Planet SolidWorks

February 22, 2019

SolidSmack

Forum: How to Start a Freelance Product Design Consultancy

Modern Lighter Design

Designing products for clients on your own is fun—but it’s not without its risks. For one, there’s the time pressure that comes from working for a company or client; while you have the creative freedom to work with vague guidelines, having to start from scratch can be a daunting challenge for the uninitiated. Second, with great design freedom comes great risk; doubly so if you’re working as a freelance product designer without the ability to bounce ideas off of a larger team.

Magnus Skogsfjord is one such brave designer setting out on his own.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Magnus Skogsfjord</figure>

After leaving his previous company to establish his design consultancy, he spent the first few months building his brand and working on two pilot projects: a lighter render for an Instagram challenge to gain better exposure for his brand, and a lamp design in Blender for a client.

Both projects were posted on a KeyShot forum post, where fellow product designers offered their support and advice for the new businessman.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">Magnus Skogsfjord</figure>

Aside from exchanging shop inquiries on the techniques Magnus used, there are also tidbits of helpful advice on starting up a design company, most of them from designer Bill Gould (KeyShot username: ‘Speedste).

<figure class="wp-block-image">Magnus Skogsfjord</figure>

Gould gave Magnus some brilliant advice on qualifying clients and setting out on your own: charging clients appropriately, communicating with them effectively, and being honest with them about the hours required for the project at hand.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Magnus Skogsfjord</figure>

There’s a fair bit to read through in the forum post, but it’s definitely worth the time for anyone looking to go into freelance product design.

Read the entire (insightful!) forum post over at KeyShot — then let us know in the comments what you think are the most critical skills a designer or engineer needs to have before setting off on their own path.

The post Forum: How to Start a Freelance Product Design Consultancy appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 22, 2019 02:00 PM

The Javelin Blog

Transition your SOLIDWORKS Installation over to use SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing

Article #6 in our SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing series:

STEP 1:

Please review the following articles prior to making attempts to switch your SOLIDWORKS client installation over to the Online Licensing model:

  1. Introducing SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing
  2. Getting started with the SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal
  3. Inviting users to participate in SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing
  4. Assigning SOLIDWORKS Products to Members using the SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal
  5. Enable Online Licensing for your SOLIDWORKS Products

STEP 2:

Begin the process of transitioning your SOLIDWORKS installation over to Online Licensing by starting up SOLIDWORKS on the system (this is the system that had been previously deactivated and is installed using the identical serial number that the administrator has adjusted within the SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal).

SOLIDWORKS will prompt you to Activate.

The Activation will fail with the following Error:

SOLIDWORKS Product Activation Fail Error

SOLIDWORKS Product Activation Fail Error

Select “No” and allow SOLIDWORKS to close.

STEP 3:

Restart SOLIDWORKS:

SOLIDWORKS now knows that it should present you with a dialog to sign into your SOLIDWORKS Account, in order to access the Online License.

Enter your email address attached to the SOLIDWORKS ID as well as the password:

Sign in to SOLIDWORKS

Sign in to SOLIDWORKS

Once you choose the LOG IN button, the SOLIDWORKS interface should load & you should be able to proceed with using SOLIDWORKS normally.

Your SOLIDWORKS License will now follow your SOLIDWORKS ID on whichever system you choose to login – provided you have internet access.

No internet access?

Subscribe to receive our next article where we will show you how to take a SOLIDWORKS Online License Offline (no internet connection).

The post Transition your SOLIDWORKS Installation over to use SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at February 22, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Weekend Designer Reads: ‘The Design of Everyday Things’ by Don Norman

Industrial Design Sketching

When it comes to product design books, it’s not always easy to eliminate glamorized portfolios from those that get down to the real nitty-gritty of product design. And when it comes to those actually worth reading, Don Norman will never do you wrong.

As a strong (and very early) advocate for user-centered design, Norman is a pioneer in UX and UI design principles that exist in many of the products we use today.

In his book, The Design of Everyday Things, Norman dives deeper into not just why…but how smart design is changing the landscape all around us—and what you can do to give your designs a competitive edge. If you haven’t read this one yet, consider it essential for your bookshelf. If you’ve already read it, consider giving it another spin.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The Design of Everyday Things by Don Norman — $12.92

About Author Don Norman:

Don Norman is a voyeur, always watching, always on the lookout for some common-day occurrence that everyone else takes for granted but that when examined, yields insight into the human condition. (If you are rushing to catch a train, how do you know if you got to the station on time? Empty platform? You probably are too late. People milling about, looking at their watches, peering down the tracks? Probably OK. Who needs technology when people are so informative, even if as an accidental byproduct of their activities.

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

Feature image via Airgora

The post Weekend Designer Reads: ‘The Design of Everyday Things’ by Don Norman appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 22, 2019 11:30 AM

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 08.19

MakerBot’s Definitive How-To Guide For Post-Processing 3D Prints is Wicked Helpful

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

Re:ease is the Ideal Modular Organizer for a Cluttered CAD Workstation Desktop

Though many don’t mind a cluttered work area, there are a few who can’t resume working unless their desk resembles the pinnacle of orderliness. The Re:ease desk organizer was made for these select neat freaks.

<figure class="aligncenter">Re:ease is the Ideal Modular Organizer for a Cluttered CAD Workstation Desktop </figure>

SkillCoach | Make “Squircle” Shaped Objects Using the Fusion 360 Conic Tool

What in the world is a “Squircle” you might ask? Well, its a cross between a square and a circle. Designers the world over admire the squircle because it gives us a lot of form exploration range. If I want a product to be perceived as stately or strong I might adjust the squircle more toward the square end of the spectrum.

<figure class="aligncenter">SkillCoach | Make “Squircle” Shaped Objects Using the Fusion 360 Conic Tool</figure>

Panel: Navigating the Stages of Building a Hardware Company

On January 30th, 2019, an impressive concentration of hardware pros could be found at Synapse Product Development‘s downtown Seattle office. Usually, HW people are in the minority at tech events, but not this time. What was the buzz about? Dragon Innovation was there to sponsor a HW startup panel which also included representation from HacksterGlowforge, and Root Ventures.

<figure class="aligncenter">Panel: Navigating the Stages of Building a Hardware Company</figure>

MakerBot’s Definitive How-To Guide For Post-Processing 3D Prints is Wicked Helpful

Using a series of post-processing techniques like sanding, painting, gluing, and mold-forming, you can easily make your 3D printed projects look just like their store-bought counterparts — ideal for when presenting realistic “looks like” prototypes to clients or coworkers.

<figure class="aligncenter">MakerBot’s Definitive How-To Guide For Post-Processing 3D Prints is Wicked Helpful</figure>

Adaptive UI for Siemens NX Just Changed the Future of 3D Design Software

Every once in a while, you’ll be enjoying a hot ham ‘n cheese, when something comes along, slaps that sandwich out of your hand, and marks a substantial shift in the future of 3D product development software. They’re shifts that mark moments when other software developers take notice and consider their own software dev plans.

<figure class="aligncenter">Siemens NX Adaptive UI Add-on NX30179</figure>

5 Epic Consumer Product Design Failures (and How We’d Fix Them)

I was squirtin’ some tunes on a Zune last week, when all of sudden I got a notification about a blog post on Onshape: Lessons From 5 Epic Consumer Design Failures.

<figure class="aligncenter">5 Epic Consumer Product Design Failures (and How We’d Fix Them)</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 08.19 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 22, 2019 11:00 AM

February 21, 2019

SolidSmack

Velo3D Flow: Most Powerful We’ve Seen For Preparing 3D Print Jobs

Velo3D metal 3d Printing Flow Software

There’s something very interesting going down at Velo3D.

The previously mysterious California-based metal 3D printing startup made a splash last fall with their new Sapphire metal 3D printer, which has the incredible ability to 3D print extreme overhangs without the need for support structures.

Today we learned quite a bit more about the company and their strategic goals. It seems they believe they have a solution approach for the fundamental problems in metal 3D printing that have not yet been attempted by others. Those issues include an assurance of part quality, extreme consistency and actual design freedom.

What? Isn’t 3D printing all about design freedom? Can’t you print any geometry?

In fact, due to the incredible complexities in 3D printing metal objects, there actually is far less design freedom than you might imagine. There are all kinds of constraints around the thickness of walls, overhangs, holes, thermal warping, trapped supports and other problematic factors. There are a thousand ways to fail in metal 3D printing. Velo3D wants to fix all that with their comprehensive strategy.

And what is that strategy? It’s complete integration between hardware, software and process.

This resonates with me, as you often have different vendors providing all of the above. For example, if the software preparing the print job doesn’t know much about the hardware, then a less-than-optimal job occurs.

We’ve seen hints of this strategy previously with some vendors offering, say, proprietary materials accompanied with optimal print parameters, which provide better results than using third party materials and guessing at the print parameters. But Velo3D has taken this approach and supercharged it.

They’ve developed not only a competent metal 3D printer, the Sapphire, but also a completely integrated printing lifecycle all the way through each step needed to produce a quality metal part.

One of the foundation pieces to this strategy was revealed this week: Flow, their print management software. This software is perhaps the most powerful we’ve yet seen in the 3D printing world for preparing print jobs.

<figure class="wp-block-pullquote no-margin no-padding">

This software is perhaps the most powerful we’ve yet seen in the 3D printing world for preparing print jobs.

</figure>
<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption> Velo3D’s new Flow 3D print management software [Source: Velo3D] </figcaption></figure>

A key element of Flow’s structure is that it does NOT use .STL files or 3D meshes of any kind. Instead it requires as input actual CAD files. They can import multiple file types, including all commonly used CAD formats, such as SOLIDWORKS, CATIA, STEP, etc. directly into Flow for processing.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption> Assigning a laser to 3D print regions in Flow [Source: Velo3D] </figcaption></figure>

This gives them the tremendous advantage of “knowing” the object’s structure in ways a mesh could not provide. Third party software usually does not know the machine or process being undertaken. Velo3D leverages this capability extensively in Flow. For example, a very powerful feature in Flow is the ability to define “regions” composed of CAD components. These regions can be used to apply different print parameters, for example.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Different regions in a metal 3D print job in Flow [Source: Velo3D] </figcaption></figure>

A second major point of integration is that the Sapphire equipment is extensively instrumented. There are mountains of sensors crawling all over the machine that take note of virtually every activity in real time.

Flow takes advantage of this by generating a simulation of the print job — in software — and this simulation is used during the print in real time to monitor what “should be happening”. If something is off, then the machine either attempts to self-correct, or aborts the job. This is something I’ve not seen anywhere — and should provide extreme reliability.

The simulation also provides a powerful corrective tool: it can predict thermal warping effects and instantly develop a “counter-deformed” part that will “warp” into the desired shape when cooled.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption> Selecting “smooth” parameters for the outer surface region of a metal part in Flow [Source: Velo3D] </figcaption></figure>

Print jobs are easily set up in Flow, partly because they’ve ensured the user interface is entirely operable with only a mouse — no keyboard is required. But they also have multiple powerful features that can be used to both organize and inspect a print job.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption> Support structures in Flow [Source: Velo3D] </figcaption></figure>

Support structure generation is quite flexible and allows several different approaches. You are also able to edit individual supports if you feel they are not required, for example. Of course, because the Sapphire machine is able to 3D print objects with extreme overhangs without support, there is less need for them in the first place.

By the way, the reason the Sapphire is able to print such extreme overhangs is a side effect of all the instrumentation and process control. They know exactly what is going on in that machine as it prints.

Flow is also able to open incredibly complex 3D models that would otherwise choke many 3D print management systems. This is, I think, a critical feature because it opens the door to leveraging the technology as much as possible, particularly when you consider the avalanche of highly complex computer generated 3D models that will soon arrive.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gxM86xWlGjk?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Velo3D believes, and I agree, that there are not enough metal 3D printing experts in the world today. This has definitely held back the progress of the tools worldwide. However, their Flow system provides a number of interesting real-time feedbacks, so that an operator would be able to gradually understand the effects of doing “this” or “that”. In this way Velo3D hopes to actually increase the number of metal 3D printing experts, through software exposure.

I’m not going to delve into the myriad features of Flow because there are many. It is an entirely fascinating product that will likely shake things up in the industry.

Flow (or at least a couple of licenses) will be bundled with each new Velo3D equipment sale, and they will be providing existing clients with the software as well. We’re told they will also be able to provide Flow to those who are not clients, but wish to use it to prepare print jobs for service bureaus using Velo3D hardware. This is a terrific idea.

If you want to see the future of 3D printing, see their systems and approach at velo3d.com.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post Velo3D Flow: Most Powerful We’ve Seen For Preparing 3D Print Jobs appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at February 21, 2019 05:47 PM

Another Perspective on 3DXWorld Announcement

For those who haven’t seen it, I’d recommend going over to Roopinder’s site and reading what he has to say about 3DXW. He has some quotes from people, general reactions…

by matt at February 21, 2019 03:25 PM

SolidSmack

Build Your Next CAD Workstation with This Computer Building Course

Hard Drive

These days, you can get just about any computer rig designed to your exact specifications. Whether you’re a RAM-hogging SOLIDWORKS user, or simply just want a powerful workstation, there’s something for everybody. But no standardized hardware mod will ever replace the satisfaction of building your own rig from scratch.

If you’ve ever wanted to create your own custom-built PC but didn’t know where to start, boy do we have great news for you.

The How to Build a Computer Bundle consolidates five intensive online courses (a total of 126 individual lessons) ranging from how to create a blueprint for your desired desktop or laptop setup to how to overclock CPU processor functions to speed up rendering times.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

How to Build a Computer Bundle — $374 $19.00 (94% off)

Topics Covered Include:

  • Learn about the basic functions of a computer system
  • Pick out appropriate hardware for your build
  • Assemble all hardware needed for a fully functional computer
  • Wire everything within the case like an expert
  • Cover the most effective method of CPI cooling: closed-loop liquid cooling
  • Upgrade to a higher capacity storage device
  • Improve your RAM chip(s)
  • Clean & refresh your CPU cooling unit
  • Swap in an SSD
  • Learn about the various tricky aspects about RAID setups
  • Understand how to increase data read/write speeds & prepare your computer for a drive crash

Get It!

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Build Your Next CAD Workstation with This Computer Building Course appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 21, 2019 01:06 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to enable Online Licensing for your SOLIDWORKS Products

Article #5 in our SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing series:

In the previous article we showed you how to Assign SOLIDWORKS Products to Members using the SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal. Before a SOLIDWORKS user can make use of a SOLIDWORKS License attached to their SOLIDWORKS ID the Administrator will need to switch the licensing mode of the product, over to use “ONLINE LICENSING”.

The steps to do this are as follows:

STEP 1:

Once your SOLIDWORKS Administrator has arrived at the main page of the SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal, they may choose to search for the desired member in the “Members” list. Alternatively the product / user combination can also be searched by using the serial number of the product.

Find Members

Find Members

STEP 2:

Select the desired user from your list of Members within the SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal

Selecting a Member

Selecting a Member

STEP 3:

Choose the product you wish to migrate to the “Online Licensing” mode from the list of “Assigned Products” attached to the selected user.

Choosing a Product

Choosing a Product

STEP 4:

On the Individual Product page that will result from the selection in STEP #3, you will find information such as the serial number, subscription end date as well as the “Activation Type” that is being used by the license.

The license will be migrated to use ONLINE LICENSING once the “Change to Online Licensing” hyperlink is selected.

Change to SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing

Change to SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing

TIP: This option will not be available if ALL Machine Activations attached to the SOLIDWORKS serial number have not been deactivated – Two indicators that the deactivation has not been completed prior to your attempt are the appearance of the “NO GO” sign when hovering over the hyperlink as well as the following message while hovering over the question mark Icon beside the link:

Activated License

Activated License

Deactivation of the license can be accomplished by choosing “Deactivate Licenses” from the help menu of your SOLIDWORKS installation.

STEP 5:

Once you are able to select the “Change to Online Licensing” Link, you may see a warning dialog, advising you that you are making the switch over to ONLINE LICENSING, Simply select “OK” to close the dialog.

Confirm Change to Online Licensing

Confirm Change to Online Licensing

STEP 6:

Within the details for the product, under “Activation Type:” you will see that the line item reports that the license is currently set to “Online Licensing” rather than “Machine Activation” that was present earlier.

The hyperlink that you had selected to make the switch to Online Licensing, should now read: “Change to Machine Activation” so that you can migrate back to the machine based activation system, whenever you prefer.

Change to Machine Activation

Change to Machine Activation

This concludes the work that needs to be done by the SOLIDWORKS Administrator within the Admin Portal for an individual license.  Our next article will explore the steps required to switch a client system from “Machine Activation” to using the SOLIDWORKS ID to Login to a SOLIDWORKS Session.

Next Steps

For next steps in the SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing process, please subscribe to receive our upcoming articles:

  • Transition your SOLIDWORKS Installation over to use SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing
  • Logging into a SOLIDWORKS Session using Online Licensing

The post How to enable Online Licensing for your SOLIDWORKS Products appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at February 21, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Xpad is the World’s Thinnest and First-Ever Flexible Wireless Charger

Yes, yes, you might’ve heard smartphone accessory companies brag about how their wireless chargers are the thinnest in all the land. But, if you find a wireless charger thinner than 0.11 inches, it’s either made from some undiscovered material or an entirely bogus claim.

The environmentally-conscious Xpad universal charger from Australian company PlusUs, however, is actually that—and aims to be just as fancy as it is thin.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UKA9sqqilDw?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Xpad users can pick from either cork, timber veneer, or Italian leather coverings to lay their phones upon, but the core material of the charger is thermal-insulating cork. This prevents the surface you put your phone upon from turning into a thermal heater while your phone is charging.

As for what’s inside the Xpad, PlusUs reduced the standard coil thickness by 50% of its normal size to make it more portable and efficient. The circuit board was also reduced in size by 70% and is actually separate from the pad, making it produce less heat and allows the charging pad to be a lot thinner.

<figure class="aligncenter">xpad</figure>

Charging phones on the Xpad is easy: plop your wireless-chargeable phone onto the pad, find a USB to plug the Xpad in, and off it goes. The pad uses adaptive smart chip tech to determine the highest power transferable to a phone via the charger, so you can charge any phone from any power source, be it a wall socket, PC, or laptop (there’s even an adapter so you can charge your phone while lugging your laptop around). It’s also Qi-compatible, meaning any Qi-enabled device can be charged by the Xpad as well.

The Xpad is currently live on Indiegogo and has netted $7,514 of its $20,000 goal. You can find more on this environment-friendly thin charger on its Indiegogo page.

The post Xpad is the World’s Thinnest and First-Ever Flexible Wireless Charger appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 21, 2019 12:58 PM

Cool Tools: The Uni Kuru Toga Rotating Lead Mechanical Pencil

Mechanical Pencil

Those of you who know us well know of our longstanding love for the iconic rOtring 800 Mechanical Pencil. But heck, it isn’t the only great mechanical pencil to have on your desktop.

For those who are particular about sharp lead points — AT ALL TIMES — the brilliant engineering behind writing tool manufacturer Uni’s Kuru Toga mechanical pencil just might be the best thing for you since, well, sliced bread.

Ideal for sketching, writing, engineering linework, or just about anything else that requires a nice bit of lead to the paper, the Kuru Toga features a mechanism that rotates the lead ever-so-slightly each time it’s lifted from the page—meaning, you’re always presented with a sharp edge for each new stroke. Similar to other professional-quality mechanical pencils, the Kuru Toga comes in a weighty metal body and makes use of a universal knurled grip to accommodate a variety of sketching styles. Best of all, however, the dang thing is less than ten bucks.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/H_OXoxymeho?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Uni Kuru Toga Mechanical Pencil — $6.50

Features:

  • Kuru Toga lead rotating technology
  • 0.5mm lead
  • Gun metallic body
  • Made in Japan

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: The Uni Kuru Toga Rotating Lead Mechanical Pencil appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 21, 2019 11:19 AM

Watch How a Mechanical Engineer Created a Functional 3D Printed Roller Coaster in SOLIDWORKS

SolidWorks roller coaster

While his day job has him designing engines for the Ford Motor Company (not a bad job in its own right), systems engineer Matt Schmotzer spends his free time creating 3D printed replicas of real-life roller coasters using his breadth of SOLIDWORKS knowledge and 3D printing techniques.

His first 3D printed roller coaster is a 1:25 scale replica of the Invertigo, an inverted boomerang roller coaster which propels its passengers upside down for the majority of the ride before propelling them back down the same track. He started working on the model in early 2017, using SOLIDWORKS to model the parts and print them in his garage.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/U4EP1V-G9-Y?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;start=57&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

As a one-time passenger of the stomach-churning roller coaster, making the Invertigo replica was a lot easier due to his ability to recreate the construction and scale from his own experience. Schmotzer simply took the layout for the coaster, exported the XYZ data onto an Excel spreadsheet, and scaled it down to fit his planned replica. Once the data was miniaturized, he exported it into SOLIDWORKS and designed the tracks, mechanisms, and launch station for the scaled model.

<figure class="aligncenter">miniature roller coasters </figure>

The biggest problem proved to be getting the carts to run on the tracks. Since the weight and dimensions of a real roller coaster cart are what allow it to run on the track, Schmotzer had to reduce the friction on the wheels and get the turns on the roller coaster just right so the cart completes its run without stopping or derailing from the track.

The friction problem was remedied by using ceramic bearings and a magnet-based lift system, while plastic tubing glued to the track helps keep the cart on the track. In total, the Invertigo replica is composed of 33 track sections and fits on a 4×8 foot table.

<figure class="aligncenter">miniature roller coasters</figure>

His success with the Invertigo 1:25 replica drew the attention of the SOLIDWORKS marketing crew, who got the talented engineer to showcase his 3D printed roller coaster at the 2019 SOLIDWORKS World Convention in Dallas, Texas in early February.

He was even able to collaborate with the Cedar Point Theme Park management on a static replica of their newest attraction: the Steel Vengeance. The life-sized coaster takes one of their older attractions, the Mean Streak, and combines wood and steel to create a more modern coaster with a 205-foot drop which gives riders 30 seconds of airtime.

Schmotzer’s replica of the Steel Vengeance, on the other hand, uses 3,500 printed parts integrated onto brass supports. Since he was working with Cedar Point, they were able to give him the blueprints for the ride.

<figure class="aligncenter">miniature roller coasters</figure>
<figure class="aligncenter">miniature roller coasters</figure>

His latest completed project is Batman: The Ride – a series of roller coasters based on the 1989 superhero film. Taking his experience from his Invertigo and static Steel Vengeance builds, Schmotzer used 10 3D printers and the SOLIDWORKS API to automate the track creation process—reducing the time it took to create the track to little over a month’s time.

Though the printing process took only 12 hours, Schmotzer had to splice the track sections together with the help of his wife. Using Microsoft Visual Studio, they created a series of macros to automate the splicing process. Instead of taking three weeks to hand-splice the tracks together (like he did with the Invertigo), the program now does the majority of the work automatically.

Schmotzer has tons more roller coaster replicas in the works. The Millenium Force roller coaster at Cedar Point has a replica in the works which is half finished, while another Cedar Point coaster called the Magnum XL-200 already has its design finalized and ready for printing (he must really love Cedar Point roller coasters). With more working replicas on the way, Matt Schmotzer could—using the words of Zoolander—open up his own miniature theme park for ants!

The post Watch How a Mechanical Engineer Created a Functional 3D Printed Roller Coaster in SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 21, 2019 03:15 AM

February 20, 2019

SolidSmack

Adaptive UI for Siemens NX Just Changed the Future of 3D Design Software

Siemens NX Adaptive UI Add-on NX30179

Every once in a while, you’ll be enjoying a hot ham ‘n cheese, when something comes along, slaps that sandwich out of your hand, and marks a substantial shift in the future of 3D product development software. They’re shifts that mark moments when other software developers take notice and consider their own software dev plans.

Come to think of it, Siemens has been behind a few of those moments (even if they were not the first) – Mac support (NX for Mac), mixed direct/parametric, history/history-free modeling (Synchronous Technology), facet/surface/solid modeling (Convergent Modeling) – and this week, they put their flag in the sand of future CAD tech yet again with the announcement of Adaptive UI for Siemens NX.

Al Dean at Develop3D, lays it out:

Essentially, you begin a modelling or detailing activity in NX, then the system knows, through analysis and prediction (the machine learning part) what you’re most likely to do next, so brings up the most commonly used operations or commands.

Biff, bam, boom, aaaaand done. More or less. In the Siemens PLM press release they describe the implications:

The NX Command Prediction module is the first introduction of the machine learning-enabled NX adaptive user interface architecture to the market, and will be the basis for, and lead to, additional machine learning-driven UI solutions.

Further, Bob Haubrock, Senior Vice President, Product Engineering Software at Siemens PLM Software, says:

The latest version of NX uses machine learning and artificial intelligence to monitor the actions of the user, and their successes and failures, so now we can dynamically determine how to serve the right NX commands or modify the interface to make the individual user more productive.

Failures? Puh-leeease. Ok, maybe a few… hundred. Before I go any further, have a look at how the NX interface adapts for different users:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SN17ExY-8Ek?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Make sense now? Sometimes it’s hard to put new technologies like machine learning and artificial intelligence into practical and meaningful concepts but the Adaptive UI for Siemens NX demonstrates it in how your own use of the software helps it learn to make you more productive.

It can go a long way toward reducing clicks but there’s so much potential – completing sketch operations, assembly creation, component addition, generating initial simulation scenarios, drawing view layout/manipulation,detailing, supply chain and parts acquisition – it goes on and on.

And I’m talking specifically about the user interface here, not about the content. Many a software, desktop and cloud, has some sort of auto-complete, shape recognition, assembly definition, or BOM generation capable of utilizing data amassed by its use. But adaptive UIs step into a whole other area of user interation.

Now, imagine it off the 2D screen. Or, applied to our modern day conveyances?

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1G13KzEJqBw?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
<figcaption> “Well if that was a 3rd class maneuver, then what’s a 1st class?” </figcaption></figure>

Hmmm.

According to Pat McManus, Senior Technical Manager at Siemens PLM Software, the patent on this has been filed and Adaptive UI for NX is available now as an add-on for NX, specifically, NX30179 – NX Command Prediction. So, apparently, there’s a license cost associated with that. Price? Who knows.

The post Adaptive UI for Siemens NX Just Changed the Future of 3D Design Software appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 20, 2019 11:55 PM

App Smack 08.19: Coda, Otter Voice, Sketchbook, Google Lens, and More…

Best iPhone Apps

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved smart device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional. This week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Kalkulator 2 (iOS — $0.99)

Kalkulator will help you remember the results of your last calculation. It stores your results, which is then easily accessible. There is a history feature which allows you to continue calculations, where you left off. It is simple, and smart.

<figure class="aligncenter">Kalkulator 2</figure>

Coda (iOS – Free)

Coda docs start simple like other docs — and grow and evolve into powerful tools. We’ve seen people build Coda docs that do everything from launch products, run companies, and remind you to water the plants.

<figure class="aligncenter">Coda App</figure>

Otter Voice Notes (iOS — Free)

Otter is a smart note-taking app that empowers you to remember, search, and share your voice conversations (English only). 600 free minutes every month! Otter.ai is a cloud service that is also accessible from the Web.

<figure class="aligncenter">Otter Voice Notes</figure>

TickTick: To Do List (Android — Free)

TickTick is a simple and effective to-do list and task manager app which helps you make schedule, manage time, remind about deadlines and organize life at work, home and everywhere else.

<figure class="aligncenter">TickTick To Do</figure>

Autodesk Sketchbook (Android — Free)

At Autodesk, we believe creativity starts with an idea. From quick conceptual sketches to fully finished artwork, sketching is at the heart of the creative process. You never know when a great idea will strike, so access to fast and powerful creative sketching tools is an invaluable part of any creative process.

<figure class="aligncenter">Autodesk Sketchbook</figure>

Google Lens (Android — Free)

<figure class="aligncenter">Google Lens</figure>

Learn more about the world.

The post App Smack 08.19: Coda, Otter Voice, Sketchbook, Google Lens, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 20, 2019 08:50 PM

Cool Tools: The Suizan Japanese Pull Saw

Japanese Saw

When it comes to woodworking, the quality of your work really can come down to the quality of your tools—which is why it’s critical to invest in tools that perform properly for the cuts you need. Thankfully, wood craftsmen have been refining many of these tools and techniques for centuries.

And among others that stand out above the rest are Japanese hand tools—which are different from Western tools in that they are minimally designed, which results in a lighter and simpler tool. The SUIZNAN brand of Japanese Pull Saws is a perfect example.

Pull saws are popular in both Western and Japanese woodworking shops because they require less power and create exceedingly smooth and accurate cuts. Not to mention, a great pull saw blade design is sharper and thinner (0.008 inch), and has a greater number of teeth per inch (30 TPI) than comparable saws of its size—Japanese pull saws like the Dozuki Saw from SUIZAN.

With a history of over 100 years, all of the processes to make the pull saws are completed by master craftsmen in one of Japan’s towns known for their craftsmanship: Sanjō in Niigata prefecture. Thankfully, you don’t have to go back in time—or travel to Japan—to get this stunning hand tool today. You may never go back to a conventional saw ever again.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Suizan 8-Inch Japanese Pull Saw — $43.99

Features:

  • Works with both soft wood and hardwoods like tiger maple, red oak, teak, MDF, OSB, and even driftwoods
  • 0.0031-inch — the Thinnest Saw Blade in the world for highl precision work
  • Teeth Per Inch: 30 TPI / Blade Thickness: 0.008 inch / Kerf Width: 0.012 inch / Blade Length: 8 inch / Overall Length: 20-1/2 inch
  • The saw blade is easily removable and interchangeable
  • All Suizan products are manufactured in Japan by Japanese master craftsmen

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: The Suizan Japanese Pull Saw appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 20, 2019 07:53 PM

MakerBot’s Definitive How-To Guide For Post-Processing 3D Prints is Wicked Helpful

3D Printing Post Processing

Using a series of post-processing techniques like sanding, painting, gluing, and mold-forming, you can easily make your 3D printed projects look just like their store-bought counterparts — ideal for when presenting realistic “looks like” prototypes to clients or coworkers.

From sanding and gluing all the way to crafting different molds and finally painting the objects, MakerBot’s Definitive Guide to 3D Printing Post-Processing is a valuable resource containing seven different post-processing techniques for design students and professionals to “take their ideas beyond the build plate”.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0KU0lgoC42Q?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">makerbot post processing guide</figure>

Each guided technique features a video detailing the different steps you have to take before and after the printing process. To ensure that you aren’t scrambling for your tools halfway through, each video begins with a complete checklist of things you need to carry out the post-processing technique. These checklists are also organized into a handy Amazon shopping list for one-click tool and supply purchasing, if necessary.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">makerbot post processing guide</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">makerbot post processing guide</figure>

But each how-to guide doesn’t just start and end at the post-processing technique. In the case of the sanding guide, it guides you through printer settings, print orientation, and other print settings that can have an impact on your finished model. Once the printing has finished, different grits of sandpaper are used in both wet and dry variations to give the item a smooth finish ideal for priming and painting.

<figure class="wp-block-image">makerbot post processing guide</figure>

And to ensure that you don’t have to pause and rewind each video for every step of the guide, a handy breakdown of steps accompanies each video to make it easy to follow along. sanding, gluing, painting, inserts, two guides for silicone molding, and vacuum forming. Here’s to hoping they add more soon!

If you’re looking to expand your ‘How-To’ bookmark folder—this is one handy resource you won’t want to miss!

The post MakerBot’s Definitive How-To Guide For Post-Processing 3D Prints is Wicked Helpful appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 20, 2019 01:16 PM

Cool Tools: Preppin’ Weapon Ergonomic Sanding Blocks

Those wood or 3D printed parts won’t smooth themselves!

But how often do you spend wrestling a piece of sandpaper around weird edges—only to be left with a half-crooked and totally botched result? There’s a remedy for that — and we can’t recommend it enough.

The Preppin’ Weapon sanding block is a workshop necessity that lets users load sandpaper and adjust tension quickly and easily. And while just one Preppin’ Weapon sanding block will go a long way in your process, arming yourself with a four-pack for four different levels of grit will take it to another level—no need to stop and reload!

For power users, the Preppin’ Weapon also lets you stack up to four sheets of sandpaper in each block for quick tearaways when a new sheet is needed without stopping to reset. Fast and consistent sanding has never been this easy.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Preppin’ Weapon Ergonomic Sanding Blocks (4-Pack) — $79.98

Features:

  • Dramatically reduces sanding time
  • Color-coded (yellow, blue, green and red) for different grit
  • Easy to use wet or dry with multiple materials
  • Ergonomic for reducing pain points
  • Preload multiple sandpaper sheets into each block
  • Durable construction with Lifetime Warranty

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: Preppin’ Weapon Ergonomic Sanding Blocks appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 20, 2019 01:10 PM

The Javelin Blog

Assign SOLIDWORKS Products to Members using the SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal

Article #4 in our SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing series:

In our previous article we showed you how to Invite Users to participate in SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing. But before a SOLIDWORKS user can make use of their SOLIDWORKS ID to login to their SOLIDWORKS Products, an administrator will need to ensure that products have been assigned to that user.

STEP 1:

Begin by selecting the desired user from your list of Members within the SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal

Select a User in the SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal

Select a User in the SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal

STEP 2:

The “member details” page will load, where you can VERIFY that you have selected the correct member (user).

STEP 3:

VERIFY that the license you intend to apply is set to “Online Licensing”.

If the Online Licensing Column reads “Y” or “N” the SOLIDWORKS Product is still set to use the Machine Activation Mechanism and will not be available if logging into SOLIDWORKS using your SOLIDWORKS ID

(That procedure may be found in the following article)

STEP 4:

Select the line of the SOLIDWORKS product within the “Available Products Table” you wish to assign. The product line will highlight in blue when selected.

STEP 5:

Select the “Assign Product” link

Assign Product in the SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal

Assign Product in the SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal

STEP 6:

You should see an pop up dialog present you with confirmation that the product has been assigned to the user.

Once a SOLIDWORKS License is assigned to a particular user, you can proceed to Enabling the ONLINE LICENSING Functionality for the user.

Next Steps

For Next steps in the SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing process, please subscribe to receive our upcoming articles:

  • Enable Online Licensing for your SOLIDWORKS Products
  • Transition your SOLIDWORKS Installation over to use SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing

The post Assign SOLIDWORKS Products to Members using the SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at February 20, 2019 01:00 PM

February 19, 2019

SolidSmack

Panel: Navigating the Stages of Building a Hardware Company

On January 30th, 2019, an impressive concentration of hardware pros could be found at Synapse Product Development‘s downtown Seattle office. Usually, HW people are in the minority at tech events, but not this time. What was the buzz about? Dragon Innovation was there to sponsor a HW startup panel which also included representation from Hackster, Glowforge, and Root Ventures.

Also, there was beer on tap. So, that’s something to be buzzed about. Here’s photographic proof of how excited everyone was:

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Proof of HW engineers being excited at Synapse. Also: reasons why we can’t have nice things.</figcaption></figure>

Watch Video of the Talk

There were lots of valuable tips and trends the panel pros shared during the discussion. You can watch the highlights in the video below:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dwRWg5ytFXs?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Who Was Speaking?

Scott N. Miller

<figure class="aligncenter is-resized"></figure>

Scott N. Miller, CEO of Dragon Innovation (an Avnet company) moderated the panel. He has plenty of getting-hands-dirty experience as an early iRobot engineer. His academic background is in mechanical engineering and he also tools around with robots . . . obviously . . . Miller also has a keen grasp on the business and longer-term development perspective. He puts all that to use guiding HW startups at Dragon, and he made for the perfect moderator of this diverse panel.

Heather Brundage

Heather Brundage was the Synapse representation on the panel. Part of her background includes working on submersible robots. She’s now an account manager at Synapse, helping companies bring their hardware babies to life. Like Miller, Brundage brought a valuable viewpoint with her combined perspectives as an engineer plus businessy business person.

Adam Benzion

Adam Benzion is cofounder and CEO of Hackster. Before Hackster, he gained experience successfully founding and then selling a hardware startup. Benzion claims he is more businessy business person than engineer, and simply knew how to ask the right questions and get help from all the necessary specialists when he created his mobile power management gizmo. In any case, that gizmo got his name on 3 patents and led to many more endeavors in the HW space.

Chrissy Meyer

Chrissy Meyer made for another double threat as both experienced electrical engineer and partner at Root Ventures. In her own words, Root Ventures likes to fund very early stage startups solving extremely technically difficult problems. (Why tho? Do they like migraines? Because that’s how we get migraines.) Well, the rougher the mountain terrain, the sharper the Sherpa. Meyer had some great insights with over half Root’s portfolio companies involving hardware in some fashion.

Renuka Ayer

Renuka Ayer, CFO of Glowforge, queen of money management, rounded out the panel’s knowledge. Prior to Glowforge, she helped keep companies making very, very large hardware (e.g. automotive and aerospace) running smoothly financially. Having a background in automotive myself, I know how difficult that can be. Big widgets can involve some of the biggest financial mistakes if you’re not careful (or even if you are). At Glowforge, she sharpened her skills on the tougher task of keeping a budding hardware company running.

Some Tips From the Pros

Adam Benzion (Hackster):

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>
  1. Go to HW MeetUp-type events (like this very panel) to meet those with the skill sets you need. Hardware requires many more disciplines to design a system than SW dev does. You’re also not going to find all the HW skill sets you need in just a couple people — you’ll need several experts. So, get to networking! That’s how Benzion, himself, succeeded.
  2. For specific questions, reach out to online forums. If you’re on Hackster.io, oftentimes, you can find an example project that involved the thing you’re trying to figure out. Reach out to person who posted and ask how they did it! You might have luck on other platforms, too, like Stack Overflow, Reddit, Github, etc.

Heather Brundage (Synapse):

<figure class="aligncenter is-resized"></figure>
  1. Get feedback from engineers understanding high-volume design requirements early on. And then expect to potentially rethink your entire design based on what they tell you. Don’t ask how to scale your 3D-printed, duct-taped, wire hanger design, ask them how they would build your gadget. Your prototype is best thought of as a way to explain your concept to experts who can build it better.
  2. And advice 1a.) be honest about what you don’t know. Get help for your blind-spots.
  3. Don’t shop for service partners like you did scrapping for parts for your proof-of-concept. Penny pinching is really great to start with, but when you’re thinking about scale, saving on up-front dollar amounts might cost you in the long run. Look for engineering and vendor partners who a.) know their stuff, and b.) can get you to high volume smoothly.
  4. Build relationships with your distributors and retailers. If your sales aren’t 100% direct to customer, keep in close contact with your distribution chain so you know if you’re manufacturing enough or too little.
  5. Communicate your priorities to your vendors in terms of “Good/Fast/Cheap Pick Any 2”. Expecting all 3 will get you nowhere, because it’s not possible. If you don’t make your priorities clear, they will be decided for you.

Chrissy Meyer (Root Ventures):

<figure class="aligncenter is-resized"></figure>
  1. Engage your supply chain early on. Even if you’re not ready to jump into large scale production, do a sanity check with your suppliers as soon as you can. Get feedback on how manufacturable your idea is and broad guidelines as soon as possible.
  2. “Do not take a dollar of venture money if you don’t have to.” (Wait, what?) Keep in mind, venture capitalists expect 1/2 their porfolio companies will fail. VC’s are motivated to push companies to grow big quickly, but that’s not necessarily based on the best interest of the startup.
  3. Build relationship capital with your supply chain. When you’re in a bind and need a favor, you want your supplier to pick up the phone. Relationship capital is often overlooked because it’s an intangible, but it can make or break your startup.
  4. Experience is vital for HW startups while not critically important in SW startups. Root Ventures has a saying, “our portfolio companies have more CEO’s that are PhD’s than MBA’s”. They look for deep technical expertise in the founders they give money to. Startups with founders who successfully shipped a physical product before are also favored.

Renuka Ayer, Glowforge

<figure class="aligncenter is-resized"></figure>
  1. Figure out how much money you want and need financially — both personally and professionally.
  2. If you crowdfund your HW startup, a fiscally responsible route forward is to find alternative funding for day-to-day expenses. That’s what Glowforge did. They intended their Kickstarter money to go directly to the product from the start.
  3. Find credible engineering and manufacturing partners, even if it costs more. The cost of goods sold might start at almost 100% of revenue, but then you work to bring it down to 30-40% as you go.

What Trends Do They See?

Heather Brundage (Synapse):

Voice user interfaces are not just being embedded in more and more hardware, but consumers are beginning to expect it.

Chrissy Meyer (Root Ventures):

Huge increases have happened in sensing technology with all the money dumped into autonomous vehicle development. Root Ventures is seeing this tech trickle down into other industries like manufacturing and logistics.

Adam Benzion (Hackster):

  1. Machine learning and AI is exploding into all sorts of tech, especially on Hackster.
  2. Interesting companies are emerging using blockchain not in the cryptocurrency arena. These include HW and SW products to do things like: asset management using smart contracts and creating a more secure and big-brotherless internet.

Now Go Network!

Hopefully the panelists impressed upon you the importance of networking with other hardware enginerds. I further hope we’ll see more events posted to Dragon Innovation’s Eventbrite page soon!

The post Panel: Navigating the Stages of Building a Hardware Company appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at February 19, 2019 07:37 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to Invite Users to participate in SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing

Article #3 in our SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing series:

In previous articles for this series we introduced SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing, and showed you how to get started with the SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal.

Before SOLIDWORKS can be assigned SOLIDWORKS assets within the SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing model, an administrator must “invite” the user to participate in online licensing for their organization.

Please follow the steps below in order to invite additional members to participate in SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing

STEP 1:

After arriving at the main page of the SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal, choose the “Members” selection within the page header and select the “Invite Member” link located at the top of the members list:

SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal Members

SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal Members

STEP 2:

As shown in the screenshot below start by entering the email address[es] associated with the SOLIDWORKS ID of the individual you wish to invite.

Next specify the appropriate User Rights for the individual[s], proceed to refining the invitation message for the users.

Then select the Send Invitations button:

Member Invitation

Member Invitation

Once the message has been sent, you will be returned to the main page of the Admin Portal.

As a confirmation step that the invitation has gone out successfully, check the “User Rights” column of the Admin Portal Members page to ensure that the member’s status is set to “PENDING”.

**I also suggest that the user check Junk mail folders if the automated message does not arrive.

STEP 3:

The SOLIDWORKS User will receive an invitation by email to login to their previously created SOLIDWORKS account, or to Create a NEW SOLIDWORKS ID

Sent Invitation Email

Sent Invitation Email

Once the user has selected the link within the email they will be brought to the welcome page:

Welcome Screen for Members

Welcome Screen for Members

Once the user has clicked OK on the welcome screen and logged in using their SOLIDWORKS ID  “User Rights” column of the Admin Portal Members page to ensure that the member’s status has changed to “Member” or “Admin”.

Member User Rights

Member User Rights

You are now ready to proceed In Assigning SOLIDWORKS PRODUCTS to your new Member.

Next Steps

For the next steps in the SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing process, please subscribe to receive our upcoming articles:

  • Assigning SOLIDWORKS Products to Members using the SOLIDWORKS Admin Portal
  • Enable ONLINE Licensing for your SOLIDWORKS Products
  • Transition your SOLIDWORKS Installation over to use SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing

The post How to Invite Users to participate in SOLIDWORKS Online Licensing appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at February 19, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidWorks World becomes 3DX World

By now you’ve probably heard that SolidWorks World 2019 has already been announced as the last SolidWorks World. Next year’s big event from DS/SW will be called 3D Connection World.…

by matt at February 19, 2019 02:53 AM

February 18, 2019

SolidSmack

SkillCoach | Make “Squircle” Shaped Objects Using the Fusion 360 Conic Tool

What in the world is a “Squircle” you might ask? Well, its a cross between a square and a circle. Designers the world over admire the squircle because it gives us a lot of form exploration range. If I want a product to be perceived as stately or strong I might adjust the squircle more toward the square end of the spectrum. But, if I’m going for playful and approachable, I’d likely opt toward the circle end of the spectrum. Now keep in mind there are other factors that go into the equation of how a product is perceived such as CMF. If you want to see squircle in action hop over to 3Dconnexion and check out their SpaceMouse® Wireless.

I suppose the next question one might ask is, how do I replicate a squircle in CAD? What tool would I use? The answer, the conic tool! Every CAD package has its own version of the conic tool. The primary difference being how the geometry is constrained within the 2D sketch environment.

Discovering The Conic

Recently I was singing the praises of the conic to my Virginia Tech sophomore CAD class. I told them that perhaps more than any other sketch entity the conic offered quick design iteration power. As our discussion unfolded, I told them about the #46 @Renderweekly design challenge on Instagram. Prompt #46 was to design and model a silicone tray. I encouraged my students to enter the challenge as a way to practice using the conic tool inside of Fusion 360. Having issued the challenge, I thought I better get busy myself. The images in this post are the results of my @Skillcoach modeling effort.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Multiple concept variation accomplished simply by changing the rho value of the conic sketch section.</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Screenshot from @renderweekly
</figcaption></figure>

Fusion Conic Behavior

Prior experience told me I would need to construct four individual conic entities to make a complete squircle section. So I set out to create the desired section. I found the conic tool to behave differently than expected in the following ways:

  • Placing dimensions on the end of the conic to control tangency was not possible (at least that I could find).
  • Tangency and symmetry can be accomplished by constructing a construction cage using a center point rectangle.
  • The Rho value is embedded in the conic. To edit it requires double-clicking on the conic entity.
  • The Rho value is not accessible through the parameter panel. Therefore, I could not create a parameter to change all four conics at the same time.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>The squircle is achieved by combining four conic entities into one 2D Sketch section.</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-video alignwide"><video controls="controls" src="https://www.solidsmack.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Conic-Sketch-Study-med-rez.mp4"></video><figcaption>On the fly learning of Fusion 360 conic tool</figcaption></figure> <figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

I’m attaching a Skillcoach “Learn with Me” video so you can review my on-the-fly learning of the Fusion 360 conic tool behavior. Additional, Kevin Kennedy’s Product Design Online Youtube channel has an excellent explanation of the conic. Have a look as it is good stuff!

Until next time……….Keep on learning!

The post SkillCoach | Make “Squircle” Shaped Objects Using the Fusion 360 Conic Tool appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Vince Haley at February 18, 2019 09:30 PM

5 Epic Consumer Product Design Failures (and How We’d Fix Them)

I was squirtin’ some tunes on a Zune last week, when all of sudden I got a notification about a blog post on Onshape: Lessons From 5 Epic Consumer Design Failures.

In it, John McEleney, Co-founder of Onshape, breaks down some of, what many thought would be, the best products EVER. In one way or another, they FAILED, and we’re left with the tattered remnants of their memory and questions about how much to sell them for.

I bet you can think of A LOT more product fails (leave them in the comments if so) but we’re going to tackle John’s list and make-believe that we solved their mass-consumer uptake problems by kicking what-if scenarios into the nether-regions of the web-o-sphere.

We’ll give a brief overview of each and describe how we’d turn the product from a failure into a success. Read the Onshape post for more details on the products, fails, and lessons learned. Oh, and feel free to laugh at yourself if you thought any of these were shifting paradigms (we did). Here we go:

1. Coolest Cooler (2014)

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

The Product: The Coolest Cooler is an all-in-one outdoor entertainment solution including a blender, bluetooth speaker, USB charger, LED light, oversized wheels, bottle opener and bungee tie down.

The Failure: Cost of development, manufacturing and shipping. Communication with customers. Over promising, under-delivering.

Our Solution: This one is simple – simplify the shiznit out of this thang. Design principle #1 – Less is More. This was a cornucopia of solutions looking for problems. They would have been better served to build a simple foundation, open a design that their fans could build accessories on top of instead of trying to provide a scenario for every party barge and desert rave. Make it a box, that could hold 10 24-packs of PBR, and eliminate all the nooks and crannies for sand, dirt and party liquids to seep into. Lastly, make it cool better and cost less than a YETI or similar and you’ve got yourself a winner.

2. Google Glass (2013-2015)

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The Product: Google Glass was a wearable, voice-controlled Android device that resembled a pair of eyeglasses and was aimed at eliminating mobile devices.

The Failure: It cost $1,500 and looked as appealing as wearing a pocket protector, not to mention the privacy concerns and an incredible lack of product support.

Our Solution: This should have been a collaboration with Oakley, GoPro or, at least, designed as a sleaker, more fashionable device (you’re trying to get people to wear glasses who DON’T want to wear glasses). And yes, it shouldn’t have been limited to GLASSES. Provide a base for it to be adapted into another type of wearable. They also should have provided low-cost dev versions with feedback/issues collected, collated, and addressed every few weeks. Marketing should have had a constant push on what was possible, what was being created, and the capabilities beyond current wearables.

3. 3D Television (2010)

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The Product: 3D TV was television that allowed producers to provide a 3D experience for the viewer if they were ok with low-resolution and wearing some clunky-ass glasses.

The Failure: No one wanted to wear a clunky set of glasses to enjoy nausea every day, plus the lack of content hobbled sales and desire to create content. (A not to VR/AR headset makers?)

Our Solution: This is a chicken and egg issue and more about execution than the actual product design. This would have been a great example to see TV manufacturers and producers team up to push innovation, instead of racing to be ‘the first’. (However, the failure did form into the popularity of 3D movies and renewed interest in VR/AR, so there’s that.) The design downfall here was limiting it to a screen. The tech was there for wall or space projection but the scope was limited to what people were viewing on TV already. Refocusing on the consumer and allowing them to produce their own content (memories, videos, Google Glass?) could have propelled ‘3D TV’, and 3D content, forward.

4. Juicero Press (2017)

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

The Product: The Juicero was a $400 internet-connected joke juicer that used single-serving packets of chopped organic fruits and vegetables sold exclusively by the company by subscription.

The Failure: A completely over-engineered device (400 custom parts) that squeezed the juice packs as well as you could with your hands. It, the packs, and the subscription were expensive.

Our Solution: Again, a solution looking for a problem. With juicing the goal is BETTER HEALTH not BETTER JUICE – people will juice about anything because it’s healthy. They would have done better kicking their custom packet squeezer to the curb and creating a juicer ingredient subscription service and community – think Blue Apron meets the FitBit app – that people could use with ANY juicer and share their ‘secret recipes’ and health successes.

5. Microsoft Zune (2006-2012)

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The Product: The Zune was a portable digital music player from Microsoft launched as a competitor to the Apple iPod.

The Failure: Microsoft was too little, too late with the iPod out over five years already. It didn’t innovate anything, just copied another idea in hopes of success by brand loyalty.

Our Solution: This is a lot tougher. You’re not simply asking, “How can we innovate [insert product]?” You’re asking, “How can we innovate [insert product] that has an established and massive community, massive backing, and massive dev resources?” It wouldn’t due to match it. Microsoft needs to do something pivotal here and, incidently, has now failed with music twice – Zune and Groove (music streaming platform). They may be done with music at this point. Mainstream music, indie music, streaming music devices – great solutions exist for all. I think there’s one possibility but… we’ll just leave this solution for y’all to solve. What could Microsoft (or another company) do to innovate on music products?

And there we are. Problems solved. Failures avoided. Designs improved. Perhaps some more thought could be put into each but perhaps thinking about these solutions will help you with some product design challenges of you’re own.

The post 5 Epic Consumer Product Design Failures (and How We’d Fix Them) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 18, 2019 09:08 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to change the SOLIDWORKS Composer SVG highlight colour

SOLIDWORKS Composer helps your organization, including nontechnical users, leverage 3D CAD data to create dynamic graphical content that clearly and effectively depicts even your most complex products.

One of those contents are SVG images which are saved using the Technical Illustration within the Workshops pane.

Most users want these SVG images to apply a different highlight colour, displayed when hovering the mouse pointer over the parts, to something other than the default green.

Changing the Highlight Colour

This highlight colour that we see in the viewport is what is saved into an .svg image and can be changed through:

  1. File > Properties > Document Properties.

Any changes made to the document properties apply to the current open document. Whereas, the changes made to the default document properties will apply to the new documents that will be opened within SOLIDWORKS Composer. 

How to access document properties

How to access document properties

  1. This opens the document properties dialog box > click on selection tab.
  2. Within selection tab we can modify the selection colour as well as Highlight colour for both parts and assemblies.

Selection colour applies just to the viewport whereas the highlight colour applies to both an SVG image as well as viewport.

Document properties dialog box - Changes

Document properties dialog box – Changes

  1. Once the selection colour and highlight colours are changed, then click apply and click OK.
  2. Within the viewport we will be notice the change in selection colour and highlight colour. In my case I am selecting pink for selection for part (default) and yellow for highlight. Here is the result I have.
Result in SOLIDWORKS Composer View Port

Result in SOLIDWORKS Composer Viewport

  1. Now when the SVG image is saved using Workshops Pane > Technical illustration > Save as an .svg. When we hover over the parts in the SVG the highlight colour has changed from green to yellow.

 

SVG image – highlight colour

Learn more about Composer

To learn more about SOLIDWORKS Composer attend our essentials training course either in a classroom near you or live online.

The post How to change the SOLIDWORKS Composer SVG highlight colour appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at February 18, 2019 01:00 PM

February 15, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Description option missing on Save as dialog box. How to fix it?

Recently, a few customers have contacted me to report that their SOLIDWORKS Save as dialog box is missing the description field? When saving a part, assembly, or drawing document, you can add a description for the file via the Save As dialog box as shown below:

Description Filed on save as dialog box

Normally, when you install SOLIDWORKS this description field should be shown by default but if it missing you can enable it by following these steps:

Step 1: Toggle on Details Pane

Sometimes this problem can be easily fixed by toggling on the details pane through the File > Open dialog box.

To do so go to File > Open > Organize > Layout > Toggle ON the details pane. Now, try saving the file again using File > save as and see if the description option appears.

If the problem still exists then follow step 2.

Toggle ON Details Pane

Toggle ON Details Pane

Step 2: Register a Dynamic Link Library (.dll) file that couldn’t register properly during the installation process

As mentioned earlier, the description field is missing as sldpropertyhandler.dll couldn’t register properly due to lack of admin privileges. We will have to manually register this file using command prompt.

  • Run command prompt, through Start > Type Cmd > Right-click > Run as an administrator from the shortcut menu.
Run Command prompt as an Administrator

Run Command prompt as an Administrator

  • Now locate the path of sldpropertyhandler.dll within windows file explorer in the SOLIDWORKS Installation directory. By default this path is C:\Program Files\SOLIDWORKS Corp\SOLIDWORKS. Copy this path from the file explorer.
  • Type regsvr32, then space and within quotation marks paste the path of dll file and add the dll file-name followed by backward slash  and then hit Enter.

The command should look like this regsvr32 “C:\Program Files\SOLIDWORKS Corp\SolidWorks\sldpropertyhandler.dll”

Command to register sldpropertyhandler.dll

Command to register sldpropertyhandler.dll

  • Pop-up message showing the dll registration succeeded confirms that the dll file is successfully registered.

Now the description filed should appear within File > Save as dialog box.

If you would like to learn how to link the SOLIDWORKS Save As dialog description field to a Custom Property please refer to this blog article.

The post Description option missing on Save as dialog box. How to fix it? appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at February 15, 2019 01:00 PM

February 14, 2019

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS Toolbox in a SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault – Unable to backup destination database

When using the UpdateBrowserDatabase.exe utility to update SOLIDWORKS Toolbox in SOLIDWORKS PDM vault manually, you may receive the error “Unable to backup destination database” as shown below:

Unable to backup destination database

Unable to backup destination database

The unable to backup destination database error occurs if the UpdateBrowserDatabase utility cannot delete the swbrowser.sldedbold backup file.

When the UpdateBrowserDatabase utility runs an update, it removes the swbrowser.sldedbold file and replaces the file with the new backup.

To prevent this issue, clear the ‘Read-only” check box in the ‘Properties‘ dialog box for the swbrowser.sldedbold file.

File Properties

File Properties

The post SOLIDWORKS Toolbox in a SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault – Unable to backup destination database appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at February 14, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Re:ease is the Ideal Modular Organizer for a Cluttered CAD Workstation Desktop 

Desktop Organizer

Though many don’t mind a cluttered work area, there are a few who can’t resume working unless their desk resembles the pinnacle of orderliness. The Re:ease desk organizer was made for these select neat freaks.

Created by product designer Marc Stüber and engineer Laurent Hartmann, this modular desk organizer is made up of 6 compact modules, each with their own unique features, and contains everything you need in a workspace environment so you can stop procrastinating and actually get some work done.

<figure><iframe height="450" src="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/marcstueber/re-ease-the-modular-desk-organizer-with-11-feature/widget/video.html" width="800"></iframe></figure>

You have your standard hole puncher, pen and note holder, stapler, pencil sharpener, and tape dispenser — but Re:ease also has some unique modules which come in the form of a 21st century-inspired charging station and even a plant pot.

<figure class="wp-block-image">reease</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">reease</figure>

Possibly the coolest feature of the Re:ease is how the modules can be attached and arranged exactly how you want them to be: hidden on the base of each are magnets for fully-customizable modular solutions. Depending on how many or how few of the modules you need, you can adjust the Re:ease to fit your workstation exactly as you need it — no more, no less.

<figure class="wp-block-image">reease</figure>

Developed over two years, Re:ease transitioned from being one “ultimate” office tool holder into a modular, customizable organizer. Initial prototypes of the modules were 3D printed using a homemade printer and PLA material before moving onto more dimensionally accurate finished units courtesy of an HP Multi Jet 3D printer.

<figure class="wp-block-image">reease</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">reease</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">reease</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">reease</figure>

The bases of the finished modules are made of either ash wood or concrete. While the wood bases were shaped using a CNC milling machine, the concrete bases were made by adding tiny plastic grids in-between the concrete to keep them stable while making them as thin as 0.4 inches thick.

<figure class="wp-block-image">reease</figure>

Re:ease is currently seeking funding on Kickstarter with nearly $10K funded out of its $16,914 goal and three weeks left to go. If you like procrastinating but hate not getting any work done, you should definitely check out this modular organizer’s Kickstarter page (once you fix your cluttered desk, of course).

The post Re:ease is the Ideal Modular Organizer for a Cluttered CAD Workstation Desktop  appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 14, 2019 12:00 PM

Build Your First Raspberry Pi Project This Weekend with the $34 Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle

Raspberry Pi

We’ve said it time and time again, but the Raspberry Pi is just so dang cool and we believe all designers and engineers should have one in their toolkit—if not on their desktop. While there is a bit of a slight learning curve, it’s nothing that today’s designers and engineers can’t handle on a leisurely Saturday.

So why not start now?

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle includes 8 courses to get started creating your very own Amazon Echo or even a KUKA-like robotic arm for your desktop (how’s that for office bragging rights). Throw in any of your own 3D printed housing designs, and the opportunities are limitless!

For a limited time, The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle is 96% off of the $865 retail price and can be purchased right here for a mere $34.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle — $865 $34

Courses included:

  • Automation with Raspberry Pi Zero
  • Introduction to Raspberry Pi
  • Hardware Projects Using Raspberry Pi
  • Bitcoin Mining Using Raspberry Pi
  • Raspberry Pi Robotics
  • Internet of Things Automation Using Raspberry Pi 2
  • Home Automation in 48 Hours Without Coding
  • Build Your Own ArmBot Step By Step Using Raspberry Pi Zero

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
StackSocial Amazon

The post Build Your First Raspberry Pi Project This Weekend with the $34 Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 14, 2019 11:10 AM

Cool Tools of Doom: The rOtring 800 Retractable Mechanical Pencil

Rotring Pencil

When it comes to mechanical pencils, not all are created equal. And with rOtring, this couldn’t be more true.

Ideal for sketching, writing, and drawing, the iconic rOtring 800 Mechanical Pencil features an ergonomically enhanced full metal body, with centered weight balance and a comfortable non-slip knurled grip for long work periods without discomfort or fatigue. Featuring a “Twist and Click” retractable mechanism of the entire sleeve and lead, the rOtring 800 Mechanical Pencil can easily go from pocket to sketch without worrying about damage or lead breakage. Quite frankly, you’d be hard-pressed to find a better mechanical pencil for this price.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The rOtring 800 Retractable Mechanical Pencil — $28.49

Features:

  • An iconic tool meant for a lifetime of use.
  • Unique “Twist and Click” mechanism retracts entire lead and sleeve for durability and pocket-safety.
  • Full metal body providing the ideal balance of weight and feeling.
  • Hexagonal barrel ensuring fatigue-free writing and drawing.
  • Fixed lead guidance sleeve prevents breakage and gives a clear page view for ruler-based drawing.

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The rOtring 800 Retractable Mechanical Pencil appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 14, 2019 11:00 AM

February 13, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Video: Desktop Metal Studio System 3D Printer Unboxing and First Impressions

<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bUCaRhQ8UEQ?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe>

After much anticipation, our Desktop Metal Studio System has arrived at our Oakville head office!

The Desktop Metal Studio System is a three-part solution that automates metal 3D printing. Tightly integrated through Desktop Metal’s cloud-based software, it delivers a seamless workflow for printing complex metal parts in-house—from digital file to sintered part. Join John, Wayne and Rob as they unbox the Desktop Metal 3D printer, Debinder and Furnace.

Metal 3D Printing with a Desktop Metal Studio System is a three step process:

1. The Studio Printer shapes the parts

The Studio printer is similar to the safest and most widely used 3D printing process – Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) featured in Stratasys 3D printers. Unlike laser-based systems that selectively melt metal powder, the Studio printer extrudes bound metal rods–similar to how a plastic FDM printer works. This eliminates the safety requirements associated with metal 3D printing while opening up new alloys and enabling new features like the use of closed-cell infill for lightweight strength.

Desktop Metal Studio System Printer

2. The Debinder prepares green parts for sintering

The Debinder prepared green parts for sintering by dissolving primary binder. With a low emission design, it requires no external ventilation and is safe for an office environment. Automatic fluid distillation and recycling means there is no need to refill between each cycle. The Studio System™ debinder immerses green parts in proprietary debind fluid, dissolving primary binder and creating open-pore channels throughout the part in preparation for sintering. With a low emission design, the debinder is safe for use in an office environment. Automatic fluid distillation and recycling means there is no need to refill between each cycle. New features introduced with Studio System+ include adjustable shelving optimized for batch processing.

Studio System Debinder

Studio System Debinder

3. The Furnace sinters the parts

Desktop Metal designed the first office-friendly sintering furnace. Fully automated with closed loop thermal control and sized to fit through an office door, it delivers industrial-strength sintering in an office-friendly package. The furnace combines SiC heating elements with high-powered microwaves to sinter printed parts after primary binder is removed. Cloud-connected, the furnace has temperature profiles that are tuned to every build and material. It uniformly heats parts to just below their melting point, removing binder and fusing metal particles to form fully dense parts without the residual stresses introduced in laser-based systems.

Studio System Furnace

Desktop Studio System Furnace

Stay tuned for our next Desktop Metal video when we will plug in the Desktop Metal Studio System and start 3D printing metal parts! We will also answer some of your commonly asked questions about the Desktop Metal Studio System.

In the meantime, get in touch with us if you have questions or would like a quote.

The post Video: Desktop Metal Studio System 3D Printer Unboxing and First Impressions appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Sarah Pew at February 13, 2019 06:43 PM

SolidSmack

Spacebridge is an Augmented Reality Workspace Concept from Wacom and Magic Leap

Magic Leap Spacebridge

Last year, we got an inkling on Magic Leap’s plans to partner with like-minded companies like Onshape to create more interactive 3D work environments using their not-quite-so-cheap AR/VR headset. By allowing multiple users to see and interact with 3D models in a real-world context simultaneously, working on models for engineering, product design, video games, and special effects became a heck of a lot easier.

Now, Magic Leap has teamed up with Wacom for an even more immersive collaborative AR/VR experience in the form of the Spacebridge interactive workspace.

<figure class="wp-block-image">Magic Leap Spacebridge</figure>

Upon putting on a Magic Leap One headset connected to a Wacom Intuos Pro tablet, users activate Spacebridge, which takes 3D data and integrates it into a real-world space. Collaborators using the headset in the same area can interact with the 3D data in real time, allowing them to adjust and modify the model simultaneously.

Interacting with 3D models requires the use of the Wacom Intuos Pro tablet and a stylus rather than a traditional AR/VR controller. Pressing the stylus’ middle button opens up a menu that allows a user to pick from various colors and pen tools while the forward button lets you swap through move tools such as rotation, scale, and drag.

One particularly useful feature is the ability to add footnotes on a digital whiteboard; notifications from both you and your co-workers for specific 3D models can be brought up to make adjustments easier. It may seem like a small addition, but not having to switch back and forth from an actual whiteboard can theoretically save teams a lot of time.

“Magic Leap and Wacom share the belief that the spatial computing creative design experience should feel natural, intuitive, and inclusive of the world and other people,” says Rony Abovitz, CEO of Magic Leap. “The solutions we are developing together now, will hopefully inspire and empower the next generation of creatives to design and build new products, living spaces, and even worlds.”

The Spacebridge application is still in its beta stage, but both Wacom and Magic Leap are hoping the finished program can foster a more interactive workspace for 3D designers. We’ll have to get our hands on it ourselves, but maybe this will finally justify the purchase of an almost $2,300 headset.

The post Spacebridge is an Augmented Reality Workspace Concept from Wacom and Magic Leap appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 13, 2019 05:19 PM

App Smack 07.19: Tally, Any.do, Slite, Obscura 2, and More…

SolidSmack App Smack

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved smart device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional. This week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Obscura 2 (iOS — $4.99)

The best camera is the one you have with you. But what if that camera was improved with pro features, a gorgeous interface, intuitive controls, and was always with you?

<figure class="aligncenter">Obscura 2</figure>

Dark Sky Weather (iOS – $3.99)

Dark Sky is the most accurate source of hyperlocal weather information. With down-to-the-minute forecasts, you’ll know exactly when the rain will start or stop, right where you’re standing. (It’s like magic.)

<figure class="aligncenter">Dark Sky Weather App</figure>

Tally: The Anything Tracker (iOS — Free)

TALLY is a simple tool to help you track absolutely anything.

<figure class="aligncenter">Tally App</figure>

Headspace: Meditation & Mindfulness (Android — Free)

Headspace is your personal guide to health and happiness. It’ll help you focus, breathe, stay calm, perform at your best, and get a better night’s rest through the life-changing skills of relaxation, meditation and mindfulness.

<figure class="aligncenter">Headspace: Meditation & Mindfulness</figure>

Any.do (Android — Free)

It’s the ultimate app for managing Tasks, Reminders, Lists, Calendar events, Grocery lists, planning and collaboration with others.

<figure class="aligncenter">Any.do</figure>

Slite (Android — Free)

Slite is where modern teams write & collaborate.

<figure class="aligncenter">Slite</figure>

The post App Smack 07.19: Tally, Any.do, Slite, Obscura 2, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 13, 2019 04:53 PM

Cool Tools: Copic Industrial Design Sketching Markers

Copic Design Markers

When it comes to sketching and communicating your ideas well, nothing beats a good old-fashioned pencil and a keen sense of perspective. That said, adding simple depth to your form sketches with light and shadow is a natural next step in taking your sketches to the next level.

And when it comes time to cranking ideas out fast, our favorite go-to is a fistful of 2-3 Sketching Grays from Copic that give us great contrast. These ultra-blendable, low odor, alcohol-based inks deliver rich and smooth strokes that are ideal for quickly communicating product concepts. And unlike water-based inks, which tend to pill and oversoak paper while blending, Copics mix on the surface fast and easy-like.

While there are plenty of Copic marker sets out there, we recommend sticking to this compact six-pack of Sketching Grays for maximum versatility. If you want to get extra-fancy, try adding a single bright ‘pop’ color for your arrows, callouts, and anytime you want a callout to really stand out. And don’t forget that marker paper pad, too!

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Copic Sketch Set of 6 Markers – Sketching Grays $29.78

Features:

  • Packaged in a clear plastic case, a sketch set is the ideal way to begin or add to a marker collection
  • Refillable markers and replaceable nibs, compatible with Copic air brush system
  • Alcohol-based ink is permanent and non-toxic, dries acid free

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: Copic Industrial Design Sketching Markers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 13, 2019 03:20 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to restore SOLIDWORKS file shortcut options in Windows Explorer

Many SOLIDWORKS users are used to access SOLIDWORKS which appears when we right click on any part, assembly or drawing file within Windows Explorer. This SOLIDWORKS file option has various sub-options such as Pack and Go, Rename, Replace and Move. Hence, it allows user to create pack and go of the file right from the file explorer.

Usually this SOLIDWORKS option appears when we right click on SOLIDWORKS files, but sometimes it disappears when some updates occur on our machine such as recently one of our customer updated his Microsoft Office 365 and this SOLIDWORKS option was gone. Here is the image that shows this option missing when we right click on the SW file in file explorer.

SOLIDWORKS option missing on right click

SOLIDWORKS option missing on right click

To bring back this SOLIDWORKS option we will have to make some changes to the SOLIDWORKS registry in registry editor and here the steps to do so:

Step 1:  Run Registry editor as an administrator:

Go to Start > Type Regedit > Right click on Regedit and run as an administrator. This will launch registry Editor.

Step 2: Locate registries of SW file extensions

Locate the following path:

Computer\HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FileExts

Within file extension locate all three file extensions for SW parts (.SLDPRT), assemblies (.SLDASM) and drawings (.SLDDRW) and then rename them. After renaming all three extensions registry editor should look like this.

Rename SOLIDWORKS file extension registries

Rename SOLIDWORKS file extension registries

Renaming the registries should bring back SOLIDWORKS option on the right click of all SW file types; parts, assemblies and drawings.

SOLIDWORKS option available when right-clicking on files in file explorer

SOLIDWORKS option available when right-clicking on files in file explorer

Learn more about SOLIDWORKS

Attend a SOLIDWORKS Essentials training course either in a Canadian classroom near you or live online. For more information about SOLIDWORKS software and training call 1-877-219-6757.

The post How to restore SOLIDWORKS file shortcut options in Windows Explorer appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Vipanjot Kaur, CSWP at February 13, 2019 01:00 PM

Product Design: How Fast is Too Fast?

In product design, speed is often what it’s all about. We don’t always have the luxury of making models with perfect design intent. You can’t always make sure you’ve dotted…

by matt at February 13, 2019 06:59 AM

February 12, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Problems with imported model? Import Diagnostics to the rescue!

So you imported some model and it’s giving you grief.  Perhaps inexplicable behavior that cannot be resolved simply by restarting SOLIDWORKS.  We feel your pain!

At the earliest opportunity, you want to run Import Diagnostics.  It’s a powerful tool that harness the miracle of computer-based modeling to heal bad faces/edges.  For more information, check out the other helpful articles tagged as Import Diagnostics in our blog.  Best practice is to run Import Diagnostics before adding any features.

The problem is this: if Import Diagnostics wasn’t run, and there are now SOLIDWORKS features already added to the Feature Manager Design Tree (or “Tree” for short), then you cannot run Import Diagnostics with the model in its current state.  It’s not available if SOLIDWORKS native features have been added to the tree.  Fortunately, there are a couple of options:

  1. Delete the features that were added previously and then run Import Diagnostics.  Depending on how much work was done, this could mean unacceptable loss of much work, in which case perhaps the second option is preferable:
  2. Export the model as-is into a dumb solid such as STEP, IGES, Parasolid, etc. then re-import into SOLIDWORKS.  This should allow you to access Import Diagnostics.  The downside here is that the model is now a dumb solid, and previously-added SOLIDWORKS features are no longer accessible.  The model is still editable, using various techniques like Move Face, but as the model is entirely a dumb solid now, it is not as easily and parametrically editable as before.  So when to export?  You may choose to do some more modeling before the export, or just get the export over with now and add new features later.  Sooner is often better, as a solid model in need of Import Diagnostics repairs can result in failure of certain modeling attempts, and wasted time.

One last thing to note:  In more recent versions of SOLIDWORKS, due to 3D Interconnect functionality, the healing commands within Import Diagnostics are sometimes not available at first:

import Diagnostics

Import Diagnostics

To enable the healing commands, first right-click the imported solid and choose Dissolve Feature:

Dissolve Features

Dissolve Features

This allows us to then run Import Diagnostics on the imported solid feature.  Below is the way to access it by right-clicking the imported solid in the tree, but you can also access Import Diagnostics from Tools > Evaluate:

Access Import Diagnostics

Access Import Diagnostics

…and the healing commands should now be available:

Healing commands available

Healing commands available

The post Problems with imported model? Import Diagnostics to the rescue! appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at February 12, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Behind the Design: Transforming Damascus Steel Into An Intricate Japanese Chisel

Even with the massive convenience that digital fabrication technologies have afforded us, you’ve got to admire those who are actively keeping the primitive manufacturing arts alive. Sculpting, woodworking, and blacksmithing are just a few of the ancient crafts that still manage to draw the eye with their personalized, handcrafted looks — not to mention insane, mesmerizing manufacturing processes.

Blacksmith Dmitry Shevchenko, who goes by the YouTube handle shurap, is one of the few keeping the craft alive, and almost exclusively works with Damascus steel. Starting with a single ore, he presses the metal into shape before hammering it down and grinding it by hand to make some of the most beautiful tools you’ve ever seen.

In this instance, he takes a solid piece of his favorite metal and turns it into an oversized Japanese woodworking chisel:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EK9xXtZSdvw?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">japanese chisel</figure>

After tempering and pressing the metal for what seems like days, Dmitry was finally able to whittle the block-sized Damascus steel into a slim rectangle perfect for the wooden handle. Using a mix of hammering techniques and metal pressing, he shapes one side down to fit the handle while the actual chisel remains large and flat.

<figure class="wp-block-image">japanese chisel</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">japanese chisel</figure>

With the final shape in place, he grinds, sharpens, and polishes the metal to a mirror sheen before making a small indent in the center of the chisel (possibly to make holding it more comfortable).

<figure class="wp-block-image">japanese chisel</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">japanese chisel</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">japanese chisel</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">japanese chisel</figure>

After this step, it’s back to more polishing and shaping down the inner center curve of the chisel. Dmitry then smooths out the metal using sanders, grinders, and a small polisher before dunking it in a finish and brushing it down with water. The resulting finished surface complements the Japanese woodwork on the handle nicely.

<figure class="wp-block-image">japanese chisel</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">japanese chisel</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">japanese chisel</figure>

After this, it’s back to more polishing and shaping down the inner center curve of the chisel. Dmitry then smooths out the metal using sanders, grinders, and a small polisher before dunking it in a finish and brushing it down with water. The resulting finished surface complements the Japanese woodwork on the handle nicely.

While it’s not difficult to appreciate the beauty of any handmade masterpiece from a blacksmith, it’s when you see how much sweat and tears when into the object that really elevates to a whole other level. Watch more of Dmitry’s videos over on his YouTube channel.

The post Behind the Design: Transforming Damascus Steel Into An Intricate Japanese Chisel appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 12, 2019 11:00 AM

Cool Tools: The 3Dconnexion SpaceMouse Wireless 3D Mouse

3D Connexion Mouse

Long considered an indispensable asset for anybody working in CAD, the 3D mouse is a quintessential tool that belongs on the desktop of any industrial designer or engineer.

Within a 3D application such as SolidWorks, Rhino, Fusion 360, or Keyshot, the directional, zoom and rotate functions provide an intuitive extension of the users’ design intent. To put it quite simply, a 3D mouse helps get rid of those annoying repetitive keystrokes and allows the designer to come as close to possible to holding their digital 3D design in the physical world.

As pioneers of the 3D mouse territory, 3Dconnexion has blazed a trail with their SpaceMouse collection. And when it comes to the perfect balance of price, performance, and portability, we’re big fans of the company’s SpaceNavigator 3D Mouse.

Utilizing the company’s patented 6-Degrees-of-Freedom (6DoF) sensor, the intuitive 3D mouse also includes two buttons for accessing radial control menus to drive commands from directly within your applications. And with a wireless connection, you can be sure that this won’t be just another desktop peripheral clogging your desk with obnoxious wires.

<figure class="aligncenter">SpaceMouse 3D Mouse</figure>

The 3Dconnexion SpaceMouse Wireless 3D Mouse — $149.00

Features:

  • Superior 3D Navigation – Intuitively and precisely navigate digital models or viewports in 3D space.
  • Wireless Freedom – 3Dconnexion 2.4GHz Wireless technology ensures a reliable, real-time connection to your 3D content.
  • Easy to Use – Each SpaceMouse Wireless button opens its own radial menu providing convenient mouse-click access to four application commands.
  • Flexible Recharging – Supplied micro-USB cable handles re-charging and data at the same time. Just connect and continue working, Stylish Design – small footprint, elegant brushed steel base, two buttons.

PURCHASE NOW VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: The 3Dconnexion SpaceMouse Wireless 3D Mouse appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 12, 2019 10:59 AM

SolidSmack Radio | SOLIDWORKS World 2019 Special (Powered by Spotify)

Spotify Playlist

Hey there SOLIDWORKS World 2019 attendees!

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’ll get the groove going with “get innocuous” from LCD Soundsystem before diving into tracks from DARKSIDE, Beck, Vampire Weekend, The Dandy Warhols, and others before wrapping up with “Wire – Leaping Dub” from the always amazing Massive Attack. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<figure><iframe height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/4G8FOXlTk1058flRuV0Uxf" width="100%"></iframe></figure>

The post SolidSmack Radio | SOLIDWORKS World 2019 Special (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 12, 2019 10:48 AM

February 11, 2019

SolidSmack

Going to SOLIDWORKS World 2019? Here’s What You Don’t Want to Miss.

Wow. Doesn’t it feel like the first SOLIDWORKS World was waaaaay back in 1998? It was. And here we are again, 21 years later – a magically odd number for a magically odd year. And it promises to be better than ever. Why? 1) It’s in Dallas 2) It’s in TEXAS and 3) It’s SOLIDWORKS, y’all.

There’s lots going on at SolidWorks World (SWW) so thought you might like to have some of the highlights tucked away for when you’re standing patiently in the crowded entrance to the General Session and need something to both help you plan and impress your cohorts. Send others if you think we’ve missed any. See you at SOLIDWORKS World!

SOLIDWORKS World 2019 Top Ten

Get yo’ bad CAD self involved before the conference even begins. January 31, 2019 is the last day to vote for features in the SOLIDWORKS World 2019 Top Ten. Go and do this quickly!

CAD Monkey Dinner

What kicks off SWW? The Saturday night CAD Monkey Dinner, of course. Since 2012, this get together has gotten old friends and fellow SOLIDWORKS users together to kick the conference off right. Join in Sat, Feb 9 @7 at Vetted Well in the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema.

SOLIDWORKS World Overview & Agenda

Free Certification Exams

On Sunday, from 10-2 and 3-7, you have the opportunity to take a certification exam for free (included with each full conference pass). NEW for 2019 is a voucher to take the exam within one year. Plus, there’s the SWW secret CSWE event.

Special Event – Gilley’s Dallas

The SWW Offsite event is always a must-go, geek out adventure of unlimited possible ‘what-could-go-wrong if I do this scenarios‘. It’s at Gilley’s this year, Tuesday, @7-10, which makes it even more a must-attend event.

General Session Live Stream

If you can’t go to SWW or you’re passed out in a Dallas back-alley, you can stream the General Sessions with SOLIDWORKS World Livestream.

Get Ribboned

You might have a ribbon or ten on your badge, but make note of these fun subgroups not officially endorsed by SolidWorks, but totally legit. It’s easy to join up too.

#Hashtagit

If you want to stay in the loop on the socials, follow the hashtags. The official SWW hashtag is #SWW19. Use it wisely or don’t.

Things To Do in Dallas?

There are loads of things to do in the Dallas-Fort Worth area (The Metroplex is larger than Connecticut and Rhode Island COMBINED.) Here are a few references and some my own recommendations. Enjoy.

Dallas Bucket List #1 | Dallas Bucket List #2 – Amee Meghani from GoEngineer put together two great posts for both SWW16 and SWW19 in DFW.
Less Common Things – Matt Lorono at SOLIDWORKS put together a list too.

And my picks…
Dallas World Aquarium – If you like sea life with a zoo vibe.
Hypnotic Donuts – Out at White Rock Lake, but worth the 10 to 15-minute drive.
The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden – While you’re out getting a donut stop by the garden.
White Rock Lake – And might as well stop by for a stroll in this large city park with 10 miles of hike and bike trails.
Dallas Holocaust Museum – A grim reminder and must visit.
Historic Grapevine – a 30-minute drive north for a quaint downtown visit and excellent food. Main Street Bistro is a must.
North Shore Trail – A beautiful hike/bike trail up near Grapevine and Grapevine Lake.
Forth Worth Stockyards – You want Texas? Here’s Texas for ya. Pretty close anyway.
Stockyard Stables – Want to go horseback riding? You don’t have to go too far to Forth Worth and ride the Trinity River.
Forth Worth Water Garden – And if you go to Forth Worth, you’ll definitely want to stop downtown for a walk and visit the water garden.

Breweries? Yes.

Revolver, Rahr & Son, Martin House, DBC, Community, Wild Acre, Four Corners, Hopfusion, Railport, Braindead, Deep Ellum, Panther Island, Peticolas, Bishop Cider, Legal Draft Beer Co.

Other Links

Here are just a few other links and resources to have on hand at the conference this year.


SWW Registration (Open to Feb 8)
SWW Survival Guide (Must read)
Feb 2019 DFW Weather (50s/30s)

Going to SOLIDWORKS World? I would love to meet you. Follow @solidsmack on Twitter for SWW19 coverage and you can get a hold of me @joshmings or over on LinkedIn.


The post Going to SOLIDWORKS World 2019? Here’s What You Don’t Want to Miss. appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 11, 2019 02:38 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to fix a SOLIDWORKS Manage Can not Authenticate Error

During the process of restoring a SOLIDWORKS Manage database, you could receive the error “Could not Authenticate!” if you try to test the Sites Properties.

SOLIDWORKS Manage Can not Authenticate Error

SOLIDWORKS Manage Can not Authenticate Error

Reason for this error

The reason for this error is an incomplete procedure for restoring the SOLIDWORKS Manage database and this can cause a miss authentication on the File Server.

How to fix the Can not Authenticate error

To fix the issue, you can rename the .swmc file contained in the FileServer folder.

  1. Browse to the folder Fileserver folder

    Fileserver folder

    Fileserver folder

  2. Select the file *.swmc present in the folder

    Select the swmc file

    Select the swmc file

  3. Rename it to SWManage.swmc

    Rename it to SWManage.swmc

    Rename it to SWManage.swmc

  4. Open SOLIDWORKS Manage and select the SWManage.swmc file renamed, because the previous one will not be present
    Open SOLIDWORKS Manage

    Open SOLIDWORKS Manage

    File selected

    File selected

  5. Go to System administration > Sites and run the test for FileServer

    Site Properties

    Site Properties

The post How to fix a SOLIDWORKS Manage Can not Authenticate Error appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at February 11, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Monday List 07.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

When the Tools of the Trade Are the Keyboard and Mouse

For Daisuke Wakabayashi, who covers Google, computer accessories are important. Very important.

<figure class="aligncenter">When the Tools of the Trade Are the Keyboard and Mouse</figure>

Monkeys With Superpower Eyes Could Help Cure Color Blindness

A preposterously cute grey squirrel monkey named Dalton bonks his head against a computer screen in front of him. Wide-eyed and mutton chopped, Dalton has quite the set up—the screen, wide in squirrel-monkey terms, displays dots of varying sizes and colors. Below that is a monkey-sized basin, like a sink in a dollhouse kitchen remodeled with stainless steel fixtures.

<figure class="aligncenter">Monkeys With Superpower Eyes Could Help Cure Color Blindness</figure>

Failed Your Fitness Goals Already? There’s a Simple Fix for That

The reason you didn’t stick to your New Year’s resolution is that you don’t like exercise. But that can change.

<figure class="aligncenter">Failed Your Fitness Goals Already? There’s a Simple Fix for That</figure>

Six Sigma Gives Way to Rendanheyi at GE’s Appliance Business

Haier, the new owner, has its own plan to revive the struggling brand.

<figure class="aligncenter">Six Sigma Gives Way to Rendanheyi at GE’s Appliance Business</figure>

8 Reasons Why Apple Won’t Buy Netflix

It has the cash, and Netflix has the audience. But the idea is still rotten.

<figure class="aligncenter">8 Reasons Why Apple Won’t Buy Netflix</figure>

In This Manhattan Apartment, Every Room Is a Testament to Japanese Tradition

The artist Hiroshi Sugimoto’s first architectural project in New York City is a defiant celebration of a bygone age.

<figure class="aligncenter">In This Manhattan Apartment, Every Room Is a Testament to Japanese Tradition</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 07.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 11, 2019 11:00 AM

Cool Tools of Doom: The Palomino Blackwing 602 Pencil

Blackwing Pencil

Cherished by writers, designers, illustrators, and other creative professionals for its soft dark lead and unique flat eraser, the Blackwing 602 is worth trying at least once—but be forewarned: you may never go back to plain old #2 pencils again.

Originally manufactured by the Eberhard Faber Pencil Company from 1934 – 1988, the Blackwing brand was acquired by California Cedar Products Company in 2008 and reintroduced to a new generation of creatives in 2012.

And now, you can score your own 12-pack of the legendary pencil for just 23 bucks.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Palomino Blackwing 602 Pencils 12-Pack — $24.95

Features:

  • One pack of 12 Palomino Blackwing pencils
  • Pencils feature a soft and smooth graphite core that is perfect for artists and composers
  • Pencils feature a unique ferrule and allows you to extend and replace the eraser
  • Replacement erasers available in three different colors
  • Pencils made out of Genuine Incense-cedar

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: The Palomino Blackwing 602 Pencil appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 11, 2019 10:59 AM

Impossible Models: Draft

Sometimes the modeling difficulty is the draft. I had forgotten about this project. It was a quickie stuck in between a couple of other larger projects about 8 years ago.…

by matt at February 11, 2019 10:17 AM

February 09, 2019

SolidSmack

Powerful Handheld 3D Scanners Are Coming

iphone 3d scanning

A report suggests that upcoming Apple iPhone designs may include powerful 3D scanning capabilities.

According to a report on Bloomberg, it seems that Apple is expanding its 3D camera technology in a way that might enable some extremely interesting 3D scanning applications — not just applications the company is pursuing.

Let’s review what Apple does today.

Since the introduction of the iPhone X, the front-facing camera on the device includes a 3D feature. The 3D scan takes place in a volume in front of the camera to a distance of about half a meter

Why so small a volume? Because the purpose of this 3D camera is to enable facial recognition. The 3D depth map is analyzed to determine a number of physical factors, like the distance between the eyes, for example, and those are matched against the iPhone owner’s information for authentication.

This was definitely not designed for 3D scanning, although some have actually used this hardware to do so, as we tested a few weeks ago. The “Capture” app actually worked reasonably well, but we found it to be extremely awkward to use because the 3D camera was on the wrong side of the phone. The Capture folks even contemplated building a kind of mirror attachment to help with this problem.

(And there are other apps like Scandy, 3D Scanner Pro, Qlone, and others.)

But now we hear that the new iPhones might have a 3D camera on BOTH sides. The rear-facing camera, the one that isn’t used to take selfies, is apparently getting a similar 3D capture capability, but with a difference.

It is to be laser powered instead of using infrared points. Apparently the infrared point approach does not work over longer distances, suggesting that the new camera would be specifically designed to capture much larger volumes.

Why would Apple want to do such a complex thing? It’s because of augmented reality. The idea is that you would be able to hold your phone up, and on the screen you’d see the real scene with added virtual elements. This is a powerful capability, as all manner of information could be provided. For example, you might see how your walls may be painted with a different color, or identify who is in the scene by name, or measure the size of the tires on that car, etc. And I can’t even imagine what kind of games might be possible.

That’s all fine, but I think there is another very powerful use to emerge from this hardware: 3D scanning.

If such hardware existed, then it would be a relatively straightforward project to build a full-on 3D scanning app — one that works from the correct side of the phone, too.

The scans would be of lower quality than one would obtain from proper industrial 3D scanners, but would certainly generate a ton of 3D models — and these could potentially be 3D printed.

Could we be seeing the emergence of a new driver for 3D printing? What if, say, three BILLION people are carrying these things around everyday, capturing 3D scans? Certainly some of them will want 3D prints, and even a slim percentage would be a gigantic boost to the 3D print industry.

We await announcements from Apple.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

Image: Scandy Pro

The post Powerful Handheld 3D Scanners Are Coming appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at February 09, 2019 04:33 PM

February 08, 2019

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: The Crumble Insidious

It met us against the sunrise, hands overturning pebbles on the edge of night. A roar to dine, a sword to bind, and seconds until the sun did shine. But wait! The bag, the mirror, the trail. Suddenly the sun broke the cloudy veil, stole the night, bent the gale and froze the troll in the midst of these links.

Luca Zampriolo – Be still my mech-lovin’ heart. This is the work and process of Mantova, Italy-based Concept Artist and Sculptor Luca.

There is but one question ultimately to be asked respecting every line you draw, Is it right or wrong? If right, it most assuredly is not a “free” line, but an intensely continent, restrained and considered line; and the action of the hand in laying it is just as decisive, and just as “free” as the hand of a first-rate surgeon in a critical incision.”

John Ruskin (Born Feb. 8, 1819) – Cestus of Aglaia, chapter VI, section 72

Slo-Mo Mag Fields – Magnetic Games shows you what your science teacher would never let you do with super strong magnets and a slo-mo camera.

La Havane – The Streets of Havana, Cuba photographed by Helene Havard, who set out to shoot the urban decay and captured something quite beautiful.

White Pages – Instagram follow of the week. Paola Grizi creates bronze sculptures of books and pages filled with faces.

Igpoty – The winners of the International Garden Photographer of the Year. Beautiful.

’69 Bronco – This truck. a 5.0-liter Coyote V8, 2.9-liter supercharger, 6-speed transmission on a 2.5″ lift.

Mixkit – Free HD videos. If you’ve ever needed free videos, this is the place to start.

<script type="text/javascript"> amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "solid0a-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Deals We're Watching"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B01NBMA0R1,B07GTTYJMG,B019U00D7K,B07B48SQGT"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "a4deee6d95d69370022a1a8348aec5f8"; </script> <script src="http://z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>

Got To Keep On – New from the Chemical Brothers. It’s the Chemical Brothers. How weird could it get?

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rSYwtllbweY?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The post Friday Smackdown: The Crumble Insidious appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 08, 2019 09:18 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS MBD PDF Security Settings

SOLIDWORKS MBD has come a long way since it initially released back in 2015. Adding dimensions or using existing design dimensions to publish directly into a manufacturable PDF saves time and interpretation errors.

SOLIDWORKS 2019 has now added more features to the already innovative PDF.  You can now add security measures to the 3D PDF.

New PDF Security Settings

In the “Publish to 3D PDF” area there is a “Security Settings” button added right beside the “Browse” button. Clicking it will open up a new window.

Publish to 3D PDF

Publish to 3D PDF

This new window brings up some check boxes. You now can select:

  • Disable printing the 3D PDF
  • Disable editing the 3D PDF
  • Disable copying the 3D PDF

The PDFs created by SOLIDWORKS MBD were open ended, which means they could be edited by anyone. In the default templates there were empty boxes that provided the opportunity for notes to be passed along the line for the ideal approval and passed back down for any revisions. This function can now be locked out for any unwanted hands touching.

SOLIDWORKS MBD PDF Security Settings

SOLIDWORKS MBD PDF Security Settings

The same goes for printing and copying, both features prevent the PDFs being passed onto unwanted eyes as much as it can.

Adding a Password

Lastly, a password can be added to cover all bases of security. Check the box and enter the desired password. A warning though, this is not editable after the PDF is saved out. If you forget and need to change the password, it’s important to note that a new PDF is to be created.

The post SOLIDWORKS MBD PDF Security Settings appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at February 08, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Urban Design Project Invites Public to ‘3D Print (Their) City’ From Waste

3D Printed Chair

With much of the world turning a newer, greener leaf, many people are finding ways to incorporate a “greener” lifestyle with 21st-century technologies. In the case of Rotterdam-based design studio The New Raw, this means letting citizens create their own recycled furniture.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-vimeo wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-vimeo wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="433" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/311304894" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The studio created the ‘Print Your City’ initiative: a recycling project first introduced in Amsterdam, Netherlands and now in the city of Thessaloniki, Greece. The program allows citizens to bring their plastic waste to a lab, design furniture using a website created by the studio, and, ultimately, 3D print their upcycled creation—which can then be placed in a public area of their choosing.

<figure class="wp-block-image">print your city</figure>

While, perhaps, not being able to take your self-designed recycled sofa home is a bummer, the movement focuses on teaching city inhabitants to be more mindful about how much waste they produce. Upon entering the lab, each person learns about the recycling process of different plastics and how their trash will inevitably become a place to rest.

<figure class="wp-block-image">print your city</figure>

Once they’ve ingrained the method of production and any design constraints, citizens design the furniture at their leisure. Based on their personal interest, they can incorporate specific features into their designs including a dog bowl, a bike rack, or a plant pot. Regardless of the finished concept, all of the furniture is manufactured with a similar motif to ensure cohesiveness across the collection—while an individual tag indicates how many kilos of plastic were recycled to make it.

<figure class="wp-block-image">print your city</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">print your city</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">print your city</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">print your city</figure>

Though initial prototypes were printed in the summer of 2018, over 3,000 unique designs have been uploaded to the website since it was made public in December 2018. The New Raw’s long-term goal is to recycle a whopping four tons of plastic waste, which equates to roughly 3628.74 kilograms. By giving citizens the creative power to make their city a greener place, they might succeed!

The post Urban Design Project Invites Public to ‘3D Print (Their) City’ From Waste appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 08, 2019 12:39 PM

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 06.19

Star Wars Sound Design Inspires a Closer Listen to Modern Machines

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

Chevrolet Just Built a Full-Sized LEGO Silverado Pickup Truck

Always a (giant) crowd pleaser for any LEGO fan – making gigantic ‘things’ out of LEGO—this time it’s a Chevrolet Silverado pick up truck. Agreed it’s only because of a movie partnership – “The LEGO® Movie 2: The Second Part” – no less, we can all do with a little bit more of the bricks to play with.

<figure class="aligncenter">Chevrolet Just Built a Full-Sized LEGO Silverado Pickup Truck</figure>

Tour of Greater Seattle Area’s ‘The Facility Makerspace’

Did you know there’s a packed, 11,000 square foot makerspace just 15 miles north of Seattle? We stopped by The Facility Makerspace to see the toys inside this new space funded by Edmonds Community College. If you’re worried about not being a student there — don’t! This makerspace is open to the public and you don’t need to be enrolled in any formal program to use the equipment, either.

<figure class="aligncenter">Tour of Greater Seattle Area’s ‘The Facility Makerspace’</figure>

Star Wars Sound Design Inspires a Closer Listen to Modern Machines

The first Star Wars movie came out in 1977 and cemented itself as one of cinema’s most popular franchises. To bring this story set in a galaxy far, far away to life, director George Lucas used brilliant set design, vehicle design, costumes, special effects, and some of the best sound design of the time.

<figure class="aligncenter">Star Wars Sound Design Inspires a Closer Listen to Modern Machines</figure>

How to Build a Computer Mouse with a Built-in Computer (For Real)

Even with the prevalence of touchscreens and touchpads, no piece of input hardware can interact with a computer quite like the traditional mouse. Introduced as a prototype in 1964, the very first personal computer mouse has let users edit their Word documents, play video games, and altogether explore a digital world created by 1s and 0s. Take away your computer’s mouse, and you’ll discover just how hard it is to get any real work done (and no, switching to your laptop’s touchpad doesn’t count).

<figure class="aligncenter">How to Build a Computer Mouse with a Built-in Computer (For Real)</figure>

10 Simple Storage Ideas For Your Garage Workshop

Even if you’re not some hotshot designer or engineer, being your family and friends’ resident Mr. Fixit can be just as good of a title. But now it’s time to take it up a notch and get your workshop organized. Here are 10 storage tips on how to turn your garage into a streamlined workshop fit for any project.

<figure class="aligncenter">10 Simple Storage Ideas For Your Garage Workshop</figure>

NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000: First Look

NVIDIA introduced their Quadro RTX line with an eye-poppin’ mix of high-end GPUs that put previous Quadro cards to shame and made workstations question their life choices. What seemed to be missing, however, was a mid-range RTX option. They introduced that last fall – the Quadro RTX 4000 – and it’s due… really, any moment. NVIDIA snagged one and shot it over so we could give you a first look and see what this GPU can do.

<figure class="aligncenter">NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000: First Look</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 06.19 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 08, 2019 12:15 PM

Cool Tools: KingMoore Tactical Military Build Belt

Tactical Belt

As somebody’s wise old uncle probably said at one point or another in history: never underestimate the power of a reliable belt. While it might be an easy item to overlook in the wardrobe department, having a belt with the right fit can make or break a day in the workshop — particularly if you’re bending up and down with that old Shop Vac hose.

While a good, solid leather belt and custom-engraved cowboy buckle are pretty awesome, we also love the simplicity of a straight-up, no BS, simple solution like the KingMoore Tactical Build designed after military-style belt systems. Oh yeah, and it’s just 15 bucks.

With breathable wear-resisting nylon and a metal clasp buckle, this easy-on-the-eyes belt is capable of infinite adjustments so you’ll always be sure to find that perfect fit. And when nature calls, the Quick Release mechanism is intuitive and smooth for a no-fuss, no-hassle unclasping. And just like most other things designed in the tactical or everyday carry gear market — what’s not to love about the purity and simplicity of plain old functional gear?

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

KingMoore Tactical Military Belt — $14.99

Features:

  • Heavy Duty Metal Buckle – This tactical belt features a military belt buckle made from heavy-duty metal.
  • Quality Nylon Belt – This tactical belt made from wear-resisting nylon webbing material that is more durable, breathable and fast-dry. 
  • Quick Release – Intuitive and smooth quick release functionality when you push the golden tabs down at the same time
  • Everyday Carry Gear – The tactical belt is applicable to all kinds of overalls, casual pants, tactical trousers, and outdoor trousers as well as outdoor uses such as outward bound training like outdoor rock climbing, tactics and prompt drop.
  • Ideal and suitable for active daily work

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: KingMoore Tactical Military Build Belt appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 08, 2019 11:15 AM

Raspberry Pi Launches First Official Retail Store

Raspberry Pi Cambridge

The Raspberry Pi credit-card sized computer can’t do everything — but boy can it sure do a lot. Whether you spring for the full-sized Model B+ to create a custom 3D printed smart home camera, or the compact Zero to create a frickin’ homebrew pocketable smartphone, there’s no denying that the affordable boards are one of the best ways to kill a lazy Saturday in the workshop.

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Following suit with other brands including Nike, Microsoft, and Apple skewing towards “experiential retail”, the Raspberry Pi foundation launched their first retail store in Cambridge, UK Thursday with an emphasis on allowing visitors to experience that #RaspberryPiLife.

With stations arranged throughout with project breakdowns, the store almost doubles as a Raspberry Pi museum for showing off everything the miniature computer is capable of in the hands of ‘Digital Makers’:

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Released in February of 2012 and previously only available through limited online retailers, nearly every generation and model of Raspberry Pi board has found critical success and fanfare both due to its relatively cheap price point (usually around $35 USD) and its remarkable ability to adapt to the needs of multiple user types and industries. Among others, these have included education and STEM training, home automation, industrial automation, and even some commercial products from small manufacturers.

For those ‘Digital Makers’ in the UK, the Raspberry Pi Store in Cambridge might be worth checking out. Find it at Grand Arcade — just a pebble’s throw down the cobblestone street from the University of Cambridge.


The post Raspberry Pi Launches First Official Retail Store appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Simon Martin at February 08, 2019 02:38 AM

February 07, 2019

SolidSmack

NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000: First Look

NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000

NVIDIA introduced their Quadro RTX line with an eye-poppin’ mix of high-end GPUs that put previous Quadro cards to shame and made workstations question their life choices. What seemed to be missing, however, was a mid-range RTX option. They introduced that last fall – the Quadro RTX 4000 – and it’s due… really, any moment. NVIDIA snagged one and shot it over so we could give you a first look and see what this GPU can do.

At the time of this writing, I don’t have a tower workstation for the RTX 4000, so don’t have photos of it in its natural RAM-rich, storage-maxed, PCIe-ready, motherboardin‘ habitat. However… well, you should have seen that GPU all boxed up and static-sealed… it needed OUT. So, I took it to the country for fresh air and an introduction to some who seem to question/fear the power emanating from its sleek aluminum enclosure.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZM8u5-CTx2k?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

When the Quadro RTX 4000 was announced last November it was slated to be out December 2018. You won’t find it in the NVIDIA shop or in the OEM workstations quite yet but since it’s sitting here on the desk aaaaand enjoying time in the county you should be expecting it to drop soon.

As you know, we like to have a look behind the design of products. It’s hard to imagine all that goes into the development of GPU technology but interesting to see a video from NVIDIA with a wonderful little glimpse behind the Quadro card scene. They explain the applications, the history, why the Turing architecture is so important and, with the testing put into it, perhaps explains why we’re still anticipating its release.

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</figure>

Quadro RTX: Things To Know

There’s quite a lot to the Quadro RTX line up and some notable differences over the previous Quadro cards. The new cards use the next generation of GPUs which include two very important aspects. They are:

1. Based on Turing GPU Architecture
The Turing architecture adds many important features over previous architecture, the primary of which is the new Tensor cores that add deep learning-based AI capabilities and the RT cores for real-time ray tracing acceleration. But there’s much, much more to Turing. It introduces a slew of new advanced shading features: Mesh shading to improve geometry handling performance, texture-space shading to cache shading results, variable rate-shading (VRS) to control shading resolution for specific regions, and multi-view rendering (MVR) that allows the rendering of multiple views in a single pass. The VRS and MVR have some very interesting applications if VR is of interest to you, with shading resolution based on eye-position and faster rendering of VR scenes. If you want deeper into the Turing rabbit hole, I absolutely recommend a quick read of the 86-page Turing GPU white paper.

2. Part of the NVIDIA RTX Platform
The Turing architecture and its features come together on the
NVIDIA RTX platform. This platform provides various RTX APIs for developers which allow them to build RTX applications that take advantage of the RTX Turing architecture which allow you to take advantage of those RTX features in applications that take advantage of NVIDIA’s line of RTX GPUs. It’s a big RTX love fest and you’re invited.

To date, there are 14 Turing-based Quadro GPUs and four in the Quadro RTX line. The Quadro RTX 4000 leads the pack followed by the RTX 5000, 6000, and 8000.

If you’re familiar with older generation Quadro cards, and GPU specs in general, you likely evaluate it on GPU memory, memory bandwidth, CUDA cores for NVIDIA cards, and perhaps display connectors/support and power consumption. The RTX cards add some new specs you’ll want to get familiar with, namely the count for the Tensor Cores and RT Cores I mentioned earlier.

CUDA Cores Quadro RTX GPU Comparison
  Quadro RTX 4000 Quadro RTX 5000 Quadro RTX 6000 Quadro RTX 8000
GPU Memory 8 GB GDDR6 16 GB GDDR6 24 GB GDDR6 48 GB GDDR6
Memory Bandwidth 416 Gbps 416 Gbps 624 Gbps 624 Gbps
CUDA Cores 2304 3072 4608 4608
Tensor Cores 288 384 576 576
RT Cores 36 48 72 72
RTX-OPS 43T 62T 84T 84T
Rays Cast 6 Giga Rays/Sec 8 Giga Rays/Sec 10 Giga Rays/Sec 10 Giga Rays/Sec
FP32 Performance 7.1 TFLOPS 11.2 TFLOPS 16.3 TFLOPS 16.3 TFLOPS
List Price $900 $2300 $6300 $10000

Now, unless you’ve sprung for an RTX 6000, you’re likely on an older P(ascal), K(epler), or M(axwell) series Quadro card. All previous Quadro cards lack the Turing RT Cores and Tensor Cores. Also to note, the peak memory bandwidth of the RTX cards start out at 416 Gbps for the RTX 4000 while the P-series maxes out at 432 Gbps for the P6000. While it’s a leap from a direct comparison, the Quadro RTX 4000 is considered a mid-range card that pops in at the same 8 gigabitties (GDDR5) of the mid-range Quadro P4000 which also has much lower memory bandwidth and CUDA core count.

CUDA Cores Quadro Mid-Range GPU Comparison
  Quadro RTX 4000 Quadro P4000 Quadro P2000 Quadro P1000
GPU Memory 8 GB GDDR6 8 GB GDDR5 5 GB GDDR5 4 GB GDDR5
Memory Bandwidth 416 Gbps 243 Gbps 140 Gbps 80 Gbps
CUDA Cores 2304 1792 1024 640
Tensor Cores 288
RT Cores 36
RTX-OPS 43T
Rays Cast 6 Giga Rays/Sec
FP32 Performance 7.1 TFLOPS 5.3 TFLOPS 3.0 TFLOPS 1.9 TFLOPS
List Price $900 $750 $399 $319

So, I hope that gives you a sense of what we’re dealing with in the new Quadro RTX line. I have a Lenovo P520 Tower (with a Quadro P4000) I’ll put the RTX 4000 card into for some testing and *ahem* better photos. Having seen what a Quadro RTX 6000 can do, I’m anxious to see what a card with 8GB of GDDR6 memory (1/4th that of the 6000) is capable of and also how it compares with the Quadro P4000.

Once I go a few rounds, I’ll post my finding. Until then, let me know what questions you have about the Quadro RTX 4000 and I’ll do my best to answer them.

If you haven’t had a chance to see the new NVIDIA GPUs in action, and you’ll be at SOLIDWORKS World 2019 next week in Dallas, Texas, NVIDIA and their partners, both software and hardware, will be featuring their capabilities. I’m particularly interested in the range of applications the Turing tech holds for CAD/CAM/CAE software.

Oh, and keep an eye on the Quadro RTX 4000 page for new info and to get a notification about its availability.

The post NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000: First Look appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 07, 2019 06:29 PM

The Javelin Blog

Designing 90° Sheet Metal HVAC Duct in SOLIDWORKS – Part 4 of 4

Welcome to part 4 of this adventure of making a large sheet metal HVAC duct. In Part 3 we saved the bodies, converting them into sheet metal parts and exported as DXF/DWG. In this final part I’m going to show you how to modify the exported parts in DraftSight to get a laser/plasma friendly part that gets the best yield out of the material.

I will start out by opening up the inlet and saving it as a different name. I used the same name as the SOLIDWORKS initial part. Next I’m opening up all the parts in order from the inlet and then copying and pasting into my main duct DXF. So in doing this I should have my 7 parts.

Has too much wasted material

Has too much wasted material

Editing these parts can be challenging but believe me, your boss will thank you. From the screen shot below, you can see the current parts together and note that this is the size of sheet metal you’ll need.

Sheet Metal Required

Sheet Metal Required

I’m going to modify 3 parts (every other- parts 2, 4 & 6) to fit nicely inside the other parts. I take part 2 and cut it in half, keeping both halves and then join them together on the opposite side. Take a look at the screen shot of the progression on this part.

This is the part before I edited it and after I edited it.

This is the part before I edited it and after I edited it.

I first start by drawing a vertical line, starting in the bottom middle to the top middle. My line didn’t snap stop at the top, so I drew past and trimmed afterwards. I then made a horizontal line on the new vertical lines mid-point. I then copied this and used the “Split” command on both sections, deleted the end lines and merged the opposite sides together. I then made this into a block and started fitting it into the inlet

Common shortcuts for commands: “L” for line, “SC” for scale, “TR” for trim, “MID” for mid-point, “Ctrl + X + V” to paste as a block and the typical windows shortcuts work here, too.

Doing this to the 3 parts, making them blocks, fitting them inside one another and now comparing the lengths before and after- you can see the difference is just over 39″ in length or over 41 square feet. That’s a big difference to the sheet metal yield. The cutting time can be reduced if the edges are shared when cutting.

Notice the length is now 158" instead of 197"

Notice the length is now 158″ instead of 197″

This concludes this series. Please subscribe for more advanced tips and tricks on developing this duct work in the near future.

The post Designing 90° Sheet Metal HVAC Duct in SOLIDWORKS – Part 4 of 4 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at February 07, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

10 Simple Storage Ideas For Your Garage Workshop

Garage Storage

Even if you’re not some hotshot designer or engineer, being your family and friends’ resident Mr. Fixit can be just as good of a title. But now it’s time to take it up a notch and get your workshop organized. Here are 10 storage tips on how to turn your garage into a streamlined workshop fit for any project.

1. Use magnetic strips for drill bits.

<figure class="aligncenter">10 storage workshop tips<figcaption>image source: https://www.pinterest.ph/pin/446067538065544364/</figcaption></figure>

Stop leaving your drill pieces around for people to accidentally step on and toddlers to chew. By sticking some magnetic strips in high places such as your workstation walls or worktable, you now have a place to store all your drill bits without the hassle of opening a box or cabinet to put them back in. Heck, you can even make a fun game where you throw the drill bits onto the strip from way across the other side of your workshop!


2. Create different-sized bins for varying pieces of scrap.

<figure class="aligncenter">10 storage workshop tips<figcaption>image source: https://www.pinterest.ph/pin/446067538065516378/</figcaption></figure>

While reusing scrap materials is well and good for the environment, rarely do you get spare pieces of the same size. Create designated scrap crates which allow you to segregate reusable scrap according to their material, make, and most importantly, size. Your future self will thank you when you easily find the piece of material you need to work on a new project.


3. Not enough storage space on the floor? Make use of wall cabinets!

<figure class="aligncenter">10 storage workshop tips<figcaption>image source: https://www.pinterest.ph/pin/446067538062845754/</figcaption></figure>

Though a standard house garage is big enough to fit at least two cars, rarely can it hold a person’s imagination. You’ll soon find that not everything will conventionally fit inside your garage workshop.

This is where wall cabinets come in. Instead of taking up space on your garage floor which could otherwise store a car or two, you can instead attach some heavy duty wall cabinets on your walls. Unlike their mild-mannered kitchen brethren, heavy-duty cabinets can hold power tools and heavy metal parts which could otherwise be only stored on a ground-based storage container.


4. Make small holders for your hand tools

<figure class="aligncenter">10 storage workshop tips<figcaption>image source: https://www.pinterest.ph/pin/109353097180333230/</figcaption></figure>

Just like drill bits, the hardest part of putting away small hand tools is opening the cabinet, finding the proper receptacle, and placing them in an orderly fashion. This wastes a lot of time which could otherwise be used for working on projects or taking a break from staying in the garage too long.

By drilling a series of holes into some wall or cabinet-mounted wood, you can easily store your tools in an orderly fashion without having to waste energy by opening a cabinet. This also makes it easier to find the right tool for the job when your hands are full.

5. While you’re at it, put even more stuff on the wall!

<figure class="aligncenter">10 storage workshop tips<figcaption>image source: https://www.pinterest.ph/pin/446067538062845742/</figcaption></figure>

Why stop at small hand tools and wall cabinets? You can rack longer items and receptacles onto the wall using different-sized screws and racks. Step ladders, screw boxes, and other tools you find hard to reach can be made more accessible by hanging them on the wall. Sure they’ll pick up dust in the long run, but it’s worth the sacrifice if you can get the job done faster.


6. Use multi-CD containers as string containers.

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</figure>

This is a personal favorite of mine. Take a multi-CD container (the cheap kind you find in a digital store), drill a hole on the top, and run the thread through to make a string dispenser. This makes cutting specific sizes of string easier since gravity does the unrolling for you. As a bonus, the upside-down container prevents the string from rolling away and finding itself in the paws of a grubby cat.


7. Pringles cans make good receptacles for straight rulers.

<figure class="aligncenter">10 storage workshop tips<figcaption>image source: https://www.pinterest.ph/pin/243053711111516376/?lp=true</figcaption></figure>

To save yourself some money on storage containers, empty Pringles cans can be used to hold your straight rulers. They don’t fit as well inside a cabinet, but these upright containers help save some space on your desk (which is where you’ll be using rulers the most).


8. Use biscuit tins to store small screws, nails, and small objects.

<figure class="aligncenter">10 storage workshop tips<figcaption>image source: https://sc01.alicdn.com/kf/HTB1w5K2q_dYBeNkSmLyq6xfnVXa6/Custom-Round-Butter-Cookies-Tin.jpg</figcaption></figure>

There’s a reason your grandma uses biscuit tins as a place to store her sewing materials: it’s because they’re great for organizing small objects. If you have small items which you don’t immediately need for a project, take a page from your grandma’s book and use these babies to store your different screws, nails, and smaller pieces of metal (after you finish eating the biscuits, of course).


9. Keep heavy machinery on mobile stands for easy access.

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</figure>

One constant when working on any project is whenever you need something specific; it’s never there. This not only applies to small tools and objects but heavier tools like saws and drills as well.

Buying or making your own mobile stands with wheels may take some money or time respectively, but they let you wheel over the tools you need to whatever dark corner of the shop your project is sitting in.


10. Store dangerous materials in hard-to-reach cabinets!

<figure class="aligncenter">10 storage workshop tips<figcaption>image source:. https://www.pinterest.ph/pin/446067538062845753/</figcaption></figure>

After all these tips, it’s always good to remind everyone how safety takes priority in everything you do. While it’s cool to have everything you need within arm’s reach, this isn’t an excuse to leave your tools just anywhere before, during, and after a project.

You aren’t the only one who passes through the garage, so it’s a good idea to store buzzsaws, hammers, drills, and other dangerous objects in containers only an adult can reach. Keep long and sharp pieces of wood and metal in a shed and lock it tight when not in use. Not only will it save other people’s lives, but it will save you on hospital bills too!

The post 10 Simple Storage Ideas For Your Garage Workshop appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 07, 2019 12:59 PM

App Smack 06.19: Tunity, Google Messages, Pluto, and More…

iPhone

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved smart device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional. This week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Tunity: Hear any muted TV (iOS — Free)

Now you can tune-in wherever you go! TUNITY is a FREE app that allows you to hear any muted, live TV’s audio directly on your mobile device. Simply scan the TV, let Tunity locate the channel and stream the audio through your headphones or bluetooth speaker.

<figure class="aligncenter">Tunity: Hear any muted TV</figure>

Simple Mileage Tracker (iOS – Free)

Simple automatically tracks and records your mileage in the background as you drive your car for business. Simple users save an average of $6,000 per year.

<figure class="aligncenter">Simple Mileage Tracker</figure>

Pluto: Money Saver & Tracker (iOS — Free)

Manage your spending & saving in a fun, simple & automatic way. No more tedious budgets, stressful numbers & ugly graphs—ever again!

<figure class="aligncenter">Pluto: Money Saver & Tracker</figure>

letgo: Buy & Sell Used Stuff (Android — Free)

letgo is the biggest and fastest growing app to buy and sell locally. Over 75 million downloads and 200 million listings!

<figure class="aligncenter">letgo: Buy & Sell Used Stuff</figure>

ES File Explorer File Manager (Android — Free)

ES File Explorer (File Manager) is a full-featured file (Images, Music, Movies, Documents, app) manager for both local and networked use!

<figure class="aligncenter">ES File Explorer</figure>

Messages (Android — Free)

Meet Messages, Google’s official app for texting (SMS, MMS) and chat (RCS). Message anyone from anywhere with the reliability of texting and the richness of chat.

<figure class="aligncenter">Google Messages</figure>

The post App Smack 06.19: Tunity, Google Messages, Pluto, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 07, 2019 12:28 PM

Learn How to Build Your Next CAD Workstation with This $19 Online Course

Computer Hard Drive

These days, you can get just about any computer rig designed to your exact specifications. Whether you’re a RAM-hogging SolidWorks user, or simply just want a powerful workstation, there’s something for everybody. But no standardized hardware mod will ever replace the satisfaction of building your own rig from scratch.

If you’ve ever wanted to create your own custom-built PC but didn’t know where to start, boy do we have great news for you.

The How to Build a Computer Bundle consolidates five intensive online courses (a total of 126 individual lessons) ranging from how to create a blueprint for your desired desktop or laptop setup to how to overclock CPU processor functions to speed up rendering times.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

How to Build a Computer Bundle — $374 $19.00 (94% off)

Topics Covered Include:

  • Learn about the basic functions of a computer system
  • Pick out appropriate hardware for your build
  • Assemble all hardware needed for a fully functional computer
  • Wire everything within the case like an expert
  • Cover the most effective method of CPI cooling: closed-loop liquid cooling
  • Upgrade to a higher capacity storage device
  • Improve your RAM chip(s)
  • Clean & refresh your CPU cooling unit
  • Swap in an SSD
  • Learn about the various tricky aspects about RAID setups
  • Understand how to increase data read/write speeds & prepare your computer for a drive crash

Get It!

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Learn How to Build Your Next CAD Workstation with This $19 Online Course appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 07, 2019 12:04 PM

February 06, 2019

SolidSmack

How to Build a Computer Mouse with a Built-in Computer (For Real)

3D Printed Computer Mouse

Even with the prevalence of touchscreens and touchpads, no piece of input hardware can interact with a computer quite like the traditional mouse. Introduced as a prototype in 1964, the very first personal computer mouse has let users edit their Word documents, play video games, and altogether explore a digital world created by 1s and 0s. Take away your computer’s mouse, and you’ll discover just how hard it is to get any real work done (and no, switching to your laptop’s touchpad doesn’t count).

The computer is dependent on the mouse and vise versa — but what if you could integrate the two? While a trackpad roughly counts as a mouse being incorporated into a computer, YouTube creator Electronic Grenade has done the opposite and integrated a computer into a mouse:

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</figure>

Contained inside of this slightly-larger-than-a-traditional-mouse are a keyboard, a battery, and a 1.5-inch screen that lets users interact with the CPU unit housed within the mouse body—powered by a Raspberry Pi Zero. While the initial idea was to take a commercially-produced mouse and fit a computer inside of it, the required hardware needed Electronic Grenade to make a mouse of his own.

<figure class="wp-block-image">computer mouse</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">computer mouse</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">computer mouse</figure>

Using 3D printing, he was able to carve out a slot for the keyboard, hinges for the screen, and a power button for the computer. This goes without saying the mouse itself has all of the traditional mouse buttons, complete with a scroll wheel.

<figure class="wp-block-image">computer mouse</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">computer mouse</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">computer mouse</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">computer mouse</figure>

Booting up the computer requires a user to turn on the power switch and wait for a couple of seconds. Once it’s on, the low sensitivity of the mouse makes it pretty easy to navigate through the tiny screen. While it won’t be running high-end games or editing 100-megapixel Photoshop documents, simple programs like Notebook and low graphics games like Minecraft run like a dream…except after building for a couple of minutes, Minecraft promptly crashed — maybe a fix is on the way?

It isn’t the most practical build since the screen is so small — plus, using the computer can be cumbersome, but it’s the thought that counts.

Electronic Grenade is planning on making a future video detailing the design process of the mouse and how he fit all the components into it. You can find it as well as his other Raspberry Pi projects on his YouTube channel.

The post How to Build a Computer Mouse with a Built-in Computer (For Real) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 06, 2019 07:24 PM

Star Wars Sound Design Inspires a Closer Listen to Modern Machines

Millenium Falcon

The first Star Wars movie came out in 1977 and cemented itself as one of cinema’s most popular franchises. To bring this story set in a galaxy far, far away to life, director George Lucas used brilliant set design, vehicle design, costumes, special effects, and some of the best sound design of the time.

Case in point: the iconic Millennium Falcon.

Piloted by Rebel Alliance starfighters Han Solo and Chewbacca, the Millenium Falcon carries a strikingly unique shape and sound that remains unchanged—even through to the many sequels being made today. While the form of the Millennium Falcon took inspiration from a hamburger (no lie; you can look it up yourself), the sound of the iconic ship’s hyperdrive malfunctioning took inspiration from eight different sounds from real-life malfunctioning equipment:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-4-3 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8G6RChOLrTA?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Some of these sounds include the sound of an old biplane motor, an air hiss from dentist equipment, an arclight motor, a tank motor, and some rattling faucet pipes, of all things. It’s impressive to see how these unlike sounds, when combined and mixed, make up the iconic sputter and spurt of an intergalactic spaceship.

This video makes you notice just how much of our daily life is filled with rattling equipment which sounds like it might break down at any second. So what other malfunctions can you determine in your machines by sound alone?

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-4-3 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LYJzFP-QSuY?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Let’s start with the obvious choice: your car. Screeching brakes often means you need to change your brake pads, while a looseness in your steering wheel coupled with a mechanical sound is a sign you need to take your automobile to a mechanic and have the ball joints checked. There are over a million different sounds in a car alone which signal you to fix different parts, but these are the most common sounds you’ll hear.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/93HWrhxl3tw?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Inversely, the lack of sound from an electric guitar means you should open it up and see if any of the wires are interfering with the circuit. In this particular case, long grounded wires which are pressed too close to the guitar’s circuit get in the way of the current. A simple fix is to trim the wires down to just the right size, so they connect the components and not much else. After cutting them down and soldering them back on, a constant tune from the guitar means it’s in working shape.

These are just a few machines whose sounds (or lack of sound) signal you to open them up and check their parts. Granted they don’t sound as cool as a Millennium Falcon, but having a car which isn’t a safety hazard or a guitar which produces sound is a pretty good consolation prize.

The post Star Wars Sound Design Inspires a Closer Listen to Modern Machines appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at February 06, 2019 06:48 PM

Impossible Models: Manufacturing Concerns – Shelling

My storage of customer files has 280 folders. Generally that’s one or more projects per customer, and some have a lot of projects in each folder, and most projects are…

by matt at February 06, 2019 04:20 PM

The Javelin Blog

Designing 90° Sheet Metal HVAC Duct in SOLIDWORKS – Part 3 of 4

Welcome to part 3 of this adventure of making a large sheet metal HVAC duct. We left off in part 2 splitting the single body duct into 7 bodies. Today I’m going to demonstrate how to save the bodies out and how to convert into the desired thickness of gauge sheet metal.

Using the “Split Command” gave use random names and numbers for our parts. I will first start off by renaming/renumbering the parts starting from the inlet and ending on the outlet. To reveal the bodies I hit the drop down option. Note: renaming the parts is a slow double-click.

Save the bodies into individual parts

To save the bodies out to individual parts I will right-click on the bodies folder and in the middle is “Save Bodies”. A new command comes up. I selected all parts by checking all the boxes. Before I end the command, there’s an option to make all these bodies into an assembly. I did this, but keep in mind that it’s certainly not needed. The new assembly can be saved by selecting where you’d like to save and you can name it accordingly.

Save Bodies

Save Bodies

Note: if you do the optional assembly from the “Save Bodies” command the parts will only be fixed in place and no mates will be established.

Convert Bodies to Sheet Metal

Moving on to converting these bodies into sheet metal parts is only a few step process that will be repeated for all 7 segments. I’m going to start with the inlet opening. In the “Sheet Metal” tab on the far right is “Insert Bends” option and I’m going to use this. I need to select a fixed edge or face, so I’m going to select an edge on the slit we made. Once I complete the command, it’s important to notice that there’s now sheet metal parameters added on and I’m able to flatten this.

Convert to Sheet Metal

Convert to Sheet Metal

My last step is to save this out as a DXF or DWG to be modified or go directly into the nesting program.

Important: please be careful when selecting a face to export, as it’s easy to select the incorrect side and get a reversed flat pattern. Pay close attention on what edge you’ve selected to be stationary and how the part flattens.

Save as a DWG/DXF

To change this into a DWF or DWG, all you have to do is right click on the face and select the option to export (near the bottom). I used the “Save As” and selected the correct file location. Next I can select different faces, views or sheet metal so I’m going to select “Sheet Metal” and click the check mark. I now get a new box with what the DXF/DWG will look like. If there are sporadic lines, here’s where you can delete them before the file is saved.

Save as DWG/DXF

Save as DWG/DXF

The last few steps is rinse and repeat for all parts. Follow this to the next article to see how to modify the DWX/DWG’s to get a nice laser/plasma and roller/press friendly part.

The post Designing 90° Sheet Metal HVAC Duct in SOLIDWORKS – Part 3 of 4 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at February 06, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

SolidSmack Radio | New Adventures in Geometric Freedom (Powered by Spotify)

Spotify Playlist

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’ll get the groove going with “Friday Sky” from Babeheaven before diving into tracks from Night Moves, TOPS, Blue Hawaii, and others before wrapping up with “Looks Like That” from Sneaks. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<figure><iframe height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/67OXBnwi4HUZxt8CQw2vSN" width="100%"></iframe></figure>

The post SolidSmack Radio | New Adventures in Geometric Freedom (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 06, 2019 03:46 AM

February 05, 2019

SolidSmack

Tour of Greater Seattle Area’s ‘The Facility Makerspace’

Did you know there’s a packed, 11,000 square foot makerspace just 15 miles north of Seattle? We stopped by The Facility Makerspace to see the toys inside this new space funded by Edmonds Community College. If you’re worried about not being a student there — don’t! This makerspace is open to the public and you don’t need to be enrolled in any formal program to use the equipment, either.

David Voetmann led the detailed tour and explained how The Facility works. You can see the highlights for yourself in the video below:

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HZvPUoAO68s?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
<figcaption>Come on a tour with us of The Facility Makerspace in this video!</figcaption></figure>

The Facility, located in Lynnwood, Washington, is already decked out with impressive gear and it’s growing.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Vacuum-forming equipment. Now that’s something you don’t see in every makerspace!</figcaption></figure>

Today, you can find wood and metal working tools, 3D printers, and even a kiln for ceramics work. These guys are constantly evaluating the needs of those using the space and making adjustments. So, it’s highly likely the list of tools will expand. Some highlights are below.

(Some of ) The Goods

  • 3D printers: including Form 2, uPrint and TAZ 6
  • Laser cutter
  • Water jet
  • CNC router
  • MIG welder
  • 3D scanner
  • Fusion 360 (primarily), plus some SolidWorks and Rhino seats
  • Vacuum forming equipment
  • Injection molders (for smaller parts)
  • Room with filtered ventilation for work kicking up a lot of debris
  • A friggin’ wind tunnel (seriously)
  • All the typical saws, sanders and smaller tools you’d expect
<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Saws and drills you’d expect.</figcaption></figure>

While the breadth of equipment is impressive, the operating format for the space may be equally so. The main goal of The Facility is to make all these sweet tools as accessible as possible to the general public. For $50 and 2 hours of your time, you can get trained on any supported equipment. Or, if you already know how to use those big machines, you can get a check done of your skills. As soon as they verify you’re not likely to accidentally hack off one of your own fingers, you’re good to go! Just reserve time on the machine and pay afterwards for your time and any materials.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Check out all that space…for making.</figcaption></figure>

Example Rates

The (subject to change) rates are approximately:

  • “Open shop” = $5/hr.
  • Laser cutter = $30/hr.
  • CNC router = $30/hr.
  • 3D printer = ~$15/hr. (including materials)

If you’re not looking to build the next unicorn physical product to launch on KickStarter, that’s OK. The Facility still offers a super affordable way to get practical training and experience on machines useful in industry. Vocational training programs are typically way less expensive than a 4-year degree, but this is even cheaper than that! And you can even come away with a nice portfolio of things you made with your new skills.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>Ventilated space for sand blasters, sanding equipment, and other messy, airborne stuff.</figcaption></figure>

I don’t live anywhere near Seattle and I’m constantly traveling, but even I was pondering how this space might be useful to me. If I’m in the area and need quick access to some expensive tools, The Facility could come in handy.

David Voetmann told me there are other classes in the works. He hopes The Facility can offer more comprehensive support in the future to budding hardware creators. Things like business, marketing, and legal guidance for example, are crucial in successfully taking the next step past building the thing.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption>The gigundous water jet cutter.</figcaption></figure>

The neatest aspect about this space overall, though, is probably the willingness of the staff to build it in whichever way will encourage more people to jump in and get their hands dirty. They focus on keeping the obstacles to putting a tool in your hand to a minimum. They’re also continually questioning the structure and offerings as they go. If you stop by the space and have comments or suggestions, I’m sure Voetmann would be interested in your feedback!

The Facility Makerspace can be found at:

6606 196TH ST SW
Lynnwood, WA 98036

And the website is:

FacilityMade.com

The post Tour of Greater Seattle Area’s ‘The Facility Makerspace’ appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Erin McDermott at February 05, 2019 06:10 PM

The Javelin Blog

Searching Additional Variables in SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2

SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 search is a convenient, single search box that is able to search File Names, Folder Names as well as the Comment and Description variables by default, but what if you need to search more variable values?

SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 Search

SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 Search

This can be done easily by modifying the Application Settings for the SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 site.

Go to the Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager on the server hosting the Web2 site.  In the SOLIDWORKSPDM site settings, go to “Application Settings” in the ASP.NET section.

Information Services (IIS) Manager

Information Services (IIS) Manager

In the Application Settings, go to the “SearchDataCardVariables” setting and double click it to open the edit dialog.

By default it will contain the value “Comment|Description”, but you can add any additional Variables that you wish to include in the search.  Each variable should be separated by a | (pipe key).

SearchDataCardVariables

SearchDataCardVariables

Make sure that the variable name syntax is exactly correct so that Web2 will be able to search the variable values.

Once the change is made, the users simply need to refresh the Web2 site in their browser to be able to search the additional fields.

Search the additional fields

Search the additional fields

The post Searching Additional Variables in SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at February 05, 2019 01:00 PM

February 04, 2019

How to Build Impossible Models

I once sat at a table and listened to someone mock engineers, explaining why we have such a lack of creativity. I blew my top, because I had heard it…

by matt at February 04, 2019 07:50 PM

SolidSmack

Build Your Own Smart Speaker with the $34 Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle

Smart Speaker

We’ve said it time and time again, but the Raspberry Pi is just so dang cool and we believe all designers and engineers should have one in their toolkit—if not on their desktop. While there is a bit of a slight learning curve, it’s nothing that today’s designers and engineers can’t handle on a leisurely Saturday.

So why not start now?

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle includes 8 courses to get started creating your very own Amazon Echo or even a ‘vintage’ streaming internet radio over a weekend. Throw in your own 3D printed housings, and the opportunities are limitless!

For a limited time, The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle is 96% off of the $865 retail price and can be purchased right here for a mere $34.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle — $865 $34

Courses Included in the Bundle:

  • Automation with Raspberry Pi Zero
  • Introduction to Raspberry Pi
  • Hardware Projects Using Raspberry Pi
  • Bitcoin Mining Using Raspberry Pi
  • Raspberry Pi Robotics
  • Internet of Things Automation Using Raspberry Pi 2
  • Home Automation in 48 Hours Without Coding
  • Build Your Own ArmBot Step By Step Using Raspberry Pi Zero

BUY HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
StackSocial Amazon

The post Build Your Own Smart Speaker with the $34 Raspberry Pi Mastery Bundle appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 04, 2019 06:50 PM

The SolidSmack Monday List 06.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Huawei Sting Offers Rare Glimpse of the U.S. Targeting a Chinese Giant

Diamond glass could make your phone’s screen nearly unbreakable—and its inventor says the FBI enlisted him after Huawei tried to steal his secrets.

<figure class="aligncenter">Huawei</figure>

This App Wants to Track Every Homeless Person in San Francisco

The epicenter of innovation is turning to software to help the most vulnerable get off the streets.

<figure class="aligncenter">This App Wants to Track Every Homeless Person in San Francisco</figure>

Letter of Recommendation: Color Blind Pal

Everyone can stop pointing at stuff and asking me, ‘O.K., so what color is that?’

<figure class="aligncenter">Letter of Recommendation: Color Blind Pal</figure>

Will Sports Betting Transform How Games Are Watched, and Even Played?

After decades of resistance to sports gambling, team owners and state officials are laying the groundwork for it — with potentially huge implications.

<figure class="aligncenter">Will Sports Betting Transform How Games Are Watched, and Even Played?</figure>

The Social Network Was More Right Than Anyone Realized

In 2010, Facebook was having a pretty good year. It was good because the site was still seeing massive user growth and it had seen its valuation balloon to $23 billion. Facebook was also facing backlash over violating users’ privacy, but it was nothing like the public lashings the company faces now. Not all on the up-and-up, but not all bad either.

<figure class="aligncenter">The Social Network Was More Right Than Anyone Realized</figure>

The Simple Psychology Behind Apple’s Fall

Customers are willing to pay upwards of $1,000 for a phone — but only if they’re rewarded with just as much status.

<figure class="aligncenter">The Simple Psychology Behind Apple’s Fall</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 06.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 04, 2019 03:05 PM

The Javelin Blog

Free Introductory SOLIDWORKS Self-Paced Tutorials

New to CAD (Computer-Aided Design)?  Enrolled in the SOLIDWORKS Essentials class?  Or, looking to take advantage of advanced functionality of SOLIDWORKS?  Either way, here is a great way to prepare for using SOLIDWORKS, and optimize your learning experience if you’re taking the Essentials class.  If you’ve used CAD before, then scroll down past this next paragraph.  Otherwise, keep reading:

A common scenario we see often is one that plagues first-time CAD users:  2D sketching.  So fundamental to a 3D model, and yet sketching is not so easy when it’s our first time!  An Essentials class will typically dive into sketching on the first day, and we find that students may have a more satisfying learning experience if they are already somewhat familiar with basic sketching techniques.  A common temptation is to perform the same steps as the instructor through the case studies, but students who are new to CAD often get tripped up if having never sketched in CAD before.  To overcome this obstacle, we recommend the following:

  1. SOLIDWORKS includes self-paced Tutorials!  To access, run SOLIDWORKS and go to Help > SOLIDWORKS Tutorials.  In there, you’ll find a wealth of step-by-step guided lessons that range from basic part modeling through to advanced stuff such as CSWP (Certified SOLIDWORKS Professional – click this link!) exam preparation, Sheet Metal, 3D Sketching (very useful for Weldments!), and SO much more.
Accessing SOLIDWORKS Tutorials

Accessing SOLIDWORKS Tutorials

2. Another great resource for self-paced learning are the online tutorials on my.solidworks.com  We highly encourage you to check these out as well, for various reasons such as that they include video guidance to demonstrate the steps.

Now you know how to learn much at your own pace, and for free!  So get out there and rock!  🙂

The post Free Introductory SOLIDWORKS Self-Paced Tutorials appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by John Lee, CSWP at February 04, 2019 01:00 PM

February 03, 2019

SolidSmack

Cool Tools of Doom: Prismacolor Premier Verithin Colored Pencils

ID Sketching

As far as colored pencils go, Prismacolors have just about everybody else beat. Whether you’re a designer, engineer, or even a professional artist, the quality of Prismacolor in a variety of applications is just simply unrivaled.

And for those looking to sketch intricate details with defined lines and crisp edges that just can’t be done without a constant sharp point, the brand’s Verithin line of colored pencils feature a hardened core that resists crumbling for ultra-detailed sketch sessions.

We love this 24-pack variety of Verithin Colored Pencils to keep around the shop because each pencil lasts seemingly forever—thanks to that hardened core—and can be used for just about any other marking job, too.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Prismacolor Premier Verithin Colored Pencils 24-Pack — $12.99

Features:

  • Thin cores are perfect for details, edges, and lettering
  • Leads resist crumbling, cracking and breakage
  • Richly saturated, lightfast pigments
  • Hardened cores sharpen to an ultra-fine point making them perfect for filling in tight spaces
  • Includes: Lemon Yellow, Canary Yellow, Orange, Poppy Red, Crimson Red, Magenta, Process Red, Light Peach, Dahlia Purple, Parma Violet, Violet, Ultramarine, Peacock Blue, Indigo Blue, Apple Green, Grass Green, Olive Green, Peacock Green, Terra Cotta, Tuscan Red, Dark Brown, Warm Grey 20%, White and Black

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools of Doom: Prismacolor Premier Verithin Colored Pencils appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 03, 2019 07:01 PM

February 01, 2019

SolidSmack

Friday Smackdown: Blade of the Guhl Shard

A purple burp of a slime biter hid amongst the thicket. The scale-charred sword of the guhl shard drug across the dirt inches away. Though hidden, the blades could cut, giving seconds to escape perhaps, but more assured it would be, they could shoot from the trees, after coating their blades with these links.

Marnix Rekkers – Ships. Bunch of ’em, created by Den Dungen-based concept artist. Vehicles as well, like the Magnum Fury and the Magnum Inferno.

JDP – Joel Daniel Phillips does amazing things with charcoal. You’ll love the plastic bags in Hazards May Be Present and the deatil and smoke in The Future Was Now.

The man who can see all the greys, and reds, and purples in a peach, will paint the peach rightly round, and rightly altogether; but the man who has only studied its roundness, may not see its purples and greys, and if he does not, will never get it to look like a peach; so that great power over color is always a sign of large general art-intellect.

John Ruskin, Of Mountain Beauty

Sabritree – You may yet to have seen ceramic art of the caliber of Sabri Ben-Achour who combines clay and metal crystals. On Instagram here.

Versailles 3D – A tour of Versailles from the beginning in 1624 to the revolution and beyond in these interactive 3D walkthroughs and 3D scale models for mobile.

BLK3.0 – Stuart Semple’s Culture Hustle is known for their color. Now they’ve made their blackest black available in a Kickstater campaign.

Moving Stills – Papercut looping animations made by Rebeka Molnár for Czech Television for the gaps during live streaming.

438 Days – How a man was lost and survived in the Pacific Ocean for over a year.

Mixer – The PBR texture creation tool is available for free throughout the rest of the beta.

RISC – Digital slide-mounted shot counter for Glocks from Radetec. You’d think you’d see more of these for semi-autos.

<script type="text/javascript"> amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "solid0a-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Deals We're Watching"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B07H29YRQ3,B07B5YKL8V,B075JJ7JDN,B07DWQDZL7"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "38d653773c841a076fac993810b57c73"; </script> <script src="http://z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>

Come Along With Me – Adventure Time fans rejoice. The DVD box set arrives April 30. This is a video for the theme song created with fan-created art and colorings.

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<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nwAL24rbDi4?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The post Friday Smackdown: Blade of the Guhl Shard appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Josh Mings at February 01, 2019 06:01 PM

Chevrolet Just Built a Full-Sized LEGO Silverado Pickup Truck

LEGO Pick up truck

Always a (giant) crowd pleaser for any LEGO fan – making gigantic ‘things’ out of LEGO—this time it’s a Chevrolet Silverado pick up truck. Agreed it’s only because of a movie partnership – “The LEGO® Movie 2: The Second Part” – no less, we can all do with a little bit more of the bricks to play with.

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The students of the Oxford Community School’s FIRST LEGO® League and Detroit’s Ralph Waldo Emerson Elementary’s A World in Motion Program created this first-ever full-size LEGO® Silverado — unveiled in January at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. What makes the whole exercise even more impressive is that the team has managed to create a replica of the 2019 Silverado 1500 LT Trail Boss; a new edition to the Chevy family.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

In total, it took eighteen specially-trained LEGO Master Builders to dedicate about 2000 hours of their time to construct this red beauty. Their endeavors made them painstakingly select about 334,544 specific pieces that would suit the particular design needs of the brick truck build. And although you may not be able to fire up the engine, you will be able to work the unique working lights. You can also appreciate the graphic details added strategically to the design.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

The finished constructed model measures in at about 6-feet high, 8-feet wide and 20-feet long. This brick-car weighs about 3,307 pounds, which is quite a bit – 1500 kg! No prizes for guessing that the most commonly used brick was the red 2×8 stud brick. Constructed by the LEGO Master Builders in the LEGO Group’s Model Shop in Enfield, Connecticut, this model Chevy is undoubtedly a treat for any truck-loving LEGO fan.

The post Chevrolet Just Built a Full-Sized LEGO Silverado Pickup Truck appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Radhika Seth at February 01, 2019 01:02 PM

The Javelin Blog

SOLIDWORKS MBD 2019 now includes Cosmetic Threads

A once sore subject with SOLIDWORKS MBD is “Cosmetic Thread” appearance or lack of. Well, SOLIDWORKS MBD 2019 takes care of that. Now when you save out a PDF you get to see the thread picture.

If you are not aware of Cosmetic Threads, please take a look at a couple of our SOLIDWORKS articles listed below:

This is a close up of the studs on a disk brake assembly

This is a close up of the studs on a disk brake assembly

The quick rundown of Cosmetic Threads’ main purpose is to show a visual representation of the internal or external thread(s). Showing the physical threads tends to slow down assemblies and is essentially unnecessary.

Imagine you have a complete assembly of a car engine, having all the nuts and bolts showing their threads would be time consuming to design and mate together. This would significantly slow down the assembly when trying to modify it. So, because of this, pictures of threads replace the physical threads.

SOLIDWORKS MBD 2018 PDF with Cosmetic Threads missing

SOLIDWORKS MBD 2018 PDF with Cosmetic Threads missing

Looking at the before and after pictures shows the cosmetic thread can now be used and shown in published SOLIDWORKS MBD 2019 PDFs. This is the same assembly just opened in different versions.

SOLIDWORKS MBD 2019 PDF includes Cosmetic Threads

SOLIDWORKS MBD 2019 PDF includes Cosmetic Threads

The post SOLIDWORKS MBD 2019 now includes Cosmetic Threads appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at February 01, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 05.19

Don your favorite bathrobe, cream that coffee and get comfortable with this week’s SolidSmack Weekend Reader.

The Weekend Reader features a handful of the most interesting articles featured on the ‘Smack over the past week ranging from tips and tricks to inspirational designs, processes, and more. So lay back, relax and take a load off while reading the top stories on SolidSmack this past week.

Oh and uh…don’t forget to shed some much-needed sunlight on your face, too.

Going to SOLIDWORKS World 2019? Here’s What You Don’t Want to Miss.

Wow. Doesn’t it feel like the first SOLIDWORKS World was waaaaay back in 1998? It was. And here we are again, 21 years later – a magically odd number for a magically odd year. And it promises to be better than ever. Why? 1) It’s in Dallas 2) It’s in TEXAS and 3) It’s SOLIDWORKS, y’all.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Nissan Created an Insane Mobile Woodworking Shop Inside a Van

We’ve featured many woodworking workshops before on SolidSmack—but they’ve always been stationary; idle abodes usually found in garages where woodworkers can live in isolation to work on their craft. While these isolated environments certainly enable many artisans to concentrate better, it doesn’t leave them with a lot of flexibility to work on projects further from home.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

How to Configure Your Workstation for SOLIDWORKS

When it comes to configuring your workstation for SOLIDWORKS, how do you know what to prioritize? Does the size of the GPU matter more than the clock-speed of the CPU? Does your workflow change what’s important? Working at Lenovo, it was important to understand how you as a SOLIDWORKS user need answers to these questions to ensure you are getting the most out of your workstation – especially when there are a massive number of brands, models and configurations to consider.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

This Wood Design Kit is like LEGO for Industrial Designers

Much like LEGOs, modern modular design kits contain various pieces that let the user build various structures. Desks, shelves, pot holders – depending on the kit’s materials, the user can make an assortment of things from a cleverly-designed family of attachable components.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Samsung Introduces New Bioplastic for Hardware Package Designs

It’s usually never official until a sizeable multi-national company does it. While smaller electronics companies have been using paper and other recyclable materials for their products for years, Samsung is only now catching onto the environment-friendly trend.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Video Game Fans Build Real-Life Version of In-Game Turret

For those who haven’t tried it yet, Overwatch is a cartoonish multiplayer video game set in the not-so-distant future. With a diverse roster of characters—from the giant talking ape Winston to the gun-slinging cowboy McCree—Overwatch’s cast is as wacky as it is all-inclusive.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

The post The SolidSmack Weekend Reader | Week 05.19 appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 01, 2019 12:42 PM

Cool Tools: The Hudson Durable Goods Waxed Canvas Work Apron

Hudson Waxed Apron

Few shop tools—yes, we’ll call it a “tool”—are as indispensable as a reliable work apron. While not a “tool” in the traditional sense, a good, durable apron can serve many purposes ranging from tool organization to even psychologically making yourself ‘present’ in the workshop.

But no two aprons are alike—and striking the balance between functional and economical isn’t always easy. Which is why we like the Cross Back Adjustable Apron from Hudson Durable Goods.

Made from thick and durable waxed canvas, this stylish work apron features design details that are as carefully considered as the long-lasting materials they’re constructed from. Additionally, the cross-back (X-back) straps ensure that weight from tools is spread evenly across the back to avoid neck strain. Best of all, since the apron is made from waxed canvas, it will only get better with age.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Hudson Durable Goods Waxed Canvas Work Apron — $29.99

Features:

  • Cross-back (x-back) straps spread the weight of tools to prevent neck strain
  • 2 large tool pockets (6.5 inches tall x 8 inches wide)
  • Chest pocket for cellphone/pencil/tools (4.5 inches tall x 4 inches wide)
  • Kangaroo pocket (large hoodie-style hand pocket)
  • Straps sewn on ends to prevent slipping through side grommets
  • Flat black canvas and gun-metal hardware for a low-key, unisex, professional look

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: The Hudson Durable Goods Waxed Canvas Work Apron appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at February 01, 2019 11:05 AM

January 31, 2019

SolidSmack

This Tool-Changing 3D Printer Allows Quick Swap for Materials and Colors

multi-tool 3d printer

E3D-Online has nearly completed its beta test of an unusual tool-changing 3D printer.

The UK-based company is most well known for their powerful and reliable hot ends and extruders, which are used in countless 3D printers made by dozens of manufacturers worldwide. But they’re also working on an advanced 3D printer.

Their “tool-changing” 3D printer is very unusual in its approach to achieving multi-color / multi-material prints. While most current concepts involve using multiple print heads in a fixed line on the 3D printer’s motion system or some form of single-nozzle-but-multiple-input-feeds system, E3D’s concept is very different and it overcomes the problems with these approaches:

  • Multiple hot ends can interfere with each other and require very careful alignment to avoid print catastrophes and poor output.
  • Single-nozzle approaches require “purge” cycles to get rid of the previous color, wasting both material and considerable time.

E3D’s approach is to literally use multiple Bowden extruder/hotends, each used singly by the motion platform. The idea is to keep these ready for immediate use, and have the motion system stop by to “pick them up” and extrude. This allows a very quick method to swap materials/colors without much delay, and no requirement for purging or alignment issues.

Their current approach is a system involving four different hotends, thus up to four different colors — or materials — can be 3D printed in the same print job.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption> The four stations for the tool-changing 3D printer [Source: E3D-Online] </figcaption></figure>

If that description doesn’t make sense, then you might want to watch this video, from one of E3D’s beta testers, that shows how the system works when changing tools:

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sd941kne_z8?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Here’s an example of what you can achieve with this system from one of their competent beta testers, “Adalinda: The Singing Serpent” modeled by @Loubie_3D and printed by René Jurack. Apparently, this 250mm tall item required no fewer than 2,807 tool changes during the print to achieve the multiple colors. E3D says these changes cost only about 5% of the total print duration, which is very good.

<figure class="wp-block-image"><figcaption> A beautiful multi-color 3D print made with a tool-changing 3D printer [Source: E3D-Online] </figcaption></figure>

ou’ll also note the very high quality of the print; color switches are very crisp as there is no residual “other” material to deal with — each hotend is “pure”.

E3D’s approach is to continue with their beta testing until March 1st, after which they will collate and analyze all the feedback. They will no doubt develop some changes to the system at that point, and proceed on with producing the final product.

That final product is actually a kit that you will assemble. They’re providing a set of parts that can be built into a fully operating, tool-changing, four-extruder 3D printer. The cost of the kit is set at £2,600.50 (US$3400) and I’m not sure what the £0.50 is for.

Read more about 3D printing at Fabbaloo!

The post This Tool-Changing 3D Printer Allows Quick Swap for Materials and Colors appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Fabbaloo at January 31, 2019 11:29 PM

Nissan Created an Insane Mobile Woodworking Shop Inside a Van

mobile workshop van

We’ve featured many woodworking workshops before on SolidSmack—but they’ve always been stationary; idle abodes usually found in garages where woodworkers can live in isolation to work on their craft. While these isolated environments certainly enable many artisans to concentrate better, it doesn’t leave them with a lot of flexibility to work on projects further from home.

In an attempt to make woodworking a more mobile occupation, Nissan and UK-based design studio Studio Hardie have collaborated to turn one of the car company’s newest vans, an NV300, into a bonafide mobile woodworking workshop.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CpCEv5Sppmw?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

The converted NV300 van contains a vast array of woodworking tools, from chisels and hammers to power saws and drills. And no woodworking shop could call itself as such without having an interior made entirely out of wood.

<figure class="wp-block-image">nissan woodworking van</figure>

One of the most significant problems with any wood workshop is having enough sockets to power all your heavy duty power tools and shop equipment. This dilemma goes doubly so for a mobile workshop inside a van. Instead of relying on the car’s battery power or hand-cranked generators, the modified NV300 uses many Nissan Energy ROAM power packs which can store up to 700Wh and generate up to a maximum of 1kW.

Made from recycled Nissan Leaf batteries (the Leaf is an electric car made by Nissan), the ROAM is silent and can be recharged either by using an electrical socket or, if you’re stuck in the wilderness far from civilization, powered using the solar panels found on the roof. This super-considered electrical setup allows the battery packs to power woodworking tools without the van sounding or polluting like a miniature factory.

<figure class="wp-block-image">nissan woodworking van</figure>

Apart from the power tools, the van also has an integrated touch-screen computer, LED lighting, compact storage cabinets, and of course, seats in the back that allow the artisan to swivel and shift between different areas of the workshop.

<figure class="wp-block-image">nissan woodworking van</figure>

No news yet on when (or even, if) this modified NV300 van will go on sale, however, the Energy ROAM power packs are set to launch sometime this spring of 2019…just in case you feel inspired to build your own mobile workshop.

The post Nissan Created an Insane Mobile Woodworking Shop Inside a Van appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 31, 2019 01:52 PM

Cool Tools: Geier Glove Co. Elkskin Work Gloves

Founded in 1927 in Centralia, Washington by the Geier Brothers, the Geier Glove Company has been churning out some of the world’s finest work gloves for heavy wear and tear.

Made from Elkskin, which is more rugged than deerskin, these gloves can stand up to just about anything you can throw at them—from nasty wood splinters to cold steel bars. Heck—they even make great winter gloves whether you use them in the shop at all.

Made in the USA, you can’t go wrong with this Western staple in your workshop.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Geier Glove Elkskin Gloves — $58.99

Features:

  • Men’s elkskin gloves in a slip-on style
  • Rugged and tough for work or riding
  • Made of the finest elkskin
  • Unlined
  • Made In USA

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: Geier Glove Co. Elkskin Work Gloves appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 31, 2019 01:51 PM

Level Up Your Graphic Design Skills with This $15 Bootcamp

Aaron Draplin

It’s not always easy to juggle multiple hats in the design and engineering worlds—but if there is a common language that will likely end up saving you a lot of time and frustration down the road, it’s having basic knowledge of visual communication.

While nobody can become an Aaron Draplin overnight, having a strong grasp on the fundamentals of color theory and layout could easily make or break your projects—particularly when communication specific details to stakeholders. Thankfully, you don’t need to go back to design school to get started with leveling up your visual communication game.

From setting up an Adobe Creative Cloud environment to building a portfolio website, the Graphic Design Bootcamp will accelerate your design sense and assist in further leveling up your existing design or engineering know-how. Best of all, SolidSmack readers can purchase the course for just $15—that’s 88% off the retail price of $125.00.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Graphic Design Bootcamp – $125 $15 (88% Off)

Features:

  • Access 65 lectures & 8 hours of content 24/7
  • Learn how to create pixel-perfect projects for print & web
  • Download all project files to use as references
  • Communicate in a private Facebook group w/ other students to share projects & critique work

GET IT!

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale! Thank you for your help in moving away from banner ads by delivering better content!

Find more deals here:
StackSocial

The post Level Up Your Graphic Design Skills with This $15 Bootcamp appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 31, 2019 01:48 PM

The Javelin Blog

Displaying Custom Columns in SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2

A very useful feature in SOLIDWORKS PDM Vault Views is the ability to display customized Column Sets built from any Variables that have been created in the PDM Vault.

SOLIDWORKS PDM Custom Columns

SOLIDWORKS PDM Custom Columns

By default, SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 will display columns for “Checked Out By”, “State”, “Days In State”, “Version”, “Modified”, “Size” and “Path” values.  However, it’s possible to add a custom Column Set to the Web2 interface as well.

 

Standard Columns in SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2

Standard Columns in SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2

To show a custom Column Set in Web2, go to the Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager on the server hosting the Web2 site.  In the SOLIDWORKSPDM site settings, go to “Application Settings” in the ASP.NET section.

IIS Manager

IIS Manager

In the Application Settings, go to the “ColumnSetName” setting and double click to edit it.  Type the exact name of the Column Set that you want to show in the “Value” field and click “Ok”. (you can find this name by expanding the “Columns” section in the PDM Administration console)

SOLIDWORKS PDM Application Settings

SOLIDWORKS PDM Application Settings

Once this is done the additional columns from the Column Set will display after the default ones in the Web2 interface.

New columns added

New columns added

Unfortunately at this time, there is no way to re-order the columns in the Web2 interface, however as of SOLIDWORKS PDM 2019, we can hide some of the default columns if we wish.  To do this, go to the “gear” icon next to the column headers, and un-check any columns that you do not wish to have shown.

Hiding Columns

Hiding Columns

The post Displaying Custom Columns in SOLIDWORKS PDM Web2 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Andrew Lidstone, CSWE at January 31, 2019 01:00 PM

January 30, 2019

SolidSmack

How to Configure Your Workstation for SOLIDWORKS

Lenovo Thinkstation NVIDIA RTX

When it comes to configuring your workstation for SOLIDWORKS, how do you know what to prioritize? Does the size of the GPU matter more than the clock-speed of the CPU? Does your workflow change what’s important? Working at Lenovo, it was important to understand how you as a SOLIDWORKS user need answers to these questions to ensure you are getting the most out of your workstation – especially when there are a massive number of brands, models and configurations to consider.

What’s The Best SOLIDWORKS Workstation?

With various graphics card options, software packages, operating systems and more, it can all get very complicated, very quickly. What it comes down to is this: Know the optimal configuration for your workflow. With the right information, you can put that money into the solution that’s right for you – saving that money and maximizing your performance at the same time.

In prioritizing your workstation build for SOLIDWORKS, there are several things to consider – from memory and storage to your CPU and GPU. The right combination of NVIDIA Quadro GPU paired with a potent Intel CPU are the most essential ingredients to consider. From there, you can unlock the full potential of every component of your configuration. Oh, and did you know this? Graphics performance can increase over 20% just by choosing the right CPU.

Workstation Configurations

As you know, SOLIDWORKS is used by a variety of professionals focusing on solid modeling, simulation, visualization or any combination of the three. Here are some ideal configurations for those workflows:

Workflow Solid Modeling Simulation Visualization
  ThinkStation P330 ThinkStation P520 ThinkStation P520
Graphics NVIDIA Quadro P2000 NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000 NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000
CPU Intel Core i7-8700K Intel Xeon W-2175 Intel Xeon W-2145
Memory 16GB 64GB 32GB
Storage 256GB NVMe SSD 1TB NVMe SSD 512GB NVMe SSD

We estimate around three quarters of SOLIDWORKS users work within general solid model workflows. If you find yourself in this group, the optimal configuration requires the best of both worlds – a high-performing graphics card and a high clock speed CPU. This pairing also depends on your preferred view mode. For example, those using RealView with ambient occlusion will benefit from a higher-end NVIDIA Quadro graphics. With the right combination, users will see a significant performance boost. In fact, according to recent data from SPEC.org, overall professionals using the Intel Core i7-8700K with the NVIDIA Quadro P4000 will see up to 43 percent increase in performance (see chart below).

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

In building the ideal configuration, each are fully certified for SOLIDWORKS applications – including the ThinkStation P330 Tower, an ideal machine for those working in solid model workflows. Designed for acceleration, the ThinkStation P330 Tower delivers speeds of up to 4.7GHz with the Intel Core i7-8700K 6 Core Processor – giving users a 47 percent performance boost compared to other CPUs (see chart below). With additional support for Intel Optane Memory and the latest NVIDIA Quadro graphics, the ThinkStation P330 Tower delivers on both performance and speed – making it the sweet spot for the largest SOLIDWORKS user group.

<figure class="wp-block-image"></figure>

For SOLIDWORKS users focused on simulation like CAE or FEA, careful consideration of the CPU and GPU is crucial to address more computationally intensive needs. Most of these users will begin by selecting a system that is based on a high-core count CPU but also has a powerful graphics card, such as the new NVIDIA Quadro RTX.

Lenovo recently announced our support and availability for NVIDIA Quadro RTX graphics technology, an advantage not only for those focused on simulation, but also for visualization users working with complex 3D models in SOLIDWORKS Visualize. The latest NVIDIA Quadro RTX GPUs offer accelerated rendering and photorealistic ray-tracing to de-noise and render at a much faster rates.

These NVIDIA Quadro RTX graphics cards can also benefit those visualization users who are actively using VR or looking to introduce VR into their workflow. VR is becoming a staple part of collaboration workflows to evaluate everything from design aesthetics and reach studies to immersive training and simulation experiences.

“As Lenovo’s Quadro RTX-powered offerings expand, SOLIDWORKS users will experience best-in-class performance no matter their budget,” said Bob Pette, Vice President, Professional Visualization at NVIDIA. “By upgrading to the Quadro RTX 4000 and above, users will experience an incredible boost to performance, with SOLIDWORKS applications running at maximum speeds.”

Whatever your SOLIDWORKS workflow though, Lenovo has a portfolio of desktops and mobile workstations with the right configurations—and just in time for SOLIDWORKS World 2019.

Oh, and there’s a great webinar we just hosted that goes further into how to configure a workstation to support different 3D design workflows and gives you recipe cards with configurations and advice for the different workstation needs.

To learn more about configuring your workstation for SOLIDWORKS, you can view the recently published benchmark data here on SPEC.org.

This post is sponsored and paid for by Lenovo. We take pride in the content on SolidSmack and work with the best brands to produce helpful information for content pieces like this! Have a question or comment. Let us know!

The post How to Configure Your Workstation for SOLIDWORKS appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Bill Martin-Otto at January 30, 2019 02:04 PM

Video Game Fans Build Real-Life Version of In-Game Turret

Overwatch Turret

For those who haven’t tried it yet, Overwatch is a cartoonish multiplayer video game set in the not-so-distant future. With a diverse roster of characters—from the giant talking ape Winston to the gun-slinging cowboy McCree—Overwatch’s cast is as wacky as it is all-inclusive.

One of these wacky characters—a Swedish engineer by the name of Torbjörn—is a dwarf whose main role in the game is to drop a turret, then otherwise be generally useless. But his mechanical companion is so connected to the character that you can’t have one without the other. KONGDOLE Production, a small design team from South Korea, love the little Swedish man’s creation so much they decided to bring it to life (You might want to turn on captions):

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tG-G2_sE4Xc?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

Using CAD to mockup their design, the team designed a 55-pound turret including a barrel that fires and shakes with similar physics just as it does in the game. In total, over 2000 hours were spent 3D printing the finished parts, which consist of the gears, body, and mechanism of the turret.

<figure class="wp-block-image">life-size torb turret</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">life-size torb turret</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">life-size torb turret</figure>

Since a traditional motor wouldn’t bring out the shaking effect, they instead use two dynamixel servos coupled with reduction gears to increase the power. After this, it was a matter of figuring out the circuitry and modeling the rest of the turret’s design.

<figure class="wp-block-image">life-size torb turret</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">life-size torb turret</figure>

The base of the turret body had to be sturdy, so they used acrylic and polycarbonate panels that connect to the 3D printed legs as well as the gears which power the servos.

<figure class="wp-block-image">life-size torb turret</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">life-size torb turret</figure>

For the core of the turret, a series of metal ball bearings are attached to the bottom to make it easier to rotate and seek out enemies. While the final product won’t be shooting anything dangerous like the rivets you see in-game, it definitely makes the turret look more realistic. Afterward, it’s a matter of sanding down the remaining 3D printed parts and spray painting them.

<figure class="wp-block-image">life-size torb turret</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">life-size torb turret</figure>

The firing mechanism for the ping pong balls functions a lot like your standard baseball pitching machine. Using brushless motors and servos, they managed to make the turret barrels fire alternately with a sick mechanical sound. Once it works properly, they attach the turret onto the base and legs using a screwdriver and some old-fashioned Torbjörn hammering.

<figure class="wp-block-image">life-size torb turret</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">life-size torb turret</figure>

The firing mechanism for the ping pong balls functions a lot like your standard baseball pitching machine. Using brushless motors and servos, they managed to make the turret barrels fire alternately with a sick mechanical sound. Once it works properly, they attach the turret onto the base and legs using a screwdriver and some old-fashioned Torbjörn hammering.

<figure class="wp-block-embed-youtube wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio">
<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" height="434" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/e2AvMxS2-Ag?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;autohide=2&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" style="border:0;" type="text/html" width="770"></iframe>
</figure>

KONGDOLE Production has more projects in the making, all of which can be found on their YouTube channel.

The post Video Game Fans Build Real-Life Version of In-Game Turret appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 30, 2019 01:17 PM

The Javelin Blog

How to Reset the SOLIDWORKS Registry Entries

In SOLIDWORKS you can make wide array of customization to your user settings and also the user interface. It can be hard to keep track of these changes if you are editing them on a daily basis like I do. Also, we all know that system updates have been known to damage registry files that SOLIDWORKS needs to be able to function correctly.

So if you would like to fully reset all of your SOLIDWORKS preferences, or if you have noticed strange behavior or missing icons since a recent Windows update. One option to resolve your issues it to reset SOLIDWORKS registry entries.

WARNING: Be very careful when making modifications to the registry as this may cause serious instability on your system. As such, you will need full administrative permissions on your computer to be able to edit them. Note that Javelin is not responsible for any changes that you make to your system, the following is just a guide.

Resetting SOLIDWORKS Windows Registry steps:

  1. Close all instances of SOLIDWORKS
  2. Launch the Windows Registry Editor.  (In Windows XP go to the Start menu and click Run and type: regedit ; In Windows Vista or Windows 7, or Windows 10 go to the Start menu and type: regedit)
  3. In the Registry Editor expand HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\SolidWorks
  4. Expand the SolidWorks folder. This folder contains multiple folders that control different aspects of SOLIDWORKS on your machine. There are separate folders listed here for each different version of SOLIDWORKS that is installed on the machine. In the image below you may see that I have multiple versions (2016, 2017, and 2018).
  5. It is always advisable not to make permanent changes to the registry without first checking that they will not damage your system. As such, at this point you can right-click the folder that represents the version of SOLIDWORKS that you want to reset (in this case 2018), and select to Rename the folder.
  6. Rename the entry something like SOLIDWORKS 2018_Backup.

    WARNING: Do not rename SolidWorks registry key at the top level if you have SOLIDWORKS PDM installed on your system.

    Reset SOLIDWORKS Registry

    Windows Registry Editor

  7. Launch SOLIDWORKS 2018.  When the program starts it will create a new registry entry in this location called SOLIDWORKS 2018.  Once SOLIDWORKS opens. You will be asked to agree to the end user license agreement and treated like a new user.
SOLIDWORKS Initial Startup

SOLIDWORKS Initial Startup

How to undo this operation

If the problem you were experiencing is gone, great!  If not, and you want to undo the process of resetting SOLIDWORKS Windows Registry, no problem, that’s why we only renamed the SOLIDWORKS entry and didn’t delete it.

Simply go back to the Registry Editor, refresh the display by pressing F5 to show the new entry, and rename the new SolidWorks entry (again best not to delete it until you are sure everything is back exactly as before) then name the old one back to SolidWorks.

If the issue is fixed you are now left with essentially a fresh copy of SOLIDWORKS, meaning any customization you have performed will be lost.

The post How to Reset the SOLIDWORKS Registry Entries appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by Nadeem Akhtar at January 30, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Cool Books: ‘Sketching’ by Koos Eissen and Roselien Steur

Design Sketching

While there used to be a painful shortage of inspirational design sketching books out there, these days, design students and those looking to refresh their skill set may, in fact, have too many to choose from. The good news is, there’s something different to learn from each—so go ahead and build out that library.

Among other design sketching book favorites, we love the broad variety of sketching styles presented in Sketching.

While the book is ideal for any design student or classroom, many professionals and design studios will also likely learn a thing or two from the wide variety of sketching styles and form examples presented within the book’s 256 pages.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Sketching (12th printing): Drawing Techniques for Product Designers/em> by Koos Eissen and Roselien Steur — $26.73

About the Authors:

Koos Eissen is an associate professor and head of the Design Drawing Techniques staff (TU Delft, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, in the Netherlands). He is at present guest-lecturer at the Royal Academy of Arts in The Hague. Roselien Steur is a free-lance visualiser, and lecturer at the HKU/Utrecht School of the Arts, The Faculty of Visual Arts and Design in the Netherlands.

PURCHASE VIA AMAZONAffiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale.
Thank you!


Feature Image via Spencer Nugent
.

The post Cool Books: ‘Sketching’ by Koos Eissen and Roselien Steur appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 30, 2019 12:59 PM

App Smack 05.19: Invoice 2go, Invstr, Screen Lock HD, and More…

Best iPhone Apps 2019

It’s time for another round of apps that cover the spectrum of your beloved smart device(s)!

The Weekly App Smack is the best of new or updated design and productivity apps (and maybe a couple of fun ones, too) for the busy design or engineering professional. This week we have a list sure to make you more efficient.

Do you have an app suggestion that has made your life easier or changed up your workflow? Let us know in the comments below or send it into tips@solidsmack.com.

Hit it!

Invstr: Investing for Everyone (iOS — Free)

Invest $1M of virtual cash and win real prizes with Fantasy Finance. And when you’re ready, trade for real from $1.

<figure class="aligncenter">INVSTR App</figure>

Microsoft Word (iOS – Free)

The trusted Word app lets you create, edit, view, and share your files with others quickly and easily. It also lets you view and edit Office docs attached to emails. With Word, your Office moves with you. Whether you are a blogger, writer, journalist, columnist, student, or a project manager working on documentation, it’s as handy as you want it to be.

<figure class="aligncenter">Microsoft Word</figure>

Invoice 2go (iOS — Free)

Create great-looking, professional invoices and get paid faster using one simple app. Accept all the ways your clients want to pay online. Capture your expenses as you incur them. We are the on-the-go invoicing solution for all types of small businesses: from contractors to dog walkers, web designers to musicians. All of your information is automatically synced and available on your iPhone, iPad and computer.

<figure class="aligncenter">Invoice 2go</figure>

Galaxy Invaders: Alien Shooter (Android — Free)

Galaxy Invader: Alien Shooter is a combination of classic shoot ‘em up game feels and modernized mechanics.

<figure class="aligncenter">Galaxy Invaders: Alien Shooter</figure>

Screen Lock HD (Android — Free)

Screen Lock HD is a screen lock app with awesome wallpapers. Dozens of HD & high-definition live wallpapers, offers you stunning effects to decorate your phone.

<figure class="aligncenter">Screen Lock HD</figure>

Security Defender – Antivirus Scan, Junk Clean (Android — Free)

Security Defender is an antivirus app that protects your mobile security 24/7.

<figure class="aligncenter">Security Defender - Antivirus Scan, Junk Clean</figure>

The post App Smack 05.19: Invoice 2go, Invstr, Screen Lock HD, and More… appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 30, 2019 12:54 PM

January 29, 2019

SolidSmack

Cool Tools: Trusco Toolboxes

Trusco Toolbox

Founded in 1959 as a professional tool manufacturer to support Japan’s burgeoning manufacturing industry, Trusco—a combination of the words “Trust” and “Company”—is still manufacturing some of the best toolboxes, today.

While their stripped-down design makes them a must-have for many design aficionados, the pressed steel boxes are ridiculously useful for just about anything—tools or not.

Still manufactured in Fukui, Japan, Trusco tool boxes now come in more sizes than ever—capable of whatever storage challenges you throw at them.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Trusco Toolboxes — $12.99 – $147.37

Features:

  • Steel body, formed for extra strength
  • Versatile sizing for specific storage solutions
  • Double-hinged construction for smooth opening
  • Dividers included
  • Equally useful in the home, office, or the shop

PURCHASE VIA AMAZON

Affiliate purchases help support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale. Thank you!

The post Cool Tools: Trusco Toolboxes appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 29, 2019 01:17 PM

SolidSmack Radio | The Precision Bits (Powered by Spotify)

Spotify playlist

Get that stretch out of your system with this week’s Spotify-powered SolidSmack Radio Playlist. It’s fashioned up, ready to make you pull your shoulder blades back and knock out another week of meaningful work while you bob your head to the beat. Whether you’re in the shop milling aluminum, sketching the latest product prototypes or modeling up a 3D storm, consider these tracks as a tool for your process.

This week on SolidSmack Radio we’ll get the groove going with “Haunted” from Pinc Louds before diving into tracks from Dave Bixby, Cate le Bon, Knox Fortune, Ceramic Animal, and others before wrapping up with “Sentiment” from Better Person. Ready? Let’s Rock!

Have suggestions? As always, let us know what you listen to, what you want to hear and what tunes get you through the week. Shoot us an email or leave a comment down below!!

*Note: if the embedded playlist below doesn’t work for you, try this.

<figure><iframe height="775" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/evdmedia/playlist/4JbaP3afTz1Ux2NpXHM74w" width="100%"></iframe></figure>

The post SolidSmack Radio | The Precision Bits (Powered by Spotify) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 29, 2019 01:11 PM

The Javelin Blog

Designing 90° Sheet Metal HVAC Duct in SOLIDWORKS – Part 2 of 4

Welcome to Designing 90° Sheet Metal HVAC Duct in SOLIDWORKS – Part 2. In the previous part we had created the basic model for the duct, the required sizes are set with a basic sketch, and a circular profile sweep was used to create the model. In this second part we’re going to cut a small slit, for future reasons, and then split the part into 7 individual bodies.

PART 2: How to split the part into separate bodies

Let’s jump into this head first:

  • Start a sketch on the top plane. Here I’m going to convert the first sketch’s construction arc and then join the points together to form a full circle.
  • With the sketch still open, I’m going to do a mid-plane cut extrude 0.005″. This puts the much needed slit in for the conversion into sheet metal, which will be shown in a later article.
  • I converted the arc for design intent, now when I change the size of the duct, the extrude cut will change along with it.
Applying a circular cut for sheet metal flattening

Applying a circular cut for sheet metal flattening

  • This next sketch is a little more complex but first, I need to create a different plane. I pre-select the top plane and went to “Reference Plane” to add in a new plane.
  • My second reference is the face of the inlet. My reference plane snapped to the perpendicular relation, so I changed it to parallel because I want to sketch above, but have this plane linked to the size.
Adding a reference plane

Adding a reference plane

With the new plane created I will now start my sketch:

  • What I like to do once I start my sketch is hid the plane. Again, I’m going to use my first sketch and reuse geometry.
  • I bilaterally offset the lines that are not construction lines past the geometry in both directions.
  • Next, I do a Ctrl + A to select all and make those construction lines.
  • I can now connect each points with a regular line.
Creating split lines

Creating split lines

Now that we have this sketch completed we can move into our “Split” command. This is located under the “Direct Editing” tab, or you can use the search bar to locate it. The “Split” command will take our single body part and split into the amount of bodies we want. The amount of bodies depends on the sketch we create and the selections we select.

  • With the sketch pre-selected I will click “Split”, I will also select the duct body from the graphics area.
  • I can now click the “Cut Part” button. Just below that I will select all 7 parts and click “Auto Assign Names” and accept the command.
Split Body

Split Body

You’ll notice that I now have 7 different bodies in the bodies box. Each can now be modified individually or saved out. Follow this series to the next article where we save out the parts and convert to sheet metal.

Subscribe to our blog for the next article to learn how to save the bodies and convert them into the desired thickness of sheet metal gauge.

The post Designing 90° Sheet Metal HVAC Duct in SOLIDWORKS – Part 2 of 4 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at January 29, 2019 01:00 PM

SolidSmack

Samsung Introduces New Bioplastic for Hardware Package Designs

Samsung Packaging

It’s usually never official until a sizeable multi-national company does it. While smaller electronics companies have been using paper and other recyclable materials for their products for years, Samsung is only now catching onto the environment-friendly trend.

In a recent press release, the electronics division of the company has announced that instead of using plastics for their packaging, Samsung will be using greener materials such as paper or recycled plastics.

Concerning appliances, this means the plastic wrapping you so love to rip off your brand new fridge or microwave will be replaced with recycled plastics and bioplastics made from starch or sugar cane.

<figure class="wp-block-image">samsung packaging</figure>

On the mobile phones and accessories front, Samsung will be replacing their plastic trays (the ones found inside the boxes) with pulp molds and eco-friendly bags. They even plan on changing the design of their standard phone chargers; replacing their glossy plastic protected exteriors in favor of a less-shiny-but-still-cool matte finish.

Paper packaging will only use materials certified by organizations such as the Forest Stewardship Council, the Sustainable Forestry Initiative, and the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification Scheme. Collaborating with groups like these ensures Samsung will be using trees and recycled paper materials which won’t offend nature lovers.

This movement to greener packaging is the result of a task force formed by Samsung to create innovative packaging ideas. The company plans only to use paper packaging approved by forestry initiatives for its electronics by next year. In ten years, they hope to use 500,000 tons of recycled plastics and retrieve 7.5 million tons of their disposable products.

The post Samsung Introduces New Bioplastic for Hardware Package Designs appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 29, 2019 02:27 AM

Launch Your Product Idea with The Business Launching Bundle (95% Off)

Hustle

When it comes to side projects, hours become days, days become weeks, and weeks can often become months or years. But what if getting a minimum viable product created could happen on a Saturday…assuming you aren’t building a flying car?

Many successful entrepreneurs have been touting the benefits of the 1-Day MVP—a one-day, all-out sprint to go from fresh idea to app or hardware prototype. Sure, some projects may take a little more energy and time than others, but having the process and infrastructure in place to successfully glide ideas along is what counts the most.

Which is exactly the premise behind the 1-Day MVP 2.0 online training course; one of seven courses bundled in Evan Kimbrell’s Business Launching Bundle.

From validating ideas to outsourcing menial tasks leading up to launch, the bundle covers just about everything you need to get that side project up and out the door. And for just the next 3 days, SolidSmack readers can save 95% off the retail price of $1,213 — that’s just $49 for the entire bundle.

<figure class="aligncenter"></figure>

Evan Kimbrell’s Business Launching Bundle

From Concept to Launch: Score an Amazing Mentor in This Silicon Valley Exec & Get 104 Hours of Guidance for Launching Your Business

Included Courses:

  • Intro to Entrepreneurship
  • Outsource Your Idea
  • Idea Validation
  • How to Come Up With Killer Business Ideas
  • 1-Day MVP 2.0: Go From Idea to Minimum Viable Product in One Day
  • Master Outsourcing
  • The Complete Guide to Running a Mobile App Development Biz

PURCHASE HERE

This post features affiliate links which helps support SolidSmack through a small commission earned from the sale!

Find more deals that support SolidSmack here:
StackSocial Amazon

The post Launch Your Product Idea with The Business Launching Bundle (95% Off) appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 29, 2019 01:01 AM

This Wood Design Kit is like LEGO for Industrial Designers

tika kickstarter

Much like LEGOs, modern modular design kits contain various pieces that let the user build various structures. Desks, shelves, pot holders – depending on the kit’s materials, the user can make an assortment of things from a cleverly-designed family of attachable components.

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</figure>

TikA by TiKA Lab are modular kits comprised mainly of different-sized connectable wood sticks. These sticks can conduct electricity and be fitted with dimmable LED lights that turn the structures into bonafide lamps. Connecting these sticks are small magnetic balls which serve as joints. These bits and bobs can support their own weight or be put on one of three different bases. Put all these parts together and you have a kit which lets you make a wide variety of self-lighting, poseable structures.

<figure class="aligncenter">TiKA modular design kit</figure>

Different kits and parts allow for different TiKA variations. One kit, for instance, is more geared towards building plant holders and thus doesn’t have any electrical components that could get fried when watering the plants. Another does the complete opposite; it’s made specifically for building lamp structures. Depending on what you’re planning to build, you can either pick a specific TiKA kit or mix and match different kits to get more options.

<figure class="wp-block-image">TiKA modular design kit</figure>

In total, there are five different-sized sticks to choose from when building a TiKA structure. More than one stick can be magnetized to a single magnetic ball, allowing for more complex structures and flexibility.

Each of the three bases comes fitted with features made specifically for certain structures. The wooden base includes slots for holding magnetic ammunition and comes with an engraved switch used for turning the power on and off. The plant pot is made from concrete and has hanging rings which allow you to suspend your plants on a ceiling. Finally, the ceiling base comes with metal suspender cables and electrical components meant for connecting lamp structures over an area.

<figure class="wp-block-image">TiKA modular design kit</figure>

The method by which the LED sticks work is pretty awesome. Whilst non-electrical sticks can be connected any which way to a magnetic metal ball, LED sticks require you to set them in a specific angle so as to create a circuit for the energy to flow. Not only does this simplify the electrical process, but it’s a great way to teach kids how electricity works without resorting to boring old textbooks or getting into accidents!

<figure class="wp-block-image">TiKA modular design kit</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">TiKA modular design kit</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">TiKA modular design kit</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">TiKA modular design kit</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">TiKA modular design kit</figure> <figure class="wp-block-image">TiKA modular design kit</figure>

Bringing the TiKA kits to life took and simplifying the system took the design team through a process consisting of tons of iterations and prototyping. The one constant throughout the entire product development process was the mesh structure of the kits. Using this structure as the basis of the final build, the design team constructed all of the parts around the wooden sticks and magnets to come up with a unified format for all of the finished TiKA kit designs.

<figure class="wp-block-image">TiKA modular design kit</figure>

Of course, half the fun of the TiKA kits—like playing with LEGOs—is making the finished household designs yourself. As long your brain can think it up, and it doesn’t involve bending the sticks, chances are you can build your wild furniture idea with a TiKA kit.

The TiKa modular design kit was successfully funded on Kickstarter. You can find more details on its Kickstarter page or on the official TiKa Lab webpage.  

The post This Wood Design Kit is like LEGO for Industrial Designers appeared first on SolidSmack.

by Carlos Zotomayor at January 29, 2019 12:54 AM

The SolidSmack Monday List 05.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week

1960s Space Race

Mondays might not be your favorite day of the week, but the good news is that we’re all in this together ladies and gentlemen. As purveyors of prime Grade A web content, the SolidSmack crew has done some of the heavy-lifting to make sure you get your Mondays started on the right track.

Welcome to The Monday List.

Every Monday, we link you up with some of the most insightful, informative, and socially-relevant stories to keep tabbed, bookmarked, reading listed, pocketed, or what have you to get your week started on the right foot. Be sure to check in each week for a new crop of freshly sprouted words curated straight from the source of your favorite homegrown ‘Smack.

What We’re Reading This Week:

Outrunning Hunger

Why do many people report little interest in food in the hours after intense exercise?

<figure class="aligncenter">Outrunning Hunger</figure>

This Is What Happens When You Try to Sue Your Boss

Millions of American workers sign away legal rights without knowing what they’re in for: Arbitration Hell.

<figure class="aligncenter">This Is What Happens When You Try to Sue Your Boss</figure>

It’s Time to Rethink Who’s Best Suited for Space Travel

“We were different in a way they needed.”

<figure class="aligncenter">It’s Time to Rethink Who’s Best Suited for Space Travel</figure>

Why Harley’s New Electric Motorcycle Costs $30,000

The LiveWire is a giant leap for Harley, if only a small step for the motorcycle industry as a whole.

<figure class="aligncenter">Why Harley’s New Electric Motorcycle Costs $30,000</figure>

Banksy Mural Is Stolen From Bataclan, Site of Paris Attacks

A mural painted on the emergency exit door of the Bataclan theater in Paris, attributed to the British street artist Banksy, has been stolen, the venue said in a post on Twitter.

<figure class="aligncenter">Banksy Mural Is Stolen From Bataclan, Site of Paris Attacks</figure>

These Goggles Act Like Surgical X-Ray Specs

Augmedics’ Xvision headset superimposes CT scans and other medical imaging over a patient’s body during an operation.

<figure class="aligncenter">These Goggles Act Like Surgical X-Ray Specs</figure>

The post The SolidSmack Monday List 05.19 | Stories We’re Reading This Week appeared first on SolidSmack.

by SolidSmack at January 29, 2019 12:39 AM

January 28, 2019

The Javelin Blog

Designing a 90° Sheet Metal HVAC Duct in SOLIDWORKS – Part 1 of 4

Designing and manufacturing a duct for a ventilation system is easy, right?

With this series I’m going to start with simple, but most commonly asked for in a HVAC system design, the 90° bend:

SOLIDWORKS HVAC System

90 Degree Bends

I’m going to break down the SOLIDWORKS creation process into these 4 parts:

  1. How to sketch and model the duct part
  2. How to separate into different separate bodies,
  3. How to save out the individual bodies and convert into sheet metal
  4. And finally, how to edit the parts to get a nice material-yield-friendly laser/plasma cut.

PART 1: How to sketch and model the duct part

Starting with the basics and keeping the size simple, I’m going to make a large 48″ diameter duct, 96″ span in a 90° bend. I want  to have 7 individual parts that will be welded together after they have been laser cut and rolled (on the rolling machine).

  • On the top plane I will start my first sketch using the “3 Point Arc” start on the origin to create a quarter of a circle.
  • Starting with the end points I’m going to add a horizontal relation to one and a vertical to the other.
  • Next, I will draw my vertical line and horizontal line, making them equal with a dimension of 18″. This is my inlet and outlet.
  • Lastly, to fully define the sketch I will add in my dimension of 96″ from the lines I just created.
Duct Sketch

Duct Sketch

  • Here’s the tricky part- I will now change the arc into a construction line. I want to add 5 equal lines using the arc as a reference. Make sure that the end points of the 5 lines are coincident with the arc.
  • I will now use the “Swept Boss/Base” feature to sweep a 48″ circular profile along that path.
    • I’m going to use the thin feature to add in my thickness of 0.0359″ for 20 gauge material
Swept Boss/Base feature

Swept Boss/Base Thin Feature

  • Then I will add my material of ASTM A36.
Completed Duct Model

Completed Duct Model

We now have a duct that looks the part, so if you’re only doing a plant layout or just need a pretty picture, you can stop here.

Subscribe to our blog for the next article where we cut this model into usable parts.

The post Designing a 90° Sheet Metal HVAC Duct in SOLIDWORKS – Part 1 of 4 appeared first on The Javelin Blog.

by James Swackhammer at January 28, 2019 01:00 PM