Planet SolidWorks

May 25, 2020

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Answers to commonly asked surface and advanced modelling problems (Part 2)

Continue from our last model, now it is time to divide the shelled model into two pieces using split feature and a plane:

 

(Note that split feature [insert > feature > split] cuts a solid body into pieces based on the entities selected; while split line feature [insert > curve > split line] only divide model faces into smaller pieces using sketch or intersection of other geometry. These are two different features)

 

The split feature also works with surface and sketches:

You could even save the cut bodies into new part files by assigning names to them. But normally it would be the final step of your modeling, not with an unfinished design.

For the next part we will try to the two solid bodies to align easily in real life, by using the fastening feature – lip/groove:

By selecting the groove face and edges, pairing with the lip face and edges, you could easeily obtain the new geometry following the parameters you have entered.

It works very similarly to sweep and sweep cut, but by using fastening feature:

  1. You do not need to create profile sketches for sweep
  2. You can control the parameter of both sides in a single feature
  3. Gaps and draft setting could be easily achieved and changed
  4. Setting could be saved and reused even in other files

However, if you want to create a customized profile for the lib and groove, you would need to use the sweep feature instead.

The next fastening feature that would be helpful is mounting boss.

To begin with, mounting feature allows you to create two types of fastening method: pin or hardware:

Pin fastener type

Hardware fastener type

To create this feature, again you would not need to use sketch to draw the profile, but simply select a point where you would like to build the pin, and a plane for the pin’s direction:

 

Similar as before, you would have a table to fill in the diameter controls:

And you could save the setting for later use.

For the positioning, you would edit the 3D sketch to add dimension or relation on the sketch point for a more precise control

 

To create another half of the pair, again select the point and direction, but this time also select the circular edge of the pin for positioning:

 

For the parameter, simply select the mating face (touching face of the pins) and the mating edge (at the tip of the pin), a matching thread pin would then be created.

If you find overlapping solid bodies, you could also use indent to cut one body based on another:

Remember to check the “cut” checkbox to create a simple cut, while keeping both bodies

Or you could leave the cut checkbox cleared to create a “pocket” with the thickness input:

In the next blog we would finish the model by tidying up the part file, like removing unwanted faces or bodies, to prepare for export to an assembly file. Stand tune if you are interested in learning more tips and tricks in SolidWorks modelling.

Written by Jason Tse, Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.

Author information

Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.
Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.
Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.

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by Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd. at May 25, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation demonstrates how social distancing helps limit the spread of COVID-19

SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software can analyze and simulate real-life fluid and heat transfer behavior of products. By using CFD, you can also analyze real-life scenarios, including how a virus can easily spread when people are in close proximity.

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Simulation software can also contribute to bringing innovative medical devices to market faster, and, ultimately, benefit patients seeking new treatments and services.

Complete the form below to watch the 22-minute on-demand webinar to learn how simulation tools can help medical device engineers gain assurance of product quality, reliability, and safety.

Learn how concurrent engineering with CAD and embedded simulation capabilities from structural to CFD and injection molding enable you to navigate challenges and bring your medical breakthroughs to life faster than ever.

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by Rod Mackay at May 25, 2020 01:40 PM

May 22, 2020

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – May 2020

Hello to all,

Welcome to the new edition of the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News!  This monthly news blog is co-authored by members of the SOLIDWORKS Technical Support teams worldwide.

 

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 Quick Search Tool

By Nicole Phillips

We going to go over one of my favorite additions to SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020…Quick Search Tool.

You now have a search box right at your fingertips while navigating within the vault.  You can search right in the folder you are in, or search the folder you are in and the sub folders.  To get to the quick search you can mouse over and click in the box to start typing your search.  Or simply press the Ctrl + F keys to access the quick search and you can type your search right away without using the mouse.  By default, the Quick Search will just search by File/Folder Name, but you can expand that to additional variables.  To start, we’ll go over the Quick Search Variable Lists.

To enhance the search we can expand the search criteria from just File/Folder Names to 5 additional variables per list.  With this ability of Lists we can also make different lists and assign those to different users/groups. To get to the “Quick Search Variable Lists”, open up the PDM Administration Tool, and expand “Lists”.  Right click on the “Quick Search Variable Lists” and select “New List”

In the New List, you can customize it to up to any 5 additional variables you want.  In my example, I am using these 5 additional variables and assigning them to the user’s I have available in the vault.

Now I will have will have the additional variables I can search.  If you are testing this and already logged in to the vault and you do not see them right away.  Just log out, by exiting from the SOLIDWORKS PDM tray icon and log back in.  They will then be available right away for you.

Now to go a bit further, we now have available operators we can use, AND, OR, and NOT.  These operators we’ll go over are also available in any search card, Web2 search, the SOLIDWORKS PDM Search Tool and Quick Search.   Also note that these operators must be capitalized as they are case-sensitive or alternatively, you can use their corresponding symbols.   The operators are:

  • AND or &
    • Note, a space in the search will imply an AND operator
  • OR or |
  • NOT or !

Below we’ll go over a few search and what results we will retrieve back:

First example, I want to find all the parts and drawings in the folder.  This operator I will use is “OR” and it will show me all results with prt and dwg in the name and/or variables that I h

This example we’ll be using the AND operator.  I wanted to find any files that included speaker and prt in the filename:

Third example, we are using the NOT operator.  I choose to look in the variable “Author” and I wanted to find any files in this folder that were not Authored by Admin:

Lastly we’ll show a greater than operator (>) using the Revision field.  We are looking for revisions that are greater than A using our defined revision scheme.  Here you can see it brought back the files that had a revision greater than A:

With these few examples you can start to see how great this quick search can be.  And the many ways you can use it.  There are so many abilities with these operators you can do in the search.  With the bonus of the performance of finding the files you need much more quickly with quick search.  I encourage you to check out the new quick search and all the other great enhancements with SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020!  If you want to check out the help documentation on these and many other features, check out the online help here.

 

Noteworthy Solutions from the SOLIDWORKS Knowledge Base

 

icon - SW In the SOLIDWORKS® 2020 software, why does hiding or showing components in a lightweight or large assembly mode (LAM) assembly cause a crash?
For more information, see Solution Id: S-077709.

In the SOLIDWORKS® Electrical software, is it possible to change the default snap and grid settings when I create a new symbol?
For more information on this, see Solution Id: S-077605.

Icon - EPDM What can cause Windows® File Explorer to hang or crash when selecting the ‘Preview’, ‘Data Card’, ‘Version’, ‘BOM’, ‘Contains’ or ‘Where Used’ tabs in the SOLIDWORKS® PDM 2020 SP2 file vault view?
For more information, see Solution Id: S-077678.

In the SOLIDWORKS® Plastics 2019 and earlier software, how do I assign two different ‘Insert’ materials to two different ‘Cavity’ > ‘Insert’ domains?
For more information on this, see Solution Id: S-077516.

In the SOLIDWORKS® Flow Simulation software, is there a way to plot temperature gradients across a solid body?
For more information, check out Solution Id: S-077643.


That’s it for this month. Thanks for reading this edition of SOLIDWORKS Support News. If you need additional help with these issues or any others, please contact your SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller.

 

Comments and suggestions are always welcome. You can enter them below.

Author information

Nicole Phillips
Technical Customer Support Engineer, SOLIDWORKS, Americas at DS SolidWorks Corp.
I have been with DS SOLIDWORKS as a Technical Support Engineer since 2013. I provide support for our SOLIDWORKS PDM products. I also handle the SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News blog.

The post SOLIDWORKS Support Monthly News – May 2020 appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Nicole Phillips at May 22, 2020 11:24 PM

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Stiltbots of Rim Village Hollow

Battle-worn stiltbots of the rim village hollows hung in the root-wrenched cliffs. Once they took flight our stunners would be useless unless we could disable the plasma shields with the blast charge of these links.

Paul Chadeisson – These ships. So many. Orbiting planets, landing aircraft, carrying out missions, some abandoned. Amazing work, and more city, space, and environment shots.

Big Box Collection – Remember when video games came in boxes. The good ol’ days. This is a 3D collection of the boxes of video game past.

The Swiss Machine – 70 step basketball trick shot and one of the most impressive Rub Goldberg builds I’ve yet seen.

Super Violin Mario – Japanese Violinist Teppei Okada plays the music AND sound effects for Super Mario Bros from stage one to the final stage.

Subtractive Variability – “Felipe Pantone’s kinetic sculpture Substractive Variability Manipulable 3 is the symbiosis of both theory of color and the search of the oeuvre’s manipulable essence.”

Light Pulse – A visual of the time it takes pulses of light to reach the moon, then Mars, from Data is Beautiful.

Sparrek – Instagram follow of the week. Kylli Sparre creates surreal single-subject paintings of women in motion.

Fluent UI – Teaser and visuals for Microsoft’s new web and mobile UX framework to illustrate a new approach to building cross-platform experiences

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BLURRY – Crown the Empire brings their melodic rock and mad drum chops in a song from the band’s latest album ‘Sudden Sky’. MZRY is another (heavier) one to see.

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by Josh Mings at May 22, 2020 08:09 PM

Nano Dimension and HENSOLDT Have 3D Printed PCB Breakthrough. Stock Soars.

Nano Dimension HENDSOLDT 3D Printed PCB

If you happen to own stock in Nano Dimension, it’s definitely your lucky week, as the price quadrupled after a surprise announcement. 

The company announced a breakthrough in its technology that will be of significant interest to the industry. Nano Dimension produces equipment to 3D print circuit boards. While circuit boards are essentially 2D structures, the company’s DragonFly device is able to 3D print three-dimensional printed circuit boards (PCBs). 

The company previously expanded its application footprint in 2019 but suffered some layoffs later in the year due to poor results. It seems they may be in for a bit of a turnaround as a result of the latest news.

Nano Dimension Breakthrough

There’s been a persistent problem in 3D printing PCBs: the process for soldering on advanced chips and components for dual-sided boards was incompatible with the materials used in 3D printed PCBs. 

The inability to mount components on 3D printed boards is obviously a show-stopper for many applications. 

However, this is no longer a barrier as Nano Dimension announced they were able to overcome this effect through the use of specific materials. With their client HENSOLDT, a German manufacturer of military sensors, they were able to produce — and mount components on — a 10-layer PCB for the first time in history. 

At top you can see this unusual 10-layer PCB. 

Additively Manufactured Electronics

Additively Manufactured Electronics, or “AMEs”, are of significant interest if they can be made to work. Just as conventional 3D printing can adopt radically new geometries for mechanical parts, so too can PCBs. This would be highly beneficial to any application that requires unusually-shaped PCBs that must fit into non-standard spaces, and that likely includes military applications. 

Nano Dimension said:

“AMEs are useful to verify a new design and functionality of specialized electronic components before production. AME is a highly agile and individual engineering methodology to prototype a new electronic circuitry. This leads to significant reduction of time and cost in the development process. Furthermore, AME gives a verified and approved design before production starts, leading to higher quality of the final product.”

These are benefits quite similar to those found in the mechanical 3D print world: iterative prototyping can be done far, far faster, leading to better final results at lower costs. And we all know what happened once that industry “discovered” 3D printing. 

Nano Dimension Stock Price

Will a similar boom occur in 3D printed electronics as a result of this breakthrough? It seems that investors think so, as Nano Dimension’s stock price blew through the roof in the past few days. 

From a stable US$0.77, the stock price ripped up to over US$3.00 in short order. 

It’s not clear that the stock price will remain at those high levels, but if this breakthrough stands and additional clients begin exploring Nano Dimension’s capabilities, it may go even higher. 

The post Nano Dimension and HENSOLDT Have 3D Printed PCB Breakthrough. Stock Soars. appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at May 22, 2020 03:34 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Pinata Sweet Jar – Part 2 – Tutorial

In part 2 of this 2-part SOLIDWORKS Tutorial you will need to have modeled the Pinata body from part 1. Part 2 of the tutorial involves shelling the model to turn it into a 2-part jar, and applying decals. The Decal files used in this tutorial are available to download here.

In Part 1 of this tutorial, we ended with the full Pinata body, using this body, we use the split tool, to section the jar into the two parts, we also cut away half the model to apply the shell feature, sometimes more complex models require splitting into smaller parts for shelling. This was needed for the pinata base, but the head could be shelled whole. 

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3p-zav27Sd0" width="560"></iframe> 

With the jar split in two, offset entities and boss extrude was used to create the jar fitting to put the lid on and off. Section view was used to see into the model without hiding parts.

Once the jar features were added and the model was complete, the decals were added, starting with the main part colour, and other block colours. The reins were added as a png. image so that the background of the decal could be masked in SOLIDWORKS and decals could be layered. The reins decal was added with projection mapping, it was a fairly simple image but when projected, it wrapped around to Pinata to create a much more detailed finish.

The Pinata pattern was projected from the sides and then the front, the decals were matched up to make the pattern look as continuous as possible. The decals are created in vector software, and are repeatedly edited and saved while on the SOLIDWORKS model until they match up together. The SOLIDWORKS decals on the model update each time you edit and re-export the image. The finished design was rendered in SOLIDWORKS Visualize, sweet parts were added to finish off the look, a small animation of the jar opening can be seen at the end of the tutorial.

Author information

Jade Crompton
I am a 3D Designer and Solidworks Blog Contributor from the UK. I am a self taught Solidworks user, and have been using it to inform and create my designs since 2012. I specialise in the design of Ceramics, Home Accessories and Wooden Toy Design.

The post Pinata Sweet Jar – Part 2 – Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Jade Crompton at May 22, 2020 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Società Gomma Antivibrante SRL Slashes Prototypes with SIMULIAworks FEA

Società Gomma Antivibrante SRL (S.G.A.) is a leading manufacturer of anti-vibration components, including pivots (flexible joints), resilient inserts, bushings, bumpers, guiding components, and suspensions. Because the company’s products are found worldwide in railway, tram, and subway cars that carry passengers, safety is a priority at S.G.A.

The behavior and vibration-damping characteristics of the rubber and elastomers used in S.G.A.’s wide range of products are thoroughly analyzed by S.G.A. engineers. Explains Quality System/Test Laboratory Manager Stefano Meli, “Analysis and definition of the overall product dimensions/footprint and laboratory development of the related load-failure diagrams, and subsequent prototype testing, are the most challenging portions of our product development process.”

To accelerate time to market, S.G.A. needed an accurate, efficient solution for conducting nonlinear large displacement analyses, in addition to other types of sophisticated simulations.

Robust and Integrated FEA

S.G.A. was attracted by SOLIDWORKS® 3D product development solutions to leverage the robust and integrated SIMULIAworks FEA simulation capabilities. The nonlinear FEA application, SIMULIAworks, incorporates the SIMULIA Abaqus solver, which was able to accurately solve S.G.A.’s advanced analysis problems and supports multistep/multiphysics simulation scenarios.

“While we evaluated other FEA systems, we chose SIMULIAworks because it was the only product that delivered results comparable to those achieved through traditional prototyping techniques,” says Technical Manager Davide Massa. “We also value the ability to change the subject geometry inside SOLIDWORKS without having to apply the modifications in SIMULIAworks or create a new mesh for running subsequent analyses.”

Figure 1 – Permanent deformation after diameter reduction phase

 

Reduce Prototypes and Lead Times

S.G.A. used SIMULIAworks to save time and money by minimizing the number of prototypes required to define the elastic properties of the elastomers used in the silent block on the connector arm bushing of the railway carriage for the Hitachi Caravaggio train car.

“The biggest savings we’ve experienced using SIMULIAworks derive from the reduction in lead time between product design and final configuration and from the reduction in costs related to changes to production and control equipment,” Meli stresses. “Because SIMULIAworks enables us to eliminate and/or minimize the number of prototypes required to achieve final product performance, it helps us to reduce lead time from design to final production as well as reduce both prototyping and fine-tuning costs.”

 

Figure 2 – Displacement due to elastic release of diameter reduction phase

 

Complex Simulations with Accurate Results

The majority of simulation scenarios encountered when developing anti-vibration systems involve large displacement analysis, but S.G.A. engineers also use SIMULIAworks to achieve accurate results for many other challenging nonlinear, large displacement analysis problems.

The toughest issues involve the simulation of shrinkage/stress due to thermal variations and pre-compression due to steel plasticization. “With SIMULIAworks, it is very easy to achieve results in line with the real results of a project that we had already finalized,” Massa adds. “In other words, we demonstrated the accuracy of the simulation results by validating an existing project with SIMULIAworks.”

Figure 3 – Axial displacement test, section view

 

“SIMULIAworks gives us the full range of tools that we need to ensure that our products provide safe, reliable performance,” Meli says. “We also value the ability to conduct multistep/multiphysics simulations, such as performing thermal and mechanical analysis within the same project without having to duplicate geometry changes or create a new mesh due to the full integration between the SOLIDWORKS portfolio and SIMULIAworks.”

Click here to learn more about SOLIDWORKS cloud-based solutions. For more information about SIMULIAworks, contact your local reseller. And, feel free to add your comments or questions below.

 

 

 

 

 

Author information

Mitch Bossart
Mitch Bossart is a technology enthusiast; he loves to write about product development and innovation. Whether working with Fortune 100 companies or feisty startups, Mitch finds every story genuinely unique and often inspiring.

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by Mitch Bossart at May 22, 2020 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Automatically create Chamfers in SOLIDWORKS CAM

Creating chamfers in SOLIDWORKS CAM used to be a tedious experience. Previously chamfers had to be programming into the operation strategies or created with many curve features at the end of the program.

New in SOLIDWORKS CAM 2020 Chamfers can be created automatically by selecting Curve features for chamfering in CAM Options. Tools > SOLIDWORKS CAM > Options or right-mouse button (RMB) on the SOLIDWORKS CAM NC Manager and select Options, and move to the Mill Features Tab.

Curve features for chamfering

Then we use Extract Machinable Features on our part. RMB on Mill Part Setup 1 and select Extract Machinable Features.

Extract Machinable Features

Extract Machinable Features

Once the features have been extracted, we can see our Curve Feature1 Edge Break generated automatically. RMB on Mill Part Setup 1 and select Generate Option Plan.

Generate Option Plan

Generate Option Plan

Once the Operation Plan has been generated, we may edit the definition to make changes to this operation. RMB on Mill Part Setup 1 and select Generate Toolpath.

Generate Toolpath

Generate Toolpath

There we have our edge break and all we had to do was check a box.

Edge break applied

Edge break applied

Take SOLIDWORKS CAM Training

Learn more about CNC programming in our SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard and SOLIDWORKS CAM Professional courses.

The post Automatically create Chamfers in SOLIDWORKS CAM appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Shawn McEachern at May 22, 2020 12:00 PM

May 21, 2020

The Javelin Blog

User Interface updates in SOLIDWORKS 2020 SP03

There are some recent changes to the SOLIDWORKS User Interface that have been rolled out in Service Pack 03 (SP03). DS SolidWorks have posted the following information in the SOLIDWORKS Forum, which we are reposting below for reference:

Quick Access Tools

A new option is added to customize the location of Quick Access Tools in the SOLIDWORKS interface. These tools will appear in the Menu Bar if you upgrade from an existing version of SOLIDWORKS.  For a clean install, these tools will be displayed in the Command Manager.

CommandManager in SOLIDWORKS 2020 SP03

CommandManager in SOLIDWORKS 2020 SP03

You can always change your preference in Customize dialog. Here is the link to the help page for more information.

Quick Tools Options in Customize

Quick Tools Options in Customize

Help Menu

The help menu was available from the SOLIDWORKS menus as well as the help icon (next to the minimize button). These two locations have been consolidated. You can now access the menu using the help icon in the upper right corner of the application. The shortcuts to access the menu (Alt+H) and the help page (F1) still works the same. More details on the help page.

Help in SOLIDWORKS 2020 SP03

Help icon in SOLIDWORKS 2020 SP03

The post User Interface updates in SOLIDWORKS 2020 SP03 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at May 21, 2020 04:52 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Surface and advanced modeling skills that you may not yet know (Part 1)

When coming to product design using SolidWorks software, surface modelling tools could benefit users creating different shapes and geometry with ease. Below are some of the options that you might not have checked upon:

1. Close loft

Loft surface is one of the most commonly used surface feature, which allow you to create geometry by joining selected profiles. In the property manager, the close loft option allows you to join the last profile back to the first selected profile, creating an all-round surface body as you wish:

2. Sketch point as profile

Another interesting skill is that a single sketch point could act as a profile when using loft or boundary feature. You could even apply end condition to control the surface. You could also apply this for the loft boss/base feature as well.

3. Shell feature failed. WHY?

After doing all the hard work creating surfaces, knitting them together and form a solid body. At this point you remember you need to shell the solid and feel anxious as the bad memory flashed back in your mind? Viewer discretion is advised.

To help you overcome this nightmare, you need to first understand what is causing this error message. You could see that the thickness value of the shell is greater than the minimum radius of the curvature. In simple words, the wall of shell is thicker than the gaps between the surfaces. Seeing this message does not means that the shell could not be performed, but as a warning which the hollowed face might not be neat so you need to double check the internal region.

What if your luck run out and the shell operation totally failed to complete? One of the most common reasons is due to the zero thickness geometry. This infamous problem could be also found in drawing section view or combine feature, where your dimension entered matches the thickness/location of existing face. In this case SolidWorks could not determine whether the face should exist or not, hence causing the rebuild problem. There is not really an option or feature to get rid of this but to slightly change the dimension or existing geometry to avoid this problem.

For example, for a 3mm thickness geometry cannot use a 1.5mm shell thickness. An internal region of 0mm of thickness will be formed but there is no representation of this. Hence SolidWorks could not handle this situation and error is resulted.

There is not ready a feature or option specify for this, you as user need to determinate which geometry and dimension to be changed to avoid this condition.

You would be able to see the failing faces appeared as a difference color when your shell failed:

Written by Jason Tse, Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.

Author information

Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.
Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.
Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.

The post Surface and advanced modeling skills that you may not yet know (Part 1) appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd. at May 21, 2020 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Be Yourself with 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS

Everyone has their own style when it comes to getting the job done. 3DEXPERIENCE® WORKS gives you the power to do things your way. This cloud-based solution portfolio allows every user in every area of your business to have their own unique experience—all while still working on the same online platform. And, because it’s so flexible, you can be yourself and work your own way, no matter what conditions you (or the world) are facing.

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Want to design and collaborate with teammates on the back deck? In your home office? From the comfort of your bed? All you need is a high-speed internet connection and you’re already there. Not a huge PC fan? Want to design on a Mac or a tablet? The cloud-based 3DEXPERIENCE platform can be used on any device, and all of your settings are carried over. You can work wherever, whenever you want, and with a robust suite of collaboration tools at your disposal, you and your coworkers are never left out of the loop.

Why try 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS? Because it works! Sign up for a free trial today and get ready to do things your way, with everyone you work with, wherever you are.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Be Yourself with 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at May 21, 2020 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Creating a Custom Appearance in SOLIDWORKS Visualize

SOLIDWORKS Visualize installs with a large library of appearance files that you can apply to your models, but you can also create  Custom Appearance files and save them in your Appearances Palette for future use.

Create a Custom Appearance File

Brand new appearance can be created through Appearances Palette > Click on “+” > New Appearance

OR Copy (Ctrl+C) the existing appearance in the Appearances Palette > Click on empty space in appearances palette and paste (Ctrl+V).

Create/Add new Appearance

Create/Add new Appearance

Appearance properties:

Now, on the General Tab, give it a new name in “Appearance Name” field and change the appearance type. Texture can also be added to the appearances on the Texture tab and then map the textures on the texture mapping tab.

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Appearance Tabs

SOLIDWORKS Visualize Appearance Tabs

Export/Add to the Appearance Library:

Once you have created the appearance and changed the properties, now this appearance can be exported and saved into the appearances library of SOLIDWORKS Visualize and can be used for other projects in future.

To do so:

  1. On the Appearances Palette > Select the custom appearance > Now click on Export icon > Click on Save Appearance.
Add Appearance

Save Appearance

  1. By default the save appearance file dialog-box allows us to Save this appearance (.svap) file into the default appearances path.
Save Appearance

Save Appearance in default appearances path

Now, these custom appearances can be used for new projects.

The post Creating a Custom Appearance in SOLIDWORKS Visualize appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at May 21, 2020 12:00 PM

May 20, 2020

The Javelin Blog

A SOLIDWORKS X-Ray Machine: The Ultimate Assembly Visualization Training Event

On Thursday June 4, Alin Vargatu is sharing his 3DEXPERIENCE World presentation (A SOLIDWORKS X-Ray Machine: The Ultimate Assembly Visualization Training) in an online live training format.

Your assemblies contain a treasure of valuable information. During this webinar, you will learn how to extract it in seconds and use it to sort, select, colour, hide, show, open, configure components or generate quick reports that could be used by customers, suppliers and other departments in your company.

For users who work with SOLIDWORKS assemblies there is no tool more versatile for interrogating an existing assembly as the Assembly Visualization Tool. It really is the Swiss Army Knife of SOLIDWORKS Reporting and Troubleshooting Even more important, the data supplied by this tool can be valuable for all stakeholders: engineers, designers, purchasing department, sales, marketing, production, suppliers and customers. Re-purposing this data inside and outside SOLIDWORKS can be done with ease.

This session will demonstrate in detail the Assembly Visualization Tool functionality by exploring 10 time saving practical uses:

  1. Increase clarity in graphics by instantly colouring assembly components differently from one other
  2. Quick creation of display states based on any criterion
  3. Visually sort components based on user selected criteria
  4. Edit custom properties values
  5. Select components in bulk, by various criteria
  6. Troubleshoot mating schemes
  7. Quickly generate visual reports using the drawing environment
  8. Diagnostics of assembly slowdowns by identifying components which impact performance
  9. Quickly hide and show groups of components by range
  10. Generate reports in Excel format

Event Speaker

Alin Vargatu

Alin Vargatu, CSWE

‘SOLIDWORKS Guru’ Senior Training and Process Consultant @Javelin

Alin is a SOLIDWORKS Elite Applications Engineer and an avid contributor to the SOLIDWORKS Community. Alin has presented multiple times at SOLIDWORKS World, Technical Summits, and User Group Meetings, while being very active on the SOLIDWORKS Forum.

The post A SOLIDWORKS X-Ray Machine: The Ultimate Assembly Visualization Training Event appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at May 20, 2020 01:48 PM

How to work faster with SOLIDWORKS FREE Online Live Training Event

On Thursday May 28, Alin Vargatu is sharing his 3DEXPERIENCE World presentation (Interface in Your Face – the 2020 Edition) with the SOLIDWORKS community, in a FREE online live training format.

You will get to sample the first lesson of Javelin’s SOLIDWORKS Advanced Update training course. One hour will be enough for you to learn and master the most efficient workflow for “telling” SOLIDWORKS 2020 what to do. Your mouse movement will be reduced by 75%, but more importantly your eyes will stay focused on the model, allowing you to concentrate on design and “stay in the flow”.

Based on our experience of working with thousands of SOLIDWORKS users, we noticed that most of them interact with the user interface in an inefficient manner. Saving a few seconds for each task might not seem much, but those tasks are performed hundreds of times every day, so the time savings add fast. Not only that, but by constantly hunting for icons, their focus shifts continuously from the model and their train of thought gets derailed.

What you will learn

We put together a set of extremely effective tools and techniques which we believe are very easy to understand and master. They are based on common sense and accomplish the main goals:

  • How to become three times more productive compared to the average SOLIDWORKS user
  • How to reduce your mouse movement
  • How to reduce your keyboard interaction
  • Maintaining your eye and mind focus on the model

Event Speaker

Alin Vargatu

Alin Vargatu, CSWE

‘SOLIDWORKS Guru’ Senior Training and Process Consultant @Javelin

Alin is a SOLIDWORKS Elite Applications Engineer and an avid contributor to the SOLIDWORKS Community. Alin has presented multiple times at SOLIDWORKS World, Technical Summits, and User Group Meetings, while being very active on the SOLIDWORKS Forum.

 

The post How to work faster with SOLIDWORKS FREE Online Live Training Event appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at May 20, 2020 12:23 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Get It Done Faster: Product Development Productivity Apps

Everyone uses smartphones for way more than merely a telephone or a device for their favorite music playlists. Google’s Android and Apple’s iOS are platforms for a host of useful (and fun) apps. Productivity apps, news apps, social networking apps, and so much more. (At last count, according to Statista, Android has ~2.5 million apps on Google Play, and Apple had ~1.8 million apps on the Apple Store.)

Similarly, the Collaborative Industry Innovator role on the 3DEXPERIENCE® platform offers you a host of apps within various categories such as collaboration, task management, community reviews, and much more. These apps can be accessed at any time, from any location using any device with a browser and an internet connection.

Below are some product development productivity apps that I think you will appreciate.

Get There Faster

Wouldn’t it be nice to have an app to help you consistently meet your project deadlines—in or out of the office? The Collaborative Tasks app is seamlessly integrated with the platform, so assigning tasks is easy and notifying users is automated. Users can plan, execute, and monitor tasks.

The Collaborative Tasks app organizes communication between all users in your project community, improving both productivity and efficiency. Moreover, this app automatically enables the ability to combine all tasks that you might have from different apps and roles within the platform as well, such as a Project Plan or an automated Route Task.

What’s the Difference?

The Compare app makes it effortless to understand changes in product designs when attempting to identify differences between component geometry, structures, and properties. Color-coded models are overlaid, making it easy to see the differences and similarities in 3D. With the Compare app, you can:

  •         Compare structures and geometries between different products or different revisions
  •         Detect differences in large structures
  •         Find duplicated designs that can be easily compared to their predecessors
  •         Locate specific components quickly in 3D comparisons

The Compare app makes you more efficient by simplifying the process of finding differences or duplicated content.

Clean your Room!

When development work hits a frantic pace, the ability to stay organized so that you can keep projects and people on track is more vital than ever. Bookmarks can help you keep your relevant data organized and easily accessible so you can find it when you need it most.

Think of Bookmarks as folders and shortcuts—on steroids.

They organize information so you can quickly access them when you need them. You can create Bookmarks inside other Bookmarks (again, just like folders) to develop an organized structure that makes it easier for you to work as a team. Different Bookmarks point to the same data instead of duplicates providing greater connectivity as compared to traditional folders.

Bookmarks also provide access to additional tools, lifecycle actions, and collaboration features that make it easy to perform everyday tasks to stay on top of the game.

Everyone on the Cloud

Whether you have 3DEXPERIENCE design apps or SOLIDWORKS® desktop, both can enjoy the productivity afforded by the Collaborative Industry Innovator. Securely work from home, at the office, or on the road.

You can sign up today for your free trial of the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. And, please feel free to add your comments or thoughts below. Or contact your local reseller for more information.

Author information

Mohit Daga
Mohit Daga
Mohit is a Senior Product Portfolio Manager for ENOVIAWORKS. Sports enthusiast, Vegetarian foodie and likes bourbon!

The post Get It Done Faster: Product Development Productivity Apps appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mohit Daga at May 20, 2020 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Saving a PDF/Word document in a SOLIDWORKS Electrical Project Archive

Most often users want to add a PDF or Microsoft Word document in the SOLIDWORKS Electrical project and collect it within the project archive. This can be done only by adding the document in the document tree.

If there are a limited number of files you would like to add, you can do so by following the steps below:

STEP 1:

Right-Click on the Book > New > Click on Data files/Datasheet > Now browse to the PDF or the document you would like to add to the project > select the file.

Add PDF document in the document manager

Add PDF document in the document manager

STEP 2:

You will now see this attached file in the document tree on the document manager.

PDF in the Document tree

PDF in Document tree

STEP 3:

This file will be included in the project archive when the project is archived through File > Project manager > Select the project > Click Archive on the management Tab.

Archive the project (includes PDF)

Archive the project (includes PDF)

However, if multiple users are using electrical at your company, then you could store all the datasheets in a network location accessible by all users and reference the network location in the part properties.

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS Electrical

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Electrical training course either in a Canadian classroom near you or live online. For more information about electrical software and training solutions call 1-877-219-6757.

The post Saving a PDF/Word document in a SOLIDWORKS Electrical Project Archive appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at May 20, 2020 12:00 PM

May 19, 2020

SolidSmack

What Happens When You Put Formula 1 Wheels On A Hoverboard?

f1 hoverboard

Remember those ridiculous abominations on wheels in the mid to late 2010s called “hoverboards”? Oh, what’s that? They’re still around? *Shakes head* So you remember they don’t actually hover? I know, it’s 2020. Where are our priorities?

To poke fun (we think) at the wheeled monstrosities, YouTuber The Q creates a monstrosity of his own. It’s technically still a hoverboard, a flat board between a pair of wheels, but he gives it some elevation by slapping on some chunky ol’ Formula 1 tires.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
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</figure>

Here’s how he managed to create a toy even the most seasoned racer would enjoy:

1. Craft Specialized Bearings

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">f1 hoverboard</figure>

As the standard hoverboard isn’t meant to attach car tires (already lol’ing), The Q has to craft his own method of connecting those ginormous F1 tires to the board. Simple, right?

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">f1 hoverboard</figure>

By measuring an F1 tire’s diameter, he creates a pair of specialized bearings from wood, screws, and bolts. He spraypaints the wood black so it doesn’t clash with the board or the tires, before applying some electrical tape on the outer bearings.

2. Remove A Store-Bought Hoverboard’s Housing

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">f1 hoverboard</figure>

The Q can’t add his new bearings as the housing surrounding the board wraps around the old tires. To fix this, he removes the housing around the board’s electronics before wrapping the whole thing in electrical tape.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">f1 hoverboard</figure>

Given enough time, you could make your own specialized (3d printed?) housing but for now, simply wrapping the wires, motor, and electrical boards will suffice.

3. Deflate The Tires, Add The Bearings

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">f1 hoverboard</figure>

Instead of removing the hoverboard tires, The Q actually deflates them to make room for his specialized bearings. He places the deflated tires into the bottom half before adding in the top and locking them in place. Genius.

4. Connect The F1 Tires

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">f1 hoverboard</figure>

Without further ado, The Q finally attaches the F1 tires onto his modified hoverboard. After a little elbow grease (and a lot of grunts), the finished hoverboard is now complete.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">f1 hoverboard<figcaption>The F1 Hoverboard it all of its glory.</figcaption></figure>

Since this is basically a hoverboard with MUCH bigger tires, it works exactly as you would expect it to. It might take a little longer for the board to travel as it was, ya know, never made to support such large tires but most hoverboards move at a snail’s pace, so who’s going to really notice.

F1 tires are made for the track, so you may want to avoid F1-hoverboardin’ in the snow or rain, or I suppose you could switch them out with snow tires. Next project?

As always, The Q’s YouTube channel is chock-full of DIY goodness and weird shenanigans.

The post What Happens When You Put Formula 1 Wheels On A Hoverboard? appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at May 19, 2020 08:00 PM

Make Your Own Wooden Table Using 2x4s And Dowels for Under $100

dowel table

You can’t go wrong making your own DIY dowel table. With it, you can stack countless things, have a place to eat, or simply kick your legs up on it after a long day, or, yeah… MAKE OTHER THINGS.

Using 1” dowels, a stack of 2x4s, some 4x4s, and barrels of glue, Rob from Make Things shows how you can make your own high-end, super sturdy 2×4 dowel table for under $100 in materials:

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</figure>

1. Mark The 2x4s On Center

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

Since the tabletop will be made from 19 2x4s stacked side by side via dowels, he marks each piece of wood on center and places marks 8-inches apart for eight of the dowels and 2-inches off the edge for the two end dowels – all for a total of 10 dowels – hefty.

2. Cut the Dowel Holes

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

Using his drill press, Rob meticulously drills 170-ish holes into the 19 2x4s using a 26mm diameter Forstner drill bit. To make sure the holes are perfect, he does a couple of things:

First, he adds support to both ends of the 2×4 to give it a clean, straight cut. As he uses the drill press, he makes sure to clean out the drill bit regularly and dip the bit in water. These two steps lenghten the drill time, but save your bit.

3. Start Assembling The Tabletop With Your Glue And Dowels

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

Using modified dowels with evenly spaced 1/8th-inch grooves (for the glue to seep through easier), Rob starts assembling the tabletop. He applies a hefty coat of glue to one side of the first 2×4 as well as on the tips of the dowels before hammering them in.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

With the first 2×4 set, the second and third 2x4s are placed under the first but not before coating them similarly in glue. Once good and sticky, Rob hammers the dowels down. To ensure it’s solid, he applies glue to the dowels each time.

4. Continue Hammering And Gluing Those 2x4s

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

The succeeding 2x4s are hammered on top of the first panel… one at a time.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

Just as with the second and third panels, hammer down these pieces gently. As they get closer to the rest of its glue-slathered brethren, be sure to apply glue to the new piece as well.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

If all goes well, soon you’ll have yourself a wall of glue-oozing, interconnected 2x4s for your tabletop.

5. Smooth The Top Using A Router

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

After giving the glue some time to dry, Rob takes his router and uses the router rails from one of his previous videos to smooth the top and sides of his stack of 2x4s – now it’s starting to look like a table.

6. Make The Table Legs

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

You can’t call it a table if it doesn’t have legs, so Rob made and provided a Sketchup file for the different sections of the table base.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

The legs are 30” 4x4s with mortises in the middle. Each square hole is made by drilling three small holes with a Forstner bit and chiseling out the rest of the square by hand.  

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

To make the sections for a bottom stretcher (more on that later), Robb first cuts the bottom portion with a table saw to make lap joints. These make it easier for him to hammer down, chisel out the excess wood, and sand for connecting later.

7. Slot Tenons Into The Mortises

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

To keep the legs from collapsing, you need to fit tenons into the square mortises.

These are basically 2x4s with the similar connectors as on the legs. The process for making them is the same as well: use a table saw to cut out lap joints, hammer them out with a mallet, chisel, and sand down.

Just apply glue to the connecting parts and hammer them into the table legs!

8. Make The Stretchers and Half Flaps

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

With the two pairs of table legs more or less secure, Robb adds 2x6s on the top portion of the legs. Using the same hammer and chisel method, he makes connectors that can easily be glued onto the legs.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

He uses a number of long wood planks he calls “stretchers” to connect the two leg pairs together. These are placed near bottom and top of the legs and are glued to make the table base sturdy.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

With the tenons, 2x6s, and stretchers all glued, Robb safely clamps them down and let the glue do its magic.

9. Add Runners, Biscuits, and Table Wheels

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

To add a shelf for your tabletop, you’re gonna need runners and screws. This supports the shelf base beneath your tabletop.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

The shelf floor however is made with individual rectangular wood planks glued to the top of the shelf base. For a stronger shelf and to reinforce each plank, Robb adds biscuits (small, half-circle-shaped tabs of wood which match slots on the adjoining wood plank).

While he could have just used glue to stick the planks together, he says adding the biscuits felt satisfying and added to the sturdiness of the base.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

Adding wheels to the table is completely optional, but it does make lugging this large table around the shop a heck of a lot easier. After a year with his dowel table, Robb says he was thankful he added them.

10. Attach The Tabletop

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

This project started with dowels, so it’s only fitting it ends the same way. Robb connects the tabletop to the rest of the table by drilling in six dowel holes (6” each), coating in more glue and hammer the dowel into each with a mallet. Pro tip: put a bit of tape around each dowel hole to keep glue from soaking into the surface.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

Once the glue is dry, he saws the excess wood from the dowels and uses a sander to sand them smooth.

11. Finish With A Few Dog Holes And Some Danish Oil

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

Since Robb uses his table for woodworking, he adds three ¾” dog holes at the top for tools and the like. He says that has been more than enough for him over the past year.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table</figure>

He slathers on some Danish oil to give it a film finish and his dowel table is finally complete.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">dowel table<figcaption>The finished 2×4 dowel table.</figcaption></figure>

This is just a short summary of the dowel table’s design process. Robb has made an in-depth guide (complete with images and side notes) here. To see more of his work, be sure to check out his YouTube channel, Make Things.

The post Make Your Own Wooden Table Using 2x4s And Dowels for Under $100 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at May 19, 2020 06:57 PM

Model of the Week: Heavy Loader Construction Bot [I Will Load YOU!]

You’ve got so much work, you could use an extra hand, am I right? Well, how about a Heavy Loader or ten? Unfortunately, our model of the week won’t pick up the slack but it will pick up your spirits when you gaze upon the army of 10-inch bot loaders you’ve printed to share your workspace.

The totally poseable Heavy Loader 3D model comes from Cults3D user JWOONG, Industrial and Space Designer, who say I “Do not need paint, Do not need extra parts such as bolts, nuts and etc. Only need a 3D printer. Just print it and build it.”

We’re totally down with that JWOONG and totally down with the thought you’ve put into this incredible model. Not only is it poseable, it can also be used with his Android Prototype P-01 poseable figure and may even work with other 6-inch action figures.

The model includes 78 parts in a 347MB download (STL format). Using a standard FDM printer (we recommend a Creality Ender 3 Pro or a Anycubic Mega X) using 1.75mm filament. A layer height of 0.18 mm (0.10 for knee/elbow pins) and infill of 15-20% is recommended. You’ll have supports, so keep your Xacto knife and sandpaper nearby.

Assembly is required for this model but he was kind enough to include a two-part video assembly guide that detail the assembly of the upper half and lower half:

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</figure>

The result?

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

You can download the model from Cults3D and grab the Android character here. (Bonus! JWoong has some other incredible toy/interactive model prints, among them and hand-operated low-poly turtle and dolphin. Check’em out!)

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Model of the Week: Heavy Loader Construction Bot [I Will Load YOU!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at May 19, 2020 03:54 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Expanding Your Reach

SOLIDWORKS 2020 includes capabilities that will expand your reach with CAD-centric workflows by enhancing mesh body utilization and adding new features to SOLIDWORKS CAM.

In SOLIDWORKS 2020 you can now edit, remove and add certain features directly on imported mesh files. No need to spend time translating it to a solid model first! With SOLIDWORKS 2020, front-end work with imported mesh files offer simple workflows for reverse engineering, shortened paths to Additive Manufacturing, and extended collaboration with industrial design tools.

When you think about the back-end of the design workflow, the first thing that comes to mind is probably CAM. Verifying manufacturing steps is extremely valuable and it gets even better in SOLIDWORKS CAM 2020, with the probe tool. Machinists typically use a probe on a CNC mill to automatically find fixture coordinates and measure finished features. SOLIDWORKS CAM Professional 2020 incorporates probes, which speeds up setup and improves part quality.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 is focused on doing more than just CAD design. Mesh body editing and the probe tool in SOLIDWORKS CAM help you become more efficient throughout your engineering workflow, from start to finish.

Author information

Andrew Gross
Andrew Gross
Andrew is a Senior Territory Technical Manager at SOLIDWORKS, and lives in Los Angeles, CA. He has years of experience working with resellers and customers, and has a strong background in Engineering Simulation and Design Validation. More recently, Andrew has expanded his interest and passion into Industrial Design. Andrew holds a Master’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering from UCLA.

The post Expanding Your Reach appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Andrew Gross at May 19, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to know when the mouse is acting up in SOLIDWORKS

Checkboxes ignoring your clicks?  Seeing strange behavior when trying to sketch something?  No, you’re not necessarily losing your mind (well, hopefully not today, at least).  And it’s likely not a Cylon computer virus trying to learn your system, either.  In fact, as we learn on Battlestar Galactica, “All of this has happened before, and all of this will happen again.”

The mishaps may seem random: maybe you were sketching several lines in succession in SOLIDWORKS using the click-move-click method (without dragging) and all of a sudden the next line doesn’t get automatically started, and so you have to manually start it.  Or, a spline may prematurely complete.  Maybe that checkbox you clicked in didn’t change state as it was supposed to, as if it completely ignored your click.  These are some of the most common symptoms.

If any of this sounds familiar, then it’s possible that the system was occasionally registering double-clicks from the mouse, even though you were attempting single-clicks.  Double-clicks are intended functionality in SOLIDWORKS that cause some sketch geometry like splines or connected lines to complete.  But when the mouse is faulty, and sends an unwanted double-click that your system registers, then these sketch attempts will sometimes complete prematurely.  And that checkbox you clicked in?  It will make that appear as though you never clicked it at all, but actually it could have changed state twice very rapidly.

These unwanted behaviors could be symptoms of a faulty mousing device, but there a simple confirmation test we can do in SOLIDWORKS: create a sketch and click your way through a few dozen lines using that click-move-click method.  If you suddenly stop getting that next automatic line, then it’s likely that the mouse is at fault.  Try switching to a different mouse and see if you can reproduce the behavior.

Sketch Lines

Single-clicking line endpoints to test for inadvertent double-clicks. A gap like this one will appear when a double-click is registered, causing termination of automatic next line.  Be careful not to click+drag as that too will end the continuity and give a false positive. Just click, move, click, move, etc.

Faulty mouse behavior can manifest in other sketch situations, such as circles appearing much smaller than intended, where the first click sets the center and the second click sets the radius.

The post How to know when the mouse is acting up in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWE at May 19, 2020 12:00 PM

May 18, 2020

SolidSmack

Dissim Cast Metal Lighter Design Lets You Light in Any Position

dissim lighter

Now I’m not a smoking man, but even I can see the use of a pocket lighter for various situations. Apart from lightin’ up, a portable flame lets you illuminate dark areas, start a survival fire, or provide quick cauterization of a small wound if you happen to get jabbed in the middle of nowhere.

The only problem I have: conventional lighters are awkward to light and tend to burn my fingers. Now some would chalk that up to clumsy fingers but for the creators of the Dissim lighter, they figure this is just bad design.

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</figure>

Tired of burning their own digits, the designers at Dissim spent almost two years designing and engineering an “inverted lighter” which is designed to ignite right side up or upside down. And while two years sounds like a long time to come up with a solution to a simple problem, it kinda makes you wonder why you didn’t think of it in the first place and then, what makes it so unique.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large is-resized"></figure>

The two biggest design decisions are seen in the angled flame port and the circular grip. These provide a form that mends itself to the primary function of the lighter 1) to light away from the fingers 2) to make it conducive to lighting upside down and 3) to allow multiple ways to easily move it into an inverted position.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">dissim lighter</figure>

Most lighters eject their flame in an upwards direction. While this doesn’t seem like such a big deal, it matters when you have to angle the lighter to use it. You typically have to tilt the flame towards whatever you plan to light and in doing so, you angle the flame towards your fingers.

The angled flame port makes it easier to aim the lighter without having to twist the lighter and your hand into an awkward position. Couple this with the positioning of the port and the switch and the chances of burning yourself become much slimmer.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">dissim lighter</figure>

The other unique design choice is the inner circular ring which allows you to easily position the Dissim lighter right-side-up or upside down. This is more for convenience but makes it easier to invert the lighter without dropping it. An added bonus? t also turns the lighter into a pretty neat fidget toy.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">dissim lighter</figure>

These two features together make the Dissim easier and safer to use in either orientation.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">dissim lighter</figure>

There are another couple of important features incorporated into the Dissim lighter, such as a flame adjustment knob, a fuel window, and a refill valve to make sure you aren’t wasting lighter fluid.

While most lighters you find in a gas station or on the shelves near a grocery cashier are made of plastic, this lighter is made from cast metal materials and weighs 3oz. And, in case you’re wondering, this lighter has a fuel capacity of 2g.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">dissim lighter</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">dissim lighter</figure>

The Dissim Lighter is on Kickstarter clearing its $3500 goal and pushing toward $270,000 with over 5,600 backers. Each lighter has a lifetime warranty – if it breaks they will send you a new one. Options start at $24 for one lighter and $117 for four lighter with cases. They’ve finished their pre-production manufacturing run and moving toward mass production in May/June 2020 with a delivery date of August 2020.

The post Dissim Cast Metal Lighter Design Lets You Light in Any Position appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at May 18, 2020 09:53 PM

See Jude Pullen on the Latest Episode of Ok Xoomer

If you haven’t caught Xometry’s Ok Xoomer yet, you’re missing out. But don’t worry, they’re only on 10 episodes in and one of their latest episodes is the perfect place to start. Aaron Lichtig of Xometry interviews technologist, prototyping expert, and SolidSmack friend, Jude Pullen.

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</figure>

The quick 15-minute interview goes into where Jude has been involved at the intersection of technology, compassion, and innovation. Once again, it’s an inspirational episode that shows how engineers are solving problems and doing what they do best.

Be sure to subscribe to Ok Xoomer and subscribe to Jude Pullen’s channel.

The post See Jude Pullen on the Latest Episode of Ok Xoomer appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at May 18, 2020 03:10 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Top 8 Troubleshooting Steps for PDM Connectivity Issues

Using SolidWorks PDM is a great tool to control your revisions and versions, manage your files, etc. However, when it doesn’t work it can become very frustrating. Don’t worry, most issues are usually IT related, which can easily be resolved by following these troubleshooting steps. The most common and generic error when working with PDM is “Cannot access the item in the database” or “Could not find the Server”. Have you experienced this before? Here are our top 8 troubleshooting steps to resolve these issues.

PDM error

Firstly, about the error – we need to get as much information about the cause of the error. These messages only tell us what the error is, not what caused it. To determine the cause of the error, you’ll need to open up you PDM Administration Tool, the under Local Settings double click on Log File. This will give you a chronological list of errors and warnings, once you find the log at the time you got the error, double click on the entry to get full details.
The description of the PDM Client Log will show you a similar message to “SQL Server does not exist or access denied.” This is the cause of the error and we need to address this.

Top 8 troubleshooting steps for PDM connectivity issues

As PDM is a client server setup, the error could be from your client or from the server. The first question you should ask yourself – is this happening to everyone or just me? If it’s just you, then it’s a client-side issue, if it’s happening to everyone then it’s a server-side issue. We cover both sides in this blog.
Please note, it is assumed you are at least a little experienced with IT troubleshooting processes and have some administration permissions, otherwise, as always, we highly recommend you contact your reseller for support.

Troubleshooting For PDM Client

There are several reasons why this error message can occur. Below are some basic troubleshooting steps that can be performed on PDM client-side to establish connection with SQL Server.

1. Check if the SQL Server Name and Database shown in the log description are correct.

The Server Name and SQL Database information can be found in the error log shown in the image above as well as from the PDM Administration tool. Open PDM Administration tool, right click on the vault and click properties. Consult your IT Team to check if the information about the server is correct.

Top 8 troubleshooting steps for PDM connectivity issues

If the server details shown here are correct, then contact your reseller so they can have a look if the registries of the Vault are correct. You may need Windows Admin log in for your VAR to be able to access and check registries.

2.  Check if the client machine can communicate with SQL Server Machine

Perform a “Ping” test to the server machine from your client machine. First ping the server machine by server-name and then use the Server IP address to test. The ping test is a simple DOS command that tests network connectivity, it does not test ports. To access ping test, click Windows Start and type “Command Prompt”, you should right click and open as Administrator. Once open, you’ll need to type “ping SERVERNAME” and press enter, where you put in your Server Name or Server IP Address. Here are a few scenarios:

A. Ping test successful for either of the two but unsuccessful for another

If you can successfully ping the server using server name but no luck with IP address or vice versa, then this shows that this is a DNS Host Name issue.

To resolve this, use Host file to map the IP Address and the Server Machine name and this will fix the DNS issue and the SQL Server should now be recognised.

B. Ping test unsuccessful for both.

If this is the case, then Client machine is not communicating to the Server Machine. Check the network connection and make sure that both machines are on the same Domain Network. If not, you will need some support from your IT to fix the network connection issue.

C. Ping test successful for both

If the ping test returns successful for both, then it is important to test if the ports the client machine communicates to the SQL Server are open. More details about ports are in the next step.

3. Check if the ports used for SQL are open

If SQL is installed and configured to use default ports, then we need to make sure that Ports – TCP 1433 and UDP 1434 are open. To test this, perform a “Telnet” Test.

Remember to turn on the “telnet” client on the client machine for telnet test to work, in Control Panel -> Programs and Features -> Turn Windows features on or off.

To use Telnet to test a port, open Command Prompt again, this time you want to type – telnet <IP ADDRESS OF SERVER PC> <PORT>. If you get a blank screen with a blinking cursor then it worked, if you receive an error message then the port is not open.

A. Telnet test Unsuccessful

If the Telnet test returns unsuccessful while the ping tests are successful, this means that the ports are blocked. The ports need to be opened. Contact your IT to make sure they have opened the ports that are being used for SQL.

B. Telnet Test Successful

If Telnet test returns successful, then the ports are open, and the communication should work fine.

If you still receive an error message while accessing the vault, then it is worth ensuring your client machine is using a static TCP port to communicate to the SQL Server – see next step.

4. Force Client Machine to use Static TCP Port for SQL Database communication

To enable a client to use a static port to communicate to SQL Database, an ODBC Test needs to be performed. The easiest way to find the tool is to click Windows Start and type ODBC, you’ll get the 32 and 64 bit version, use the 64 Bit version. When configuring an ODBC Test, it is advisable to use SQL “sa” (System Administration user) log in so please make sure that you have the password easily accessible. If not, please ask your IT/Admin to help you.

While configuring the test, make sure to click Client Configuration. In the dialogue box, alias name and server name will be automatically populated. There is no need to change them. Just uncheck “Dynamically Determine Port” and use the port number that is being used by SQL Server. If it’s a default, then it will be 1433.

Top 8 troubleshooting steps for PDM connectivity issues

Once you get a successful result from this test then you should not have any issues communicating to the SQL Server. Remember to restart your PDM Client.

ODBC Test establishes an ODBC connection alias which will then be used by the client when communicating with the SQL server instance. In most of the cases where the SQL has a named instance (i.e. when the name of the SQL instance hosting the vault database is different than the default name) ODBC Test is required.
When all the above steps are performed and there is still an error message when communicating with SQL Server, then this requires a troubleshooting at the server level.

Troubleshooting on Server Machine

On the server, following are the few basic things that can be checked:

1.Make sure SQL Server Services are running

The list of these services can be checked from the task manager

2.Firewall Settings

As the firewall should be on for protection, please check that all the ports were added to the firewall exception list. Make sure the firewall exceptions are added for both incoming and outgoing. If PDM is configured using default ports, then following is the list of ports that need to be opened:
i. SNL (SolidNetwork License Manager) Ports for PDM Licensing to work properly
a. TCP 25734 & 25735
ii. Archive Server Ports
a. TCP – 3030
b. UDP – 3030
iii. Database Server (SQL Server) Ports
a. TCP – 1433
b. UDP – 1434

3.Force SQL to use Static TCP Port

Open SQL Server Configuration Manager. If you don’t have this tool installed, then press “Windows Key + r” and run “compmgmt.msc” to access the SQL Server Configurations.
Use the following steps to make sure SQL Services are communicating through port 1433 for all IP Addresses.

PDM Force SQL

4.Make sure SQL System Admin (sa) Log in Credentials are correct

There could be couple of scenarios:
A. PDM is configured to use correct “sa” credentials
B. Not sure if PDM Vault is configured with correct “sa” log in credentials or if “sa” login credentials have been changed recently

CASE A: If PDM is configured using correct “sa” credentials, then make sure that vault is using the “default” SQL Login. This setting can be done within the Archive Server Configuration tool. Access the properties – Right Click Vault -> Properties -> Navigate to Login tab. Check the box for “Use default SQL Login”

CASE B: If unsure that PDM was setup using correct “sa” credentials or if “sa” credentials have been changed then you can update PDM to use the correct SQL Password. Follow the steps mentioned above to navigate to the Login tab of the Vault Properties dialogue box and simply uncheck the dialogue box to enter the correct password.

 

This will not test the password; it will just use this password whenever it needs to. So, if it is wrong you will get the error, however, once you fix up the correct password PDM will begin to work as normal.

Hopefully, you’ve successfully troubleshooted your PDM connectivity issues and are back on track using PDM to help with your SolidWorks designs. It’s always extra satisfying to resolve your own issues.

However, if you have tried all of these troubleshooting steps and solutions and you’re still having these issues, that’s what your reseller support is for. We have some highly experienced PDM application engineers on hand ready to get you back up and running asap.

 

Written by

Arpit Saxena, Applications Engineer Team Leader at CADspace, a SOLIDWORKS Value Added Reseller in Australia.

Author information

CADspace
CADspace is a dedicated SOLIDWORKS Reseller in Australia, partnered with SOLIDWORKS early in 2013 and since that time we have grown rapidly into a full-service provider to our clients. Over the years we have built trusted relationships based on honesty and outstanding service levels from the most dedicated support and sales team in the country.

The post Top 8 Troubleshooting Steps for PDM Connectivity Issues appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by CADspace at May 18, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to Locate Virtual Components within a SOLIDWORKS Assembly

SOLIDWORKS Virtual Components in an assembly stores the information internally within the assembly file.  There is no external file (.sldprt or .sldasm) that is referenced.  These components are typically used when generating models using the top-down modeling method.  For more information on this modeling practice (and when you should and shouldn’t use it), I’d definitely recommend the SOLIDWORKS Assembly Modeling training course.

SOLIDWORKS Insert New Part in Assemblies

SOLIDWORKS Insert New Part in Assemblies

Virtual components are also useful to add entries to a BOM without changing the model geometry.  Check out our blog article ‘Adding Non-visible items to your BOM‘ for more detail.

These components can be saved out to external files at any time as shown in the SOLIDWORKS Help.  However if you’ve been using a mix of virtual components throughout your design, you may need to search for all virtual components to determine if they should be saved out as a separate file.

Search for Virtual Components

An easy way to locate all virtual components in an assembly is using the Filter tool at the top of the assembly Design Tree.  All virtual components will use the naming convention:

[component_name^assembly_name]
SOLIDWORKS Assembly Design Tree

SOLIDWORKS Assembly Design Tree

Therefore since all virtual components will have the character ‘^’ which is not a common value in a component name, enter this character into the Filter.  This will show all components, including those within subassemblies, that are virtual.

Filter SOLIDWORKS Virtual Components

Filter SOLIDWORKS Virtual Components

The post How to Locate Virtual Components within a SOLIDWORKS Assembly appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Scott Durksen, CSWE at May 18, 2020 01:42 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

BioMechatronics: Designing Next-Level Robotics for Humans [Podcast]

Born to Design Podcast - Matt Carney - BioMechatronics

Born to Design Podcast - Matt Carney - BioMechatronics

I grew up in the generation where fictional characters like Coronel Steve Austin, also known as The Six Million Dollar Man, was a hero to many young kids.  Six million dollars seemed like an enormous amount of money back then too.   For those of you too young to remember the TV show, Austin was an astronaut who was badly injured and needed six million dollars of bionics to make him into a super-strong crime fighter.  He was the original RoboCop, in a sense.  We all understood that Col. Austin was a fictional character with an almost completely bionic body, which was such a futuristic concept, and one that I never thought I would see in my lifetime.

We’ll, after speaking with Dr. Matt Carney, it seems we might be at the tipping point of when we could possibly see a real-life Col. Steve Austin sooner than we think.  Matt is an expert on Biometrics.  He received his PhD from MIT, focused on Biomechatronics, has a BS and Masters in Mechanical Engineering, and eight years of industry experience in Medical device, wind power, humanoid robotics systems, and lower extremity walking robots.  Quite the resume, and Matt might also be the guy who brings us to the next level of Biomechatronics.  I’ll be honest, I knew nothing about this field, but after speaking with Matt, I’m very excited about the future of this area of study.

Listen into my full interview with Matt in the latest Born to Design Podcast:

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Be sure to check out all of the Born to Design podcasts, and subscribe below so you will never miss an episode:

Soundcloud  Subscribe to Solidworks Podcast on Spotify iTunes Stitcher Listen on Google Play Music TuneIn - Solidworks Podcast Page Subscribe to Solidworks Podcast on CastBox  Subscribe to Solidworks Podcast on Overcast

Also, since this interview, Matt has taken up a side project to help with COVID-19…Learn more about the Open Standard Respirator project here…

Here is a short interview with Dr. Carney at 3DEXPERIENCE World 2020:

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/y8qUi0XGMO4" width="560"></iframe>

To keep up with Matt, here are some links:

 

 

Author information

Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling is a Senior Marketing Manager at SolidWorks and the host for the Born to Design Podcast.

The post BioMechatronics: Designing Next-Level Robotics for Humans [Podcast] appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Cliff Medling at May 18, 2020 12:30 PM

May 16, 2020

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: 3D Textures

 

3D Textures: This model is intended to demonstrate the power of 3D Textures. Five examples are provided. Tire Tread, Coin, Fish Scales, Tree Bark and Moon Craters. Each example has its own unique Appearance attached to it in the form of a Bitmap Image. The Bitmap Images are then converted to actual model geometry via the 3D Textures command. Note that the setting for ‘Store appearance, decal and scene data in model file’ has been disabled, allowing the separate Bitmap Image files to be modified in any Photo Editor or stored in a separate folder. 3D Textures.

Complexity: Moderate

Features: 3D Textures, Revolved Surface, Boundary Boss/Base, Filled Surface, Circular Pattern

Want to learn more? You can view the full list of previous Part Reviewer Tutorials here.

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Part Reviewer: 3D Textures appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at May 16, 2020 03:00 PM

May 15, 2020

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Root Burrows of Waxwing Ravine

Pavel-Vophira-art

A flood of tumbling cedar berries filled the root burrows of waxwing ravine. Near its end the tendrils wrapped and fell in quiet ease as the rumbling grew louder and the edges of the sky broke open at the rising of these links.

Pavel Vophira – The pastely, muted tones our my favorite in the array of surreal scenes of large robots, ships, machines, and floating vehicles.

Unreal Engine 5 Demo – There’s a reason it has almost 10 Million views in just a couple of days. Absolute, pure awesome.

Jerry Stiller RIP – Jerry Stiller, best known as George Costanza on Seinfeld, passed this week at the age of 92. This is a tribute to his comedic genius.

Big Picture – Winners of the the Big Picture 2020 Nature Photography competition.

Invisible Rockets – An inside look at four space shuttle launches with real-time staging and fuel burn.

SpaceX Docking Simulator – Do you have what it takes to dock a spacecraft?

VANMOOF – The launch of the VanMoof S3 and X3. Just a beautiful example of an interactive WebGL product experience.

ManMan – Instagram follow of the week. Studio of Zhipeng Tan that creates skeletal inspired furniture pieces.

Chair Times – And on that subject. A documentary on the history of chair design.

Tony Hawk Pro Skater – The iconic games are getting remastered and re-released in glorious 4K. This is the trailer. Pre-orders get a new warehouse scene.

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Kaskade – Live from the Grand Canyon Skywalk (last night). Great chill background music for your evening and weekend.

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</figure>

The post Friday Smackdown: Root Burrows of Waxwing Ravine appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at May 15, 2020 07:14 PM

The Annobike A1 Might Be The Toughest E-bike Ever Made

a1 annobike

Truth be told, I never quite understood e-bikes. I mean, why have an electric-powered bike when a traditional bike provides exercise and less manufacturing and electronic waste? Then again, used as a daily commuter, any extra power would be welcome. Plus – and this is a big bonus – an e-bike helps you avoid public transportation.

However, there are a lot of e-bikes out there less durable than a plastic toy scooter. As soon as they hit a few bumps or an unpaved road, they creak, snap, or pop loose like a pile of pasted popsicle sticks. Copenhagen-based Annobike, is set to change this with the Annobike A1.

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</figure>

The A1 falls into the high-end of e-bikes, built to be a flexible transportation option you can rely on in any situation. As the first production of many e-bike designs from the company, this baby is made of high-quality materials to ensure it lasts just as long as its rider does — maybe longer. Let’s have a look.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">a1 annobike</figure>

Powering the e-bike’s G06 series Bafang brushless motor are a number of 18650 Samsung cells. These cells are charged by plugging the A1 into any electrical socket and provide that added boost when pedalling forward.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">a1 annobike</figure>

When riding your bike, a Shimano Tourney derailleur lets you easily switch gears while adjustable Exa Form shocks on the front and back suspensions reduce the impact of the terrain you’re on.

Should you ever decide to stop riding your bike (you know, in case you’re nearing your destination or heading toward a cliff face), Tektro disk brakes with 160mm rotors are installed on the A1.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">a1 annobike</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">a1 annobike</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">a1 annobike</figure>

You also have your adjustable seat and dirt bike standard handlebars, built-in seat post-release, a color screen on the handle, and best of all – a pair of chunky, puncture-resistant, 20-inch by 4-inch Kenda tires. There’s also an option to add a tracking device which works via GPS, so you can find your nearly-$1,000 bike when/if it gets ganked.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">a1 annobike</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">a1 annobike</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">a1 annobike</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">a1 annobike</figure>

The Annobike A1 has been a pursuit of passion spanning years. Finalizing the prototype alone took one year, and this doesn’t include the time spent sketching, modeling, rendering, and revising the bike. With a bike built around durability and versatility, they’re hoping all the hard work will pay off.

And it looks like it just may. The A1 is currently live on Kickstarter until June 16, 2020. They’ve passed the $21,000 heading toward $200,000 raised with 125 backers. Pleadges start at $850 for the base model and go up to $2300 for a set of two with more powerful motors. To see more of the bike’s specs and support the project, just hop over to their Kickstarter campaign.

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post The Annobike A1 Might Be The Toughest E-bike Ever Made appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at May 15, 2020 05:04 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to run SOLIDWORKS Visualize AI Denoiser on almost any computer

SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2018 SP3.0 onward includes an Artificial Intelligence (AI) Denoiser tool, which allows professional renderings to be made 10x faster.

When the Denoiser is enabled it helps in the significant reductions in render time for production-quality images.It produces better-looking renderings with fewer passes, which takes less time. So this means 150 passes with the Denoiser disabled is comparable to 15 passes with it enabled.

This tool does require:

  • A minimum of 4gigs of VRAM (video ram)
  • NVIDIA® GPU (Kepler™ architecture or newer) with CUDA® 9.0 support.

However, if you want to use it and don’t meet the minimum requirements, you can still force the software to enable the Denoiser.

Denoiser OFF and ON

Follow the steps below to enable the denoiser, if your machine meets or doesn’t meet  the requirements:

Step 1: Enable the Denoiser:

Enable the AI Denoiser through Tools > Options > 3D Viewport and Enable Denoiser. If it’s still not showing up then it could be the VRAM issue, then follow Step 2.

Toggle Denoiser ON

Step 2: Forcefully enable Denoiser even if hardware requirement isn’t met:

  1. To force the Denoiser Open Windows Explorer and navigate to:
%localappdata%\Dassault_Systèmes\SLDWORKSVisualize.exe_StrongName_m1hrhdwyiihwvztj1jjjmmmt1uiqebob\27.0.0.0\
  1. Within this folder you will find the file “user.config”.Make sure you make a copy of this file before you edit it just in case you run into any issue.
  2. Feel free to copy and paste the above path in the address bar of your windows explorer.

Note: In the above path, “28.0.0.0” is version dependent: 2020 is 28.0.0.0, 2019 is 27.0.0.0, and 2018 is 26.0.0.0

  1. Now right-click on the file “user.config” > Open with > select Notepad
  2. We will have to make a modification within this file. Press “Ctrl+F” to open up the find window and pasting the below string into the search field and Click “Find Next”.
MinimumGraphicsMemoryForDenoiser

Below this string is a value that needs to be adjusted, it should look like:

<value>4096</value>
  1. The 4096 value will need to be adjusted to 1024, this will allow the Denoiser to run on any CUDA-based video card, Kepler technology and up, that has at least 1gig of VRAM.
  2. Save the file through File > Save and Launch SOLIDWORKS Visualize, now you should see the enable denoiser option like explained in Step 1.

The post How to run SOLIDWORKS Visualize AI Denoiser on almost any computer appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at May 15, 2020 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Are you a Passionate, Certified SOLIDWORKS User? You could be a “Champion!”

The past few days on LinkedIn, I’ve been so inspired by the amount of you who have actively gone out and shared your well-earned accomplishments as certified SOLIDWORKS users, as part of the brand new Dassault Systèmes Digital Badge Program. What’s even more impressive than your SOLIDWORKS certifications is just how clearly proud you are to be in such an elite class among your peers.

I say this all the time, to SOLIDWORKS users I know personally and to coworkers here internally: we are so fortunate to have millions of users who are not only skilled and certified, but love sharing their expertise and passion for SOLIDWORKS wherever, whenever, and however possible. It’s outstanding – truly.

Over the course of more than two decades, we’ve grown our community together. We’ve made unique strides across several long-running programs and initiatives. Among them: our user group network (SWUGN), the certification program, our efforts with startups and education, and much more. Not to mention all the fantastic work done over the years by our VARs and partners.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sKKQmPepo8s?feature=oembed" title="Getting Involved - SOLIDWORKS" width="1140"></iframe>

 

And it’s at this time that we are introducing another engaging and enabling program, created with the aim of bringing our most passionate and skilled users closer together with both one another and the team here at SOLIDWORKS. I’d like to introduce to you: the SOLIDWORKS Champions Program.

The SOLIDWORKS Champions Program aims to acknowledge & connect community members from around the world who go above & beyond in sharing their passion & expertise.

When I took the time last year to design and create the new Community page that currently exists on SOLIDWORKS.com (quick plug: check it out!), I went into it with what I believe was a fairly clear objective: to provide an easy way for anyone to find out how to ‘get involved,’ no matter their age or level of experience, within some aspect of the SOLIDWORKS community.

As I progressed through putting your stories together, a light bulb turned on. Across all of the areas covered on that page, I noticed common threads. This was ultimately the brainchild of the Champions Program. As I connected themes and stories cohesively, inspiration emerged to create a new program centered upon the desire to acknowledge and connect our users in industry who:

  • Are certified within our Certification Program (ex: CSWP, CSWE)
  • Demonstrate active participation within online Communities (ex: social media, forums), User Groups, or local initiatives (ex: student mentoring programs)
  • Actively participate in and promote our community-driven approach to software development (ex: Alpha/BETA programs, usability testing, bug/enhancement reporting)

And, as part of your involvement within this program, you’ll be able to explore exciting opportunities and perks, such as:

  • Receiving a ‘Welcome Kit’ including special swag
  • Special invitation-only speaking & event attendance opportunities
  • Highlighted participation in online outlets & communities
  • Invitation-only access to try new products
  • First-pass invitations to special programs & initiatives
  • Exclusive access to other user champions and members of the SOLIDWORKS team via discussion spaces, periodic meetups on relevant topics, and more

Does this seem like something you are interested in? If so, we invite you to apply today! Applying is quick and easy. We’re looking forward to hearing more about you!

Author information

Sean O'Neill
Sean O'Neill
I'm a Community & User Advocacy Manager here at SOLIDWORKS. As a longtime SOLIDWORKS user myself, I love meeting with users and hearing about all the interesting things they're doing in the SOLIDWORKS community!

The post Are you a Passionate, Certified SOLIDWORKS User? You could be a “Champion!” appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Sean O'Neill at May 15, 2020 12:00 PM

May 14, 2020

SolidSmack

The Q’s Handmade Wooden Keyboard Is A Thing of Beauty

wooden keyboard

There’s are a couple of reasons why computer keyboards are made from plastic and not wood. 1) Wood doesn’t lend itself to mass manufacturing like plastic does and 2) the amount of abuse and hand oils absorbed by the wooden keys would wear faster than the myth of George Washington’s wooden teeth.

But that won’t stop YouTuber The Q, who throws caution to the wind and jumps at the chance to show a step-by-step process on how to create a wooden computer keyboard of your very own:

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gJ3Fv84rHK4?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

1. Make The Wooden Backboard

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden keyboard</figure>

Using a cheap plastic keyboard as a basis for his design, cut a keyboard outline onto a thin piece of wood. Place the innards of the plastic keyboard on the backboard and screws the circuit board in the upper area, matching the layout of the original keyboard.

Don’t forget to sand it, though. Even though your hands won’t be touching the back portion of the keyboard, it would look unprofessional to leave a side of your work unsanded.

2. Glue Together A Frame

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden keyboard</figure>

With a backboard in place, use the shape and position of the keys to layout the keyboard frame and supports. This involves a lot of measuring, cutting, and gluing different sized pieces of wood together to make a suitable housing for the keyboard, as well as spacing for the arrow and function keys. As with the backboard, reference the plastic keyboard as a basis for making the different parts of the frame. After sanding the edges smooth, the keyboard frame is ready to glue to the backboard.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden keyboard</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden keyboard</figure>

3. Craft Those Wooden Keys

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden keyboard</figure>

Now comes the hardest and most time-consuming part: making the individual keys. Measure each unique key from the plastic keyboard. This is where a set of digital calipers (Mitutoyo 6″/150mm is our favorite) will come in handy.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden keyboard</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden keyboard</figure>

Sand and shape to resemble the smooth keys of a keyboard then use a wood burner with a fine tip to carefully label each key with their corresponding keyboard function. This is where I would have used a desktop CNC milling machine to cut all keys and labels at once.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden keyboard</figure>

This is actually the trickiest part of the key-making process. Anyone who has ever cleaned their keyboard knows just how hard it is to put the keys back in their proper place. This feat is only made more difficult when you realize you’re labelling these keys and one mistake means you’ll have to make a new key from scratch.

4. Glue The Keys to The Keyboard

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden keyboard</figure>

Unlike a traditional plastic keyboard that has hollow keys, The Q’s wooden keyboard features solid keys that need to be glued onto the keyboard. This means you’ll never be able to clean the keyboard thoroughly, as you can’t remove these keys without ripping off the glue which binds them to the keyboard. Even if you manage such a time-consuming task, would you really want to glue all of these keys back together again?

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden keyboard</figure>

5. Get to Typing!

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">wooden keyboard<figcaption>
</figcaption></figure>

Nitpicks aside, this is a fun way to add some personality to your workstation. A wooden keyboard definitely sticks out amidst all the plastic peripherals of a normal computer, plus it is way easier on the eyes (especially when it’s brand new). Just don’t expect the keyboard to remain looking that way.

You can find more do-it-yourself goodness on The Q’s YouTube channel.

The post The Q’s Handmade Wooden Keyboard Is A Thing of Beauty appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at May 14, 2020 06:55 PM

10 Free Miele Accessories to Download and 3D Print at Home

Meile 3D4U 3D Printed Designs

Miele, the high-end German manufacturer of consumer goods, now offers downloadable 3D models for printing.

The company produces a wide array of top-notch consumer products, including vacuums, stoves, refrigerators, washers and dryers, wine coolers, dishwashers, coffee makers, and much more. Last year their revenue exceeded €4B, making them one of the largest producers of appliances in the world.

Appliance makers are one type of manufacturer I always thought could provide benefit to their customers through 3D printing. Specifically, it’s that moment we all experience: the knob on the dishwasher has broken, and we mentally debate whether to buy a replacement for US$79 or simply use a pair of pliers instead. Usually, we end up paying.

If only the company would simply issue the 3D model for the knob, we could merrily 3D print it and get on with the dish cleaning. But that’s not happening for these reasons:

  • Why would a company give away or sell at a low price a 3D model for a part they could charge you an outrageous amount for instead?
  • Would a company publicly distribute a 3D model that is their intellectual property, and thus lose control of it?
  • When would a company subvert the business model for their wide parts distribution network upon which they depend?

Nope, we’re not seeing dishwasher knobs or any other replacement parts online from most major appliance makers anytime soon. Instead, we are seeing complementary products.

Miele 3D4U Accessories

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Meile 3D printed hose ends<figcaption>3D printable vacuum nozzle attachments [Source: Miele]</figcaption></figure>

Take the case of Miele, which recently announced “Miele 3D4U”, an initiative to distribute 3D printable designs over the network to customers at no charge.

The initiative offers a website explaining the (currently) ten items for distribution, all of which offer added value to their products. If you happen to own a Miele vacuum, for instance, you can 3D print these accessories and make it even more functional.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Meile 3D printed bubble blower vacuum<figcaption>The 3D printable bubble attachment for vacuums [Source: Miele]</figcaption></figure>

The ten items distributed by Miele include:

  • Micro Handle — a small version of a vacuum nozzle for getting into tiny areas
  • Bubble Attachment — make your Miele vacuum blow bubbles (Why doesn’t every vacuum manufacturer offer this????)
  • Flexi Nozzle — a bendy vacuum nozzle attachment to allow for more coverage (two sizes)
  • Mono Bracket — attach another accessory to a vacuum
  • Valuables Separator — vacuum nozzle attachment to avoid small items in a drawer
  • Motif Dispenser — coffee device to mark foam with your custom design
  • Coffee Clip — convenient way to close an open coffee bag
  • Borehole Cleaning Aid — vacuum attachment to slurp up debris when boring a hole with a drill (I am going to try out this one, as it works on any drill)
  • Twin Adapter — vacuum splitter to allow for two simultaneously operating heads

One interesting aspect is that Miele is not actually hosting the files themselves. Instead, they have opened up a Thingiverse account and are posting them there, while only linking to them from the Miele site proper. This is perhaps a way to gain greater coverage and noticeability through Thingiverse’s massive audience.

While these parts are definitely not going to repair your broken vacuum, they are quite creative and appear highly functional. If I owned a Miele vacuum, I’d be printing all of them.

I’d like to see more manufacturers take this approach, where they make their products better through online 3D models, at least for those with access to a 3D printer.

The post 10 Free Miele Accessories to Download and 3D Print at Home appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at May 14, 2020 05:29 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Reverse Engineering Police Respirator Mask Canister in SOLIDWORKS for Milwaukee Police

The Police Chief of Milwaukee put out a statement March 20th for businesses in the Milwaukee area to donate any Personal Protection Equipment (PPEs) they could due to supply shortages.

MPD’s Detective Eric Draeger’s gave a call to us at GSC shortly after the 20th, for design assistance in hopes of using 3D printing to combat the coronavirus and COVID-19.

Responding to COVID-19 Police Mask Need with SOLIDWORKS & HP 3D Printing

 

Collage

 

The force needed to ensure they had enough respirator face mask filters to protect its officers and meet demand. They had masks, but not enough filters to adequately supply the masks and their officers.

It took creative thinking to find filters that weren’t depleted in stores or online. Using filters different than the standard issue involved re-designing and reverse engineering the force’s respirator mask filter canister in SOLIDWORKS.

After sourcing new filters from Milwaukee Tool and O-rings from Bradley Corp, GSC’s 3D printing expert Aaron Niedermann quickly started prototyping an adapter for the filters, since they are a different size from the force’s normal supply.

He reverse engineered the filter canisters in SOLIDWORKS and began testing prototype parts on our HP 3D printers. Aaron had a working prototype within a few hours.

Watch the Design Process at High-Speed in SOLIDWORKS

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“We went from idea, to the design, to the actual field part in 5 and a half days. And that’s unheard of,” said Detective Draeger. That is the beauty of 3D printing – the ability to quickly adapt and change as needed.

Open Source 3D Printing Design Files

We have made the design files available online. Please note that for law enforcement, these design files are specific to the issued mask the Milwaukee Police Department uses, and if you have the same mask you can use these files for easy adoption.

The coronavirus particles are very small, making filtration a complex process and a major factor in the design process. The face mask includes a silicon lining for a great seal. GSC 3D printed the threads on the HP 5200 printer for a secure fit. There is an air-tight cap for storage.

All of these features are vital, because leakage can render the masks ineffective and expose officers.

Watch the Full Story

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="475" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CMHFk2GewcY" width="750"></iframe>

If you like this story, and would like to learn more about Detective Draeger, GSC, and the behind-the-scenes of this project, you can view our blog, “We Needed Masks” – GSC 3D Prints Hundreds of Parts for Milwaukee Police Protective Masks with HP Technology.”

 

Author information

GSC
GSC fuels customer success with 3D engineering solutions for design, simulation, data management, electrical schematics, PCB, technical documentation, and 3D printing, as well as the most comprehensive consulting, technical support, and training in the industry. As a leading provider of SOLIDWORKS solutions, HP, and Markforged 3D printing technologies, GSC’s world-class team of dedicated professionals have helped numerous companies innovate and increase productivity by leveraging advanced technologies to drive 3D business success. Founded in 1989, GSC is headquartered in Germantown, WI. For more information about GSC, please visit www.gsc-3d.com.

The post Reverse Engineering Police Respirator Mask Canister in SOLIDWORKS for Milwaukee Police appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GSC at May 14, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to Import & Update SOLIDWORKS CAM TechDB to a newer version

The Import Database Function allows you to import changes from another SOLIDWORKS CAM TechDB, as well as, update a TechDB to a newer version of SOLIDWORKS CAM.

Here is the default location for the TechDB that is created when SOLIDWORKS is installed:

C:\ProgramData\SOLIDWORKS\SOLIDWORKS CAM\TechDB\TechDB.cwdb

You may find this under CAM Options > File Locations Tab > TechDB Location

Note for PDM users, if your TechDB is checked into a vault it will have to be checked-out to make changes as write access is required. TechDB.cwdb is the only file that needs to be checked out. The TechDB must be checked out if you are importing.

To access Settings in the TechDB Tools > SOLIDWORKS CAM > Technology Database > Settings

We see a warning that SOLIDWORKS should be closed. Close SOLIDWORKS, so only the TechDB windows remains.

Select Import Database. We can see the current link to our TechDB and select that we want mill and turn data imported and create a back-up of the active TechDB in case something goes wrong.  Hit Browse.

Import Database

Import Database

Navigate to the location of the TechDB you wish to Import.

Find location of the TechDB

Find location of the TechDB

Once we return to the Settings page, we can see the link to the database we would link to import. We have the option of select whether we want to import mill and/or turn data and create a backup of the existing TechDB. Click Import.

Import mill and/or turn data

Import mill and/or turn data

It may take a moment or two to import. When complete we should get the green Data migration is done successfully! Message.

Data migration is done successfully

Data migration is done successfully

If we go to our original TechDB folder there will be a back-up of the original TechDB. Just to be safe.

back-up of the original TechDB

Back-up of the original TechDB

Subscribe to receive a future CAM blog post where I’ll show you how to Move and re-link your TechDB in SOLIDWORKS CAM.

Learn more about CNC programming in our SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard and SOLIDWORKS CAM Professional courses.

The post How to Import & Update SOLIDWORKS CAM TechDB to a newer version appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Shawn McEachern at May 14, 2020 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

The Value of Simulation Web Series

Last week, we concluded Part 2 of the SOLIDWORKS Simulation and SIMULIAworks webinar series. We are using unique themes as below to highlight the depth and breadth of the SOLIDWORKS Simulation technologies. If you missed the previous webinars, no worries. You will find the links below to watch the recordings. But first, let us recap Part 2:

Theme # 1 – The Value of Simulation / Which Design is the best.

Part 2: “Got Moving Parts? Motion Simulation can help” focused on understanding and simulating the kinematic and dynamic behavior of moving systems and mechanisms.

The webinar discusses the basics of motion analysis in the context of finding the best actuator design for a vertical lift rack system as shown below.

Next Optimization tools built within the tool set are used to illustrate how motion analysis serves as a design tool as well in addition to enforcing design constraints and goals. A medical couch example is used to highlight this powerful capability. The setup process is shown below.

Next, productivity tools such as Motion 2D Analysis as well as Stress Recovery are covered.

The webinar wraps up discussing key challenges using motion analysis to analyze big complex machines with servos and sensors. These challenges can be easily addressed using Event Based Motion (EBM) analysis. A screenshot of the workflow in EBM is shown below.

Click here to watch the recording of this webinar for complete details.

Click here to watch Part 1 of this webinar series.

You can also register now for any or all of the upcoming webinars.

May 20th: Using CFD to drive Product Performance click here
June 3rd: Can your Plastics Part be Manufactured? click here

Theme # 2 – Improving Productivity using SOLIDWORKS Simulation

Part 2: Making the Right Decisions – FEA vs. CFD

Doing thermal analysis to capture conduction, convection and radiation, you can use SOLIDWORKS Simulation Professional or Flow Simulation, with pros and cons for each. The choice has implications in terms of the required input, accuracy, meshing, solution time, and output. The main difference is whether the fluid (liquid or gas) surrounding the solid model is included in the simulation or not.

With Simulation Professional using FEA, the fluid is not modeled and convection is approximated by the user-defined convection coefficient and ambient temperature. Doing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in Flow Simulation, the fluid is modeled and convection coefficient is part of the solution and output among others. In this webinar, you will see some basic concepts of using FEA and CFD in heat transfer as employed by SOLIDWORKS Simulation and Flow Simulation. This is followed by a quick tech tip, a few industry examples and Q&A.

 

Click here to watch the recording of this webinar for complete details.

Click here to watch Part 1 of this webinar series.

You can also register now for any or all of the upcoming webinars:

May 20th: Addressing Vibration Issues – Statics vs. Dynamics click here
June 3rd: Large Assembly Analysis Made Easy click here
June 17th: Topology Optimization – Exploring the AM Space click here

Author information

Ramesh Lakshmipathy
Ramesh Lakshmipathy
Senior Territory Technical Manager at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post The Value of Simulation Web Series appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Ramesh Lakshmipathy at May 14, 2020 12:00 PM

The Magical Fill Surface

The Fill Surface is different from the other types of features like loft, boundary and sweep. The main difference is that Fill is magical. Honestly, you can make the Fill…

by matt at May 14, 2020 01:41 AM

May 13, 2020

The Javelin Blog

Un client du Québec, l’Hôpital général juif, accroît sa capacité d’impression 3D pour aider à combattre la COVID-19

À l’hôpital général juif de Montréal, augmenter la capacité de fabrication additive est récemment devenu un besoin urgent. Étant l’emplacement principal de patients atteints de la COVID-19 dans la région de Montréal, le personnel hospitalier a reconnu le besoin d’augmenter la production interne d’écrans faciaux de protection et de composants de ventilateur.

Appuyées par la donatrice Dr Sharon Azrieli, les récentes acquisitions auprès de Javelin comprennent deux imprimantes Stratasys Fortus 450 mc 3D et une imprimante F170 entièrement dédiées à la production associée à la COVID-19 à l’aide de matériaux FDM (dépôt de filament fondu).

Jewish General Hospital

L’hôpital général juif de Montréal

Technologie FDM et support Javelin

La technologie FDM est compatible avec des thermoplastiques de calibre d’ingénierie afin de construire des pièces robustes et durables qui peuvent être stérilisées. Les imprimantes 3D FDM perfectionnées ont d’importantes capacités de matériaux permettant des temps de fabrication prolongés et ininterrompus, de plus grosses pièces et des quantités plus élevées.

Fortus 450mc Tray Inspect

Fortus 450mc

Javelin a fourni l’installation des imprimantes et la formation au cours de la semaine du 6 avril 2020 et la production de pièces critiques a commencé la semaine du 13 avril. Le directeur national des ventes de Javelin, Maxime Lacouture, a affirmé que Javelin est fière de jouer un rôle pour aider l’hôpital à être capable de produire son propre équipement essentiel.

« Nous avons équipé le nouvel espace Sharon Azrieli Creative Space avec une flotte d’imprimantes 3D Stratasys qui permettent la production d’ÉPI dès maintenant et qui permettront de s’adapter aux besoins changeants. Nous savons que cette technologie sera d’une aide précieuse bien au-delà de la fin de cette pandémie. Les applications variant des appareils spécifiques aux patients, tels que des guides chirurgicaux, des orthèses et des prothèses, aux modèles pour l’éducation du patient et aux outils d’apprentissage des cliniciens. »

— Maxime Lacouture, Le directeur national des ventes de Javelin

L’application Binah.ai

L’Hôpital général juif a aussi fait les manchettes pour son utilisation prévue d’une application de téléphone intelligent qui mesure les signes vitaux d’une personne sans avoir à la toucher. L’application Binah.ai peut mesurer avec précision la fréquence cardiaque, la variabilité cardiaque (VRC), les niveaux de saturation en oxygène et de stress mental – le tout sans aucun contact. L’application se trouve actuellement en phase de tests, en commençant par le service d’urgence de l’hôpital.

Partagez votre histoire d’assistance COVID-19

Javelin exprime sa reconnaissance et son appréciation envers le personnel dévoué et innovateur de l’Hôpital général juif.

Les clients de Javelin excellent dans tous les secteurs : de la conception de produits et la fabrication de haut niveau, aux soins de la santé et à l’éducation. À l’heure actuelle, plusieurs d’entre eux sont en train de changer, de diversifier, de réoutiller et de rééduquer, dans certains cas pour contribuer directement à lutter contre la COVID-19. Dans d’autres cas, pour appuyer le travail essentiel en cours dans les secteurs tels l’agriculture et la production alimentaire, l’énergie et le transport. Nous sommes fiers de présenter les histoires de certaines entreprises canadiennes faisant un travail exceptionnel.

The post Un client du Québec, l’Hôpital général juif, accroît sa capacité d’impression 3D pour aider à combattre la COVID-19 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Karen Majerly at May 13, 2020 12:32 PM

Using Shrink to address SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Free Space

The recommended free disk space for an SQL Server (SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional database), is 15%. If free disk space reaches levels below that, problems can occur. Lower levels can lead to PDM can becoming unusable.

There may not may any notification of low disk space, until running the SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Upgrade Wizard.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Upgrade Wizard

SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Upgrade Wizard

The PDM Database Upgrade Wizard, is used to upgrade the SQL database(s), used by PDM. This is normally done after upgrading SOLIDWORKS PDM to a newer release.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Full Errors

In the case of insufficient disk space, the log created by the PDM Database Upgrade Wizard, will show that there was a failure, but may not provide the cause.  To find the cause we need to look in the PDM USER log. In the log there will be errors such as:

  • SOLIDWORKS® PDM database upgrade (upgrade.exe) to fail with a client log error “[SQL Server] The transaction log for database ‘db_name’ is full”?
  • [Microsoft][ODBC SQL Server Driver][SQL Server] The transaction log for database ‘db_name’ is full.

These errors point to the Transaction Log being full. The Transaction Log records all SQL transactions as well database modifications. The Transaction Log is critical to disaster recovery and should never be deleted or moved.

These messages may occur because the defined maximum Transaction Log size has been reached or because there is no more disk space for the Transaction Log to grow.

The reason that low disk space may not be noted until the use of the PDM Database Upgrade Wizard, is because the Upgrade process will create many temporary tables. The greater the gap between versions of the database(s), the more free space that will be required, during the Upgrade

If disk space becomes more critical, users may start to get the message ‘‘Error accessing the database’ and ‘Transaction log is full’ in client log.”  When investigating this message it is important to determine if Autogrowth has been enabled and that the defined Maximum File Size has not been reached.

Transition Log - Enable Autogrowth

Transition Log – Enable Autogrowth

If the Transaction Log settings are correct the the available disk space should be checked.

Only those who are familiar with SQL should make any changes as incorrect settings may have a detrimental effect on PDM use.

How to limit the consumption of disk space

There are a number of reasons why disk space can become an issue and there are things that can be done to limit the consumption of disk space. Some of these are:

  • Having a dedicated SQL Server. This would mean having a separate server for the PDM Archives. Having separate servers for the PDM Archive and Database, can increase PDM performance, on larger implementations
  • Using Simple as the Recovery Model for SQL.
  • Moving old SQL back-ups to a separate server.

When disk free space has become critical, there are a couple of solutions. First, would be increase the amount of disk space. The other is to Shrink the Transition log. The Shrink operation will cause SQL Index fragmentation and this can lead to poor SQL/PDM performance. So it is not recommended that it be used on a regular basis, but in situations where disk space is critical, it may provide stop gap solution, until a final solution can be implemented. Also, on large databases or in environments where there hundreds of users, shrinking databases yearly, may actually increase performance.

The post Using Shrink to address SOLIDWORKS PDM Database Free Space appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at May 13, 2020 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Successfully Manage Entire Engineering Teams from Any Location

We get it. Sometimes you just have to get the job done. And, you probably don’t have the time (or the resources) to start setting up a PDM server and VPNs so you can work from home. So, you copy files to a memory stick and take them home with you—maybe not an ideal set up but it works and you have to get it done. Besides, you can worry about which one is the master copy or the latest version later.

But then you must work with others on the team. How do you share the design files? How do you get feedback from others? What about wading through those l-o-n-g email threads amongst the team? Which one is the latest version again?

What if you could start using engineering solutions today that have instant access to the data and all project-related communications from any location using any device? And easily share that data with the right people knowing it is secure.

All that you need with cloud-based engineering solutions from Dassault Systèmes is an internet connection and a web browser. Forget about relying on unpredictable or slow VPN or remote desktop connections to get work done from home.

Let’s take a look at the built-in collaboration features using 3D Creator and 3D Sculptor on the cloud-based 3DEXPERIENCE® platform. 3D Creator is a 3D parametric modeler for components and assemblies design. 3D Sculptor enables you to create organic, advanced surfaces very quickly using subdivision (Sub-D) modeling technology.

Work Simultaneously on One Assembly

When you are working on a model in either Role, 3D Creator or 3D Sculptor, and have permissions to make changes to a specific part, simply go ahead and make them. The design will have been “reserved” for you automatically the moment you began working on it. This prevents other users from making changes to the same thing at the same time.

On the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, you could have multiple users working on various parts of the same assembly simultaneously. Part of your team could be working on parametric features of the product in 3D Creator, while others could be doing advanced surfacing in 3D Sculptor. Everyone working on the same model is built right into the platform.

No need to set up a PDM or PLM system; the capabilities are baked right into the design environment. Think about attempting to open a file from a shared network drive, and you get an error saying the file is in use. What do you do now?

The 3DEXPERIENCE platform allows work to continue by allowing users to reserve just what they are working on and free up other components for other users simultaneously.

Eliminate Mountains of Emails

One of the challenges of building a product from start to finish is managing communications throughout the process, especially when managers, vendors, and customers are involved. Emails quickly become unwieldy, often requiring forwarding, collating, and organizing in a multitude of folders.

The cloud-based 3DEXPERIENCE platform takes a different approach, allowing communications from all stakeholders all in a single place.

Like familiar social media platforms, project Communities enable you to make posts, create tasks, ask questions, or present product ideas all in one shared environment with your team. Because everyone is communicating from the same platform, traceability happens automatically. For managers who are always on the go, they can review posted 3D models and even mark up the model and make comments—from any device, even from a smartphone.

No more managing tons of project emails. Disputes with co-workers or managers or clients are quickly resolved by reviewing communication threads within the project Community. This makes it easy to solve disagreements over what was communicated (or not communicated) in the past without the frustration of digging through piles of emails.

Receive Feedback from the Entire Team

Now you can conduct real-time digital mock-ups accessible to everyone on the team—without any requisite of CAD knowledge. This enables all non-CAD users to participate in the product development cycle. Invite marketing, sales, or executive personnel to early-stage reviews. Get real-time design for manufacturing (DFM) advice from the shop floor or manufacturing vendors, avoiding (potentially expensive) downstream issues.

Making 3D available to everyone is like sharing a common language; everyone can fully understand it, no need to learn how to interpret 2D drawings.

It becomes so easy to communicate concerns, identify issues, and propose resolutions—especially to non-engineering colleagues. Promoting your product ideas becomes a snap because all team members, including those outside your doors, can participate in the design review process with full 3D detailed models without worrying about downloading add-ins to participate in the process.

Because any team member can view, rotate, markup, and measure your model, manager or executive signoffs are accelerated since they can see the full 3D version of the product for themselves. All communication is captured on the platform, so traceability is built right into the process.

 

SOLIDWORKS Desktop Users Included

All the collaboration features covered in this article will also work for SOLIDWORKS desktop users who connect to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform using the Collaborative Designer for SOLIDWORKS Role, or the included SOLIDWORKS Connector with 3D Creator and 3D Sculptor. You can use 3D Creator or 3D Sculptor as dedicated tools or to work complementary to SOLIDWORKS desktop.

If you include a 3D Creator and/or 3D Sculptor design in a SOLIDWORKS assembly, any changes made in 3D Creator and 3D Sculptor quickly propagate through to SOLIDWORKS. The same is true the other way around, using SOLIDWORKS data on the platform.

You can sign up today for your free trial of the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. And, please feel free to add your comments or thoughts below.

Author information

Mark Rushton
Mark Rushton
Mark Rushton is a Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS and has been involved with 3D CAD and 3D Printing for over 15 years in several capacities from research to consulting for the likes of Rolls Royce, GE, JCB and Dyson. When not playing with 3D printers or other tech, he is most likely out snowboarding, wake boarding or mountain biking.

The post Successfully Manage Entire Engineering Teams from Any Location appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Mark Rushton at May 13, 2020 12:00 PM

May 12, 2020

SolidSmack

3D Printed Foam Expands 40x for Big Prints from Small 3D Printers

I don’t know what you think when you hear of small prints that can expand to 40x their size, but my first thought is JACKETS. Thousands of little jackets printed, stored, and expanded with heat when I need a new one. Just think, unlimited jackets. Of course, there are some other applications like, oh, let’s say aerospace, automotive, medicine but everyone in those industries needs jackets too, so…

Researchers at the University of California San Diego developed the capability with a foaming prepolymer and published it in a paper at Applied Materials & Interfaces.

They state:

We have developed a foaming prepolymer resin for lithographic additive manufacturing, which can be expanded after printing to produce parts up to 40× larger than their original volume. This allows for the fabrication of structures significantly larger than the build volume of the 3D printer that produced them. Complex geometries comprised of porous foams have implications in technologically demanding fields such as architecture, aerospace, energy, and biomedicine.”

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

The chemicals comprise an array of liquid monomers, oligimers, and crosslinkers but the basic process is that used in an SLA 3D printer. In this case, a very inexpensive Anycubic Photon UV LCD 3D Printer was used to print the 3D models created in Rhino (edu version) with STL optimized in Autodesk Meshmixer. After printing, the foam was expanded using a Thermo Scientific Lindberg/Blue M VO914A vacuum oven.

Their demonstrations didn’t include jackets, but did include 1) a wind turbine printed at 1/3 scale, expanded to full-size and attached to a belt drive and DC generator and 2) a boat hull printed at 1/3 scale, expanded to full-size then floated and stacked with weight until it sunk.

Here’s more on the technology from researcher on the project, David M. Wirth, who goes further into demonstrations and the applications, including expandable prints for aerospace:

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PoAvYRy21qw?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post 3D Printed Foam Expands 40x for Big Prints from Small 3D Printers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at May 12, 2020 06:53 PM

Construct the Computer From Your Childhood With These Downloadable Papercraft Models

Papercraft computers

Kids these days will never appreciate how good they have it. Smartphones with built-in computers? Bah, back in the day we had to be content with clunky boxes, big screens, and a wad of wires. Even then our computers wouldn’t connect to ‘World Wide Web’ without a dial-up connection. Ah, the good ol’ days, right?

While we can’t bring’em back, artist and designer Rocky Bergen has made something easier for kids and (kids-at-heart) to enjoy. Using the wonders of modern computers, he has made a variety of papercraft models featuring old computers, game consoles, and many other old pieces of technology.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">Papercraft computers</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">Papercraft computers</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">Papercraft computers</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter size-large">Papercraft computers</figure>

These models, which feature the likes of the Apple II, Atari 520 ST, Nintendo GameCube, and most importantly, a Conion C-100F boombox are available as a PDF format and completely free.

All you have to do is download the files from Bergen’s website, print them on some thick paper, and you’re ready to go. Of course, I left out the parts where you have to cut, fold, and glue the individual pieces together, but I’ll leave that up to you.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Papercraft computers</figure>

One neat little trick Bergen has implemented with the computers is the inclusion of swappable screens. Should you get tired of the Amiga Workbench on your papercraft Amiga 500 for instance, you can swap it out for a knock-off version of Super Mario Bros. or a point-and-click adventure game.

What’s great is how Bergen manages to squeeze in his personal life to each piece of tech. Clicking each link doesn’t immediately open the PDF file, but sends you on a trip down Bergen’s memories where he recounts his time with the real thing. And even if he never had the gadget, he always makes time to comment on its make and design.

Here’s an excerpt from his Apple II papercraft:

Growing up, the only game I ever played on the Apple II is Oregon Trail because that was the only game our school had. I was already pretty obsessed with computers and always hungry for more exposure. Thankfully the Internet happened and now I can experience this machine in a multitude of ways, which happens to include creating and sharing this papercraft pattern.

Only after you’ve gone through this sweet and touching experience will you find the link to the PDF file at the bottom of the webpage. Just as you would find a link to his papercraft files here; at the bottom of this webpage.

Maybe working on these papercraft models will give the young’uns a better appreciation of old school technology. If they can be bothered to get off their smartphones, that is.

The post Construct the Computer From Your Childhood With These Downloadable Papercraft Models appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at May 12, 2020 06:08 PM

Model of the Week: Curtiss “Number 3” Engine [The Wonders of Powered Flight!]

Ah! The early days of flight! Experimental flights, experimental aircraft and, most interesting of all, experimental engines. Since 1903 there have been all matter of engines from air-cooled to liquid-cooled, inline, v-type, rotary, piston, turbine, and more.

A bump in the 100+ year history of the aircraft engine is the Curtiss Number 3, a V-8 water-cooled, electric-start engine that would power the AEA Silver Dart experimental aircraft. It’s an engine that won’t make any ‘best of’ lists but one that did set the stage for many a decision about powered flight to come.

Erich Weidenhammer, aka ‘Erich with an H’ on Thingiverse, has captured a recreation of the Curtiss No. 3 based on a scan of the original 1908 artifact displayed at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum (CASM). He has scaled it, optimized it, and made the engine available for 3D printing.

The polygon mesh generated through [the scan] process provided dimensional information for a parametric CAD model at 1/8 scale which was made using Autodesk Fusion 360 software. The original dimensions have been adjusted in order to be printable using a consumer-level FDM printer with a standard .5mm nozzle. The model has been separated into pieces in order to make it possible to print at this scale.

<figure class="wp-block-gallery columns-2 is-cropped"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>Curtiss Number 3 aircraft engine. Source: Instagram – hammerwerk_ca</figcaption></figure>

As you can see, at 1/8 scale, this is a small print but no less beautiful. The 23 detailed parts were printed with a PRUSA i3 MK2S. Supports are used for the cylinder bank as well as the engine case which also contains alignment channels. He recommends having some tools handy, ones you may have for model building, including hobby files, sand paper, emery boards, sprue cutter, CA glue and, of course, primer and paint.

Erich has provided complete instructions, along with all the files, and a brief history of the engine. You can grab the model over at Thingiverse. Erich has a number of other model aircraft-related designs and this great 3d printable paint rack for all your model paints!

You also don’t want to miss other great shots of the build and more projects Erich has done and has in work on his Instagram profile. Check it out!

Have a model you think everyone needs? Share the link and details with us here!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post Model of the Week: Curtiss “Number 3” Engine [The Wonders of Powered Flight!] appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at May 12, 2020 03:22 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Quick Tips – Turntable Animation

Turntable animations are a super simple way for you to show all angles of your product, with the click of a button – no keyframing necessary! SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional makes it incredibly easy to create a turntable animation of your product. In this week’s Visualize Quick Tip, we’ll cover how easy it is to create a turntable render in Visualize and how to adjust the settings. This video was recorded before we introduced the new AI Denoiser in 2019, so don’t forget to enable the new Denoiser for instant 10x faster rendering!

 

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UFhpeZD7-kM" width="560"></iframe>
 

Check out this YouTube playlist more helpful Visualize videos!

USE THE VISUALIZE FORUM to connect with the global Visualize Community for self-help support with common questions. Don’t forget to share your Visualize images and animations on this Forum thread!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS Quick Tips – Turntable Animation appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at May 12, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Simplify Your SOLIDWORKS Assembly Drawing with Display States

One use of display states is to help improve the clarity of information conveyed in a SOLIDWORKS assembly drawing. In the example below, we have a u-joint assembly drawing with a bill of materials. What if we want to include a view of one particular part in this assembly to highlight a specific dimension?

We can achieve this using display states. In the assembly model, we can create a new display state (select the Configurations tab, right-click in the FeatureManager > Add Display State).

Creating a new display state

Creating a new display state

After selecting the new display state “Bracket”, we can selectively hide components to only show the bracket component.

Bracket display state

Bracket display state

Switching back to the drawing, we can bring up the drawing view palette and insert a right side view of the assembly. In the view FeatureManager, we can select the “Bracket” display state to show only the bracket component. We can focus on dimensions for this part, and balloon annotations will reference the assembly bill of materials.

Assembly Drawing Display States

Right side drawing view of “bracket” display state

The post Simplify Your SOLIDWORKS Assembly Drawing with Display States appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Julian Wolf at May 12, 2020 12:00 PM

May 11, 2020

SolidSmack

Here’s How Vinyl Records Are Made

how vinyl records are made

I can’t quite call myself old enough to have experienced the golden age of the phonograph, ya know since they date back as early as the mid-1800s.  But with the (continual) resurgence of vinyl records, now with the age of hipsters and vintage music enthusiasts, I figure this would be a nice opportunity to see how these timeless music storage devices are made.

In this video by Insider, they take a trip to BrooklynPhono’s vinyl record pressing plant to explore how the New York-based factory makes up to 3,000 vinyls a day:

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</figure>

The whole video is a treat to watch, but for those who want the short version, here’s the (super simplified) rundown:

1. Carving The Music Onto A Stamper

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">how vinyl records are made</figure>

Music can be basically boiled down to really ‘groovy’ sound waves, so in order to press those sound waves onto a piece of vinyl, it first needs to be professionally mixed for the medium.

Once the music is mixed, the sound is carved into a series of grooves which are transferred to a stamper. These stampers are then sent out by record companies and indie bands to a number of pressing plants (such as BrooklynPhono) which load the stampers onto their hydraulic press machines for vinyl record-making.

2. Baking The Vinyl

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">how vinyl records are made</figure>

When an order for records comes through, BrooklyPhono prepares circular chunks of vinyl. These chunks are first drilled in the center before being baked in an oven.

3. Adding The Labels and Press The Record

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">how vinyl records are made</figure>

These heated vinyl chunks are then sandwiched between two labels by use of an extruder. The crude vinyl sandwiches are then shot forward into the main pressing area where the stampers can be found. With the stampers in place, the vinyls have the sweet, sweet music pressed onto them.

In the case of BrooklynPhono, they use the traditional method of using steam and heated water to press the vinyls into records. 2,000psi is applied to a heated piece of vinyl before being cooled down to produce a record.

This isn’t the most cost-efficient or environment-friendly method of pressing records; some companies have moved on to more modern steamless modules that use electricity instead of water to heat up the vinyl.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">how vinyl records are made</figure>

While BrooklynPhono does use the old steam method, they have taken it upon themselves to implement a closed-loop recycling system. This means excess vinyl from old records is reused and turned into new records. So they’re doing what they can to make their pressing plant able to reuse/recycle materials.

4. Trimming The Record and Prepping for Shipping

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">how vinyl records are made</figure>

With the music imprinted onto the records, all that’s left to do now is remove the excess vinyl, trim the records into their iconic disc shape, and prepare them for shipping to music lovers worldwide.

It’s a fascinating process that brings a deeper appreciation for making the music and the medium that has brought us so many wonderful groups. So the next time you’re browsing in your local record store, take a moment and reflect on just how a series of melted grooves produces your favorite band’s newest (or most classic) album.

The post Here’s How Vinyl Records Are Made appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at May 11, 2020 10:58 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

TOP 5 TPM SOLIDWORKS TECH POSTS

TPM voted on our Top 5 technical posts and we wanted to share each of them. These videos and blog posts provide helpful tips and tricks on several SOLIDWORKS products like Simulation, Mold Design, PDM and more!

 

#5

SOLIDWORKS Mold Design

This tech video showcases the basic tools and workflows utilized to create mold tooling in SOLIDWORKS.

While the Mold design process can be daunting, this video walks through the basic design process of a bicycle handlebar plug and shows how a seemingly complex process can be accomplished with ease!

 

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2EDL6uUJIx0" width="560"></iframe>

 

#4

SOLIDWORKS Electrical for P&ID

In this video, we learn how to use SOLIDWORKS Electrical to generate P&ID documentation.

This basic how-to video demonstrates some simple tricks we can utilize to create P&IDs with ease and speed.

 

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Zu6aU__w01U" width="560"></iframe>

 

#3

15 SOLIDWORKS Simulation Mesh Tips in 3 Minutes 

We are sharing 15 important tips to help solve your meshes faster and more accurately!

The tips and tricks shown in this tech video can help take SOLIDWORKS Simulation to its maximum potential. Check out this video and try these meshing tips when you run your next simulation mesh.

 

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GVrnomJfT5E" width="560"></iframe>

 

#2

Introducing SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020

SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020 has the capability to streamline your SOLIDWORKS operations and eliminate your pain points while also saving you money. Check out this blog post and see if any of these new features could potentially solve some of your own pain points!

Introducing the New SOLIDWORKS PDM 2020: Performance, Speed, Control

 

#1

Borrowing SOLIDWORKS Licenses

Knowledge about SOLIDWORKS licensing can definitely save you in times of need!

Check out this tech post for pertinent information on how to borrow licenses from your server.

 

<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yGzpKs6knOY" width="560"></iframe>

Maxwell Ames, Technical Solutions Consultant, TPM, Inc.

Author information

TPM
TPM, Inc. is the Carolina’s largest 3D CAD provider and a leading technology company proud of its reputation of providing cutting-edge solutions to the engineering and design community for the past 40 years. Founded in 1973, TPM Inc. serves more than 3,000 customers across the Southeast each year. Inspired by our founder, Jerry Cooper, we are committed to offering our clients the best: 3D Design Software, 3D Printing and Scanning Options, Data and Document Management Solutions, Large-Format Graphics, Wide-Format Plotters and Office Equipment, and Reprographics.

The post TOP 5 TPM SOLIDWORKS TECH POSTS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by TPM at May 11, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Quebec customer Jewish General Hospital increases 3D printing capacity to help fight COVID-19

At Montreal’s Jewish General Hospital, increasing additive manufacturing capacity recently became an urgent need. As the main site for COVID-19 patients in the Montreal area, hospital staff recognized the need for more in-house production of protective face shields and ventilator components.

Supported by donor Dr. Sharon Azrieli, recent purchases from Javelin include two Stratasys Fortus 450 mc 3D printers and one F170 printer, all dedicated to COVID-19-related production using FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) materials.

Jewish General Hospital

Jewish General Hospital in Montreal

FDM Technology and Javelin Support

FDM technology works with engineering-grade thermoplastics to build strong, long-lasting parts that can be sterilized. Advanced FDM 3D printers have large build envelopes and material capacities, delivering longer, uninterrupted build times, bigger parts, and higher quantities.

Fortus 450mc

Stratasys Fortus 450mc 3D printer

Javelin provided printer installation and training during the week of April 6, 2020 and critical part production began the week of April 13. Javelin’s national sales manager Maxime Lacouture said Javelin is proud to play a role in the hospital being able to make its own essential equipment.

“We have equipped the new Sharon Azrieli Creative Space with a fleet of Stratasys 3D printers that enable production now and will meet evolving needs. We know this technology will see valuable use far beyond the end of this pandemic. Applications span from patient-specific devices, such as surgical guides, orthotics, and prosthetics, to patient education models and clinician learning tools.”

Maxime Lacouture – National Sales Manager

The Binah.ai App

Jewish General Hospital also made news for its intended use of a smartphone app that measures a person’s vital signs without having to touch them. The Binah.ai app can accurately measure heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV), respiration and oxygen saturation levels, and mental stress levels – all without any contact. The app is currently in the testing phase, starting in the hospital’s Emergency Department.

Javelin sends thanks and appreciation to the hardworking, innovative staff at the Jewish General Hospital.

Share your COVID-19 support story

Javelin’s customers excel in every sector, from product design and top-tier manufacturing to healthcare and education. Right now, many of them are shifting, diversifying, retooling, and retraining, in some cases to contribute directly to fighting COVID-19, in other cases to support ongoing essential work in sectors such as agriculture and food production, energy, and transportation. We are proud to feature stories of some of the Canadian businesses doing exceptional work.

Tell us how your business is supporting the COVID-19 pandemic effort with the production of PPE, medical devices or other products and services > contact us.

The post Quebec customer Jewish General Hospital increases 3D printing capacity to help fight COVID-19 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Karen Majerly at May 11, 2020 01:34 PM

Copy Settings Wizard strategy before and after a SOLIDWORKS registry reset fixed a problem

Restoring SOLIDWORKS custom settings is sometimes necessary, and if much time has been invested in setting them all then it’s not fun to imagine having to restore them all manually. This article discusses restoring custom settings if there was deemed to be a corruption in the SOLIDWORKS part of the Windows registry.

If you did not invest much time in customizing your settings, then manual re-creation of custom settings might be an option and this article might not be for you.  If you do not relish the idea of manual re-creation, then keep reading, as restoring your hard work might not be as straightforward as you think, as there is a nasty little trap we can get into.  Fortunately, there is a way to avoid it!

“Knowing that a trap exists is the first step in avoiding it”

— Frank Herbert, Dune

Each key element in the trap is quite innocent by itself.  Here they are:

  • Almost inevitably, SOLIDWORKS performance issues will crop up that can be resolved by a SOLIDWORKS registry resetIf the reset fixed the problem, then we know where the problem lay: in the registry!  We then refer to the registry issue as a corruption.  Its cause is usually unknown.  And a registry is only magnetically-stored data… if a bit is flipped from a 0 to a 1, that can create a corruption.  Could even be caused by cosmic rays from outer space.
  • Copy Settings Wizard is a great way to save hours of manual re-creation of your custom settings in SOLIDWORKS.  It copies the user’s SOLIDWORKS subset of the Windows registry, where the custom settings are stored, and writes them to backup files for possible restoration later.

Can you guess how the trap works, when these two elements are used in sequence?  This is how:

  1. Copy Settings Wizard is a copier; if there was a corruption in the user settings of the SOLIDWORKS registry, then it will copy that corruption to the settings files
  2. It is rather difficult to know precisely when the corruption first crept into the registry.  Could have been months ago.  Could have been from a colleague’s settings file or an admin image.  Sometimes the adverse effect is isolated to some area of SOLIDWORKS that you haven’t used in a while.  Therefore it may not be obvious when the corruption was copied out to the settings files.  This is why it is so important to regularly back up your SOLIDWORKS custom settings, and maintain a collection of multiple settings files.  Because if there is only one settings file, and you always overwrite the same one, then it’s just a matter of time before it inherits a corruption.  It is good practice to incorporate the save date into the filename of each, for easy reference.  But if you only have the one file, fear not….keep reading!
  3. When Copy Settings Wizard is used to restore custom settings after the registry was reset, it will restore any corruption that was previously saved out to the file from which you’re restoring.

This trap can be dealt with in a few different ways:

  • if you did not invest much time in customizing your settings, then manual re-creation of custom settings will likely avoid the trap completely.  Otherwise, keep reading
  • if the restore has re-introducing the corruption (can test whether this is the case in SOLIDWORKS), then consider restoring from older backups until you find one that did not re-introduce the corruption.  No need to reset the registry each time; the backup restore will overwrite those registry settings anyway
  • if you need to restore from a particular settings file that you suspect DOES contain the corruption, then you can experiment with the checkbox settings to isolate which one contains the corruption.  That way, at least you get to restore most of the settings once you determine which checkbox needs to be left unchecked.  With luck, you will have very little customization work left to do.  You can even restore just that checkbox from an older settings file, and maybe completely save yourself any manual re-creation of your custom settings.

    SOLIDWORKS Copy Settings Wizard

    Can try unchecking various checkboxes if you suspect the corruption is in that file.  Try half, then a third, etc.

NOTE: For those who are moderately or heavily invested in customizing SOLIDWORKS settings, we recommend maintaining a collection of custom settings files, with a new one saved out every once in a while, so that you have a good stock from which to restore when needed.

The post Copy Settings Wizard strategy before and after a SOLIDWORKS registry reset fixed a problem appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWE at May 11, 2020 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Explore 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS LIVE!

Let’s talk about magic. Does connecting all phases of business across an entire organization sound like magic to you? The 3DEXPERIENCE® Platform makes this idea a reality with interconnected software solutions for every stakeholder in your business: from engineers and designers to managers and beyond! Sounds exciting? Want to learn more from two of the most pumped-up 3DEXPERIENCE experts in the business? Then you need to check out Exploring 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS LIVE: A Bi-Weekly Webinar Series!

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/evMqCtfZLrk?feature=oembed" title="Exploring 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS LIVE Teaser" width="1140"></iframe>

 

Every other Monday, Industry Process Consultants Gian Calise and John Martorano will take you on a journey through the different capabilities and workflows of the 3DEXPERIENCE platform and all it has to offer. Engage with these live demos and learn platform tips and tricks from the masters themselves. Each session gets into the meat of design solutions like 3D Creator and 3D Sculptor, as well as fully integrated tools for collaboration, data management, project management, and much more.

John and Gian are ready to answer all of your questions and be your guides through the new and awesome features found on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. Join them for their next webinar on May 18 and register for future webinars today!

Want to get in on the action? Sign up for a free trial of the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform and discover the future of product development for yourself!

Author information

Sara Zuckerman
Sara Zuckerman
Sara Zuckerman is a Content Marketing Specialist in Brand Offer Marketing for SOLIDWORKS and 3DEXPERIENCE Works.

The post Explore 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS LIVE! appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Sara Zuckerman at May 11, 2020 12:00 PM

New Page Added to Episodes Surfacing Class: Sunglasses

For those of you who haven’t yet signed up for the Episodes surfacing class, this is a little bit of what you’re missing out on. In addition to the private…

by matt at May 11, 2020 09:31 AM

May 08, 2020

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: The Machines Broke the Horizon

Tianhua-Xu-art

Tumbling across the crust of the stinjin’ bog, a band of the small creatures amassed toward the hill. In the distance five of the machines broke the horizon, sun at their backs and the blood of a thousand worlds pumping through their veins to these sound of these links.

Tianhua Xu – He may be the master of highly detailed art featuring characters riding atop beasts. Really though, all pieces are masterfully done.

Book sculpture – Bethan Bickle calls herself a creative problem solver shown best in her sculptures illustrating the books they are built on.

100 Days of Poetry – 100 graphics created by graphic artist Notty as if they were written as a poem over 100 days.

Generative Beethoven – A visual representation of the the classical music from the greatest composer using generative design.

Crank it up – Instagram follow of the week. Florian W. Meuller photographs toy cars on carboard backdrops and it looks absolutely real.

Lada Limo – 20 photos of stretched Ladas. Pimpin.

Navadijos – What if science fiction happened to a small village in the remote hills of Spain. As illustrated by Oscar Llorens.

Farmland – Tom Hegan has many an overhead photo series. This one features shots of farms during winter.

<script type="text/javascript"> amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "solid0a-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Deals We Love"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "b4adc8c156a3487603c73acf50292eaa"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B006U0Z3BA,B00363PSEQ,B07HF226B4,B00339C3FA"; </script> <script src="http://z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>

Evergreen – New video from Leah Senior with a catchy 70s style riff and simple beat.

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</figure>

The post Friday Smackdown: The Machines Broke the Horizon appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at May 08, 2020 03:47 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Electrify Your Workflow

Product complexity places unique challenges on Engineering Teams, making the interaction between Mechanical and Electrical designers more critical than ever. New enhancements in SOLIDWORKS 2020 have taken the ECAD/MCAD collaboration to the next level, by providing an intelligent collaborative environment that allows these teams to significantly improve their workflows.

SOLIDWORKS 2020 3D Routing now enables users to update a flattened route while maintaining the associativity of drawing elements. This new routing enhancement speeds up the process of creating more realistic results while maintaining proper documentation. With the new ability to re-import electrical data, you’ll be able to maintain a high level of performance in your design iterations.

In the electronics industry, there’s an increasing demand for flexible circuit boards. Their popularity is in-part due to the fact that they save space and weight while reducing the need for interconnect wiring. With new support for Flexible PCBs in SOLIDWORKS 2020, designers can create innovative designs while maintaining strong collaboration between mechanical and electrical teams.

Flexible PCBs combine the capabilities of connectors, cables, and wires, eliminating the need for wire harnesses and speeding up the assembly process. It offers new design opportunities for engineers to fit and shape flexible PCBs into areas where no other design solution would work. Additionally, designers can fold and unfold the flexible PCB for an accurate board fit check. SOLIDWORKS PCB 2020 enables electrical and mechanical teams to seamlessly create, share, and collaborate flex design intent natively, eliminating the need for inaccurate paper mock-ups and expensive prototypes to check for board fit. Additional enhancements in SOLIDWORKS PCB 2020 make it easy to communicate fabrication requirements to the board manufacturer, reducing the risk inherent to inadequate documentation.

The collaboration of innovative designs between Electrical and Mechanical teams has never been easier. 3D routing ensures realistic representation of your design while maintaining accurate documentation. And flexible PCBs provide designers innovative tools to tackle the hardest design challenges, all while improving productivity at every stage of the design process.

Author information

Andrew Gross
Andrew Gross
Andrew is a Senior Territory Technical Manager at SOLIDWORKS, and lives in Los Angeles, CA. He has years of experience working with resellers and customers, and has a strong background in Engineering Simulation and Design Validation. More recently, Andrew has expanded his interest and passion into Industrial Design. Andrew holds a Master’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering from UCLA.

The post Electrify Your Workflow appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Andrew Gross at May 08, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Clean up your SOLIDWORKS Drawings with the Auto Arrange Dimensions Tool

A helpful SOLIDWORKS tool for organizing dimensions and annotations in a drawing is the Auto Arrange Dimensions tool. This can be activated several ways:

  • By selecting the tool from the Align Toolbar (enabled by right-clicking the CommandManager and selecting Align from the Toolbar drop-down menu).
  • Through Tools > Align.
  • By right-clicking a group of dimensions and selecting Align from the heads up menu.
  • Or by box-selecting a group of dimensions and selecting the tool from the Dimension Palette.

This is particularly helpful for organizing dimensions and annotations brought in as model items. In the drawing below, the sprocket has horizontal and vertical dimensions, circular pattern spacing callouts, fillet radii, and hole wizard callouts in their default placement after importing as model items.

Sprocket after importing model items

Sprocket after importing model items

We can use the Auto Arrange Dimensions tool and with one click organize the dimensions and annotations to make them more readable. The various tools on the Align Toolbar can also be used to organize balloon annotations.

Sprocket after using Auto Arrange Dimensions

Sprocket after using Auto Arrange Dimensions

The post Clean up your SOLIDWORKS Drawings with the Auto Arrange Dimensions Tool appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Julian Wolf at May 08, 2020 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

How I Used SOLIDWORKS to Design the Cars You’ve Seen in Movies

If you want to practice building empathy, a good way might be to imagine being the car from one of your favorite movies. Seriously – think about it. Take a second to recall the vehicle from one an action movie you might’ve seen lately. Sure, it might have its glossy moment (say, in the film poster advertising its release), looking all nice and shiny. But, at some point during the film, it might very well:

  •          Go zooming off of a cliff
  •          Explode into a fiery mess
  •          Get into a high-speed crash
  •          Have its windows busted in

Sometimes one of these things happens. Sometimes, all four happen. If you’re like me, this spurs many, many questions, such as:

  •          Does filming pause so the car can get repaired? If so, how long is production sidelined?
  •          Do you save all of the ‘bad’ (‘bad’ for the car, good for the viewers) scenes, where the car suffers extreme damage, for the end of shooting?
  •          Who exactly designs the cars we see in movies? What is that process like? How does a person even wind up doing such a thing?!

Before long, you realize: it would be nice to actually talk to someone who knows how all of this works. And thankfully, that’s something I got to do on a call very recently with Dave Clark of Dave Clark Designs. Dave’s worked on vehicle concepts/builds for movie franchises like Mission Impossible, Terminator, and Ready Player One. Surely, I thought: he could answer some of our questions!

Q: So Dave, how did you get into design in the first place? What’s your story?

A: For as long as I can remember, I’ve been able to draw. And my father was always hands on around the house – building extensions, knocking holes through walls, etc. He was never shy about picking up a drill and making stuff!

My uncle was very artistic, and he showed me the fundamentals of drawing one day. Perspective, vanishing points, drawing a face, working with symmetry. I was always sketching cars and buildings, and once I could draw a car, that was it. I’d go to my dad’s workshop and carve the wood into the shape of cars. Then I’d take it to the next level, trying to make go karts. Then, I tried to carve gears out of wood – get some rack and pinion action going on. And I continued on from there.

In school, I tended to struggle a bit. I found I was actually dyslexic, but things I was always good at as I grew up were metalwork, wood work, art, technology, and those sorts of things. Basically, things I could get hands on with.

Q: What about your early career? What kind of work did you wind up getting into when you were getting started?

A: I found a local company to work for in their lab. They made plastic moldings for the car industry. My dad encouraged me to get a job in their lab when I could because we knew they had a drawing office there. The idea was that since I wanted to get a job working in the drawing office, I might be able to get there easier if I started off in their laboratory. So, I did.

Literally, from day one, I badgered the drawing office manager to get me work there. The drawing office manager eventually got me in, but he required me to take a tool room apprenticeship. He said, “I’m not having anyone in the drawing office who can’t make what they design.”

I didn’t want to be a tool maker; I wanted to be a designer. But I spent three years in the tool room, learning how to lathe, mill, and all that – and looking back, it was the most precious time I’ve ever spent. I can make what I design. And when I draw, it helps to know how things are going to be made.

Q: I totally get it. Design for manufacturing is still a huge topic, even with different, newer manufacturing methods becoming more prevalent today. What was next for you after that apprenticeship?

A: I started with a company looking for service engineers at the time. I was out on the road servicing printing equipment, but they were also looking for people who could design new installations as well. I was doing surveys on production lines, designing equipment, installing it. I found myself having to modify out standard equipment to fit unusual circumstances.

This got picked up by the design office manager, who asked if I wanted to move over from the service role into design, since we had a need to design new products at the time. I had a knack for both sides, so I could come at the design of new products from the service engineer point of view, making them easier to use, service, and manufacture.

I also got to use my industrial design side since they wanted the newer products to stand out a bit more for exhibitions and so on. I spent 13 years with that company.

So, where did his desire to go freelance come from? How did Dave decide to make this big jump, ultimately?

After 13 years at the company described above, Dave “figured he’d done all he could do with that job.” Ultimately, he knew he wanted to be a freelance designer. The most logical path, prior to making the choice to give it a go full-time, seemed to be to work for as many different types of companies as he could to in order to see what he could do.

From there, Dave jumped over to the lighting industry, which is where he got a lot of exposure to 3D CAD. It was a bit of an adjustment from the drawing board he was accustomed to using. There was one feature that really got him hooked, however: Undo. He joked: “As soon as you discover the ‘Undo’ button, all’s forgiven.”

“There’d been a couple jobs that I wanted to go for that required SOLIDWORKS,” Dave remembers. “This company had just purchased SOLIDWORKS. I knew 3D was the way to go. With that, I learned SOLIDWORKS pretty well as I worked there in lighting over a three-year span.”

He made stops in a variety of other industries. Along the way: building retractable barriers for airports, making Maclaren baby buggies (making them, in his words, “light as a feather, and strong as an ox!”), and working at a design consultancy.

Eventually, he went at it alone. He got into freelance at first with a project he’d taken on from a friend of his. He knew he inevitably wanted to balance his freelance work (where he frequently did work for other companies using SOLIDWORKS), design his own furniture (tables, chairs, etc.), and his own vehicle sculptures – which is something he’s really gotten more into through today. It seemed to be a great meshing of his diverse ME/ID skillset.

“I really needed to design stuff that I liked,” Dave recalls.

Along the way, he “found a guy making replica Aston Martins” from ventures related to his sculpture work. He looked at Dave’s sculptures, and said, “I don’t want a sculpture, but are you any good at making full-sized cars?”

Dave did some work through this contact for a couple months, and got to know a certain vehicle mechanic over this time. A few years later, through these contacts, someone reached out to Dave and said “I have someone working with me here who’s recommended you as a designer. I work in the movie industry.”

From these connections through to today, Dave uses SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD and SOLIDWORKS Visualize to make not only the vehicle designs you see in movies, but the rough concepts and details you may or may not ever get to see. Visualize specifically comes in handy when conveying concepts to studio executives (instead of making several physical prototypes, which would be costly in terms of time, labor, and expense).

And with Dave’s industrial and mechanical backgrounds, he can not only make designs that look great, but designs that can assuredly be made practically using available manufacturing methods.

Q: I have to ask, Dave: what are some assumptions you had before getting into the film industry that have been dispelled during your work there?

A: I always assumed that if you saw one car in a movie, this was the one version of that car that was used. Really, it’s: if you build one, you build seven of the same thing. You have the ‘hero’ vehicle without a scratch, another one coming off the side of a building on a six-foot drop, one that rolls over, and one that explodes, for example. So, you’re building seven of everything – if not more.

I design them as if I’m spending my own money on them. On one film, the amount of people involved and length of filming is astronomical. A ten-minute chase scene can take four weeks to make. The level of detail we go to – we go down to really fine detail. For example, we’ll apply things like custom logos in a car that no one will ever see!

There’s moldings, fabrications, multiple materials, and ultimately, we have to engineer them – having all seven of these vehicles side by side. But this sort of work ticks every box for me. It’s sort of like the baby buggies I used to make. It has to look pretty, but the build of the cars and how they operate is quite complex.

Q: That’s an interesting parallel. What are some differences in usage consideration between the stunt cars you rapidly create for the film industry versus, for example, a daily driver someone would traditionally drive to work?

A: All of a sudden, with stunt cars, requirements can change. All of a sudden, you might hear ‘it needs to go backwards 18 mph.’ So now, we have to figure out how to achieve that when we didn’t expect to. And every day, you’re creating something that didn’t exist, so it’s really exciting.

Longevity is also a big difference in terms of considerations. With films, it has to be reliable, but it only has a certain lifespan. It doesn’t have to be indestructible. It’ll have to do a stunt 1-3 times, or we might know it is going to get destroyed in the first go-round. You’re not designing for thousands of units; you’re designing for seven or so.

When I designed lighting equipment, you might be designing for 250k units a year. So you have to be sure. And tolerances can be different.

Q: It sounds like there’s a very necessary confluence of both the thematic artistic considerations for these cars as well as mechanical function. How does the conceptualization process usually flow through you?

A: In the film industry, there is usually an art department for each film. You get a great picture from them- an artist’s impression, which is a drawing of what they want out of a vehicle. When you try to make what they’ve drawn work with the vehicle you’re modifying, what they’re thinking might not work with the vehicle specified. You have to keep in mind that you need a roll cage, a stunt driver with a helmet, protective gear, etc. to fit into these cars.

At times, I’ll go into SOLIDWORKS, knowing the vehicle we are building these stunt courses off of, and I’ll build a mock-up of the vehicle in a short time. I can then run it through Visualize. I’ll put it in a desert or on a highway scene, and it looks great.

That goes to the art director for approval, and we have a collaborative process where they might suggest things with an artist’s drawings and I can easily add it in 3D in SOLIDWORKS. SOLIDWORKS is so cool to use, for example, to make something so quickly that looks amazing – and to get several different looks at a concept.

In terms of his film work: what’s Dave up to next? One of the next films Dave’s done work on, Infinite (starring Mark Wahlberg), is due for release in 2021. And, if you’re into cars whatsoever – or know someone who is – I absolutely implore you to check out Dave’s awesome 3D sculptures. I’ve included some examples here, and you can contact him via his website to learn how to get one of your own!

Author information

Sean O'Neill
Sean O'Neill
I'm a Community & User Advocacy Manager here at SOLIDWORKS. As a longtime SOLIDWORKS user myself, I love meeting with users and hearing about all the interesting things they're doing in the SOLIDWORKS community!

The post How I Used SOLIDWORKS to Design the Cars You’ve Seen in Movies appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Sean O'Neill at May 08, 2020 12:00 PM

SolidSmack

VELO3D Announces Unusual Aluminum Metal Material

VELO3D announced the availability of a new alloy of aluminum for use in their Sapphire series of metal 3D printers.

The California company has been quietly developing new materials for the Sapphire system, which recently gained a new, tall option. The stretch version of the Sapphire 3D printer sports a 1m tall build volume, and can 3D print any of VELO3D’s support metal materials. We’ll have some thoughts about that machine in a future post, but before we can get to that they’ve already announced a new material, Aluminum F357.

Anodized Aluminum

Aluminum is available in a number of alloys for 3D printing, but the most frequently used aluminum powder has been AlSi10Mg. However, VELO3D’s Aluminum F357 offers some different properties. One of the most notable is that it can be anodized.

Anodization is the process of building up an oxide layer on the surface of a metal part. This is quite useful for protecting the metal from corrosion or providing a better surface for painting. Anodizing using dyes can also provide a baked-in color surface that we’ve all seen on metal objects.

Aluminum F357 apparently also shares some properties with Aluminum A356. A356 is a well-known casting alloy that provides great strength. The material is also known for its weldability. The increased strength allows it to undergo delicate machining, and thus it is commonly used in aerospace for the production of critical components.

Why Aluminum F357?

That last reason is why I think VELO3D pursued this particular material. The company has the habit of taking simple steps that open up large markets, and this could definitely be one of them. As I’ve said before, many manufacturers will not consider buying equipment unless it can 3D print the specific material they require. Thus, by adding this material it’s possible VELO3D has just gained a ton of good prospects for not only the material but Sapphire 3D printers.

From this I expect to see two things happen: VELO3D will sell more Sapphire 3D printers, and secondly VELO3D will no doubt announce even more interesting materials for yet more new markets.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post VELO3D Announces Unusual Aluminum Metal Material appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at May 08, 2020 03:46 AM

May 07, 2020

EngineersRule.com: Boundary vs Loft

For anyone who’s interested, EngineersRule.com just published an article on Boundary vs Loft that I wrote. In the article I plunge the depths of comparison between the two. I even…

by matt at May 07, 2020 08:39 PM

SolidSmack

MAINGEAR Pro WS Workstations Bring Big Power to 3D Professionals

Maingear Pro WS

Designers, artists, and 3D professionals across different industries know there’s nothing better than a powerful computer that cuts through your processes like warm butter. Whether it’s 3D CAD, animation, video production, or complex simulations, a computer with hardware and software tailored to the work you do makes work life that much better. And that’s MAINGEAR’s focus.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Maingear Pro WS</figure>

This week, they announced its newest high-performance computer build, the Pro WS Workstation – a desktop tower that comes in either pre-configured or customizable flavors allowing you to optimize your rig for your software needs.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Maingear Pro WS</figure>

CPU options abound and bring huge power with Intel Core i9 8-core and 18-core options or AMD Ryzen 16-core or Threadripper 64-core options. Graphics cards include options for up to 4x NVIDIA Titan RTX or NVIDIA Quadro RTX, or 4x AMD Radeon or Radeon Pro GPUs.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Maingear Pro WS</figure>

Other options include up to 256GB of internal memory and 72TB of storage space on either m.2 or HDD configurations. There are both air-cooled and closed/open loop liquid cooling options and yes, they can even apply your logo or custom graphic to the side.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Maingear Pro WS</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">Maingear Pro WS</figure>

The customization options and ability to pick through them on the Maingear website is laid out well, but if you want a pre-configured system for certain applications, they have those available too. MAINGEAR has worked with application developers and currently has Pro WS workstations available for KeyShot, Adobe Creative Cloud apps Photoshop, Lightroom, and Premiere, and DaVinci Resolve.

AMD systems starting at $1999 can be configured here and Intel systems starting at $2233 can be configured here. You can check the full specs list of the Pro WS workstation on the Maingear webpage.

The post MAINGEAR Pro WS Workstations Bring Big Power to 3D Professionals appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at May 07, 2020 07:13 PM

2020 Trend to Watch: Hand Tracking – Hand Physics Lab

Hand Physics Lab Oculus Quest VR 2020

Using your hands in VR can often feel like using two clubs to eat a sandwich. Though the past decade gave us a glimpse into motion/hand tracking, it’s really only recently that it has had a jump in accuracy and functionality.

Dennys Kuhnert, Co-founder and COO of Holonautic, a Swiss VR experience and game maker, has shared a new project demonstrating where we’re at with the technology and some potential applications.

Hand Physics Lab is a project that pushes the limits of hand tracking, combining it with physics to provide a more life-like VR experience. Dennys has shared several tweets previewing the interaction physics of virtual objects.

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</figure>

And then there’s this…

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<script async="async" charset="utf-8" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js"></script>
</figure>

According to Dennys, the app uses the Oculus Quest hand tracking technology released earlier this year. This hand tracking uses deep neural networks that use a combination of deep learning and model-based tracking (as opposed to depth-sensing technology or sensor-laden gloves) that construct a 26 degree-of-freedom, 3-dimensional representation of a fully-articulating hand.

The Hand Physics Lab builds on the experience in Holonautic’s first physics-based game Holoception that allows you to venture scenes battling cartoon stick minions and machines bent on wreaking havoc. It’s your job to take them out in a Matrix-like VR environment.

The Hand Physics Lab project is currently in pre-launch and will go live on SideQuestVR at the end of this week. You can follow along for updates about the project on the Hand Physics Lab Twitter account. And, for those interested, there’s an Immersive Interaction Design Masterclass taught by the Holonautic’s team new available at XR Bootcamp.

The post 2020 Trend to Watch: Hand Tracking – Hand Physics Lab appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at May 07, 2020 06:18 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Best selection of sketch projection tools in SOLIDWORKS

There are 3 main tools that can project our 2D sketch onto a face: Project curve, Split line and Wrap. How should we choose and what is the difference between them? Here are some tips for you.

Project curve – For Sketch on faces projection type, it can generate a 3D curve on the projection faces from a 2D sketch. It is the most flexible feature that can work with any sketches and faces, but it cannot split the faces like the other two. It is a great tool for a sweep path.

Split line – For projection type, it can isolate a region from the sketch by dividing the original face. The sketch can be very flexible, it just needs to be able to create or divide the projection face, so it could be an open contour or even a single line only. It is usually used for appearance and decals.

 

 

 

 

Wrap – Wrap is like the stickers, the only feature that not just projecting the sketch onto the face, but truly surround the face and create geometry. The Analytical method preserves legacy behaviour and wrap completely around a cylinder or cone; The Spline surface allows wrap on any face type.

The below chart is the key features between each tool.

Project curve

Split line

Wrap

Projection face type

Any

Any

Analytical: cylinder
and cone only

Spline surface: any

Sketch limitation

No

Able to create a
split face

Close contour within
the projected face

Projected size

Adjust with face

Adjust with face

Fixed with sketch

Result

3D curve

Split faces

Emboss, Deboss or
Scribe

Main usage

Sweep path,
reference

Apply appearance,
decals

Create geometry, fixed
sketch size, fully around the face

Hope the information could help you understand these sketch projection tools more and select your suitable modelling tools.

Written by Marco Yam, Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.

Author information

Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.
Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.
Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd.

The post Best selection of sketch projection tools in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Intelligent CAD/CAM Technology Ltd. at May 07, 2020 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

An Electrical Engineer Using Sheet Metal?

As an electrical engineer, I typically stick to designing detailed schematics or tweaking my wire and cable routes. Because of this, there really hasn’t been a need for me to dive into some of the really awesome features that SOLIDWORKS has to offer. I usually leave those features to my more mechanically inclined teammates.

However, this time I decided to dabble in something I’ve never tried before: Sheet Metal. I recently started working on a new project that required me to design a custom electrical enclosure. To my surprise it was actually really easy to use. I extruded a box, I converted it to sheet metal, and voila, I had my first sheet metal part!

I was happy with my first attempt, but it wasn’t really what I wanted. If I tried to have this part made in the real world, every machine shop would have laughed at me and told me to try again.

 

On my second attempt, I extruded a sketch again, but instead I simply made a flat sheet. I decided to try the Edge Flange command instead. THIS is what I really wanted. Now I was able to design the four sides to the enclosure. After only a couple more clicks using the same Edge Flange command, I had my enclosure!

In order to dial-in this new part, I used the Corners command to clean up all the sharp edges, I added some vents on the sidewalls for air flow, and also included some through-holes for cable glands and screws. If I say so myself, this is coming together nicely for someone who has never touched Sheet Metal features before!

 

My favorite feature is yet to come! I still can’t send the completed box to my local machine shop – they will still just laugh at me. Therefore, the Flatten command helps to complete the package by giving me the ability to create a flattened view of the enclosure. This flat image can now be added to a drawing that includes all the dimensions, call-outs and notes they require to get this project accepted, completed on time, while also keeping my overall design time in check.

Once the enclosure is complete, it’s on to the next task. We need to insert components within the assembly, work with SOLIDWORKS PCB for placement of the circuit board, and even routing our wires that are connected directly to our electrical schematics.

Even though I had fun designing this enclosure using Sheet Metal, the Electrical world is where I belong.

 

 

Come join the SOLIDWORKS ECAD team as we continue to design our Frozen Drink Dispenser during our Town Hall series where we explore the collaborative and intelligent features that help us design more efficiently.

DESIGN, ANALYSIS, and FINALIZING DOCUMENTATION, 1:00 PM to 2:00 EDT, May 19th, 2020. Click here to register.

 

Author information

JP Emanuele
JP Emanuele
JP is a Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, North America.

The post An Electrical Engineer Using Sheet Metal? appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by JP Emanuele at May 07, 2020 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Creating Custom Mill Tools and Holders in SOLIDWORKS CAM

SOLIDWORKS CAM comes with many predefined standard milling tools to help us make short work of our projects. In the event you find yourself having to use something specialized, a custom tool can be added to your SOLIDWORKS CAM TechDB.

If you have not created standard tools in SOLIDWORKS CAM, please click on the link and review before proceeding.

Create the custom tool with SOLIDWORKS modeling tools

First, we start with a sketch of our tool or holder. The sketch must be on the front plane in +X and +Y directions with the tool tip coincident with the origin. Whether the sketch is created by you or it is imported from your tool vendor, it must conform to these conditions. For this example, we will create the custom milling tool shown below.

Custom milling tool

Custom milling tool

Create a Revolve of the sketch.

Revolve of the sketch

Revolve of the sketch

Save to the SOLIDWORKS CAM TechDB

Save the model by going to Tools > SOLIDWORKS CAM > User Defined Tools and Holders. Under File Type, select Mill Tool (.mt) or Mill Holder (.mh), then hit Browse to save the file in a safe place.

Save as a Mill Tool (.mt) or Mill Holder (.mh)

Save as a Mill Tool (.mt) or Mill Holder (.mh)

Next, we need to open the TechDB, Tools > SOLIDWORKS CAM > Technology Database and select User Defined Tools. We will cover tools first then holders as the process is very similar.

SOLIDWORKS CAM User Defined Tools

SOLIDWORKS CAM User Defined Tools

In order to add our tool, we will need to copy an existing entry and change the values. Select id 11 and hit Copy, id 12 will be created for us to edit with our tool information. Be sure to link the model (.mt file) saved in the previous step.

Copy an existing entry and change the values

Copy an existing entry and change the values

If we roll down, specific cutting parameters for the tool can be entered. Always remember to hit Save when done.

Cutting parameters

Cutting parameters

For Holders, select Tools > SOLIDWORKS CAM > Technology Database and pick Holders.

SOLIDWORKS CAM holders

SOLIDWORKS CAM holders

Again, we will need to copy an existing entry and change the values. Select id 31 and hit copy, id 32 will be created for us to edit with our holder information. Be sure to link the model (.mh file) saved from the previous step. Always remember to hit Save when done.

Copy an existing entry again

Copy an existing entry again

Now your custom tool and/or holder are added for use in your milling projects.

Take a SOLIDWORKS CAM Online training course

Learn more about CNC programming in our SOLIDWORKS CAM Standard and SOLIDWORKS CAM Professional courses.

The post Creating Custom Mill Tools and Holders in SOLIDWORKS CAM appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Shawn McEachern at May 07, 2020 12:00 PM

May 06, 2020

SolidSmack

Japanese Mom Makes Her 4-Year-Old Son A Cardboard Laptop

cardboard laptop

Weeks-long isolation brings out the creative juices in us all, but for Japanese Twitter user and cardboard enthusiast koshiyoda, she’s using her powers for one of the most important people in her life: her son.

Yes, A Cardboard Laptop

After seeing his older brother (who is in junior high school) take part in an online class using his laptop, the young boy went to his mom and asked for a computer of his very own. Now, seeing as a real laptop would be a bit costly, koshiyoda opted to MAKE her son a laptop… from cardboard.

But if you thought it was a glue and corrugated paper mess, you’re in for a lil’ bit of a surprise. Though she doesn’t provide a lot of details about how she made it, she provides a lot of images of the highly detailed, yet simple completion that may serve as some inspiration for your own papercraft laptop.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cardboard laptop<figcaption>image source: koshiyoda</figcaption></figure>

According to IT Media, koshiyoda made the laptop over the course of five days and worked a grand total of four hours. Using corrugated boards of varying thickness (3 mm, 1.5 mm, and 0.9 mm boards, to be exact), she made sure each part looks just like the real deal.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cardboard laptop<figcaption>image source: koshiyoda</figcaption></figure>

For the cardboard MacBook screen, she added a slit on the side which allows a sheet of paper to be added, so her son can draw directly on the screen. Once he finishes a masterpiece, he can simply slide the paper out and fit the screen with a clean sheet.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cardboard laptop<figcaption>image source: koshiyoda</figcaption></figure>

Instead of an Apple logo, koshiyoda added her own, and may we say classier, strawberry logo design.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">cardboard laptop<figcaption>image source: koshiyoda</figcaption></figure>

The details of this cardboard laptop really lie in the bottom half, where the keyboard and the touchpad are found. Koshiyoda cut and glued individual cardboard keypads to give it an accurate look and feel.

Speaking of the keys, just look at how each one was carefully measured, cut, and glued onto the body. Heck, even both the English and Japanese characters on the keys were painstakingly handwritten. It just goes to show how much love and care koshiyoda put into something simple her son will cherish.

You can find more of koshiyoda’s cardboard works on Twitter and on her blog.

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The post Japanese Mom Makes Her 4-Year-Old Son A Cardboard Laptop appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at May 06, 2020 10:03 PM

The Javelin Blog

Save time detailing bodies in SOLIDWORKS with Relative To Model view!

So you’ve got a multibody part, such as a weldment or other non-welded design (doesn’t even need to use Weldment tools) in SOLIDWORKS, and it’s time to detail each body as it would appear before being welded or assembled.  With assemblies, common practice is to detail each component part in its own drawing view.  But when all of the bits and pieces are contained in the same part (hence the term “multibody”), then we need another solution.  There are several, such as hiding bodies in View Properties, or creating Display States in the model (to be later selected in the drawing view properties).  But perhaps the simplest, easiest, and most user-friendly method for multibody parts is the Relative To Model view, otherwise known as Relative view.

Before you begin, you’ll need a multibody part, and a drawing in which to detail the bodies.

How it works:

  1. Open the part (this can simplify the workflow) and the drawing.
  2. From the drawing, Insert > Drawing View > Relative To Model > choose the model when prompted, or follow the instructions in yellow.

    Create a Relative View

    Create a Relative View

  3. Switch to the model if not already there (Ctrl+Tab is great for switching back and forth).  Notice that the left taskpane is activated (that’s due to the Relative To Model command) to show what is perhaps the coolest part: how you want the body to be oriented on the sheet!

    Orient the piece as it would appear on the drawing

    The left taskpane is ready for selections to orient the piece as it would appear on the drawing

  4. Select the body(s) you want in the view, and pick faces or planes that define which side is up, or front, etc.  Let’s say I want the cross-bracing to be horizontal on the sheet.  I’ll make selections for front and top (blue and pink, respectively) and click OK.  This takes me back to the drawing.

    The colour tags are used to track which body(s) to include in the view

    The colour tags are used to track which body(s) to include in the view, and which entities define the orientation

  5. Click on the drawing sheet to place the view.  Et voila!  It should appear exactly per those face selections in the model.  Note that you can detail sub-weldments this way.  Most or all of the size information will be included in the Weldment Cut List table.

    Member shown in drawing

    Member shown with tangent edges hidden (of the rounded corners) and hidden lines visible (HVL) Display Style, in order to show the inner walls, denoting a hollow tube.  Alternately, can project a view that looks through the tube.

  6. Marvel at how much time you could have saved, had you known about this sooner!

Attend our SOLIDWORKS Weldments LIVE Online training course to learn more multibody modeling techniques in SOLIDWORKS!

The post Save time detailing bodies in SOLIDWORKS with Relative To Model view! appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWE at May 06, 2020 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

The Easy Way to Work from Home with your SOLIDWORKS Team

The current situation with COVID-19 necessitates working from home for many engineers. SOLIDWORKS® has tools at your disposal, right now, that will help you share, review, annotate, and validate designs with your engineering team from the comfort of your home office. And it is quick and easy to setup.

The Collaborative Business Innovator, which resides on the cloud-based 3DEXPERIENCE® platform, has the necessary apps to get the job done conveniently from your home office—just think of the apps as functionality—to make it happen. The below example shows you the basics of how to set up a collaborative environment for you and your team to review a model.

Create a Dashboard
This is where you manage and view all the information captured in your (project) communities.

Create New Community and Add Members
Create a new community with the 3DSwym app and give it a name such as Model Design Review & Validation community. Invite co-workers (“Members”) to join your community. Because you are working from the cloud, all information is shared in real-time. Send a message (“Post”) to your community and give them a heads up regarding the model review project.

Create a New Tab for Model Review
Use the 3DDrive app to upload the files and share it with your team members for model design review

Review CAD Model and Fix Issues
Use the 3DPlay app to review, mark, comment, and measure the file and, if you discover issues, let your team know what is going on and assign a task to fix the problems.

 

Modify CAD Model in SOLIDWORKS

Utilize 3DDrive connector for SOLIDWORKS to open CAD files directly from the SOLIDWORKS task pane to make necessary changes.

Because the Collaborative Business Innovator is on the cloud-based 3DEXPERIENCE platform, there is no need to get your IT department involved to set up a VPN connection or supply new software or deal with hardware issues.

The co-workers you invite into the Model Design Review & Validation community simply click on a link to get involved in the project. It’s that easy.

More About the Apps (functionality)

3DSwym is where everyone comes together as a team on one common platform to share information in real-time. You can make posts, discuss projects, create tasks, ask questions, and more.

3DDrive is fully integrated with SOLIDWORKS; it enables you to keep your files in a single location on the cloud and securely share them. You can even allow vendors to access data for review and download in a secure environment. And it auto-synchs to Windows.

3DPlay enables you to interrogate the models—zoom, rotate, take measurements—and make comments. Publish your design directly from 3DPlay to your community for feedback on your design.

3DSearch enables search through any metadata or files stored in the platform. You can easily search for data on the platform using the 6WTags filter.

By leveraging the Collaborative Business Innovator,you can start working from home as a team today. Because everyone works from a common platform, all communications, changes, and tasks are captured in every project—kind of like a built-in audit trail.

If you have further questions, please contact your local reseller. And, please feel free to share your comments below.

Author information

Salih Alani
Salih Alani
Graduate of the University of Technology , Iraq - Baghdad with BS in Mechanical Engineering , graduate of Northeastern University with a Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering, specializing in mechanics and design - 6+ Years in SOLIDWORKS ®Technical Support team - Focused on core SOLIDWORKS , DraftSight , licensing (Online Licensing), Lead Technical Support of 3D CONTENTCENTRAL® , Technical Support Account Manager for Enterprise Subscription Services (ESS) customer account and lead organizer for VAR Performance Tuning Workshop in Dassault Systemes Waltham - Certifications: - 3DEXPERIENCE® Platform Explorer – Associate - CSWA, CSWP, CSWP-Drawing Tools, CSWP-Weldment, CSWP-Sheet Metal

The post The Easy Way to Work from Home with your SOLIDWORKS Team appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Salih Alani at May 06, 2020 12:00 PM

May 05, 2020

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Learn the Value of Simulation in our Webinar Series

Last month, we officially kicked off the SOLIDWORKS Simulation and SIMULIAworks webinar series. We are excited to bring this educational and awareness event to you. The webinars are broken down into two major themes:

Theme # 1 – The Value of Simulation / Which Design is the best?

Part 1: “Driving Design Decisions using SOLIDWORKS Simulation” is focused on answering the fundamental question:

How can SOLIDWORKS Simulation help drive your design decision-making process?

The webinar specifically provides a high-level overview of Why, What, When & How of Simulation?  Design cases such as the example below are used to illustrate how as a SOLIDWORKS user, you can leverage the integrated design and simulation approach to making better and informed design decisions.

Click here to watch the recording of this webinar for complete details.

You can also register now for any or all of the upcoming webinars:

May 6th: Got Moving Parts? Motion Simulation can help! click here
May 20th: Using CFD to Drive Product Performance click here
June 3rd: Can Your Plastics Part be Manufactured? click here

Theme # 2 – Improving Productivity using SOLIDWORKS Simulation

Part 1: “2D Analysis Versus 3D Analysis – Who Wins?” is summarized below.

Everything in the world is 3D of course, but some simulations lend themselves to a 2D analysis, depending on the study type, geometry, loads and constraints. In Finite Element Analysis (FEA), we talk about Axisymmetric, Plane Stress and Plane Strain problems (see image below for examples). . If the study qualifies, the advantage of a 2D analysis over 3D in these cases is a faster solution time with an even higher accuracy if you use a finer mesh. In this webinar, you will see the requirements and benefits of 2D analysis, and how to setup a SOLIDWORKS Simulation study using 2D Simplification. A quick technical tip and a few industry examples are also discussed towards the end of this webinar presentation.

Click here to watch the recording of this webinar for complete details.

You can also register now for any or all of the upcoming webinars.

May 6th: Making the Right Decisions – FEA vs. CFD click here
May 20th: Addressing Vibration Issues – Statics vs. Dynamics click here
June 3rd: Large Assembly Analysis Made Easy click here
June 17th: Topology Optimization – Exploring the AM Space click here

 

 

 

Author information

Ramesh Lakshmipathy
Ramesh Lakshmipathy
Senior Territory Technical Manager at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post Learn the Value of Simulation in our Webinar Series appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Ramesh Lakshmipathy at May 05, 2020 08:38 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Cloud Design Tools on 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS Platform

Recently you may have been hearing more about 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS for SOLIDWORKS users and discovering that there are new SOLIDWORKS design tools available on the cloud. With COVID-19 forcing us to work from home this is probably a good time to start researching and testing the new cloud apps that have come onto the market from DS SolidWorks. Before I discuss these new apps I’ll give you an outline of what 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS actually is…

What is 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS?

3DEXPERIENCE WORKS is a family of solutions connected to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform that work together to help you innovate and accelerate every aspect of your product development process. It encompasses the SOLIDWORKS portfolio of design solutions, SIMULIAWORKS portfolio of simulation solutions, DELMIAWORKS manufacturing solution, and ENOVIAWORKS portfolio of product data and lifecycle management solutions. 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS essentially extends SOLIDWORKS to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform allowing you to solve your product design problems faster.

The main reason for adopting 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS is to unite your entire organization from design and manufacturing to service and marketing under one collaborative, interactive environment in the cloud. Where you can leverage everyone’s data, knowledge and know how on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform and collaborate with teams and solutions.

3DEXPERIENCE Design Roles from SOLIDWORKS

Within 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS are different roles which you obtain with a subscription fee. A role can be purchased as a Quarterly Service Contract (QSC) or as a Yearly Service Contract (YSC). Within a role are various apps for getting your job done, such as the SOLIDWORKS xDesign Modeler. Roles are separated into four general categorizes for SOLIDWORKS users who want to Design, Simulate, Manage or Manufacture.  The Design roles that are currently available are:

You can learn more about the roles and apps in the following on-demand webinar, and there is more information further down in this post:

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3D Creator (SOLIDWORKS xDesign App)

The 3D Creator role is ideal for the early stages of the design process, and situations where you do not need the breadth and depth of SOLIDWORKS desktop software. Because it’s on the cloud you will find it useful for situations where a CAD workstation may not be available. 3D Creator is a parametric modeler where you create parts and assemblies in a very similar way to using SOLIDWORKS.

3D Creator is designed for companies that:

  • Have field engineers with lightweight computing devices
  • Perform design work across multiple sites
  • Do a lot of concept / prototype design
  • Have design needs on the shop floor
  • Need to collaborate with multiple stakeholders
SOLIDWORKS Cloud 3D Creator

SOLIDWORKS Cloud 3D Creator

3D Sculptor (SOLIDWORKS xShape App)

3D Sculptor is the perfect role for creating complex surfaces and organic looking shapes. 3D Sculptor is specifically for Designers and Engineers, who are constrained by parametric surface modeling, or rely on disconnected specialist modeling tools.

3D Sculptor is ideal for companies that:

  • Create shapes and surfaces for industrial design
  • Use point solutions for industrial design
  • Transfer file across industrial and mechanical design domains
  • Perform design works across multiple sites
  • Do a lot of concept / prototype design
  • Need to collaborate with multiple stakeholders
3DEXPERIENCE 3D Sculptor Role

3DEXPERIENCE 3D Sculptor Role

Collaborative Business Innovator and Collaborative Industry Innovator

Collaborative Industry and Business Innovator provides apps and services that connect all users in the industry value chain together – to organize, manage and collaborate on content in real-time and in a secured manner. The role includes a single repository to store, share and manage content, search and find relevant data and information, navigate through a product data set, easily view and compare 3D content.

The Collaborative Industry Innovator role is based upon a common data model for design / engineering, manufacturing / production and simulation processes. Its online environment helps medium to large companies bring more innovative products to market faster.

Business Industry Innovation Role

Collaborative Industry Innovation Role

Connect to SOLIDWORKS Desktop

The great thing about the 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS cloud apps is you can connect them to your existing SOLIDWORKS desktop experience. Integrate directly in SOLIDWORKS with the 3DEXPERIENCE Desktop Add-in allows you to access all of your information from the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform right from within SOLIDWORKS. This workflow allows you to combine the power of SOLIDWORKS to quickly create and edit your engineering designs, with the collaborative features of the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform.

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Add-in

3DEXPERIENCE SOLIDWORKS Add-in

Learning how to use the new Design Roles and Apps

A quick and easy way to learn how to use these new Design Roles and Apps is through MySolidWorks. There are a number of new 3DEXPERIENCE learning paths available which group together tutorial videos to help you get started quickly.

3D Sculptor Training

3D Sculptor Training

3DEXPERIENCE Design Apps Promotion

Just one other thing to mention, for a limited time we are offering a 50% discount on 3DEXPERIENCE Design Apps to enable your SOLIDWORKS Design Team to 3D model and collaborate on the Cloud. You can learn more about the promotion on our website, and contact us to get pricing and more details.

The post SOLIDWORKS Cloud Design Tools on 3DEXPERIENCE WORKS Platform appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at May 05, 2020 07:43 PM

SolidSmack

AR Cut & Paste Is the Kick in the Rear 3D Capture Needs

AR Cut and Paste Cyril Diagne

The practical uses of AR/VR are becoming more apparent every day, especially for design and engineering, where we’re able to design in VR or collaborate in AR. What if you boil it down even further and mix common computer actions with common AR needs? Scan/Capture + Copy/Paste?

Cyril Diagne is a french digital interaction artist who just demonstrated one example of what that may look like with a video and example code that allows you to scan and capture everyday objects with your mobile phone camera and paste them into documents or image editing software.

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If it seems like an obvious use case, Cyril isn’t the only one thinking of it. Matthieu Rouif, Co-founder of Photoroom app, quickly shared how they’re taking the idea and adding more product showcase and image editing/authoring aspects.

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At first, it seems like a bit of a novelty — scan/capture then copy/paste an object. Big deal, right? But the implications for where this works into design and engineering are big, especially when you consider the conversion of that object to usable 3D data. Suddenly, you’ve gone from fun, little image collages to designing in, around, or using objects you didn’t have in your software seconds earlier. There’s a gap in many cases with 3D workflows between desktop and mobile or AR/VR and workstation – we’re either in one or the other, rarely working seamlessly between the two. The ones to watch are those making this seamless, often by just bridging processes with the practical simplicity we take for granted as we computer around everyday.

You can follow Cyril Diagne on and Matthieu Rouif on Twitter for their latest. Cyril has made his AR Cut & Paste code available on Github.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large"></figure>

The post AR Cut & Paste Is the Kick in the Rear 3D Capture Needs appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at May 05, 2020 04:03 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

Pinata Sweet Jar – Part 1 – Tutorial

In part 1 of this 2-part SOLIDWORKS Tutorial you will learn how to create the body of a Pinata. This involves the use of DXF files, lofts with guides, boundary boss, move/copy bodies and the combine tool. Part 2 of the tutorial involves shelling the model to turn it into a 2-part jar, and applying decals. The DXF file used in this tutorial is available to download here.. By the end of part 1 of the tutorial you will have the main body of the Pinata created ready for part 2.

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The neck of the Pinata is created using a guide DXF file which shows you where to add planes to create loft profiles, but also acts as guide curves for the lofting feature. The guides were created in a vector based programe, exported as a DXF and imported into SOLIDWORKS. If you draw a dashed line in the vector software, they will come in as a center-line guide sketch. Six new planes were added along the DXF sketch centre-lines, these were used to draw the lofting profiles.

The outer sketch curves were used as guide curves with the loft. Guide curves can be very useful in achieving the exact profile from your loft profiles.

Boundary boss was used to create the Pinatas ears, and again a guide curve was used created with a 3D sketch to inform the boundary on what path to follow joining the two faces. The boundary boss can be very useful joining up two touching sketch profiles along a guide.

The Pinata tail was created using a flexed boss extruded body, it was copied and moved into place, Several copies were made, and mirrored mid plane so that the tail was symmetric. Move/Copy Bodies allows you to copy, move and rotate or even mate bodies into place, it is very precise, and gives you full control of the placement of multiple bodies.

The tail copies were combined to the Pinata body to become one body, all edges and joins were filleted. With the Pinata complete, watch Part 2 to see how the jar is shelled, the lid fixture is formed, and decals are applied.

Author information

Jade Crompton
I am a 3D Designer and Solidworks Blog Contributor from the UK. I am a self taught Solidworks user, and have been using it to inform and create my designs since 2012. I specialise in the design of Ceramics, Home Accessories and Wooden Toy Design.

The post Pinata Sweet Jar – Part 1 – Tutorial appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by Jade Crompton at May 05, 2020 03:00 PM

SolidSmack

MagnetCubes Are Beautifully Designed Marble Coaster Action

MagnetCubes

It’s hard to take a break between long computer sessions, whether it’s because you’re “in the zone”, finishing a personal project or slammin’ pixels for project deadline. But with MagnetCubes, I think we’ll find ways to jump off the computer an hour or five for some good ol’ fashion play.

MagnetCubes Modular Magnetic Blocks

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</figure>

To put it simply, MagnetCubes are a series of stackable magnetic blocks with a variety of connectable tracks. First, you create the transparent cube structure of your dreams, then you snap the red marble tracks through or around the cubes to make your own little marble coaster.

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</figure>

Your marble coaster may consist of a one-way track, as many loop-de-loops as (in)humanely possible, or even an infinitely looping track with a magnet launcher. No matter what you make, you won’t know how it performs until you plop that first marble on the track.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">MagnetCubes</figure>

The best part about MagnetCubes is that, even with their rigid scaffold-like design, the cubes are completely transparent, and allow you to see the marbles as they traverse your meticulously built coaster design of doom.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large is-resized">MagnetCubes</figure>

The contrasting transparent cubes and red track are beautifully designed, almost elegant it their form and simplicity. It can be just as much center piece as it play piece, just as much party game for adult as it is construction kit for kids.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">MagnetCubes</figure>

While MagnetCubes was designed to teach children basic science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) principles, they also serve as a great way for adults to go analog; to relax and build something off a computer or tablet, or as a tool of sorts to simply get the creative juices flowing.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">MagnetCubes</figure>

Unlike a stress ball or a Newton’s cradle, however, MagnetCubes take up a bit more space on your desk. But, they’re modular and able to go anywhere, like the kitchen countertop, the coffee table, atop the fridge, around the plants, through the bookshelf… I think you get the idea now.

<figure class="aligncenter size-large">MagnetCubes</figure>

The variation, the design, the diversion from our digital overlords… we love it. Other folks seem to as well, with a Kickstarter goal of $10,000 that has been blown past and currenlt nearing the $250,000 mark.

There are a variety of MagnetCube options available from a 64-cube starter pack for $35 to 1536-cube mega pack for $792 with variation of straight tracks, quarter-turn, loop, top-hill, downhill, launchers and marbles. They’re currently going into their second trial production with shipment and delivery to happen July 2020.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"></figure>

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

The post MagnetCubes Are Beautifully Designed Marble Coaster Action appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at May 05, 2020 01:03 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Learn How to Improve Productivity with Simulation

What drives innovation? Today, millions of engineering companies around the world use simulation software to drive innovation based on reliable and accurate results. At SOLIDWORKS, we have several simulation solutions, tools and features to cater to all the various industries and applications. Given the variety of methods to run and solve analyses, it is crucial to know which tool is right for the job.

For example, let’s consider two circular plates compressing an O-ring to create a seal.

 

An O-ring is typically made from rubber material. A nonlinear analysis would be the appropriate simulation to simulation the O-ring compression accurately.

Given that the assembly is circular symmetry (axi-symmetry) model, we can use 2D Simplification to solve this analysis much faster compared to solving the analysis on the entire 3D part.

Once 2D profile is selected, SOLIDWORKS Simulation will automatically create it for the analysis. Here, a translation is applied to the edge of the top plate to ensure both plates coincide to compress the O-ring.

For the results, we can view the stress plot and contact pressure between the O-ring and the plates. These results will help us determine if this O-ring compression will give us a full seal for operational use Furthermore,  this results will help use evaluate the best way to keep the two plates together given the high pressure internally.

 

Let’s consider another example. A compact electronic product would typically require a thermal analysis to avoid overheating. Both SOLIDWORKS Simulation and Flow Simulation are capable of simulating conduction and convection, but why pick one over the other?

To find out, join us for our simulation-focused webinar series on Improving Productivity. This webinar series will cover topics like 2D Simplification in detail, FEA vs CFD, Static vs Dynamics, Large Assembly analysis and simulation for 3D-printed parts.

Whether you’re seasoned expert or a beginner, you are bound to learn something new in this webinar series to improve your productivity for simulation.

If you would like to learn more about SOLIDWORKS Simulation prior to the webinars, check out this short video link

You can register now for any or all of the upcoming webinars:

May 6th: Making the Right Decisions – FEA Versus CFD Click here to register

May 20th: Addressing Vibration Issues – Static Versus Dynamics Click here to register

June 3rd: Large Assembly Analysis Made Easy – Click here to register

June 17th: Topology Optimization – Exploring the AM Space Click here to register 

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Learn How to Improve Productivity with Simulation appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by SOLIDWORKS at May 05, 2020 12:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Changing the Direction of a Beam in SOLIDWORKS Simulation

When you model a beam in SOLIDWORKS, you can set up the cross section to align with the default coordinate system. The contrived beam shown below was modeled with the bottom face parallel to the x axis:

Beam profile

Beam profile

If a simulation study is created and the beam is modeled using beam elements, SOLIDWORKS Simulation will automatically create a local coordinate system for the beam based on its cross section. The forces and stresses will be reported relative to this coordinate system. We can view this coordinate system by right-clicking on the component in the Feature Tree and selecting “Edit Definition”. This will bring up the “Apply/Edit Beam” Property Manager which contains a checkbox to “Show beam direction”.

Show beam direction

Show beam direction

As we can see, the red axis is along the axial direction of the beam, but the green (direction 1) and blue (direction 2) axes are not aligned with the x and y axes of our model. This is because SOLIDWORKS defines direction 1 to be parallel to the longest edge of the cross section. In our model, this is the sloped side section. This will affect reported values of moment of inertia compared to section properties obtained in the model. To rectify this, we can utilize a simple modeling trick to make the bottom edge the longest edge. If we sketch lines on the four sloped faces (interior and exterior) and use the Split Line command, we can effectively shorten the edge length without affecting the model geometry.

Beam with split lines

Beam with split lines

We can now go back to the study and, after right-clicking on the study name to “Update All Components”, we can edit the definition of the beam to see that the beam direction has updated.

Adjusted coordinate system

Adjusted coordinate system

The post Changing the Direction of a Beam in SOLIDWORKS Simulation appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Julian Wolf at May 05, 2020 12:00 PM

May 04, 2020

The Javelin Blog

Javelin customer Spartan Bioscience designs revolutionary rapid testing kit for COVID-19

Javelin’s customers excel in every sector, from product design and top-tier manufacturing to healthcare and education. Right now, many of them are shifting, diversifying, retooling, and retraining, in some cases to contribute directly to fighting COVID-19, in other cases to support ongoing essential work in sectors such as agriculture and food production, energy, and transportation. We are proud to feature stories of some of the Canadian businesses doing exceptional work.

Spartan Bioscience

One of Javelin’s SOLIDWORKS customers in Canada’s capital region is having a massive impact on COVID-19 testing capabilities. On April 13, Spartan Bioscience received Health Canada approval for its rapid, accurate, and portable COVID-19 test, which provides results in less than an hour.

Spartan is currently addressing concerns raised about the efficacy of the proprietary swab. Read this statement from Spartan Bioscience, issued May 3, 2020. 

The Spartan Cube

The “Spartan Cube” is the world’s smallest DNA analyzer, about the size of a coffee cup. The Cube performs the test using Spartan’s test cartridges and proprietary swabs.

The "Spartan Cube" Rendering

The Spartan Cube – COVID-19 rapid testing kit

SOLIDWORKS Mechanical Design

SOLIDWORKS is Spartan’s primary mechanical design tool. They also use SOLIDWORKS PDM (product data management) to manage their CAD data.

Using SOLIDWORKS helped make accelerated product development possible, with both time savings and reduced errors. Having the PDM and SOLIDWORKS systems set up to handle component information through custom properties and data cards, to be able to automatically fill in elements like drawing title blocks and bill of materials, meant that no one on the team had to spend time on “paperwork.” They spent time building models and testing them.

Spartan’s engineering team also recognized support from Javelin, attributing much of their learning to Javelin’s training courses, technical blog, and resource library.

Thank you, Spartan Bioscience

Spartan’s made-in-Canada testing solution is designed to be used by non-laboratory personnel in settings such as airports, border crossings, doctors’ offices, pharmacies, and remote communities. Thank you to Spartan Bioscience for their contribution to fighting the pandemic.

Share your COVID-19 support story

Tell us how your business is supporting the COVID-19 pandemic effort with the production of PPE, medical devices or other products and services > contact us.

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by Karen Majerly at May 04, 2020 08:10 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Quick tips – Advanced Component Selection

Everyone knows SOLIDWORKS is very flexible and user friendly to execute the commands to complete any 3D design easily. When it comes to handling Complex assemblies (Increased in number of components) many of us will search for special tools to select components in assemblies. In addition to the default selection method (clicking an entity in the graphics area or Feature Manager Design tree), many other tools are available for selecting components in assemblies.

Let us take a look on Selection tools inside SOLIDWORKS which gives easiest ways to interact with your component selection

Selection tools can be accessed from Standard toolbar area or Right click on the graphics area,

 

SOLIDWORKS Standard toolbar area

 

Magnified Selection: Allows you select a small component in a big assembly without changing the view Keyboard shortcut: G.

Select mated to will easily allow you to select the components that mated with the selected component in just a click.

When you want select a component which is not visible or fully enclosed by another component you can just use Select internal components.

Visible components in a particular (Standard or current) view can be accessed directly by using Select by views make sure current view is enabled for non-standard views.

 

Select components by view

 

Select by size can easily allow to select the components by setting up the size in percentage make sure the dynamic interaction is enabled for live interaction

Select components by Size

 

Advanced Component Selection is a criteria or category based selection where the user can select components by certain Categories, Conditions, Values and Logical operators.

Advanced component selection

 

User also can save the selection by giving the specific name in “Name of search” area and save it for future use and can also be added to the favorites in “Manage Searches” for quick access in a standard tool bar drop-down menu. These custom searches can also be export and import as a .sqy and .xml files.

SOLIDWORKS Custom Search

 

 

Author information

EGS India
E G S Computers India Private Limited, since 1993, has been in the forefront of delivering solutions to customers in the areas of Product Design and Development with SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD,Remaining Life Calculations, Validation using Finite Element Analysis, Customization of Engineering activities and Training in advanced engineering functions relating to design and development. EGS India - Authorized Reseller for SOLIDWORKS Solutions in India - Chennai, Coimbatore, Trichy, Madurai - Tamil Nadu, Pondicherry. For any queries on SOLIDWORKS Solutions contact @ 9445424704 | mktg@egs.co.in | Website - www.egsindia.com

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by EGS India at May 04, 2020 03:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

SCIEX works with Javelin to contribute to PPE manufacturing project

Javelin continues to work on our PPE face shield development project; over 700 units have been produced and are currently being distributed to our project partners.

This has been made possible, in part, by a generous donation of 3D printed components from our customer SCIEX. Working with our Professional Services team, their group has contributed face shield visors, printed on their Stratasys F450 3D printer with ABS M30i material. This donation, in combination with private contributions, has facilitated the production of 200 additional units.

“It’s inspiring to know that in such trying times, we can all come together to do what we can to protect our frontline workers and are thinking creatively about how we can approach it,” says Chris Lock, VP, LCMS R&D, SCIEX. “The specific face shields we are helping to build will be donated to frontline professionals at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto, which makes our effort even more critical, directly supporting the local community where many of our associates live.”

Assembled Face Shield

Assembled Face Shield

Production 3D printers offer biocompatible material

The F450 is a workhorse 3D printer for engineers that require demanding flexibility to print larger-sized or many parts in an array of engineering-grade materials with high speed and unfailing throughput. It offers 13 production-grade materials, including bio-compatible materials that are ideal for the medical industry.

ABS-M30i material was chosen for this initiative because it is a high strength material well suited for the medical industry. Parts manufactured with this material are biocompatible and can be gamma or EtO sterilized. The goal is to produce sterilizable and reusable face shields to overcome the resource burden caused by single use devices.

We are in this together

The team at Javelin sincerely appreciates all contributions towards this initiative. Over the last few months, we have seen many businesses, educational institutions, and individuals across Canada contributing, collaborating and helping in any way possible to fight the pandemic.

If you would like to contribute to the cost of the 3D printing raw materials for the production of the face shields you can make a $20 contribution via our web store. Note that Javelin is not a registered charity and, as a result, we are not able to provide tax receipts for project contributions.

For more information on our PPE manufacturing project, follow this link.

 

Click to Support Face Shield Production »

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by Kelly Clancy at May 04, 2020 12:45 PM

SOLIDWORKS PDM Reference Tree Selection Controls

Navigating large assembly reference trees within SOLIDWORKS PDM can be difficult, especially when Checking a file In/Out, performing a Copy Tree function, or Changing States.

Let’s look at the dialog box when checking out a file:

Check Out Assembly

Check Out Assembly

When checking out a file, the dialog box above is the default dialog box that is seen, however, if I had wanted to select all of the references for one of the sub assemblies, I’d need to select them individually.

However, with a slight modification, all you will need to do is select one checkbox to select ALL of its referenced components…. See below:

Check Out Dialog Box Commands

Check Out Dialog Box Commands

  • The Show All Levels/Top Level Only dropdown above allows you to expand/collapse your reference tree in the dialog box
  • The Show Reference Selection Controls toggle turns on a parallel set of check boxes that will allow you to select or clear all check boxes from that one node. So if I only want to check out one sub-assembly and its parts from the Top level assembly, I can do so using the parallel check box. To access this toggle, Right click on any file listed and select ‘Show Reference Selection Control

The same commands can be applied when the file is being checked out or used in the copy tree functionality.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Training

Javelin offers various SOLIDWORKS PDM training courses which cover all the new additions and features such as searching within the vault. PDM Administrator training covers topics such as this in great detail and ample examples and exercises are provided for PDM administrators to familiarize themselves with new additions to SOLIDWORKS PDM.

The post SOLIDWORKS PDM Reference Tree Selection Controls appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Samony Riyaz at May 04, 2020 12:00 PM

May 01, 2020

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Clenderbeast Spindles

Jan-Sarbort-art

The spindles dropped through the clouds in a rhythm one by one then returning. It had happened for years and only with the clouds of the fifth moon. It wasn’t until years later that we would learn these were the legs of the Clenderbeasts sprinting through the rain layer of these links.

Jan Sarbort – Jan is a Prague-based concept artist in film and game with a particular knack for massive sky city scenes. Thanks, Ron!

British Museum Collection – The British Museum has put 4.5 million pieces of their collection online from Egypt and the Americas to sculptures, paintings, and more.

Citizen DJ – Listen to sounds from Library of Congress collections, and combine sounds to make ‘beats’ of your own. Super cool.

Desert Cities – The photography of Manuel Alvarez Diestro captures the construction of cities and structures in the desert on the outskirts Cairo, Alexandria, and other cities.

Parks and Rec – Ya heard? A special episode with the whole cast to raise money for Feeding America. Hilarious.

Righteous – A free stylin’ new hand-drawn script font from Arendxstudio with a wide range of features.

Zip Tie Art – You won’t believe what Elisabeth Picard can create with zip ties and hardware. Some cardboard and paint work too.

Urban Tetris – Instagram follow of the week. Mariyan Atanasov creates 3-dimensional Tetris art from urban structures.

Raspberry Pi 12MP Camera – Raspberry Pi has a new camera with more MP and interchangeable lens mount. All for $50.

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Alive – Bringin’ back that New York rap. Yes, that one, from Beastie Boys. Completely remastered. It can be nice to be alive.

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by Josh Mings at May 01, 2020 06:06 PM

Autodesk Offers Free Commercial Use of Fusion 360

Free Autodesk Fusion 360

Did you know Autodesk is providing free access to Fusion 360 due to the crisis?

Fusion 360 Features

Autodesk’s Fusion 360 system is a powerful cloud-based CAD tool that can provide both beginners and full-time professional designers a worthy experience. The system includes a wide variety of CAD features, including 2D sketching, 3D modeling, simulation, sculpting, sheet metal design, CAM toolpath generation and even generative design through cloud servers.

Recently they introduced the ability to slice 3D models for 3D printing in Fusion 360, although I felt it was a bit rough. That’s understandable, as it was their first attempt at the function. 

The accumulation of these features is one of the reasons Autodesk named the product “Fusion” 360, as it attempts to join together all necessary design tools. 

Fusion 360 is relatively easy to learn compared to some other professional CAD tools. Autodesk provides a near-avalanche of short videos through which anyone can gradually learn the tool at one’s own pace. Their discussion forums frequently contain the answer you’re looking for, and experts often post short video answers showing exactly how to perform the unknown task in Fusion 360. 

Fusion 360 Pricing

Normally, Autodesk Fusion 360 is a subscription-based paid option. Payment levels vary depending on what you’re doing, where you are, and for how long you wish to subscribe. Fusion 360 is definitely not a free tool but it also provides an extraordinarily powerful environment for professional use.

Now, Autodesk is offering free access through its Fusion 360 Extended Access Program. They say: 

We understand the stress and challenges the recent changes to our world can have on you and your business. We are here to help. Get free access to Fusion 360 until May 31, 2020, enabling you to:

Easily adapt to your new work environment

Eliminate the barrier of on-premise software requirements

Collaborate seamlessly with your entire extended team”

The program description also points you to a series of learning videos and the ability to speak directly to team members for assistance. 

Fusion 360 Offer Value

Is this a worthwhile step to take? I have several thoughts.

First, using a powerful CAD tool for only a month is a bit tricky, as it can take quite a while to learn a complex tool. Would one learn enough in a week or two to make good use of Fusion 360 for the remainder of the 30 days? I’m thinking that is a questionable proposition. 

Thus it could be that you’re really simply getting the first month free for a permanent Fusion 360 subscription, but hey, that’s something. 

Another scenario might be more profitable, where a company is quickly reworking something in their operations to react to the crisis. They’ve pulled in a group of designers, perhaps on a temporary contract basis, to do the necessary redesigns. This could be a great way to quickly equip them with powerful CAD tools to get the job done at no cost, at least for a month. 

Finally, there is the possibility of a group working rapidly to develop new tools or products specifically for COVID-19 mitigation. This offer could quickly deploy advanced design tools to a larger group.

It’s not a bad offer from Autodesk, and one anyone can take advantage of, especially if you were contemplating getting into Autodesk Fusion 360. 

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale at no extra cost to you!

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by Fabbaloo at May 01, 2020 03:21 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to prevent a user from accidentally moving a folder in a SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault

Is there a setting in SOLIDWORKS PDM to prevent a user from accidentally moving a folder in a vault?

The following steps can be used to prevent a user from accidentally moving a folder in the vault because of a ‘lack of permission’ by disabling the ‘Move folder’ privilege.

In the Administration tool > Users or Groups properties > Select Folder Permissions > Permissions per Folder uncheck ‘Move folder’ on the folder in question.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Move Folder Permission

SOLIDWORKS PDM Move Folder Permission

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by Nadeem Akhtar at May 01, 2020 12:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

Collaborating Remotely Using SOLIDWORKS: How to Do It Like the Pros

When you think of the phrase “collaborating with your coworkers,” what do you picture? I’ll tell you what I picture.

  •         Standing over someone’s desk discussing a problem or decision to be made
  •         Attending scrum-style update meetings in the conference room to catch up on different areas related to a project
  •         White-boarding concepts – sometimes in impromptu fashion – to convey them real-time and in-person to my colleagues

All of a sudden, what’s listed above encompass three examples of things we cannot do. And now, many of us are doing our best to replace these peer-to-peer collaboration conventions with an endless onslaught of emails, conference calls, text messages, and other forms of communication that can best be described as: Disjointed. Disparate. And, inevitably, pretty demoralizing!

All of this, while, thankfully, we get to retain so much of what we (or, at least, “I”) often take for granted. For instance: that we get to retain information like ‘who’s the go-to’ for ID-style work in our groups. That we have some familiarity with how project leads like to work in our companies.

These basic ‘knowns’ can go a long way in easing these sudden transitions away from our physical workplaces. Now, imagine you had none of this. You not only had a painful lack of tools to help you collaborate remotely, but you’d also lost all organizational knowledge and had to start from scratch to figure out who the relevant stakeholders are, and ‘who’s good at what’s’ all over again.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kSr3z2lLQ_U?feature=oembed" title="Effective Remote Collaboration: A Truly Unique Perspective" width="1140"></iframe>

Sounds dreadful, right? But if there were ever a use case to learn from, in teaching ourselves how we can use current-day tools to collaborate better with our own teams during these challenging times, it’d be one like that. And, thankfully, such a use case exists.

In the video above, you’ll get to follow me learning from SOLIDWORKS users just like you. Well, except for the fact that they, in just 30 days or so, went from not knowing each other at all to successfully using SOLIDWORKS and the 3DEXPERIENCE platform in ways that allowed them to make a fully functioning prosthetic prototype design. All of this, as part of the first-ever 3DEXPERIENCE For Good Hackathon.

And yes, to be clear: Jade (UK), Aidan (Canada), and Rob (US) had never met in person before.

So, how did they do it? Well, as you’ll see in this video, they used some tools that were not only easy to use, but required very little implementation time to get started. In order to sprint as quickly as they did, they had to overcome certain obstacles.

Being located across three different countries and different time zones was rough. Not to mention, they also had a team member in Italy, bringing the grand tally on their small team of 5 people to 4 countries overall!

What provided to be key, outside of the short implementation time, was ubiquitous, seamless access to communications, ideas, and data. This is something they were able to get in the following ways that might help you today.

Cloud-Based Data Management (from within SOLIDWORKS)

When I called Jade, we talked about how crucial it was for them to be able to centrally store and access documents and projects from SOLIDWORKS and the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

Using an add-in directly inside of SOLIDWORKS, the team was able to track and change the status of projects, revision projects, and more – without ever needing to leave the SOLIDWORKS interface.

Designs and other important documents could then be accessed from within their local interfaces or from any browser (using any web-enabled device), logged into the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. All of this was able to be done extremely quickly, with very little implementation time!

Manage and Participate in Projects from Anywhere

During my conversation with Aidan, who’s currently a student in university, he talked about how useful the project planning tools on the platform were for their team – and how useful they can be now, to help with assignment tracking.

Using the project planning tools available on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, you can assign tasks to different team members, stay updated on their progress, and get a full scope of what’s been done – and what remains to be completed.

You can do this in several ways. Among them: via full project timeline layouts and auto-updating status dashboards.

This really cuts down on the need for status check-in emails, 1-hour meetings that really don’t need to happen, and more – all of which ultimately return time back to you and your team for the things that truly need to be done.

Share Ideas and Communicate in a Connected Manner

Rob and I could’ve sat on this video chat call, lamenting the nature of text messaging and email for hours. Thankfully, we didn’t do that, but we did talk about it a fair amount when discussing the benefits of communities on the platform.

With platform communities, your team can have private spaces to simply discuss ideas, updates, and questions related to your projects. No offense to email, but it simply wasn’t built specifically to handle all of those things – and, for me, attempts to bend it to my will usually end up in frustration and messy, disconnected communications.

This not only contributes to the (likely) already high-stress level of getting things done remotely when you aren’t used to it; it’s just plain ineffective. Rob (and Aidan before him) talks a lot about how great the 3DSwym communities were for his team, and how they could be used by anyone in industry today.

Feeling inspired after all of this? Want to try out some of what you’ve seen, in order to see if these plug-and-play solutions can empower your team like they empowered Jade, Aidan, and Rob? Click here to try them for yourself!

Author information

Sean O'Neill
Sean O'Neill
I'm a Community & User Advocacy Manager here at SOLIDWORKS. As a longtime SOLIDWORKS user myself, I love meeting with users and hearing about all the interesting things they're doing in the SOLIDWORKS community!

The post Collaborating Remotely Using SOLIDWORKS: How to Do It Like the Pros appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Sean O'Neill at May 01, 2020 12:00 PM

April 30, 2020

The Javelin Blog

How to Modernize your Industrial Design with a Stratasys J55 3D Printer

Product and Industrial design has been modernized in the last few years with the introduction of professional 3D printers that are designed specifically for designers to quickly and easily produce concept models for fit, form, function, and aesthetics testing of their industrial design.

The Stratasys J55 takes the modern design approach to another level by providing designers with PANTONE™ colour matching, multiple material builds, and a lower price point than other machines on the market. In this article I will outline the advantages of using a Stratasys J55 for industrial design along with applications and examples.

Sketch concept 3D CAD and Rendering 3D printed design

Current Challenges for Industrial Designers

Designers have common challenges with industrial design and using other 3D printers in the market space, these typically include:

  • Communication breakdown or failures often impact both the design and product quality, as well as a products time to market. Using a 2D rendering on paper or a screenshot to convey an idea doesn’t communicate the full scope of design intent and requires an unrealistic imaginative leap. This makes it difficult for a client or stakeholder to buy in to your project.
  • The design cycle is inefficient and costs time and money, being late to market costs $X every day. High fidelity modeling methods are costly.
  • Professional 3D printers are bulky, unaffordable, and require experienced operators. Space in a small office is at a premium and you can’t afford to designate an exclusive room or space to the printer.  Also, it can’t be in the office because it is noisy, produces toxic fumes and foul odors, it takes up too much space, etc.
  • Outsourcing to an external 3D printing service bureau is not only expensive, but it risks confidentiality and intellectual property. Potentially, an outside company can steal an IP and get to market faster, grabbing a majority of the market share or ultimately lowering your products value.
Traditional industrial design model made from clay

Traditional model making with clay, wood, or foam

What if you could..

  • Create a better finished product that is tangible — a prototype that can be seen/felt/held.  Increase the amount of design iterations and improve design quality. Realistic models are easier to promote and more likely to elicit an emotional attachment from a client.
  • Cut modeling time. Explore colours and textures earlier, integrating form and function, ultimately saving on modeling costs.
  • Utilize a 3D printer that has a small footprint, is quiet and non-toxic.  Doesn’t need its own designated shop/room/area.  Could be in the same location as your office paper printer.
  • Keep production internal so design ideas and prototypes stay protected in house.  The consequence of losing exclusivity to groundbreaking intellectual property is priceless.
Modern industrial design with 3D printed concept model

Modern 3D printed concept model

Introducing the Stratasys J55

Javelin has a solution to your industrial product design process challenges with the new Stratasys J55 3D printer. The J55 offers unparalleled part realism, in an office or studio environment, at an affordable price.

It is a huge leap forward for accessible, full colour 3D printing and allows designers to have multiple iterations of a prototype ready and available in a matter of hours, without the need for a shop operator or an external service bureau.

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With the J55 you can now go from render to reality faster with a simple industrial design-to-print workflow that lets you import CAD models directly into GrabCAD Print™. The user-friendly design incorporates a touchscreen interface and makes it easier than ever to get printed parts in your hand.

The J55 is affordable enough for you to start saving on costs right away – take advantage of 80% less cost per part and the ability to create high-quality models in just one day. Here are other benefits of the machine:

  • The first 3D printer with a rotational printing sequence
    • Unique and cutting edge rotational technology on the J55 provides a full design solution, end-to-end.
    • Very limited head movement and constant speed while printing promotes exceptional quality and realism.
  • Print Quality
    • Physical prototypes accurately portray the look and feel of a design.
    • Great resolution and outstanding surface finish.
    • Endless combinations of colour (Pantone® verified), glass-like transparency and mimic textures such as leather, wood, etc.
  • Office friendly
    • Nontoxic and a truly low noise level (less than 53dB), mean the J55 can exist unobtrusively at a designer’s elbow.
    • Save space in the office with a compact system that has a small footprint.
  • Reduced time to market
    • Create precise models and complete assemblies swiftly in order to meet tight deadlines.
    • Innovate faster with a streamlined workflow in GrabCAD Print™ with 3MF file format compatibility to make your work in software like SOLIDWORKS® or KeyShot® as simple as “point and click.”
    • Calibration is fully automatic and the entire maintenance process is is as simple as pushing a button.

Industrial Design & Engineering Applications

The full colour and clear material configuration provides solutions for a wide variety of product design modeling challenges – all the way from matte and glossy surfaces, 3D graphic design, and material like leather, wood, stone, PC simulation and more. Typical design applications include:

Stratasys J55 3d printer glass liquid Stratasys J55 3d printer textures gradients Stratasys J55 3d printer fluid channels Stratasys J55 3d printer FEA Stratasys J55 3D printer Wood & leather simulation j55 text labels j55 optical transparency j55 lighting components J55 transparency

Stratasys J55 Specifications

Providing the best-in-class footprint-to-printing size ratio on the market:

  • J55 Printer size & weight:
    • Width: 651 mm
    • Depth: 661 mm
    • Height: 774 mm
    • Weight: 90 Kg
  • J55 Material cabinet:
    • Width: 651 mm
    • Depth:   629 mm
    • Height: 750 mm
    • Weight: 138 Kg
  • J55 Printer on material cabinet:
    • Total Height: 1,511 mm
    • Total Weight: 228 Kg
  • Materials
    • Vero™ family of opaque materials
      • VeroCyanV™
      • VeroMagentaV™
      • VeroYellowV™
      • VeroPureWhite™
      • VeroBlackPlus™
    • VeroClear™ for transparent applications
    • DraftGrey™ for modeling concepts
  • Printing mode
    • High Quality (HQS) – 18.75µm
  • Build tray​
    • Typical printing area up to 1,174cm2
  • Accuracy
    • Deviation from STL dimensions, for 1 Sigma (67%) of models printed with rigid materials, based on size: under 100 mm – ±150μ; above 100 mm – ±0.15% of part length.
    • Deviation from STL dimensions, for 2 Sigma (95%) of models printed with rigid materials, based on size: under 100 mm – ±180μ; above 100 mm – ±0.2% of part length

Interested in a Stratasys J55 3D Printer?

Contact us to learn more and request a sample part from us.

The post How to Modernize your Industrial Design with a Stratasys J55 3D Printer appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Rod Mackay at April 30, 2020 05:00 PM

SolidSmack

New Stratasys J55 Full-Color 3D Printer Brings Big Advantages to Designers

Stratasys has dropped a full-color 3D printed bombshell with the introduction of the new J55 3D Printer that combines a number of features in a printer that’s sized and priced for small and medium design and engineering business.

The J55 is a full-color 3D printer with a rotating build platform, stationary head, odor-free operation, native 3D file format support, 3MF file format support, with clear, 478k color gamut, and Pantone support. This all comes together at a price of $99,000, half of their J8 PolyJet shop series with much of the capability in a footprint that’s just a bit over 4 sq ft.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>The Stratasys J55 with a small 4.6 sq ft (.43 sq m) footprint.</figcaption></figure>

They call the J55 a “full-color, office-friendly 3D printer for designers” and the features reveal a lot about that. It hits a sweet spot between desktop and shop-size 3D printers that has been mostly dismissed; a spot where prototyping could save the cost of the printer in a single project alone.

As Tim Greene, a research director for 3D printing at global research firm IDC says, “We know that the risk and time involved with traditional prototyping simply doesn’t work anymore, yet there’s no room for compromise on design. Designers can and should do a lot more prototyping in-house, from initial concept modeling to highly realistic final prototypes. It’s just been a matter of bringing enterprise quality to a design shop’s price point and workspace. And now we’re there.”

The printer uses the same model and support material as the PolyJet printers with the same texture and transparency capabilities and support for X-Rite Pantone colors.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>The range of realistic colors and texture capabilities on the J55.</figcaption></figure>

Where this all comes together to greatly simplify the process and improve the quality is the native support for 3D file formats. This includes support for SOLIDWORKS, CATIA, PTC Creo, NX, and Inventor CAD file formats, as well as direct full-color printing of KeyShot rendered scenes through a new 3MF color workflow.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>From KeyShot rendering to 3D print on the J55 with Pantone verified colors.</figcaption></figure>

With a focus on designers and the prototyping process the 3D render from KeyShot to 3D print on the J55, with support for clear/translucent materials, gradients, and Pantone colors

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>The 3MF color workflow from KeyShot to the J55 allows visual and physical consistency.</figcaption></figure>

This file format support, made possible by GrabCAD Print, is significant in an industry where the workflow has depended largely on low-quality STL, OBJ, and VRML files.

With the small footprint, a sub-53 dB noise level, their zero-odor ProAero™ Air Extractor, and single-phase (120/220 VAC) power, Stratasys have designed this for the office workspace.

The J55 is expected to ship July 2020 with pre-orders available now and the 3MF color workflow from KeyShot currently in beta and expected in Fall 2020.

J55 Full-Color 3D Printer Specs

Category Spec
Model Materials VeroCyanV, VeroMagentaV, VeroYellowV, VeroPureWhite, VeroBlackPlus, VeroClear, DraftGrey
Support Materials SUP710
Cartridge capacity 5 (+ support)
Build Size 1,174 cm² (182 inches²)
Build Volume 1,340 cubic inches (22 liters)
Layer Thickness 18 microns (.0007 in)
Network Connectivity LAN – TCP/IP
System Size 651 x 661 x 1551 mm (25.63 x 26.02 x 61.06 in.)
System Weight 228 kg (503 lbs)
Operating Sound Under 53 dB
Operating Requirements 100–120 VAC, 50–60 Hz, 6A, 1 phase
220–240 VAC, 50–60 Hz, 3A, 1 phase
Regulatory Compliance CE, FCC, EAC
Software GrabCAD Print
Build Modes 18.75 microns (High Quality Speed)
Accuracy Deviation ±0.15 – 0.2% of part length (parts above 100mm)

You can get an interactive overview of the new printer here and read the full press release here.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><figcaption>The J55, in its native environment.</figcaption></figure>

Full Disclosure: Josh Mings, Founder of SolidSmack, previously worked for GrabCAD, now owned by Stratasys. He also handled marketing for Luxion and continues to work with them as a client.

The post New Stratasys J55 Full-Color 3D Printer Brings Big Advantages to Designers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at April 30, 2020 04:14 PM

SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog

SOLIDWORKS Command, Delete Face: Easily Remove Faces From a Solid or Surface Body

Learn how to easily delete a face from a solid or surface body when modeling in SOLIDWORKS. Our #TechTip this week is by Training Manager John Setzer.

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Video Transcript

Hi and welcome to another GSC tech tip. Today we’re going to take a look at a command called ‘delete face.’ And what delete face does is it will remove a face from a solid or surface body. And then, what we’re left with depends on the geometry that’s involved, as well as some of the options that we’ll explore.

Read other blogs by John, or find more videos on our YouTube Channel including more Tips and Tricks.

Finding the Delete Face Command

So let’s first find out how to find the delete face command. You can find it by going to the menu, insert face, delete. You can also customize your command manager, just right click and bring up your direct adding toolbar, and you’ll find the delete face there. You can go ahead and run that command. Let’s take a look at some of the options that we have.

Command Options

First of all, you’re going to be selecting one or more faces to remove from your body. And as I do this, I’ll be able to pick a face such as this one or three faces or de-select them and go back to the one from our selection boxes, adding or subtracting faces from that selection set. In the options area, we have three options, delete, delete and patch and delete and fill. Let’s go with just straight delete and with selected face, accept it, and we can see what we have as a result. So face has been removed from our solid body, which means it’s not a solid body anymore. It no longer encloses the volume. You can see as they rotate, you can see the quote inside of the model.

Again, that’s because, well, there is no inside, outside definition for volume. We just have a surface body, no longer closing of volume. You’ll note that the edge color. Where the gap is is blue, because blue indicates the end of the world, if you will, for a surface body. So that’s where our gap is. As we see inside that face is removed.

It’s now a surface body. Let’s edit the delete face feature that we just added and take a look into deleting patch, what delete and patch does, is it well removes the face selected certainly, and then it keeps the solid body definition. By extending existing surfaces or faces to put patch over the gap. The results in this situation would be, as we see these three faces extend to fill what was the left or the gap here I left behind by the remove face.

Considering Tangency

If I were to edit that feature and pick all four of these faces, deleted and patch. This would be the result as the planar face is simply extending each other. Basically making this a block again, delete and fill, I’m going to right click clear selections and then simply pick this face again and we’ll do delete and fill and there’s an option under, do they even feel for tangent. Or not, um, to delete and fill, well, what’s that’s gonna do is remove the face or faces,  that you selected and replace it with one new face.

And that new face can be calculated to be tangent to every edge that the new face is connecting to or simply be connected and not necessarily worried about being tangent. If I say delete and fill without tangency. And we examined the results. It doesn’t look like much has changed, but if I moved to this position, you can see how this has flattened out because the new face that was created in place of the old face does not  have a tangent condition to these other faces at these edges where they meet.

Simply put something there, make a new surface in that spot, but just worry about being connected. Don’t worry about being tangent or smooth. If I were to edit the delete face. And put tangency in. Well then it looks like the face was never really deleted, but in fact, it was, this face was deleted and then a new face is putting in its place.

It’s exactly like the previous one. It wouldn’t be much of a point to it and this particular situation, but if I edit the delete face and I pick these other three faces to go along with it, and we do this delete and fill, I’m going to turn off the tangent fill for this. Then we’ll see the results. Well that operation, so four faces removed left with one single face, which is curvature, continuous spline based, but there’s no tangency control.

So this face is not necessarily tangent to this face at this edge or at this edge. Certainly wouldn’t be at this, this face, at that edge. If I did turn on tangent fell for this. I’d get a pretty funky looking surface because what’s happening is this face is being calculated to be tangent to this face at this common edge.

So kind of pulls it in and pulls it back out, kind of swoops it out so that there is tangent to see on the inside portion, not what we would want here, but it does show, it does show how the different options affect the results with the delayed phase come in.

Use Cases / Scenarios

So where might we use the delete face command? Well, it’s actually a really good tool for cleaning up things. In this scenario, I have a model where I have used the, fill command and some setback options to create a blended area where there was once a sharp corner. However, in order to create the geometry that I wanted, SOLIDWORKS had to break this up into a bunch of small faces.

I’d prefer this be one single face curvature continuous across that whole area. The delete face is going to help me clean that up. I’m going to use my delete face command, set my parameters to be deleted and fill because I want a new face created where these several faces would be removed. And I do want tangency as well.

I want my new face to be tangent to the other faces that connects to at common edges. Let’s go ahead and pick you small faces that I would like to get rid of and with the delete and fill and tangent fill options selected, finish up and there we go. A single new face. In place as several other faces that used to be there, and this new face has been set up, so it’s tangent to the other face as it connects to at these three common edges or those sets, and I want it to, I can do it for the other side, or I can even expand this.

I could include these three faces and get a larger surface, across a larger area can curvature continuous. All the way to these edges here and here and here, or go across to the other side and move this guy and these faces and a bunch of other faces.

And then I would end up with one single curvature, continuous face that is tangent to all the other faces. It meets at common edge sets. Yeah. That’s a much cleaner model and much nicer geometry to work with. Here’s another example of using delete phase to clean up our geometry. I have a thin wall part and revolve feature that by its nature extends out through my thin wall because of the sizes involved.

Now, I don’t want these three faces that came through from the other side that revolve feature. People might decide to try and do some kind of a cutaway or like a loft cut or revolve cut or some other kind of thing to get rid of that geometry. But it’s actually a much simpler solution if you use the delete face function.

In this case, I’m going to use the delete face. I’m going to set it to be deleted patch this time cause I want to extend existing surface geometry over what would be the gap. I’ll go ahead and remove these three faces. One, two, three, accept it and the job is done. Nice and simple. Again,  I used delete and patch because I wanted to extend the existing surface, which really surrounds what would be a gap there to create the geometry, I want it without having to resort to a new quote patch phase. If I had done or fill phase, but I had done a delete and fill, then there would be a new face separated from the other. I don’t want that. I just want delete the patch, extend over. What would have been a gap if I had just not done either of those.

Another Example

And so here you can see another example of using the delete face command to help clean up model geometry. It doesn’t matter if this geometry is made in SOLIDWORKS or imported from some other CAD system. This is directly editing. We’re taking existing faces, removing them, and then deciding what to do about the gap.

If we do anything with some of the options that we have here. I hope you enjoyed this little discussion about the delete face command and hopefully you can find use for it. In some of your everyday solid modeling. Thanks and see you next time.


Want More on 3D CAD?

If you’re interested in SOLIDWORKS CAD and other resources:

Author

John Setzer

This blog is authored by John Setzer, GSC’s Training Product Manager. John discovered his love of teaching early in life. He worked his way through college as a youth coach, umpire, and referee before earning his bachelor’s degree in education. As Training Manager at GSC, he has been sharing his SOLIDWORKS wisdom with GSC customers ever since – over 20 years! John is a Certified SOLIDWORKS Expert (CSWE), a Certified SOLIDWORKS Instructor, and a Certified SOLIDWORKS Technician. As the only CSWE with a state certification in teaching, John is well-versed is teaching all types of learning styles. John is a regular contributor to the GSC blog, available at www.gsc-3d.com/blog.

Author information

GSC
GSC fuels customer success with 3D engineering solutions for design, simulation, data management, electrical schematics, PCB, technical documentation, and 3D printing, as well as the most comprehensive consulting, technical support, and training in the industry. As a leading provider of SOLIDWORKS solutions, HP, and Markforged 3D printing technologies, GSC’s world-class team of dedicated professionals have helped numerous companies innovate and increase productivity by leveraging advanced technologies to drive 3D business success. Founded in 1989, GSC is headquartered in Germantown, WI. For more information about GSC, please visit www.gsc-3d.com.

The post SOLIDWORKS Command, Delete Face: Easily Remove Faces From a Solid or Surface Body appeared first on SOLIDWORKS Tech Blog.

by GSC at April 30, 2020 03:00 PM

The SOLIDWORKS Blog

COVID-19, Simulation and Computational Fluid Dynamics

The 2020 Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has affected everyone in the world, with ramifications in our public health, prosperity and beyond. There are so many lessons we can draw. I will focus on two: Science and Simulation on the one hand, and Community and Collaboration on the other. I will give you my perspective as a professional at a software company.

Let’s do a simple math about the scale of exponential growth and epidemics turning into pandemics: If a person with a contagious infection spreads the disease to just one other person every two days, then after only 10 days, 32 people will be infected, that is 2 to the power of 5. But if the rate of spread is one per day, you have 2 to the power of 10, that is 1024. Again, 32 vs. 1024! These ratios will be more drastic depending on the reproduction number, incubation period, overall length of the pandemic, the population and other factors, but you get the point about exponential growth.

This was simple math to do an Analysis. Why is Simulation important? Because knowing what may happen, in the case of the pandemic, saves lives and avoids economic collapse. In product development, we advocate for Simulation every day, using sophisticated software and methods such as Finite Element Analysis FEA and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to help designers, engineers and analysts come up with better products faster, cheaper and more efficiently, ultimately improving the quality of life.

In this pandemic, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is promoting “Social distancing.” The recommendation is to stay apart at least six feet, or two meters, to avoid passing infections. Why is it? COVID-19 is an infectious disease that spreads from person to person mainly from droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes. So, the right distance is a function of the reach of the pathogen.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UEM5gE-AcXM?feature=oembed" title="Office Sneeze | Examining the Spread of COVID 19 from Person-To-Person in Air-Conditioned Spaces" width="1140"></iframe>

 

You can see this complicated phenomenon of sneeze experimentally, using slow motion footage from cameras with extremely high frames per second. Scientifically, sneeze is a very complicated phenomenon, with multi-phase turbulent clouds, gaseous phase coupled with droplets. A face mask can create the obstruction or re-direction between the person sneezing and the person exposed.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kQwpwp_6TI0?feature=oembed" title="SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation COVID-19 Spread Prevention" width="1140"></iframe>

 

With some applications, HVAC design for a building for example, multiple physical tests are very expensive, time-consuming and simply not efficient. Even for a simple application like pressure drop and valve design or heat buildup in a computer box, virtual testing is very beneficial. CFD is extremely useful in these applications and beyond, for gas and liquid flow as well as thermal analysis. Such simulations are fast and cost-effective. Especially during the initial design and engineering phase, they enable the engineer to look at many “what-if” scenarios, improving efficiency and productivity, and thus, have the highest impact. As we see in this pandemic, prevention and early preparation are not only smarter but also cheaper than late mitigation.

Another lesson learned from COVID-19 is the aspect of community and collaboration. Unity in diversity, the world has inter-dependencies that cannot be suppressed or ignored. In our industry, for a product to succeed in the market, you need the collaboration of multiple stakeholders, from product development and design to engineering simulation, manufacturing, marketing, sales and others. Ideally, they would interact in an efficient collaborative interactive environment. Dassault Systemès 3DEXPERIENCE is a platform with this philosophy in mind.

Please check out our OPEN COVID-19 global and online community where we are leveraging collective intelligence to source, qualify, design, engineer and manufacture rapid solutions during this pandemic.

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="641" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/V4So9flAZnk?feature=oembed" title="「くしゃみシミュレーション」で医療従事者を守るフェイスシールドの設計を支援" width="1140"></iframe>

 

This pandemic has given us a new perspective: the value of life, our families and all our loved ones. We are in this together and everybody has a role to play. In my profession and the field of Simulation, the mission statement of the company I work for, makes more sense to me today than ever before: “Dassault Systèmes provides business & people with 3DEXPERIENCE universes to imagine sustainable innovations capable of harmonizing product, nature and life.

 

Author information

Dr. Reza Tabatabai
Reza Tabatabai is a Sr. Technical Manager for Simulation products, focusing on SOLIDWORKS Simulation and SIMULIA works product portfolios at Dassault Systèmes. He has 20 years of industry experience. Reza received his PhD from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) and was a Lecturer & Research Associate at the University of California at Berkeley.

The post COVID-19, Simulation and Computational Fluid Dynamics appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

by Dr. Reza Tabatabai at April 30, 2020 12:01 PM

The Javelin Blog

Why SOLIDWORKS Link Values is better than a Global Variable

Back with the release of SOLIDWORKS 2010, SOLIDWORKS introduced Global Variables. A nice little utility, to define a constant that can be used to drive multiple dimensions.

Equations, Global Variables and Dimensions

Equations, Global Variables and Dimensions

And for many situations this works well but the one downside is that a Global Variable has to be applied to each dimension individually. This can be tedious, when many dimensions need to be linked.

Applying a Global Variable

Prior to Global Variables, dimensions were made equal by using Link Values.

The main advantage of SOLIDWORKS Link Values, is that it can be applied to multiple dimensions at once.

How to Link Values

All that is required is selecting the dimensions that need to be linked, by using either Ctrl-select or Window select. After all the dimensions are selected, it’s simply a matter of right-clicking and selecting Link Values from the shortcut menu:

SOLIDWORKS Link Values

Linking Values

 

In the Shared Values dialog box, a Name is entered for the Linked Values.

Shared Values

Linked dimensions are denoted with a link (not infinity) icon.

SOLIDWORKS Linked Values

Linked Values (denoted by red link icon)

Linking Values does require selecting all dimensions to be linked. In a situation where these dimensions may belong to different features, not all the dimensions will be visible. This can addressed by right-clicking on Annotations in The FeatureManager and selecting Show Feature Dimensions.

Show Feature Dimensions

Show Feature Dimensions

Modifying Linked Values

The Link icon will also appear in the Modify Dimension dialog box and modifying any one of the Linked dimension, will update all Linked dimensions

Modify Dimension

Modify Dimension

Unlink Values

Linked dimensions can be unlinked by selecting one or more Linked dimensions, right-clicking and choosing Unlink Value.

Unlink Value

The post Why SOLIDWORKS Link Values is better than a Global Variable appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at April 30, 2020 12:00 PM

April 29, 2020

The Javelin Blog

Five Ways a 3D Printer will Save Time and Money in Your Product Development Process

Is your current product development process costing you more time and money than it should? Do you want to reduce friction in the stakeholder approval process?

The Solution

Bring higher quality modeling in-house at your team’s elbow, and straight into the product development process. Using traditional production methods is costing your product development teams time and money. Quality model shops have a long queue and large price tag, traditional modeling by hand is laborious and time consuming, and outsourcing comes with a laundry list of communication headaches, IP theft concerns, and extra costs.

Make communication easier, improve design quality, and reduce time to market. Read on to find out how bringing full-colour, multi-material modeling tools in house with a Stratasys J55 3D printer can save money, time, and significantly improve your product design process.

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1. Cut modeling time and cost

Outsourcing to model shops or modeling and painting by hand may be the norm, but waiting days or weeks for models to arrive or spending hours carving them from foam wastes valuable time – something you can’t get more of.

Bringing full colour, multi-material 3D printing in-house means faster models created more efficiently. With minimal material waste, little to no post-processing, and enhanced communication, you can spare designers modeling time by 50% and create models at 15% of the cost of outsourcing.

Stratasys J55 3D printer in the office

Stratasys J55 3D printer in the office

2. Accelerate design iterations

With a strict time frame until a product goes to market, companies that outsource or hand-make models often must skip iterating designs, lean heavily on renders, or are limited to one or two physical models. This can lead to design flaws later, disrupting the process and costing your company more time and money.

Bringing full colour 3D printing in house lets teams create five times the number of prototypes they would normally be able to make, meaning detailed design models can happen sooner, design issues can be ironed out earlier in the process, and decisions and design freeze can happen faster.

3D printed design iterations

3D printed design iterations

3. Improve product design quality

While outsourcing can be a useful tool, model quality can be unreliable due to communication issues and wait times. Outsourcing also limits the number of prototypes that are feasible within time and budget, preventing designers from experimenting with new ideas.

Incorporating 3D printing into the design process allows the team to ensure model quality and perfect ideas in-house. 3D printing also lets designers make concept models, create CMF models sooner and high fidelity models more often, even when models require full color or simulated material surface finish.

Improve product design quality

Improve product design quality

4. Reduce risk of design exposure

Some companies assume that, because of outsourcing, IP theft is an inevitable cost of doing business. But the impact of IP theft is so much more than just the initial design exposure – it can result in long-term hits to your company’s market value. About 90% of people in the consumer space outsource overseas.The result? One in five designs are stolen.

When you keep production in-house, you drastically reduce the risk of design exposure. Keep intellectual property within your company and ensure that your products stand out once they hit the market.

Product Development Process

Colour 3D printed mock-ups

5. Get stakeholder approval faster

Creating quality prototypes in just a few hours lets you put those prototypes in the hands of stakeholders and reviewers. With a real, physical model – not just a 2D render – reviewers can make faster decisions about designs, whether they’re assessing the colour or the ergonomics of a product.

Putting multiple iterations in the decision maker’s hands lets them know that the team listens and responds to feedback in a meaningful way. This not only ensures that stakeholders are fully behind the project, it makes the process more efficient, giving you a better product that gets to market weeks or months earlier.

Stakeholder approval

Stakeholder approval

The new J55 3D printer from Stratasys

If your business is losing time and money because of outsourcing headaches, laborious modeling processes and IP theft, the Stratasys J55 3D printer is an effective tool to make the most of your design process. Our multi-colour, multi-material office solution can help your team make product development faster and more cost-effective – with higher quality results.

Learn More

The post Five Ways a 3D Printer will Save Time and Money in Your Product Development Process appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Stratasys Ltd. at April 29, 2020 05:00 PM

SolidSmack

This Capsule Bot Lets Doctors Examine Your Stomach Lining

gastric endoscope capsule

“If you’re a big fan of robots, would you ever consider having one inside your stomach?”

This is the question you have to ask yourself before committing to Ankon Medical Technologies’ Gastric Endoscope Capsule. You may think this tiny thing is just like any edible capsule, but in reality, it’s actually a magnetically controlled robot that lets doctors get a good look at your digestive system and… it’s pretty, dang cool:

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</figure>

In order to get the jump on stomach ailments like ulcers, inflammation, or even cancer, doctors conduct an endoscopy. This usually involves inserting a long tube inside your mouth and down your digestive tract which, as you can imagine or have even experienced, isn’t much fun.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">gastric endoscope capsule</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">gastric endoscope capsule</figure>

The Gastric Endoscope Capsule is far less painful. In fact, the claim is that it is completely non-invasive. How does the robot capsule work? After fasting (just like before any sort of endoscopy), the patient takes a mixture of liquids before putting on a special data recording vest and swallowing the capsule.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">gastric endoscope capsule</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large">gastric endoscope capsule</figure>

The fun part comes as soon as the capsule reaches the stomach. With the patient on their side, the doctor is able to perform a thorough endoscopy from a remote control station. With the capsule in position, it can be moved using a set of joysticks throughout the stomach. These joysticks allow the capsule to make millimeter-length movements to ease the patient’s discomfort of having a small, maneuverable robot capsule inside their body.

<figure class="wp-block-image size-large">gastric endoscope capsule</figure>

Once the endoscopy is finished, the capsule is directed to the small intestine where the capsule proceeds through the rest of the digestive tract, and well… you know where that ultimately ends. This animation shows the process:

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vBA8dUUlgCY?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Considering the alternative is a long tube crammed down your throat, I would much rather ingest a tiny robot, thank you very much. Not only is it less intrusive but having a tiny robot inside your stomach is all kinda cool. Hopefully, the medical industry explores more ways of incorporating robotics into their procedures including, perhaps, fitting these capsule bots with UV light for internal anti-microbial treatment. Now, wouldn’t that be something.

The post This Capsule Bot Lets Doctors Examine Your Stomach Lining appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at April 29, 2020 04:43 PM

Vagon.io Has a Cloud Computer for Your COVID-19 Project

Vagon.io Cloud Computer

Earlier this month, we shared a new startup company, vagon, who offers personal, high-performance computers in the cloud. Each isolated virtual machine allows you to run graphics and 3D software on any computer via a browser session. Now, they reached out with details on what they’re doing to support those working around the clock on projects to support the development and manufacturing of personal protective equipment (PPE) for the COVID-19 pandemic.

Vagon COVID-19 Support

If you are supporting an open-source COVID-19 project, vagon wants to help you with your computer needs while lockdown and stay-at-home order remain in effect around the world.

Zahid Sagiroglu, Co-founder of vagon, explains that “we’d like to offer our help to any designer who wants to contribute to those projects but have problems accessing a good workstation due to the isolation situation.”

If you need a cloud computer to help with your project, contact vagon directly at info@vagon.io or their website.

Offer for SolidSmack Readers

We’ve also lined up an offer for other SolidSmack readers. It includes a 2-month free storage subscription plus 3 hours of “professional” and 2 hours of “challenger” performance usage so you can work on and render your design. The promo code is limited to 200 people. Simply, use code SOLIDSMACK when you register.

Have a Project With vagon?

If you’re currently working on a COVID-19 project or other design project and using vagon, contact us! We would love to hear about your experience and how it has helped.

The post Vagon.io Has a Cloud Computer for Your COVID-19 Project appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at April 29, 2020 04:01 PM

The Javelin Blog

Problem Exiting Design Tables in SOLIDWORKS?

There is currently a compatibility issue between Microsoft Excel based Design Tables in SOLIDWORKS and some versions of Microsoft Excel. These versions include Version 2003 (Build 12624.20320), Version 2003 (Build 12624.20382), Version 2003 (Build 12624.20442), and Version 2003 (Build 12624.20466).

The compatibility issue may be triggered when editing design tables or inserting a new Microsoft Excel based design table and can result in difficulties exiting the design table.

Edit Table in New Window

A possible workaround for ‘Edit Table’ function that cannot be exited is to use the option ‘Edit Table in New Window’.

Edit Table in New Window

Edit Table in New Window

Rollback Microsoft Excel

Another workaround is to roll back Microsoft Excel to prior to this version (for example roll back to Version 2002 (Build 12527.20278) or older). This is specifically important for users who use Microsoft Office 365 which auto-upgrades to the latest version.

To find out Microsoft Excel version, follow the instructions below:

  1. Open Microsoft Excel.
  2. Navigate to File> Account.
  3. The version of the installation can be viewed next to About Excel. 
Finding the Version of Microsoft Excel

Finding the Version of Microsoft Excel

Also, a list of all the Microsoft Office update history can be found on the Microsoft website.

To start rolling back the Microsoft Excel version, first make sure the automatic updates are disabled following the steps below:

  1. Open Microsoft Excel.
  2. Navigate to File > Account > Upgrade Options > Disable Updates. 
  3. Close Microsoft Excel. 

A reminder can be set up to manually check for future versions to update Microsoft Excel when this issue is resolved.

Disabling Automatic Updates

Disabling Automatic Updates

Once the automatic updates have been disabled, in order to revert Microsoft Excel to a prior version, please follow the instructions on the Microsoft website.

A permanent solution is coming soon

SOLIDWORKS is actively working on a permanent solution for these issues. With a valid subscription contract, SOLIDWORKS users affected by Microsoft Excel-related issues may contact their Value Added Reseller to ensure they are notified when the solution has been implemented.

The post Problem Exiting Design Tables in SOLIDWORKS? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Mersedeh Zandvakili at April 29, 2020 03:20 PM

How to find a Corrupt SOLIDWORKS Component

If you find that a SOLIDWORKS Component in your assembly or drawing has become corrupted, there are a couple of common causes for a file corruption:

  1. A SOLIDWORKS file became truncated while being saved. This can occur when the drive the file is being saved to becomes suddenly unavailable, or the system crashes.
  2. A SOLIDWORKS file was being copied to or from a network drive and the network drive suddenly became unavailable during the process. In this scenario the file in the target location may have been corrupted.

Usually a user will receive an indication that the file is corrupt when they try to open it, but if the corrupted file is in an open top level document, such as an assembly or drawing, there may not be any indication of a corruption until the top-level document is saved.

When there is a corrupt file, a user will receive a message that indicates that the file cannot be opened or saved and to contact their SOLIDWORKS reseller. In a top level document, though, there is no indication whether it is the top-level document or a referenced document that is corrupt. So how do we find the corrupt file? This does require a process of elimination.

Identifying a corrupt SOLIDWORKS file

The first step is to open the top-level document and then to set Advanced from the Configuration pull-down as shown in the figure below:

Setting Advanced for SOLIDWORKS Configuration

Setting Advanced for Configuration

After clicking on Open, in the ensuing dialog box, select ‘New configuration showing assembly structure only’ and provide a name for the new configuration, i.e. Troubleshooting. This will suppress all components referenced in the assembly.

SOLIDWORKS Configure Document

Configure Document

Once the assembly is open, starting from the top of the FeatureManager, unsuppress each component, one at a time, until you get a warning about not be able to load the component. This will be the corrupt file. If the issue is with a sub-assembly, you may need to open each sub-assembly, from the Open dialog box using Advanced mode for Configurations.

Solving the corruption problem

Now that you have identified the corrupt component, send it your SOLIDWORKS reseller, who will confirm that the component is corrupt and will then send it to DS SOLIDWORKS support, so that they can attempt to repair it.

For the most part, DS SOLIDWORKS support can repair corrupt files, but this can take some time and there is a chance that the file cannot be repaired. If a back-up or an earlier version of the file exists, using and/or updating this file may provide the fastest resolution. For simple parts then recreating part may be the fastest solution.

The post How to find a Corrupt SOLIDWORKS Component appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Joe Medeiros, CSWE at April 29, 2020 12:00 PM