Planet SolidWorks

December 17, 2018

SolidSmack

Erik Åberg’s Ghostkube Is Now On Kickstarter, Letting You Purchase Your Own Origami Wood Cube

Ghostkube


Three years ago, we covered the Ghostkube – paper engineer Erik Åberg’s origami creation made from wooden cubes. Instead of using scrap paper as the base material, the Ghostkube is composed of small, interlocking wooden cubes and triangles which are designed to move in unison. The result is one “master” cube which can be rearranged in many ways yet still mimic the fluidity of a living object.

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Fast forward to 2018 and Åberg has refined his design and is making it available to the public for the first time so you can create the mesmerizing cubical creations. The cubes are each created with six of the same piece with the ability to interlock with each other to create a variety of kinetic sculptures you see below and a keystone cube should you want to lock your designs in place.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Ghostkube</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Ghostkube</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Ghostkube</figure>

Just like the prototype, the Ghostkube can be made to form a seemingly infinite number of shapes which when manipulated, make it move as smooth as an early morning coffee. The more small cubes there, the more shapes you can pull off with the Ghostkube.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Ghostkube</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Ghostkube</figure>

With the number of cubes being relative to the design possibilities, Åberg created a new plastic system which allows you to connect more than one Ghostkube together. This makes it possible to build Ghostkube sculpts with an unlimited number of small cubes.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Ghostkube</figure>

The Ghostkube is currently live on Kickstarter and has already achieved its meager $2,207 goal (pushing toward $20k). Kit’s start at $50 and, if you decide to purchase one, Erik was kind enough to pass along an offer for a free Keystone block –
Just send an email to friendsandfamily@erikaberg.com with your backer number and “ULTRA” as the subject.

You can find more about this majestic moving cube on Kickstarter as well as on Erik Åberg’s Facebook page.

The post Erik Åberg’s Ghostkube Is Now On Kickstarter, Letting You Purchase Your Own Origami Wood Cube appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at December 17, 2018 05:44 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Warning when Inserting Complex Components

Everyone wants improved performance when working with their assemblies.  If this is causing a significant hindrance to your productivity, let us help with our Large Assembly Productivity Service and we will solve any assembly issues you may be having!

What some may not realize is that the bulk of the lag may come down to a couple “simple” components.  Imported geometry from a 3rd party source is a common problem.  While it looks like a simplified model without a long list of features, all of the fine details with a high Image Quality setting can wreak havoc on generating the graphics in assemblies.

SOLIDWORKS 2019 now provides a pop-up warning as you insert a complex part so you can take action before things get out of control.  In the example below, I’ve inserted an imported model of a Chiller.  No features in the model, just a single part file with several dumb bodies.  When I insert this into my assembly there is a warning in the top right corner of my graphics window.  Click the down-arrow at the bottom of the warning to give more details as shown.

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Insert Warning

This warning is given when the inserted part meets one of the following criteria:

  • Over 3,500 faces and over 150,000 graphics triangles
  • Over 300,000 graphics triangles

It also gives you quick access to the Performance Evaluation tool to give you an overall analysis of the assembly.  Sure enough the Chiller part is the worst component for Display Performance with the most graphical triangles.

SOLIDWORKS Performance Evaluation

Click on Assembly Visualization to see how this stacks up with other components in my assembly.  Sort by the Total Graphics Triangle column and we’ll see there are a few other components that we’ll need to deal with.

SOLIDWORKS Assembly Visualization

On opening the part it turns out this was an imported component with hundreds of bodies, complex detail and a higher Image Quality setting.

SOLIDWORKS Imported Part Image Quality

Perhaps it’s time to learn better methods of working with imported vendor models:

The post SOLIDWORKS 2019 Warning when Inserting Complex Components appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at December 17, 2018 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Microsoft’s AR Technology Finds Its Way Into Toyota Engineering Teams

Toyota Hololens

Even if you have just a grain of knowledge about the automotive industry, you’ll know how resilient Toyota is. This resilience is mostly due to what the company calls “The Toyota Way” – an adaptation of the kaizen philosophy where everyone, from the head honcho to the interns, work together to further improve the business. This includes adopting new business practices, ideas, and yes… new technologies.

With other automotive companies like Volvo and Ford using AR in their car building processes, Toyota now plans on working with Microsoft’s AR technology and HoloLens to make car production much more efficient. Their plan is to create a solution for having fewer people to work on a single automobile at a time, thus reducing production costs and saving time.

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In a more practical scenario, AR project manager Koichi Kayano uses an AR headset to measure paint thickness – a task which would traditionally take two people around a day to complete by placing paper patterns on the car exterior and scanning the paint using a special tool.

Toyota AR

With the HoloLens, Kayano and his AR team have built a program which allows the AR headset to project the same dot patterns onto the car without having to go through the effort of placing them physically. This visual guide can then be used to locate the areas of the car which need to be tested. Instead of taking a full working day, the entire process can be cut down to about four hours.

This is on top of the big advantage AR has which allows Toyota’s design team to make on-the-spot changes to 3D models without going through all the paperwork; designers and engineers can simply change the model in real time and everyone working on the project gets notified.

Toyota AR

Apart from the HoloLens, Toyota is also dabbling in Microsoft Dynamics 365, a resource planning application that allows companies to design the layouts of their sites in VR before viewing the changes in the real world through AR. This ultimately lets them better plan out their factories and workspaces before even setting any equipment.

These are just two of Toyota’s plans to bring itself into the future. With a more efficient production process at the cost of less manpower, Toyota looks poised to stick around for a long time.

The post Microsoft’s AR Technology Finds Its Way Into Toyota Engineering Teams appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at December 17, 2018 12:56 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: Geier Glove Co. Elkskin Work Gloves

Elkskin Work Gloves

Founded in 1927 in Centralia, Washington by the Geier Brothers, the Geier Glove Company has been churning out some of the world’s finest work gloves for heavy wear and tear.

Made from Elkskin, which is more rugged than deerskin, these gloves can stand up to just about anything you can throw at them—from nasty wood splinters to cold steel bars. Heck—they even make great winter gloves whether you use them in the shop at all.

Made in the USA, you can’t go wrong with this Western staple in your workshop.

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Geier Glove Elkskin Gloves — $58.95

Features:

  • Men’s elkskin gloves in slip-on style
  • Rugged and tough for work or riding
  • Made of the finest elkskin
  • Unlined
  • Made In USA

PURCHASE VIA AMAZONAffiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: Geier Glove Co. Elkskin Work Gloves appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at December 17, 2018 11:58 AM

December 16, 2018

The Javelin Blog

Adjusting the SOLIDWORKS Manage Bill of Materials Performance

To increase SOLIDWORKS Manage performance when a large BOM of Record is selected for the first time, an administrator can specify the number of BOM levels that will be loaded.

To do this select Administration Options.

Accessing Administration Options

Accessing Administration Options

 

Next from the Advanced options, select the General and click on the BOM tab.

SOLIDWORKS Manage Performance BOM Levels

Defining Number of BOM Levels

The Number of Levels can be specified for View and Edit Mode.

The post Adjusting the SOLIDWORKS Manage Bill of Materials Performance appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at December 16, 2018 01:00 PM

December 15, 2018

The Javelin Blog

List all Logged In SOLIDWORKS PDM Users

Using the SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional search tool, we can complete a search to list all logged in users.

Importing the Users Search Card

  • Via the Administration Tool; open the card editor;
Via the Administration Tool; open the card editor;

Card Editor

  • Select File > Import
Select File > Import

Select File > Import

  • Navigate to the client installation files and select all(Search Complete)_gb.crd for English
    • Select > Open

Default location of the client install files is; C:\Program Files\SOLIDWORKS Corp\SOLIDWORKS PDM\Default Cards

Default Cards

Default Cards

  • Save the card

List all logged in users

  • Open the Search Tool
Open the Search Tool

Open the Search Tool

  • Select the Show Users search
    • Leave the User name field blank
    • Check Show logged in users box
    • Clear the Show non-logged in users box
      • Select Search

 

Show Logged in Users option

Show Logged in Users option

This will return a list of all users who are currently logged in to the vault.

Scenarios where this may be useful…

Scenario 1: Upgrading the vault

For a vault upgrade, we strongly recommend that all files are checked in, and users are logged out.  Using this search we can ensure all users are logged out before completing the upgrade.

Scenario 2: The license fight

If you’re constantly in a fight for a PDM license so you can access the vault, you can ask one of your fellow colleagues to complete this search and find out who you need to request to log out so you can gain a license. *

*Alternatively, you could recruit your friendly neighborhood VAR and purchase more licenses

The post List all Logged In SOLIDWORKS PDM Users appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at December 15, 2018 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Smack Powered Ferret Nibbles

It began slowly, a low hum buried in a flea-bitten haze of fur and glowing eyes. What we were hearing in the cavern and what we were measuring on the nibblometer didn’t match though. The power readings were off the charts, and all we could do is huddle in the corner, cover our eyes, and hope they would pass us to get to these links.

Celia Lowenthal – The illustrious New York-based Illustrator has a way with a color palette in a refreshing comic-like style of period scenes.

Video Game Propaganda Prints – All of Fernando Reza’s illustrated prints are amazing but these, these take the cake. From Dig Dug and Pac-man to Zelda and Mario.

Human Terrain -Matt Daniels set out to visualize human population growth. This is the interactive map that shows you the terrain of the world, based on quantities of humans.

Dr. Seuss, Taxidermist – Tufted Gustards, Drouberhannis, and Andulovian Gracklers, of course. The famous collection of stuffed Seuss oddities.

Yōkai – Instagram follow of the week. Cristian Marianciuc’s paper crane creations take origami to the next level… and then the next.

Fiddleridoo – Andy Graham has created “a hybrid didgeridoo and bowed stringed instrument” that meshes the sound of each. If a fret could be added now.

The Tree – In a world of drought, an old man spends his days collecting drops of water to quench the thirst of a dead tree.

Emission Series – A geometric exploration in shape and light. “Each iteration I would duplicate the setup, create a new illustration, transition that into a 3D scene, and then recompose the final output.”

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Heavy Metal – New one from Justice for their Grammy-nominated album, Woman Worldwide.

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The post Friday Smackdown: Smack Powered Ferret Nibbles appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at December 15, 2018 12:00 AM

December 14, 2018

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM Reorganize Index Process

SOLIDWORKS PDM Reorganize Index or Rebuild can increase performance on a fragmented database. If fragmentation is between 10 – 30% then Reorganize is recommended, when above 30% a Rebuild would be best. For fragmentation values lower than 10%, or for smaller databases, Reorganize and Rebuild may not increase performance. The SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base article S-061702 offers a query to find average fragmentation and provides guidance on whether to use the Reorganize or Rebuild tasks.

How to Reorganize a Single Database

In the example below, we will look at how to create a one time task to Reorganize a single database. I am specifying a one time task as I wish to only use this task when fragmentation is between 10 – 30% as noted earlier.

In Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio (2014), under Management, right-click on Management Plans and select Maintenance Plan Wizard.

Start Maintenance Plan Wizard

Start Maintenance Plan Wizard

Identify the Plan Properties. Since I only want to run this task when there is minimum amount of fragmentation, I will run this task on demand, by selecting the Not Scheduled option

Maintenance Plan Properties

Maintenance Plan Properties

 

Select the Maintenance Task(s) that will be executed by this Plan.

Maintenance Plan Tasks

Along with the Reorganize Task, I have also selected the Update Statistics Task, as well. This Task updates query optimization Statistics, which in turn can lead to increased query performance. Updating query Statistics, requires that the queries to be recompiled. This can have the effect of reducing performance, so frequent updating of Statistics should be avoided.

The management of Statistics can be handled by automatic options and may sufficient, to maintain performance. These options are Auto Create and  Auto Update. Auto Create will automatically create missing Statistics and Auto Update will update Statistics when they’re deemed to be out of date. Both of these are set from the Options tab of a Databases Properties. The Database Properties are available by right-clicking on a Database.

Auto-create and Auto-up Statistics

Once the Tasks have been identified and the order in which the Tasks are executed, have been defined. The next step is to identify the database(s) to run this Task(s) on.

Specify Database[s] for Index Task

Specify Database[s] for Index Task

If you would like to have a report generated for the outcome of this task, identify how you would like this report created.

Report Options

Report Options

Confirm that the task is configured correctly and click on Finish to start the task.

Maintenance Plan Review

Maintenance Plan Review

When the task is complete you can review the results and the report.

Maintenance Plan Complete

Maintenance Plan Complete

The Maintenance plan will be saved for later use.

Saved Task

Saved Task

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Reorganize Index Process appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at December 14, 2018 01:00 PM

December 13, 2018

SolidSmack

Reactions to Materialise’s 3D Printing Trends for 2019

Materialise published a series of trends and we have some thoughts.

Materialise is one of the larger and more notable 3D print services in the industry, and they’re one of the oldest as well. They work with global businesses to help produce 3D prints in many ways, including software and services.

Recently they published a list of five 3D printing trends they’ve observed and expect to continue into 2019. Let’s take a look at them.

1. Applications, not technology, will drive the 3D printing industry forward

They propose:

”The industry was shifting its focus to identifying the right applications for 3D printing, rather than in developing new technologies. In 2019 that tendency will intensify, as the application-driven approach to 3D printing is likely to gain attention from the financial world.”

We believe this has been true for several years and yes, it will intensify. The huge boom in 3D printing interest circa 2010-2014 was largely due to boosterism and misguided marketing related to the notion of consumer 3D printing. While that has evaporated, the rest of the industry is focusing on making the devices perform productive tasks – and that’s what is driven by 3D printing applications.

2. A rise in polymer materials for 3D printing

They propose:

“Last year, we predicted that Metal 3D Printing would get its deserved attention in 2018. This time around, it’s the plastic materials for 3D printing that have been preparing for substantial growth in 2019. Major material manufacturers are playing a big role in this movement.”

We believe this is true. We have observed a massive interest in the space by several major chemical companies including Mitsubishi, SABIC, DSM and, perhaps most notably, BASF. These companies intend on setting a beachhead in a new market (for them) ahead of an anticipated period of growth.

BASF in particular has been ingenious and relentless in their myriad ways of attaching themselves to the 3D printing ecosystem of many companies. They’ve bought companies, have partnered with companies and also supply companies. The others will likely do the same.

But how do they compete? Largely it will be by leveraging their enormous catalogs of thermoplastics that have been developed over decades and are well familiar to many design engineers, who would welcome their appearance as a 3D printing material.

3. Software will be the key to boosting productivity in 3D printing

They propose:

”As industries work on integrating 3D printing into their production mix, their challenges are less about technology and more about economics. The goal is to reduce costs and to increase efficiency.”

We believe that there are still massive barriers to ease of use, some related to design tools and others related to 3D printing operations tools. Both of which must be addressed to truly open up the industry to massive growth in the future.

This has been going on for some time now, with many companies attempting to simplify various aspects of the 3D printing workflow. Obviously, that will continue. But the big question is whether anyone will invent a breakthrough approach that will vastly simplify the entire process.

4. Technology-neutral interconnectivity, not proprietary solutions

They propose:

“For 3D printing to unlock that potential and claim a bigger share of that $12 trillion market, the 3D printing industry needs offer interoperability and technology-neutral solutions. If industrial manufacturers want to be serious about adopting 3D printing as a complementary manufacturing technology for final products, they simply cannot afford to be locked into proprietary solutions that limit their flexibility and choice.”

We agree that this is necessary, but we’re not certain it will happen, as existing companies generally have a tendency to offer increasingly proprietary solutions. MakerBot, for example, just released a new 3D printer that requires proprietary material. All of them are looking for ways to make their products “sticky”, so that once bought, they will provide a revenue stream for years to come.

That tendency will be very hard to overcome. I believe it will take one or two companies to abandon habits and embrace open standards. Once they get business, others will follow.

5. Governments will get more involved

They propose:

“We have seen 3D printing emerge as a discussion point in governmental environments, says Bram Smits, Public Policy Officer at Materialise, and we believe this will increase significantly in 2019. This rise is a signal that 3D printing is gaining importance in society and is freeing itself from the label of a prototyping technology.”

We believe this will be a regional thing. Some jurisdictions have already taken on 3D printing as a strategy to meet growth goals, while others have ignored the technology entirely. In major markets we suspect the majority of activity will be driven by industry and governments will follow.

We can only hope that any regulations devised will be done so intelligently, taking into account the opinions of experts, unlike some rash decisions made in certain countries reacting to non-issues like 3D printed weapons.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Reactions to Materialise’s 3D Printing Trends for 2019 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at December 13, 2018 06:01 PM

Everyday Apps Reimagined As Products From The 20th Century

Re:Birth 20th Century Apps

Thomas Ollivier isn’t like some designers – he was born in the 20th century. There are so many products from that time, that inspired the products of this time, but Thomas has made the correlation even more direct.

Using decades-old products as an inspiration, the French designer rebranded the ancient gadgets with apps and programs we use today. Dubbed Re:Birth, the project should be near and dear to those born waaaaaaaaaay back before the year 2000.

Re:Birth 20th Century Apps Re:Birth 20th Century Apps Re:Birth 20th Century AppsThere’s the high-tech Netflix View-Master you can use to stream over a million movie and TV reels. You can call over your friends to watch them using your What’s App Walkie-Talkie and document the entire hangout using an Instagram Disposable Camera (complete with vintage filters).

Re:Birth 20th Century Apps Re:Birth 20th Century AppsRe:Birth 20th Century AppsBefore posting them in your family album, you can doctor the pictures using the Adobe Illustrator Etch-A-Sketch or through the Snapchat Selfie Machine while listening to some old school tunes on your Spotify Walkman.

Re:Birth 20th Century Apps Re:Birth 20th Century AppsOnce the photos are finished, you can make use of the Google Speak & Spell to properly label the album before contacting your friends using a Facebook Pager (because what other mobile device would you use to keep in touch) to tell your friends and family to come over and view the album with you.

Or you could just use the apps on your phone/computer to do all the work. But where’s the fun in that?

Sadly, these are only concept designs, as the cost of producing the gadgets (and the hilarious level of impracticality) would be more than it’s all worth. It is interesting to think how those products inspired our current apps though and what the current apps may inspire in the future. All these vintage redesigns and more can be found on Thomas Ollivier’s webpage.

The post Everyday Apps Reimagined As Products From The 20th Century appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at December 13, 2018 03:56 PM

The Javelin Blog

Geodesic Entities are new in SOLIDWORKS 2019

In SOLIDWORKS 2019, using the Offset on Surface tool, you can create Geodesic Entities. Within the Offset to Surface tool, you need to specify either you want a Geodesic Offset or an Euclidean Offset. The Offset on Surface tool can be accessed through Tools > Sketch Tools > Offset on Surface. Previously you were only able to create Euclidean Offset using the Offset on Surface tool.

Geodesic Offset creates an offset using the shortest possible distance between the edge that is going to be used to create the offset and the resultant offset entity on the curvature surface. With this method, the curvature is taken into account for calculating the offset distance.

Geodesic Offset in the Offset on Surface Tool

Geodesic Offset in the Offset on Surface Tool

In a Euclidean Offset, the distance between the selected edge and the resultant offset edge does not include the curvature of surface and it is a linear distance.

Geodesic Entities in the Offset on Surface Tool

Euclidean Offset in the Offset on Surface Tool

The post Geodesic Entities are new in SOLIDWORKS 2019 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at December 13, 2018 01:00 PM

December 12, 2018

SolidSmack

Smart Design: The SPLITTER Combines a Spatula, a Spork, and Tongs

Splitter outdoor utensil

Three words for ya. Camping. Is. Fun. Besides the heat, the cold, the rain, the wasps, ticks, poison ivy, and animals that would devour you given the chance, it’s one of the most enjoyable experiences you’ll have. Prepping and lugging the necessities into the great outdoors can present some other challenges. Did you remember your sleeping bag and headlamp? Tent and toiletries? Clothes and food?

Speaking of food: while you can get by on trail mix and 5-year old Spam, nothing beats cooking your own meals. The problem? More stuff to pack in your bag. But you can start whittling weight and extras down with some smart design.

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THE SPLITTER

True to its name, THE SPLITTER is a multi-function utensil that is a spatula and a long ol’ spork. When combined using a stainless steel clip-pin, it’s like the VOLTRON of camping gear–the two form a pair of tongs. If you’ve ever camped, you know how this 3-in-1 tool could help make cooking outdoors more convenient and less laborious.

Created by outdoor accessory company Full Windsor, it’s a 50-gram utensil made from stainless 1-mm sheet Titanium with a number of spatula, spork, and tongs features which cater to spatula, spork, and tongs aficionados.

Splitter outdoor utensilThe spatula has a chamfered edge to make scraping food easier. On the side, its serrated edge doubles as a knife to help with cutting meat or amputating your arm in case you get it wedged between a bear and a boulder.

The spork, on the other hand, is longer than the one you get with that cup-o-noodles (10 inches long, to be exact) and can reach into most food packs. It also has a volume of 1 Tbsp and those iconic fork edges (which everyone still wonders how to use).Splitter outdoor utensil

Held together by an integrated stainless steel pin, the two utensils combine into a set of flexible tongs which allow you to pick up food after dropping it on the earthy floor. You’ll also be glad to know the spatula edge and the sporky grip can still be used when in tong form.

Splitter outdoor utensilSince THE SPLITTER is made of Titanium, it’s less conductive than other metals, making it 15.8% less likely you’ll cuss up a storm in front of your family when cooking those brats. It is also recyclable, so don’t worry about those trees, horny toads, and militant environmentalists trying to shame you.

A lot of people seem to love the idea of having a compact cooking utensil because the Splitter overshot its initial $15,000 Kickstarter goal by over 10 times with a final funding of $164,713. You can find out more and snag one on THE SPLITTER Kickstarter page.

The post Smart Design: The SPLITTER Combines a Spatula, a Spork, and Tongs appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at December 12, 2018 08:58 PM

MakerBot Method: Performance 3D Printer (Not Stasis Pod)

Despite often being pragmatic to the point of dispassionate, it turns out that I am not immune to hype, particularly when it comes to 3D printers.  So, I fell for the lure of MakerBot’s announcement of a new product reveal on December 11th featuring cryptic and tantalizing images of glass and angular enclosures. 

<figure class="wp-block-image">MakerBot Method Teaser</figure>

It was a delightful marketing ploy that tugged our emotional heartstrings and PLA filament things. And then the reveal…

The
MakerBot

Method

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The MakerBot Method–a deep-space hibernation pod!  A surprising, no, shocking reveal that solidifies MakerBot as part of the vanguard leading the industrial revolution while using their foreknowledge of an impending robot revolution to help humanity prepare for off-earth cryosleep until which point it is safe to return for reanimation and recolonization.*deep breath*

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Wait. What’s that you say? This is actually a desktop 3D printer.  Oh…  That makes more sense, I suppose. Well, props to the design team for making it look like the coolest little hypersleep chamber. Ahh, this video make it all clear:

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As the first 3D printer for MakerBot in two years, Method is a new class of 3D printer for MakerBot described as ‘The First Performance 3D Printer” which they define as “bridging the gap between industrial 3D printer accuracy and desktop 3D printer accessibility.” It builds on patented Stratasys 3D printer tech and the Replicator line, in particular, the Replicator Z18 that launched as a printer with “The best price-to-performance ratio in the extra-large, professional 3D printer category”.

That September 2016 announcement for the new Replicator products was the point MakerBot refocused on professionals and educators. It’s a trend seen across the manufacturing industry where manufacturers starting with a focus on the consumer market are exploring the shift to other markets, particularly, the professional and educational markets. 

What’s most shocking, at least from my vantage point, is the under-adoption of additive manufacturing in those sectors. In order to achieve penetration, manufacturers are focused on delivering exceptional reliability, print quality, and ease of use.  The way to do this is through improved design and engineering and by controlling the build environment and materials but without the high cost of industrial grade printers.  This is exactly what it appears MakerBot is attempting to do. 

And the price? It’s right in line with the Z18. In fact, it’s the same price – $6499. While the Method has a smaller build volume, MakerBot is touting the Method’s dimensional accuracy of ±0.2mm with speeds up to 2x faster than other desktop 3D printers. It ships Q1 of 2019 and pre-order is available now.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

The Specs

Layer Resolution Range: 20 – 400 microns
Extruders: Dual Performance Extruders (Model & Support)
Supported Materials: MakerBot Precision Materials (Tough, PLA, PVA), MakerBot Specialty Materials (PETG, PVA-M, more to come)
Build Volume: 7.5 x 7.5 x 7.75 in (19 L x 19 W x 19.6 H cm)
Build Surface: Spring Steel Build Plate with Grip Surface
Size: 17.2 x 16.3 x 25.6 in (43.7 L x 41.3 W x 64.9 H cm)
Connectivity: WiFi, Ethernet, USB Drive
Power Need: 100 – 240V / 4A, 50-60 Hz / 400 W max.
Price: $6499
More Info: MakerBot

Will the MakerBot Method live up to the hype? Will MakerBot’s move pay off? Will I secure a stasis pod before the robot rising? Stay tuned…

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

The post MakerBot Method: Performance 3D Printer (Not Stasis Pod) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Dan Slaski at December 12, 2018 07:01 PM

How To Be As Lazy As Possible

It’s Christmas time again, and that means I’m kind of searching for new topics. I keep an eye on the SolidWorks forums, and there is a wealth of great topics…

by matt at December 12, 2018 05:12 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to start off with Pre-Made SOLIDWORKS Parts

The final chapter in my SOLIDWORKS Part Template Series is to start off with pre-made parts. If your company is one that has a set amount of jigs and fixtures, or creates similar parts all the time with some dimensional changes then pre-made SOLIDWORKS Parts is for you.

One thing that could save time is to have different sets of templates per material type and the extra mile would be thickness, too. So for example, you can have a template dedicated for 0.250″ (1/4″) – Stainless Steel (ferritic) and another for 0.125″ (1/8″) – Plain Carbon Steel.

If you often make similar parts, it could be in your best interest to start off with an example part. Once this is complete you can edit a few dimensions and a couple properties then you’re done. Look at that, a brand new part in minutes and if linked to the proper drawing template (another series), the full set can be sent to the manufacturer.

An example of a pre-made part is best demonstrated with sheet metal. Please take a look at the screen shot below:

Sheet Metal Part Pre-made

Sheet Metal Part Pre-made

Creating a part following the best practices like naming conventions to help find particular features faster and naming dimensions for future properties usage or equations.

Pre-made SOLIDWORKS Part

Sheet Metal Part with Pre-made Features

But the best advice is to keep it simple and don’t overly complicate the template. Make is so anyone can open it and completely understand it.

This completes my SOLIDWORKS Part Template Series. Thank you for reading and following along.

The post How to start off with Pre-Made SOLIDWORKS Parts appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at December 12, 2018 01:00 PM

December 11, 2018

The Javelin Blog

How to specify where SOLIDWORKS should look for Document Templates

So you created the much needed SOLIDWORKS Part template, but you can’t seemed to load it. Not to worry – I will show you how to add templates to SOLIDWORKS with an option called “File Locations”.

  1. With SOLIDWORKS open, pick on the top cog icon and click “Options”, or select Tools > Options
  2. At about the middle of the System Options list on the left, click on “File Locations“.
  3. In the drop down box under “Show folders for:” we are going to select “Document Templates” if not already selected.
  4. Then you will click on the “Add…” button on the right.
System Options File Locations

System Options File Locations

This will open up a standard dialog box. This is where you can point to where you saved your template. In here you can create a new folder, place it where you want, if you haven’t already, for all your custom templates.

Once done creating or finding the file location, you are going to click on the route folder where the template is. For example, if you placed the templates in a new file folder called “Custom Templates”, click the folder itself and NOT what’s within the folder as shown in the example below:

Custom Template Location

Custom Template Location Example

Now click “Select Folder” on the bottom. This will bring you back to the “System Options” menu. This is the time to check the file location to ensure it was added correctly.

If you have several templates locations scattered on your company server, in your PDM vault, or on your C: drive you can set the order of file locations for SOLIDWORKS to search for templates, use the Move Up and Move Down buttons to reorder the folder list:

Document Templates Folder Order

Document Templates Folder/Location Order

Once ordered in the desired manner, click “OK“. You have now pointed SOLIDWORKS to your custom templates.

The post How to specify where SOLIDWORKS should look for Document Templates appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at December 11, 2018 01:00 PM

December 10, 2018

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: Minimal 3D Printed Headphone Stand [Chunky!]

You know how tough it can be without a stylin’ set of headphones bakin’ up sweet sounds in your earholes, aaaaand how handy they can be to avoid talking to people. Either way you use them, you need a place to store them and the bottom drawer next to that stale pile of Cheez-It’s ain’t cuttin’ it.

If you don’t have a headphone stand, we’ve got one you can 3D print in a matter of minutes for a dose of super style and easy access when you see that jabber jaws comin’ round the corner.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

The Monastic Headphone Stand you see here was designed by Jan Geloen. Though Jan has a Thingiverse page, it was fellow Thingiverse user, Cory Robertson, who provided the 3D printed file.

The overall size of the stand is 6″ x 9″ x 3″ (152mm x 228mm x 76mm) and the design really couldn’t be more simple, but it’s the simplicity and thick, blocky structure that, to me at least, makes it so attractive.

Jan uses Velleman Vertex 3D Printers, which he also had a part in designing, hashing out the concept, the mechanical and electrical design, and the prototyping. Well done!

You could probably extrude this up in SolidWorks or Tinkercad faster that clicking over to download it, but if want a starting point, you can snag the .stl model on Thingiverse. (Bonus! Check out Jan Geloen’s designs and his website here!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

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This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Model of the Week: Minimal 3D Printed Headphone Stand [Chunky!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at December 10, 2018 11:31 PM

Enhancements in Over-The-Hill Software

Ageism is really a terrible thing. I’ve never been self-conscious about my age until a couple of years ago. I feel energetic, mentally agile, able to form unconventional ideas, vital.…

by matt at December 10, 2018 08:37 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Preview Blocks in the Design Library

The SOLIDWORKS Design Library is a great tool to keep all of your common parts, features, tools, etc.  This also provides access to your blocks for a quick drag and drop.  A SOLIDWORKS 2019 enhancement provides thumbnail previews of blocks in the Design Library.  This makes it easier to find the block you need.

SOLIDWORKS Design Library Preview Blocks

SOLIDWORKS 2019 Thumbnail Preview of Blocks in Design Library

The following formats are supported for SOLIDWORKS Design Library Preview Blocks:

  • .sldnotestl
  • .sldsffvt
  • .sldsfstl
  • .sldsym
  • .sldweldfvt
  • .sldweldstl
  • .dwg files
  • .dxffiles
  • .sldblk
  • .sldnotefvt
  • .sldgtolfvt
  • .sldgtolstl

In past versions you needed to hover your cursor over the block to see the preview.  The icon was the same for all blocks of similar type.

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Blocks in Design Library

SOLIDWORKS 2018 Blocks in Design Library

The post SOLIDWORKS 2019 Preview Blocks in the Design Library appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at December 10, 2018 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

MIT Media Labs’ Plant-Powered Robot is Paving the Way for Cyborg Botany

You don’t have to be an absolute green thumb to understand how plants eat, breathe, and even generate their own bio-electricity. But can a plant use its own bio-energy sources to power a robot? Thanks to a recent project by MIT scientists Harpreet Sareen and Pattie Maes, we now know.

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Elowan is a self-driving robot powered by plant energy. Using the bio-electricity generated by the plant on top of its head and a series of electrodes attached to the robot, this plant-robot hybrid propels itself forward or backward depending on where the light shines on it. Elowan robot plant

Just like humans, changes in the environment such as gravity, light exposure, and temperature cause plants to get bio-electrically charged and act upon its surroundings. By converting this energy to electricity, Elowan gives the plant a “body” which allows it to move towards light sources so it can gather additional light.

Elowan robot plant

While you wouldn’t use Elowan as anything more than a nice distraction on a rainy day, it shows just how viable plant-electronic symbiosis is. Just like electronics, plants have a myriad of signal networks which power themselves. But unlike our manmade devices, these are made naturally and regenerate when they start to degrade (like how trees regain their leaves after a long autumn).

Elowan robot plant

Though the field of cyborg botany is still young, this science involving the relationship between plants and artificial electronics may unlock more efficient and eco-friendly technologies.

You can read the whole project overview on this nature-fueled robot on the MIT media webpage.

The post MIT Media Labs’ Plant-Powered Robot is Paving the Way for Cyborg Botany appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at December 10, 2018 12:40 PM

The ‘Marshmallow’ Is a Modern, Minimalist Take on the Ping Pong Table

Marshmallow Ping Pong Table

Even though most people can’t play a lengthy rally, almost everyone can have a good time playing ping pong (or table tennis, if you live in other parts of the world). The games are fast, the equipment isn’t expensive, and the ping pong table itself makes a nice place to store junk whenever you’re not using it.

Since the table pretty much always has to be the center of attention (you know, so there’s enough room for two players to use it), it only makes sense to make it as eye-appealing as possible.

Enter the Marshmallow– a ping pong table designed by Studio Vono designers Adam Stok and Monika Kozderková to act as both a standard playing table and centerpiece sculpture. Using hydraulically pressed metal pipes, the Marshmallow combines minimalism and a simple metal design with your everyday ping pong table.

<figure class="wp-block-image">marshmallow ping pong table</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">marshmallow ping pong table</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">marshmallow ping pong table</figure>

The table gets its name from, you guessed it, the fluffy marshmallow. The designers explain how easily metal flattens when put through a hydraulic press, so much so that it reminds you of a marshmallow being pressed between your fingers.

<figure class="wp-block-image">marshmallow ping pong table</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">marshmallow ping pong table</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

This method of flattening the metal allowed Adam and Monika to mold the table into a lightweight piece of sports furniture. The table and net are made from dark wood and mesh, while the legs are black metal legs bent at the corners and edges. This makes the legs look almost inflated; like they were made from finely shaped balloons.

Studio Vono doesn’t have an official webpage yet, but you can find more pictures and info on their latest projects over at their Instagram page.

The post The ‘Marshmallow’ Is a Modern, Minimalist Take on the Ping Pong Table appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at December 10, 2018 12:20 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: The Rollbahn Gold Pocket Memo Book

Rollbahn Notebook

Having a place to jot down your ideas when inspiration strikes is a must for any designer or engineer. Yet, finding the ideal (durable!) scratchpad to keep in your pocket (or close by) at all times isn’t always easy. Which is why we love the Rollbahn pocket memo from Rollbahn.

Featuring a gold metal cover (yep—really!) and tearaway gridded pages, this edition of the iconic Japanese notebook is the perfect fusion of simplicity and function.

Rollbahn Gold Metal Cover Pocket Memo Book (Gridded Pages) — $10.00

Features:

  • Made in Japan
  • 112×138mm
  • Durable Metal Cover
  • Elastic Enclosure
  • Perforated Tearaway Pages

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The Rollbahn Gold Pocket Memo Book appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at December 10, 2018 11:46 AM

December 09, 2018

The Javelin Blog

How to Set up Revision Tables in SOLIDWORKS PDM

In SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018, the much-anticipated Revision Tables integration was added, and we can now automatically add table rows with updated variable values via a workflow transition or the Set Revision command.  In this article, we’re going to look at the basic set up of this feature to automatically update the Revision Table via a workflow transition action.

NOTE: This functionality requires SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 or later, and the drawing file format to be 2018 or later.

How To Set Up Revision Tables

By default there are 5 revision columns; Zone, Rev, Description, Date and Approved.  For this example, we’re going to create a table that only uses Rev, Description, Date and Approved

Enable Revision Tables

  • Administration Tool > SOLIDWORKS > Revision Table
    • Settings:
      • Check Enable Revision Table
      • Number of visible rows: 3
      • Revision placeholder character(s): *

"Enable

Map Variables

  • Administration Tool > Variables > Revision
    • Create a new attribute
      • Block Name: SWRevTable
      • Attribute Name: Revision
      • Extension: slddrw
Map Variables

Map Variables

Repeat for variables used for the Description, Date and Approved values.

Integrate Into Workflow

For any transitions that have revision actions associated with them; add Set Variable actions to update the variable used by the table

Integrate Into Workflow

Integrate Into Workflow

For this example, I’m using the Default vault set up, therefore this required adding actions to the transitions; Passed Approval, No Approval Required and Change Approved

For more information regarding the increment of a revision via a workflow please see our previous article on SOLIDWORKS PDM Revision.

Test Thoroughly

This is a great example of something that can be tested thoroughly in a Sandbox vault, ahead of implementing in your production vault.

Test Thoroughly

NOTE: The drawing must have a pre-existing revision table within it, for the integration to work and the rows to be added automatically.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS PDM Revisions

Attend our SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration training course to learn more about using or administering SOLIDWORKS PDM, and creating a complete revision numbering system.

The post How to Set up Revision Tables in SOLIDWORKS PDM appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at December 09, 2018 01:00 PM

December 08, 2018

The Javelin Blog

Selecting a source to be used as a SOLIDWORKS MANAGE Document Template

When creating a new Document or Record in SOLIDWORKS Manage 2019, a user with sufficient permissions, can select a source to be used as the SOLIDWORKS MANAGE Document Template. The new Document or Record source can be an existing SOLIDWORKS Manage document object or a SOLIDWORKS PDM file.

After clicking on New to create a new Document or Record, enter the required Properties and press Save.

SOLIDWORKS Manage New Document or Record

SOLIDWORKS Manage New Document or Record

The user will then be prompted to either select an Existing File or use one temporarily (Use this one for now), that can be replaced later.

SOLIDWORKS Manage Document Template

SOLIDWORKS Manage Document Template

The post Selecting a source to be used as a SOLIDWORKS MANAGE Document Template appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at December 08, 2018 01:00 PM

December 07, 2018

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Return of the Fire Eaters

Thunder clapped around the base of the red metal arms tearing up through the soil and fog. An uncountable number of drones shot from the launch bays on its back, streaming laser beams and orange juice streams, all moving as a single entity at the bidding of its master, attempting to quell the fiery rage of these links.

Emmanuel Shiu – Been a few years since we’ve checked in with Mr. Shiu. He’s been busy, creating concepts for films such as Mars Needs Moms, Bladerunner 2049, and others.

Root Bench – I have a mind to build one of these in the middle of our 10-acre wood, if it wouldn’t turn into a home for snakes and wild things.

Thunderbird in the Dust – Winners of the 2018 National Geographic Photo Contest with wallpapers of each shot available for download.

Mars Insight – The Insight has landed. These are the images thus far.

Wall•E Typography – What typography was used in the movie Wall•E? I’m glad you asked. Types in the Future breaks it down.

Iconian – Dan Zadorozny’s site with fonts with his amazing (and free) futuristic fonts featured in the previous link.

Facades – Mostly cathedrals, large cathedrals, photographed by Marcus Brunetti, with verticals that make it look more like a drawing.

Bronco – Gateway Bronc has been restoring Ford Broncos for years. They’re not cheap, but if you’re a fan like me, you’ll appreciate each one. <script type="text/javascript"> amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "solid0a-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Deals We're Watching"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B073VTCS66,B07F2VXLT2,B0798NR83K,B01N077H9N"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "9021f0039f532e71c4df422b17bb8c0c"; </script> <script src="http://z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>

SOS – New music from Millencolin? You better believe it. And killin’ it as usual. Album out February 15.

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The post Friday Smackdown: Return of the Fire Eaters appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at December 07, 2018 08:48 PM

Are Your 3D Designs Being Stolen?

I’m reading a detailed post by Ars Technica on automated theft of AutoCAD designs, but is this also applicable to 3D print designs?

The post explains that multiple nefarious characters have long been using scripts as a means of industrial espionage. These scripts are secretly installed on Autodesk AutoCAD instances, and then silently relay encountered designs back to the originator.

The scripts are installed through standard phishing approaches, in which innocuous-appearing messages encourage recipients to click on links that ultimately install malware scripts into the AutoCAD system. The scripts are written in AutoCAD Lisp, a derivative of the original Lisp programming language. Normally such scripts are used to enhance the experience of the AutoCAD user in various ways.

But in this case, they are used for unethical purposes.

Ars Technica’s Dan Goodin writes:

“Forcepoint said it has tracked more than 200 data sets and about 40 unique malicious modules, including one that purported to include a design for Hong Kong’s Zhuhai-Macau Bridge. The attacks include a precompiled and encrypted AutoLISP program titled acad.fas. It first copies itself to three locations in an infected computer to increase the chances it will be opened if it spreads to new computers. Infected computers also report to attacker-controlled servers, which use a series of obfuscated commands to download documents.”

And:

”All of the control server subdomains resolve to the same IP address, which appears to be running a Chinese-language installation of Microsoft Internet Information Server 6.0. Forcepoint researchers found that the same IP was used in earlier AutoCAD campaigns. They also found a neighboring IP that had the same IIS configuration.”

The intention of this work would be to identify and capture new building construction techniques, rather than attempting to duplicate whole structures. These techniques are quite important, as they are what differentiates designers from each other. Were they to be exposed and re-used elsewhere, designers could lose their unique discoveries.

But this scenario seems to be limited to AutoCAD users, who typically design buildings and architectural layouts.

My question is, could the same approach be used by bad actors to capture 3D models of printable 3D designs?

Such designs are of huge value: spare parts for countless products are a massive business, mostly because the designs are proprietary and thus the product manufacturer has a monopoly on replacements. If designs were freed, then they might face inexpensive clone replacement parts operations that produce literally identical spare parts.

Artistic works could also suffer, as most high-level 3D print designs are securely held so that the artist can make money by selling copies of the work. If the 3D CAD model is stolen, then again identical clones can appear.

In aerospace or automotive industries, secret designs for hidden components might be exposed to competitors, making trouble for the originator.

Could this happen? I suspect it might be possible to do if a 3D CAD tool offered a scripting capability. Then it is simply a matter of tricking the operator into launching a script that does the dirty business.

Currently SOLIDWORKS, one of the more popular industrial design tools, offers the ability to create and execute macros, which are similar to a script. In theory these might be used to perform the same tasks, if the macro language includes the right set of commands to make it happen.

Autodesk Fusion 360 also allows scripts and add-ins, so it is likely there is potential for this type of crime to take place in many 3D environments.

We have no evidence this is taking place, but based on the Ars Technica story, I would not be surprised to eventually learn that it has happened.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Are Your 3D Designs Being Stolen? appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at December 07, 2018 03:52 PM

The Javelin Blog

Automatic View Update option saved as a Document Property in SOLIDWORKS 2019

Now in SOLIDWORKS 2019, the SOLIDWORKS Automatic View Update option is saved as a document property. This property is stored within the drawing and it will be remembered for the future sessions when you open the drawing again. Previously, the selected option was only applied to the current session of SOLIDWORKS and did not transfer to subsequent sessions.

The SOLIDWORKS Automatic View Update option controls the update behavior in the active drawing. With this option selected, any changes that are made to the model, will propagate to the drawing views.

In order to change the Automatic View Update option, you need to right-click on the icon at the top of the FeatureManager design tree, and select/clear the Automatic View Update option.

SOLIDWORKS Automatic View Update Option

Turning the Automatic Update View Option On or Off

You can also exclude selected views from automatic updates by going to the drawing view property manager. In the drawing view property manager, under Automatic View Update, you can check Exclude from Automatic Update. 

Excluding Specific Views From Automatic View Update

Excluding Specific Views From Automatic View Update

The post Automatic View Update option saved as a Document Property in SOLIDWORKS 2019 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at December 07, 2018 01:00 PM

December 06, 2018

SolidSmack

Highlights from the TechCrunch Disrupt Berlin 2018

TechCrunch Disrupt Berlin brought together startups and tech enthusiasts from all over Europe November 29-30, 2018. I stopped by to bring you the highlights.

The scale of the event in Berlin, Germany was noticeably smaller than the one in San Francisco, which we covered here. Disrupt San Francisco reported around 7,500 attendees while Disrupt Berlin expected about 2,500. It was also a 2-day affair versus San Fran’s 3 days of geeking out on tech. While there was still a great variety of talks and displays, the smaller scale meant fewer overall spotlights on drones, robotics, HW, and other fun stuff we like to see.

Still, there was some good stuff there! Read on for those bits or see the video here:

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/mYEUAvRdG70?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>

Talk: “Racing to the Future” with Lucas di Grassi of Roborace

The first talk on the main stage was a great one! Lucas di Grassi, the champion electric racing driver (‘cuz that’s a thing), talked about replacing racers like himself with autonomous driving. Or, at least, creating a new category of racing. He’s CEO of Roborace, a company developing autonomous racing vehicles and the competitions for them.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99193" style="width: 770px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Lucas di Grassi of Roborace (left)</figcaption></figure>

One of the first questions the interviewer wanted to ask was: why autonomous racing? What’s the point? Who wants to see that?

Di Grassi had a great answer that could be applied to many other autonomous endeavors. Traditionally, when we as humans have built vehicles, they had to be built for human limitations. However, when you’re building an autonomous vehicle, there is a much smaller chance you could kill somebody. When you have no concern for driver safety, you can do some wild experiments with automotive engineering. Some of those experiments inevitably would lead to improvements trickling down to cars made for us mere mortals, too.

The other part of di Grassi’s sales pitch is: he hopes when the public sees autonomous vehicles do crazily-impressive things without crashing, this will hasten an increased trust level of autonomous driving in general. That, in turn, could accelerate the adoption of this tech in the real world.

Robocar

Di Grassi also brought a Robocar with him — the low-riding, autonomous electric racing vehicle shown here:

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99199" style="width: 770px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Robocar, the pretty little vicious electric vehicle from Roborace.</figcaption></figure>

Race car design apparently gets a lot sleeker when you don’t have to fit an animal inside!

Exhibitors

Only one of the days of Disrupt Berlin had sections in their exhibitor hall, er. . . , exhibitor aisle for “Games” or “Hardware, Robotics, and IoT”. Here are some of the interesting projects that stood out to me.

AR4.IO – Augmented Reality for Industry Operations

AR4.IO partners with DAQRI to use their AR headsets for industrial applications. The primary use is to help experts remotely guide industrial workers who are doing complicated on-site work. This means highly trained personnel don’t need to waste time commuting to each industrial site that has a problem. They can just tune in to what an on-site worker sees and guide that person via the AR display.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99197" style="width: 770px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">AR4.IO’s booth plus example AR view in the top right screen.</figcaption></figure>

ClarK – Industrial Smart Glasses

I ran into ClarK after stopping by AR4.IO and was surprised to see their very similar product in the same place. Well, at least the overall application was similar. ClarK is developing smart glasses for industrial workers, too, but their version will likely be much cheaper and comes with additional sensors.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99196" style="width: 770px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Clark’s sensors on their hand-soldered prototype board.</figcaption></figure>

They pack in thermal imaging, temperature and humidity sensors and radar to their specs. Instead of a fancy DAQRI headset, they’re using custom hardware very similar to an inexpensive smartphone. Because ClarK’s glasses can help workers navigate hazardous environments and are also rather inexpensive, it’s not as big of a loss if they get damaged in those places. I just hope companies purchasing these still hope to get the workers wearing them back in one piece!

SYNE App – Music Creation SW for Dummies

SYNE is a fun music creation app that even a child could use to string together beats and harmonies. All you have to do is tap boxes to turn on sounds at different times in a repeated loop.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99210" style="width: 770px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">SYNE’s app in action.</figcaption></figure>

I enjoyed playing with it but wasn’t able to capture the sound well on my camera. To check it out for yourself, you can download it from the Google Play Store here.

Z+ – bringing VR to Amusement Park Rides

If you stopped playing bumper cars years ago because it just wasn’t intense enough for you, there’s good news. It’s now possible in some places to amp up this game with VR! Z+ (“Z plus”) is a company bringing VR to a bunch of traditional amusement park rides. This changes up the experience if you ride more than once, and also allows for some rides to become a competitive experience.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99206" style="width: 770px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Z+ bringing new VR tech to old school amusement park rides.</figcaption></figure>

One example I was given was pitting 2 groups of riders against each other to see which group could get the highest percentage of riders with hands in the air. These VR add-ons are already at some parks around the world including one in Orlando, Florida (no, not Disney World).

The After Party

I gave you all a peek at the gigundous after party for the San Francisco Disrupt ’18 event, so I tried to do the same in Germany. Unfortunately, I was not allowed to take any images or video there. . . lame.

The shindig was held on one floor of a 2-floor club. It was packed, but compared to the entire revamped warehouse Disrupt took over for the party in San Fran, it was tiny.

I felt bad I wouldn’t be able to get you all any video footage, so when other Disrupt attendees offered to kidnap me and bring me to the West-siyeed of Berlin, I accepted. I got you all video from the dancing at that club instead. . . it was similar except. . . uh. . . there were more women.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99195" style="width: 770px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Definitely Not the Disrupt Berlin After Party</figcaption></figure>

Pro Clubbing Tip: I learned from these other Polish attendees (who happened to be e-marketing pros) how to find good spots to go out on the town. Their method is to look up influencers on Instagram in the area and check out their recent videos. This gives you a look at live action at different venues. Brilliant.

Startup Battlefield Winner – Legacy

I watched some of the early rounds of Startup Battlefield and they left me really sad. Some of these companies had potentially great products, but their pitch game was poor. It was in general due to misunderstandings, yet surprisingly, none of it had to do with language misunderstandings. Many of these startups had difficulty understanding the basis of the questions they were being asked. Many also didn’t have a good feel for the perspective of their audiences. This made their responses weak.

Here are some interesting companies that didn’t take home the grand prize. Note: I’m not implying anything about the pitch game of these specific startups!

Startup Battlefield Competition

Spike – an app for diabetes management that sends real-time updates based on measured data. It also relies on friends and family of the patient to help keep blood sugar levels in-line. It turns out loved ones are a highly effective tool!

Imagio – bringing computer vision to crop analysis to make farming smarter. Having better and faster analysis of disease and yields in crops aids in making better farming decisions faster. That all equates to more food for the world, or so Imagio AI hopes. Imagio.AI was the runner-up in the Startup Battlefield Battlefield competition.

Loro – AI and machine vision assistant for wheelchair users. Loro combines a mounted camera and software to enable those in wheelchairs to see behind them, or zoom into a spot difficult to see from their position. It also offers other functionalities including face recognition and text-to-speech to help disabilities beyond being wheelchair-bound.

The Battlefield Winner

Then, I heard rumors of Legacy’s amazing first-round pitch. Afterward, I saw their pitch in the final round. It was smooth, real smooth.

Legacy is all about male fertility. They run clinical tests on sperm samples to give feedback to a man about his fertility. Legacy’s end game is to freeze men’s swimmers for safe-keeping.

Like Spike, Legacy’s method for reaching the end user is through that person’s loved ones. With Spike, it was on the side of day-to-day use. With Legacy, it’s hoped a man’s family (often the wife), would prod him into giving the topic more serious thought before he becomes a customer.

At the end of the final round Legacy pitch I watched, judges would ask questions to which founder Khaled Kteily would respond with a thorough, well-rehearsed answer. Then judges would silently purse their lips and nod with a look that said, “uhh . . . I got nothin’.”

It wasn’t super shocking when Legacy took home the grand $50,000 prize and all the glittery confetti.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99202" style="width: 770px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Startup Battlefield Winner Legacy’s $50,000 check, confetti and Sekt!</figcaption></figure>

Congratulations to Legacy and all the participants!

The post Highlights from the TechCrunch Disrupt Berlin 2018 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at December 06, 2018 07:48 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to add more Properties to the Standard SOLIDWORKS Custom Properties List

The standard SOLIDWORKS Custom Properties List that is included with SOLIDWORKS are decent and cover most needs, but what if you want more?

SOLIDWORKS Custom Properties

SOLIDWORKS Custom Properties

There is a solution that comes in two forms. The first is quite simple: in the “Property Name” field at the bottom of your already great list, click in the box and start typing what you want to add. That’s great and all, but it’s typing and multiple times at that.

Editing the default list of Custom Properties

We can edit that list by digging into the system’s files and adding properties to the text file. Finding that text file is half the battle. In a standard installation of SOLIDWORKS the typical location for the Custom Properties text file is:

C:\ProgramData\SOLIDWORKS\SOLIDWORKS 20XX\lang\english
SOLIDWORKS Custom Properties List text file

Properties text file

Sharing Custom Properties with other users

The SOLIDWORKS Custom Properties List text file can be shared with other users over a server. To share the file with others you have to replace the existing file with this one.

  1. In the “Options” menu > “System Options” > “File Location” > “Customer Property Files” and click “Delete” to discard the current file location.
  2. Click on “Add” to point to the new shared server location.

Thank you for following this how to guide for adding more properties to the standard properties list.

The post How to add more Properties to the Standard SOLIDWORKS Custom Properties List appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at December 06, 2018 01:00 PM

December 05, 2018

Mastering SolidWorks Book Offer for User Groups

My publisher agreed to send out 20 (!!) promotional copies of the Mastering SolidWorks book. I’m choosing to send them to user group leaders. So, if you are a SolidWorks…

by matt at December 05, 2018 04:42 PM

The Javelin Blog

Working with Autodesk Inventor Files in SOLIDWORKS PDM

In order for Autodesk Inventor files to be managed in SOLIDWORKS PDM, the client system needs to have either the full Inventor application or the Inventor Viewer installed. The reason for this, is that the Inventor files are read/written to, using the Inventor API.

The Inventor viewer, Inventor View, can be downloaded from the Autodesk web site. Inventor View is NOT required to preview files .iam and ipt Inventor files, in the Local Vault View. The 3D Interconnect functionality built into eDrawings, will accommodate these file types.

SOLIDWORKS 3D Interconnect Webinar

SOLIDWORKS 3D Interconnect

About SOLIDWORKS 3D Interconnect

SOLIDWORKS 3D Interconnect delivers groundbreaking capabilities for working with both neutral and native CAD data from various sources, unlocking powerful workflows for you to collaborate with customers and vendors. With 3D Interconnect you can:

  • Maintain direct integration of native CAD files from PTC® Creo®, Autodesk® Inventor®, Siemens® NX, Solid Edge®, and CATIA®, and treat them like native components.
  • Avoid fixing errors or problems due to SOLIDWORKS awareness of all components in the native CAD files, like face and edge IDs.
  • Directly open imported files and treat them like Base Parts, so you can freely make design modifications without affecting the native file.
  • Update both part and assembly files as design changes take place with Update Model feature.

Watch a demonstration below to learn more:

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nUckD-_xq_U?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The post Working with Autodesk Inventor Files in SOLIDWORKS PDM appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at December 05, 2018 04:23 PM

SolidSmack

Behind the Design: Making a Farmhouse Table from Reclaimed Barn Wood

Epoxy Table

Not as many self-sufficient folks live off the grid like they used to, but the way of living is still as self-gratifying as it has ever been. How cool would it be to say you got your food from your backyard or your new leather shoes from last year’s cowhide?

Living on a farm still has its charms, as YouTube creator Jonny Builds reminds us through his do-it-yourself Parson’s table using reused wood from an old barn and inlaid epoxy.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/J9dXA33eWr0?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>

The hardest part about using old wood for woodworking is the inconsistency of the materials. Almost no piece of barn wood Jonny acquires is straight, and most of them feature cracks and twists.

DIY farmhouse table

Using a 15-foot beam, Jonny cuts two 32-inch long pieces of wood to form the table legs. Since the beam is so thick, he has to flip it over and cut it twice to make the parts.

DIY farmhouse table DIY farmhouse table DIY farmhouse table

Taking the two pieces to a bandsaw, he cuts out the thick wood to make the four table legs. Because the wood and bandsaw are both so ancient, the resulting cuts weren’t as straight as Jonny wanted them to be. This means he has to take the legs to a jointer to straighten out and make them easy to work with. Finally, he cuts them with a 14-inch rip blade to form their final width of 4¼ inches.

DIY farmhouse table DIY farmhouse table DIY farmhouse table

Using a mixture of red and white oak boards for the table body, Jonny finds he has roughly enough material to make a 7-foot long Parson’s table. After cutting the boards to size and running them through the jointer, he sets the longer boards in the middle and uses dominoes to align the warped wood pieces together. He then drills individual nubs into the wood planks for the dominoes before gluing the pieces together and hammering them in with a mallet.

DIY farmhouse table

Once done hammering, he sands down the middle portion to smooth it out before repeating the same process with the rest of the table pieces. Jonny then pulls all the pieces together using dominoes and clamps to prevent the wood from bending out of shape.

DIY farmhouse table DIY farmhouse table

To finish the main table body, he props up the warped high spots of the table with glue and splints and levels the whole thing down using a router sled. This keeps the Parson’s table level without sacrificing the character the old barn wood brings. All he has to do now is add the shorter pieces of wood which connect the table legs.

DIY farmhouse table

Going back to the table legs, Jonny takes an 80-grit belt sander and smoothens these unsightly stumps down.

DIY farmhouse table DIY farmhouse table

With all the pieces smoothed out and ready for fastening, he finally starts with the epoxy inlays. After applying aluminum tape to keep the spills in check, Jonny mixes and pours his blue-green epoxy resin on the cracks and crevices of the table. To help keep the table together, he combines some sawdust with epoxy and pours it between the wooden planks.

DIY farmhouse table

DIY farmhouse table

Even the legs aren’t safe from Jonny’s quest to plug every nook and crack with some adhesive liquid. He uses a mixture of Bondo filler and fiberglass resin on the legs before filling them in with the same blue-green epoxy mixture and drying it with a heat gun.

DIY farmhouse table DIY farmhouse table

Once the epoxy has dried, he applies the heat gun to the spillover epoxy before chiseling it away. To give the table a clean finish, he sands the resin using 600-grit sandpaper before upping the grit to 1,200 and finally 2,000-grit paper.

DIY farmhouse table DIY farmhouse table

The assembly is where Jonny had the most difficulty. After some problems with the aprons holding the legs to the table, he had to redo the entire apron structure using dominoes and glue to make it sturdy. While not as permanent as a couple of metal batons and bolts, the dominoes in both the legs and table keep the wood together without causing the entire structure to wobble.

DIY farmhouse table DIY farmhouse table To complete the Parson’s table, he cuts off the remaining excess wood before applying the finish to the entire thing. Unfortunately, upon connecting the tabletop to the body, the uneven clamping pressure and imperfect wood pieces caused large gaps between the individual pieces.

DIY farmhouse table

Unbeknownst to us, Jonny was working on a second table; using the first one as a prototype to learn from his mistakes. So while the end of the video was pretty anticlimactic, he did finish his project and got the table to the place he wanted.

You can find more of Jonny’s fascinating woodwork projects on his YouTube channel, Jonny Builds.

The post Behind the Design: Making a Farmhouse Table from Reclaimed Barn Wood appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at December 05, 2018 11:48 AM

Make Your Home a Smart Home While Learning Raspberry Pi for Just $34

We’ve said it time and time again, but the Raspberry Pi is just so dang cool and we believe all designers and engineers should have one in their toolkit—if not on their desktop. While there is a bit of a slight learning curve, it’s nothing that today’s designers and engineers can’t handle on a leisurely Saturday.

So why not start now?

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle includes 8 courses to get started creating your very own Amazon Echo or even a KUKA-like robotic arm for your desktop (how’s that for office bragging rights). Throw in any of your own 3D printed housing designs, and the opportunities are limitless!

For a limited time, The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle is 96% off of the $865 retail price and can be purchased right here for a mere $34.

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle — $865 $34

Courses Included in the Bundle:

  • Automation with Raspberry Pi Zero
  • Introduction to Raspberry Pi
  • Hardware Projects Using Raspberry Pi
  • Bitcoin Mining Using Raspberry Pi
  • Raspberry Pi Robotics
  • Internet of Things Automation Using Raspberry Pi 2
  • Home Automation in 48 Hours Without Coding
  • Build Your Own ArmBot Step By Step Using Raspberry Pi Zero

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
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The post Make Your Home a Smart Home While Learning Raspberry Pi for Just $34 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at December 05, 2018 10:49 AM

December 04, 2018

SolidSmack

How to Not be a Total N00b

Total n00b

<figure class="wp-caption alignright" id="attachment_99174" style="width: 300px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Dan Slaski – The High School Years.</figcaption></figure>

Are you a total n00b? Do you walk around proudly pronouncing fillet like in ballet instead skillet? You may be a n00b. It’s okay if you are. I once was myself. I thought k-factor was when someone had an undefinable special medium quality. I thought kerf was cheap imitation Nerf.  I thought we had the world’s hungriest machinist the way he was always talking about scallops and chips. But just like my freshman high school yearbook I can look back now and grimace slightly less. So, let’s have a dialogue on how we can come togeth…… LeeeeEEEEROY JENKINS!

Ask a Lot of Questions

Questions are your compass.  They give you your direction.  Keep going back to your “compass” to stay on course.  When a fresh employee starts, and they aren’t asking questions, I get very worried.  Worried that they can’t be going in the right direction with the experiential knowledge they have.  As a more experienced professional and employee even I may not be totally clear on the goal.  The misconception is that asking questions is an open admission of a shortcoming.  There is not an assumption that you, the new employee, are the all-knowing knower of all the things. Unless you put omniscience on your resume, it is assumed that you are at the level stated and have the technical and education credentials you claimed.  There is a learning curve involved with joining new organizations.  Learning the unique culture, software, processes, and skills.  Asking questions to accelerate through the learning curve is pro [k21] .  Stubbornly inefficient trial and error is total n00b.

Ask Good Questions

Being around people with encyclopedic knowledge in your chosen field of expertise can be both exciting and intimidating. You are an information sponge surrounded by knowledge fountains. Or, through a different lens, an alien parasitic brain leech.  Try to ask questions around what to do, not how to do it.  Avoid the temptation to let directional questions digress into direct technical questions.  The ease, certainty, and safety of overusing provided information can result in a complacency crutch that stunts your growth.  The difference is subtle, but think of your talented coworkers as mentors, not teachers.  As such, do learn all you can by listening and observation in the most unobtrusive ways.  Particularly about mistakes. But don’t just regurgitate. Your value is not as a lesser copy but through improved solutions and methodologies.  Do ask a Zen Koan on occasion to keep people on their toes.  What is the color of wind?

Combine Questions

Batch questions.  Take it upon yourself to create a system that works for both parties. For example, emailing a list of questions or using scheduled stand up times.  Politeness and cultural norms dictate that a coworker will stop what they are doing and answer your question.  Answering others’ questions with enough frequency can cross a threshold where it becomes a significant work impediment.  Understand that you are taking someone out of the flow of what they are doing and getting back in that same flow mindset isn’t as easy as turning a switch on.  If people have headsets on or their door is closed, take the hint. Also, first coffee then talkee.

Balancing Speed and Thoroughness

An excited and highly motivated employee starts.  The desire to impress and show their value is palpable.  Like a bolt of lightning looking for a path to ground. It takes patience to create infrastructure to channel that energy into a time traveling DeLorean.  But channeling/harnessing that raw energy is not easy. Perhaps a better analogy is an excited dog who I am training to hunt for truffles, but he just keeps bringing me back the same slobbery stick. Speed is not unimportant.  But thoroughness is paramount, and speed comes with time. As the saying goes, first crawl then walk then run.  Rote tasks like performing tests and assembling prototypes should be done thoroughly and expediently with the goal of getting back to the work that isn’t linear or process oriented and where the outcome is highly individualistic.

Most of us started with throughput incentivized work.  How many lawns mowed, how many sandwiches made. Risk was low.  A missed patch of grass or too much chipotle mayo was acceptable (to little chipotle mayo is never acceptable). Now we have graduated into a knowledge-based field where both the potential downsides and upsides are very high.  The risk of an incorrect design can result in tens of thousands of dollars of scrap material or recalls.  The reward of finding a unique part can mean significant savings or opportunity wins.  The time it can take to get to breakthrough is unpredictable, but it predictably doesn’t come from scratching the surface. A quick cursory google search for what you are looking for might reveal nothing.  Done.  Not so fast.  What you are looking for might be a yet unreleased product.  It may require contacting vendors, searching press releases, and thinking about similar products or applications that could be adapted. It requires going deep, Mariana Trench deep. I often remind myself that if it was easy, someone else would have done it already.

Stay Humble. Frag your ego.

When starting a new position, the common sentiment is “to pay your dues”. To quietly and selflessly do what is asked of you by your superiors as was done by your predecessors. What about the quiet practice, sacrifices, and schooling to get to this point.  Is this not the payoff I have worked towards? When are the dues paid?  Who is getting paid? Is this a Ponzi scheme?

I am, by all my accounts, one of the great designers of our era.  I should be fed grapes and fanned with a fern while I ideate and exclaim streams of groundbreaking designs for dictation.  Yet in reality I still mostly do all of the additional unglamorous work I always have. From IT and shipping to prototyping, building, and assembly. And I don’t see much of an end in sight. Doing the work, all of it, is what developed me into who I am and what I can do.  Being integrally involved with software tools, maintaining the 3D printers and chatting with others when helping them out. I notice things; ways to improve, subtle details otherwise missed that I leverage in big ways which leads to deeper and deeper learning and understanding. It’s not forced on me like some cosmic debt. It’s a part of my continuous training that prevents me from ever getting nerfed.

Ask good questions, focus on thoroughness, and build speed while humbly doing the work and one day you will find yourself respawned as a pro.

The post How to Not be a Total N00b appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Dan Slaski at December 04, 2018 05:42 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS MBD now has support for Sheet Metal

SOLIDWORKS MBD is a fantastic tool that eliminates the need for standard 2D drawings on the shop floor by creating and communicating design information directly onto your model. SOLIDWORKS MBD was first introduced in 2015 and has come a long way to deliver even more industry specific features.

Now SOLIDWORKS MBD Sheet Metal support is new for SOLIDWORKS 2019.

  • You simply right-click on your flat pattern view feature and insert annotations. This will automatically insert bend notes on your part, flatten the part, callout the BEND DIRECTION, ANGLE and RADIUS.
  • For components that contain many bends, a BEND TABLE can be inserted to your 3D view. When a bend table is inserted, each bend is tagged in relation to the table.
  • When finished, you can capture this with a 3D view, ready to be published in a 3D PDF and shared with other members of your design team and organization.

Watch the video below to learn more (note there is no audio with this video)

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sAd1CCQazM4?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

The post SOLIDWORKS MBD now has support for Sheet Metal appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vicky Guignard at December 04, 2018 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Books of Doom: ‘Emotional Design’ by Don Norman

industrial design

Named by Business Week as one of “the world’s most influential designers,” Don Norman has spent a lifetime dedicated to better understanding how humans interact with the manufactured world around them. Suffice to say; he’s seen the gamut of good and bad design.

Which is why his book, Emotional Design: Why We Love (or Hate) Everyday Things, belongs on the shelf of every designer and engineer.

Norman, who also wrote The Design of Everyday Things, deep dives into why we as humans think about our manufactured “stuff” the way we do—and why we as designers or engineers should hold ourselves accountable for making our products attractive, pleasurable, and ultimately, a joy to use.

Emotional Design by Don Norman — $17.99

About Author Don Norman:

Don Norman is a voyeur, always watching, always on the lookout for some common-day occurrence that everyone else takes for granted but that when examined, yields insight into the human condition. (If you are rushing to catch a train, how do you know if you got to the station on time? Empty platform? You probably are too late. People milling about, looking at their watches, peering down the tracks? Probably OK. Who needs technology when people are so informative, even if as an accidental byproduct of their activities.

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

Feature image via Trendland.

The post Cool Books of Doom: ‘Emotional Design’ by Don Norman appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at December 04, 2018 12:15 PM

Bellrobot’s Mabot Robot is a Brilliant Take on STEM Education and Fun

Mabot Robot

With the Holidays just a few weeks away, it’s probably time to think about what gifts the young kids in your life might like. If they’re into robotics, perhaps Bellrobot’s Mabot Plug-and-Play Modular Robot is just what you’re looking for. Sure it’s a STEM-based learning kit, but it’s easy to put together and program in nearly endless combinations. And with added LEGO compatibility? The icing on the cake.

According to Bellrobot, the Mabot comes in kit form and allows you to use modular balls to create different robots with unique functions — including moving, sensing, and interacting with its environment.

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Five kinds of robotic balls make up the Mabot including a control ball, drive ball, sensing ball, connection ball, and battery ball, all of which can be hot-swapped without turning off the power. As a bonus, you can integrate Legos—both Technics and standard, into your design, allowing for additional creativity in your creations.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99179" style="width: 684px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The Mabot IDE is based on Scratch, allowing kids to easily program their creations using different drag-and-drop instruction sets.</figcaption></figure>

Programming the Mabot is done through the Mabot Go app, which uses an IDE based on Scratch, allowing kids to easily drag-and-drop instruction sets in a novel GUI environment to create instructions. The app also comes with step-by-step instructions to build 12 different robots, each with a different mission for kids to complete, which allows them to learn as they go through the building and programming process.

Bellrobot offers four different Mabot kits- including a Starter Kit, Advanced Kit, Deluxe Kit, and Pro Kit- each with an increased amount of components the higher you go. The kits are available now on Amazon starting at $199 and up.

The post Bellrobot’s Mabot Robot is a Brilliant Take on STEM Education and Fun appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at December 04, 2018 12:11 PM

Mui Is a Wall-Mounted Smart Home Hub Disguised as a Plank of Wood

mui touchpanel kickstarter

With more houses becoming almost sentient with their built-in A.I.s and voice-activated functions, it can feel a tad creepy coming back home to find some invisible guardian controlling your personal living space.

That said, mui is attempting to bring some of that analog connectivity back into the digital home. It isn’t a hovering know-it-all like Amazon’s Alexa, but rather a wall-mounted, inconspicuous plank of wood which looks about as interactive as a wallboard. But give the mui the slightest touch, and it turns into a smart control hub that connects you to your household appliances, the internet, and mobile devices.

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The big difference here is the focus on touch element. While you can interact with the mui via voice commands through its built-in Google Assistant interface, you can’t actually see what the mui is showing until you go through the effort of walking over and standing in front of it.

mui wall mounted smart home hub mui wall mounted smart home hub

Activating this hidden piece of tech takes but a finger swipe across the surface. Once the on-wood prompts present themselves, you can send and receive text messages, check news and weather updates, or control your lights, thermostats, and appliances. After you’re done using the mui, it goes back to its unassuming wooden form by fading away from the digital prompts until you have the use for it again.

mui wall mounted smart home hub mui wall mounted smart home hub mui wall mounted smart home hub

The initial plan was to have the mui become completely invisible. By hiding the interface in the walls of your office or home, there would be no need to hang a plank of wood in such a weird place. But due to design difficulties (and probably because the designers were never able to find the wall prompts once they disappeared), various types of wooden planks were used instead. By integrating electronics into the wood, the mui can be as interactive or as inconspicuous as it needs to be.

mui wall mounted smart home hub

The mui can be programmed using a mobile app that connects to the popular automation platform IFTTT, allowing everything in your home to be connected on a single system. On top of this, the device can also connect to your run-of-the-mill Google Home and Amazon Echo via API and the cloud, just in case you were starting to miss ol’ Alexa’s voice.

For aspiring creators who want to work on the mui, the design team is providing a HAT for Raspberry Pi and an SDK for Andriod. This allows you to make custom programs for the mui and any of its interconnected devices.

mui wall mounted smart home hub

The mui is currently live on Kickstarter and has funding of $96,287, roughly $4,000 shy of its $100,000 goal. If you think standing up to change the thermostat will help you lose weight (or if you love the idea of having a snazzy, interactive wall piece in your home) then you can find more details on the mui on its Kickstarter page.

The post Mui Is a Wall-Mounted Smart Home Hub Disguised as a Plank of Wood appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at December 04, 2018 11:58 AM

SolidSmack Radio | The Dimensional Breakdown (Powered by Spotify)

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’ll get the groove going with the all-new “We Appreciate Power” from Grimes/HANA before diving into a mix of killer tracks from David Bowie, Tennis, Death From Above, Oracle Sisters, and others before wrapping up with the classic “Anemone” from The Brian Jonestown Massacre. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/6zXJawa6YW653LLeUmGuVw" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Dimensional Breakdown (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at December 04, 2018 11:47 AM

The SolidSmack Monday List 49.18 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

SolidSmack-Monday-List

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

This Startup Stranded Customers Overseas With No Refunds

We Roam’s broken promises about a new life of remote work are an object lesson in the darker side of startup turnover.

This Startup Stranded Customers Overseas With No Refunds

China’s Christmas Village Isn’t Worried About Trump’s Trade War

Yiwu has plans to get around White House tariffs on holiday lights.

China’s Christmas Village Isn’t Worried About Trump’s Trade War

Jeff Goldblum Is Going Back to His Roots

I’m not really trying to impress anybody.

Jeff Goldblum Is Going Back to His Roots

The Truth About Facebook’s Fake Quest to Connect the World

From the start, the case for connecting the world wasn’t based on morality, but survival.

The Truth About Facebook's Fake Quest to Connect the World

Buying an Apple Product Will Always Hurt

Why the best thing Apple can do is confuse the heck out of you

\

The Total Incompatibility of Mindfulness and Busyness

Regardless of how centered and present you try to be, overloading your schedule is a way of being unfaithful to yourself

The Total Incompatibility of Mindfulness and Busyness

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 49.18 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at December 04, 2018 05:23 AM

December 03, 2018

SolidSmack

Model of the Week: BB-8 Google Home [Ok Google, Play Imperial March!]

I bet you a bag of plush porglets you’ve had dreams of owning, building or transferring your conscience into your very own BB-8. If you also happen to have a Google Home device (or not), I may just have found you the perfect excuse for 3D printing the adorable spherical droid.

Manchester’s own Steve Wagg has punched licensing terms in the face by bringing you a Star Wars / Google mashup to make your home more entertaining for any Star Wars fan. Just imagine calling your own BB-8 droid ‘Google’ and having it do your bidding.

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“I decided my Google home was a bit boring so designed him a BB8 Costume. If you haven’t got a Home, then I’ve also included ‘no speaker’ parts so you can just make him as a model.”

There are quite a few parts, but no supports are needed. Steve used PLA with a layer height of 0.15mm, super gluing all the pieces together for the final build. He provided both an .igs model of the entire BB-8 unit along with all the .stl files for printing. The front grill can be oriented so the dots are visible and the USB cord connects where the head attaches. The only thing I might change is designing a snap-in piece so the Google Home device can be removed easily if needed.

You can download the model on Thingiverse. (Bonus! Check out the alternate BB-9 model here!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

The post Model of the Week: BB-8 Google Home [Ok Google, Play Imperial March!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at December 03, 2018 10:07 PM

LEGO FORMA | Customizable Fish Models For Adults to Relax and Create

LEGO FORMA

If I’m to be truly honest, the infinite possibilities of LEGOs can be a bit daunting when it comes to building. When someone 10 years younger than myself can make a masterpiece out of the same 500 bricks I’m given, it can feel disheartening to even begin my own creation.

Not as many adults have the time to be as creative as they would like, but LEGO thinks they have the answer to the problem with customizable sets that allows adults to both relax and be creative while eliminating the need to plan out a LEGO masterpiece.

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Unlike the other divisions of LEGO which require you to think outside the box, LEGO FORMA models come with instructions which adults can follow to make their very own mechanical fish. Using 294 plastic parts including rods, cranks, and gears which fit specifically with one another, the older generation can relax while leaving the creativity to the younger folk.

LEGO FORMA LEGO FORMA LEGO FORMA

Once the plastic model is assembled, you can slap on one of four customizable skins: the classic koi skin, a splash koi skin, an ink koi skin, or a shark skin. The skins look pretty snazzy on their own, but it is encouraged to put your own spin and color the skins yourself. A rainbow-colored koi looks far cooler than the classic red, white, and black version, as does a solid gold shark!

LEGO FORMA LEGO FORMA

With the model outfitted in a new skin, all there is to do now is turn the crank at the base and watch it swim in place. The makers in Denmark took inspiration from classic nature themes and animal behaviors, so LEGO FORMA models have a certain flow to their design in contrast to the classic blocky LEGO models.

LEGO FORMA

While not on the official LEGO webpage, you can find more details on LEGO FORMA on Indiegogo (which is a tad weird, considering LEGO doesn’t really need funding).

The post LEGO FORMA | Customizable Fish Models For Adults to Relax and Create appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at December 03, 2018 09:34 PM

Must Create Details the Art of Guitar Building

Building a guitar is as much art as it is science, and chances are if you’re playing one, you’ve probably entertained the notion of making one of your own.

While most all electric guitars are CNC milled (even those considered ‘handmade’), acoustics are a different story, consisting of a myriad of steps that range from making molds to get the perfect side bends, to installing back inlays and bracing, and that doesn’t include the detailed work needed for the neck.

To get a better insight on the process of building acoustic guitars, Mike Tracz of Must Create has uploaded a series of videos that detail how to make a headstock and tailstock, how to shape them, and how to make the kerfing that reinforces the inside joints. These three video walkthroughs are the first to document his entire build process.

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The first installment details how to make the headstock, and prepare it and glue the pieces together, which is done using templates, a bandsaw and table saw for rough cuts, which are planned and sanded before being glued, clamped together and left to cure.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JsSXREEVqiU?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>

Once the headstock and tailblock have finished drying, Mike then gets to work shaping the neck and headstock, gluing on some veneer, sanding the wood for the correct thickness, and mills some aesthetic slots to provide the headstock with a unique look. The tuning holes are then drilled, pegs installed, and the tailblock shaped and sanded.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5EAj7Ds_MTo?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>

For his third entry, Mike creates the kerfing that will be used to strengthen the joints between the top, backplate, and sides of the guitar. This involves cutting thin strips of wood and notching them out over at specific measurements. This step is inherently difficult, as the cuts allow the wood to be matched with the joints. If the measures are off, the kerfing will not fit correctly.

To help overcome the inconsistency that goes along with the kerfing process, Mike designed an ingenious jig based on Kevin Caton’s kerf lining machine. For his rig, Mike used Fusion 360 to model the articulating parts, and then 3D printed them in PLA using a MakerBot printer. The videos provide great insight into how acoustic guitars are built, so it will be interesting to see the next video installments.

The post Must Create Details the Art of Guitar Building appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Cabe Atwell at December 03, 2018 09:20 PM

Appearance Hierarchy

I wrote about colors a couple of weeks ago. Colors are great to assist visualization. But there are some technical details regarding how you implement the use of colors in…

by matt at December 03, 2018 05:43 PM

SolidSmack

Getting Your VR Fix in Seattle | Seattle VR: Demos and Experiences MeetUp

We did a story earlier this year on where to find other HW nerds in Seattle. But what if you want to specifically find VR nerds? Wonder no more! In this article, we give you a peek inside a huge monthly VR MeetUp in Seattle. It’s a sure spot for a chance to demo VR games and VR experiences and network with fellow weirdos. This group also encompasses AR and immersive tech.

I give you: Seattle VR: Demos & Experiences

I attended this MeetUp in October and was surprised to learn Seattle has a massive and strong VR community. Also, the people I met were friendly and collaborative. Seattle Freeze-schmeeze. Not here!

However, if you worry they might also be lacking that special brand of Seattle-weird, don’t; it’s in there. I didn’t mind, though. I like weird. To top it off, this meeting doubled as their Halloween party, so it was also double the weird. To see what I mean, check out this video of the event below with a look at individual demos:

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Sansar

Sansar‘s platform allows for the sale and purchase of characters and character features. So, creators can make a buck on here, not just Sansar. Beyond games, there are also live events where you can meet other users . . . which to me sounded like old school chat rooms getting upgraded for 2018. We got a peek of a virtual nightclub in our video. Perhaps a nice option if you feel like socializing but not leaving your home.

They brought in a trick-or-treating experience aptly named Trick or Treat. It allows you to walk down a creepy street and night and see what each house has to offer. Some characters were sweet and cartoonish while other doors held more creeptastic surprises.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99157" style="width: 1802px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Peek at Sansar’s Trick or Treat VR Game</figcaption></figure>

I tried this one out and was amazed at how detailed the scenes were. Looking upwards, you can even see a realistic night sky!

Go here in the video to see Sansar’s goods:

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MXTReality – (Halloween) Maze Walk VR

As the name would suggest, Halloween Maze Walk VR is a virtual reality maze. This game uses an iPhone and some walking. . . Or, you at least need to do some head-bobbing. I was told the game was designed to pick up on the player walking by the natural up-and-down motion of one’s head when they walk. Most people realize quickly all they need to do is bob their head to get their character walking and end up just doing that because humans are inherently lazy. It’s kinda funny to watch from the outside.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99159" style="width: 1490px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Clip from the Halloween Version of Maze Walk VR</figcaption></figure>

MXTReality already has a hugely popular game, Maze Walk VR, available on the Apple App Store under the developer name MyPad3D.

The video picks up here with footage on Haunted Maze:

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/esjfKMmDCgk?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>

Daily Magic’s Witching Tower VR

It happened to be a big day for the game production company, Daily Magic.

They were celebrating the launch of their new game, Witching Tower VR, on Steam, and also had a demo available to play. Plus, jello shots. So, I had my own reason to celebrate!

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99100" style="width: 1811px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">The crew from Daily Magic knows how to party.</figcaption></figure>

I watched as some MeetUp members demoed a harrowing part of the game where they had to scale the outside of a stone tower. There was a bit of man-screeching. For me, it was a nail-biting experience just to watch the other users on a flat screen.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99158" style="width: 1038px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Snapshot from Witching Tower VR</figcaption></figure>

CEO of Daily Magic, Marianna Vallejo, told me their company made games for several years but this one was an experiment. It was their first foray into VR and also taking the game into as dark of territory as they did was not the plan at the onset.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99106" style="width: 1474px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Marianna Vallejo, CEO of Daily Magic, Witch.</figcaption></figure>

To help with all that experimentation was this very MeetUp group! In the closing remarks for the event, Vallejo thanked members for their support and assistance throughout the development of Witching Tower VR. So, the whole-collaborative-environment plan for this group is more than just a nice idea – it’s truly bringing about tangible progress.

Watch the video here to see more about Witching Tower VR:

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Haunted Graveyard by Holospark

If you’ve ever had a burning desire to stroll through a haunted graveyard at night, yet at the same time found that too terrifying to follow through with, this experience might be for you. It’s exactly what it sounds like: you get to walk around a spooky, haunted graveyard!

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99163" style="width: 1636px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Image from Haunted Graveyard by Holospark.</figcaption></figure>

I hear it’s still pretty creepy, though, so you might want to play it when there are other people in the room . . .

Beat Saber

This one is classified as a “rhythm game.” (I did not know that was a category of game before the MeetUp.) There’s also a lightsaber, so if “lightsaber games” is another category, it’s in that one, too.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99102" style="width: 2092px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">A Beat Saber master captured in the zone.</figcaption></figure>

Music plays as the player bounces around trying to lance flying blocks to the beat. You rack up points as you do, or if you’re rhythm inept, it’s possible to lose. This game had the most physical activity going on out of all the demos and all the players looked like they were having a lot of fun. It’s even amusing to watch the players dance around. You can gawk at some players for yourself by jumping here in the video:

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Takelings House Party

This game experiments with a new format. The aim is to make VR gaming a more social experience for people who are physically in the same place. It only requires 1 player have a VR headset with the others just needing a normal screen and hand-held controllers. Judging by the shouting and cries from players and spectators, the approach seems to work!

The human character in the middle of the scene represents the player using the VR headset. He’s scrambling about a kitchen trying to kill miniature alien “Takelings” by shoving them in a toaster or down a sink, or whichever other appliance can be used for murder. The little takeling goobers are manipulated by the team of players using hand-held controllers. Those takelings are able to unplug or otherwise disable murderous appliances. In this way, the raucous, competitive battle ensues.

Play the video from here to hear the screams for yourself:

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You can find Takelings House Party on Steam here.

MeetUp Member and “Astronaut” Lou Ward

This guy, hands-down, had the coolest costume at this party. See his astronaut suit in strange locations at Lou Ward’s Instagram handle: theecadet

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99161" style="width: 1046px"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Lou Ward and his glorious spacesuit.</figcaption></figure>

Aside from the sweet spacesuit, Ward has a lot of things cooking in the VR space. It was touching to hear the heartfelt motivations behind his VR projects. The first he mentioned was a bit of a tribute to his grandfather who passed away this year. Ward’s grandfather suffered from Alzheimer’s and he was compelled to create a way to illustrate the experience of a grandchild who gradually loses a loved one to this disease. He’s doing this through a project called Tinker VR.

I admit, I got a little verklempt.

His other project, Monster in the Closet, demonstrates issues of anxiety from the perspective of a little girl. It was intended for Oculus Launchpad but Ward’s team just learned they won’t be receiving development money from the program. I hope that doesn’t stop this guy from keeping on with his creative projects.

To see Lou and his spectacular spacesuit, you can skip to this part of the video:

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/esjfKMmDCgk?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>

Attend the MeetUp for Yourself!

Most of this MeetUp’s events have a $5 admission fee, but they also usually have snacks. Even sans snacks, if you want to meet some other VR enthusiasts, this is where to go in Seattle.

If you’re working in the VR/AR space or would like to be, I’m confident this community could help you advance. Whether it’s collaboration, advice, feedback, or connections you desire, this is the perfect place to look.

Or, if you want to learn about new experimental platforms and content, there’s a lot of experimentation going on here! It’s always fun to see and have a chance to contribute to a thing as it’s being formed. Or maybe you just want to play with some new VR/AR toys without plunking down the cash for the equipment.

Whatever the reason for your interest, you can see what events are in the works here: https://www.meetup.com/Seattle-VR-Demos-Experiences/

 

The post Getting Your VR Fix in Seattle | Seattle VR: Demos and Experiences MeetUp appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at December 03, 2018 05:08 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM Major and Minor Revision Numbering System

In this article, we are going to look at how to implement a SOLIDWORKS PDM Revision Numbering System, that incorporates both minor and major revisions.

Review our previous article for a complete guide to increment a revision number via a workflow

How to create a SOLIDWORKS PDM Revision Numbering System for major and minor revisions

For this example, we’re going to create a system that uses uppercase alphabetical for major revisions, and numerical for a minor revision.  For example = A-01, B-01, C-01, C-02, C-03 etc.

First, we have to create our revision numbering components…

  • Administration Tool > Revisions > Revision Number Components
    • Right-Click >  New Component…
SOLIDWORKS PDM Revision Numbering System

Revision Number Components

Next, we have to create the Revision Number System…

  • Administration Tool > Revisions > Revision numbers
    • Right-Click >  New revision number…
      • Add the revision number components we created in the previous step
Revision Number System

Revision Number System

Now we have to implement this into the workflow.  In the appropriate workflow and state;

  • Administration Tool > Workflows > [Workflow Name]
Incorporate into a workflow

Incorporate into a workflow

On the state where the revision is first applied:

For this example the ‘Approved’ state

  • Properties > Revision Numbers
    • Add the new revision number system
      • Leave the ‘Increment by’ and the ‘Reset to’ values blank
        • Save the workflow
Clear increment by on revision state

Clear increment by on revision state

In the transition preceding the state where the revision is first applied;

For this example the ‘Passed Approval’ transition

  • Properties > Revision Numbers
    • Add the new revision number system
      • For both revision number components; set the ‘Reset to’ vault to 1

When files first enter this state, the revision will be set to A-01

Passed Approval Properties

In the transition preceding the state where the revision is first applied reset the revision components to 1

Now, we need to increment the appropriate revision in the corresponding state;

For the ‘Major Rev Change’ transition

  • Properties > Revision Numbers
    • For the Major Rev Component set the value to increment by 1
Increment the major rev

Major Rev Change transition

For the ‘Minor Rev Change’ transition

  • Properties > Revision Numbers
    • For the Minor Rev Component set the value to increment by 1
Increment the minor rev

Minor Rev Component

  • Save and close the workflow.

As with any change in the vault; it’s imperative to test any changes thoroughly before implementing.  This is a great example of a change that should be implemented in a sandbox vault, ahead of the production vault.

Test thoroughly

Test thoroughly

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Major and Minor Revision Numbering System appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at December 03, 2018 01:00 PM

November 30, 2018

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Lock Rotation of new Concentric Mates to Components

In SOLIDWORKS 2019, any new Toolbox components can have their concentric mates rotation locked automatically. In order to activate the SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Lock Rotation for concentric mates option, you need to go to: Tools > Options > System Options > Hole Wizard/Toolbox and under Toolbox Mates, check the Lock rotation of new concentric mates to Toolbox components option.

Enabling Automatic Lock Rotation of New Concentric Mates for Toolbox Components

Enabling Automatic Lock Rotation of New Concentric Mates for Toolbox Components

Once you have this option enabled, any new Toolbox component that you insert into your assembly and apply a concentric mate, will have its rotation locked. You can still right-click on the mate and Edit Feature and clear Lock Rotation under the Concentric mate to unlock the rotation.

Here is an example of how you can use this new functionality:

  1. Insert the toolbox component into your assembly by drag and dropping it to the face where it is going to be mated to (creating an automatic concentric mate).
Drag and Dropping a Bolt (Toolbox Component) to a Cylindrical Face to Create an Automatic Concentric Mate

Drag and Dropping a Bolt (Toolbox Component) to a Cylindrical Face to Create an Automatic Concentric Mate

  1. Verify that the concentric mate has its rotation locked by looking at the locked rotation icon and also editing the mate feature.
SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Lock Rotation

Editing the Concentric Mate Using Edit Feature To Verify the Automatic Locked Rotation For Concentric Mates

  1. When you edit the mate feature, you can clear the Lock Rotation box for the concentric mate if needed.
The Lock Rotation Box Can Be Unchecked If Required

The Lock Rotation Box Can Be Unchecked If Required

NOTE: SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Lock Rotation functionality also works when using the Smart Fastener command, when creating a SmartMate using the Alt + drag technique on a cylindrical face (or circular edge) of a toolbox component, or when manually creating a concentric mate.

The post SOLIDWORKS Toolbox Lock Rotation of new Concentric Mates to Components appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at November 30, 2018 01:00 PM

November 29, 2018

SolidSmack

KODAK 3D Printer Back On Track With 4 Unique Features

We hadn’t heard much from Kodak on their new 3D printer for quite a while, but now they’re back in action.

We first saw their machine earlier this year at CES, where they showed their Portrait 3D printer. At that time we noted that the machine included a number of fascinating features that were designed to make life much easier for the operator, such as their tilting dual nozzle that helps avoid collisions during 3D printing.

We’re told they’ve incurred a bit of a delay to obtain specific regulatory certifications for the equipment, which have now been completed. Now they’re fully ready to sell machines.

But in the interim, they’ve jazzed up the machine with even more useful features, one of which is quite unique.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99125" style="width: 720px">A successful ABS 3D print of an object with pathological geometry by the Kodak Portrait 3D printer [Source: Fabbaloo]<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">A successful ABS 3D print of an object with pathological geometry by the Kodak Portrait 3D printer [Source: Fabbaloo]</figcaption></figure>1. Fully Enclosed
The machine is now fully enclosed, meaning it is able to easily capture stray heat from the heated print surface to raise the ambient temperature in the print chamber. This will greatly help 3D printing certain warpy materials such as ABS.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99126" style="width: 720px">Screenshot of the Kodak 3D printing cloud [Source: Fabbaloo]<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Screenshot of the Kodak 3D printing cloud [Source: Fabbaloo]</figcaption></figure>2. KODAK 3D Cloud
The machine now hooks up to the Kodak 3D Printing Ecosystem that can, for example, queue up print jobs, slice in the cloud, store GCODE files for future re-prints and monitor live print operations with the embedded camera in the Portrait 3D printer. The cloud service is based in Microsoft Azure, and we believe is actually a variant of 3DPrinterOS.

3. Dual Hot Ends
But the final improvement is quite unique: they’ve outfitted the dual E3D-Online hot ends differently. One hot end has a PTFE feed tube, while the other is entirely made of metal.

Why do this?

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99128" style="width: 720px">Flexible Nylon 6 3D print produced on the Kodak Portrait [Source: Fabbaloo]<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Flexible Nylon 6 3D print produced on the Kodak Portrait [Source: Fabbaloo]</figcaption></figure>

The PTFE nozzle is ideal for softer materials, and in particular for flexible filaments like TPU. These must be printed at far lower speeds than typical rigid filaments and would incur too much friction while passing through all-metal nozzles.

Meanwhile, the other nozzle is all-metal, meaning it can be heated to very high temperatures. PTFE nozzles have a temperature limit because PTFE material will begin to break down at around 260C – and emitting some nasty chemicals in the process. Thus Kodak has made their second hot end capable of 3D printing high-temperature materials.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99129" style="width: 720px">Control panel on the Kodak Portrait 3D printer monitoring a nylon 3D print [Source: Fabbaloo]<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Control panel on the Kodak Portrait 3D printer monitoring a nylon 3D print [Source: Fabbaloo]</figcaption></figure>Both of these hot end scenarios are well known. However, Kodak has implemented BOTH in the same machine. This means that if you, for example, want to print TPU today, you merely print it on nozzle 1. You do not need to take apart the machine to swap nozzles, as is done in many other 3D printers. Similarly, the second nozzle is ready for printing high-temperature materials anytime without requiring hardware changes.

<figure class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_99131" style="width: 720px">It’s load and go on the Kodak Portrait 3D printer for either flexible or high temperature materials [Source: Fabbaloo]<figcaption class="wp-caption-text">It’s load and go on the Kodak Portrait 3D printer for either flexible or high temperature materials [Source: Fabbaloo]</figcaption></figure>That’s a huge convenience feature for 3D printer operators that we have not seen previously. It’s actually quite a simple idea and I’m wondering why it hasn’t been a more popular approach.

4. 4-year Warranty
Kodak also explained their warranty program. For US$400 per year, you will receive a 4-year warranty on the equipment. This is perhaps one of the longest warranties available in the entire world of 3D printing, and it’s not that expensive. The warranty includes an annual “check-up” at their now numerous service partners.

Kodak tells us the machine is now available from “many resellers across USA, Canada and Europe”.

That’s the power of a brand like Kodak.

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Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post KODAK 3D Printer Back On Track With 4 Unique Features appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at November 29, 2018 04:33 PM

The Javelin Blog

Is the SOLIDWORKS PDM Convert Task crashing Windows Explorer?

Is the SOLIDWORKS PDM Convert Task crashing Windows Explorer? Did you recently perform an upgrade on a SOLIDWORKS PDM client? See below for a possible explanation:

In SOLIDWORKS PDM 2017, when client machines were upgraded to a newer PDM version, it was still possible to run the SOLIDWORKS PDM Convert task but the new features would not be available. In SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 however, using the incorrect version of the SWTaskAddIn with the incorrect client version can cause explorer to crash. To Avoid crashing, ensure the following:

  • SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 SP4 is using SWTaskAddIn 2018 SP4
  • SOLIDWORKS PDM 2018 SP0-SP3 is using SWTaskAddIn 2018 SP0-SP3

To check the SOLIDWORKS Task Add-in, right click and open the SWTaskAddIn:

Open the SOLIDWORKS Task Add-in

Open the SOLIDWORKS Task Add-in

The SOLIDWORKS Task Add-in version will be listed as shown:

 SOLIDWORKS Task Add-in version

SOLIDWORKS Task Add-in version

If the versions do not match, the SWTaskAddIn will need to be updated:

Browse to C:\Program Files\SOLIDWORKS Corp\SOLIDWORKS PDM\Default Data on the client machine and open the “Convert_gb.cex” task

Drag-and-drop “SWtaskAddin” into the vault and select Yes to update the existing add-in:

 SOLIDWORKS Task Add-in conversion

SOLIDWORKS Task Add-in conversion

Check the version of the SWTaskAddIn again and if it matches the PDM version, the crashing issue should now be resolved.

Note: Keep in mind that updating the SWTaskAddIn will update it for all clients. As such it is important to ensure all clients are running the same version otherwise this will cause the same problem to other clients.

The post Is the SOLIDWORKS PDM Convert Task crashing Windows Explorer? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ish at November 29, 2018 01:00 PM

November 28, 2018

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM Microsoft Office Outlook No Default Mail Client Error

Are you receiving a Microsoft Office Outlook / SOLIDWORKS PDM No Default Mail Client Error while previewing files in the vault?

SOLIDWORKS PDM No Default Mail Client Error

SOLIDWORKS PDM No Default Mail Client Error

Why am I receiving this SOLIDWORKS PDM No Default Mail Client Error?

SOLIDWORKS PDM uses eDrawings to preview files, and within eDrawings, there’s functionality that sends performance emails.  Essentially; eDrawings is trying to access Outlook to send an email, and has run into some corruption in the registry related to Outlook.  This issue is detailed within the Microsoft Knowledge base.

As a workaround, we can disable the eDrawings setting to automatically send performance emails.

Fix the error by disabling eDrawings Performance email

  • Start > Programs > SOLIDWORKS 20xx > eDrawings 20xx
Launch eDrawings

Start > Programs > SOLIDWORKS 20xx > eDrawings 20xx

  • eDrawings > Tools > Options

eDrawings > Tools > Options

  • General > Clear ‘Enable performance email’
eDrawings Options

General > Clear ‘Enable performance email’

  • Ok > Close eDrawings

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Microsoft Office Outlook No Default Mail Client Error appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Justin Williams at November 28, 2018 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Love Hultén’s Latest Custom Game Console is a Glass-Encased Nintendo Shrine

Custom NES Console

Back in 2016, Nintendo released the NES Classic Edition – a miniaturized version of their 1985 Nintendo Entertainment System (called the Famicom in Japan). The console came preinstalled with 30 of the console’s best games. With titles like Super Mario Bros., The Legend of Zelda: A Link To The Past, and Super Metroid included in the platform, you’d be hard-pressed to find a classic game you didn’t like on the NES Classic.

Sadly, the preinstalled nature of the console meant you couldn’t slot in your retro game cartridges as you did with the original console. Granted, it is harder to obtain original NES games than their digital counterparts, but if you wanted to play some obscure indie games, chances are the NES Classic wouldn’t have them.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vWLVcG-lErE?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>

Enter the Pyua – a completely playable Nintendo shrine that allows you to play your old cartridges on a working console. Created by designer Love Hultén, the Pyua is a retro tribute to the console that pretty much saved the video game industry back in the day.

NES shrine NES shrine

At the center of the platform is retro company Analogue’s own Nt mini, a fully compatible console which can play classic NES cartridges up to 1080p HDMI and RGB, complete with wireless controllers and wired peripheral support. Unlike the NES Classic Edition, the Nt mini can also play both Famicom and NES cartridges (which come in two different shapes).

NES shrine NES shrine

Surrounding the console is Love Hultén’s retro-designed shrine itself. It has a glass case covering two slots where you can connect an NES or Famicom cartridge, while the console has been redesigned with a sleeker look (the Japanese kanji in front reads “Nintendo”). Pressing the big red button turns on an illuminating light, while all of the console’s slots and ports can be found at the back.

NES shrine NES shrine NES shrine

To store the cartridges and controllers when not in use, Hultén made a case which satisfyingly clicks and pops out your games and controllers like the snazziest catalog you ever saw. The case can be connected to the shrine to give it more elevation.

NES shrine

Find more of Love Hultén’s impressive game console redesigns over on his webpage.

The post Love Hultén’s Latest Custom Game Console is a Glass-Encased Nintendo Shrine appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 28, 2018 11:56 AM

Pay What You Want for This Killer All-in-One Arduino Super Bundle

Arduino Kit

Most designers and engineers already know that Arduino is a powerful and versatile platform for creating electronics projects. Yet, knowing where to dive into learning about the powerful little computer isn’t quite so easy.

From building robots to adding a little IoT intelligence into weekend projects, the Pay What You Want: 2018 Arduino Enthusiast E-Book Bundle is the perfect place to begin broadening your horizons in the world of Arduino.

The project-based approach presented in the course teaches users how to create everything from DC motor controllers operated by a web page, slide switch, or touch sensors to constructing electronic operating status displays for just about anything. Best of all, the course is yours forever—so tackling projects on the weekend can be done at any pace.

The Pay What You Want: 2018 Arduino Enthusiast E-Book Bundle

Skills Presented Include:

  • Monitor several Arduino boards simultaneously
  • Tweet sensor data directly from your Arduino board
  • Post updates on your Facebook wall directly from your Arduino board
  • Create an automated access control w/ a fingerprint sensor
  • Control your entire home from a single dashboard
  • Make a GPS tracker that you can track in Google Maps
  • Build a live camera that streams directly from your robot

Get Started Here!

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by SolidSmack at November 28, 2018 10:59 AM

Cool Books of Doom: ‘The Pushing Points Topology Workbook’

polygonal car modeling

When it comes to SubD topology, having the ability to construct a variety of meshes with clean polygon flows can mean the difference between yelling an obscene amount of profanities at your monitor or having a blast. Thanks to a new book from the renowned 3D artist, writer, and director William Vaughan, getting to that fun place won’t have to be so challenging after all.

Vaughan’s comprehensive 125-page Pushing Points Topology Workbook includes over 60 exercises to train anybody in managing their mesh topology. Even those who may consider themselves “experts” at SubD could certainly learn a thing or two from the master modeler—whose portfolio spans across Nickelodeon and Pixar.

The Pushing Points Topology Workbook — $48.00

About Author William Vaughan:

William Vaughan is an award-winning artist, writer, and director. He has created thousands of original computer-generated characters, including Tofu the Vegan Zombie. William has trained thousands of CG artists throughout the world and authored more than one thousand tutorials and instructional videos. He has been published by major cg magazines, contributed to twenty books, has written and directed several award-winning films, and has created digital art for many top studios, including Nickelodeon and Pixar Animation Studios.

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

Feature image via Polycount

The post Cool Books of Doom: ‘The Pushing Points Topology Workbook’ appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 28, 2018 10:24 AM

November 27, 2018

Publication Formats for Technical Documentation

For those who have been paying attention, you may have noticed that occasionally I have been known to grouse about publishers and the restrictions of publication formats. It’s true. I’m…

by matt at November 27, 2018 06:13 PM

SolidSmack

This Old-School iPod Case For The Series 4 Apple Watch is Peak Apple Nostalgia

Pod Case for Apple Watch Series 4

Back in 2001, when Apple was still known as just a computer company with fruit logos on its computers, it released the first iPod. Unlike other media players before it, this white block used a touch-based scroll wheel to play songs, skip tracks, and scroll through menus. This may seem old hat by today’s standards, but back then, the idea of using a machine with such intuitive controls was revolutionary.

It helped shape the tech industry as it is today: no more hard-to-press buttons, just functional, reliable touch-based interaction. Of course with the times being ever-changing, the iPod adapted as well; eventually getting rid of the scroll wheel and incorporating a touchscreen for a more natural interface.

Still, the first generation iPod holds a special place in people’s hearts; whether for its physical appearance or because it’s where they stored all their Linkin Park albums.

Apple Watch iPod case

Designer Joyce Kang of Caseology knows clearn and well how much people love the original iPod, so she designed a case which makes the Series 4 Apple Watch look like a bonafide retro music player (because something released in 2001 now counts as “retro”).

Apple Watch iPod case

There are a few differences, however. Unlike the original iPod, the case has more rounded edges for the newer Apple Watch to slip in easily. It also isn’t as big as the traditional media player, since lugging around the original iPod felt like storing a brick inside your pocket.

Apple Watch iPod case

But possibly the saddest differentiation from the original iPod is that the case is purely cosmetic, which means the scroll wheels and buttons don’t work and are just for show. While you can still use the Apple Watch touchscreen as you usually would, it would have been cool to navigate through menus the same way you did a decade ago.

Apple Watch iPod case

Still, the concept behind the design is pretty cool, especially for those who are fans of tech nostalgia. The case isn’t for sale (at least for now), but more design images can be found on Behance.

The post This Old-School iPod Case For The Series 4 Apple Watch is Peak Apple Nostalgia appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 27, 2018 01:09 PM

The Javelin Blog

Setting up a Static Simulation on SOLIDWORKS Weldments

When working with large assemblies, you may want to run a static simulation on a sub-assembly and you are faced with the error “Load/Restraint cannot be applied to the beam face, edge, or vertex”  as seen in the picture below when applying fixtures & external loads. When setting up a SOLIDWORKS Weldments static simulation there is a step you need to do to make it work. Let’s see how we can get our simulation up and running.

This can happen when you are dealing with Static Simulation on Weldments

Error: Load/Restraint cannot be applied to beam face, edge, or vertex.

Default Settings for SOLIDWORKS Weldments Static Simulation

Since our assembly contains a weldment, by default it is modeled as a beam. The left side of the picture below illustrates this, but what we want for SOLIDWORKS Weldments Static Simulation is a mesh like the one on the right side of the picture.

Applying attributes to Solids is easier.

Mesh for Beam vs. Solid

Treat each Weldment as a Solid

To get that result, there is one setting we will need to toggle. For each weldment in the simulation, we will need to go to the Simulation tree and select:

  • Cut List Folder > (right click) All parts > Treat as Solid (see picture below)

By selecting this option for all weldment parts in the cut list, the geometry of the part will be used for creating the mesh.

Right click on Weldment and select Treat as Solid

Right click on Weldment and select Treat as Solid

And now we are off to the races and can now apply the necessary fixtures & applied loads to the model. When completed, run the simulation to see the results.

SOLIDWORKS Weldments Static Simulation

Now we can apply external Loads & fixtures

So next time you run into that error, all you need to do is check if your parts are made of weldments and select the “Treat as Solid” option and you will be good to go. If you would like to know more about simulation with weldments, please check out the links below:

The post Setting up a Static Simulation on SOLIDWORKS Weldments appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at November 27, 2018 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | The Marker Bleed – Autumn 2018 Edition (Powered by Spotify)

Spotify

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’ll get the groove going with “Healing” from Clams Casino before diving into a mix of killer tracks from LCD Soundsystem, Cass McCombs, Deerhunter, Blonde Redhead, and others before wrapping up with “What Would I Do?” from Strawberry Guy. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/15iAb3Xy1O8B8VbCy3mmpT" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Marker Bleed – Autumn 2018 Edition (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 27, 2018 01:00 PM

Get a Lifetime of 2TB Secure Cloud Storage for Just $59.99

Clouds

These days, it’s nearly impossible to avoid having to use the cloud for at least some sort of file storage—even if it’s just a few photos off of your phone. And for more serious users, juggling huge amounts of important data can be cumbersome without a serious and dedicated Cloud storage account.

For those looking for some cloud storage breathing room Degoo Premium brings you 2TB of secured cloud storage accessible from all of your devices with high-speed transfers. That’s more than Dropbox, OneDrive, and Google Drive combined! And for a limited time, SolidSmack readers can grab a lifetime subscription to Degoo Premium for just $59.99—that’s 95% off!

Features:

  • Send files easily to friends via email or link
  • Store up to 2TB of data under ultra-secure 256-bit AES encryption
  • Replicate your backup as you perform it, giving you extra peace of mind
  • Perform backup to all of your devices
  • Get more storage space than Dropbox, OneDrive, & Google Drive combined
  • Keep your backup automatically up to date thanks to automatic file change detection

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
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Feature Image Courtesy of SolidWorks-Corsi

The post Get a Lifetime of 2TB Secure Cloud Storage for Just $59.99 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 27, 2018 11:11 AM

November 26, 2018

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Monday List 48.18 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

SolidSmack Best Stories

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Five big thinkers puzzle over the future of the future.

From Gene Editing to A.I., How Will Technology Transform Humanity?

The U.S. Is Playing Catch-Up With Rivals as Globalization Marches On

Four major trade trends to watch for in 2019.

The U.S. Is Playing Catch-Up With Rivals as Globalization Marches On

How Companies Get You to Pay More for the Same Product

It’s not just the airlines; consumers are paying up for everything from sneakers to pickup trucks.

How Companies Get You to Pay More for the Same Product

Lucid Dreaming: This Retreat Can Train Your Nighttime Visions

The more I learned about the power of lucid dreaming, the more I wanted to be able to induce lucid dreams on a consistent basis.

Lucid Dreaming: This Retreat Can Train Your Nighttime Visions

Unpacking the Millennial Work Ethic

Or, what Hannah Arendt can tell us about LinkedIn’s content problem

Unpacking the Millennial Work Ethic

Technologists Should Abandon Their Craft

Everyone is trying to break into technology, but I wish more people would break out.

Technologists Should Abandon Their Craft

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 48.18 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 26, 2018 01:17 PM

The Javelin Blog

Gotta pattern something in SOLIDWORKS? Reduce your effort with a Sketch Driven Pattern!

A SOLIDWORKS Sketch Driven Pattern is a great way to control instance locations, but did you know you can use the same sketch for both the instances AND the feature?  You can!  To demonstrate, we’re going to dive into the universe of one of my all-time favorite sci-fi novels and movies, “2001: A Space Odyssey”:

Science teams have located a monolith here:

Model that requires hole pattern

Model that requires hole pattern

To study it further, we’ll attempt to bore holes in it thus:

Holes applied

Holes applied

In order to minimize the sketching, we’ll create a single sketch that includes both the hole (represented by circle) AND the patterned instance locations (represented by sketch points):

Sketch for hole and pattern feature

Sketch for hole and pattern feature

Next, we’ll create a cut-extrude with that sketch.  And then we’ll create a sketch-driven pattern that references the cut-extrude AND its sketch!  So basically, one sketch to rule them all (that’s yet another book/movie reference)!  With the sketch-driven pattern, every sketch point will result in another patterned instance of the feature. Here, a pattern of holes!

SOLIDWORKS Sketch Driven Pattern

SOLIDWORKS Sketch Driven Pattern

Whether we can actually cut through this exotic material is unknown.  Failing that, unconfirmed rumors tell of a second monolith, but that’s highly classified.

The post Gotta pattern something in SOLIDWORKS? Reduce your effort with a Sketch Driven Pattern! appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at November 26, 2018 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Behind the Design: Noah Deledda’s Insane Aluminum Can Sculptures

Noah Deledda

Take one look at an empty soda can, and you may think “trash,” but to sculptor Noah Deledda, he sees an aluminum canvas ripe for setting his hands on to create something truly unique.

Though Noah is a sculptor by profession, he doesn’t work with just any sort of wood, rock, or conventional metal. Neither does he use conventional tools. His claim to fame is his ability to use nothing but his hands to pound, press, and crease patterns onto commercial aluminum soda cans and turn them into one-of-a-kind sculptures.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yjuJ0H6W00o?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>

Anyone looking at the finished product might think these intricate and consistent patterns were machine-pressed. After scratching off the labels and polishing it with sandpaper, Noah takes each soda can into his masterful hands and carefully measures every crease he presses. Using a ruler, his thumbs, and a boatload of talent, this hands-on approach ensures every soda can is left with its own unique pattern.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tilw2vZYPLM?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>

The philosophy behind his art is to create something out of an ordinary object. Inspired by the natural bumps, bends, and dents soda cans get whenever they’re thrown away, Noah is able to come up with a seemingly infinite number of patterns.

It may look easy, but the sculpting techniques he uses on such a finicky material are the result of years of practice and trial-and-error. You can find more of Noah’s soda can sculptures on his webpage as well as his YouTube channel, where his videos detail the sculpting process and the ideation behind them.

The post Behind the Design: Noah Deledda’s Insane Aluminum Can Sculptures appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 26, 2018 12:46 PM

New Design Documentary Tells the Story of Bauhaus Designer László Moholy-Nagy

Quick history lesson: László Moholy-Nagy was a Hungarian photographer, painter, sculptor, and all-around artist who helped revolutionize the art scene during the early 20th century. Think of him as a sort of Leonardo Da Vinci of his time, if you will; he took photos, built buildings, designed products – if it involved any form of media, chances are he dipped his feet into it.

The New Bauhaus

His expertise in various fields landed him a job as a professor at the Staatliches Bauhaus – a prestigious German art school which he taught at for five years before leaving to start his own design studio.

But the lure of teaching seemed to be too strong, as Moholy-Nagy started a new school once he migrated to the United States. Initially called ‘The New Bauhaus’, the Chicago-based university is now better known as the IIT Institute of Design – a graduate school focused on human-centered design.

The New Bauhaus

2019 marks 100 years since Moholy-Nagy founded the Chicago Bauhaus, so it seemed like the ideal time to make a documentary on his cultural impact on the art and design world. The New Bauhaus (that’s the name of the documentary, not the school itself) takes a look at Moholy-Nagy’s life, art, his school, and their relevance in the world of modern design today.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/petterringbom/the-new-bauhaus-a-feature-documentary/widget/video.html" width="800"> </iframe>

The documentary includes research on Moholy-Nagy’s works, interviews with designers and artists he inspired, as well as a look at his personal life through his daughter, Hattula Moholy-Nagy. From his time in Germany, all the way to his migration to America and teaching at the Bauhaus, The New Bauhaus will premiere in 2019 to coincide with the school’s 100th anniversary.

The documentary has already been fully funded on Kickstarter, earning $52,314 in total to make the production possible. Find out more on The New Bauhaus and where you’ll be able to catch it over on its Kickstarter.

The post New Design Documentary Tells the Story of Bauhaus Designer László Moholy-Nagy appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 26, 2018 12:37 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: Prismacolor Premier Verithin Colored Pencils

Prismacolor Colored Pencils

As far as colored pencils go, Prismacolors have just about everybody else beat. Whether you’re a designer, engineer, or even a professional artist, the quality of Prismacolor in a variety of applications is just simply unrivaled.

And for those looking to sketch intricate details with defined lines and crisp edges that just can’t be done without a constant sharp point, the brand’s Verithin line of colored pencils feature a hardened core that resists crumbling for ultra-detailed sketch sessions.

We love this 24-pack variety of Verithin Colored Pencils to keep around the shop because each pencil lasts seemingly forever—thanks to that hardened core—and can be used for just about any other marking job, too.

Prismacolor Premier Verithin Colored Pencils 24-Pack — $12.99

Features:

  • Thin cores are perfect for details, edges, and lettering
  • Leads resist crumbling, cracking and breakage
  • Richly saturated, lightfast pigments
  • Hardened cores sharpen to an ultra-fine point making them perfect for filling in tight spaces
  • Includes: Lemon Yellow, Canary Yellow, Orange, Poppy Red, Crimson Red, Magenta, Process Red, Light Peach, Dahlia Purple, Parma Violet, Violet, Ultramarine, Peacock Blue, Indigo Blue, Apple Green, Grass Green, Olive Green, Peacock Green, Terra Cotta, Tuscan Red, Dark Brown, Warm Grey 20%, White and Black

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: Prismacolor Premier Verithin Colored Pencils appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 26, 2018 12:35 PM

November 25, 2018

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Component Types

In SOLIDWORKS Electrical, the options to specify a component type is given to allow users to better classify and search for different components in their design:

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Schematics

SOLIDWORKS Electrical Schematic

The available SOLIDWORKS Electrical component types are:

  • Base: Base components have either a single reference or are the main reference if used in a component with multiple references. For example, a contactor would be defined as a base component in a design.
  • Auxiliary: Auxiliary components are components that are not bases, but are connected to a base AND serve an electrical purpose, sticking to the contactor example, this can for example be an overload relay used to protect a motor.
  • Accessory: Accessory components are very similar to Auxiliary components, with the difference being they do not serve an electrical purpose. Examples may include mounting screws, brackets, etc.

Choosing the right type can help make a design more efficient and easier to work with. It can make functions such as searching for example easier, as one can apply filters for the component type.

The post SOLIDWORKS Electrical Component Types appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ish at November 25, 2018 01:00 PM

November 24, 2018

The Javelin Blog

How to add a Date automatically to SOLIDWORKS Custom File Properties

In my last article I touched on populating the File Properties in a SOLIDWORKS Part template to reduce typing. But what about adding dates? If only we could have dates automatically appear for us. Well, I have some specific codes that can be input to populate a SOLIDWORKS Custom Property Date. Magic!

This is the code to be entered into the Value field for the date when the part was created:

$PRP:"SW-Created Date"

This is the code to be entered into the Value field for the date when the part was last saved:

$PRP:"SW-Last Saved Date"

I created a simple part and the only thing I have to change is the description and the part number. Take a look below. This takes a few seconds instead of minutes filling out these fields and it’s ISO compliant.

SOLIDWORKS Custom Property Date

Date Properties added

The post How to add a Date automatically to SOLIDWORKS Custom File Properties appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at November 24, 2018 01:00 PM

November 23, 2018

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS not responding? Enable Status Feedback (in 2018 SP3 and above)

Ahh! The nasty white glaze screen of SOLIDWORKS not responding. This condition is triggered by a Windows application timeout. Where it thinks the application has stopped responding due to the length time the application is working in the background. Don’t be fooled! SOLIDWORKS could still be working and if you hit close you will lose data. SOLIDWORKS Status Feedback lets us know that the application is still working and requires more time to complete the given task.

While Status Feedback is a standard option in SOLIDWORKS 2019, users who are using SOLIDWORKS 2018 SP3 and above can also take advantage of this new feature.

SOLIDWORKS Status Feedback

SOLIDWORKS Status Feedback

 

WARNING: Please be very careful when editing or deleting any entries in the Windows Registry as changing the wrong entry can lead to major issues on your system. Note that Javelin is not responsible for any changes that you make to your system, the following is just a guideline.

Registry Editor

Registry Editor

Enable SOLIDWORKS Status Feedback

Here are the steps to enable the new Status Feedback feature in SOLIDWORKS 2018 (SP3 or above).  With SOLIDWORKS closed, try the following steps:

  1. Open regedit.
  2. Browse to: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\SolidWorks\SolidWorks 2018\General
  3. Right click in the empty space , select “New> DWORD (32bit) Value”
  4. Name it ‘Enable White Glaze’
  5. Double click on it after creation – set the value from 0 (zero) to 1.

If you need proof that SOLIDWORKS is still chugging away, jump into the Windows Task Manager and check the CPU utilized by the SOLIDWORKS application.

The post SOLIDWORKS not responding? Enable Status Feedback (in 2018 SP3 and above) appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Shawn McEachern at November 23, 2018 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The Best SolidSmack Stories of the Week — November 23rd, 2018

The New 2018 MacBook Air Has A DIY Replaceable Battery (Sort Of)

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

Behind the Design: Manufacturing the Leatherman Wave Multi-Tool

The Leatherman Wave was released back in 1996 and was the first Leatherman to feature accessible blades without opening the handle. People must have loved cutting things to ribbons because it became the company’s bestselling multi-tool ever. So it only made sense for BRANDMADE.TV, a documentary YouTube channel, to show how this iconic multi-tool gets made.

Behind the Design: Manufacturing the Leatherman Wave Multi-Tool

The New 2018 MacBook Air Has A DIY Replaceable Battery (Sort Of)

Fans of open hardware that also just so happen to like using a Mac, your prayers have been… slightly heard? According to the internal service readiness guide for this year’s MacBook Air, Apple has made their new laptop’s battery a self-removable one.

The New 2018 MacBook Air Has A DIY Replaceable Battery (Sort Of)

Onshape Partners With Magic Leap for Immersive AR/VR 3D CAD

As anyone who has used a AR/VR headset for gaming purposes would know, it’s always more fun to play with friends. Well, the same concept applies to AR/VR on an industrial working scale, which is why Onshape has paired up with VR virtuoso Magic Leap to create a 3D design app for the headset.

Onshape Partners With Magic Leap for Immersive AR/VR 3D CAD

YouTube Model Maker BLACKHAND Is Back With A 10,000 Match Flaming Skull

Halloween may be over, but that hasn’t stopped YouTube creator BLACKHAND from making one of his creepiest chain matchstick pieces yet. SolidSmack previously covered one of his chain matchstick reactions, but while the old one was a hodgepodge of smaller matchstick structures stuck together, this new one is a bit more…bare bones.

YouTube Model Maker BLACKHAND Is Back With A 10,000 Match Flaming Skull

Behind the Design: Burning Art Onto A Skateboard Is As Cool As It Sounds

While bikes, scooters, and maybe even unicycles are cool, nothing beats riding on a plank of wood on wheels at top speed with reckless abandon—particularly when said board has some pretty killer artwork on it, too.

Behind the Design: Burning Art Onto A Skateboard Is As Cool As It Sounds

Manufacturing Platform Xometry Now Has An RFQ Service for Part Quotes

Finding other people to do your grunt work for you just got a heck of a lot easier. Online manufacturing network platform Xometry, known for being one of the best on-demand manufacturing platforms, has announced a new RFQ (request for quotation) service which allows users to scout for quotes on die casting, stamping, and extrusion jobs from the company’s ever-growing list of manufacturing partners.

Manufacturing Platform Xometry Now Has An RFQ Service for Part Quotes

The post The Best SolidSmack Stories of the Week — November 23rd, 2018 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 23, 2018 09:00 AM

Cool Tools of Doom: The Palomino Blackwing 602 Pencil

Blackwing Pencils

Cherished by writers, designers, illustrators, and other creative professionals for its soft dark lead and unique flat eraser, the Blackwing 602 is worth trying at least once—but be forewarned: you may never go back to plain old #2 pencils again.

Originally manufactured by the Eberhard Faber Pencil Company from 1934 – 1988, the Blackwing brand was acquired by California Cedar Products Company in 2008 and reintroduced to a new generation of creatives in 2012.

And now, you can score your own 12-pack of the legendary pencil for just 23 bucks.

Palomino Blackwing 602 Pencils 12-Pack — $24.95

Features:

  • One pack of 12 Palomino Blackwing pencils
  • Pencils feature a soft and smooth graphite core that is perfect for artists and composers
  • Pencils feature a unique ferrule and allows you to extend and replace the eraser
  • Replacement erasers available in three different colors
  • Pencils made out of Genuine Incense-cedar

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The Palomino Blackwing 602 Pencil appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 23, 2018 08:59 AM

November 22, 2018

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: The 3Dconnexion SpaceMouse Wireless 3D Mouse

3D CAD Mouse

Long considered an indispensable asset for anybody working in CAD, the 3D mouse is a quintessential tool that belongs on the desktop of any industrial designer or engineer.

Within a 3D application such as SolidWorks, Rhino, Fusion 360, or Keyshot, the directional, zoom and rotate functions provide an intuitive extension of the users’ design intent. To put it quite simply, a 3D mouse helps get rid of those annoying repetitive keystrokes and allows the designer to come as close to possible to holding their digital 3D design in the physical world.

As pioneers of the 3D mouse territory, 3Dconnexion has blazed a trail with their SpaceMouse collection. And when it comes to the perfect balance of price, performance, and portability, we’re big fans of the company’s SpaceNavigator 3D Mouse.

Utilizing the company’s patented 6-Degrees-of-Freedom (6DoF) sensor, the intuitive 3D mouse also includes two buttons for accessing radial control menus to drive commands from directly within your applications. And with a wireless connection, you can be sure that this won’t be just another desktop peripheral clogging your desk with obnoxious wires.

SpaceMouse 3D Mouse

The 3Dconnexion SpaceMouse Wireless 3D Mouse — $149.00

Features:

  • Superior 3D Navigation – Intuitively and precisely navigate digital models or viewports in 3D space.
  • Wireless Freedom – 3Dconnexion 2.4GHz Wireless technology ensures a reliable, real-time connection to your 3D content.
  • Easy to Use – Each SpaceMouse Wireless button opens its own radial menu providing convenient mouse-click access to four application commands.
  • Flexible Recharging – Supplied micro-USB cable handles re-charging and data at the same time. Just connect and continue working, Stylish Design – small footprint, elegant brushed steel base, two buttons.

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The 3Dconnexion SpaceMouse Wireless 3D Mouse appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 22, 2018 05:06 PM

Onshape Partners With Magic Leap for Immersive AR/VR 3D CAD

OnShape Magic Leap

As anyone who has used a AR/VR headset for gaming purposes would know, it’s always more fun to play with friends. Well, the same concept applies to AR/VR on an industrial working scale, which is why Onshape has paired up with VR virtuoso Magic Leap to create a 3D design app for the headset.

Temporarily dubbed “Onshape for Magic Leap”, the AR program is being developed specifically for the Magic Leap One Creator Edition: a headset with a built-in CPU that brings digital images onscreen into the real world for interaction. 

Onshape on Magic Leap

The platform allows designers to work on their 3D CAD projects in a more practical environment. Instead of zooming in and out of a 3D project on a computer screen to continually change the angle, the Magic Leap provides users the means to see and interact with the objects they create in 3D as they will appear in the real world.

“We’re excited to bring the many benefits of modern CAD to engineers in the Magicverse,” says Onshape CEO Jon Hirschtick. “For more than a half-century, CAD users were confined to working on a flat screen. The Magic Leap One will push product design into a whole new stratosphere. Imagine your engineering team is reviewing the latest design for a race car. With the ML One, they will be able to put that car right on the conference table, go under the hood and examine the engine block. They can then levitate the car above their heads and check out the exhaust system.”

But the best part about having Onshape on the Magic Leap is the ability for many users to connect to a single CAD project, allowing for collaborative efforts on large-scale designs like cars or buildings.

Onshape for Magic Leap will support live editing for 3D CAD models, which allows collaborators to see the project being worked on in real time. This will help a lot of industries concerning fine-tuning their prototypes before production, plus it justifies having to wear those silly glasses during conference meetings and workshops.

The app’s release date is still unknown, but expect it to come sometime in 2019. If you’re working for a company who may be interested in Onshape for Magic Leap, you can arrange a media demo by contacting dgarnick@onshape.com.

The post Onshape Partners With Magic Leap for Immersive AR/VR 3D CAD appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 22, 2018 05:02 PM

Build Your Next CAD Workstation with This $19 Online Course

CAD Workstation Hard Drive

These days, you can get just about any computer rig designed to your exact specifications. Whether you’re a RAM-hogging SolidWorks user, or simply just want a powerful workstation, there’s something for everybody. But no standardized hardware mod will ever replace the satisfaction of building your own rig from scratch.

If you’ve ever wanted to create your own custom-built PC but didn’t know where to start, boy do we have great news for you.

The How to Build a Computer Bundle consolidates five intensive online courses (a total of 126 individual lessons) ranging from how to create a blueprint for your desired desktop or laptop setup to how to overclock CPU processor functions to speed up rendering times.

How to Build a Computer Bundle — $374 $19.00 (94% off)

Topics Covered Include:

  • Learn about the basic functions of a computer system
  • Pick out appropriate hardware for your build
  • Assemble all hardware needed for a fully functional computer
  • Wire everything within the case like an expert
  • Cover the most effective method of CPI cooling: closed-loop liquid cooling
  • Upgrade to a higher capacity storage device
  • Improve your RAM chip(s)
  • Clean & refresh your CPU cooling unit
  • Swap in an SSD
  • Learn about the various tricky aspects about RAID setups
  • Understand how to increase data read/write speeds & prepare your computer for a drive crash

Get It!

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Build Your Next CAD Workstation with This $19 Online Course appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 22, 2018 04:53 PM

App Smack 47.18: TBR for Tumblr, Agora 2, GM Files, and More…

Best iPhone and Android Apps 2018

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved mobile device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional. This week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

TBR for Tumblr (iOS — $2.99)

TBR is a third-party Tumblr client which helps you explore Tumblr dashboard easily.

TBR for Tumblr

LoungeBuddy Lounge Access (iOS – Free)

LoungeBuddy is the only App that makes it possible for all travelers to view, book, and access airport lounges around the world in seconds. From the casual traveler in economy to the seasoned elite road warrior, LoungeBuddy will help you make the most of your time at the airport. It’s time you experienced travel – in style.

LoungeBuddy Lounge Access

Agora 2 (iOS — $2.99)

Agora is a podcast player that allows you to manage your content easily, stay tuned to each new update of your subscriptions and expand your catalogue discovering new content, but this is not everything…

Agora 2

Notepad (Android — Free)

A simple text Notepad for Android.

Notepad for Android

GM Files (Android — $1.99)

The File Manager has been designed to give android users a free, unlimited and ad-free experience. File Manager categorizes files for you with its smart feature. Easily access photos, videos, music and other files on the phone.

GM Files

Contacts Optimizer (Android — $2.99)

Your contacts are the most important data in your phone, right? This application will deeply analyze your contacts and bring it close to perfection. The built-in intelligence will surprise you. Users say this application is so useful it should be included with every phone. It will save you hours of work, quickly paying for itself.

Contacts Optimizer

The post App Smack 47.18: TBR for Tumblr, Agora 2, GM Files, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 22, 2018 04:51 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to get the best performance from SOLIDWORKS Composer

While carrying out technical support, customers report different types of issues related to SOLIDWORKS Composer performance in which Composer doesn’t behave normally. Most of these issues are graphics related; and many occur when a different version or service-pack of Composer is installed on a machine which resets all the performance options to default.

Some of the common SOLIDWORKS Composer performance issues are:

  • When we hover over the part in a Composer assembly, instead of highlighting one part, composer starts some sort of animation and highlights the whole assembly.
  • Cutting plane capping color grayed out in the properties tab
  • Longer time to import SOLIDWORKS files into Composer

All the above issues and any other related problems are because of the Graphics and can be resolved following the steps below:

Application Preferences – Quality:

Make sure in SOLIDWORKS composer profile is set to High Quality. To do so go to File > Preferences > this Opens Application Preferences window > General > Profile > Select High quality > Click Apply and Click OK. In SOLIDWORKS 2019 profile is set to High quality by default.

SOLIDWORKS Composer performance

SOLIDWORKS Composer performance settings

Graphic Card settings:

Also add composer into NVIDIA Control program list to make sure it uses the graphic card that is installed on the machine but not the Intel machine inbuilt graphics.To do so Right click on empty area on desktop > NVIDIA control Panel > Manage 3D settings > Program settings > Add > search CATIA Composer > Click Apply and click OK.

Graphic Card settings

This will ensure Composer uses the graphic card and gives you the best performance in terms of quality and speed.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Composer training course either in a Canadian classroom near you or live online. For more information about composer software and training solutions call 1-877-219-6757.

The post How to get the best performance from SOLIDWORKS Composer appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at November 22, 2018 01:00 PM

November 21, 2018

SolidSmack

The New 2018 MacBook Air Has A DIY Replaceable Battery (Sort Of)

Rose Gold MacBook Air

Fans of open hardware that also just so happen to like using a Mac, your prayers have been… slightly heard? According to the internal service readiness guide for this year’s MacBook Air, Apple has made their new laptop’s battery a self-removable one.

For context, ever since MacBooks and MacBook Pros with retina displays were released back in 2012, laptops with battery issues had to be brought to an Apple Service Center. Since the battery was hot glued to the top case, they had to remove the entire thing, trackpad and keyboard included, before replacing it.

Replaceable MacBook Air Battery

The battery for the new MacBook Air is still glued to the top case, but this time around, Apple is providing Genius Bars (local tech support stations) and service centers with tools specially made for replacing the battery without replacing the top case. After removing the old battery and replacing it with a new one, Apple techs have to place the notebook on the company’s iPhone display press tool, where a new adhesive will stick the battery back onto the top case.

So while it is technically easier to replace this new MacBook Air’s battery yourself, the company insists on you bringing it to a service center to get it done. Still, not having to replace the entire top case to change the battery is a godsend for folks who would rather fix their laptops themselves than wait in line for hours for the same result.

The last MacBook air featured a screwed-down battery instead of a glued one, so this shift to more open hardware may be one move Apple is willing to stick to. If this is the case, then maybe more people will buy their overpriced products.

The post The New 2018 MacBook Air Has A DIY Replaceable Battery (Sort Of) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 21, 2018 07:42 PM

Cool Tools of Doom: Geier Glove Co. Elkskin Work Gloves

Elkskin Work Gloves

Founded in 1927 in Centralia, Washington by the Geier Brothers, the Geier Glove Company has been churning out some of the world’s finest work gloves for heavy wear and tear.

Made from Elkskin, which is more rugged than deerskin, these gloves can stand up to just about anything you can throw at them—from nasty wood splinters to cold steel bars. Heck—they even make great winter gloves whether you use them in the shop at all.

Made in the USA, you can’t go wrong with this Western staple in your workshop.

Geier Glove Elkskin Gloves — $58.95

Features:

  • Men’s elkskin gloves in slip-on style
  • Rugged and tough for work or riding
  • Made of the finest elkskin
  • Unlined
  • Made In USA

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: Geier Glove Co. Elkskin Work Gloves appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 21, 2018 05:43 PM

How To Take Time Off

This time of year, I thought it might be appropriate to address how to take time off. Coming from a guy who tends to get obsessive, this might mean more…

by matt at November 21, 2018 04:32 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to fix “Encountered invalid record index” error when importing a STEP file

Have you “Encountered invalid record index” when importing a STEP file into SOLIDWORKS?

Encountered invalid record index

Encountered invalid record index

To fix the file try the following:

  1. Deactivate “3D Interconnect” in SOLIDWORKS Options > System Options > Import
  2. Open the STEP file using text editor such as Notepad. The file will open as text.
  3. Use Search/Find, and search for: PRESENTATION_STYLE_ASSIGNMENT
    If this problematic data is found, replace it using the Search/Find & Replace command with: PRES

    PRESENTATION_STYLE_ASSIGNMENT

    PRESENTATION_STYLE_ASSIGNMENT

  4. Save the file. This parameter will now be skipped during the import’s parsing process, and thus the warning will not display and the STEP should import as expected.
  5. Retry the Import into SOLIDWORKS.
File imported into SOLIDWORKS

STEP File imported into SOLIDWORKS

The post How to fix “Encountered invalid record index” error when importing a STEP file appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Shawn McEachern at November 21, 2018 01:00 PM

November 20, 2018

SolidSmack

Behind the Design: Manufacturing the Leatherman Wave Multi-Tool

How It's Made - Leatherman Tool

The Leatherman Wave was released back in 1996 and was the first Leatherman to feature accessible blades without opening the handle. People must have loved cutting things to ribbons because it became the company’s bestselling multi-tool ever. So it only made sense for BRANDMADE.TV, a documentary YouTube channel, to show how this iconic multi-tool gets made.

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Tx4QruhI0F0?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>

Starting with the handles, each of the Wave’s 17 tools is made separately by machines before being assembled by human hands. Consisting of screwdrivers, pliers, blades, and a small saw to name a few, each of the individual parts are heat-treated before being tumbled with ceramic beads to remove any rough edges and to polish them. Once hundreds of beads pulverize the parts during the bead blasting process, they are then finished individually.

Leatherman Wave Leatherman Wave Leatherman Wave

Blades are sharpened using a double disc grinder, saws are side grinded, while scissor blades are individually made and sharpened before being flattened to the right thickness.

Leatherman Wave

Keeping the Leatherman Wave together is a taper lock which holds the tools in place as they are being used. This helps them conform to the single tool they’re supposed to fit into and is core step in completing the assembly process.

Leatherman Wave

Last to come are the iconic pliers, which are cast using a process called coining wherein the punch press exerts a ton of force on the metal to bend it into the desired shape. Once the metals are bent, they are sanded and polished before joining the rest of the Leatherman Wave parts for hand assembly.

Leatherman Wave

The assembled Leatherman Wave is checked for consistency to make sure all of the tools are working as intended. Torque, tightness, and sharpness of the blades are tested before being sent out into the wild.

The still images don’t do the video justice, as seeing layers of sheet metal get turned into one of the world’s most durable multi-tools is awesome in its own right. You can find more behind-the-scenes videos on some of your favorite products on BRANDMADE.TV’s YouTube channel.

The post Behind the Design: Manufacturing the Leatherman Wave Multi-Tool appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 20, 2018 07:02 PM

Master the Bézier Curve in a Weekend with This Graphic Design Bootcamp

Chair Design

It’s not always easy to juggle multiple hats in the design and engineering worlds—but if there is a common language that will likely end up saving you a lot of time and frustration down the road, it’s having basic knowledge of visual communication.

While nobody can become an Aaron Draplin overnight, having a strong grasp on the fundamentals of color theory and layout could easily make or break your projects—particularly when communication specific details to stakeholders. Thankfully, you don’t need to go back to design school to get started with leveling up your visual communication game.

From setting up an Adobe Creative Cloud environment to building a portfolio website, the Graphic Design Bootcamp will accelerate your design sense and assist in further leveling up your existing design or engineering know-how. Best of all, SolidSmack readers can purchase the course for just $15—that’s 88% off the retail price of $125.00.

Graphic Design Bootcamp – $125 $15 (88% Off)

Features:

  • Access 65 lectures & 8 hours of content 24/7
  • Learn how to create pixel-perfect projects for print & web
  • Download all project files to use as references
  • Communicate in a private Facebook group w/ other students to share projects & critique work

GET IT!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
StackSocial Amazon

The post Master the Bézier Curve in a Weekend with This Graphic Design Bootcamp appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 20, 2018 06:50 PM

SolidSmack Radio | The Glowing Curvatures (Powered by Spotify)

Spotify Playlist

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’ll get the groove going with “It’s A Shame My Store Isn’t Open” from Natural Child before diving into an off-kilter mix of killer new tracks from Nicolas Jaar, Stereolab, Fleece, and others before wrapping up with “Defeatist Anthem By The Sea” from Blonde Redhead. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<iframe frameborder="0" height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/5nuZuh4u8po5QvIYJ94ap3" width="100%"></iframe>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Glowing Curvatures (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 20, 2018 06:45 PM

The SolidSmack Monday List 47.18 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

RC Car

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

The Forgotten Legend of Silicon Valley’s Flying Saucer Man

Alexander Weygers, a Renaissance man in the mold of the tech industry’s stated ideal, inspired an art dealer to become an acolyte.

The Forgotten Legend of Silicon Valley’s Flying Saucer Man

Did Elon Musk Forget About Buffalo?

After $750 million in subsidies and years of delays, critics say the Tesla CEO hasn’t done enough for the Gigafactory 2 solar panel factory.

Did Elon Musk Forget About Buffalo?

The Human Brain is a Time Traveler

Left to its own devices, the human brain resorts to one of its most emblematic tricks, maybe one that helped make us human in the first place. It time travels.

The Human Brain is a Time Traveler

Everyone Wants to ‘Influence’ You

In the face of powerful influences, how can you locate and hold onto that original, irrefutable spark of self, your free will, your character, even your soul?

Everyone Wants to ‘Influence’ You

Trouble Naming Your Product? Try This Tested Method

Naming a product can be tough, especially if you don’t have a method.

Trouble Naming Your Product? Try This Tested Method

The DIY Tinkerers Harnessing the Power of Artificial Intelligence

In late winter of 1975, a scrap of paper started appearing on bulletin boards around the San Francisco Peninsula. “Are you building your own computer?” it asked. “Or some other digital black-magic box? If so, you might like to come to a gathering.”

The DIY Tinkerers Harnessing the Power of Artificial Intelligence

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 47.18 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 20, 2018 06:37 PM

The Javelin Blog

Specifying Hole Wizard Tolerances in SOLIDWORKS 2019

Now in SOLIDWORKS 2019 you can specify the SOLIDWORKS Hole Wizard Tolerances and Precision directly within the hole wizard feature. The tolerance that have been added within the hole wizard command, will automatically propagate to hole callouts in drawings. This means that you no longer need to manually insert the tolerance/precision of hole wizard features in your drawings by modifying the hole callouts.

To get started, you need expand the Tolerance/Precision menu under Type tab within the hole wizard property manager.

SOLIDWORKS Hole Wizard Tolerances

Adding Hole Wizard Tolerance Directly From the Hole Wizard Feature

Depending on the hole type, the tolerance options that apply to the hole specification are available to select. After you insert your desired tolerance, you can close the hole wizard property manager. When you create a drawing from this part, the tolerance values automatically pop up in the hole callout.

The Tolerance Added Within the Hole Wizard Feature Populates to Hole Callout in the Drawing

The Tolerance Added Within the Hole Wizard Feature Populates to Hole Callout in the Drawing

The post Specifying Hole Wizard Tolerances in SOLIDWORKS 2019 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at November 20, 2018 01:00 PM

November 19, 2018

Use of Color in Models

Color is something some engineers avoid.The model above is not just boring, it’s hard to see which parts are different from one another. You can tell they are all sheet…

by matt at November 19, 2018 05:40 PM

SolidSmack

YouTube Model Maker BLACKHAND Is Back With A 10,000 Match Flaming Skull

Blackhand Matchstick Skull

Halloween may be over, but that hasn’t stopped YouTube creator BLACKHAND from making one of his creepiest chain matchstick pieces yet. SolidSmack previously covered one of his chain matchstick reactions, but while the old one was a hodgepodge of smaller matchstick structures stuck together, this new one is a bit more… bare bones.

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His latest foray into burning matchstick art is a giant skull – because seeing giant skulls go up in flames is just dang cool, okay? Using about 10,000 well-placed matchsticks, some superglue, and metal wiring, BLACKHAND can create an upright skull ready to set the world on fire.

BLACKHAND skull

He starts at the center of the skull by making a matchstick framework which he glues to some metal wire. This frame is what keeps the skull together and is the basis for its shape. With this, he now has a rough guide as to where to put the succeeding matchsticks.

BLACKHAND skull

From here, he adds the “brain” of the skull – which is made up of many wooden splinters. He covers the most delicate part of the head with a bevy of red matchsticks using both the brain and the frame as guides. BLACKHAND also works on the eyes and upper jaw: using black matchsticks to represent eyeholes and a toothless jaw to make room for the “teeth”.

BLACKHAND skull

After cutting out the lower part of the metal frame, he starts putting the final touches on the skull. By cutting wooden spoons (you know, the ones used for small doses of ice cream), BLACKHAND was able to create a set of believable wooden teeth. He adds these to the top and bottom jaws before covering the rest of the skull with some more red matchsticks.

BLACKHAND skull BLACKHAND skull

Now for the moment everyone’s been waiting for: the burning! Watching this 10,000 stick work of art aflame is downright impressive and scary at the same time. On the one hand, it looks like Marvel’s Ghost Rider come to life. On the other, you wouldn’t want to see this flaming skull flying at you on a dark night.

BLACKHAND makes a lot more than just matchstick art. He has previously used cardboard to make a controllable basketball game, more cardboard and an iPad to create an arcade game machine, and much more. Find all of this and more on his YouTube channel.

The post YouTube Model Maker BLACKHAND Is Back With A 10,000 Match Flaming Skull appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 19, 2018 04:42 PM

Cool Books of Doom: ‘Sketching’ by Koos Eissen and Roselien Steur

Spencer Nugent Industrial Designer

While there used to be a painful shortage of inspirational design sketching books out there, these days, design students and those looking to refresh their skill set may, in fact, have too many to choose from. The good news is, there’s something different to learn from each—so go ahead and build out that library.

Among other design sketching book favorites, we love the broad variety of sketching styles presented in Sketching.

While the book is ideal for any design student or classroom, many professionals and design studios will also likely learn a thing or two from the wide variety of sketching styles and form examples presented within the book’s 256 pages.

Sketching (12th printing): Drawing Techniques for Product Designers/em> by Koos Eissen and Roselien Steur — $36.24

About the Authors:

Koos Eissen is an associate professor and head of the Design Drawing Techniques staff (TU Delft, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, in the Netherlands). He is at present guest-lecturer at the Royal Academy of Arts in The Hague. Roselien Steur is a free-lance visualiser, and lecturer at the HKU/Utrecht School of the Arts, The Faculty of Visual Arts and Design in the Netherlands.

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Feature Image via Spencer Nugent
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The post Cool Books of Doom: ‘Sketching’ by Koos Eissen and Roselien Steur appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at November 19, 2018 04:33 PM

The Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ Is a Cheaper, Physically Smaller Version of the Pi 3B+

Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+

To keep up in a modern age where everything is better when it’s the size of your thumb, The Raspberry Pi Foundation have created an updated version of their old 2014 Raspberry Pi 3B+ quad-core processor, simply called the Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+.

Loyal followers of Raspberry might recall the company releasing a miniaturized version of the Pi 3B+ processor during the latter half of 2014. This was the Raspberry Pi Model A+, which had half the RAM of the original and had no USB hub or Ethernet controller.

Raspberry Pi 3A+

The new Model 3 A+ doesn’t sacrifice anything in terms of performance. Just like its big brother, it has 512 MB LPDDR2 SDRAM, a 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core processor, single USB 2.0 mass-storage ports, a micro SD port, dual-band 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2/BLE. In terms of Raspberry hardware connectivity, it also has a CSI camera port for a Raspberry Pi Camera Module and a DSI display port for a Raspberry Pi Touch Display.

Raspberry Pi 3A+

Since the company announced back in March that the 3+ will be their final foray using the classic Raspberry Pi, it feels like a good end before they work on something new. The Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ will cost $25 and be out this December; just in time to stuff your stockings with something better than coal.

They even made a totally informative product alert for the Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ as well:

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More details can be found on the Raspberry webpage.

The post The Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ Is a Cheaper, Physically Smaller Version of the Pi 3B+ appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at November 19, 2018 04:28 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS PDM could not find the Standards Database?

If SOLIDWORKS Toolbox is managed by SOLIDWORKS PDM then the swbrowser.sldedb Toolbox file must be cached locally and users must be able to access it.

Here are some questions and answers to help you troubleshoot a SOLIDWORKS PDM Standards Database Error:

Could not find the Standards database ‘C:\\\lang\english\swbrowser.sldedb’

Are Toolbox Files Cached Locally?

First ensure that this file is cached locally. If it is not, then perform a ‘Get Latest’ on that file. To ensure ALL Toolbox Files are cached locally, perform a Get latest on the Toolbox Folder.

Get Latest Version

Get Latest Version

Do users have Sufficient Permission to access Toolbox files?

Next, make sure that user has sufficient permissions to see this file. A good way of testing that this, is from the user’s computer, log in as the PDM Admin and see if the error occurs. If not, check the Users Permissions. If the user is part of a Group, check the Group Permissions.

To avoid having to ensure the Users/Groups, have sufficient permissions, in PDM Admin double-click on Toolbox, in the SOLIDWORKS node. For the option ‘When accessing Toolbox, use permissions from:’, select ‘Admin (System Administrator). This will elevate the users permissions, when they access Toolbox components.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Standards Database Error SOLIDWORKS PDM Admin Permissions

SOLIDWORKS PDM Admin Permissions

Is the Toolbox File Path correctly specified?

Also, check the SOLIDWORKS System Options, Hole Wizard/Toolbox, that the path is correct.

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox File Path

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox File Path

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM could not find the Standards Database? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at November 19, 2018 01:00 PM

November 18, 2018

The Javelin Blog

How to Insert a Part Specific Configuration in SOLIDWORKS 2019

In SOLIDWORKS 2019, additional functionality has been added to the Insert Part feature. It will now be possible to insert a part with a specific configuration into another part! Part Specific Configuration allows for greater customization when using configurations within a part file. Let’s take a closer look and see how it works.

New SOLIDWORKS Part Specific Configuration Dialog Box

After going to Insert > Part, we are met with the Insert Part dialog Box. As seen in the picture below, there is a configuration drop-down menu where the various configurations of the selected part will be listed. We have the option of pinning the dialog box if multiple configurations will be inserted into the part.

Part Specific Configuration: Its fun to configure at a part level!

Selecting Configuration in Insert Part Dialog Box

Changing the Selected Configuration

We are also able to change the selected configuration of the part after we have inserted it into the feature tree. By right clicking the inserted part and selecting the Edit Feature button, we can toggle the configuration as seen below.

Note: If the features of the inserted part are no longer visible, and mates made on them will no longer work, and new mates will need to be created with the visible features.

Part Specific Configuration: Just like Assemblies!

Changing Configuration of Inserted Part

 

With this new functionality, inserted part configurations are specific to the main part configuration, like the way assembly configurations work. This allows for more customization with configurations, and easier editing down the road.

Part Specific Configuration: Just like assemblies!

Inserted Part Configurations are Specific to Main Part Configurations

The new configuration control when inserting parts is definitely a game changer, and will save people a lot of time & effort when editing assemblies or parts down stream. To learn more about inserting parts check out the articles: Changing Reference Configuration in Inserted Parts and Mirrored or Patterned Instances and Master Cut List Property Management while inserting Parts into Parts.

The post How to Insert a Part Specific Configuration in SOLIDWORKS 2019 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Ben Crisostomo at November 18, 2018 05:00 PM

November 17, 2018

The Javelin Blog

Clean Uninstall of a SOLIDWORKS PDM Client

Sometimes you may need to completely uninstall SOLIDWORKS PDM Client, including all Program Files and Registry Keys. This process is helpful when troubleshooting a problematic SOLIDWORKS PDM Client machine.

These steps will allow you to perform a clean SOLIDWORKS PDM Client uninstall and remove any installation files left behind and also remove registry entries.

Perform these steps only on the client machine where no server components are installed. If these steps are used on the machine where server components are installed, the PDM vault may stop functioning.

Before performing these steps, make sure all files are checked in to the PDM vault on the workstation:

  1. The antivirus has been disabled
  2. The Windows User Account Controls have been disabled
  3. Check in all files, if unable able to login to the SOLIDWORKS PDM vault view, go to step 4.
  4. Right click on the local vault view, select Delete File Vault View

    Delete File Vault View

  5. If unable to login and check in all files during the step 3, select “Leave the local contents of the file vault view as normal files and folders“. This will leave the files in the local folder, all the changes made after the files were checked out are not lost.

    Uninstall SOLIDWORKS PDM Client

    Delete View

  6. Rename the local folder to “PDM Vault_OLD
  7. If you were able to check in files during the step 3, select “Delete the cached file vault files and folders from the local hard disk
  8. Uninstall SOLIDWORKS PDM Client from Programs and Features in Control Panel
  9. Restart the machine to clear any DLLs or program files still active
  10. Launch the Windows Registry Editor, (In Windows 7, or Windows 10 go to Start menu and type: regedit)
  11. In the Registry Editor expand and delete the registry folder (PDMWorks Enterprise) located under following locations:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\SolidWorks\Applications\PDMWorks Enterprise
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\WOW6432Node\SolidWorks\Applications\PDMWorks Enterprise
    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\SolidWorks\Applications\PDMWorks Enterprise
  12. In the Start menu, type %localappdata% press Enter to open the local folder, open the SolidWorks folder and delete “SOLIDWORKS PDM” subfolder
  13. Delete any installation folders left behind located in the following places:
    C:\Program Files\SOLIDWORKS Corp\SOLIDWORKS PDM
    C:\Program Files (x86)\SOLIDWORKS PDM
  14. Reinstall SOLIDWORKS PDM Client
  15. Create the vault view again

The post Clean Uninstall of a SOLIDWORKS PDM Client appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at November 17, 2018 01:00 PM