Archive Server Configuration” utility which runs on the computer where the archives are stored.

You will be able to access the Archive Server Configuration tool, from Windows > Start > All Programs > SOLIDWORKS PDM, or by typing ‘Archive Server Configuration‘ in Windows search.

If the utility does not launch when you do this though, that means it’s actually already running, so go to the Task bar icons on the bottom right of the screen and find the SOLIDWORKS PDM Archive Server icon, right click and select Open.

Windows Shortcut Bar

Windows Shortcut Bar

In the utility, either double click the “Archives” folder in the main pane of the interface, or expand “This Computer” and single click to select the “Archives” folder in the tree in the left pane of the screen.  This will show all the archives hosted on this server, there may be several if you have sandbox or training vaults set up.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Archive Server

SOLIDWORKS PDM Archive Server

Right click on the vault that you need to move and select “Relocate”.

Relocate PDM Archive

Relocate PDM Archive

In the “File vault relocation” dialog box, you will see where archive folders are currently located.  In this case, currently, 100% of the archive folders are located on the C: drive.

Archive Location

Archive Location

There are 16 different archive folders in all SOLIDWORKS PDM vaults, named 0 – 9, and A – F.  This is where the actual vaulted copies of all the files are located.

Physical Archive Folders

Physical Archive Folders

Considerations when using the Archive Server Configuration tool to relocate archives:

During the relocate process there should be NO USERS ACCESSING THE VAULT.  Before initiating a move, the administrator should Block Log-ins to the vault to prevent user’s from accessing it during the move.

Consider performing the move in increments, especially if the archive is very large. The 16 archive folders are each moved as a unit, so the move can be done in increments of as little as 1/16 or roughly 6.3% at a time.

You can span the archive across as many drives as you require.

If the vault is very very large (for instance several hundred gigabytes of data), then you may want to consider performing a manual move and redirecting of the Archive Folder registry values instead of using the Relocate functionality in the Archive Server Configuration tool.  You can contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Re-seller for further directions on how this can be done.

If you are encountering issues with the backups of the archive taking too long to perform because the vault is too large, relocating the archive will not help as it does not reduce the overall size of the archive.  In that situation, you should consider also compressing the archive.

Relocate Process:

If you are moving the entire vault from one location to another here are the steps:

Step 1:  In the File vault relocation dialog, click “Add” to inset a new row under Archive Locations.  Click the “…” button and browse to the new folder location.  This should be a folder on a local hard drive, NOT a network share, mapped drive or a USB external hard drive (using anything but a local drive will degrade file access performance for users).

Add new Archive Location

Add new Archive Location

Step 2:  Adjust the “Size” slider as desired.  If the vault isn’t too large, and you have sufficient time before the users will require full access again, you can move 100% of the vault to the new location, otherwise you may wish to do so incrementally.  NOTE:  You will need to manually adjust the sliders on both locations, for instance if you set the new location Size to 100% the “Total Size” value will show as 200%.  To correct this you must manually set the initial location’s size slider to 100%.  If you are moving incrementally, you will need to make sure the Total Size adds up to 100% (watch for the indicator to turn green).

Adjust Archive Size

Adjust Archive Size

Step 3:  Click OK.  A warning will show reminding you to ensure that the users are not working in the vault (they can continue to work in Offline Mode), once you click OK the archives will begin to be moved.  This process must be allowed to complete and should not be interrupted once it begins.

Relocating SOLIDWORKS PDM Archive Folders

Confirming Archive Move

The post Relocating SOLIDWORKS PDM Archive Folders appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at April 07, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Get 8 Killer Arduino E-Books for Just $10

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It doesn’t matter if you’re a seasoned Arduino developer or an Arduino beginner, there’s always something new to be learned with the versatile open-source hardware development kit. Whether it’s a prototype for a wearable design or even controlling your garage door via a Twitter feed, the possibilities of what can be done with the versatile development board are seemingly endless.

For those looking to expand their Arduino capabilities, this master collection of Arduino E-Books is the perfect companion for deep-diving into new avenues of the open-source platform including developing products for the Internet of Things, mastering the art of a well-designed wearable and how to best implement Arduino with iOS and Android devices, among others.

Arduino

But don’t just take our word for it, take a look at the list of books below and see for yourself; building out your smart home might not be as complicated as you previously thought!

Included Books:

  • Arduino Wearable Projects
  • Arduino Electronics Blueprints
  • Arduino Development Cookbook
  • Internet of Things with Arduino Blueprints
  • Arduino by Example
  • Arduino iOS Blueprints
  • Arduino Robotic Projects
  • Arduino Android Blueprints

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
StackSocial Amazon

The post Get 8 Killer Arduino E-Books for Just $10 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 07, 2017 11:55 AM

April 06, 2017

SolidSmack

Instantly 3D Print Cities with SketchUp PlaceMaker

sketchup-placemaker-3d-printing-00

SketchUp has a very interesting extension called “PlaceMaker” to instantly generate 3D models of cities.

I don’t often recommend SketchUp for 3D printing purposes, as it is primarily focused on visual 3D, rather than the solid 3D required for proper 3D printing. It’s just too easy to create non-3D printable models in SketchUp and you are best to use other 3D print-specific tools.

Nevertheless, SketchUp does offer a very interesting extension I haven’t seen in other environments yet. Their “PlaceMakers” extension has the wonderful ability to automatically generate a 3D model of cities, including buildings, roads, and greenery.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85976" style="width: 1100px;">A generated 3D model of San Francisco using PlaceMaker<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">A generated 3D model of San Francisco using PlaceMaker</figcaption></figure>

Take a look at the image above and imagine building that by yourself, even with an efficient 3D tool. Nope, not happening.

But instead, you can literally generate this in seconds using SketchUp and PlaceMaker. Here’s a video showing how it works:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/W7sAJywfQDk?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Essentially, they allow you to select a region of terrain and then they extract information from the Digital Globe database to create the 3D shapes.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85977" style="width: 1100px;">Creating a 3D city model with PlaceMaker<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Creating a 3D city model with PlaceMaker</figcaption></figure>

From there you could theoretically export the 3D model as STL and actually 3D print it, although I suspect you’d have to do some serious 3D file repairs before it might work properly. But that’s a small price to pay to get yourself a 3D printed city.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85978" style="width: 1100px;">PlaceMaker covers many worldwide cities in its database<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">PlaceMaker covers many worldwide cities in its database</figcaption></figure>

Unfortunately, this service is not free. This makes sense as this is such a powerful product. PlaceMakers sells their product in “credits”, which are purchasable from them directly. The number of credits required for an operation seems to vary by the number of map tiles, but in the video example, they required 24 credits to complete the deal.

PlaceMakers charges USD$99 for 500 credits, suggesting that the video example would have cost under USD$5. That’s not a bad deal when you consider how much work it would take to do this by hand.

Read more at Fabbaloo!

The post Instantly 3D Print Cities with SketchUp PlaceMaker appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at April 06, 2017 09:56 PM

SOLIDWORKS Blog | SOLIDWORKS Engineering & Design Blog

The Greatest Engineering Video Clip of All Time

Dilbert - The Knack "The Curse of the Engineer"
<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/g8vHhgh6oM0?rel=0?ecver=2" style="position: absolute; width: 100%; height: 100%; left: 0;" width="640"></iframe>

"The Knack" clip from Dilbert. Dilbert is diagnosed with "The Knack" at a young age and is destined to become an engineer!

I think you all will get a laugh - Enjoy!

Author

Nick Weirens, Marketing Manager

April 06, 2017 04:57 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Setting Up Bill of Materials Your Way!

One of the first questions we get from new SOLIDWORKS users is how to set up their Bill of Materials (BOM) to match company standards. We do this by first setting up a Bill of Materials, arranging it as needed, then saving it as a template for future use.

Start by adding the Custom Properties needed to your parts in your assemblies. Use the standard list of properties as a starting point:

Then create a BOM using a default template by using Insert, Tables, Bill of Materials:

You can add additional columns by right-clicking on the new BOM and selecting Column Right or Column Left:

Then, link the column to Custom Properties by clicking on the Column Header and selecting the property from the pull-down list (custom properties must be inserted into one of the assembly components to appear in the pull-down list, such as Cost, Vendor, etc.):

Adjust the font type and size by clicking anywhere on the BOM, and using the fly-out:

You can rearrange the columns by clicking on a column header top and dragging left to right:

You can move the title Table Header from Top to Bottom, and vice versa:

Resize the Bill of Materials by selecting it, then resizing by dragging on the handle on the lower right corner.

Resize individual columns by selecting the column and dragging the separator to the right or left.

Remember to save your work as a new template by right-clicking on the table and selecting Save As…

Bill of Materials template (.sldbomtbt). To find and set your default location – Tools, Options, System Options, File Locations, BOM Templates

One last tip – you can also start by creating your new Bill of Materials in the assembly FIRST (by selecting BOM from the Assembly toolbar):

Bill of Materials

Then inserting it into the drawing, linking to an existing Bill of Materials by clicking Bill of Materials on the Assembly toolbar:

Author information

Unitec
Unitec, Inc. is a Technology/Engineering based sales and consulting organization that has been servicing the engineering community since 1988. Our goal is to use our extensive background with engineering software and bring that information to our prospects and customers. We pride ourselves on providing our customers with the best prices, support and training for all the products and services we offer.

The post Setting Up Bill of Materials Your Way! appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Unitec at April 06, 2017 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

MX3D is 3D Printing the Metal Structures of the Future

mx3d-3d-metal-printing-robot-technology-autodesk-lenovo-00

There’s been plenty on 3D metal printing to talk about over the last few years, but 2017 may be THE year of more metal – more metal printers and more structures printed in metal. I’m ready for it too – ready for a metal suit, a metal house; bring on the metal. CES 2017 saw Markforged launch their Metal X printer. That will take care of the small items, while metal mastodon MX3D finally sees their metal printing robots complete multiple, large-scale projects.

Last year we took a look at the stainless steel 3D printed bike developed by students from TUDelft and manufactured by MX3D. We mentioned the plan by MX3D to 3D print a canal bridge which is still in work but set to be installed across Amsterdam’s Oudezijds Achterburgwal canal later this year.

mx3d-3d-metal-printing-robot-technology-autodesk-lenovo-02

Their goal with the Bridge project is to show what’s possible with their multi-axis, robo-arm, 3D print technology. I told the MX3D team I need them to make me a robo-arm 3D printing (winged) body suit – THE POSSIBILITIES. Like other wise people, they dismissed my comments, but good ol’ Tim Geurtjens, CTO of MX3D, did clarify what sets them apart:

“What distinguishes our technology from traditional 3D printing methods is that we work according to the ‘Printing Outside the box’ principle. By printing with 6-axis industrial robots, we are no longer limited to a square box in which everything happens. Printing a functional, life-size bridge is of course the ideal way to demonstrate the endless possibilities of this technique.”

The large industrial robots are the beautiful, 6-axis beasts created by ABB robotics. You know, the kind you want in every room of your house to do your bidding, and then runs off to build a freakin’ bridge. ON the design side, the MX3D team is using Autodesk 3D modeling software, including Dreamcatcher for the generative design modeling and Dynamo to explore new ways of using and developing around building information modeling (BIM) data.

mx3d-3d-metal-printing-robot-technology-autodesk-lenovo-03

On the hardware side, they’re running Lenovo systems, ThinkStation P910s and the much more mobile ThinkPad P40 Yoga – I use one of these EVERY day. The videos below shows how everything comes together and, even better, has some great shots of the MX3D facility and the robots in action. (Tim looks tired in that first one!)

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zeTPMarDPis?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_6HG9wAwYXU?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Their latest project is an experimental sculpture designed by Joris Laarman Lab for Design Miami/Basel, a sculptural butterfly screen I could easily see sitting majestically in my front yard causing my neighbors to question the validity of their not-3D-printed, much-to-small plastic garden gnomes. The butterfly screen is a 2×3 meter (6.5 ft x 9.84 ft) ‘double curved bronze surface based on a hexagonal cell division.’ It looks like this:

mx3d-3d-metal-printing-robot-technology-autodesk-lenovo-04

mx3d-3d-metal-printing-robot-technology-autodesk-lenovo-05

It’s been quite a while since we’ve heard or seen anything else from MX3D. They are, however, actively hiring people experienced in Rhino, Grasshopper and other 3D modeling software as well as experts in programming or metallurgy. They’re continuing toward completion of the bridge and if you want to see the latest updates and the eventual announcement definitely follow them on Twitter or Facebook.

The post MX3D is 3D Printing the Metal Structures of the Future appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at April 06, 2017 01:21 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

SOLIDWORKS MBD: Complying with ASME Y14.5-2009 Continuous Feature Tolerances

Recently, some users have been asking about whether SOLIDWORKS MBD complies with the continuous feature requirements for ASME Y14.5-2009 standards. The standards specify two use cases shown in the figures below. One case involves coaxial same-sized holes, and the other involves multiple co-planar faces divided by grooves.

Figure 1: ASME Continuous feature standards

It is of great importance for SOLIDWORKS MBD to comply with these standards. Although these features (holes or planes) are disconnected, they are to be manufactured and inspected together continuously. Hence, they are called continuous features. I created some test models of my own to share with you how SOLIDWORKS MBD is complying with the latest industry standards.

Figure 2: Test model for continuous features, internal cylinders

Figure 3: Test model for continuous features, internal cylinders

Figure 4: Test model for continuous features, External Width

Figure 5: Test model for continuous features, External Width

I created these models to show the compliance of SOLIDWORKS MBD to the ASME continuous feature standards. Notice how MBD has the ability to highlight both features of the part when the single DimXpert annotation is selected. This graphical representation of the continuous feature helps remove any misconception during manufacturing. To achieve these results users can create a compound feature, which I demonstrate in some short videos below. Also to aid in the compliance with ASME standards users can easily add symbols to DimXpert annotations like the continuous feature symbol (CF) seen above. Symbols can be added from within the DimXpert manager under the dimension text category. Compound features and symbols are just another great way that SOLIDWORKS MBD is able to identically recreate and comply with the leading-industry standards.

Figure 6: Add symbol icon (left), SOLIDWORKS Symbol library (right)

 

Author information

Chris Pagliarini
Chris Pagliarini
Chris is a Roles Portfolio Management Intern currently studying at Wentworth Institute of Technology

The post SOLIDWORKS MBD: Complying with ASME Y14.5-2009 Continuous Feature Tolerances appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Chris Pagliarini at April 06, 2017 12:00 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to Hide/Show Dimensions in a SOLIDWORKS Drawing

In some cases instead of deleting a dimension, you might decide to hide SOLIDWORKS Drawing Dimensions. Now the question is how to make a hidden dimension visible again? This article demonstrates how to hide and then show a hidden dimension in the drawing environment.

Step 1: Right-click on a dimension in a drawing view and select Hide from the shortcut menu:

Hide SOLIDWORKS Drawing Dimensions

Right-click on a dimension and select Hide.

The image below shows that two dimensions are hidden: “3” and “150”.

SOLIDWORKS Drawing Dimensions are hidden

Dimensions “3” and “150” are hidden.

Step 2: Activate Hide/Show Annotations. This is done through View > Hide/Show > Annotations (see below)

Activate the Hide/Show Annotation

Step 3: When the Hide/Show Annotations is active, the hidden dimensions appear in a gray colour. At this stage, the mouse cursor shape will change to an eye with a cross line on it. Now, clicking on any gray hidden dimension will display them in the drawing.  Also, clicking on a visible dimension will change it’s colour to gray meaning that when the Hide/Show Annotation selection is complete, the gray dimensions will be hidden from view.

By activating Hide/Show Annotation, the hidden dimensions would show in gray color.

 

Step 4: Deactivate the Hide/Show Annotations – If only dimension “3” is selected, it will show up after deactivating the Hide/Show Annotations and others would still be hidden. In the following image, dimension “3” is selected to show up, while dimension “150” is still hidden.

Dimension “3” has reappeared and dimension “150” is still hidden.

Hide or show Multiple Dimensions at Once

When Hide/Show Annotations is activated, all hidden and shown dimensions would be shown either in gray or black color. Selecting shown dimension would change their color to gray and vice versa. Therefore, if Hide/Show Annotations is activated as shown on Step 2, any numbers of dimensions could be set hidden or show hidden dimensions. The following image demonstrates how more dimensions are set to hidden.

Multiple dimensions could be set hide or show while Hide/Show Annotations is active.

The post How to Hide/Show Dimensions in a SOLIDWORKS Drawing appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWE at April 06, 2017 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

Pay What You Want for This 10-Course Learn to Code 2017 Bundle

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Code. You don’t have to be a computer science hotshot to take the deep dive—heck, some people are up and running with their first project in a matter of weeks. But knowing where and how to enter can be half of the battle.

The recently-launched Learn How to Code 2017 Bundle is the perfect entry point and includes over 156 Hours of premium coding instruction, from Python to Ruby & everything in between.

Consisting of ten courses in total, the ‘Pay What You Want’ bundle covers not just specific code languages, but also how and why you may decide to choose one over another depending on the project at hand.

Included Courses:

  • Learn How To Code: Google’s Go Programming Language ($249 Value)
  • The Complete Python Course: Beginner to Advanced! ($195 Value)
  • Learn By Example: Scala ($50 Value)
  • Projects in Programming Languages: Ruby, Python, Java ($150 Value)
  • Learn Angular 2 from Beginner to Advanced ($195 Value)
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The post Pay What You Want for This 10-Course Learn to Code 2017 Bundle appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 06, 2017 11:49 AM

April 05, 2017

SolidSmack

A UK Engineer Just Built His Own Iron Man-Like Flying Suit

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Whether it’s the 1991 film The Rocketeer or any of the more recent Iron Man movies, Hollywood has been teasing us with the jet pack for years. After all—who wouldn’t want the chance to fly?

As a result, dozens—if not hundreds—of dreamers have built countless prototypes in an attempt to build the most viable solution capable of safely propelling a human body through the air. More recently, UK engineer Richard Browning has been making steady progress towards realizing his own interpretation of a flying suit.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JinhIHIF8Eo?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Rather than a traditional backpack-based jet propulsion system, Browning’s ‘Daedalus’ is a jet engine suit with independent thrusters for each limb. And while that may sound like all sorts of insanity, Browning relies heavily on his own athleticism to harness and control the system.

As for what it’s like to feel like a real-life Iron Man? According to Browning, flying the Daedalus is “like riding a bicycle in three dimensions”.

Find out more about Browning and the Daedalus over at Gravity.

The post A UK Engineer Just Built His Own Iron Man-Like Flying Suit appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at April 05, 2017 05:23 PM

VETR Speaker Design Goes Flat, Ditches the Box

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Traditional speakers, the kind that sits on your bookshelf, produce sound by applying an electrical audio signal to a voice-coil, which vibrates rapidly back and forth, thus moving a diaphragm, which pushes air resulting in an audible tone.

The design has not changed much over the century since the invention in 1925. However, VETR Audio, two brothers – one an engineer, the other a designer – from Phoenix, Arizona, wants to change the way audio is heard (and seen) with their PANL1 Speaker System.

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_iQEmpAaIw8?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The speakers were designed using a 1.3mm-thick carbon-fiber panel tacked to a brushed aluminum stand, which pump-out 48-watts per channel at a frequency range of 48 to 20,000Hz. Rather than housing tweeters and subwoofers in an enclosure, the speakers utilize exciters (or transducers) to vibrate the carbon-fiber panels to produce sound.

As such, these are limited in their ability to produce low-frequency bass like traditional speakers due to their large flexible membrane and enclosure. However, to overcome that limitation the PANL1 may be paired with a subwoofer.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_85937" style="width: 1100px;">VETR Speaker System including Subwoofer (they could have used a nicer cabinet for the shot, yes?)<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">VETR Speaker System including Subwoofer (they could have used a nicer cabinet for the shot, yes?)</figcaption></figure>

If the design seems familiar, it’s probably because it’s similar to an electrostatic loudspeaker (ESL), which vibrates a diaphragm material suspended between two stators. Are VETR’s PANL1 designed in the same way? It’s not clear – the technical detail is certainly lacking – but I bet my bottom dollar they share similar properties, as you can produce sound vibration using nearly any material sandwiched between two stators.

vetr-flat-speaker-design-boxless-kickstarter-02The rear of the PANL1 speakers with brushed aluminum housing.

Nevertheless, VETR is currently crowd-funding their PANL1 speakers on Kickstarter, passing their target goal of $10K in less than 24 hours, making for a successful run. Those who want to get their hands on the system can pledge $299 and up, which gets you a pair of PANL1 speakers as well as the subwoofer.

What do you think? Is this a valid speaker design? Or is it sending little conniptions through your auditory system?

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The post VETR Speaker Design Goes Flat, Ditches the Box appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at April 05, 2017 04:37 PM

This LEGO Macintosh Classic is Powered by a Raspberry Pi and an E-Paper Display

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One of the most remarkable things about the Raspberry Pi isn’t just in what it’s capable of doing—but how affordable it is. As a result, many users never think twice about building out fun side projects—many of which are some of the best examples of the single-board computer in-use.

The LEGO Macintosh Classic with e‑paper display is one of those projects.

Created by programmer Jannis Hermanns as a birthday present for a friend, the Wi-Fi enabled LEGO Macintosh replica runs Docker (via resin.io) on a Raspberry Pi Zero with an e‑paper display. While it’s not quite the original Macintosh Classic of yore, it’s a spectacular example of what the Raspberry Pi is capable of in the hands of a user with a little creativity and inspiration.

“While my son and I were playing with LEGO, after building a 1987 GMC Vandura and an off-road Segway I suddenly had the urge to build one of the first computers I remember using,” explains Hermanns.

Lego-Macintosh-Classic-5

After building a prototype with his son’s colored LEGOS, he used LEGO Digital Designer to rebuild the model in order to determine the appropriate pieces to order in white.

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Of course, fitting an e-paper display and powering it all up with a Raspberry Pi is no walk in the park, but Hermanns has documented his entire build process for anybody that wants to take the deep-dive for their next weekend project.

The post This LEGO Macintosh Classic is Powered by a Raspberry Pi and an E-Paper Display appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at April 05, 2017 03:35 PM

Model of the Week: Deadpool Bubble Pooter [POOT POWER!]

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You know what your party DOESN’T have. The ambiance created by a bubble-pooting Deadpool. Yes, folks, this will likely go down in SolidSmack history as either the height or depth of our weekly model feature, but hey, where else can you learn about the coolest design, latest tech AND how to make a Deadpool model that poots bubbles? Yeah, that’s what I thought.

You remember the Deadpool knife block? Well, that brilliance was created by the same Britt Michelsen who has now brought us the official, unofficial Bubble Breezer Deadpool – a mod of a BUB-L Breezer, a shoddy plastic toy of a man bent over, pants down, blowing bubbles out his yoohoo. Let’s just say, Britt’s version is much better, because skin cancer and Deadpool – yep, theeeeere’s the bottom. Here’s what it looks like IN ACTION:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2Ky0uxYKxtk?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The primary items you’ll need are:
A BUB-L Breezer
Bubble solution
Milliput Modeling Clay (or similar)
Sandable Primer/Filler
Utility knife
Sandpaper
Paint

Unless you want to clay model Deadpool’s head as well, you’ll need to 3D Print Britt’s Deadpool head model. She chopped the head off of this Deadpool model by Nika if you’re intersted in downloading the original model.

There’s a bit of modding, a bit of hacking and a bit of giggling throughout as you realize what you’re making, but it’s a bit of an interesting project in that regard with the improvements Britt explains in the process to reduce noise, fix arm movement and improve airflow for ultimate Deadpool poot bubble enjoyment.

You can download the model and see the step-by-step on Instructables.

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

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The post Model of the Week: Deadpool Bubble Pooter [POOT POWER!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at April 05, 2017 03:32 PM

Garage Inventor Colin Furze Squeezes a Motorcycle Engine into a Bumper Car

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When it comes to ‘garage inventors’, few people carry the title as well as Colin Furze. The plumber-turned-viral YouTube video star out of Stamford, Lincolnshire has created everything from the world’s fasted pram to a hoverbike in his humble UK-based garage workshop.

And while he probably worries his friends and family sick, he’s showing no signs of slowing down. In fact, he’s been busy lately cranking the extreme up to 11.

More recently, BBC and the Top Gear crew called upon Furze’s knack for creating insane vehicles to build a custom bumper car for the hit TV show’s resident racecar driver, The Stig. But this wasn’t your typical reimagination of a carnival ride—Furze managed to squeeze the power of a 600cc motorcycle into the body of a 1960s bumper car.

Says Furze:

“This 600cc monster is the work of hours of shed time working out how to squeeze a sports bike and wheels into a dodgy shell without making a death trap. Surprisingly, when driven in a straight line, it’s actually quite a solid ride—even when reaching 3-figure speeds. So did I make a ride fit for The Stig? I think so.”

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fGr0oifJMEI?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Equally important is Furze’s two-part behind the scenes build process:

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and

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/oKANFyeGXxc?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

Be sure to check out the rest of Furze’s insane builds over at his YouTube channel.

The post Garage Inventor Colin Furze Squeezes a Motorcycle Engine into a Bumper Car appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at April 05, 2017 03:05 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to Hide/Show Dimensions in a SOLIDWORKS Part

Do you ever hide SOLIDWORKS dimensions in the part environment? In case you have then you may be wondering how to make a hidden dimension reappear again.  This article will demonstrate how to hide a dimension and then make it visible again in the SOLIDWORKS Part environment.

Step 1: Right-click on the Annotation folder under feature manager design tree and check off Show Feature Dimensions. If this option is not checked off, the Hide option would not show up by accessing the right-mouse shortcut menu on a dimension.

Shortcut menu

Shortcut menu

Step 2:  Double-click on a feature to show all the dimensions associated to it. You can select a feature either from the graphics area or from the feature manager design tree.

Step 3: Right-click on a dimension and select Hide from the shortcut menu (see below). If Hide does not show up in the list, make sure Step 1 is carried out.

Hide SOLIDWORKS dimensions

Hide a Dimension in the Part Environment.

Dimension “30” Is Hidden.

Step 4: At this stage, if you click the parent Sketch for that feature, you will notice that all dimensions will show up including the hidden dimension. This happens because we hid the dimension in the feature level but now we are showing dimensions from the sketch level. Make sure you do not double-click on the sketch or edit it. Click just once with your left-mouse button.

Click Once on the Parent Sketch of That Feature.

Step 5: Now you can right-click on the previously hidden dimension and select Show (see below). Once you right-click on a hidden dimension, it will disappear while the menu is active. If you select Show it will reappear.

Right-click on the Previously Hidden Dimension and Select Show.

The post How to Hide/Show Dimensions in a SOLIDWORKS Part appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Mehdi Rezaei, CSWE at April 05, 2017 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Kinder Design Creates Innovative Products Faster with SOLIDWORKS Premium

At SOLIDWORKS, we love hearing stories of how our users create innovative products.  In today’s customer story highlight, we introduce Kinder Design Inc., a leading design and engineering services consulting firm based near Toronto, Canada. Not only does Kinder Design produce innovative designs for its customers, but they also used SOLIDWORKS solutions to create its own product, the Lift Top.  Owner and Mechanical Designer Tim Chung, who founded Kinder Design after spending over 10 years working as a mechanical engineer, previously relied on 2D design packages, like AutoCAD® and CADKEY®.  When starting his own business, he quickly realized that in order to be successful and continually grow his company, switching to a 3D design package would be critical to saving time and automating design processes.  It did not take long for Chung and Kinder Design to standardize on SOLIDWORKS Premium.

Chung explains, “With SOLIDWORKS® 3D design software, I am able to complete my work quickly and efficiently. SOLIDWORKS is also the most commonly used 3D package in the areas and industries in which I consult, so the decision to use SOLIDWORKS was easy to make.”

Not only does Kinder Design use SOLIDWORKS to provide efficient, cost-effective solutions for its clients, but they also develop its own innovative products, such as the Lift Top adjustable desktop table, with the help of SOLIDWORKS.  This Lift Top adjustable table allows users to work comfortably both sitting and standing with minimal effort switching back and forth.

During the development of the Lift Top, Chung’s goal was to make this table as portable and lightweight as possible to make it easy for on-the-go.  To make the product as light as possible while maintaining strength, Chung took advantage of SOLIDWORKS Simulation tools, which are included in SOLIDWORKS Premium to optimize the design. He was able to cut the number of prototypes by 75 percent.

To find out more about the Kinder Design and how it cut its development time in half with SOLIDWORKS Premium, Click Here.

 

Author information

Josie Morales
Josie Morales
Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post Kinder Design Creates Innovative Products Faster with SOLIDWORKS Premium appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Josie Morales at April 05, 2017 12:00 PM

April 04, 2017

SolidSmack

PERK Wants to Revolutionize Coffee with an Automated Pour-Over System

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From brewing methods to bean varieties, coffee connoisseurs have never had as many choices for their daily cup of brew as they do today.

And while some may swear by the simplicity of the good old-fashioned French press, brewing technologies have been slowly seeping their way into the mainstream; be it in the form of Nespresso pods or other automated systems. Few of these pod-based systems come close to emulating the taste and flavor of pour-over coffee, however. The problem is, few people have the patience to make their own pour-over coffee at home.

Enter the PERK.

Originally designed for brewing the perfect cup of joe in low-gravity environments, the PERK fully-automated pour-over coffee system gently pumps water through the coffee grains to ensure that the water reaches each grain evenly. Unlike a manual pour-over system, the PERK is also capable of lifting, tumbling and separating the coffee grains while it’s brewing.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/perk/perk-finally-a-fully-automated-pourover-coffee-mac/widget/video.html" width="800"> </iframe>

Says the company:

“The key to PERK’s groundbreaking performance is the way it takes advantage of the Physics principle of a ‘mechanical suspension’ to guarantee a perfect uniformity of saturation every time. This is done by creating a gentle, upward flow of water through the infusion chamber, creating an agitation force that lifts, separates and tumbles each coffee particle evenly. Until now, this has only been theoretically possible.”

While it appears to be in a 3D printed concept stage for now, the PERK team is currently seeking to fund their project on Kickstarter—and are already well on their way to covering their campaign goal of $100,000 with 39 days left to go. For the discerning coffee connoisseurs out there who want to be among the first to give the PERK a spin (although we always take Kickstarter projects with a giant grain of salt), the company is offering a limited amount of units for $174—that’s 40% off the $299 retail price.

The post PERK Wants to Revolutionize Coffee with an Automated Pour-Over System appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at April 04, 2017 04:43 PM

SolidSmack Radio | The Vertices Have Eyes (SP17 Edition)

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This week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist knocks you in the pop sockets with head-boppin’ groove tuneage to help propel you through the work week in style. Whether you find yourself inking markers until they’re dry, grinding material through a bandsaw, or working that 3D geometry all day, consider these fresh tracks as a tool for your process.

This week we’ll start things off with “Golden Days” from Whitney and work our way through tracks from Dannika, Craft Spells, Minden, OJR, and others before wrapping up with “Cape Coast” from Del Sur.

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:user:evdmedia:playlist:4D0tB494ksFIcT1AOrFHKX" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Vertices Have Eyes (SP17 Edition) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 04, 2017 12:14 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin

How to increment a Revision Automatically in a SOLIDWORKS PDM Workflow

In SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional and Standard, your Workflow can be set up to automatically increment the revision value as a file moves through the approval process.  Looking through the properties of the States and Transitions in a pre-established workflow you might have noticed a number of settings related to revision information.  You might be wondering how these all work together.  Here is a basic overview of how a workflow will automatically increment the SOLIDWORKS PDM Revision.

There are two parts to the process:

  1. Setting the revision information in the State,
  2. Then creating the actual action that will increment the revision in the Transition (the screen shots below are an example using the default Workflow with the default Vault setup in SOLIDWORKS PDM).
Example Document Workflow

Example Document Workflow

Revision information in the State

Before a Transition can be set up to increment the SOLIDWORKS PDM revision value, the state must be told what “Revision Number” will be used.

Step 1:  Edit the State where the revision will be set, and go to the Revision Numbers tab.

Revision Numbers Tab

Revision Numbers Tab

 

Step 2:  Select the “Revision Number” that will be incremented from the drop list (in a SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard vault there will be only one “Revision Number” available).  You can also set the “Revision Variable”.  The “Revision Variable” setting here has absolutely nothing to do with the process of incrementing the revision through the workflow though, it’s actually used by the manual “Set Revision” command.

Setting the Revision

Setting the Revision

Step 3:  In the table you will see the “Revision Number Component” associated to the selected “Revision Number”.  Each component can have an “Increment by” value set here.  This “Increment by” setting is often a cause of confusion as this setting is also found in the Transition properties, so the question often comes up of where it should be set.  This really depends on your workflow and revision schema, but you must set it in either one or the other, if a value is set in both State and Transition then this will result in revisions being skipped by the automatic process.  If you are using major and minor revisions with multiple transitions which should behave differently entering the same state then the increment setting should be set in the transition.  If all transitions entering a state should increment the revision by the same amount then set the value in the state.  In this example we’ll set the increment value here in the state to “1”.

Revision Increment Value Set

Revision Increment Value Set

Revision information in the Transition

Now that the State knows what revision number is assigned to it and how much the revision number is incremented by, the Transition can be set up to use that information to perform an automatic increment of that Revision Number.

Step 1:  Edit the Transition that enters the state where the revision information has been set up, and go to the Actions tab.  To automatically increment the Revision as the file passes through the Transition, two actions should be set up. one to set the “Revision” variable and the other to increment the system revision value.

Setting up the Transition

Setting up the Transition

Step 2:  First, create the action that will set the Revision variable value on the file’s data card.  Click “Add Action” and set it to Type “Set Variable”.  Give the action a description and select the Revision variable from the “Variable” drop list.  Next to the Value box, click the > button and select the “Next Revision” option.  Click Ok to finish creating the action.

Defining the transition action

Defining the transition action

Step 3:  Next, create the action that will increment the system revision value.  Click “Add Action” and set the Type to “Inc. Revision” and enter a description, then click OK to create the action.

Create the Action

Create the Action

Note:  The “Increment by” field on the “Revision Numbers” tab of the Transition should be blank, if there is a “0” in the field there it will block the revision increment, if there is a “1” it will cause the file to skip revisions (in this example where the increment value has already been set in the State).

Increment By Field

Increment By Field

These steps should be repeated for any transition that enters the state which should increment the SOLIDWORKS PDM revision value.

The post How to increment a Revision Automatically in a SOLIDWORKS PDM Workflow appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Tips, Videos & Tutorials from Javelin.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at April 04, 2017 12:00 PM